Science.gov

Sample records for energy experimental results

  1. Energy-resolved computed tomography: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2008-10-01

    First experimental results with energy-resolved computed tomography (CT) are reported. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in CT has been improved with x-ray energy weighting for the first time. Further, x-ray energy weighting improved the CNR in material decomposition CT when applied to CT projections prior to dual-energy subtraction. The existing CT systems use an energy (charge) integrating x-ray detector that provides a signal proportional to the energy of the x-ray photon. Thus, the x-ray photons with lower energies are scored less than those with higher energies. This underestimates contribution of lower energy photons that would provide higher contrast. The highest CNR can be achieved if the x-ray photons are scored by a factor that would increase as the x-ray energy decreases. This could be performed by detecting each x-ray photon separately and measuring its energy. The energy selective CT data could then be saved, and any weighting factor could be applied digitally to a detected x-ray photon. The CT system includes a photon counting detector with linear arrays of pixels made from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor. A cylindrical phantom with 10.2 cm diameter made from tissue-equivalent material was used for CT imaging. The phantom included contrast elements representing calcifications, iodine, adipose and glandular tissue. The x-ray tube voltage was 120 kVp. The energy selective CT data were acquired, and used to generate energy-weighted and material-selective CT images. The energy-weighted and material decomposition CT images were generated using a single CT scan at a fixed x-ray tube voltage. For material decomposition the x-ray spectrum was digitally spilt into low- and high-energy parts and dual-energy subtraction was applied. The x-ray energy weighting resulted in CNR improvement of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.40 and 1.63, respectively, as compared to conventional charge integrating CT. The x-ray energy weighting was also applied

  2. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ..delta..W/..delta..P is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ..nu../sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High energy imploding liner experiment HEL-1: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Anderson, B.G.; Ekdahl, C.A.

    1997-09-01

    Magnetically driven imploding liner systems can be used as a source of shock energy for materials equation of state studies, implosion driven magnetized plasma fusion experiments, and other similar applications. The imploding liner is a cylinder of conducting material through which a current is passed in the longitudinal direction. Interaction of the current with its own magnetic field causes the liner to implode. Sources of electrical energy for imploding liner systems are capacitor banks or explosive pulse power systems seeded by capacitor banks. In August, 1996, a high energy liner experiment (HEL-1) was conducted at the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia. A 5 tier 1 meter diameter explosive disk generator provided electrical energy to drive a 48 cm outside diameter, 4 mm thick, aluminum alloy liner having a mass of about 11kg onto an 11 cm diameter diagnostic package. The purpose of the experiment was to measure performance of the explosive pulse power generator and the heavy imploding liner. Electrical performance diagnostics included inductive (B-dot) probes, Faraday Rotation current measurement, Rogowski total current measurement, and voltage probes. Flux loss and conductor motion diagnostics included current-joint voltage measurements and motion sensing contact pins. Optical and electrical impact pins, inductive (B-dot) probes, manganin pressure probes, and continuously recording resistance probes in the Central Measuring Unit (CMU) and Piezo and manganin pressure probes, optical beam breakers, and inductive probes located in the glide planes were used as liner symmetry and velocity diagnostics. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that a peak current of more than 100 MA was attained and the liner velocity was between 6.7 km/sec and 7.5 km/sec. Liner kinetic energy was between 22 MJ and 35 MJ. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, T.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary results of two projects in the development phase of reliable wind turbines designed to supply cost-competitive electrical energy were discussed. An experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are first reviewed. The results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs are also discussed. These studies predict wind energy costs of 1.5 to 7 cents per kW-h for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 per year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  5. Experimental Results From the Thermal Energy Storage-1 (TES-1) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacqmin, David

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Storage (TES) experiments are designed to provide data to help researchers understand the long-duration microgravity behavior of thermal energy storage fluoride salts that undergo repeated melting and freezing. Such data, which have never been obtained before, have direct application to space-based solar dynamic power systems. These power systems will store solar energy in a thermal energy salt, such as lithium fluoride (LiF) or a eutectic of lithium fluoride/calcium difluoride (LiF-CaF2) (which melts at a lower temperature). The energy will be stored as the latent heat of fusion when the salt is melted by absorbing solar thermal energy. The stored energy will then be extracted during the shade portion of the orbit, enabling the solar dynamic power system to provide constant electrical power over the entire orbit. Analytical computer codes have been developed to predict the performance of a spacebased solar dynamic power system. However, the analytical predictions must be verified experimentally before the analytical results can be used for future space power design applications. Four TES flight experiments will be used to obtain the needed experimental data. This article focuses on the flight results from the first experiment, TES-1, in comparison to the predicted results from the Thermal Energy Storage Simulation (TESSIM) analytical computer code.

  6. Comparison of energy deposition calculations by the LAHET Code System with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Lisowski, P.W.; Russell, G.J.; Waters, L.S.

    1993-08-01

    A comparison was performed between the energy deposition predicted by the LAHET Code System (LCS) with experimental values determined by Belyakov-Bodin et al. for 800, 1000, and 1200 MeV protons on targets composed of lead, bismuth, beryllium, carbon, and aluminum. The lead and bismuth showed agreement within approximately 10% at locations throughout the targets, and the agreement of the total energy deposited over the axial length of the targets ranged from 1% to 25%. For the lead and bismuth cases, the LCS predictions were always greater than the experimental results. For the lighter materials, the agreement at locations throughout the target only agreed within approximately 20%. No definable trend could be determined for the lighter materials since some LCS predictions were greater than the experimental results, some were less than the experimental results, and some showed very good agreement. The total energy deposited over the axial length of the targets was not compared for the lighter materials since it was not explicitly given with the experimental data.

  7. SAA drift: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  8. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A major phase of the wind energy program is the development of reliable wind turbines for supplying cost-competitive electrical energy. This paper discusses the preliminary results of two projects in this phase of the program. First an experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are reviewed. Also discussed are the results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs. These studies show wind energy costs of 7 to 1.5 c/kWH for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 a year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  9. Optimal piezoelectric beam shape for single and broadband vibration energy harvesting: Modeling, simulation and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Nordin, N. H. Diyana

    2015-03-01

    Harvesting energy from the surroundings has become a new trend in saving our environment. Among the established ones are solar panels, wind turbines and hydroelectric generators which have successfully grown in meeting the world's energy demand. However, for low powered electronic devices; especially when being placed in a remote area, micro scale energy harvesting is preferable. One of the popular methods is via vibration energy scavenging which converts mechanical energy (from vibration) to electrical energy by the effect of coupling between mechanical variables and electric or magnetic fields. As the voltage generated greatly depends on the geometry and size of the piezoelectric material, there is a need to define an optimum shape and configuration of the piezoelectric energy scavenger. In this research, mathematical derivations for unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester are presented. Simulation is done using MATLAB and COMSOL Multiphysics software to study the effect of varying the length and shape of the beam to the generated voltage. Experimental results comparing triangular and rectangular shaped piezoelectric beam are also presented.

  10. Experimental Results from the Thermal Energy Storage-1 (TES-1) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Tolbert, Carol; Jacqmin, David

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Storage-1 (TES-1) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62), in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. TES-1 is the first experiment in a four experiment suite designed to provide data for understanding the long duration microgravity behavior of thermal energy storage fluoride salts that undergo repeated melting and freezing. Such data have never been obtained before and have direct application for the development of space-based solar dynamic (SD) power systems. These power systems will store solar energy in a thermal energy salt such as lithium fluoride or calcium fluoride. The stored energy is extracted during the shade portion of the orbit. This enables the solar dynamic power system to provide constant electrical power over the entire orbit. Analytical computer codes have been developed for predicting performance of a spaced-based solar dynamic power system. Experimental verification of the analytical predictions is needed prior to using the analytical results for future space power design applications. The four TES flight experiments will be used to obtain the needed experimental data. This paper will focus on the flight results from the first experiment, TES-1, in comparison to the predicted results from the Thermal Energy Storage Simulation (TESSIM) analytical computer code. The TES-1 conceptual development, hardware design, final development, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA lewis Research Center (LeRC). TES-1 was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  11. Comparison between experimental and analytical results for seesaw energy dissipation systems using fluid viscous dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jae-Do; Tagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of experimental and numerical investigations of a seesaw energy dissipation system (SEDS) using fluid viscous dampers (FVDs). To confirm the characteristics of the FVDs used in the tests, harmonic dynamic loading tests were conducted in advance of the free vibration tests and the shaking table tests. Shaking table tests were conducted to demonstrate the damping capacity of the SEDS under random excitations such as seismic waves, and the results showed SEDSs have sufficient damping capacity for reducing the seismic response of frames. Free vibration tests were conducted to confirm the reliability of simplified analysis. Time history response analyses were also conducted and the results are in close agreement with shaking table test results.

  12. Experimental Estimation Of Energy Damping During Free Rocking Of Unreinforced Masonry Walls. First Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrentino, Luigi; Masiani, Renato; Benedetti, Stefano

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents an ongoing experimental program on unreinforced masonry walls undergoing free rocking. Aim of the laboratory campaign is the estimation of kinetic energy damping exhibited by walls released with non-zero initial conditions of motion. Such energy damping is necessary for dynamic modelling of unreinforced masonry local mechanisms. After a brief review of the literature on this topic, the main features of the laboratory tests are presented. The program involves the experimental investigation of several parameters: 1) unit material (brick or tuff), 2) wall aspect ratio (ranging between 14.5 and 7.1), 3) restraint condition (two-sided or one-sided rocking), and 4) depth of the contact surface between facade and transverse walls (one-sided rocking only). All walls are single wythe and the mortar is pozzuolanic. The campaign is still in progress. However, it is possible to present the results on most of the mechanical properties of mortar and bricks. Moreover, a few time histories are reported, already indicating the need to correct some of the assumptions frequent in the literature.

  13. Experimental Results from the Thermal Energy Storage-2 (TES-2) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Carol

    2000-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage-2 (TES-2) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-72), in January 1996. TES-2 originally flew with TES-1 as part of the OAST-2 Hitchhiker payload on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in early 1994. The two experiments, TES-1 and TES-2 were identical except for the fluoride salts to be characterized. TES-1 provided data on lithium fluoride (LiF), TES-2 provided data on a fluoride eutectic (LiF/CaF2). Each experiment was a complex autonomous payload in a Get-Away-Special payload canister. TES-1 operated flawlessly for 22 hr. Results were reported in a paper entitled, Effect of Microgravity on Materials Undergoing Melting and Freezing-The TES Experiment, by David Namkoong et al. A software failure in TES-2 caused its shutdown after 4 sec of operation. TES-1 and 2 were the first experiments in a four experiment suite designed to provide data for understanding the long duration microgravity behavior of thermal energy storage salts that undergo repeated melting and freezing. Such data have never been obtained before and have direct application for the development of space-based solar dynamic (SD) power systems. These power systems will store energy in a thermal energy salt such as lithium fluoride or a eutectic of lithium fluoride/calcium difluoride. The stored energy is extracted during the shade portion of the orbit. This enables the solar dynamic power system to provide constant electrical power over the entire orbit. Analytical computer codes were developed for predicting performance of a space-based solar dynamic power system. Experimental verification of the analytical predictions were needed prior to using the analytical results for future space power design applications. The four TES flight experiments were to be used to obtain the needed experimental data. This paper will address the flight results from the first and second experiments, TES-1 and 2, in comparison to the predicted results from the Thermal

  14. Experimental results using a nonlinear extension of the minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, John W., III; Principe, Jose C.

    1995-03-01

    The minimum average correlation energy filter (MACE) filter has been shown to have superior performance for rejecting out of class inputs in pattern recognition applications. The MACE filter exhibits a sharp correlation peak at a specified location in the output plane and low correlation energy elsewhere. It has also been shown that the MACE filter suffers from poor generalization. Increasing the number of exemplars used to compute the filter coefficients can improve the generalization, but the number of exemplars is restricted by the stability of the computation. We show a simple extension of the MACE filter to nonlinear processing techniques (i.e. nonlinear associative memories) which exhibits improved generalization and discrimination performance. The operating parameters of the proposed extension are difficult to compute analytically and adaptive learning methods are needed. Since the output of the MACE filter is optimized over the output plane any nonlinear extension of the MACE filter should encompass the output plane as well. In general this leads to exhaustive training over the entire output plane over all training exemplars. We present an efficient method for computing the parameters of the nonlinear extension which greatly reduces the training iterations required. Experimental results with 35 GHz inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) data are also shown.

  15. Energy Transfer with Hydrogen and Superconductivity - The Review of the First Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotsky, V. S.; Antyukhov, I. V.; Firsov, V. P.; Blagov, E. V.; Kostyuk, V. V.; Nosov, A. A.; Fetisov, S. S.; Zanegin, S. Yu.; Rachuk, V. S.; Katorgin, B. I.

    The transfer of massive amounts of both electrical and chemical power over long distances will present a major challenge for the global energy enterprise in future. Attraction of hydrogen is apparent as a chemical energy agent, possessing among the highest energy density content of various common fuels, whose combustive "waste" is simply water. The usage of "gratis" cold to cool a superconducting cable made of proper superconductor permits to deliver extra electrical power with the same line. This, rather old theoretical idea recently found its experimental realization. The team of Russian institutes and organizations with using Italian-produced MgB2 wire has made and successfully tested two hybrid energy transfer lines with liquid hydrogen as a chemical source of power and superconducting cable as a source of electricity. The first line has been tested in 2011. It has length ∼10 m, maximum liquid hydrogen flow ∼250 g/s and maximum current of MgB2 superconducting cable 2600 A @ 20K. This test was the first experimental proof of conception of the hybrid energy transfer line. The second line has been tested in October 2013. It has length ∼30 m. The new MgB2 cable has critical current at 21 K ∼3500 A and successfully passed high voltage DC test of 50 kV. New hydrogen cryostat has three sections with different types of thermal insulation in each section. The idea of hybrid energy transfer is formulated and details of first experiments are reviewed.

  16. Experimental results from RO-PRO: a next generation system for low-energy desalination.

    PubMed

    Achilli, Andrea; Prante, Jeri L; Hancock, Nathan T; Maxwell, Eric B; Childress, Amy E

    2014-06-01

    A pilot system was designed and constructed to evaluate reverse osmosis (RO) energy reduction that can be achieved using pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO). The RO-PRO experimental system is the first known system to utilize energy from a volume of water transferred from atmospheric pressure to elevated pressure across a semipermeable membrane to prepressurize RO feedwater. In other words, the system demonstrated that pressure could be exchanged between PRO and RO subsystems. Additionally, the first experimental power density data for a RO-PRO system is now available. Average experimental power densities for the RO-PRO system ranged from 1.1 to 2.3 W/m2. This is higher than previous river-to-sea PRO pilot systems (1.5 W/m2) and closer to the goal of 5 W/m2 that would make PRO an economically feasible technology. Furthermore, isolated PRO system testing was performed to evaluate PRO element performance with higher cross-flow velocities and power densities exceeding 8 W/m2 were achieved with a 28 g/L NaCl draw solution. From this empirical data, inferences for future system performance can be drawn that indicate future RO-PRO systems may reduce the specific energy requirements for desalination by ∼1 kWh/m3. PMID:24798068

  17. Heating stents with radio frequency energy to prevent tumor ingrowth: modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Lawes, Kate; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    1998-04-01

    Stents are often inserted into internal orifices to treat blockage due to tumor ingrowth. Stents are favored due to their minimally invasive nature, possible avoidance of a surgical procedure, and their ability to palliate surgically non-resectable disease. Because of rapid tumor growth however, a treatment means to prevent overgrowth through the stent and resultant blockage is required. To further this goal, experiments were performed in which a stent was placed in tissue and heated with radiofrequency (RF) energy to coagulate a cylinder of tissue, thereby eradicating viable tissue in the proximity of the stent. Temperatures were measured at the central stent surface and edges over time during a 5 - 10 minute heating in phantom and in fresh tissue. In addition, a finite element model was used to simulate the electric field and temperature distribution. Blood flow was also introduced in the model by evaluating RF application to stents to determine effectiveness of the energy applications. Changing perfusion and tissue electrical conductivity as a function of temperature was applied as the tissue was heated to 100 degree(s)C. Results from the electric field model will be shown as well as the thermal distribution over time from the simulations. Lastly, results from the damage integral will be discussed.

  18. PDX experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.; Arunasalam, V.; Barnes, C.

    1981-01-01

    The main objectives of the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) are to: (1) determine the effectiveness of poloidal divertors in controlling impurities in high temperature plasmas, (2) use the poloidal divertor to provide clean plasmas for confinement and high beta studies, and (3) investigate the effect of cross-section shaping on plasma confinement and MHD properties. In this paper, we report the results obtained during initial divertor operation of the PDX.

  19. SAA drift:experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Kudela, K.; Romashova, V. V.; Drozdov, A. Yu.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth's magnetic field connected with magnetic momentum changing. Besides these variations affects on the trapped belt South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations including Space Shuttle short-time flights approved the existence SAA westward drift with speed 0.1-1.0 (deg/year) and northward drift with speed approximately 0.1 (deg/year). In this work we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in SINP MSU in 1972-2003 from different satellites. There were analyzed the fluxes of protons with energy > 50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy > 500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1-1.0 MeV in SAA area and their maxima location. The data about fluxes were obtained onboard the orbital stations ``Salut-6'' (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the identical experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact of the SAA westward drift. Moreover the same analysis of maximum flux location of electrons with hundreds keV energy (satellites ``Kosmos-484'' (1972), ``Interkosmos-17'' (1977) and ``Activny'' (``Interkosmos-24'', 1991)) confirmed not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  20. Isospin diffusion in {sup 58}Ni-induced reactions at intermediate energies. I. Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Galichet, E.; Rivet, M. F.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Durand, D.; Lopez, O.; Manduci, L.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Dayras, R.; Volant, C.; Rosato, E.

    2009-06-15

    Isospin diffusion in semiperipheral collisions is probed as a function of the dissipated energy by studying two systems {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni and {sup 58}Ni+{sup 197}Au, over the incident energy range 52A-74A MeV. A close examination of the multiplicities of light products in the forward part of the phase space clearly shows an influence of the isospin of the target on the neutron richness of these products. A progressive isospin diffusion is observed when collisions become more central, in connection with the interaction time.

  1. Experimental results of use of triple-energy X-ray beam with K-edge filter in multi-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Lee, S.; Jeon, P.-H.

    2016-04-01

    Multi-energy imaging is useful for contrast enhancement of lesions, quantitative analysis of specific materials and material separation in the human body. Generally, dual-energy methods are applied to discriminating two materials, but this method cannot discriminate more than two materials. Photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polyenergetic X-rays using multiple energy bins. In this work, we developed triple-energy X-ray beams using a filter with K-edge energy and applied them experimentally. The energy spectra of triple-energy X-ray beams were assessed by using a spectrometer. The designed triple-energy X-ray beams were validated by measuring quantitative evaluations with mean energy ratio (MER), contrast variation ratio (CVR) and exposure efficiency (EE). Then, triple-energy X-ray beams were used to extract density map of three materials, iodine (I), aluminum (Al) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The results of the thickness density maps obtained with the developed triple-energy X-ray beams were compared to those acquired using the photon-counting method. As a result, it was found experimentally that the proposed triple-energy X-ray beam technique can separate the three materials as well as the photon-counting method.

  2. High energy cosmic ray physics with underground muons in MACRO. I. Analysis methods and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Castellano, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Giglietto, N.; Guarnaccia, P.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Montaruli, T.; Raino, A.; Spinelli, P.; Cecchini, S.; Dekhissi, H.; Fantini, R.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Patrizii, L.; Popa, V.; Serra-Lugaresi, P.; Spurio, M.; Togo, V.; Hong, J.T.; Kearns, E.; Okada, C.; Orth, C.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Barish, B.C.; Goretti, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Michael, D.G.; Nolty, R.; Peck, C.W.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.W.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Battistoni, G.; Bilokon, H.; Bloise, C.; Carboni, M.; Chiarella, V.; Forti, C.; Iarocci, E.; Marini, A.; Patera, V.; Ronga, F.; Satta, L.; Sciubba, A.; Spinetti, M.; Valente, V.; Antolini, R.; Bosio, T.; Di Credico, A.; Grillo, A.; Gustavino, C.; Mikheyev, S.; Parlati, S.; Reynoldson, J.; Scapparone, E.; Bower, C.; Habig, A.; Hawthorne, A.; Heinz, R.; Miller, L.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; De Mitri, I.; Monacelli, P.; Bernardini, P.; Mancarella, G.; Martello, D.; Palamara, O.; Petrera, S.; Pistilli, P.; Ricciardi, M.; Surdo, A.; Baker, R.; and others

    1997-08-01

    In this paper, the first of a two-part work, we present the reconstruction and measurement of muon events detected underground by the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso (E{sub {mu}}{ge} 1.3 TeV in atmosphere). The main aim of this work is to discuss the muon multiplicity distribution as measured in the detector. The data sample analyzed consists of 4.4{times}10{sup 6} muon events, of which {approximately} 263000 are multiple muons, corresponding to a total live time of 5850 h. In this sample, the observed multiplicities extend above N{sub {mu}}=35, with intermuon separations up to 50 m and beyond. Additional complementing measurements, such as the inclusive muon flux, the angular distribution, and the muon separation distribution (decoherence), are also included. The physical interpretation of the results presented here is reported in the following companion paper. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Validation and verification of MCNP6 against intermediate and high-energy experimental data and results by other codes

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2010-11-22

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL transport code representing a recent merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX, has been Validated and Verified (V and V) against a variety of intermediate and high-energy experimental data and against results by different versions of MCNPX and other codes. In the present work, we V andV MCNP6 using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.02 and LAQGSM03.03. We found that MCNP6 describes reasonably well various reactions induced by particles and nuclei at incident energies from 18 MeV to about 1 TeV per nucleon measured on thin and thick targets and agrees very well with similar results obtained with MCNPX and calculations by CEM03.02, LAQGSM03.01 (03.03), INCL4 + ABLA, and Bertini INC + Dresner evaporation, EPAX, ABRABLA, HIPSE, and AMD, used as stand alone codes. Most of several computational bugs and more serious physics problems observed in MCNP6/X during our V and V have been fixed; we continue our work to solve all the known problems before MCNP6 is distributed to the public.

  4. Solar energy storage by the reversible reaction - N2O4 yields 2NO2 - Theoretical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragaini, V.

    1982-01-01

    The suitability of the reversible reaction between N2O4 and 2NO2 for short term solar energy storage applications were examined theoretically and experimentally. N2O4 dissociates completely at 140 C, while NO2 seldom dissociates below 150 C. The heat storage capacity of the reaction 2NO2 yields N2O4 was calculated for the temperature intervals between 0-500 C, showing that a maximum of 195.7 kcal/l is available with liquified 2NO2, compared to 100 kcal/l with water. Nitrogen dioxide was tested in the gas phase in a solar collector. The results indicate a heat storage capacity from 3 to 1.7 times that of water, and its use for a domestic hot water energy source is described. Toxicity problems with 2nO2 and the formation of nitric acid are suggested to be solvable by use of nitrogen dioxide in anhydrous form and in stainless steel apparatus.

  5. Experimental Test Results of Energy Efficient Transport (EET) High-Lift Airfoil in Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Harry L., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the results of an experimental study conducted in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to determine the effects of Reynolds number and Mach number on the two-dimensional aerodynamic performance of the Langley Energy Efficient Transport (EET) High-Lift Airfoil. The high-lift airfoil was a supercritical-type airfoil with a thickness-to- chord ratio of 0.12 and was equipped with a leading-edge slat and a double-slotted trailing-edge flap. The leading-edge slat could be deflected -30 deg, -40 deg, -50 deg, and -60 deg, and the trailing-edge flaps could be deflected to 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. The gaps and overlaps for the slat and flaps were fixed at each deflection resulting in 16 different configurations. All 16 configurations were tested through a Reynolds number range of 2.5 to 18 million at a Mach number of 0.20. Selected configurations were also tested through a Mach number range of 0.10 to 0.35. The plotted and tabulated force, moment, and pressure data are available on the CD-ROM supplement L-18221.

  6. Dielectric energy of orientation in dead and living cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Fitting of experimental results to a theoretical model.

    PubMed Central

    Asencor, F J; Santamaría, C; Iglesias, F J; Domínguez, A

    1993-01-01

    Using the experimental data obtained with killed cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (1), we have formulated a theoretical model that is able to predict cell orientation for microorganisms with ellipsoidal or cylindrical shapes as a function of the frequency of the electric field and of the conductivity of the external medium. In this model, comparison of the difference in potential energy for both orientations parallel-perpendicular with the thermal agitation energy allows one to interpret the intervals where these orientations occur. The model implies that the conductivity of the cytoplasm is slightly higher than that of the external medium. This assumption is easy to understand taking into account that not all the intracytoplasmic material is released to the exterior during cell death. PMID:8324197

  7. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.

  8. A New Determination of the Binding Energy of Atomic Oxygen On Dust Grain Surfaces: Experimental Results and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Shi, Jianming; Hopkins, Tyler; Vidali, Gianfranco; Kaufman, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    The energy to desorb atomic oxygen from an interstellar dust grain surface, Edes, is an important controlling parameter in gas-grain models; its value impacts the temperature range over which oxygen resides on a dust grain. However, no prior measurement has been done of the desorption energy. We report the first direct measurement of Edes for atomic oxygen from dust grain analogs. The values of Edes are 1660 ± 60 and 1850 ± 90 K for porous amorphous water ice and for a bare amorphous silicate film, respectively, or about twice the value previously adopted in simulations of the chemical evolution of a cloud. We use the new values to study oxygen chemistry as a function of depth in a molecular cloud. For n = 104 cm-3 and G0 = 102 (G0 = 1 is the average local interstellar radiation field), the main result of the adoption of the higher oxygen binding energy is that H2O can form on grains at lower visual extinction AV, closer to the cloud surface. A higher binding energy of O results in more formation of OH and H2O on grains, which are subsequently desorbed by far-ultraviolet radiation, with consequences for gas-phase chemistry. For higher values of n and G0, the higher binding energy can lead to a large increase in the column of H2O but a decrease in the column of O2.

  9. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  10. Comparison of Model and Experimental Results for Material and Energy Flow in a Titanium Evaporation System with Deforming Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Westerberg, K W; Meier, T C; Braun, D G; Frischknecht, K D; Anklam, T M

    2003-05-12

    Finite element calculations and measurements are compared for material and energy flow in a system to evaporate pure titanium. A 40 kW electron beam is used to heat the end of a 7.62 cm diameter cylindrical rod which is fed vertically through a water-cooled crucible. Vapor emanates from a liquid pool in which flow is driven strongly by buoyancy and capillary forces. At high evaporation rates, the vapor exerts strong shear and normal forces on the liquid-vapor interface. The MELT finite element code is used to calculate steady-state, axisymmetric flow and temperature fields along with liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interface locations. The influence of the vapor on the liquid top surface is treated using boundary conditions with parameters derived from Monte Carlo simulations. The upper and lower interfaces of the liquid pool are tracked using a mesh structured with rotating spines. Experimental evaporation rates are obtained from measured feed rates, and heat flow rates are determined from measured temperature rises in the cooling water. The finite element model provides a good representation of the measured evaporation rates, heat flows, and lower pool boundary locations.

  11. Experimental electrochemical capacitor test results

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.B.; Murphy, T.C.; Rogers, S.A.; Sutula, R.A.

    1998-07-01

    Various electrochemical capacitors (ultracapacitors) are being developed for hybrid vehicles as candidate power assist devices for the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) fast-response engine. The envisioned primary functions of the ultracapacitor are to level the dynamic power loads on the primary propulsion device and recover available energy from regenerative breaking during off-peak power periods. This paper will present test data from selected US Department of Energy (DOE) supported ultracapacitor projects designed to meet the fast response engine requirements. This paper will address the temperature dependence of test data obtained from a set of three devices provided from Maxwell Energy Products, Inc. These devices are rated at 2,300 F at 2.3 V. Constant-current, constant-power, and self-discharge testing as a function of temperature have been conducted. From these tests were determined the capacitance, equivalent series resistance, specific energy and power, and the self-discharge energy loss factor as a function of the device operating temperature.

  12. Pentaquarks: the latest experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    M. Battaglieri; R. De Vita; Valery Kubarovsky

    2006-01-01

    After the claim of the possible discovery of a pentaquark state, many experiments reported positive and negative results opening a discussion about the pentaquark existence. New experiments with high resolution and high statistics are needed in the reaction channels and for the kinematics of the positive results to solve the controversy. Jefferson Lab started a comprehensive program to search for pentaquark in photoproduction at threshold on proton and deuteron targets, collecting more than 10 times the existing statistics. The first experiment on the proton (g11) just finished to analyze the data, and the first results of the pentaquark search are reported here.

  13. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. I. Experimental results on the transmission of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Smejkal, Valerie; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-05-01

    We report on energy loss measurements of slow (v ≪v0 ), highly charged (Q >10 ) ions upon transmission through a 1-nm-thick carbon nanomembrane. We emphasize here the scaling of the energy loss with the velocity and charge exchange or loss. We show that a weak linear velocity dependence exists, whereas charge exchange dominates the kinetic energy loss, especially in the case of a large charge capture. A universal scaling of the energy loss with the charge exchange and velocity is found and discussed in this paper. A model for charge-state-dependent energy loss for slow ions is presented in paper II in this series [R. A. Wilhelm and W. Möller, Phys. Rev. A 93, 052709 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052709].

  14. An overview of STAR experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nu

    2014-11-01

    With large acceptance and excellent particle identification, STAR is one of the best mid-rapidity collider experiments for studying high-energy nuclear collisions. The STAR experiment provides full information on initial conditions, properties of the hot and dense medium as well as the properties at freeze-out. In Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV, STAR's focus is on the nature of the sQGP produced at RHIC. In order to explore the properties of the QCD phase diagram, since 2010, the experiment has collected sizable data sets of Au+Au collisions at the lower collision energy region where the net-baryon density is large. At the 2014 Quark Matter Conference, the STAR experiment made 16 presentations that cover physics topics including collective dynamics, electromagnetic probes, heavy-flavor, initial state physics, jets, QCD phase diagram, thermodynamics and hadron chemistry, and future experimental facilities, upgrades, and instrumentation[1]. In this overview we will highlight a few results from the STAR experiment, especially those from the recent measurements of the RHIC beam energy scan program. At the end, instead of a summary, we will discuss STAR's near future physics programs at RHIC.

  15. Experimental simulation of radiation damage of polymers in space applications by cosmic-ray-type high energy heavy ions and the resulting changes in optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, U. H.; Ensinger, W.

    2015-12-01

    Devices operating in space, e.g. in satellites, are being hit by cosmic rays. These include so-called HZE-ions, with High mass (Z) and energy (E). These highly energetic heavy ions penetrate deeply into the materials and deposit a large amount of energy, typically several keV per nm range. Serious damage is created. In space vehicles, polymers are used which are degraded under ion bombardment. HZE ion irradiation can experimentally be simulated in large scale accelerators. In the present study, the radiation damage of aliphatic vinyl- and fluoro-polymers by heavy ions with energies in the GeV range is described. The ions cause bond scission and create volatile small molecular species, leading to considerable mass loss of the polymers. Since hydrogen, oxygen and fluorine-containing molecules are created and these elements are depleted, the remaining material is carbon-richer than the original polymers and contains conjugated CC double bonds. This process is investigated by measuring the optical band gap with UV-Vis absorption spectrometry as a function of ion fluence. The results show how the optical band gaps shift from the UV into the Vis region upon ion irradiation for the different polymers.

  16. A summary of recent experimental results from Mark J: High energy e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collisions at PETRA: Report Number 131

    SciTech Connect

    Adeva, B.; Barber, D.P.; Becker, U.; Berdugo, J.; Bohm, A.; Branson, J.G.; Burger, J.D.; Capell, M.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, C.C.

    1983-12-01

    The PETRA electron-positron collider at DESY in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, began operating in 1978, with four intersection regions devoted to experiments. In the intervening five years, five detector devices, CELLO, JADE, MARK-J, PLUTO and TASSO have accumulated and published a substantial variety of experimental results. The limits of validity of Quantum Electro-Dynamics (QED) have been extended; the pointlike nature of leptons and quarks have been probed at exceedingly small distances; the Glashow, Weinberg and Salam (GWS) '' standard electroweak model'' has been tested and found to describe interactions remarkably well; the predicted interference between electromagnetic and weak forces has been conclusively demonstrated; events with three jets have been discovered and interpreted as resulting from gluons, as predicted by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD); the sixth, ''top,'' quark has not been found yet, although an energy search for ''toponium'' (top + antitop) has been carried out up to 43.1 GeV center of mass energy. An integrated luminosity of about 100 pb/sup /minus/1/ mostly at energies above 30 GeV, has produced a very large sample of events. The present paper is a complete review and up-dating of all MARK-J physics results either published or unpublished. Since the amount of interesting information is so large, we realized that a coherent summation could be of substantial usefulness to the community. In order that this review can serve many needs, we include, a brief description of the apparatus and the data acquisition and analysis.

  17. Synthesis of H2 in dirty ice mantles by fast ion energy loss: New experimental results increase the relevance of this mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirranello, Valero; Brown, W. L.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Averna, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experimental results support the importance of H2 production in molecular clouds by cosmic ray bombardment of the mantles of grains. The formation of molecules different from those originally present in the irradiated layer can be explained by the production of molecular fragments induced by the release of energy if the impinging fast particle. One way of considering the process is in terms of a transiently hot cylinder, initially about 50 A in diameter, that exists around the track of an individual fast ion. Since ice has a relatively low thermal conductivity, energy lost by the ion in the ice layers remains confined around the track for time long enough to be thermalized. The hot cylinder increases in diameter and decreases in temperature on a time scale of 10(exp -11) to 10(exp -10) sec. Molecular fragments that are formed in this high temperature region acquire enough mobility to recombine with different partners, forming new molecules. A Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction between cosmic rays and grain mantles, at various depths in the core of a spherical molecular cloud, was performed. The simulation was continued until 40,000 ions had hit each grain of the type and size chosen. During the performed experiments thin icy films made of H2O and CD4 mixed in the gas phase and deposited on a cold finger at 9 K were irradiated with 1.5 MeV helium beams. Among synthesized molecules were found H2, HD, and D2.

  18. Selectivity and the production of experimental results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, A.

    1998-12-01

    The author studies possible relations between the application of selection criteria in analyzing and interpreting the results of physical experiments and the mental preconceptions and expectations of the experimenters. He presents a detailed account of five famous cases of purported experimental results and the controversies following their publication. These cases include Joseph Weber's 1969 claim to have detected gravitational radiation - possibly originating in the center of the Milky Way, and the controversy arising from the 1985 "detection" of the 17 keV (heavy) neutrino by Simpson. Extensive bibliographical references are given for each case.

  19. Results from an experimental railgun system: ERGS-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thio, Y. C.; Clark, G. A.; Bedford, A. J.

    1983-03-01

    One phase of the Materials Research Laboratories (MRL) Experimental Rail-gun System (ERGS-1) program is for experimentation in the energy range 50 to 500 kJ. The first, and highly successful, ERGS-1 experiment was conducted in September 1981 using a barrel segment 200 mm in length. Comparison of experimental results with the theory developed by Thio yielded good agreement, particularly the values for capacitor voltage, current through the rails, plasma voltage and muzzle velocity of the projectile.

  20. Crossed beam energy transfer: Assessment of the paraxial complex geometrical optics approach versus a time-dependent paraxial method to describe experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaïtis, A.; Hüller, S.; Pesme, D.; Duchateau, G.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2016-03-01

    The Crossed Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) of two large laser beams is modeled using two approaches: (i) the time-independent Paraxial Complex Geometrical Optics (PCGO) for stochastically distributed Gaussian-shaped beamlets and (ii) the time-dependent conventional paraxial propagation of smoothed laser beams. Each description of the laser propagation is coupled to a hydrodynamics code. Both approaches are compared in a well-defined plasma configuration with density- and velocity- profiles corresponding to an inhomogeneous plasma, including a resonance zone in which the matching conditions for a resonant coupling between the two laser beams are fulfilled. The comparison is made for laser beams smoothed by random phase plates and for "regular beams" without speckles. The role of the laser speckles is also investigated for each approach. In general, a good agreement is found between the PCGO simulations and the fully time-dependent paraxial-type simulations, carried out with the code Harmony, past a transient period on the picosecond time scale. The PCGO-based CBET model is applied to the hydrodynamics simulations of a CBET experiment, the results of which reproduce essential features of the experimental data. Based on these comparisons, performed for interaction parameters up to 2 × 10 14 W cm - 2 μ m 2 , the PCGO approach proves to be a reliable method to be implemented in the hydrodynamics codes to describe the CBET in mm-scale plasmas.

  1. Microwave radiometry for humanitarian demining: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joel T.; Kim, Hyunjin; Wiggins, David R.; Cheon, Yonghun

    2002-08-01

    Previous modeling studies have indicated that a multi-frequency radiometer could prove advantageous for humanitarian demining due to the oscillatory patterns in brightness temperature versus frequency that would be observed in the presence of a sub-surface target. Initial experimental results are reported in this paper from a multi-frequency radiometer (MFRAD) system operating at 19 frequencies in the 2.1-6.5 GHz band. The basic design of MFRAD is reviewed, and the calibration and noise background removal procedures discussed. Experimental results with sub-surface metallic and styrofoam targets are then provided that demonstrate the predicted oscillatory behavior. An FFT-based detection algorithm is also described and applied to measured data. Further plans for experiments and tests with this system are also detailed.

  2. PDX experimental results in FY82

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Bitter, M.; Buchenauer, D.; Budny, R.; Brau, K.; Crowley, T.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.

    1983-08-01

    This report presents a detailed summary of the major experimental results of PDX in FY82 and represents the efforts of the entire PDX group. Topics covered include ..beta..-scaling and fishbone studies, fluctuations, disruptions, impurities and impurity transport, power handling, limiter conditioning, edge studies, plasma fueling, counter-injection, and diagnostic development. A less detailed version will appear as the FY82 PDX contribution to the PPPL Annual Report.

  3. Experimental Results for Space-Wire-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Steve; Gibson, David; Ferrer, Albert

    2015-09-01

    SpaceWire-D is a deterministic extension to SpaceWire that uses time-division multiplexing to schedule traffic within time-slots. It allows a single SpaceWire network to be used for both time-critical avionics control applications and asynchronous payload data-handling simultaneously using existing SpaceWire technology. In this paper we describe the services of SpaceWire-D and present experimental results for each service.

  4. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. James

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  5. Overview of the initial NSTX experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gates, D. A.; Grisham, L. R.; Hosea, J. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S. F.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Skinner, C. H.; Stevenson, T.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D. W.; Synakowski, E. J.; Taylor, G.; Von Halle, A.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Zweben, S. J.; Ackers, R.; Barry, R. E.; Bers, A.; Bialek, J. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Carter, M. D.; Chrzanowski, J.; Davis, W.; Doyle, E. J.; Dudek, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ellis, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Finkenthal, M.; Fredd, E.; Gibney, T.; Goldston, R. J.; Hatcher, R. E.; Hawryluck, R. J.; Hayashiya, H.; Hill, K. W.; Jarboe, T. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Ji, H.; Kalish, M.; La Marche, P.; Lao, L. L.; Lee, K. C.; Levinton, F. M.; Luhmann, N. C.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Marsala, R.; Mau, T. K.; McCormack, B.; Medley, S. S.; Menon, M. M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Nishino, N.; Oliaro, G.; Park, H. K.; Parsells, R.; Pearson, G.; Peebles, T.; Phillips, C. K.; Pinsker, R.; Porter, G. D.; Ram, A. K.; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rosenberg, A.; Schaffer, M.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sichta, P.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B. C.; Takase, Y.; Wampler, W. R.; Wurden, G. A.; Xu, X. Q.; Yang, J. G.; Zeng, L.; Zhu, W.

    2001-10-01

    The main aim of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to establish the fusion physics principles of the spherical torus (ST) concept. The NSTX device began plasma operations in February 1999 and the plasma current Ip was successfully brought up to the design value of 1 MA on 14 December 1999. The planned plasma shaping parameters, elongation κ = 1.6-2.2 and triangularity δ = 0.2-0.4, were achieved in inner wall limited, and single null and double null diverted configurations. The coaxial helicity injection (CHI) and high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) experiments were also initiated. CHI current of 27 kA produced up to 260 kA toroidal current without using an ohmic solenoid. With the injection of 2.3 MW of HHFW power, using 12 antennas connected to six transmitters, electrons were heated from a central temperature of 400 eV to 900 eV at a central density of 3.5 × 1013 cm-3, increasing the plasma energy to 59 kJ and the toroidal β, βT, to 10%. The NBI system commenced operation in September 2000. The initial results with two ion sources (PNBI = 2.8 MW) show good heating, producing a total plasma stored energy of 90 kJ corresponding to βT approx 18% at a plasma current of 1.1 MA.

  6. Overview of the Initial NSTX Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; M. Bell; R. E. Bell; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; et al

    2000-11-16

    The main aim of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to establish the fusion physics principles of the spherical torus (ST) concept. The NSTX device began plasma operations in February 1999 and the plasma current Ip was successfully brought up to the design value of 1 million amperes on December 14, 1999. The planned plasma shaping parameters, k = 1.6 {+-} 2.2 and d = 0.2 {+-} 0.4, were achieved in inner limited, single null and double null configurations. The CHI (Coaxial Helicity Injection) and HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) experiments were also initiated. A CHI injected current of 27 kA produced up to 260 kA of toroidal current without using an ohmic solenoid. With an injection of 2.3 MW of HHFW power, using twelve antennas connected to six transmitters, electrons were heated from a central temperature of 400 eV to 900 eV at a centraldensity of 3.5 x 1013 cm-3 increasing the plasma energy to 59 kJ and the toroidal beta, bT to 10 %. Finally, the NBI system commenced operatio n in Sept. 2000. The initial results with two ion sources (PNBI = 2.8 MW) shows good heating, producing a total plasma stored energy of 90 kJ corresponding to bT = 18 % at a plasma current of 1.1 MA

  7. Superspreading: molecular dynamics simulations and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Muller, Erich; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The intriguing ability of certain surfactant molecules to drive the superspreading of liquids to complete wetting on hydrophobic substrates is central to numerous applications that range from coating flow technology to enhanced oil recovery. Recently, we have observed that for superspreading to occur, two key conditions must be simultaneously satisfied: the adsorption of surfactants from the liquid-vapor surface onto the three-phase contact line augmented by local bilayer formation. Crucially, this must be coordinated with the rapid replenishment of liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces with surfactants from the interior of the droplet. Here, we present the structural characteristics and kinetics of the droplet spreading during the different stages of this process, and we compare our results with experimental data for trisiloxane and poly oxy ethylene surfactants. In this way, we highlight and explore the differences between surfactants, paving the way for the design of molecular architectures tailored specifically for applications that rely on the control of wetting. EPSRC Platform Grant MACIPh (EP/L020564/).

  8. Preliminary Experimental Results from a MARS Micro-CT System

    PubMed Central

    He, Peng; Yu, Hengyong; Thayer, Patrick; Jin, Xin; Xu, Qiong; Bennett, James; Tappenden, Rachael; Wei, Biao; Goldstein, Aaron; Renaud, Peter; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The Medipix All Resolution System (MARS) system is a commercial spectral/multi-energy micro-CT scanner designed and assembled by the MARS Bioimaging, Ltd. in New Zealand. This system utilizes the state-of-the-art Medipix photon-counting, energy-discriminating detector technology developed by a collaboration based at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). In this paper, we report our preliminary experimental results using this system, including geometrical alignment, photon energy characterization, protocol optimization, and spectral image reconstruction. We produced our scan datasets with a multi-material phantom, and then applied ordered subset-simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OS-SART) to reconstruct images in different energy ranges and principal component analysis (PCA) to evaluate spectral deviation between the energy ranges. PMID:22635175

  9. VALIDATION DATA FOR PHOTOCHEMICAL MECHANISMS: EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The smog chamber facility of the University of North Carolina (UNC) was used to provide experimental data for the EPA and atmospheric model developers for testing and validating kinetic mechanisms of photochemical smog formation. In the study, 71 dual-experiments were performed u...

  10. Experimental Test Results of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Flap-Edge Vortex Model in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Harry L., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a test conducted in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to measure the flow field properties of a flap-edge vortex. The model was the EET (Energy Efficient Transport) Flap-Edge Vortex Model, which consists of a main element and a part-span, single-slotted trailing-edge flap. The model surface was instrumented with several chordwise and spanwise rows of pressure taps on each element. The off-body flow field velocities were to be measured in several planes perpendicular to the flap edge with a laser velocimetry system capable of measuring all three components in coincidence. However, due to seeding difficulties, the preliminary laser data did not have sufficient accuracy to be suitable for presentation; therefore, this report presents only the tabulated and plotted surface pressure data. In addition, the report contains a detail description of the model which can be used to generate accurate CFD grid structures.

  11. Experimental results of the betatron sum resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.

    1993-06-01

    The experimental observations of motion near the betatron sum resonance, {nu}{sub x} + 2{nu}{sub z} = 13, are presented. A fast quadrupole (Panofsky-style ferrite picture-frame magnet with a pulsed power supplier) producing a betatron tune shift of the order of 0.03 at rise time of 1 {mu}s was used. This quadrupole was used to produce betatron tunes which jumped past and then crossed back through a betatron sum resonance line. The beam response as function of initial betatron amplitudes were recorded turn by turn. The correlated growth of the action variables, J{sub x} and J{sub z}, was observed. The phase space plots in the resonance frame reveal the features of particle motion near the nonlinear sum resonance region.

  12. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  13. Adaptive structures - Test hardware and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Kuo, Chin-Po

    1990-01-01

    The facilities and procedures used at JPL to test adaptive structures such as the large deployable reflector (LDR) are described and preliminary results are reported. The applications of adaptive structures in future NASA missions are outlined, and the techniques which are employed to modify damping, stiffness, and isolation characteristics, as well as geometric changes, are listed. The development of adaptive structures is shown to be effective as a result of new actuators and sensors, and examples are listed for categories such as fiber optics, shape-memory materials, piezoelectrics, and electrorheological fluids. Some ground test results are described for laboratory truss structures and truss test beds, which are shown to be efficient and easy to assemble in space. Adaptive structures are shown to be important for precision space structures such as the LDR, and can alleviate ground test requirements.

  14. The Humanoid Robot LOLA—Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favot, V.; Schwienbacher, M.; Buschmann, T.; Lohmeier, S.; Ulbrich, H.

    2010-09-01

    With the experience gathered during the development and construnction of the robot JOHNNIE, a new humanoid robot LOLA was built. Goal of this project is to realize a fast, human-like walking. Different aspects of this complex mechatronic system and the first experiments results are presented. The lightweight construction and the custom build multi-sensory joint drives with high torque brushless motors are introduced. The new decentralized electronic control/sensing network is also discuss as well as the simulation environment, the trajectory planning algorithm and the stabilizing walking control. Finally the first experiments result are presented.

  15. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We reviewmore » a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  16. Low-calorie sweetener use and energy balance: Results from experimental studies in animals, and large-scale prospective studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Sharon P G

    2016-10-01

    For more than a decade, pioneering animal studies conducted by investigators at Purdue University have provided evidence to support a central thesis: that the uncoupling of sweet taste and caloric intake by low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) can disrupt an animal's ability to predict the metabolic consequences of sweet taste, and thereby impair the animal's ability to respond appropriately to sweet-tasting foods. These investigators' work has been replicated and extended internationally. There now exists a body of evidence, from a number of investigators, that animals chronically exposed to any of a range of LCSs - including saccharin, sucralose, acesulfame potassium, aspartame, or the combination of erythritol+aspartame - have exhibited one or more of the following conditions: increased food consumption, lower post-prandial thermogenesis, increased weight gain, greater percent body fat, decreased GLP-1 release during glucose tolerance testing, and significantly greater fasting glucose, glucose area under the curve during glucose tolerance testing, and hyperinsulinemia, compared with animals exposed to plain water or - in many cases - even to calorically-sweetened foods or liquids. Adverse impacts of LCS have appeared diminished in animals on dietary restriction, but were pronounced among males, animals genetically predisposed to obesity, and animals with diet-induced obesity. Impacts have been especially striking in animals on high-energy diets: diets high in fats and sugars, and diets which resemble a highly-processed 'Western' diet, including trans-fatty acids and monosodium glutamate. These studies have offered both support for, and biologically plausible mechanisms to explain, the results from a series of large-scale, long-term prospective observational studies conducted in humans, in which longitudinal increases in weight, abdominal adiposity, and incidence of overweight and obesity have been observed among study participants who reported using diet sodas and other

  17. Numerical taxonomy on data: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Farach, M.

    1997-12-01

    The numerical taxonomy problems associated with most of the optimization criteria described above are NP - hard [3, 5, 1, 4]. In, the first positive result for numerical taxonomy was presented. They showed that if e is the distance to the closest tree metric under the L{sub {infinity}} norm. i.e., e = min{sub T} [L{sub {infinity}} (T-D)], then it is possible to construct a tree T such that L{sub {infinity}} (T-D) {le} 3e, that is, they gave a 3-approximation algorithm for this problem. We will refer to this algorithm as the Single Pivot (SP) heuristic.

  18. Feedback control of a cupola - concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.L.; Abdelrahman, M.A.; Larsen, E.; Clark, D.; King, P.

    1998-10-01

    In this paper we present some final results from a research project focused on introducing automatic control to the operation of cupola iron furnaces. The main aim of this research is to improve the operational efficiency and performance of the cupola furnace, an important foundry process used to melt iron. Previous papers have described the development of appropriate control system architectures for the cupola. These results are summarized. Then we describe the experimental results obtained with the U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center`s research cupola. First, experimental data is used to calibrate the model, which is taken as a first-order multivariable system with time delay. Then relative gain analysis is used to select loop pairings to be used in a multi-loop controller. The resulting controller pairs meltrate with blast volume, iron temperature with oxygen addition, and carbon composition with percent coke. Special (nonlinear) filters are used to compute meltrate from actual scale readings of the amount of iron produced and to smooth the temperature measurement. The temperature and meltrate loops use single-loop PI control. The composition loop uses a Smith predictor to discount the deadtime associated with mass transport through the furnace. Experimental results validate the conceptual controller design and provide proof-of-concept of the idea of controlling a foundry cupola. Future research directions are discussed, including the concept of an integrated, intelligent industrial process controller, or I{sup 3}PC.

  19. Experimental results on constructed wetland pilot system.

    PubMed

    González, J M; Ansola, G; Luis, E

    2001-01-01

    Research into a constructed wetland for wastewater treatment using M.H.E.A. (Hierarchical Mosaic of Artificial Ecosystems) pilot system was carried out over a vegetative period in 8 different flow and vegetable composition series. The system consisted of a free water pond as a first step working as primary treatment followed by a zone with Typha sp. and surface flow and finally a woody zone with a subsurface flow and planted with ligneous species (Salixsp., Populus sp., Fraxinus sp. and Alnus sp.). Removal efficiency in the study reflects an optimal result: 80-99% total suspended matter removal, 82-98% organic matter removal, 70-98% nutrients removal and up to 99.9% faecal bacterial disinfecting. Effluent characteristics were in accordance with European Union legislation criteria for wastewater treatment systems. PMID:11804123

  20. Nulling interferometry: symmetry requirements and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2000-07-01

    This paper provides a derivation from first principles of the stringent symmetry and stability requirements which deep stellar nulling demands, and also includes a brief status report on recent nulling results obtained with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's fiber-coupled rotational-shearing interferometer. To date, the deepest transient nulls obtained (at red wavelengths) are 2 X 10-6 with a laser diode source, and 1.4 X 10-5 with a single- polarization thermal white-light source filtered to provide an 18% passband. In addition, both the laser and white light nulls have been stabilized to the 10-4 level. This visible wavelength laboratory nuller thus meets essentially all of the performance goals for the planned nulling experiment on board NASA's Space Interferometer Mission, with the sole exception of dual-polarization operation.

  1. Reactor-pumped laser experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.; Hays, G.N.

    1994-12-31

    Reactor pumped lasers have the potential to be scaled to multi-megawatt power levels with long run times. In proposed designs, the laser will be capable of output powers of several megawatts of power for run times of several hours. Such a laser would have many diverse applications such as material processing, space debris removal and power beaming to geosynchronous satellites or the moon. However, before such systems can be designed, fundamental laser parameters such as small signal gain, saturation intensity and efficiency must be determined over a wide operational parameter space. The authors have recently measured fundamental laser parameters for a selection of nuclear pumped visible and near IR laser transitions in atomic neon, argon and xenon. An overview of the results of this investigation will be presented.

  2. Experimental results from the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bloody, F.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.

    1986-10-01

    Recent experiments on TFTR have extended the operating regime of TFTR in both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. The TFTR tokamak has reached its original machine design specifications (I/sub p/ = 2.5 MA and B/sub T/ = 5.2 T). Initial neutral-beam-heating experiments used up to 6.3 MW of deuterium beams. With the recent installation of two additional beamlines, the power has been increased up to 11 MW. A deuterium pellet injector was used to increase the central density to 2.5 x 10/sup 20/ m/sup -3/ in high current discharges. At the opposite extreme, by operating at low plasma current (I/sub p/ approx. 0.8 MA) and low density (anti n/sub e/ approx. 1 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/), high ion temperatures (9 +- 2 keV) and rotation speeds (7 x 10/sup 5/ m/s) have been achieved during injection. In addition, plasma compression experiments have demonstrated acceleration of beam ions from 82 keV to 150 keV, in accord with expectations. The wide operating range of TFTR, together with an extensive set of diagnostics and a flexible control system, has facilitated transport and scaling studies of both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. The results of these confinement studies are presented.

  3. Liquid hydrogen for automotive vehicles - Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Peschka, W.

    1981-01-01

    A BMW-518 has been adapted for LH2-fuel, representing the first LH2-fueled car in Europe. This is a joint program between the German Research and Testing Laboratory for Aeronautics and the Research Institute for Motor-Transport Service and Automotive Engines at the University of Stuttgart. The program was established for demonstration of successful car-operation and and the safe handling of LH2-fuel during car operation and refueling. Based on earlier papers, more recent test results and experiences are reported about car operation and engine performance. The car has been driven over an accumulated distance of about 1800 km on a test track. The test track consists of a loop of about 2.5 km in length, including a proper combination of straight level sections, curved sections and ascending sections. In order to demonstrate a safe liquid hydrogen refueling procedure that could also be used by untrained people, a semiautomatic computer operated refueling station has been developed. This refueling station is in successful operation.

  4. On collisional disruption - Experimental results and scaling laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R.; Ryan, Eileen V.

    1990-01-01

    Both homogeneous and inhomogeneous targets have been addressed by the present experimental consideration of the impact strengths, fragment sizes, and fragment velocities generated by cement mortar targets whose crushing strengths vary by an order of magnitude, upon impact of projectiles in the velocity range of 50-5700 m/sec. When combined with additional published data, dynamic impact strength is found to correlate with quasi-static material strengths for materials ranging in character from basalt to ice; two materials not following this trend, however, are weak mortar and clay targets. Values consistent with experimental results are obtainable with a simple scaling algorithm based on impact energy, material properties, and collisional strain rate.

  5. Experimental High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, Carla

    2005-10-12

    Neutrinos are considered promising probes for high energy astrophysics. More than four decades after deep water Cerenkov technique was proposed to detect high energy neutrinos. Two detectors of this type are successfully taking data: BAIKAL and AMANDA. They have demonstrated the feasibility of the high energy neutrino detection and have set first constraints on TeV neutrino production astrophysical models. The quest for the construction of km3 size detectors have already started: in the South Pole, the IceCube neutrino telescope is under construction; the ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR Collaborations are working towards the installation of a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Theoretical and Experimental Results Regarding LENR/CF

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Bass; Wm. Stan Gleeson

    2000-11-12

    We challenge the predominant view that low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) are prohibited by standard quantum mechanics (QM). This view, supposedly based on standard nuclear theory, need not apply in condensed-matter environments. These considerations indicate that seemingly novel experimental evidence of rapid aneutronic bulk-process transmutation, at extraordinarily low-energy levels, in a simple electrochemical reactor, can occur. This explains: (a) induced rapid decay of radioactive thorium into stable nuclides, e.g., Cu and (b) resulting, anomalous distribution of Cu isotopes. We reexamine arguments of Peebles cited as evidence that standard QM 'forbids' cold fusion (CF). We note oversimplifications in those and present an alternative, more sophisticated calculation (see Bass, Refs. 3 through 8) demonstrating that conventional wisdom about impenetrability of the 'Coulomb barrier' fails as a result of periodic-order-induced resonance. We also examine empirical evidence. In three independent tests of an LENR electrolysis cell, using different I-V-T (current/voltage/time) protocols, the percentage of radiation reduction (RR) transmutation achieved {eta}=[23{percent}, 50{percent}, 83{percent}] versus expended energy E=[0.6535, 32.5, 74.6] (Watt-hours), obtained by numerical integration of recorded product I{center_dot}V for processing time T, provides near-perfect straight-line correlation: {eta}={alpha}{center_dot}E + {eta}{sub 0}, {alpha}=0.8105, {eta}{sub 0}=22.888, (0.65 < E < 0.75).

  7. Experimental Results of Hydrate Reservoir Destabilization Through Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, J.; Hornbach, M. J.; Elwood-Madden, M.; Phelps, T. J.; Rawn, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Gas clathrate reservoirs have been considered as possible sources of energy, as hazards to deep water drilling operations, and as contributors to global climate change. Clathrate destabilization may occur through depressurization of the reservoir, addition of chemical inhibitors, or heating the reservoir. Meso-scale heat conduction experiments were conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in an attempt to apply experimental constraints to purely numerical models of heat transfer within a nearly isobaric reservoir. A column of saturated sediment was place inside the pressure vessel and pressurized to conditions sufficient to form methane clathrate at seafloor temperatures, while the system remained at room temperature (298K). Once pressurized, the temperature of the vessel was then lowered to approximately 275K, forming pore filling clathrate in the sediment column. Following hydrate formation, heat was supplied to the center of the clathrate reservoir through a hot fluid heat exchanger embedded in the sediment column to dissociate the methane hydrate. Relative changes in temperature within the hydrate-sediment column were monitored with a fiber optic quasi-distributed sensing system (DSS), along with temperature and pressure within the vessel headspace. Using the DSS Plotter analysis software, it was determined that an axis-symmetric section of clathrate was dissociated around the heat exchanger. Clathrate dissociation was accompanied by a small rise in vessel headspace pressure in addition to the expected thermal expansion of the headspace gas. The quantity of heat input to the system was calculated from the drop in fluid temperature as it flowed through the heat exchanger. Increased heat input resulted in an increase in the volume of hydrate dissociated. Clathrate rapidly reformed immediately upon the removal of the heat energy. A simple numerical model has been developed to simulate the heat flow in the system. Early

  8. Non-shock initiation model for explosive families : experimental results.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark U.; Jensen, Charles B.; Todd, Steven N.; Hugh, Chance G.; Caipen, Terry L.

    2010-03-01

    The 'DaMaGe-Initiated-Reaction' (DMGIR) computational model has been developed to predict the response of high explosives to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of a reaction in the explosive, and its growth to detonation. Specifically designed experiments were used to study the initiation process of each explosive family with embedded shock sensors and optical diagnostics. The experimental portion of this model development began with a study of PBXN-5 to develop DMGIR model coefficients for the rigid plastic bonded family, followed by studies of the cast, and bulk-moldable explosive families. The experimental results show an initiation mechanism that is related to input energy and material damage, with well defined initiation thresholds for each explosive family. These initiation details will extend the predictive capability of the DMGIR model from the rigid family into the cast and bulk-moldable families.

  9. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. PMID:15957758

  10. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. .

  11. Experimental Results on Jets in pA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelt, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The experimentally observed reduction of jet yields in ultrarelativistic heavy ion (AA) collisions relative to proton-proton (pp) collisions is widely interpreted in terms of energy loss of a hard scattered parton traversing a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) before fragmenting into a jet of hadrons. In order to constrain proposed mechanisms of energy loss, a variety of measurements are needed that quantify both how the jet yields and jet structure are modified in the medium. However, jets may also be modified by differences in the initial state of the nucleus relative to that of the proton. The precise determination of the QGP properties relies on disentangling these additional modifications, collectively termed ``cold nuclear matter'' effects, from energy loss in the QGP. Collisions between heavy ions and protons (pA) provide a potential control environment where cold nuclear matter effects should be present, but QGP formation is generally not expected to occur. In this talk, an overview of recent jet results from proton-lead collisions produced at the LHC will be given. The yield of inclusive jets and distributions of dijet pairs are shown to be compatible with generally accepted theoretical expectations, although significant modification is observed when yields are measured from specific centrality classes of pA collision events. Some measurements of high-pT charged hadron yields suggest a larger modification in pA collisions relative to pp collisions than for inclusive jet yields. The potential implications of this difference along with other measurements relating to jet structure will be discussed.

  12. Experimental Results from a Resonant Dielectric Laser Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Rodney; McNeur, Joshua; Sozer, Esin; Travish, Gil; Hazra, Kiran Shankar; Matthews, Brian; England, Joel; Peralta, Edgar; Wu, Ziran

    2015-04-01

    Laser-powered accelerators have the potential to operate with very large accelerating gradients (~ GV/m) and represent a path toward extremely compact colliders and accelerator technology. Optical-scale laser-powered devices based on field-shaping structures (known as dielectric laser accelerators, or DLAs) have been described and demonstrated recently. Here we report on the first experimental results from the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), a DLA based on a slab-symmetric resonant optical-scale structure. As a resonant (rather than near-field) device, the MAP is distinct from other DLAs. Its cavity resonance enhances its accelerating field relative to the incoming laser fields, which are coupled efficiently through a diffractive optic on the upper face of the device. The MAP demonstrated modest accelerating gradients in recent experiments, in which it was powered by a Ti:Sapphire laser well below its breakdown limit. More detailed results and some implications for future developments will be discussed. Supported in part by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (UCLA); U.S. Dept of Energy (SLAC); and DARPA (SLAC).

  13. Experimental results on atomic oxygen corrosion of silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, Albert T.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the reaction kinetics of silver with atomic oxygen in 10 degree increments over the temperature range of 0 to 70 C is reported. The silver specimens, of the order of 10,000 A in thickness, were prepared by thermal evaporation onto 3 inch diameter polished silicon wafers. There were later sliced into pieces having surface areas of the order of 1/4 to 1/2 square inch. Atomic oxygen was generated by a gas discharge in a commercial plasmod asher operating in the megahertz frequency range. The sample temperature within the chamber was controlled by means of a thermoelectric unit. Exposure of the silver specimens to atomic oxygen was incremental, with oxide film thickness measurements being carried out between exposures by means of an automated ellipsometer. For the early growth phase, the data can be described satisfactorily by a logarithmic growth law: the oxide film thickness increases as the logarithm of the exposure time. Furthermore, the oxidation process is thermally activated, the rate increasing with increasing temperature. However, the empirical activation energy parameter deduced from Arrhenius plots is quite low, being of the order of 0.1 eV.

  14. Novel results on low energy neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Gianpaolo

    2012-07-01

    Many progresses have been achieved in the study of low energy neutrinos from Sun and Earth. In the solar neutrinos the flux from 7Be has been measured with a total error <5% (introducing strong constraints also on the pp flux), while the day/night effect in that energy region has been determined at 1%. The 8B neutrinos have been detected with a threshold down to 3 MeV, while the solar neutrinos flux from pep reaction has been measured together with a stringent limit on CNO. These results give the experimental proof of the neutrino oscillation in vacuum and the validation of the MSW-LMA model in that region, while the day/night allows the isolation of the LMA solution by means of the solar neutrinos only, without the assumption of CPT symmetry. The evidence of the antineutrinos produced within the Earth by radioactive decays is now very robust, but more statistics is needed to clearly estimate the radiogenic contribution to the terrestrial caloric energy.

  15. Experimental study of the Timoshenko beam theory predictions: Further results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsivais, G.; Díaz-de-Anda, A.; Flores, J.; Gutiérrez, L.; Morales, A.

    2016-08-01

    In a previous paper (2012) we presented experimental results proving that the critical frequency fC predicted by Timoshenko beam theory indeed exists. We also showed that for frequencies f smaller than fC the spectrum is formed by almost equally spaced levels whereas for f >fC the spectrum consists of pairs of eigenvalues very close to each other as predicted by numerical solutions of Timoshenko's equation: we shall refer to them as Timoshenko doublets. In this work we measure for the first time experimental dispersion relations. For this purpose it was necessary to obtain normal-mode amplitudes with a high precision, which was done with a new experimental setup developed by us. We found that experimental dispersion relations coincide very well with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we provide an explanation of Timoshenko doublets.

  16. Ultrasonic radiation from wedges of cubic profile: Experimental results.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Remillieux, Marcel C; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Ulrich, T J; Pieczonka, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the increase in ultrasonic radiation obtained from a wedge of cubic profile relative to a plate of uniform thickness. The wedge of cubic profile provides high efficiency sound radiation matching layer from a mounted piezoelectric transducer into the surrounding air. Previous research on structures with indentations of power-law profile has focused on vibration mitigation using the so called "acoustic black-hole" effect, whereas here such structures are used to enhance ultrasonic radiation. The work provides experimental verification of the numerical results of Remillieux et al. (2014). PMID:26166628

  17. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  18. CSI sensing and control: Analytical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkins, J. L.; Pollock, T. C.; Rahman, Z. H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work on structural identification and large-angle maneuvers with vibration suppression was presented. The recent work has sought to balance structural and controls analysis activities by involving the analysts directly in the validation and experimental aspects of the research. Some new sensing, actuation, system identification, and control concepts were successfully implemented. An overview of these results is given.

  19. Design and experimental results for the S805 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, the S805, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  20. Design and experimental results for the S809 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D M

    1997-01-01

    A 21-percent-thick, laminar-flow airfoil, the S809, for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  1. Experimental and theoretical studies on solar energy for energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. P.; Thekaekara, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations made experimentally and theoretically to evaluate the various parameters that affect the amount of solar energy received on a collector surface. Measurements were made over a long period of time using both pyranometer and pyrheliometer. Computation of spectral and total irradiance at ground level have been made for a large variety of combinations of atmospheric parameters for ozone density, precipitable water vapor, turbidity-coefficients and air mass. A study of the air mass as a function of irradiance measured at GSFC, and comparison of the data with the computed values of total direct solar irradiance for various parameters indicate that turbidity changes with time of the day; atmospheric opacity is less in the afternoon than in the morning.

  2. Experimental Measurement of Low Energy Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino interactions in the few to few tens of MeV range are of importance for several physics topics, including solar, supernova and reactor neutrinos, as well as future proposed oscillation and Standard Model test experiments. Although interaction cross-sections for some simple targets are well understood, very little experimental data exist for interactions with nuclei. This talk will discuss the motivation for measuring low energy neutrino interactions, the state of knowledge, and possible future strategies.

  3. Experimental results of a predictive neural network HVAC controller

    SciTech Connect

    Jeannette, E.; Assawamartbunlue, K.; Kreider, J.F.; Curtiss, P.S.

    1998-12-31

    Proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control is widely used in many HVAC control processes and requires constant attention for optimal control. Artificial neural networks offer the potential for improved control of processes through predictive techniques. This paper introduces and shows experimental results of a predictive neural network (PNN) controller applied to an unstable hot water system in an air-handling unit. Actual laboratory testing of the PNN and PID controllers show favorable results for the PNN controller.

  4. Experimental results for a hypersonic nozzle/afterbody flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Keener, Earl R.; Hui, Frank C. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5 Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center, in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadow graph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, rake boundary-layer measurements, Preston-tube skin-friction measurements, and flow field surveys with five-hole and thermocouple probes. The probe data consist of impact pressure, flow direction, and total temperature profiles in the interaction flow field.

  5. Robustness to noise in synchronization of network motifs: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Iachello, Marco; Pham, Viet-Thanh

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the robustness to noise of synchronization in all the four-nodes network motifs. The experimental setup consists of four Chua's circuits diffusively coupled in order to implement the six different undirected network motifs that can be obtained with four nodes. In this experimental setup, synchronization in the presence of noise injected in one of the network nodes is investigated and network motifs are compared in terms of the synchronization error obtained. The analysis has been then extended to some selected case studies of networks with five and six nodes. Numerical simulations have been also performed and results in agreement with experiments have been obtained. A correlation between node degree and robustness to noise has been found also in these networks.

  6. Novel Thermoelectric Modules for Cooling Powerful LEDs: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenyuk, V.; Dekhtiaruk, R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of a cooling system based on a novel thermoelectric module specifically designed for thermal management of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The Seoul Semiconductor LED W724C0 device was chosen for experimental validation of the efficiency of the proposed cooling unit. Two cooling systems with identical heat sinks were tested for comparison: a state-of-the-art one based on an insulated metal substrate-printed circuit board (IMS-PCB), and a system with thermoelectric cooling. The obtained results show that use of thermoelectrics results in a considerable reduction of the LED operating temperature, providing increased light output and greatly increased LED lifetime.

  7. Experimental overview of COMPASS and CLAS results on TMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    In the past years, distribution functions depending on the transverse momentum of partons in the nucleon (TMDs) have been intensely studied in spin physics. The TMDs represent one approach to disentangle the multi-dimensional structure of the nucleon. Correlations of the transverse spin of quarks with their transverse momentum can be observed by measuring spin azimuthal asymmetries. Experimental results from the COMPASS (CERN) and CLAS (Jefferson Laboratory) collaborations are presented and an outlook to upcoming measurements at these facilities is given.

  8. Mechanical properties of triaxially braided composites: Experimental and analytical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.; Foye, Raymond L.; Pastore, Christopher M.; Gowayed, Yasser A.

    1992-01-01

    The unnotched tensile properties of 2-D triaxial braid reinforced composites from both an experimental and an analytical viewpoint are studied. The materials are graphite fibers in an epoxy matrix. Three different reinforcing fiber architectures were considered. Specimens were cut from resin transfer molded (RTM) composite panels made from each braid. There were considerable differences in the observed elastic constants from different size strain gage and extensometer reading. Larger strain gages gave more consistent results and correlated better with the extensometer reading. Experimental strains correlated reasonably well with analytical predictions in the longitudinal, 0 degrees, fiber direction but not in the transverse direction. Tensile strength results were not always predictable even in reinforcing directions. Minor changes in braid geometry led to disproportionate strength variations. The unit cell structure of the triaxial braid was discussed with the assistance of computer analysis of the microgeometry. Photomicrographs of braid geometry were used to improve upon the computer graphics representations of unit cells. These unit cells were used to predict the elastic moduli with various degrees of sophistication. The simple and the complex analyses were generally in agreement but none adequately matched the experimental results for all the braids.

  9. Mechanical properties of triaxially braided composites: Experimental and analytical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.; Foye, Raymond L.; Pastore, Christopher M.; Gowayed, Yasser A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the unnotched tensile properties of two-dimensional triaxial braid reinforced composites from both an experimental and analytical viewpoint. The materials are graphite fibers in an epoxy matrix. Three different reinforcing fiber architectures were considered. Specimens were cut from resin transfer molded (RTM) composite panels made from each braid. There were considerable differences in the observed elastic constants from different size strain gage and extensometer readings. Larger strain gages gave more consistent results and correlated better with the extensometer readings. Experimental strains correlated reasonably well with analytical predictions in the longitudinal, zero degree, fiber direction but not in the transverse direction. Tensile strength results were not always predictable even in reinforcing directions. Minor changes in braid geometry led to disproportionate strength variations. The unit cell structure of the triaxial braid was discussed with the assistence of computer analysis of the microgeometry. Photomicrographs of the braid geometry were used to improve upon the computer graphics representations of unit cells. These unit cells were used to predict the elastic moduli with various degrees of sophistication. The simple and the complex analyses were generally in agreement but none adequately matched the experimental results for all the braids.

  10. Modeling and experimental result analysis for high-power VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharian, Aramais R.; Hader, Joerg; Moloney, Jerome V.; Koch, Stephan W.; Lutgen, Stephan; Brick, Peter; Albrecht, Tony; Grotsch, Stefan; Luft, Johann; Spath, Werner

    2003-06-01

    We present a comparison of experimental and microscopically based model results for optically pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting semiconductor lasers. The quantum well gain model is based on a quantitative ab-initio approach that allows calculation of a complex material susceptibility dependence on the wavelength, carrier density and lattice temperature. The gain model is coupled to the macroscopic thermal transport, spatially resolved in both the radial and longitudinal directions, with temperature and carrier density dependent pump absorption. The radial distribution of the refractive index and gain due to temperature variation are computed. Thermal managment issues, highlighted by the experimental data, are discussed. Experimental results indicate a critical dependence of the input power, at which thermal roll-over occurs, on the thermal resistance of the device. This requires minimization of the substrate thickness and optimization of the design and placement of the heatsink. Dependence of the model results on the radiative and non-radiative carrier recombination lifetimes and cavity losses are evaluated.

  11. Experimental results on the enhanced backscatter phenomenon and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Nelson, William; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    Enhanced backscatter effects have long been predicted theoretically and experimentally demonstrated. The reciprocity of a turbulent channel generates a group of paired rays with identical trajectory and phase information that leads to a region in phase space with double intensity and scintillation index. Though simulation work based on phase screen models has demonstrated the existence of the phenomenon, few experimental results have been published describing its characteristics, and possible applications of the enhanced backscatter phenomenon are still unclear. With the development of commercially available high powered lasers and advanced cameras with high frame rates, we have successfully captured the enhanced backscatter effects from different reflection surfaces. In addition to static observations, we have also tilted and pre-distorted the transmitted beam at various frequencies to track the dynamic properties of the enhanced backscatter phenomenon to verify its possible application in guidance and beam and image correction through atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, experimental results will be described, and discussions on the principle and applications of the phenomenon will be included. Enhanced backscatter effects are best observed in certain levels of turbulence (Cn 2≍10-13 m-2/3), and show significant potential for providing self-guidance in beam correction that doesn't introduce additional costs (unlike providing a beacon laser). Possible applications of this phenomenon include tracking fast moving object with lasers, long distance (>1km) alignment, and focusing a high-power corrected laser beam over long distances.

  12. Experimental results from an airborne static Fourier transform imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ferrec, Yann; Taboury, Jean; Sauer, Hervé; Chavel, Pierre; Fournet, Pierre; Coudrain, Christophe; Deschamps, Joël; Primot, Jérôme

    2011-10-20

    A high étendue static Fourier transform spectral imager has been developed for airborne use. This imaging spectrometer, based on a Michelson interferometer with rooftop mirrors, is compact and robust and benefits from a high collection efficiency. Experimental airborne images were acquired in the visible domain. The processing chain to convert raw images to hyperspectral data is described, and airborne spectral images are presented. These experimental results show that the spectral resolution is close to the one expected, but also that the signal to noise ratio is limited by various phenomena (jitter, elevation fluctuations, and one parasitic image). We discuss the origin of those limitations and suggest solutions to circumvent them. PMID:22015418

  13. Design and experimental results for the S814 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    A 24-percent-thick airfoil, the S814, for the root region of a horizontal-axis wind-turbine blade has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement with the exception of maximum lift which is overpredicted. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the higher maximum lift and the lower profile drag of the S814 airfoil, thus confirming the achievement of the objectives.

  14. Experimental results on spin physics at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The AGS ran with polarized protons towards the end of 1985 and through the first two months of 1986. This comprised commissioning periods interleaved with two runs for physics at 13.5 GeV/c with beam polarization of 50 to 60%, and 18.5 GeV/c with an average beam polarization of 40%. Later, the AGS polarized beam reached peak energy of 22 GeV/c and polarization of 46%. This article describes the various spin related experimental efforts since the VI Symposium at Marseille. These will be grouped into those using unpolarized beams and the rest are the polarized proton beam users. Afterwards the future of the program is described as extensions of current experiments in addition to other measurements that are yet to be proposed.

  15. Experimental study of radiometric forces with comparison to computational results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, Nathaniel P.

    A study of the radiometric forces on heated plates has been conducted both experimentally and computationally. The experiments were carried out at USC in two vacuum chambers up to a maximum pressure of 6 Pa for various carrier gases. The computations were performed with both the DSMC and ES-BGK methods for a 2-D gas flow over a comparable range of pressures. It is shown that the radiometric devices provide maximum force at a Knudsen number approximating 0.1. Of the various gases tested, helium provides the largest peak force. Qualitatively, the experimental data and computational results are similar. A lack of experimental data on gas-surface accommodation and flow three-dimensionality yields up to a 40% difference in the magnitude of the measured and computed forces, but it is shown that this discrepancy can be used to predict accommodation values. Comparison of four geometric configurations has shown that the effect of the area is significant at pressures up to where the force is maximum. It is also demonstrated that the size of the chamber in which the radiometer resides is of primary importance, where the chamber dimensions are inversely related to the generated force. Finally, simulation of multi-vane configurations have shown that the optimal spacing of vanes can be tailored for specific uses; for maximum force production a tight spacing should be used, while maximum efficiency requires spacing on the order of a vane dimension. While the results so far are encouraging, they are far from complete. Further improvements would include: a new experimental setup to reduce uncertainty with highly accurate temperature control and measurement, an in situ way to prepare the surface as well as measure its cleanliness, and an in depth iterative computational study observing the impact of multiple radiometer vanes at numerous seperations.

  16. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  17. Experimental feature in the primary-proton flux at energies above 10 TeV according to the results of searches for primary particles in nuclear emulsions exposed in the stratosphere (RUNJOB Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2008-02-15

    In the RUNJOB experiment, a long-term exposure of x-ray emulsion chambers in the stratosphere from 1995 to 1999 with the aim of studying the composition and spectra of primary cosmic particles in the energy range 10-1000 TeV per nucleon revealed about 50% proton tracks. The remaining events of the proton group did not feature any candidate for a track of a singly charged particle within the search region determined from measurements of the coordinates of background nuclei going close to the sought track. Methodological factors that could explain this experimental observation are considered. A possible physical reason associated with the presence of a neutral component in the flux of primary protons in the energy region above 10 TeV is also analyzed.

  18. Experimental results on the atmospheric muon charge ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, N.

    2016-07-01

    The atmospheric muon charge ratio, defined as the number of positive over negative charged muons, is a highly informative observable both for cosmic rays and particle physics. It allows studying the features of high-energy hadronic interactions in the forward region and the composition of primary cosmic rays. In this review results from underground experiments measuring the charge ratio around 1 TeV are discussed. The measurements in the TeV energy region constrain the associated kaon production, which is particularly important e.g. for the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux.

  19. Comparison of Calculated and Experimental Results for a Boiling/Condensing Experimental Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Felde, David K

    2016-01-01

    A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is being developed. Details of this facility have been presented before [1, 2]. A prototype of this facility, the Thermo-Syphon Test Loop (TSTL) has been built and experimental data have been obtained and analyzed [3, 4]. Pre-test calculations for this facility with the RELAP5-3D code [5] have been presented previously [6] as well as other calculations [7, 8] with the TRACE code [9]. The results of both codes were very different [7]. RELAP5-3D predicted much higher pressures and temperatures than TRACE. This paper compares calculated results with the TSTL experimental data.

  20. Experimental results concerning global observables from the CERN SPS heavy ion program

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G.R.

    1990-06-01

    A brief overview is given of experimental results obtained during the initial operation of the heavy-ion program at the CERN SPS during the period 1986--1988. This paper confines itself to a presentation of results on so-called global observables, such as energy flow and multiplicity distributions, and on information extracted from them. Of particular interest among the latter are an estimate of the magnitude and spatial distribution of the energy density attained. 3 refs., 27 figs.

  1. Large aperture spatial heterodyne imaging spectrometer: Principle and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiangli, Bin; Cai, Qisheng; Du, Shusong

    2015-12-01

    A large aperture spatial heterodyne imaging spectrometer (LASHIS) is proposed. It is a kind of pushbroom Fourier transform ultraspectral imager with no moving parts. This imaging spectrometer, based on a Sagnac lateral shearing interferometer combined with a pair of gratings, has the advantages of high spectral resolution, high throughput and robustness. The principle of LASHIS and its spectral retrieval method are introduced. The processing chain to convert raw images to ultraspectral datacube is also described. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolving power of LASHIS with the emission spectrum of a low pressure sodium lamp.

  2. Comparison of computational and experimental results for a supercritical airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A computational investigation was performed to study the flow over a supercritical airfoil model. Solutions were obtained for steady-state transonic flow conditions using a thin-layer Navier-Stokes flow solver. The results from this computational study were compared with time-averaged experimental data obtained over a wide Reynolds number range at transonic speeds in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Comparisons were made at a nominal Mach number of 0.72 and at Reynolds numbers ranging from 6 x 10(exp 6) to 35 x 10(exp 6).

  3. ANOVA parameters influence in LCF experimental data and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delprete, C.; Sesanaa, R.; Vercelli, A.

    2010-06-01

    The virtual design of components undergoing thermo mechanical fatigue (TMF) and plastic strains is usually run in many phases. The numerical finite element method gives a useful instrument which becomes increasingly effective as the geometrical and numerical modelling gets more accurate. The constitutive model definition plays an important role in the effectiveness of the numerical simulation [1, 2] as, for example, shown in Figure 1. In this picture it is shown how a good cyclic plasticity constitutive model can simulate a cyclic load experiment. The component life estimation is the subsequent phase and it needs complex damage and life estimation models [3-5] which take into account of several parameters and phenomena contributing to damage and life duration. The calibration of these constitutive and damage models requires an accurate testing activity. In the present paper the main topic of the research activity is to investigate whether the parameters, which result to be influent in the experimental activity, influence the numerical simulations, thus defining the effectiveness of the models in taking into account of all the phenomena actually influencing the life of the component. To obtain this aim a procedure to tune the parameters needed to estimate the life of mechanical components undergoing TMF and plastic strains is presented for commercial steel. This procedure aims to be easy and to allow calibrating both material constitutive model (for the numerical structural simulation) and the damage and life model (for life assessment). The procedure has been applied to specimens. The experimental activity has been developed on three sets of tests run at several temperatures: static tests, high cycle fatigue (HCF) tests, low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests. The numerical structural FEM simulations have been run on a commercial non linear solver, ABAQUS®6.8. The simulations replied the experimental tests. The stress, strain, thermal results from the thermo structural FEM

  4. Experimental and simulational result multipactors in 112 MHz QWR injector

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Brutus, J. C.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.

    2015-05-03

    The first RF commissioning of 112 MHz QWR superconducting electron gun was done in late 2014. The coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) and Cathode Stalk (stalk) were installed and tested for the first time. During this experiment, we observed several multipacting barriers at different gun voltage levels. The simulation work was done within the same range. The comparison between the experimental observation and the simulation results are presented in this paper. The observations during the test are consisted with the simulation predictions. We were able to overcome most of the multipacting barriers and reach 1.8 MV gun voltage under pulsed mode after several round of conditioning processes.

  5. Sheet Hydroforming Process Numerical Model Improvement Through Experimental Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Papadia; Antonio, Del Prete; Alfredo, Anglani

    2010-06-01

    The increasing application of numerical simulation in metal forming field has helped engineers to solve problems one after another to manufacture a qualified formed product reducing the required time [1]. Accurate simulation results are fundamental for the tooling and the product designs. The wide application of numerical simulation is encouraging the development of highly accurate simulation procedures to meet industrial requirements. Many factors can influence the final simulation results and many studies have been carried out about materials [2], yield criteria [3] and plastic deformation [4,5], process parameters [6] and their optimization. In order to develop a reliable hydromechanical deep drawing (HDD) numerical model the authors have been worked out specific activities based on the evaluation of the effective stiffness of the blankholder structure [7]. In this paper after an appropriate tuning phase of the blankholder force distribution, the experimental activity has been taken into account to improve the accuracy of the numerical model. In the first phase, the effective capability of the blankholder structure to transfer the applied load given by hydraulic actuators to the blank has been explored. This phase ended with the definition of an appropriate subdivision of the blankholder active surface in order to take into account the effective pressure map obtained for the given loads configuration. In the second phase the numerical results obtained with the developed subdivision have been compared with the experimental data of the studied model. The numerical model has been then improved, finding the best solution for the blankholder force distribution.

  6. Recent Experimental Results from Cryogenic Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hu, S. X.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Shvarts, D.

    2008-11-01

    The implosion performance of energy-scaled cryogenic D2 and DT targets on the 60-beam OMEGA laser is important for understanding the physics of highly compressed fuel and the validation of ignition designs for the NIF. Recent experiments have demonstrated good performance using a multi-shock drive that has been tuned based on cryogenic cone-in-shell targets. Fuel areal densities are now consistently exceeding 80% of the 1-D prediction, while the yields are between 10% and 20% of 1-D predictions. These results demonstrate the benefit (and necessity) of an independent shock-timing platform. This talk will present the latest implosion performance results and potentially show the first cryogenic-fuel-core radiographs using a short pulse beam from the new OMEGA EP Laser Facility. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  7. Single And Double Pulse Irradiation And Comparison With Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fornarini, L.; Fantoni, R.; Colao, F.; Santagata, A.; Teghil, R.

    2009-09-27

    A theoretical model of laser ablation has been previously developed and applied to Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of bronzes with the aim to improve quantitative results and to focus on problems arising in the interpretation of experimental data. The model describes laser-solid matter interaction, plume expansion, plasma formation and laser-plasma interaction. A two temperature approach has been also introduced to take into account the initial temperature dynamics of the alloy surface upon ultra-short laser irradiation. We examined various target compositions, typical of archaeological artworks, and different laser characteristics such as wavelength (355 nm, 530 nm, 1064 nm) and pulse duration (8 ns, 250 fs). In this work, the model has been extended to simulate double pulse LIBS configuration in order to clarify the mechanism involved in the process and for better interpreting the experimental data. Plasma composition, relevant parameters (temperature, electron density) and their kinetic evolutions have been measured. Results have been compared with the simulation obtained using the same irradiation conditions and set of targets.

  8. Some new experimental results on the Zr Nb Fe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, C.; Saragovi, C.; Granovsky, M. S.

    2007-06-01

    The scope of this study is the identification and characterization of intermetallic phases and their binary and ternary fields in the Zr-Nb-Fe phase diagram. A construction of the central region of the phase diagram at 900 °C was proposed using new experimental results obtained by optical and scanning electron microscopies, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. In addition to the well-known Laves C15-type (ZrNb)Fe 2 phase (the polytypic C14 and C36 structures were not detected in the studied compositions), another Laves C14-type phase was found (Zr(NbFe) 2). Watson and Bennett maps helped to predict the occurrence of both of these phases. Moreover, the validity of the Pettifor prediction model for Laves phases in pseudobinary systems with transition elements was checked, verifying the obtained experimental results in the Zr-Nb-Fe system. On the other hand it was determined that the Zr-Nb-Fe ternary system at 900 °C, as it happens in the binary Zr-Nb system, would have a miscibility gap (β-Zr + β-Nb) in the 25-70 at.% Nb composition range, accepting up to 3 at.% Fe approximately.

  9. Atmospheric turbulence correction using digital holographic detection: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Marron, Joseph C; Kendrick, Richard L; Seldomridge, Nathan; Grow, Taylor D; Höft, Thomas A

    2009-07-01

    The performance of long distance imaging systems is typically degraded by phase errors imparted by atmospheric turbulence. In this paper we apply coherent imaging methods to determine, and remove, these phase errors by digitally processing coherent recordings of the image data. In this manner we are able to remove the effects of atmospheric turbulence without needing a conventional adaptive optical system. Digital holographic detection is used to record the coherent, complex-valued, optical field for a series of atmospheric and object realizations. Correction of atmospheric phase errors is then based on maximizing an image sharpness metric to determine the aberrations present and correct the underlying image. Experimental results that demonstrate image recovery in the presence of turbulence are presented. Results obtained with severe turbulence that gives rise to anisoplanatism are also presented. PMID:19582079

  10. Electrical and thermal behavior of unsaturated soils: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouveau, Marie; Grandjean, Gilles; Leroy, Philippe; Philippe, Mickael; Hedri, Estelle; Boukcim, Hassan

    2016-05-01

    When soil is affected by a heat source, some of its properties are modified, and in particular, the electrical resistivity due to changes in water content. As a result, these changes affect the thermal properties of soil, i.e., its thermal conductivity and diffusivity. We experimentally examine the changes in electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity for four soils with different grain size distributions and clay content over a wide range of temperatures, from 20 to 100 °C. This temperature range corresponds to the thermal conditions in the vicinity of a buried high voltage cable or a geothermal system. Experiments were conducted at the field scale, at a geothermal test facility, and in the laboratory using geophysical devices and probing systems. The results show that the electrical resistivity decreases and the thermal conductivity increases with temperature up to a critical temperature depending on soil types. At this critical temperature, the air volume in the pore space increases with temperature, and the resulting electrical resistivity also increases. For higher temperatures , the thermal conductivity increases sharply with temperature up to a second temperature limit. Beyond it, the thermal conductivity drops drastically. This limit corresponds to the temperature at which most of the water evaporates from the soil pore space. Once the evaporation is completed, the thermal conductivity stabilizes. To explain these experimental results, we modeled the electrical resistivity variations with temperature and water content in the temperature range 20 - 100°C, showing that two critical temperatures influence the main processes occurring during heating at temperatures below 100 °C.

  11. Registration of multimodal brain images: some experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-mei; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2002-03-01

    Joint histogram of two images is required to uniquely determine the mutual information between the two images. It has been pointed out that, under certain conditions, existing joint histogram estimation algorithms like partial volume interpolation (PVI) and linear interpolation may result in different types of artifact patterns in the MI based registration function by introducing spurious maxima. As a result, the artifacts may hamper the global optimization process and limit registration accuracy. In this paper we present an extensive study of interpolation-induced artifacts using simulated brain images and show that similar artifact patterns also exist when other intensity interpolation algorithms like cubic convolution interpolation and cubic B-spline interpolation are used. A new joint histogram estimation scheme named generalized partial volume estimation (GPVE) is proposed to eliminate the artifacts. A kernel function is involved in the proposed scheme and when the 1st order B-spline is chosen as the kernel function, it is equivalent to the PVI. A clinical brain image database furnished by Vanderbilt University is used to compare the accuracy of our algorithm with that of PVI. Our experimental results show that the use of higher order kernels can effectively remove the artifacts and, in cases when MI based registration result suffers from the artifacts, registration accuracy can be improved significantly.

  12. Solving and Learning Soft Temporal Constraints: Experimental Setting and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, F.; Sperduti, A.; Venable, K. B.; Khatib, L.; Morris, P.; Morris, R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Soft temporal constraints problems allow to describe in a natural way scenarios where events happen over time and preferences are associated to event distances and durations. However, sometimes such local preferences are difficult to set, and it may be easier instead to associate preferences to some complete solutions of the problem. Machine learning techniques can be useful in this respect. In this paper we describe two solvers (one more general and the other one more efficient) for tractable subclasses of soft temporal problems, and we show some experimental results. The random generator used to build the problems on which tests are performed is also described. We also compare the two solvers highlighting the tradeoff between performance and representational power. Finally, we present a learning module and we show its behavior on randomly-generated examples.

  13. Physical mechanism of comet outbursts - An experimental result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to an experimental investigation of the physical mechanism of comet outbursts which is consistent with the general picture of mantle presence on comets and clarifies the relation of mantles to eruptive activity. The experiment and closeup observation of Comet P/Halley suggest a result different from most mathematical models in that the release of gas pressure does not occur only from uniform gas flow out of the entire surface. In some active comets near perihelion within a few AU of the sun, gas production rates and disturbance of the surface may be so high that the outflow is nearly continuous, with the regolith being entirely stripped away, as in many of the models. The present model provides a cyclic eruption and recharge mechanism which is lacking in most other models.

  14. Beta decay and the origins of biological chirality - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary experimental results are presented of an investigation of the possible role of preferential radiolysis by electrons emitted in the beta decay of radionuclides, a parity-nonconserving process, in the universal causation of the optical activity of biological compounds. Experiments were designed to measure the asymmetry in the production of triplet positronium upon the bombardment of an amino acid powder target by a collimated beam of positrons as positron helicity or target chirality is reversed. No asymmetry down to a level of 0.0007 is found in experiments on the D and L forms of cystine and tryptophan, indicating an asymmetry in positronium formation cross section of less than 0.01, while an asymmetry of 0.0031 is found for leucine, corresponding to a formation cross section asymmetry of about 0.04

  15. Robotic follower experimentation results: ready for FCS increment I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaczkowski, Jeffrey J.

    2003-09-01

    Robotics is a fundamental enabling technology required to meet the U.S. Army's vision to be a strategically responsive force capable of domination across the entire spectrum of conflict. The U. S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Tank Automotive Research, Development & Engineering Center (TARDEC), in partnership with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, is developing a leader-follower capability for Future Combat Systems. The Robotic Follower Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) utilizes a manned leader to provide a highlevel proofing of the follower's path, which operates with minimal user intervention. This paper will give a programmatic overview and discuss both the technical approach and operational experimentation results obtained during testing conducted at Ft. Bliss, New Mexico in February-March 2003.

  16. Object impedance control for cooperative manipulation - Theory and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stanley A.; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic control module being developed in the Dynamic and Strategic Control of Cooperative Manipulators (DASCCOM) project at the Stanford University Aerospace Robotics Laboratory is described. First, the cooperative manipulation problem is analyzed from a systems perspective, and the desirable features of a control system for cooperative manipulation are discussed. Next, a control policy is developed that enforces a controlled impedance not of the individual arm endpoints, but of the manipulated object itself. A parallel implementation for a multiprocessor system is presented. The controller fully compensates for the system dynamics and directly controls the object internal forces. Most importantly, it presents a simple, powerful, intuitive interface to the strategic controller. Experimental results for a dual two-link arm robotic system are presented to verify the controllers performance, for both free-motion slews and environmental contact.

  17. Experimental Results of Rover-Based Coring and Caching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G.; Younse, Paulo; DiCicco, Matthew; Hudson, Nicolas; Collins, Curtis; Allwood, Abigail; Paolini, Robert; Male, Cason; Ma, Jeremy; Steele, Andrew; Conrad, Pamela G.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for experiments performed using a prototype rover-based sample coring and caching system. The system consists of a rotary percussive coring tool on a five degree-of-freedom manipulator arm mounted on a FIDO-class rover and a sample caching subsystem mounted on the rover. Coring and caching experiments were performed in a laboratory setting and in a field test at Mono Lake, California. Rock abrasion experiments using an abrading bit on the coring tool were also performed. The experiments indicate that the sample acquisition and caching architecture is viable for use in a 2018 timeframe Mars caching mission and that rock abrasion using an abrading bit may be feasible in place of a dedicated rock abrasion tool.

  18. Integrated radar-camera security system: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Palka, N.; Trzcinski, T.; Dulski, R.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.

    2011-06-01

    The nature of the recent military conflicts and terrorist attacks along with the necessity to protect bases, convoys and patrols have made a serious impact on the development of more effective security systems. Current widely-used perimeter protection systems with zone sensors will soon be replaced with multi-sensor systems. Multi-sensor systems can utilize day/night cameras, IR uncooled thermal cameras, and millimeter-wave radars which detect radiation reflected from targets. Ranges of detection, recognition and identification for all targets depend on the parameters of the sensors used and of the observed scene itself. In this paper two essential issues connected with multispectral systems are described. We will focus on describing the autonomous method of the system regarding object detection, tracking, identification, localization and alarm notifications. We will also present the possibility of configuring the system as a stationary, mobile or portable device as in our experimental results.

  19. Experimental results to study astrophysical plasma jets using Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupias, B.; Gregory, C. D.; Falize, E.; Waugh, J.; Seiichi, D.; Pikuz, S.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Ravasio, A.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Barroso, P.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Nazarov, W.; Takabe, H.; Sakawa, Y.; Woolsey, N.; Koenig, M.

    2009-08-01

    We present experimental results of plasma jet, interacted with an ambient medium, using intense lasers to investigate the complex features of astrophysical jets. This experiment was performed in France at the LULI facility, Ecole Polytechnique, using one long pulse laser to generate the jet and a short pulse laser to probe it by proton radiography. A foam filled cone target was used to generate high velocity plasma jet, and a gas jet nozzle produced the well known ambient medium. Using visible pyrometry and interferometry, we were able to measure the jet velocity and electronic density. We get a panel of measurements at various gas density and time delay. From these measurements, we could underline the growth of a perturbed shape of the jet interaction with the ambient medium. The reason of this last observation is still in debate and will be presented in the article.

  20. Arm-free paraplegic standing--Part II: Experimental results.

    PubMed

    Matjacić, Z; Bajd, T

    1998-06-01

    In Part I, we proposed an approach for restoring unsupported standing to thoracic-level paraplegics. The theoretical analysis and simulation of an underactuated double inverted pendulum, representing the standing subject, showed that arm-free standing might be achieved. Here in Part II, we present the mechanical apparatus which we used in our experiments and experimental results from tests of the balance-control strategy. We demonstrate that an intact and a paraplegic subject could perform quiet standing with the ankle stiffness set to 8 Nm/degree or even less (the intact subject). Both were also able to recover from disturbances, imposed by the artificial ankle joint of the apparatus. Introducing cognitive auditory feedback greatly improved the standing abilities of both subjects. PMID:9631321

  1. Object impedance control for cooperative manipulation - Theory and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stanley A.; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamic control module of the Dynamic and Strategic Control of Cooperating Manipulators (DASCCOM) project at Stanford University's Aerospace Robotics Laboratory. First, the cooperative manipulation problem is analyzed from a systems perspective, and the desirable features of a control system for cooperative manipulation are discussed. Next, a control policy is developed that enforces a controlled impedance not of the individual arm endpoints, but of the manipulated object itself. A parallel implementation for a multiprocessor system is presented. The controller fully compensates for the system dynamics and directly controls the object internal forces. Most importantly, it presents a simple, powerful, intuitive interface to higher level strategic control modules. Experimental results from a dual two-link-arm robotic system are used to compare the object impedance controller with other strategies, both for free-motion slews and environmental contact.

  2. Amplified energy harvester from footsteps: design, modeling, and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Chen, Wusi; Guzman, Plinio; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling and experimental analysis of an amplified footstep energy harvester. With the unique design of amplified piezoelectric stack harvester the kinetic energy generated by footsteps can be effectively captured and converted into usable DC power that could potentially be used to power many electric devices, such as smart phones, sensors, monitoring cameras, etc. This doormat-like energy harvester can be used in crowded places such as train stations, malls, concerts, airport escalator/elevator/stairs entrances, or anywhere large group of people walk. The harvested energy provides an alternative renewable green power to replace power requirement from grids, which run on highly polluting and global-warming-inducing fossil fuels. In this paper, two modeling approaches are compared to calculate power output. The first method is derived from the single degree of freedom (SDOF) constitutive equations, and then a correction factor is applied onto the resulting electromechanically coupled equations of motion. The second approach is to derive the coupled equations of motion with Hamilton's principle and the constitutive equations, and then formulate it with the finite element method (FEM). Experimental testing results are presented to validate modeling approaches. Simulation results from both approaches agree very well with experimental results where percentage errors are 2.09% for FEM and 4.31% for SDOF.

  3. Experimental Results for Titan Aerobot Thermo-Mechanical Subsystem Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffrey L.; Jones, J. A.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Lachenmeier, T.; Mahr, P.; Pauken, M.; Plett, G. A.; Smith, L.; VanLuvender, M. L.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes experimental results from a development program focused in maturing Titan aerobot technology in the areas of mechanical and thermal subsystems. Results from four key activities are described: first, a cryogenic balloon materials development program involving coupon and cylinder tests and culminating in the fabrication and testing of an inflated 4.6 m long prototype blimp at 93 K; second, a combined lab experiment and numerical simulation effort to assess potential problems resulting from radioisotope thermal generator waste heat generation near an inflated blimp; third, an aerial deployment and inflation development program consisting of laboratory and helicopter drop tests on a near full scale (11 m long) prototype blimp; and fourth, a proof of concept experiment demonstrating the viability of using a mechanically steerable high gain antenna on a floating blimp to perform direct to Earth telecommunications from Titan. The paper provides details on all of these successful activities and discusses their impact on the overall effort to produce mature systems technology for future Titan aerobot missions.

  4. Experimental Progress and Results of a Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuele, Rocco; Wallace, J. Kent; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Shao, Mike; Levine, B. Martin; Fregoso, Santos

    2007-01-01

    The crux of visible exoplanet detection is overcoming significant star-planet contrast ratios on the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -10)-at very small angular separations. We are developing an interferometric nulling coronagraph designed to achieve a 10(exp -6) contrast ratio at a working science bandpass of 20% visible light. Achieving large, broadband suppression requires a pseudo-achromatic phase flip, while maintaining a strict error budget. Recent results from our nulling interferometer testbed yield contrast ratios at the 1.05x10(exp -6) level, with a 15% visible bandpass. This result is at 65% of our final bandpass requirement, although limitations of our current configuration make major hardware changes essential to broadening the bandpass. We make the argument that broadening the bandpass should not necessarily adversely affect the null depth until beyond the 20% visible light level. Using the same setup we are able to reach monochromatic null depths of 1.11x10(exp -7) (?= 638 nm)averaged over three seconds. This paper will describe our experimental approach for achieving deep broadband nulls, as well as error considerations and limitations, and the most recent results for our nulling coronagraph testbed.

  5. Internal wave emission from baroclinic jets: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcia, Ion D.; Rodda, Costanza; Harlander, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale balanced flows can spontaneously radiate meso-scale inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) and are thus in fact unbalanced. While flow-dependent parameterizations for the radiation of IGWs from orographic and convective sources do exist, the situation is less developed for spontaneously emitted IGWs. Observations identify increased IGW activity in the vicinity of jet exit regions. A direct interpretation of those based on geostrophic adjustment might be tempting. However, directly applying this concept to the parameterization of spontaneous imbalance is difficult since the dynamics itself is continuously re-establishing an unbalanced flow which then sheds imbalances by GW radiation. Examining spontaneous IGW emission in the atmosphere and validating parameterization schemes confronts the scientist with particular challenges. Due to its extreme complexity, GW emission will always be embedded in the interaction of a multitude of interdependent processes, many of which are hardly detectable from analysis or campaign data. The benefits of repeated and more detailed measurements, while representing the only source of information about the real atmosphere, are limited by the non-repeatability of an atmospheric situation. The same event never occurs twice. This argues for complementary laboratory experiments, which can provide a more focused dialogue between experiment and theory. Indeed, life cycles are also examined in rotating-annulus laboratory experiments. Thus, these experiments might form a useful empirical benchmark for theoretical and modeling work that is also independent of any sort of subgrid model. In addition, the more direct correspondence between experimental and model data and the data reproducibility makes lab experiments a powerful testbed for parameterizations. Here we show first results from a small rotating annulus experiments and we will further present our new experimental facility to study wave emission from jets and fronts.

  6. Experimental results of an iodine plasma in PEGASES gridded thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    In the electric gridded thruster PEGASES, both positive and negative ions are expelled after extraction from an ion-ion plasma. This ion-ion plasma is formed downstream a localized magnetic field placed a few centimeters from the ionization region, trapping and cooling down the electron to allow a better attachment to an electronegative gas. For this thruster concept, iodine has emerged as the most attractive option. Heavy, under diatomic form and therefore good for high thrust, its low ionization threshold and high electronegativity lead to high ion-ion densities and low RF power. After the proof-of-concept of PEGASES using SF6 as propellant, we present here experimental results of an iodine plasma studied inside PEGASES thruster. At solid state at standard temperature and pressure, iodine is heated to sublimate, then injected inside the chamber where the neutral gas is heated and ionized. The whole injection system is heated to avoid deposition on surfaces and a mass flow controller allows a fine control on the neutral gas mass flow. A 3D translation stage inside the vacuum chamber allows volumetric plasma studies using electrostatic probes. The results are also compared with the global model dedicated to iodine as propellant for electric gridded thrusters. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@par project, and received financial state aid managed by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche, as part of the programme ``Investissements d'avenir.''

  7. Experimental Results of Guided Wave Travel Time Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Mast, Arjan; Bloom, Joost

    2010-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Both economical and social requirements are pushing the industry to even higher levels of availability, reliability and safety of installations. The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation is an interesting addition to the current method of periodic inspections reducing uncertainty and extending inspection intervals. Guided wave travel time tomography is a promising method to monitor the wall thickness quantitatively over large areas. Obviously the robustness and reliability of such a monitoring system is of paramount importance. Laboratory experiments have been carried out on a 10″ pipe with a nominal wall thickness of 8 mm. Multiple, inline defects have been created with a realistic morphology. The depth of the defects was increased stepwise from 0.5 mm to 2 mm. Additionally the influences of the presence of liquid inside the pipe and surface roughness have been evaluated as well. Experimental results show that this method is capable of providing quantitative wall thickness information over a distance of 4 meter, with a sufficient accuracy such that results can be used for trending. The method has no problems imaging multiple defects.

  8. Experimental results of a single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, X.J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Skaritka, J.

    1997-07-01

    A new iron dominated single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet was designed to be integrated with the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode rf Gun. This emittance compensated photoinjector is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. It has produced a 0.329 {+-} 0.012 pC, {tau}{sub 95%} = 10.9 psec electron bunches with a normalized rms transverse emittance of {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.17 {+-} 0.16 {pi} mm mrad. POISSON field maps were used with PARMELA to optimize the emittance compensation solenoidal magnet design. Magnetic field measurements show that at the cathode plane B{sub z} {le} 10 G for a peak magnetic field of B{sub z,max} = 3 kG. Which is in agreement with POISSON simulation. A single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet will produces an initial angular momentum of the electron bunch that manifests itself in a initial magnetic emittance term that cannot be eliminated. This magnetic emittance {epsilon}{sub n,rms}{sup mag} scales as 0.010 {pi} mm mrad/G as the cathode, which is in agreement with PARMELA simulations. Experimental beam dynamics results are presented that shows relative angular rotation and spot size as a function of cathode magnetic field. These results are compared to theory.

  9. Experimental results of guided wave travel time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Vos, Hendrik

    2012-05-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation matches very well with the objective to reduce cost while maintaining a high safety level. Guided waves are very attractive for permanent monitoring systems because it provides a wall thickness map in between two sensor rings. The wall thickness map provides quantitative information about the remaining wall thickness, location and extent of the corrosion. The performance of guided wave tomography has been evaluated experimentally assessing the sizing accuracy and the smallest corrosion spots that can be detected with this technology. The results show accurate sizing, with a sizing accuracy better than 10% of the nominal wall thickness. Additionally, the maximum distance between the transmitter and receiver rings and the presence of different coatings has been evaluated. The results demonstrate the robustness of the technology under a range of practical conditions.

  10. Breaking the resolution limit: an exciting experimental result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetti, Francesco

    2006-03-01

    For more than a century the possibility of imaging the structure of a medium with diffracting wavefields has been limited by the tradeoff between resolution and imaging depth. While long wavelengths can penetrate deep into a medium, the resolution limit precludes the possibility of observing subwavelength structures. Recent progress in microscopy has shown that by exploiting the super-oscillatory properties of evanescent fields, resolution several orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength can be achieved so leading to Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy. Based on a similar argument, this paper investigates the possibility of obtaining super resolution in the far-field (here far-field refers to a distance greater than λ, which would enable high resolution imaging at relatively large depth. The theoretical principles which result in the resolution limit are reviewed and a new strategy to overcome it is proposed. An advanced imaging algorithm for linear and two-dimensional array probing systems is presented and its capability of resolving targets as close as λ/3 is demonstrated experimentally, the targets being at several wavelength distance from the array. The results show that the method is superior to conventional techniques such as Synthetic Aperture Focusing, Synthetic Phased Arrays and Time Reversal.

  11. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  12. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. J. Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  13. Experimental Results of Integrated Refrigeration and Storage System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Jumper, K.

    2009-01-01

    Launch operations engineers at the Kennedy Space Center have identified an Integrated Refrigeration and Storage system as a promising technology to reduce launch costs and enable advanced cryogenic operations. This system uses a close cycle Brayton refrigerator to remove energy from the stored cryogenic propellant. This allows for the potential of a zero loss storage and transfer system, as well and control of the state of the propellant through densification or re-liquefaction. However, the behavior of the fluid in this type of system is different than typical cryogenic behavior, and there will be a learning curve associated with its use. A 400 liter research cryostat has been designed, fabricated and delivered to KSC to test the thermo fluid behavior of liquid oxygen as energy is removed from the cryogen by a simulated DC cycle cryocooler. Results of the initial testing phase focusing on heat exchanger characterization and zero loss storage operations using liquid oxygen are presented in this paper. Future plans for testing of oxygen densification tests and oxygen liquefaction tests will also be discussed. KEYWORDS: Liquid Oxygen, Refrigeration, Storage

  14. Design and experimental results of coaxial circuits for gyroklystron amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, M.K.E.; Lawson, W.; Cheng, J.; Calame, J.P.; Hogan, B.; Latham, P.E.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1994-12-31

    At the University of Maryland high power microwave source development for use in linear accelerator applications continues with the design and testing of coaxial circuits for gyroklystron amplifiers. This presentation will include experimental results from a coaxial gyroklystron that was tested on the current microwave test bed, and designs for second harmonic coaxial circuits for use in the next generation of the gyroklystron program. The authors present test results for a second harmonic coaxial circuit. Similar to previous second harmonic experiments the input cavity resonated at 9.886 GHz and the output frequency was 19.772 GHz. The coaxial insert was positioned in the input cavity and drift region. The inner conductor consisted of a tungsten rod with copper and ceramic cylinders covering its length. Two tungsten rods that bridged the space between the inner and outer conductors supported the whole assembly. The tube produced over 20 MW of output power with 17% efficiency. Beam interception by the tungsten rods resulted in minor damage. Comparisons with previous non-coaxial circuits showed that the coaxial configuration increased the parameter space over which stable operation was possible. Future experiments will feature an upgraded modulator and beam formation system capable of producing 300 MW of beam power. The fundamental frequency of operation is 8.568 GHz. A second harmonic coaxial gyroklystron circuit was designed for use in the new system. A scattering matrix code predicts a resonant frequency of 17.136 GHz and Q of 260 for the cavity with 95% of the outgoing microwaves in the desired TE032 mode. Efficiency studies of this second harmonic output cavity show 20% expected efficiency. Shorter second harmonic output cavity designs are also being investigated with expected efficiencies near 34%.

  15. Experimental Results in DIS, SIDIS and DES from Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Sebastian E.

    2011-07-15

    Jefferson Lab's electron accelerator in its present incarnation, with a maximum beam energy slightly above 6 GeV, has already enabled a large number of experiments expanding our knowledge of nucleon and nuclear structure (especially in Deep Inelastic Scattering--DIS--at moderately high x, and in the resonance region). Several pioneering experiments have yielded first results on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and other Deep Exclusive Processes (DES), and the exploration of the rich landscape of transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) structure functions using Semi-Inclusive electron scattering (SIDIS) has begun. With the upgrade of CEBAF to 12 GeV now underway, a significantly larger kinematic space will become available. The 12 GeV program taking shape will complete a detailed mapping of inclusive, TMD and generalized distribution functions for quarks, antiquarks and gluons in the valence region and beyond.

  16. Experimental Results in DIS, SIDIS and DES from Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2011-07-01

    Jefferson Lab's electron accelerator in its present incarnation, with a maximum beam energy slightly above 6 GeV, has already enabled a large number of experiments expanding our knowledge of nucleon and nuclear structure (especially in Deep Inelastic Scattering—DIS—at moderately high x, and in the resonance region). Several pioneering experiments have yielded first results on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and other Deep Exclusive Processes (DES), and the exploration of the rich landscape of transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) structure functions using Semi-Inclusive electron scattering (SIDIS) has begun. With the upgrade of CEBAF to 12 GeV now underway, a significantly larger kinematic space will become available. The 12 GeV program taking shape will complete a detailed mapping of inclusive, TMD and generalized distribution functions for quarks, antiquarks and gluons in the valence region and beyond.

  17. Preliminary Experimental Result of Magnetic Reconnection in Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. B.; Xie, J. L.; Hu, G. H.; Li, H.; Huang, G. L.; Liu, W. D.

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic reconnection is one of the most important physical processes in astrophysical plasmas. Lots of theoretical works, numerical simulations and observations have been done. Some experimental programs have been activated to investigate the basic mechanisms of magnetic reconnection. In order to investigate the electron dynamic near the electron diffusion region in magnetic reconnection process, an upgrade is accomplished in the LMP (Linear magnetic plasmas) device at University of Science and Technology of China. The magnetic field of reconnection is produced by passing two identical currents axially through two copper plates. Magnetic field and parallel electric field are measured by magnetic probes and emissive probes, respectively. The existence of a large electric field related to the reconnection process is verified. The plasma is driven by electric field and magnetic field, so the magnetic reconnection appears. The magnitude of axial current is found to scale with the number of passing particles. In the configuration of current bars, passing particles are even more and our measured axial current is about 10 A. Magnetic flux doesn't pile up because of the parameter region in our case, which is consistent with the result of numerical simulation.

  18. Medical waste to energy: experimental study

    PubMed Central

    ARCURI, C.; LUCIANI, F.; PIVA, P.; BARTULI, F.N.; OTTRIA, L.; MECHERI, B.; LICOCCIA, S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. Although waste is traditionally assessed as a pollutant which needs to be reduced or lessened, its management is certainly necessary. Nowadays, biological fuel cells, through the direct conversion of organic matter to electricity using biocatalysts, represent a technology able to produce sustainable energy by means of waste treatment. This study aims to propose a mean to generate energy from blood and saliva, that are common risk-infectious medical waste. Materials and methods. Material employed (purchased by Sigma-Aldrich) were: Glucose oxidase (GOx), Nafion perfluorinated resin solution at 5% in a mixture of lower aliphatic alcohols and water, Polyethylene oxide. Stock solutions of D (+) glucose were prepared in a 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution and stored at 4 °C for at least 24 h before use. Carbon cloth electrode ELAT HT 140 E-W with a platinum loading of 5 gm-2 was purchased by E-Tek. Electrospun Nafion fibers were obtained as follows. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the electrode morphologies. Results. In order to develop an effective immobilization strategy of GOx on the electrode surface, Nafion fibers (a fully fluorinated ion conducting polymer used as a membrane material in enzymatic fuel cells - EFC) were selected as immobilizing polymer matrix. In this work, exploiting the nafion fibers capability of being able to cathalize Gox activity, we have tried to produce an enzymatic fuel cell which could produce energy from the blood and the saliva within medical-dental waste. Conclusions. Medical waste refers to all those materials produced by the interaction among doctor and patient, such as blood and saliva. During our research we will try to complete an EFC prototype able to produce energy from blood and saliva inside the risk-infectious medical waste in order to contribute to the energy requirements of a consulting room. PMID:24971161

  19. Experimental results for an experimental condensation heat exchanger with a spiral minichanel tube. Comparison to numerical imulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peukert, P.; Hrubý, J.

    2013-04-01

    The paper describes new results for an experimental heat exchanger equipped with a single corrugated capillary tube, basic information about the measurements and the experimental setup. Some of the results were compared with numerical simulations.

  20. Can plumes collapse?: Experimental results and applications to Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2012-04-01

    Iceland has produced magma in a series of episodic events. From lava chemistry it has been inferred that the plume temperature decreased over the first 5 Myr by ~50°C and for the next 3 Myr following continental break up it continued to oscillate by ~25°C. Such data has been used to infer possible episodic collapse of the Iceland plume. Collapsing plumes are not common fluid dynamical features. In thermochemical plumes it is possible to achieve collapse by varying the relative buoyancy due to chemistry and due to temperature. In thermal plumes however, with a constant heat source we would expect plumes not to collapse but to not continue to rise after reaching a point of neutral buoyancy. We expect thermal plumes, like those Earth's bottom thermal boundary layer is capable of producing, to either rise to the surface or be deflected but not to collapse. We have designed an experimental setup to investigate the conditions that may lead to collapse in thermal plumes with constant heat sources. We used high-Prandtl number fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosities (Lyle Golden syrup and Liquidose 436) as analogues to Earth's high viscosity mantle in a cubic Plexiglas tank (26.5cm inner sides), heated by a circular 2cm diameter heater (flat with the base of the tank). We explored ΔTs between 3-60°C. The flow was visualized with shadowgraphs and an automated -3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) system to measure velocities. In Lyle's Golden Syrup collapse occurred at ΔTs as high as 8°C, while in Liquidose 436 the 8°C ΔT run showed only partial collapse. The difference is not unexpected given the different physical properties. Partial collapse was seen even for ΔTs as high as 50°C. Both complete and partial collapse manifested themselves as downwelling flow in the central part of the conduit. Collapse stopped in the hotter plumes when the downwelling fluid met the hottest part of the conduit. The observed results suggest that diffusive

  1. Can plumes collapse?: Experimental results and applications to Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Iceland has produced magma in a series of episodic events. From lava chemistry it has been inferred that the plume temperature decreased over the first 5 Myr by ~50°C and for the next 3 Myr following continental break up it continued to oscillate by ~25°C. Such data has been used to infer possible episodic collapse of the Iceland plume. Collapsing plumes are not common fluid dynamical features. In thermochemical plumes it is possible to achieve collapse by varying the relative buoyancy due to chemistry and due to temperature. In thermal plumes however, with a constant heat source we would expect plumes not to collapse but to not continue to rise after reaching a point of neutral buoyancy. We expect thermal plumes, like those Earth's bottom thermal boundary layer is capable of producing, to either rise to the surface or be deflected but not to collapse. We have designed an experimental setup to investigate the conditions that may lead to collapse in thermal plumes with constant heat sources. We used high-Prandtl number fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosities (Lyle Golden syrup and Liquidose 436) as analogues to Earth's high viscosity mantle in a cubic Plexiglas tank (26.5cm inner sides), heated by a circular 2cm diameter heater (flat with the base of the tank). We explored ΔTs between 3-60°C. The flow was visualized with shadowgraphs and an automated -3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) system to measure velocities. In Lyle's Golden Syrup collapse occurred at ΔTs as high as 8°C, while in Liquidose 436 the 8° ΔT run showed only partial collapse. The difference is not unexpected given the different physical properties. Partial collapse was seen even for ΔTs as high as 50°C. Both complete and partial collapse manifested themselves as downwelling flow in the central part of the conduit. Collapse stopped in the hotter plumes when the downwelling fluid met the hottest part of the conduit. The observed results suggest that diffusive

  2. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were in the following areas: (1) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e(+)e(-) analysis, and (bar-P) decay; (2) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the phi factory project; (3) theoretical high-energy physics; (4) H dibaryon search, search for K(sub L)(sup 0) yields (pi)(sup 0)(gamma)(gamma) and (pi)(sup 0)(nu)(bar-nu), and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (5) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (6) VLPC/scintillating fiber R & D.

  3. Dynamic Strength of Peridotite at Seismic Slip Rates: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, P.; di Toro, G.; Han, R.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.; Cocco, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ultramafic pseudotachylytes (solidified melts produced during seismic slip) decorate exhumed faults within the Balmuccia peridotite from the Ivrea zone (Italy). Unpublished studies suggest that these pseudotachylytes were produced in the upper-mantle/lower-crust. Kanamori et al. (1998) proposed extensive production of seismic melts during the Mw = 8.3 Bolivian 1994 deep focus (~600 km in depth) earthquake. It follows that seismic melting might occur in the mantle. We conducted high-velocity rock friction experiments with the Balmuccia peridotite to determine the dynamic strength of faults in the presence of ultramafic melts. During each experiment, shear stress evolved with displacement: after an initial peak shear stress, fault strength gradually decreased towards a steady-state value. Dynamic fault weakening was associated with the formation of a molten layer along the slipping zone. By performing experiments for increasing normal stresses (5 to 13 MPa) and slip rates (0.37÷1.14 m/s or ~seismic slip rates), steady-state shear stress (1) slightly increased with increasing normal stress and (2), for a given normal stress, decreased with increasing slip rate. The ratio between steady-state shear stress and normal stress was 0.13, well below the solid rock friction coefficient (~0.8). Experiments conducted under argon or fresh air flux yielded similar shear stress magnitudes, suggesting that olivine oxidation did not affect significantly the fault strength in the high-velocity experiments. The slight dependence of shear stress with normal stress suggests melt lubrication. Since the physics of melt lubrication is somehow predictable (see poster by Nielsen et al.), these experimental results might be extrapolated to the study of rupture dynamics in mantle rocks.

  4. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Terrance T; Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J; Zipfel, Gregory J; Brody, David L

    2015-09-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury-axonal injury-is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage, raising

  5. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L.; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury—axonal injury—is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage

  6. Comparison of kinetic theory predictions with experimental results for a vibrated three-dimensional granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, H.; Wildman, R. D.; Huntley, J. M.; Martin, T. W.

    2006-11-01

    The three-dimensional conservation equations relating energy and momentum transfer in a vibrated three-dimensional granular bed have been solved numerically by the finite element method. Two closures based on granular kinetic theory were used: one, the standard Fourier law relating heat flux to temperature gradient and the other, including an additional concentration gradient term. Each prediction of the two-dimensional axisymmetric granular temperature and packing fraction fields was compared against a one-dimensional model and three-dimensional experimental results, acquired using the technique of positron emission particle tracking. Both closures resulted in solutions that were in reasonable agreement with the experimental results, but it was found that differences between the predictions of each of the closures were relatively small in comparison to the anisotropy of the experimentally determined temperature distribution.

  7. Experimental measurement of energy density in a vibrating plate and comparison with energy finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navazi, H. M.; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, A.; Ghobad, Y.; Haddadpour, H.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a new method and formulation is presented for experimental measurement of energy density of high frequency vibrations of a plate. By use of the new proposed method and eight accelerometers, both kinetic and potential energy densities are measured. Also, a computer program is developed based on energy finite element method to evaluate the proposed method. For several points, the results of the developed experimental formulation are compared with those of the energy finite element analysis results. It is observed that, there is a good agreement between experimental results and analyses. Finally, another test setup with reduced accelerometer spacing was prepared and based on the comparison between kinetic and potential results, it is concluded that, the kinetic and potential counterparts of the energy density are equal in high frequency bands. Based on this conclusion, the measurement procedure was upgraded to an efficient and very simple one for high frequency ranges. According to the new test procedure, another experimental measurement was performed and the results had a good agreement with the EFEA results.

  8. Experimental study of low-energy charge transfer in nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A.

    1979-01-01

    Total charge transfer cross sections were obtained for the N2(+)-N2 system with relative translational ion energies between 9 and 441 eV. Data were obtained to examine the dependence of total cross section on ion energy. The effect of ion excitation on the cross sections was studied by varying the electron ionization energy in the mass spectrometer ion source over an electron energy range between 14.5 and 32.1 eV. The dependence of total cross section on the neutralization chamber gas pressure was examined by obtaining data at pressure values from 9.9 to 0.000199 torr. Cross section values obtained were compared with experimental and theoretical results of other investigations.

  9. Alkali Metal Backup Cooling for Stirling Systems - Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwendeman, Carl; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.

    2013-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 C temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 C temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental

  10. Alkali Metal Backup Cooling for Stirling Systems - Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwendeman, Carl; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.

    2013-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 degC temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 degC temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental

  11. Numerical and experimental studies of liquid storage tank thermal stratification for a solar energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S T; Han, S M

    1980-11-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of thermal stratification in liquid energy storage tanks for the performance of solar energy systems are presented. The investigation was divided into three areas: (1) Justification of the Importance of Thermal Stratification Inside the Energy Storage Tanks, (II) Development of a Simple Mathematical Model which is Compatible with Existing Solar Energy System Simulation Code, and (III) Validation of Mathematical Models by Experimental Data Obtained from Realistic Solar Energy System Operations.

  12. OPERA and MINOS Experimental Result Prove Big Bang Theory Invalid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressler, David E.

    2012-03-01

    The greatest error in the history of science is the misinterpretation of the Michelson-Morley Experiment. The speed of light was measured to travel at the same speed in all three directions (x, y, z axis) in ones own inertial reference system; however, c will always be measured as having an absolute different speed in all other inertial frames at different energy levels. Time slows down due to motion or a gravity field. Time is the rate of physical process. Speed = Distance/Time. If the time changes the distance must change. Therefore, BOTH mirrors must move towards the center of the interferometer and space must contract in all-three-directions; C-Space. Gravity is a C-Space condition, and is the cause of redshift in our universe-not motion. The universe is not expanding. OPERA results are directly indicated; at the surface of earth, the strength of the gravity field is at maximum-below the earth's surface, time and space is less distorted, C-Space; therefore, c is faster. Newtonian mechanics dictate that a spherical shell of matter at greater radii, with uniform density, produces no net force on an observer located centrally. An observer located on the sphere's surface, like our Earth's or a large sphere, like one located in a remote galaxy, will construct a picture centered on himself to be identical to the one centered inside the spherical shell of mass. Both observers will view the incoming radiation, emitted by the other observer, as redshifted, because they lay on each others radial line. The Universe is static and very old.

  13. Experimental results from a reverse flow annual combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, F. M.; Hattingh, H. V.

    Computer-predicted temperature distributions in the wall liners of a combustion chamber were compared to the experimentally obtained values from combustion tests carried out in a small, full-scale reverse-flow annular combustor at sea level take-off conditionns. The largest discrepancies between the measured and predicted linear temperatures occured in the primary zone, with most of the predictions falling above the measured values, and with neither of the two computer programs satisfying the accuracy of 4 percent (of the experimental values) needed for making estimates on the life of a combustor. On the other hand, the correlation between the measured and predicted liner pressure drop was satisfactory. The validity and usefulnes of simple computer models as aids in the design of gas turbine combustion chambers are discussed.

  14. CP Violation in B Meson Decays: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lanceri, Livio; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2005-08-30

    CP violation is intimately connected with the puzzle of matter-antimatter asymmetry and baryogenesis. In the Standard Model of particle physics, the observed CP violation phenomena are accounted for by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism involving a phase in the quark mixing matrix. This paper is devoted to a review of the experimental status of CP violation in the decays of B mesons.

  15. Experimental Results for an Annular Aerospike with Differential Throttling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.

    2005-01-01

    A) MSFC funded an internal study on Altitude Compensating Nozzles: 1) Develop an ACN design and performance prediction tool. 2) Design, build and test cold flow ACN nozzles. 3) An annular aerospike nozzle was designed and tested. 4) Incorporated differential throttling to assess Thrust Vector Control. B) Objective of the test hardware: 1) Provide design tool verification. 2) Provide benchmark data for CFD calculations. 3) Experimentally measure side force, or TVC, for a differentially throttled annular aerospike.

  16. Experimental results on combined ultraviolet-proton excitation of moon rock luminescence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    The experimental results reported indicate that a small synergistic effect may exist between near-UV radiation and solar-wind-energy protons in solar radiation that could slightly enhance luminescence generation on the moon's surface. The magnitude of the effect, however, is far too small to account for the apparent orders-of-magnitude discrepancy between reported telescope measurements of lunar luminescence and the limitation of lunar luminescence intensity based on lab studies of moon rocks.

  17. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  18. Recent experimental results from a long-pulse J-band relativistic klystron amplifier developmental effort

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, K.G.; Crouch, D.D.; Sar, D.R.; Speciale, R.A.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent experimental results, supporting simulations, and design modeling are presented from a developmental effort to a produce a long pulse ({approximately}1{mu}s) J-band (5.85-8.2 GHz) relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) of the high current NRL genealogy. This RKA is designed to operate at approximately 6.6 GHz, with a desired RF output {approximately}700 MW. Conversion of electron beam energy to microwave energy is obtained by a mock magnetically insulated coaxial converter which, in various incarnations, can be made to be either a cavity gap extractor or an inverse cathode.

  19. Experimental overview of Generalized Parton Distribution results from HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Zihlmann, B.

    2009-08-04

    Over the course of more than a decade the HERMES experiment has accumulated a wealth of data with electron and positron beams on various gaseous targets from Hydrogen up to Xenon. In addition, the beams and targets can be polarized. This data set is viewed in the context of Generalized Parton Distributions, a theoretical formalism with an explicit three dimensional view of the structure of the nucleon. It provides a link between experimental observables and the total angular momentum of the quarks in the nucleon.

  20. RFI in hybrid loops - Simulation and experimental results.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemer, R. E.; Nelson, D. R.; Raghavan, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    A digital simulation of an imperfect second-order hybrid phase-locked loop (HPLL) operating in radio frequency interference (RFI) is described. Its performance is characterized in terms of phase error variance and phase error probability density function (PDF). Monte-Carlo simulation is used to show that the HPLL can be superior to the conventional phase-locked loops in RFI backgrounds when minimum phase error variance is the goodness criterion. Similar experimentally obtained data are given in support of the simulation data.

  1. Optimal active vibration absorber - Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  2. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  3. Experimental Studies of Ion Beam Neutralization: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, N.; Polansky, J.; Downey, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    A testing platform is designed to study ion beam neutralization in the mesothermal, collisionless region. In the experimental setup, argon neutrals were ionized in a microwave cavity and accelerated by a plasma lens system which was biased to 2500 V above the system ground. Electrons were boiled off from two hot tungsten filaments to neutralize the ion beam. The plasma is diagnosed using Langmuir probe and Faraday probe. A 3-D traversing system and a complete data acquisition loop were developed to efficiently measure 3-D beam profile. Preliminary measurements of beam profiles are presented for different operating conditions.

  4. Titanium as reactor material for SCWO applications. First experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Boukis, N.; Friedrich, C.; Dinjus, E.

    1998-12-31

    According to literature data, nickel base alloys are not sufficiently corrosion resistant in chloride bearing SCWO environments. Titanium was proposed several times as a suitable material for the construction of a corrosion resistant reactor. Titanium does not show the required mechanical strength for high temperature high pressure applications and it can only be used to form liners for an SCWO apparatus. Therefore, pressure tubes made of alloy 625 were lined with titanium grade 2. Additionally corrosion tests with coupons made of titanium grades 2, 5, 7, 12 and {beta}-C were performed. The coupons were placed inside an alumina-lined reactor. Materials were exposed to simulated SCWO feeds consisting of water, oxygen and HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, or H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Experimental temperatures were up to 600 C, pressures up to 27 MPa and experimental times up to 200 hours. Corrosion in chloride containing solution is low. In the presence of sulfate or phosphate, corrosion of titanium grade 2 becomes severe. For these environments an upper limit of the corrosion rate could be estimated.

  5. Experimental determination of ice sublimation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, R.; Canto, J.; Satorre, M. A.; Domingo, M.

    2011-11-01

    In Astrophysics, the study of ices is important due to the wide range of scenarios in which they are present. Their physical and chemical characteristics play an important role in the study of the interstellar medium (ISM). The assessment of the energy of sublimation allows us to improve our understanding of physical and/or chemical processes that take place where ices are present. The energy of sublimation E_sub is defined as the change of energy between solid and gas phase of certain molecule. This value is important to determinate other thermodynamical parameters such as the reticular energy of ionic compounds, the energy of formation in gas phase from the energy of formation in condensed phase, or to estimate the sublimation rate, which is very important in determining the evolution of surfaces of astrophysical objects.

  6. Fracture mechanics analysis of composite microcracking - Experimental results in fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, J. A.; Liu, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Nairn (1989) variational mechanics analysis, which yields the energy release rate of a microcrack's formation between two existing microcracks, has proven useful in the fracture mechanics interpretation of cross-ply laminates' microcracking. Attention is presently given to the application of this energy release rate analysis to a fracture mechanics-based interpretation of microcrack formation during fatigue loading, for the case of fatigue experiments on three layups of Avimid K/IM6 laminates and four layups of Fiberite 934/T300 laminates. The single master Paris-law plot onto which the data from all layups of a given material system fall is claimed to offer a complete characterization of that system's microcrack-formation resistance during fatigue loading.

  7. Experimental results for a microscale ethanol vapor jet ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, W. G.; Jaworski, J. W.; Camacho, A. P.; Protz, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    A microscale jet ejector driven by ethanol vapor is designed and tested to induce a suction draft using a supersonic converging-diverging micronozzle. A three-dimensional axisymmetric nozzle is fabricated using electro-discharge machining to produce a throat diameter of 187 µm with an expansion ratio of 3:1. The motive nozzle achieves a design mass flow efficiency of 93% compared to isentropic calculations. Two different ejector area ratios are compared using ethanol vapor and nitrogen gas separately to motivate and entrain ambient air. The experimental data indicate that the ejector can produce a sufficient suction draft to satisfy both microengine mass flow and power off-take requirements to enable its substitution for high-speed microscale pumping turbomachinery.

  8. CSI Flight Computer System and experimental test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Peri, F., Jr.; Schuler, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the CSI Computer System (CCS) and the experimental tests performed to validate its functionality. This system is comprised of two major components: the space flight qualified Excitation and Damping Subsystem (EDS) which performs controls calculations; and the Remote Interface Unit (RIU) which is used for data acquisition, transmission, and filtering. The flight-like RIU is the interface between the EDS and the sensors and actuators positioned on the particular structure under control. The EDS and RIU communicate over the MIL-STD-1553B, a space flight qualified bus. To test the CCS under realistic conditions, it was connected to the Phase-0 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) at NASA Langley Research Center. The following schematic shows how the CCS is connected to the CEM. Various tests were performed which validated the ability of the system to perform control/structures experiments.

  9. Geoacoustic and source tracking using particle filtering: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2010-07-01

    A particle filtering (PF) approach is presented for performing sequential geoacoustic inversion of a complex ocean acoustic environment using a moving acoustic source. This approach treats both the environmental parameters [e.g., water column sound speed profile (SSP), water depth, sediment and bottom parameters] at the source location and the source parameters (e.g., source depth, range and speed) as unknown random variables that evolve as the source moves. This allows real-time updating of the environment and accurate tracking of the moving source. As a sequential Monte Carlo technique that operates on nonlinear systems with non-Gaussian probability densities, the PF is an ideal algorithm to perform tracking of environmental and source parameters, and their uncertainties via the evolving posterior probability densities. The approach is demonstrated on both simulated data in a shallow water environment with a sloping bottom and experimental data collected during the SWellEx-96 experiment. PMID:20649203

  10. Applying computational methods to interpret experimental results in tribology and enantioselective catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Michael T.

    Computational methods are rapidly becoming a mainstay in the field of chemistry. Advances in computational methods (both theory and implementation), increasing availability of computational resources and the advancement of parallel computing are some of the major forces driving this trend. It is now possible to perform density functional theory (DFT) calculations with chemical accuracy for model systems that can be interrogated experimentally. This allows computational methods to supplement or complement experimental methods. There are even cases where DFT calculations can give insight into processes and interactions that cannot be interrogated directly by current experimental methods. This work presents several examples of the application of computational methods to the interpretation and analysis of experimentally obtained results. First, triobological systems were investigated primarily with full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method DFT calculations. Second, small organic molecules adsorbed on Pd(111) were studied using projector-augmented wave (PAW) method DFT calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image simulations to investigate molecular interactions involved in enantioselective heterogeneous catalysis. A method for method for calculating pressure-dependent shear properties of model boundary-layer lubricants is demonstrated. The calculated values are compared with experimentally obtained results. For the case of methyl pyruvate adsorbed on Pd(111), DFT-calculated adsorption energies and structures are used along with STM simulations to identify species observed by STM imaging. A previously unobserved enol species is discovered to be present along with the expected keto species. The information about methyl pyruvate species on Pd(111) is combined with previously published studies of S-alpha-(1-naphthyl)-ethylamine (NEA) to understand the nature of their interaction upon coadsorption on Pd(111). DFT calculated structures and

  11. Experimental and theoretical analysis results for high temperature air combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Tadashi; Morita, Mitsunobu

    1998-07-01

    With Japan's preparation of its Action program to prevent global warming in 1990 and the holding of the United National Conference on Environment and Development (the Earth Summit) in 1992 as a backdrop, reflecting the global effort to protect the environment, a high performance industrial furnace development project was launched in 1993 by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). This project focuses on the development of a combustion technology which uses air that is preheated to extremely high temperatures (above 1,000 C), heretofore considered impossible. Not only can this technology reduce carbon dioxide emission, thought to cause the greenhouse effect, by over 30%, but it can also reduce nitrogen oxide emission by nearly half. This new technology makes use of the recently-developed high-cycle regenerative heat exchanger, for preheating the furnace air supply. This exchanger preheats air to above 1,000 C, much higher than for conventional furnaces, and then this air is injected with fuel. R and D data have shown that CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced markedly. However, the theoretical analysis is yet to be made, thereby hampering efforts to have this advanced technology become widely adopted. This project accumulated new data related to uniform temperature distribution, high energy heat transfer and low NO{sub x} as common characteristics of high temperature air combustion.

  12. Modeling of rock friction 1. Experimental results and constitutive equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Direct shear experiments on ground surfaces of a granodiorite from Raymond, California, at normal stresses of ??6 MPa demonstrate that competing time, displacement, and velocity effects control rock friction. It is proposed that the strength of the population of points of contacts between sliding surfaces determines frictional strength and that the population of contacts changes continuously with displacements. Previous experiments demonstrate that the strength of the contacts increases with the age of the contacts. The present experiments establish that a characteristic displacement, proportional to surface roughness, is required to change the population of contacts. Hence during slip the average age of the points of contact and therefore frictional strength decrease as slip velocity increases. Displacement weakening and consequently the potential for unstable slip occur whenever displacement reduces the average age of the contacts. In addition to this velocity dependency, which arises from displacement dependency and time dependency, the experiments also show a competing but transient increase in friction whenever slip velocity increases. Creep of the sliding surface at stresses below that for steady state slip is also observed. Constitutive relationships are developed that permit quantitative simulation of the friction versus displacement data as a function of surface roughness and for different time and velocity histories. Unstable slip in experiments is controlled by these constitutive effects and by the stiffness of the experimental system. It is argued that analogous properties control earthquake instability. Copyright ?? 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Construction of a WMR for trajectory tracking control: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ortigoza, R; Márquez-Sánchez, C; Marcelino-Aranda, M; Marciano-Melchor, M; Silva-Ortigoza, G; Bautista-Quintero, R; Ramos-Silvestre, E R; Rivera-Díaz, J C; Muñoz-Carrillo, D

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a solution for trajectory tracking control of a differential drive wheeled mobile robot (WMR) based on a hierarchical approach. The general design and construction of the WMR are described. The hierarchical controller proposed has two components: a high-level control and a low-level control. The high-level control law is based on an input-output linearization scheme for the robot kinematic model, which provides the desired angular velocity profiles that the WMR has to track in order to achieve the desired position (x∗, y∗) and orientation (φ∗). Then, a low-level control law, based on a proportional integral (PI) approach, is designed to control the velocity of the WMR wheels to ensure those tracking features. Regarding the trajectories, this paper provides the solution or the following cases: (1) time-varying parametric trajectories such as straight lines and parabolas and (2) smooth curves fitted by cubic splines which are generated by the desired data points {(x₁∗, y₁∗),..., (x(n)∗, y(n)∗)}. A straightforward algorithm is developed for constructing the cubic splines. Finally, this paper includes an experimental validation of the proposed technique by employing a DS1104 dSPACE electronic board along with MATLAB/Simulink software. PMID:23997679

  14. Construction of a WMR for Trajectory Tracking Control: Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Ortigoza, R.; Márquez-Sánchez, C.; Marcelino-Aranda, M.; Marciano-Melchor, M.; Silva-Ortigoza, G.; Bautista-Quintero, R.; Ramos-Silvestre, E. R.; Rivera-Díaz, J. C.; Muñoz-Carrillo, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a solution for trajectory tracking control of a differential drive wheeled mobile robot (WMR) based on a hierarchical approach. The general design and construction of the WMR are described. The hierarchical controller proposed has two components: a high-level control and a low-level control. The high-level control law is based on an input-output linearization scheme for the robot kinematic model, which provides the desired angular velocity profiles that the WMR has to track in order to achieve the desired position (x∗, y∗) and orientation (φ∗). Then, a low-level control law, based on a proportional integral (PI) approach, is designed to control the velocity of the WMR wheels to ensure those tracking features. Regarding the trajectories, this paper provides the solution or the following cases: (1) time-varying parametric trajectories such as straight lines and parabolas and (2) smooth curves fitted by cubic splines which are generated by the desired data points {(x1∗, y1∗),..., (xn∗, yn∗)}. A straightforward algorithm is developed for constructing the cubic splines. Finally, this paper includes an experimental validation of the proposed technique by employing a DS1104 dSPACE electronic board along with MATLAB/Simulink software. PMID:23997679

  15. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM A MICROWAVE CAVITY BEAM POSITION MONITOR.

    SciTech Connect

    BALAKIN,V.; BAZHAN,A.; LUNEV,P.; SOLYAK,N.; VOGEL,V.; ZHOGOLEV,P.; LISITSYN,A.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    1999-03-29

    Future Linear Colliders have hard requirements for the beam transverse position stability in the accelerator. A beam Position Monitor (BPM) with the resolution better than 0.1 micron in the single bunch regime is needed to control the stability of the beam position along the linac. Proposed BPM is based on the measurement of the asymmetrical mode excited by single bunch in the cavity. Four stages of signal processing (space-, time-, frequency- and phase-filtering providing the required signal-to-noise ratio) are used to obtain extremely high resolution. The measurement set-up was designed by BINP and installed at ATF/BNL to test experimentally this concept. The set-up includes three two-coordinates BPM's at the frequency of 13.566 GHz, and reference intensity/phase cavity. BPM's were mounted on support table. The two-coordinates movers allow to move and align BPM's along the straight line, using the signals from the beam. The position of each monitor is controlled by the sensors with the accuracy 0.03 micron. The information from three monitors allows to exclude angle and position jitter of the beam and measure BPM resolution. In the experiments the resolution of about 0.15 micron for 0.25 nC beam intensity was obtained, that is close to the value required.

  16. Experimental results with hydrogen fueled internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Boer, P. C. T.; Mclean, W. J.; Homan, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    The paper focuses on the most important experimental findings for hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines, with particular reference to the application of these findings to the assessment of the potential of hydrogen engines. Emphasis is on the various tradeoffs that can be made, such as between maximum efficiency, maximum power, and minimum NO emissions. The various possibilities for induction and ignition are described. Some projections are made about areas in which hydrogen engines may find their initial application and about optimum ways to design such engines. It is shown that hydrogen-fueled reciprocal internal combustion engines offer important advantages with respect to thermal efficiency and exhaust emissions. Problems arising from preignition can suitably be avoided by restricting the fuel-air equivalence ratio to values below about 0.5. The direct cylinder injection appears to be a very attractive way to operate the engine, because it combines a wide range of possible power outputs with a high thermal efficiency and very low NO emissions at part loads.

  17. Experimental study of energy conversion in the magnetic reconnection layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masaaki

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection, in which magnetic field lines break and reconnect to change their topology, occurs throughout the universe: in solar flares, the earth's magnetosphere, star forming galaxies, and laboratory fusion plasmas. The essential feature of reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy to particle energy; this process both accelerates and heats the plasma particles. Despite the recent advances of reconnection research, the exact mechanisms for bulk plasma heating, particle acceleration, and energy flow channels remain unresolved. In this work, the mechanisms responsible for the energization of plasma particles in the magnetic reconnection layer are investigated in the MRX device together with a quantitative evaluation of the conversion of magnetic energy to ions and electrons. A comprehensive analysis of the reconnection layer is made in terms of two-fluid physics based on the measurements of two-dimensional profiles of 1) electric potential, 2) flow vectors of electrons and ions, and 3) the electron temperature, Te and the ion temperature, Ti in the layer. It is experimentally verified that a saddle shaped electrostatic electric potential profile is formed in the reconnection plane. Ions are accelerated across the separatrices by the strong electrostatic field and enter the exhaust region where they become thermalized. Electron heating is observed to extend beyond the electron diffusion region, and non-classical heating mechanisms associated with high frequency fluctuations is found to play a role. Our quantitative analysis of the energy transport processes and energy inventory concludes that more than 50% of magnetic energy is converted to plasma particles, of which 2/3 transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons. The results which demonstrate that conversion of magnetic energy occurs in a significantly larger region than theoretically considered before, are compared with the two-fluid simulations and the recent space

  18. Experimental results and modeling of a dynamic hohlraum on SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.O.; Deeney, C.; Leeper, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Matuska, W.; Peterson, D.L.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1998-06-01

    Experiments were performed at SATURN, a high current z-pinch, to explore the feasibility of creating a hohlraum by imploding a tungsten wire array onto a low-density foam. Emission measurements in the 200--280 eV energy band were consistent with a 110--135 eV Planckian before the target shock heated, or stagnated, on-axis. Peak pinch radiation temperatures of nominally 160 eV were obtained. Measured early time x-ray emission histories and temperature estimates agree well with modeled performance in the 200--280 eV band using a 2D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics code. However, significant differences are observed in comparisons of the x-ray images and 2D simulations.

  19. Fuel Canister Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Colleen Shelton-Davis

    2003-03-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is tasked with ensuring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is acceptable for permanent disposal at a designated repository. From a repository acceptance criteria viewpoint and from a transportation viewpoint, of significant concern is the condition of the container at the time of shipment. Because the fuel will be in temporary storage for as much as 50 years, verification that no significant degradation has occurred to the canister is required to preclude repackaging all the fuel. Many canisters are also being removed from wet storage, vacuum dried (hot or cold), and then placed into dry storage. This process could have a detrimental effect on canister integrity. Research is currently underway to provide a technically sound assessment of the expected canister condition at the end of interim storage.

  20. Community reactions to helicopter noise - Results from an experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, James M.; Powell, Clemans A.

    1987-01-01

    Community reactions to low numbers of helicopter noise events (less than 50 per day) are investigated using a new type of study design. Although the effect of maximum noise level and number of noise events on helicopter noise annoyance was found to be similar to that represented by the energy summation principle contained in L(eq)-based noise indices, it is noted that the possibility that the number of noise events has only a small effect on annoyance cannot be rejected at the conventional p of less than 0.05 level. The effect of the duration of noise events was also shown to be consistent with L(eq)-based indices. After removing the effects of differences in duration and noise levels, little difference is found between reactions to impulsive and nonimpulsive types of helicopters.

  1. Experimental test results of a generalized parameter fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.; Gold, H.

    1973-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated recently in low cost jet propulsion systems. One of the more complicated components of jet engines is the fuel control. Results of an effort to develop a simpler hydromechanical fuel control are presented. This prototype fuel control was installed on a J85-GE-13 jet engine. Results show that the fuel control provided satisfactory engine performance at sea level static conditions over its normal nonafterburning operating range, including startup. Results of both bench and engine tests are presented; the difficulties encountered are described.

  2. Overview of Recent DIII-D Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenstermacher, M. E.; DIII-D Team

    2014-10-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have added to the ITER physics basis and to physics understanding for extrapolation to future devices. Physics mechanisms contributing to resonant magnetic perturbation ELM suppression and QH-mode were identified. The QH-mode operating space was extended to ITER-relevant parameters and predicted Super-H mode performance was observed at high shaping. Upgraded divertor Thomson data was combined with edge modeling to identify the core density limit at divertor detachment. Pedestal studies were done to determine the role of ν*, Zeff and kinetic ballooning mode instabilities in controlling pedestal structure. Injection of massive high-Z gas dissipates magnetic and kinetic energy of runaway electron beams. 3D magnetics data validate several linear MHD codes, including ability to predict neoclassical tearing viscosity torque. Feedback control of applied 3D fields facilitates access to increased βN values above the no-wall limit. The effect of test blanket module (TBM) fields on fast ion losses and momentum transport, and partial correction of TBM fields at high β was achieved. Density gradient driven trapped electron modes and core ne peaking were controlled by electron cyclotron heating suggesting a possible burn control technique. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Sub- and near-barrier fusion reactions experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnoli, G.

    2016-05-01

    Early data of sub-barrier fusion teached us that cross sections may strongly depend on the structure of colliding nuclei and on couplings to transfer channels. The influence of transfer is clearly indicated in the excitation functions of different nickel isotopes and various Ca+Zr systems. Fusion barrier distributions often yield the fingerprint of the relevant inelastic and transfer couplings. At lower energies, far below the barrier the slope of the excitation function keeps increasing in many cases, so that the cross sections are strongly over-predicted by standard coupled-channels (CC) calculations; this was named a hindrance effect. Furthermore, light heavy-ion systems show cross section oscillations above the Coulomb barrier. Recent experiments have been performed on the fusion of 28,30Si+28,30Si systems where all phenomena cited above show up. In particular regular oscillations that have been revealed above the barrier for 28Si+28Si and have been interpreted as the consequence of the strong channel couplings and/or the oblate deformation of 28Si.

  4. CPM and PDS -- A critical interpretation of experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebig, H.; Siebke, F.; Carius, R.

    1996-12-31

    CPM and PDS spectra of a-Si:H yield identical shape of the Urbach tail, while the defect absorption measured by PDS differs significantly from CPM. In this work an analysis of CPM and PDS spectra of annealed and degraded films is presented. Numerical simulations of CPM and PDS data, taking into account optical transitions, capture and emission processes as well as the Fermi level, yield information on the energy distribution and the charge state of the defects. The simulations reveal the coexistence of defects in the D{sup {minus}}, D{sup +} and D{sup 0} states. The defect distribution is dominated by charged states as predicted by the defect-pool model. Good agreement between measured and simulated PDS and CPM spectra can be obtained in the case of a homogeneous defect density. It is shown that differences between CPM and PDS are due to different sensitivities of the techniques to charged and neutral defect states. Microscopic inhomogeneities may cause significant additional differences.

  5. Primary simulation and experimental results of a coaxial plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Huang, J.; Han, J.; Zhang, Z.; Quan, R.; Wang, L.; Yang, X.; Feng, C.

    A coaxial plasma accelerator with a compressing coil is developed to simulate the impacting and erosion effect of space debris on exposed materials of spacecrafts During its adjustment operation some measurements are conducted including discharging current by Rogowski coil average plasma speed in the coaxial gun by magnetic coils and ejected particle speed by piezoelectric sensor etc In concert with the experiment a primary physical model is constructed in which only the coaxial gun is taken into account with the compressor coil not considered for its unimportant contribution to the plasma ejection speed The calculation results by the model agree well with the diagnostic results considering some assumptions for simplification Based on the simulation result some important suggestions for optimum design and adjustment of the accelerator are obtained for its later operation

  6. Railgun hybrid armatures, experimental results and performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Roger; Keefer, Dennis; Sedghinasab, Ahad

    1991-01-01

    Six hybrid armature designs were evaluated in the UTSI one-centimeter square-bore railgun. Advanced diagnostic instrumentation was used to determine the characteristics of hybrid armatures which include a compound armature (current in plasma brushes to the metal armature followed by a plasma armature). The hybrid armatures were compact, with shorter current distributions than plasma armatures as measured with both optical and electromagnetic probes. Although the results are preliminary, due to the limited geometries investigated, the results are very encouraging. The short (less than one-bore-diameter) hybrids demonstrated efficiencies equal to or greater than plasma armatures and good armature stability.

  7. Pegasus liner stability experiments: Diagnostics and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Morgan, D.V.; Rodriguez, G.

    1998-12-31

    A series of experiments to compare imploding cylindrical liner performance with Magneto-HydroDynamic (MHD) modeling has been performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus capacitor bank. Several configurations of aluminum liners have been used; some with initial perturbations and some smooth. Instability growth resulting from the perturbations has been observed with high resolution. Load diagnostics included radial x-rays, fiber optic impact pins, and VISAR (Velocity Interferometer for a Surface of Any Reflector). Diagnostic results and comparisons for several liner stability (LS) experiments are presented.

  8. Joint Soviet-American experiment on hypokinesia: Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burovskiy, N. N.

    1979-01-01

    Comprehensive results are reported from the Soviet portion of a joint Soviet-American experiment involving hypokinesia. The main emphases are on chemical analyses of blood and urine, functional tests, and examination of the cardiovascular system by electrocardiography, echocardiography, and plethysmography.

  9. Qualitative versus Quantitative Results: An Experimental Introduction to Data Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric R.; Alter, Paula

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment in which the student can ascertain the meaning of a negative result from a qualitative test by performing a more sensitive quantitative test on the same sample. Methodology for testing urinary glucose with a spectrophotometer at 630 nm and with commercial assaying glucose strips is presented. (MVL)

  10. Advanced Supersonic Nozzle Concepts: Experimental Flow Visualization Results Paired With LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andrew; Stack, Cory; Gaitonde, Datta; Glauser, Mark; Syracuse University Team; The Ohio State University Team

    2015-11-01

    Advanced supersonic nozzle concepts are currently under investigation, utilizing multiple bypass streams and airframe integration to bolster performance and efficiency. This work focuses on the parametric study of a supersonic, multi-stream jet with aft deck. The single plane of symmetry, rectangular nozzle, displays very complex and unique flow characteristics. Flow visualization techniques in the form of PIV and schlieren capture flow features at various deck lengths and Mach numbers. LES is compared to the experimental results to both validate the computational model and identify limitations of the simulation. By comparing experimental results to LES, this study will help create a foundation of knowledge for advanced nozzle designs in future aircraft. SBIR Phase II with Spectral Energies, LLC under direction of Barry Kiel.

  11. The behavior of delaminations in composite materials - experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chermoshentseva, A. S.; Pokrovskiy, A. M.; Bokhoeva, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Delamination is one of the most common failure modes of composite materials. It may occur as a consequence of imperfections in the production process or the effects of external factors during the operational life of the composite laminates, such as the impact by foreign objects. This paper presents the results of mechanical tests and the optimum degrees of filling the composite materials (CM) with hydrophobic powder (Tarkosil T-20) depending on the latter mass concentration. The results present test samples of the CM with the underlying interlayer defects. The samples were fabricated of twenty-ply pre-preg (fiberglass or carbon fiber). The industrial grade glass is T-25 (VM) specification 6-11-380-76. The composite materials have nanosized additives in structure. The volume concentration of nanopowders is varying from 0.1% to 0.5%. This kind of research has been done for the first time.

  12. Delaminations in composite plates under transverse static loads - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed measuring the damage initiation loads and the locations, shapes, and sizes of delaminations in Fiberite T300/976 graphite/epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, and ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK plates subjected to transverse static loads. The data were compared to the results of the Finn-Springer model, and good agreements were found between the measured and calculated delamination lengths and widths.

  13. Trends in experimental high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    Data from a scan of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review are used to demonstrate that American high-energy physicists show a pattern of accelerator and instrumentation usage characteristic of that expected from the logistic-substitution model of Marchetti and of Fischer and Pry.

  14. Delaminations in composite plates under transverse impact loads - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Ye-Fei; Springer, George S.

    1993-01-01

    Tests were performed measuring the locations and geometries of delaminations in Fiberite T300/976 graphite/epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, and ICI APC-2 graphite/PEEK plates subjected to transverse impact loads. The data provide specific information on the effects of impactor velocity, impactor mass, material, thickness of back ply group, difference in fiber orientation between adjacent ply groups, plate thickness, and impactor nose radius. The data were compared to the results of the Finn-Springer model. The model was found to describe the data with reasonable accuracy.

  15. Persistent GMTI surveillance: theoretical performance bounds and some experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam; Damini, Anthony; Wang, Kai

    2010-04-01

    In certain operational radar modes, slow ground moving targets are detected over several processing intervals using space-time adaptive processing. This enables use of Bayesian filtering and smoothing algorithms for estimation of time-varying moving target parameters. In this paper, some Bayesian filtering algorithms are investigated. The Craḿer-Rao bounds based on subsets of radar measurements (range, angle and Doppler) are derived for typical maneuvering targets and compared against simulated results from Bayesian filters. The performance is also evaluated using real data obtained from DRDC Ottawa's XWEAR radar.

  16. Parallel and Distributed Computational Fluid Dynamics: Experimental Results and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, Mohammad Jahed; Biswas, R.; VanderWijngaart, R.; Yarrow, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes several results of parallel and distributed computing using a large scale production flow solver program. A coarse grained parallelization based on clustering of discretization grids combined with partitioning of large grids for load balancing is presented. An assessment is given of its performance on distributed and distributed-shared memory platforms using large scale scientific problems. An experiment with this solver, adapted to a Wide Area Network execution environment is presented. We also give a comparative performance assessment of computation and communication times on both the tightly and loosely-coupled machines.

  17. Mars ionosphere: A review of experimental results and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, S. A.; Mahajan, K. K.; Kallio, E.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we review results from atmospheric and ionospheric experiments on the early planetary missions like the Mariners, Mars, and Viking 1 and 2 Orbiters/Landers. We then discuss the new results obtained from the two latest missions, namely, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Mars Express (MEX). The MGS had three ionospheric and atmospheric related experiments, namely, (1) the radio science experiment, which generated 5600 electron density profiles covering a major portion of sunspot cycle 23; (2) the magnetometer/electron reflectometer experiment, which very clearly answered the question about the presence or absence of Martian intrinsic magnetic field; and (3) the accelerometer experiment, which provided a large database of atmospheric density at various Martian locations during the aerobraking phases. The topside sounder on the MEX provided electron density profiles for altitudes above the primary ionospheric peak with a very high time resolution, thereby providing opportunity for exploring ionospheric conditions during events of rapid changes like solar flares. Unlike Venus, where simultaneous electron density, ion density, and magnetic field measurements were made, Mars lacks this kind of information. Consequently, most of our current understanding of Mars' plasma environment is based on theoretical models. We therefore review the various atmospheric and ionospheric models for Mars, which have been generated during the last 4 decades.

  18. Experimental Results of Guided Wave Travel Time Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Bloom, Joost

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation matches very well with the objective to reduce cost while maintaining a high safety level. Guided waves are very attractive for permanent monitoring systems because they can travel over large distances and therefore provide the essential large area coverage. Making use of the dispersive behavior of the guided waves, a wall thickness map over a distance of several meters can be made using only two rings of guided wave transducers. Travel time tomography is used to translate transmission travel times into a wall thickness map. This method has been applied in the field for the first time to map the wall thickness under two clearly corroded pipe supports of a 8″ and 10″ gas pipe line. The tomographic inversion results clearly maps the corrosion under the supports. Independent reference measurements confirm the tomographic inversion results.

  19. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Experimental Operations & Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish; MacLean, Matthew; Seaford, Mark; Holden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Test methodology and conditions are presented, and base heating results from 76 runs are reported in non-dimensional form. Regions of high heating are identified and comparisons of various configuration and conditions are highlighted. Base pressure and radiometer results are also reported.

  20. IP voice over ATM satellite: experimental results over satellite channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraf, Koroush A.; Butts, Norman P.

    1999-01-01

    IP telephony, a new technology to provide voice communication over traditional data networks, has the potential to revolutionize telephone communication within the modern enterprise. This innovation uses packetization techniques to carry voice conversations over IP networks. This packet switched technology promises new integrated services, and lower cost long-distance communication compared to traditional circuit switched telephone networks. Future satellites will need to carry IP traffic efficiently in order to stay competitive in servicing the global data- networking and global telephony infrastructure. However, the effects of Voice over IP over switched satellite channels have not been investigated in detail. To fully understand the effects of satellite channels on Voice over IP quality; several experiments were conducted at Lockheed Martin Telecommunications' Satellite Integration Lab. The result of those experiments along with suggested improvements for voice communication over satellite are presented in this document. First, a detailed introduction of IP telephony as a suitable technology for voice communication over future satellites is presented. This is followed by procedures for the experiments, along with results and strategies. In conclusion we hope that these capability demonstrations will alleviate any uncertainty regarding the applicability of this technology to satellite networks.

  1. Acceleration and torque feedback for robotic control - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclnroy, John E.; Saridis, George N.

    1990-01-01

    Gross motion control of robotic manipulators typically requires significant on-line computations to compensate for nonlinear dynamics due to gravity, Coriolis, centripetal, and friction nonlinearities. One controller proposed by Luo and Saridis avoids these computations by feeding back joint acceleration and torque. This study implements the controller on a Puma 600 robotic manipulator. Joint acceleration measurement is obtained by measuring linear accelerations of each joint, and deriving a computationally efficient transformation from the linear measurements to the angular accelerations. Torque feedback is obtained by using the previous torque sent to the joints. The implementation has stability problems on the Puma 600 due to the extremely high gains inherent in the feedback structure. Since these high gains excite frequency modes in the Puma 600, the algorithm is modified to decrease the gain inherent in the feedback structure. The resulting compensator is stable and insensitive to high frequency unmodeled dynamics. Moreover, a second compensator is proposed which uses acceleration and torque feedback, but still allows nonlinear terms to be fed forward. Thus, by feeding the increment in the easily calculated gravity terms forward, improved responses are obtained. Both proposed compensators are implemented, and the real time results are compared to those obtained with the computed torque algorithm.

  2. M-I-S solar cell - Theory and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, R.; Fortuna, J.; Geneczko, J.; Fonash, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents an operating-mode analysis of an MIS solar cell and discusses the advantages which can arise as a result of the use of transport control, field shaping (increased n factor), and zero bias barrier height modification. It is noted that for an n-type semiconductor, it is relatively easy to obtain an enhanced n factor using acceptor-like states without an increase in diode saturation current, the converse being true for p-type semiconductors. Several MIS configurations are examined: an acceptor-like, localized state configuration producing field shaping and no change in diode saturation current, and acceptor-like localized configurations producing field shaping, with a decrease of diode saturation current, in one case, and an increase in the other.

  3. Experimental results on low alpha electron-storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, D.; Hama, H.; Nadji, A.

    1995-09-01

    The authors report on experiments performed in two synchrotron light sources, UVSOR and Super-ACO, where the momentum compaction factor is reduced in order to reduce the bunch length. By controlling the second-order momentum compaction factor, UVSOR and Super-ACO have managed to reduce the first-order momentum compaction factor by 100. At low current the resulting bunch lengths are less than 10 ps, a factor of 10 smaller than normal. Measurements of current dependent bunch lengthening in UVSOR are presented and the cause of the bunch lengthening is determined to be potential-well distortion. The authors also show that by operating with a negative momentum compaction factor, SuperACO has achieved shorter bunch lengthening and higher peak currents than at positive momentum compaction.

  4. Microgravity Fluid Separation Physics: Experimental and Analytical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. Michael; Schrage, Dean S.

    1997-01-01

    Effective, low power, two-phase separation systems are vital for the cost-effective study and utilization of two-phase flow systems and flow physics of two-phase flows. The study of microgravity flows have the potential to reveal significant insight into the controlling mechanisms for the behavior of flows in both normal and reduced gravity environments. The microgravity environment results in a reduction in gravity induced buoyancy forces acting on the discrete phases. Thus, surface tension, viscous, and inertial forces exert an increased influence on the behavior of the flow as demonstrated by the axisymmetric flow patterns. Several space technology and operations groups have studied the flow behavior in reduced gravity since gas-liquid flows are encountered in several systems such as cabin humidity control, wastewater treatment, thermal management, and Rankine power systems.

  5. Experimental Results from Oak Ridge Isomer Spectrometer and Separator (ORISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piechaczek, A.; Batchelder, J. C.; Carter, H. K.; Goans, R. E.; Liu, S.; Shchepunov, V.; Zganjar, E. F.; Unirib Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    ORISS is a linear multi reflection time-of-flight mass analyzer developed by the University Radioactive Ion Beam Consortium. It will be used to separate any isobar and many isomers for decay spectroscopy experiments. The entire system's operation was demonstrated with a less than ideal multi-isotopic ion source and achieved a mass resolving power as high as 430,000. To better characterize the system we have installed a monoisotopic 133Cs ion source. The radiofrequency quadrupole ion cooler and buncher, which serves as the ion injector into ORISS, was tested in stand-alone mode and achieved a longitudinal emittance of 22 π eV × ns and transmission >40%. These very good results confirm our expectation that ORISS can achieve the design goals. Using the improved ion source, we expect, very soon, to demonstrate the complete system's design goals of 400,000 mass resolving power and 50% transmission.

  6. New experimental results in atlas-based brain morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, James C.; Fabella, Brian A.; Fernandes, Siddharth E.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    1999-05-01

    In a previous meeting, we described a computational approach to MRI morphometry, in which a spatial warp mapping a reference or atlas image into anatomic alignment with the subject is first inferred. Shape differences with respect to the atlas are then studied by calculating the pointwise Jacobian determinant for the warp, which provides a measure of the change in differential volume about a point in the reference as it transforms to its corresponding position in the subject. In this paper, the method is used to analyze sex differences in the shape and size of the corpus callosum in an ongoing study of a large population of normal controls. The preliminary results of the current analysis support findings in the literature that have observed the splenium to be larger in females than in males.

  7. Wide-field Fizeau imaging telescope: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, R L; Aubrun, Jean-Noel; Bell, Ray; Benson, Robert; Benson, Larry; Brace, David; Breakwell, John; Burriesci, Larry; Byler, Eric; Camp, John; Cross, Gene; Cuneo, Peter; Dean, Peter; Digumerthi, Ramji; Duncan, Alan; Farley, John; Green, Andy; Hamilton, Howard H; Herman, Bruce; Lauraitis, Kris; de Leon, Erich; Lorell, Kenneth; Martin, Rob; Matosian, Ken; Muench, Tom; Ni, Mel; Palmer, Alice; Roseman, Dennis; Russell, Sheldon; Schweiger, Paul; Sigler, Rob; Smith, John; Stone, Richard; Stubbs, David; Swietek, Gregg; Thatcher, John; Tischhauser, C; Wong, Harvey; Zarifis, Vassilis; Gleichman, Kurt; Paxman, Rick

    2006-06-20

    A nine-aperture, wide-field Fizeau imaging telescope has been built at the Lockheed-Martin Advanced Technology Center. The telescope consists of nine, 125 mm diameter collector telescopes coherently phased and combined to form a diffraction-limited image with a resolution that is consistent with the 610 mm diameter of the telescope. The phased field of view of the array is 1 murad. The measured rms wavefront error is 0.08 waves rms at 635 nm. The telescope is actively controlled to correct for tilt and phasing errors. The control sensing technique is the method known as phase diversity, which extracts wavefront information from a pair of focused and defocused images. The optical design of the telescope and typical performance results are described. PMID:16778931

  8. Longitudinal variation of the equatorial ionosphere: Modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, J. R.; Asevedo, W. D.; dos Santos, P. C. P.; Petry, A.; Bailey, G. J.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new version of the Parameterized Regional Ionospheric Model (PARIM) which has been modified to include the longitudinal dependences. This model has been reconstructed using multidimensional Fourier series. To validate PARIM results, the South America maps of critical frequencies for the E (foE) and F (foF2) regions were compared with the values calculated by Sheffield Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model (SUPIM) and IRI representations. PARIM presents very good results, the general characteristics of both regions, mainly the presence of the equatorial ionization anomaly, were well reproduced for equinoctial conditions of solar minimum and maximum. The values of foF2 and hmF2 recorded over Jicamarca (12°S; 77°W; dip lat. 1°N; mag. declination 0.3°) and sites of the conjugate point equatorial experiment (COPEX) campaign Boa Vista (2.8°N; 60.7°W; dip lat. 11.4°; mag. declination -13.1°), Cachimbo (9.5°S; 54.8°W; dip lat. -1.8°; mag. declination -15.5°), and Campo Grande (20.4°S; 54.6°W; dip lat. -11.1°; mag. declination -14.0°) have been used in this work. foF2 calculated by PARIM show good agreement with the observations, except during morning over Boa Vista and midnight-morning over Campo Grande. Some discrepancies were also found for the F-region peak height (hmF2) near the geomagnetic equator during times of F3 layer occurrences. IRI has underestimated both foF2 and hmF2 over equatorial and low latitude sectors during evening-nighttimes, except for Jicamarca where foF2 values were overestimated.

  9. Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO{sub 3} Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90{degrees}C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO{sub 4}) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated.

  10. Experimental Results on Electrorheology of Liquid Crystalline Polymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, S.; Leal, C. R.; Cidade, M. T.

    2008-07-01

    The electrorheological (ER) effect is known as the enhancement of the apparent viscosity upon application of an external electric field. Suspensions of polarizable particles in non-conducting solvents are the most studied electrorheological fluids, however, liquid crystalline materials may also present ER effect as long as their dielectric anisotropy is positive. In the liquid crystalline state of a positive dielectric anisotropy, the application of the electric field makes the director align perpendicular to the flow direction, thus increasing the apparent viscosity. In this work results of two liquid crystalline polymer solutions, acetoxypropylcellulose (APC) in dimethylacetamide (DMAc) and poly-γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG) in 1,4-dioxane, presenting opposite behavior upon application of the electric field, will be presented. APC/DMAc (negative dielectric anisotropy) presents a decrease of the apparent viscosity upon application of the electric field, as expected, while PBLG/1,4-dioxane (positive dielectric anisotropy) presents the opposite behavior. For this last solution we will present the shear flow curves for different electric fields in function of polymer molecular weight and solution concentration.

  11. The experimental results and analysis of a borehole radar prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sixin; Wu, Junjun; Dong, Hang; Fu, Lei; Wang, Fei

    2012-04-01

    A prototype of borehole radar has been successfully tested in three sites for different purposes under a field condition. The objective of the prototype is providing an effective down-hole tool for detecting targets in deep boreholes situated in a relatively high conductivity area such as the metal ores. The first testing site is at a geothermal field. The fractures extending more than 20 m from the borehole are delineated by the borehole radar in the single-hole reflection mode. The second testing site is located in a jade mine for basement evaluation. The cross-hole measurement mode was used to detect the cavities made by previous unorganized mining activities. Several high-velocity anomalies were found in the velocity profile and presumably the targets of the mine shafts and tunnels. The third test site is located in a mineralized belt characterized by low resistivity less than 1000 Ohm m, the surface-borehole measurement was carried out and the data were processed with velocity tomography. The low-velocity zone corresponds to a mineralized zone from geological records. The three testing results proved the readiness of this borehole radar prototype for further deployment in more complicated and realistic field situations.

  12. Infrared thermography for CFRP inspection: computational model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Henrique C.; Zhang, Hai; Morioka, Karen; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; López, Fernando; Maldague, Xavier P. V.; Tarpani, José R.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) is a well-known Non-destructive Testing (NDT) technique. In the last decades, it has been widely applied in several fields including inspection of composite materials (CM), specially the fiber-reinforced polymer matrix ones. Consequently, it is important to develop and improve efficient NDT techniques to inspect and assess the quality of CM parts in order to warranty airworthiness and, at the same time, reduce costs of airline companies. In this paper, active IRT is used to inspect carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) at laminate with artificial inserts (built-in sample) placed on different layers prior to the manufacture. Two optical active IRT are used. The first is pulsed thermography (PT) which is the most widely utilized IRT technique. The second is a line-scan thermography (LST) technique: a dynamic technique, which can be employed for the inspection of materials by heating a component, line-by-line, while acquiring a series of thermograms with an infrared camera. It is especially suitable for inspection of large parts as well as complex shaped parts. A computational model developed using COMSOL Multiphysics® was used in order to simulate the inspections. Sequences obtained from PT and LST were processed using principal component thermography (PCT) for comparison. Results showed that it is possible to detect insertions of different sizes at different depths using both PT and LST IRT techniques.

  13. First experimental results on the IShTAR testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Inca, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Morgal, I.; Crombe, K.; Louche, F.; Van Eester, D.; Heuraux, S.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Faudot, E.; Fünfgelder, H.; Faugel, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetized plasma test facility dedicated to the investigation of RF wave/plasma interaction [1] in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). It provides a better accessibility for the instrumentation than tokamaks while being representative of the neighboring region of the wave emitter. It is equipped with a magnetized plasma source (1 m long, 0.4 m diameter) powered by a helical antenna up to 3 kW at 11 MHz. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature) in function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes, spectrometer and cameras. The plasma is presently produced only by the helical antenna (no ICRF). We show that the plasma exists in three regime depending on the power level: the first two ones are stable and separated by a jump in density; a first spatial profile of the plasma density has been established for these modes; The third mode is unstable, characterized by strong oscillations of the plasma tube position.

  14. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

    2010-05-28

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements.Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken.This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  15. Sodium-layer laser-guide-star experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Avicola, K.; Brase, J.M.; Morris, J.R.

    1994-02-01

    The authors describe a series of experiments to characterize the sodium-layer guide star that was formed with the highpower laser developed for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program. An emission spot size of 3.0 m was measured, with an implied laser irradiance spot diameter of 2.0 m. The rms spot motion at the higher laser powers, with active beam-pointing control, was less than 0.5 arcsec and had little effect on the observed spot size under these conditions. The authors measured the resonant backscatter from the sodium layer as a function of laser power to obtain a saturation curve. With a transmitted power of 1100 W and an atmospheric transmission of 0.6, the irradiance from the guide star at the ground was 10 (photons/cm{sup 2})/ms, corresponding to a visual magnitude of 5.1. The implications for the performance of wave-front sensors with a laser guide star of this magnitude and resulting closed-loop adaptive-optics performance are discussed. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

    2010-05-01

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements. Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken. This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  17. First experimental results on the IShTAR testbed

    SciTech Connect

    D’Inca, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Morgal, I.; Fünfgelder, H.; Faugel, H.; Crombe, K.; Louche, F.; Van Eester, D.; Heuraux, S.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Faudot, E.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetized plasma test facility dedicated to the investigation of RF wave/plasma interaction [1] in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). It provides a better accessibility for the instrumentation than tokamaks while being representative of the neighboring region of the wave emitter. It is equipped with a magnetized plasma source (1 m long, 0.4 m diameter) powered by a helical antenna up to 3 kW at 11 MHz. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature) in function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes, spectrometer and cameras. The plasma is presently produced only by the helical antenna (no ICRF). We show that the plasma exists in three regime depending on the power level: the first two ones are stable and separated by a jump in density; a first spatial profile of the plasma density has been established for these modes; The third mode is unstable, characterized by strong oscillations of the plasma tube position.

  18. Impact ejecta dynamics in an atmosphere - Experimental results and extrapolations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the impacts of 0.635-cm aluminum projectiles at 6 km/sec into fine pumice dust, at 1 atm, generate a ball of ionized gas behind an expanding curtain of upward moving ejecta. The gas ball forms a toroid which dissolves as it is driven along the interior of the ejecta curtain, by contrast to near-surface explosions in which a fireball envelops early-time crater growth. High frame rate Schlieren photographs show that the atmosphere at the base of the ejecta curtain is initially turbulent, but later forms a vortex. These experiments suggest that although small size ejecta may be decelerated by air drag, they are not simply lofted and suspended but become incorporated in an ejecta cloud that is controlled by air flow which is produced by the response of the atmosphere to the impact. The extrapolation of these results to large body impacts on the earth suggests such contrasts with laboratory experiments as a large quantity of impact-generated vapor, the supersonic advance of the ejecta curtain, the lessened effect of air drag due to the tenuous upper atmosphere, and the role of secondary cratering.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-11-09

    This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in

  20. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    horizontal. High-speed radiometer measurements were made of the time-dependent impact flash at wavelengths of 350-1100 nm. We will present comparisons between these measurements and the output of APL's model. The results of this validation allow us to determine basic relationships between observed optical signatures and impact conditions.

  1. Non-Shock Initiation of the Plastic Bonded Explosive PBXN-5: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappo, K. N.; Todd, S. N.; Anderson, M. U.; Vogler, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    The plastic bonded explosive PBXN-5 was studied under impulsive loading experiments to relate impact-induced mechanical damage to the onset of, and the extent of reaction produced. A small diameter projectile generated shock and release conditions at the impact interface, on the microsecond time scale during the initial portion of the impulsive loading. These shock and release wave interactions generate significant damage, resulting in a porous, powder compaction-type initiation behavior. Experimental measurements show an energy threshold for initiation of reaction which relates to impact-induced kinetic energy. These results are implemented in the model development and validation phases of the damage-induced reaction (DMGIR) model, which is used to simulate impact scenarios of explosives, explosive components, and explosive systems.

  2. Experimental Binding Energies in Supramolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Frank; Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2016-05-11

    On the basis of many literature measurements, a critical overview is given on essential noncovalent interactions in synthetic supramolecular complexes, accompanied by analyses with selected proteins. The methods, which can be applied to derive binding increments for single noncovalent interactions, start with the evaluation of consistency and additivity with a sufficiently large number of different host-guest complexes by applying linear free energy relations. Other strategies involve the use of double mutant cycles, of molecular balances, of dynamic combinatorial libraries, and of crystal structures. Promises and limitations of these strategies are discussed. Most of the analyses stem from solution studies, but a few also from gas phase. The empirically derived interactions are then presented on the basis of selected complexes with respect to ion pairing, hydrogen bonding, electrostatic contributions, halogen bonding, π-π-stacking, dispersive forces, cation-π and anion-π interactions, and contributions from the hydrophobic effect. Cooperativity in host-guest complexes as well as in self-assembly, and entropy factors are briefly highlighted. Tables with typical values for single noncovalent free energies and polarity parameters are in the Supporting Information. PMID:27136957

  3. Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic Rays: Results and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2013-12-01

    Observations of cosmic rays have been improved at all energies, both in terms of higher statistics and reduced systematics. As a result, the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum starts to exhibit more structures than could be seen previously. Most importantly, a second knee in the cosmic ray spectrum—dominated by heavy primaries—is reported just below 1017 eV. The light component, on the other hand, exhibits an ankle-like feature above 1017 eV and starts to dominate the flux at the ankle. The key question at the highest energies is about the origin of the flux suppression observed at energies above 5 · 1019 eV. Is this the long-awaited Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect or the exhaustion of sources? The key to answering this question is again given by the still largely unknown mass composition at the highest energies. Data from different observatories do not quite agree, and common efforts have been started to settle that question. The high level of isotropy observed even at the highest energies starts to challenge a proton-dominated composition if extragalactic magnetic fields are on the order of a few nanogauss or more. We shall discuss the experimental and theoretical progress in the field and the prospects for the next decade.

  4. Energy Monitoring in Gins - 2012 Preliminary Results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electricity and fuel are the second largest source of variable costs for cotton gins, after labor. Few studies of gin energy use have been conducted recently and none have monitored energy use continuously throughout the ginning season. More detailed information is needed to identify management st...

  5. Experimental study of the effect of electromagnetic microwave radiation on parts made of high-energy polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khimenko, L. L.; Rybakov, A. P.; Rybakov, N. A.; Kozlov, A. N.

    2014-07-01

    Results of experimental measurements of Young's modulus, burning rate, and specific heat of condensed high-energy polymer compositions (solid propellants) subjected to microwave radiation are reported. Experimental equipment and arrangement of experiments are described; the results obtained are analyzed.

  6. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part I: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-04-01

    The transfer of liquid helium (LHe) into mobile dewars or transport vessels is a common and unavoidable process at LHe decant stations. During this transfer reasonable amounts of LHe evaporate due to heat leak and pressure drop. Thus generated helium gas needs to be collected and reliquefied which requires a huge amount of electrical energy. Therefore, the design of transfer lines used at LHe decant stations has been optimised to establish a LHe transfer with minor evaporation losses which increases the overall efficiency and capacity of LHe decant stations. This paper presents the experimental results achieved during the thermohydraulic optimisation of a flexible LHe transfer line. An extensive measurement campaign with a set of dedicated transfer lines equipped with pressure and temperature sensors led to unique experimental data of this specific transfer process. The experimental results cover the heat leak, the pressure drop, the transfer rate, the outlet quality, and the cool-down and warm-up behaviour of the examined transfer lines. Based on the obtained results the design of the considered flexible transfer line has been optimised, featuring reduced heat leak and pressure drop.

  7. First experimental results of the BNL inverse free electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Steenbergen, A. van; Gallardo, J.; Babzien, M.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, X.J.; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, J.M.; Qiu, X.

    1996-10-01

    A 40 MeV electron beam, using the inverse3e free-electron laser interaction, has been accelerated by {Delta}E/E = 2.5% over a distance of 0.47 m. The electrons interact with a 1--2 GW CO{sub 2} laser beam bounded by a 2.8 mm ID sapphire circular waveguide in the presence of a tapered wiggler with Bmax {approx} 1 T and a period 2.89 cm {le} {lambda}{sub w} {le} 3.14 cm. The experimental results of {Delta}E/E as a function of electron energy E, peak magnetic field Bw and laser power W{sub 1} compare well with analytical and 1-D numerical simulations and permit scaling to higher laser power and electron energy.

  8. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  9. The effect of ambient pressure on well chamber response: experimental results with empirical correction factors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, S L; DeWerd, L A; Micka, J A; Bohm, T D

    2005-03-01

    For some air-communicating well-type chambers used for low-energy brachytherapy source assay, deviations from expected values of measured air kerma strength were observed at low pressures associated with high altitudes. This effect is consistent with an overcompensation by the air density correction to standard atmospheric temperature and pressure (P(TP)). This work demonstrates that the P(TP) correction does not fully compensate for the high altitude pressure effects that are seen with air-communicating chambers at low photon energies in the range of 20-100 keV. Deviations of up to 18% at a pressure corresponding to an approximate elevation of 8500 ft for photon energies of 20 keV are possible. For high-energy photons and for high-energy beta emitters in air-communicating chambers the P(TP) factor is applicable. As expected, the ambient pressure does not significantly affect the response of pressurized well chambers (within 1%) to either low- or high-energy photons. However, when used with beta emitters, pressurized chambers appear to exhibit a slight dependence on the ambient pressure. Using measured data, the response and correction factors were determined for three models of air-communicating well chambers for low-energy photon sources at various pressures corresponding to elevations above sea level. Monte Carlo calculations were also performed which were correlated with the experimental findings. A more complete study of the Monte Carlo calculations is presented in the accompanying paper, "The effect of ambient pressure on well chamber response: Monte Carlo calculated results for the HDR1000 Plus." PMID:15839341

  10. Experimental investigation of fatigue in a cantilever energy harvesting beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avvari, Panduranga Vittal; Yang, Yaowen; Liu, Peiwen; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, cantilever energy harvesters gained immense popularity owing to the simplicity of the design and piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) using the cantilever design has undergone considerable evolution. The major drawback of a vibrating cantilever beam is its vulnerability to fatigue over a period of time. This article brings forth an experimental investigation into the phenomenon of fatigue of a PEH cantilever beam. As there has been very little literature reported in this area, an effort has been made to scrutinize the damage due to fatigue in a linear vibrating cantilever PEH beam consisting of an aluminum substrate with a piezoelectric macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch attached near the root of the beam and a tip mass attached to the beam. The beam was subjected to transverse vibrations and the behavior of the open circuit voltage was recorded with passing time. Moreover, electro-mechanical admittance readings were obtained periodically using the same MFC patch as a Structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor to assess the health of the PEH beam. The results show that with passing time the PEH beam underwent fatigue in both the substrate and MFC, which is observed in a complimentary trend in the voltage and admittance readings. The claim is further supported using the variation of root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the real part of admittance (conductance) readings. Thus, this study concludes that the fatigue issue should be addressed in the design of PEH for long term vibration energy harvesting.

  11. Experimental results of the investigation of a laboratory cold seal TEC

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, V.I.; Mironov, V.S.; Kiryushenko, A.I.; Mikheyev, A.S.; Tulin, S.M.; Meleta, Y.A.; Yarygin, D.V.; Wolff, L.R.

    1998-07-01

    The results of experimental investigation of characteristics of a laboratory Cold Seal Thermionic Energy Converter (CS TEC) with a built-in gas regulated heat pipe are discussed. They were obtained to justify the electric-thermal-physical characteristics of a flame heated CS TEC. The CS TEC design is being developed by a joint Russian-Dutch team of researchers with support of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). The concept of this flame heated Cold Seal TEC was presented in a previous publication. This paper deals with experimental data on the emission properties of electrodes and the voltage-current characteristics (JVC) of an electrically heated laboratory TEC. They were studied over a wide interval of variation in the electrode temperature and interelectrode distance. The cesium vapour working pressure in the interelectrode space was regulated both by the conventional method (using a cesium reservoir) and by means of a gas regulated cesium heat pipe. This allows one to use a rubber (viton) seal in the non-condensing gas (argon) area. The acquired experimental characteristics will allow one to identify the inner parameters at further stages of their work when testing the full-scale flame heated CS TEC.

  12. Experimental verification of Santilli`s clean, subnuclear, hadronic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsagas, N.F.; Mystakidis, A.; Bakos, G.

    1996-02-01

    The structure of the nucleus and its constituents still presents a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physicists. This paper deals mainly with the an experimental attempt for the verification of the new theory for neutron structure and its stimulated decay recently proposed by R.M. Santilli which would imply a new, clean, subnuclear energy. The experiment is carried out by the Laboratory of Nuclear Technology at the University of Thrace, Xanthi, Greece.

  13. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ˜10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132-300 tungsten wires with 5-10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (˜50 TW) and total radiated energy (˜500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  14. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  15. Femtosecond laser for glaucoma treatment: the comparison between simulation and experimentation results on ocular tissue removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong Xia; Ngoi, Bryan K. A.; Hoh, Sek Tien; Koh, Lee Huat K.; Deng, Yuan Zi

    2005-04-01

    In ophthalmology, the use of femtosecond lasers is receiving more attention than ever due to its extremely high intensity and ultra short pulse duration. It opens the highly beneficial possibilities for minimized side effects during surgery process, and one of the specific areas is laser surgery in glaucoma treatment. However, the sophisticated femtosecond laser-ocular tissue interaction mechanism hampers the clinical application of femtosecond laser to treat glaucoma. The potential contribution in this work lies in the fact, that this is the first time a modified moving breakdown theory is applied, which is appropriate for femtosecond time scale, to analyze femtosecond laser-ocular tissue interaction mechanism. Based on this theory, energy deposition and corresponding thermal increase are studied by both simulation and experimentation. A simulation model was developed using Matlab software, and the simulation result was validated through in-vitro laser-tissue interaction experiment using pig iris. By comparing the theoretical and experimental results, it is shown that femtosecond laser can obtain determined ocular tissue removal, and the thermal damage is evidently reduced. This result provides a promising potential for femtosecond laser in glaucoma treatment.

  16. Experimental and theoretical research in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, George W.

    1990-01-01

    NASA grants to MIT for investigations in experimental and theoretical high energy astrophysics have, over the years, nurtured the infrastructure development and experimental activities that have led to successful proposals for the OSO 7, SAS 3, HEAO 1, and HEAO 2 missions and to the achievements in high energy astrophysics of the MIT Group. This report consists of excerpts from the progress reports of 1988 through 1990 that have been submitted as a regular feature of the renewal requests. These excerpts convey the flavor of the grant-supported activities, and a sense of the progress that has been made in each of the areas investigations.

  17. Molecular modeling of hair keratin/peptide complex: Using MM-PBSA calculations to describe experimental binding results.

    PubMed

    Azoia, Nuno G; Fernandes, Margarida M; Micaêlo, Nuno M; Soares, Cláudio M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a keratin/peptide complex have been conducted to predict the binding affinity of four different peptides toward human hair. Free energy calculations on the peptides' interaction with the keratin model demonstrated that electrostatic interactions are believed to be the main driving force stabilizing the complex. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology used for the free energy calculations demonstrated that the dielectric constant in the protein's interior plays a major role in the free energy calculations, and the only way to obtain accordance between the free energy calculations and the experimental binding results was to use the average dielectric constant. PMID:22275089

  18. Determining the performance of energy wheels: Part 2 -- Experimental data and numerical validation

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, C.J.; Ciepliski, D.L.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Experimentally measured and numerically simulated performance data are presented for an energy wheel operating in a wide range of conditions for mass flux, temperature, and humidity. Typically, the agreement between simulated and measured results is well within the experimental uncertainty. Both the simulated and numerical results show that the three effectiveness values (i.e., sensible, latent, and total) are unequal and each has its own unique sensitivity to operating conditions. Also, total effectiveness is shown to be a poor measurement of performance when the supply and exhaust inlet air enthalpies are nearly equal. Simulated results with the numerical model show that experimental results measured using half of the energy wheel, to reduce equipment sizes, underpredict the measured sensible effectiveness by up to 7%. The proposed method of determining energy wheel performance is to validate a detailed numerical model with a range of accurate experimental data and then use the model to predict performance for other operating conditions.

  19. CZT detectors used in different irradiation geometries: Simulations and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Shannon G.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2009-04-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate potential advantages and limitations of CZT detectors used in surface-on, edge-on, and tilted angle irradiation geometries. Simulations and experimental investigations of the energy spectrum measured by a CZT detector have been performed using different irradiation geometries of the CZT. Experiments were performed using a CZT detector with 10x10 mm{sup 2} size and 3 mm thickness. The detector was irradiated with collimated photon beams from Am-241 (59.5 keV) and Co-57 (122 keV). The edge-scan method was used to measure the detector response function in edge-on illumination mode. The tilted angle mode was investigated with the radiation beam directed to the detector surface at angles of 90 degree sign , 15 degree sign , and 10 degree sign . The Hecht formalism was used to simulate theoretical energy spectra. The parameters used for simulations were matched to experiment to compare experimental and theoretical results. The tilted angle CZT detector suppressed the tailing of the spectrum and provided an increase in peak-to-total ratio from 38% at 90 degree sign to 83% at 10 degree sign tilt angle for 122 keV radiation. The corresponding increase for 59 keV radiation was from 60% at 90 degree sign to 85% at 10 degree sign tilt angle. The edge-on CZT detector provided high energy resolution when the beam thickness was much smaller than the thickness of CZT. The FWHM resolution in edge-on illumination mode was 4.2% for 122 keV beam with 0.3 mm thickness, and rapidly deteriorated when the thickness of the beam was increased. The energy resolution of surface-on geometry suffered from strong tailing effect at photon energies higher than 60 keV. It is concluded that tilted angle CZT provides high energy resolution but it is limited to a 1D linear array configuration. The surface-on CZT provides 2D pixel arrays but suffers from tailing effect and charge build up. The edge-on CZT is considered suboptimal as it requires small beam

  20. Inter-species extrapolation of skin heating resulting from millimeter wave irradiation: modeling and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D A; Walters, T J; Ryan, K L; Emerton, K B; Hurt, W D; Ziriax, J M; Johnson, L R; Mason, P A

    2003-05-01

    This study reports measurements of the skin surface temperature elevations during localized irradiation (94 GHz) of three species: rat (irradiated on lower abdomen), rhesus monkey (posterior forelimb), and human (posterior forearm). Two exposure conditions were examined: prolonged, low power density microwaves (LPM) and short-term, high power density microwaves (HPM). Temperature histories were compared with calculations from a bio-heat transfer model. The mean peak surface temperature increase was approximately 7.0 degrees C for the short-term HPM exposures for all three species/locations, and 8.5 degrees C (monkey, human) to 10.5 degrees C (rat) for the longer-duration LPM exposures. The HPM temperature histories are in close agreement with a one-dimensional conduction heat transfer model with negligible blood flow. The LPM temperature histories were compared with calculations from the bio-heat model, evaluated for various (constant) blood flow rates. Results suggest a variable blood flow model, reflecting a dynamic thermoregulatory response, may be more suited to describing skin surface temperature response under long-duration MMW irradiation. PMID:12747480

  1. Experimental and computer simulation results of the spot welding process using SORPAS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jader, M. A.; Cullen, J. D.; Athi, N.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.

    2009-07-01

    The highly competitive nature of the automotive industry drives demand for improvements and increased precision engineering in resistance spot welding. Currently there are about 4300 weld points on the average steel vehicle. Current industrial monitoring systems check the quality of the nugget after processing 15 cars, once every two weeks. The nuggets are examined off line using a destructive process, which takes approximately 10 days to complete causing a long delay in the production process. This paper presents a simulation of the spot welding growth curves, along with a comparison to growth curves performed on an industrial spot welding machine. The correlation of experimental results shows that SORPAS simulations can be used as an off line measurement to reduce factory energy usage. The first section in your paper

  2. Deuteron induced reactions on Ho and La: Experimental excitation functions and comparison with code results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam-Rebeles, R.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Csikai, J.; Takacs, M. P.; Ignatyuk, A.

    2013-09-01

    Activation products of rare earth elements are gaining importance in medical and technical applications. In stacked foil irradiations, followed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy, the cross-sections for production of 161,165Er, 166gHo on 165Ho and 135,137m,137g,139Ce, 140La, 133m,133g,cumBa and 136Cs on natLa targets were measured up to 50 MeV. Reduced uncertainty is obtained by simultaneous remeasurement of the 27Al(d,x)24,22Na monitor reactions over the whole energy range. A comparison with experimental literature values and results from updated theoretical codes (ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and the TENDL2012 online library) is discussed.

  3. Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2013-07-31

    This is the final report of a program of research on ``Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies'' of the High Energy Physics (HEP) group of The Rockefeller University. The research was carried out using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Three faculty members, two research associates, and two postdoctoral associates participated in this project. At CDF, we studied proton-antiproton collisions at an energy of 1.96 TeV. We focused on diffractive interactions, in which the colliding antiproton loses a small fraction of its momentum, typically less than 1%, while the proton is excited into a high mass state retaining its quantum numbers. The study of such collisions provides insight into the nature of the diffractive exchange, conventionally referred to as Pomeron exchange. In studies of W and Z production, we found results that point to a QCD-based interpretation of the diffractive exchange, as predicted in a data-driven phenomenology developed within the Rockefeller HEP group. At CMS, we worked on diffraction, supersymmetry (SUSY), dark matter, large extra dimensions, and statistical applications to data analysis projects. In diffraction, we extended our CDF studies to higher energies working on two fronts: measurement of the single/double diffraction and of the rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV, and development of a simulation of diffractive processes along the lines of our successful model used at CDF. Working with the PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo simulation authors, we implemented our model as a PYTHIA8-MBR option in PYTHIA8 and used it in our data analysis. Preliminary results indicate good agreement. We searched for SUSY by measuring parameters in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and found results which, combined with other experimental constraints and theoretical considerations, indicate that the

  4. Energy dissipation in Exosat tanks: Test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marce, J. L.; Torres, L.; Assemat, D.; Michel, S.

    1981-03-01

    Results of tests performed with inertia ratio and filling ratio scanning on Ariane tanks are presented. The Exosat launch requires the use of a fourth stage (P 0.7). The Exosat + P 0.7 assembly is spin stabilized with a spin rate of 50 rpm during transfer orbit. The unstable assembly is fitted with an active nutation damping system. To size this, it is necessary to know the time constant of nutation build up essentially due to fuel motion in the propane tanks and the hydrazine tank of Exosat. The major source of dissipation is the hydrazine tank for which an hysteresis phenomenon on diaphragm position was observed; the worst time constants of nutation build up, deduced from tests are 2.5 mn before P 0.7 and 1.9 mn after P 0.7 firing, taking into account the appropriate safety factors.

  5. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-24

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  6. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M. L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-01

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  7. Designing free energy surfaces that match experimental data with metadynamics.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew D; Dama, James F; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-06-01

    Creating models that are consistent with experimental data is essential in molecular modeling. This is often done by iteratively tuning the molecular force field of a simulation to match experimental data. An alternative method is to bias a simulation, leading to a hybrid model composed of the original force field and biasing terms. We previously introduced such a method called experiment directed simulation (EDS). EDS minimally biases simulations to match average values. In this work, we introduce a new method called experiment directed metadynamics (EDM) that creates minimal biases for matching entire free energy surfaces such as radial distribution functions and phi/psi angle free energies. It is also possible with EDM to create a tunable mixture of the experimental data and free energy of the unbiased ensemble with explicit ratios. EDM can be proven to be convergent, and we also present proof, via a maximum entropy argument, that the final bias is minimal and unique. Examples of its use are given in the construction of ensembles that follow a desired free energy. The example systems studied include a Lennard-Jones fluid made to match a radial distribution function, an atomistic model augmented with bioinformatics data, and a three-component electrolyte solution where ab initio simulation data is used to improve a classical empirical model. PMID:26575545

  8. Comparative studies on shielding properties of some steel alloys using Geant4, MCNP, WinXCOM and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Shirmardi, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients, μ/ρ and effective atomic numbers, Zeff of some carbon steel and stainless steel alloys have been calculated by using Geant4, MCNP simulation codes for different gamma ray energies, 279.1 keV, 661.6 keV, 662 keV, 1115.5 keV, 1173 keV and 1332 keV. The simulation results of Zeff using Geant4 and MCNP codes have been compared with possible available experimental results and theoretical WinXcom, and good agreement has been observed. The simulated μ/ρ and Zeff values using Geant4 and MCNP code signifies that both the simulation process can be followed to determine the gamma ray interaction properties of the alloys for energies wherever analogous experimental results may not be available. This kind of studies can be used for various applications such as for radiation dosimetry, medical and radiation shielding.

  9. Results from experimental investigations of the performance of air condensers for steam turbine units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V. A.; Mil'man, O. O.; Kolesnikov, N. V.; Anan'ev, P. A.; Dunaev, S. N.; Mikhal'kov, A. M.; Mosin, A. V.; Kondrat'ev, A. V.

    2013-02-01

    Results from experimental investigations of the model versions of Type ABC GI air condensers are presented, and it is shown that these condensers have better performance characteristics as compared with their analogs that are currently in operation.

  10. Experimental Results for Temporally Overlapping Pulses from Quantel EverGreen 200 Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal

    2013-01-01

    This report will detail the experimental results and observations obtained while investigating the feasibility of temporally overlapping the two laser pulses from a Quantel EverGreen 200 Laser. This laser was specifically designed for Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) applications and operate by emitting two 532 nm laser pulses that are seperated by an adjustable finite time (typically on the order of ten to hundreds of microseconds). However, the use of this model laser has found recent application for Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) testing, especially for rotorcraft research. For this testing, it is desired to only use one laser pulse. While this is easily done by only firing one of the laser heads, more excitation energy could conceivably be had if both laser heads are fired with zero pulse separation. In addition, recently large field-of-view PIV measurements have become possible and need ever increasing laser power to illuminate the larger areas. For this work, two different methods of timing the laser are investigated using both a traditional power meter to monitor laser power as well as a fast photodiode to determine pulse separation. The results are presented here as well as some simple implications for PIV experiments using these methods.