Science.gov

Sample records for energy high brightness

  1. High energy high brightness thin disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Matthew D.; Cates, Michael C.

    2012-11-01

    Boeing has been developing solid state lasers for high energy applications since 2004 using Yb:YAG thin disk lasers as pioneered by A. Giesen1 and commercialized by Trumpf Laser GmbH.2 In this paper, we report results of our second generation design and status of a third generation we are currently developing, which will produce 35 kW and a beam quality <2.

  2. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2005-05-16

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  3. Brightness temperature measurements for high-energy jet propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The use of fiber optics to measure times of arrival and brightness temperature profiles for high-energy gas jets is described. Voitenko compressors were used to produce high-energy air and oxygen jets through steel pipes 2 cm i.d. and 350 cm in length containing air initially at 0.02 Torr or less. Reduction of the time-of-arrival data indicated that velocities for the various identified jet components ranged between 2.40 and 7.95 cm/microsec. The fiber optics emplacement design and brightness temperature calibration procedure are described. Maximum brightness temperatures of 93,000 and 136,000 K were measured for air and oxygen jets, respectively, as they started down the exit pipes. Brightness temperature profiles were obtained to 50 microsec behind the jet front. The results suggest that delayed entrainment of wall material was the predominant factor in reducing pressures and temperatures in the slower components of the jet.

  4. Generating Polarized High-Brightness Muon Beams With High-Energy Gammas

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2009-01-22

    Hadron colliders are impractical at very high energies as effective interaction energy is a fraction of the energies of the beams and luminosity must rise as energy squared. Further, the prevailing gluon-gluon background radiation makes it difficult to sort out events. e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, on other hand, are constrained at TeV energies by beamstrahlung radiation and also by cost as long linacs are required to avoid synchrotron radiation in the rings. A muon collider will have the same advantages in energy reach as an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, but without prohibitive beamstrahlung- and synchrotron- radiation. Generation of the high-brightness polarized muon ({mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}) beams through gamma conversion into pairs in the nuclei field is considered in this paper. The dominant effect in the interaction of the high-energy photons with the solid target will be the production of electron-positron pairs. The low-phase space of the resulting muon beams adequately compensates for the small probability of generating a {mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +} pair.

  5. High brightness electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    High energy physics accelerators and free electron lasers put increased demands on the electron beam sources. This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams using photoinjectors. Recent results from the experimental programs will be given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers will be discussed, and the following topics will be covered. Progress has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency. Cesium telluride has demonstrated significantly longer lifetimes than cesium antimonide at 10{sup {minus}8} torr. However, the laser system is more difficult because cesium telluride requires quadrupled YLF instead of the doubled YLF required for cesium antimonide. The difficulty in using photoinjectors is primarily the drive laser, in particular the amplitude stability. Finally, emittance measurements of photoinjector systems can be complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam. An example of the difficulty in measuring beam emittance is given.

  6. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S; Crane, J; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Jacob, J S; Frigola, P; Lim, J; Rosenzweig, J; Travish, G

    2005-05-19

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10{sup 7} photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 {micro}m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verified the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials.

  7. High Brightness Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Caporaso, G.J.; Boyd, J.K.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-08-07

    The High Brightness Test Stand is a 2 MeV, less than or equal to 10 kA electron accelerator module. This accelerator module, designed as an upgrade prototype for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), combines solid state nonlinear magnetic drives with state-of-the-art induction linac technology. The facility serves a dual role, as it not only provides a test bed for this new technology, but is used to develop high brightness electron optics. We will both further describe the accelerator, as well as present some of the preliminary electron optics measurements.

  8. A high brightness photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, Gregory Peter

    Linear colliders, future electron acceleration schemes, and short pulse, ultrawideband millimeter-wave sources require very bright electron beams. Conventional electron injectors including thermionic cathodes and RF bunchers or DC guns have intrinsic limitations which preclude their usage for many of these applications. RF photoinjectors have shown their ability to produce relativistic electron beams with low emittance and energy spread. However, previously developed RF photoinjectors are also subject to significant limitations. These include extreme sensitivity to timing between the RF in the accelerator structure and the drive laser, low efficiency with respect to the number and charge of the electron bunches produced by the injector, and high cost associated with both the RF drive and laser systems. The presently described system has addressed these issues by combining state-of-the-art capabilities in the laser and RF systems, photocathode materials, and new concepts for synchronization. Phase jitter generated by sources including Klystron modulator voltage fluctuation has been measured in detail, and schemes for alleviating this problem have undergone initial proof-of-principle testing. New concepts for the drive laser system have been tested which will lead to further improvements in performance, simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and compactness. The analytical and experimental work associated with the development of a high brightness, high gradient electron accelerator is presented. The presentation emphasizes the systematic progress toward the original design goals of the project, as well as the state-of-the-art innovations characterizing the system. The linear electron accelerator system is based on a 1 1/2 cell side-wall coupled, π-mode standing wave accelerator structure, driven by a 20 MW SLAC Klystron operating at 8.548 GHz, a Ti:Sapphire laser oscillator, and an 8-pass, chirped pulse Ti:Sapphire laser amplifier. Simulations show an rms transverse

  9. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  10. A Bright Source of High-Energy X-rays: Final Report on LDRD Project 04-FS-007

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J D; Felter, T E; Searson, P C; Chen, M

    2005-02-03

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating pure-metal foams via a novel four-step technique based upon ion beam lithography. In this report we discuss why and how such foams are useful as bright, high-photon-energy x-ray sources; the details of the fabrication technique we employed to make such foams; the results obtained; and what we plan to do in the future to improve the technique and turn the foams so fabricated into real laser targets for high-brightness, high-energy back lighting.

  11. High-brightness, high-energy radiation generation from non-linear Thomson scattering of laser wakefield accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, W.; Zhao, Z.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Sarri, G.; Corvan, D.; Zepf, M.; Cole, J.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2014-10-01

    To date, all-optical sources of high-energy (>MeV) photons have only been reported in the linear (a0 < 1) regime of Thomson scattering using laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). We present novel results of high-brightness, high-energy photons generated via non-linear Thomson scattering using the two-beam Astra-Gemini laser facility. With one 300 TW beam, electrons were first accelerated to 500 MeV energies inside gas cells through the process of LWFA. A second 300 TW laser pulse focused to a0 = 2 was subsequently scattered off these electrons, resulting in a highly directional, small source size, and short pulse beam of photons with >10 MeV energies. The photon beam was propagated through a low- Z converter and produced Compton-scattered electrons that were spectrally measured by magnetic deflection and correlated with the incident photons. The measured photon yield at 15 MeV was 2 ×106 photons/MeV and, when coupled with the small source size, divergence, and pulse duration, results in a record peak brightness of 2 ×1019 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%bandwidth at 15 MeV photon energy. Current Affiliation: Stanford University/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  12. Ultra-bright, high-energy-density γ-ray emission from a gas-filled gold cone-capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xing-Long; Yin, Yan; Yu, Tong-Pu; Liu, Jin-Jin; Zou, De-Bin; Ge, Zhe-Yi; Wang, Wei-Quan; Shao, Fu-Qiu

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new scheme to obtain a compact ultra-bright, high-energy-density γ ray source by ultra-intense laser interaction with a near-critical-density (NCD) plasmas filled gold cone-capillary. By using the particle-in-cell code EPOCH, it is shown that NCD electrons are accelerated by the laser ponderomotive force in the gold cone and emit strong radiation. Considering the effect of large radiation back-reaction force, some electrons are kicked into the laser field. The trapped electrons oscillate significantly in the transverse direction and emit ultra-bright γ ray in the forward direction. By attaching a capillary to the gold cone, the trapped electrons are able to keep oscillating for a long distance and the radiation emission can be significantly enhanced. Three-dimensional simulations show that the total γ photon flux with the photon energy in the range of 3 MeV to 30 MeV is approximately 1013/shot, and the corresponding peak brightness is in the order of 1023 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW. The average energy-density of the radiated γ photons is about 1017J /m3 , which is six orders of magnitude higher than the threshold of high-energy-density physics. The energy conversion efficiency from the laser to the γ photons is estimated to be about 5% at the irradiation of a laser with intensity ˜1.37 ×1022W /cm2 .

  13. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  14. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, <0.08 numerical aperture (NA) output fiber at a single center wavelength was demonstrated. Our TeraBlade industrial platform achieves world-record brightness levels for direct diode lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  15. Very High Brightness Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Devices via Enhanced Energy Transfer from a Phosphorescent Sensitizer.

    PubMed

    Zamani Siboni, Hossein; Sadeghimakki, Bahareh; Sivoththaman, Siva; Aziz, Hany

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate very efficient and bright quantum dot light-emitting devices (QDLEDs) with the use of a phosphorescent sensitizer and a thermal annealing step. Utilizing CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots with 560 nm emission peak, bis(4,6-difluorophenylpyridinatoN,C2) picolinatoiridium as a sensitizer, and thermal annealing at 50 °C for 30 min, green-emitting QDLEDs with a maximum current efficiency of 23.9 cd/A, a power efficiency of 31 lm/W, and a brightness of 65,000 cd/m(2) are demonstrated. The high efficiency and brightness are attributed to annealing-induced enhancements in both the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process from the phosphorescent energy donor to the QD acceptor and hole transport across the device. The FRET enhancement is attributed to annealing-induced diffusion of the phosphorescent material molecules from the sensitizer layer into the QD layer, which results in a shorter donor-acceptor distance. We also find, quite interestingly, that FRET to a QD acceptor is strongly influenced by the QD size, and is generally less efficient to QDs with larger sizes despite their narrower bandgaps. PMID:26556102

  16. High-brightness multilaser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Douglas S.; Gordon, Wayne L.; Jollay, Richard A.; Roblee, Jeffrey W.; Gavrilovic, Paul; Kuksenkov, Dmitri V.; Goyal, Anish K.; Zu, Qinxin

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses a high-brightness multi-laser source developed at Polaroid for such applications as coupling light to fibers, pumping fiber lasers, pumping solid state lasers, material processing, and medical procedures. The power and brightness are obtained by imaging the nearfields of up to eight separate multi-mode lasers side by side on a multi-faceted mirror that makes the beams parallel. The lasers are microlensed to equalize the divergences in the two principal meridians. Each laser is aligned in a field- replaceable illuminator module whose output beam, focused at infinity, is bore-sighted in a mechanical cylinder. The illuminators are arranged roughly radially and the nearfields are reimaged on the mirror, which is produced by diamond machining. The array of nearfields is linearly polarized. A customizable afocal relay forms a telecentric image of the juxtaposed nearfields, as required by the application. The lasers can be of differing powers and wavelengths, and they can be independently switched. Light from other sources can be combined. The output can be utilized in free space or it can be coupled into a fiber for transport or a fiber laser for pumping. A linearly polarized free space output can be obtained, which allows two units to be polarization combined to double the power and brightness.

  17. Brightness measurements on the Livermore high brightness test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Birx, D.L.

    1985-05-09

    Several techniques using small radius collimating pipes with and without axial magnetic fields to measure the brightness of an extracted 1 - 2 kA, 1 - 1.5 MeV electron beam will be described. The output beam of the High Brightness Test Stand as measured by one of these techniques is in excess of 2 x 10/sup 5/ amp/cm/sup 2//steradian. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  18. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  19. High-Brightness Beam Generation and Characterization at the Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewellen, John; Biedron, Sandra; Borland, Michael; Hahne, Michael; Harkay, Katherine; Lumpkin, Alex; Milton, Stephen; Sereno, Nicholas; Travish, Gil

    2000-04-01

    Improvements to the Advanced Photon Source injector linac have been made to allow for the production and characterization of high-brightness beams in support of fourth-generation light source research. In particular, effort has been directed at generating beams suitable for use in the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) free-electron laser (FEL). We describe the enhancements to the linac operational and diagnostic capabilities that enabled self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation of the FEL at 530 nm. Electron beam measurement techniques and recent results will be discussed. Beam properties are measured under the same operational conditions as those used for FEL studies. The nominal FEL beam parameters are as follows: 217 MeV beam energy; less than 0.15 mm-mrad normalized emittance; 100 A peak current from a 0.7-nC charge at a 7-psec bunch. * Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38

  20. Photoluminescence, energy transfer and tunable color of Ce(3+), Tb(3+) and Eu(2+) activated oxynitride phosphors with high brightness.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei; Huo, Jiansheng; Feng, Yang; Zhao, Shuang; You, Hongpeng

    2016-06-21

    New tuneable light-emitting Ca3Al8Si4O17N4:Ce(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(2+) oxynitride phosphors with high brightness have been prepared. When doped with trivalent cerium or divalent europium they present blue luminescence under UV excitation. The energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) and Ce(3+) to Eu(2+) ions is deduced from the spectral overlap between Ce(3+) emission and Tb(3+)/Eu(2+) excitation spectra. The energy-transfer efficiencies and corresponding mechanisms are discussed in detail, and the mechanisms of energy transfer from the Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) and Ce(3+) to Eu(2+) ions are demonstrated to be a dipole-quadrupole and dipole-dipole mechanism, respectively, by the Inokuti-Hirayama model. The International Commission on Illumination value of color tuneable emission as well as luminescence quantum yield (23.8-80.6%) can be tuned by controlling the content of Ce(3+), Tb(3+) and Eu(2+). All results suggest that they are suitable for UV light-emitting diode excitation. PMID:27226201

  1. High brightness beams and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams. Thermionic systems are briefly covered. Recent and past results from the photoinjector programs are given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers using photoinjectors is discussed. The progress that has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency, is covered. Finally, a discussion of emittance measurements of photoinjector systems and how the measurement is complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam is presented.

  2. Very high brightness diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Stefan; Lewis, Ben; Michaelis, Karsten; Schmidt, Torsten

    2012-03-01

    Multiple Single Emitter (MSE) modules allow highest power and highest brightness diode lasers based on standard broad area diodes. 12 single emitters, each rated at 11 W, are stacked in fast axis and with polarization multiplexing 200W are achieved in a fully collimated beam with a beam quality of 7mm*mrad in both axes. Volume Bragg Gratings (VBG) stabilize the wavelength and narrow the linewidth to less than 2nm. Dichroic mirrors are used for dense wavelength multiplexing of 4 channels within 12 nm. 400W are measured from a 0.2 mm fiber, 0.1 NA. Control and drive electronics are integrated into the 200 W platform and represent a basic building block for a variety of applications, such as a flexible turn key system comprising 12 MSE modules. An integrated beam switch directs the light in six 100 μm, or in one 0.2 mm and one 0.1 mm fiber. 800W are measured from the six 0.1 mm fibers and 700W from the 0.2 mm fiber. The technologies can be transferred to other wavelengths to include 793 nm and 1530 nm. Narrow line gratings and optimized spectral combining enable further improvements in spectral brightness and power.

  3. Impulsive and long duration high-energy gamma-ray emission from the very bright 2012 March 7 solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu; and others

    2014-07-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected gamma-rays up to 4 GeV from two bright X-class solar flares on 2012 March 7, showing both an impulsive and temporally extended emission phases. The gamma-rays appear to originate from the same active region as the X-rays associated with these flares. The >100 MeV gamma-ray flux decreases monotonically during the first hour (impulsive phase) followed by a slower decrease for the next 20 hr. A power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff can adequately describe the photon spectrum. Assuming that the gamma rays result from the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with a power-law spectrum, we find that the index of that spectrum is ∼3, with minor variations during the impulsive phase. During the extended phase the photon spectrum softens monotonically, requiring the proton index varying from ∼4 to >5. The >30 MeV proton flux observed by the GOES satellites also shows a flux decrease and spectral softening, but with a harder spectrum (index ∼2-3). Based on these observations, we explore the relative merits of prompt or continuous acceleration scenarios, hadronic or leptonic emission processes, and acceleration at the solar corona or by the fast coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the most likely scenario is continuous acceleration of protons in the solar corona that penetrate the lower solar atmosphere and produce pions that decay into gamma rays. However, acceleration in the downstream of the shock cannot be definitely ruled out.

  4. Bright Idea: Solar Energy Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City.

    This booklet is intended to address questions most frequently asked about solar energy. It provides basic information and a starting point for prospective solar energy users. Information includes discussion of solar space heating, solar water heating, and solar greenhouses. (Author/RE)

  5. Bright, Light and Energy Efficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1981

    1981-01-01

    The new Sharon Elementary School in Newburgh (Indiana) has a three-fuel plan that will allow selection of the most economical energy source for each heating season with an energy-efficient lighting system that includes skylights. (Author/MLF)

  6. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  7. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Bass, Gary K.; Copsey, Jesse F.; Garber, Jr., William E.; Kwong, Vincent H.; Levin, Izrail; MacLennan, Donald A.; Roy, Robert J.; Steiner, Paul E.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  8. Diagnostics for high-brightness beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Special techniques are required for beam diagnostics on high-brightness particle beams. Examples of high-brightness beams include low-emittance proton linacs (either pulsed or CW), electron linacs suitable for free-electron-laser applications, and future linear colliders. Non-interceptive and minimally-interceptive techniques for measuring beam current, position, profile, and transverse and longitudinal emittance will be reviewed. Included will be stripline, wire scanner, laser neutralization, beam-beam scattering, interceptive microgratings, spontaneous emission, optical transition radiation, and other techniques. 24 refs.

  9. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  10. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices. PMID:26764780

  11. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Manikandan, N.; Aravinthan, K.

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  12. A high brightness field emission display

    SciTech Connect

    Palevsky, A.

    1996-12-31

    The military requirement for avionics display performance requires that displays be legible with 10,000 foot-candles (fc) bright light shining into the pilot`s eyes, or 10,000 fc shining directly on the display. The contrast ratio under these conditions must be at least 4.66:1. In addition, instant-on operation is sought for temperatures as low as {minus}54 C. Currently these specifications can barely be met by monochrome CRTs whose use is counter-indicated by other factors. No color display can achieve optimum performance in the areas mentioned, nor do any current contenders, primarily AMLCD`s, have any prospects of achieving full compliance. The FED being developed by Raytheon shows strong promise of being able to achieve the brightness and contrast ratios desired. The FED is also inherently able to provide instant-on functionality at any terrestrial temperature and does not require any heating at low temperatures. The technical objective of the Raytheon development program is to develop a high performance, full color, FED Panel that meets the performance and environmental operating condition requirements specified for military and other high performance display applications.

  13. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm-2 sr-1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  14. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  15. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  16. High brightness EUV light source modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Sergey V.; Choi, Peter; Zakharov, Vasily S.

    2010-04-01

    EUV source for actinic mask metrology, particularly for defect inspection, requires extremely high brightness. The selfabsorption of radiation limits the in-band EUV radiance of the source plasma and the etendue constraint limits the usable power of a conventional single unit EUV source. Theoretical study and numerical modelling has been carried out to address fundamental issues in tin and xenon plasmas and to optimize the performance of EUV sources. The highly ionized xenon plasma in the presence of fast electrons demonstrates the enhanced radiance. Theoretical models and robust modelling tools are being further developed under an international collaboration project FIRE in the frame of the EU FP7 IAPP program. NANO-UV is delivering a new generation of EUV light source with an intrinsic photon collector. Extensive numerical modelling has provided basic numbers to select the optimal regimes for tin and xenon based source operation. From these designs, a family of specially configured multiplexed source structures is being introduced to address the mask metrology needs.

  17. Developing high brightness and high current beams for HIF injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, Larry; Grote, Dave; Kwan, Joe

    2002-05-24

    The US Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is continuing research into ion sources and injectors that simultaneously provide high current (0.5-1.0 Amps) and high brightness (normalized emittance better than 1.0 {pi}-mm-mr). The central issue of focus is whether to continue pursuing the traditional approach of large surface ionization sources or to adopt a multiaperture approach that transports many smaller ''beamlets'' separately at low energies before allowing them to merge. For the large surface source concept, the recent commissioning of the 2-MeV injector for the High Current eXperiment has increased our understanding of the beam quality limitations for these sources. We have also improved our techniques for fabricating large diameter aluminosilicate sources to improve lifetime and emission uniformity. For the multiaperture approach, we are continuing to study the feasibility of small surface sources and a RF induced plasma source in preparation for beamlet merging experiments, while continuing to run computer simulations for better understanding of this alternate concept. Experiments into both architectures will be performed on a newly commissioned ion source test stand at LLNL called STS-500. This stand test provides a platform for testing a variety of ion sources and accelerating structures with 500 kV, 17-microsecond pulses. Recent progress in these areas will be discussed as well as plans for future experiments.

  18. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of High-Brightness Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-11-30

    Theoretical and computational investigations of adiabatic thermal beams have been carried out in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research and for various applications such as light sources. Most accelerator applications require high-brightness beams. This is true for high-energy accelerators such as linear colliders. It is also true for energy recovery linacs (ERLs) and free electron lasers (FELs) such as x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from February 1, 2013 to November 30, 2013 were: a) Completion of a preliminary theoretical and computational study of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow (Mok, 2013); and b) Presentation of an invited paper entitled ?Adiabatic Thermal Beams in a Periodic Focusing Field? at Space Charge 2013 Workshop, CERN, April 16-19, 2013 (Chen, 2013). In this report, an introductory background for the research project is provided. Basic theory of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow is reviewed. Results of simulation studies of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flows are discussed.

  19. Record high-average current from a high-brightness photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Bruce; Barley, John; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Dobbins, John; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Johnson, Brent; Kaplan, Roger; Karkare, Siddharth; Kostroun, Vaclav; Li Yulin; Liepe, Matthias; Liu Xianghong; Loehl, Florian; Maxson, Jared; Quigley, Peter; Reilly, John; Rice, David; Sabol, Daniel; and others

    2013-01-21

    High-power, high-brightness electron beams are of interest for many applications, especially as drivers for free electron lasers and energy recovery linac light sources. For these particular applications, photoemission injectors are used in most cases, and the initial beam brightness from the injector sets a limit on the quality of the light generated at the end of the accelerator. At Cornell University, we have built such a high-power injector using a DC photoemission gun followed by a superconducting accelerating module. Recent results will be presented demonstrating record setting performance up to 65 mA average current with beam energies of 4-5 MeV.

  20. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  1. High purity bright single photon source.

    PubMed

    Neergaard-Nielsen, J S; Nielsen, B M; Takahashi, H; Vistnes, A I; Polzik, E S

    2007-06-25

    Using cavity-enhanced non-degenerate parametric down-conversion, we have built a frequency tunable source of heralded single photons with a narrow bandwidth of 8 MHz, making it compatible with atomic quantum memories. The photon state is 70% pure single photon as characterized by a tomographic measurement and reconstruction of the quantum state, revealing a clearly negative Wigner function. Furthermore, it has a spectral brightness of ~1,500 photons/s per MHz bandwidth, making it one of the brightest single photon sources available. We also investigate the correlation function of the down-converted fields using a combination of two very distinct detection methods; photon counting and homodyne measurement. PMID:19547121

  2. Ultra-high resolution and high-brightness AMOLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Ghosh, Amal; Prache, Olivier; Draper, Russ; Fellowes, Dave

    2012-06-01

    As part of its continuing effort to improve both the resolution and optical performance of AMOLED microdisplays, eMagin has recently developed an SXGA (1280×3×1024) microdisplay under a US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD contract that combines the world's smallest OLED pixel pitch with an ultra-high brightness green OLED emitter. This development is aimed at next-generation HMD systems with "see-through" and daylight imaging requirements. The OLED pixel array is built on a 0.18-micron CMOS backplane and contains over 4 million individually addressable pixels with a pixel pitch of 2.7 × 8.1 microns, resulting in an active area of 0.52 inches diagonal. Using both spatial and temporal enhancement, the display can provide over 10-bits of gray-level control for high dynamic range applications. The new pixel design also enables the future implementation of a full-color QSXGA (2560 × RGB × 2048) microdisplay in an active area of only 1.05 inch diagonal. A low-power serialized low-voltage-differential-signaling (LVDS) interface is integrated into the display for use as a remote video link for tethered systems. The new SXGA backplane has been combined with the high-brightness green OLED device developed by eMagin under an NVESD contract. This OLED device has produced an output brightness of more than 8000fL with all pixels on; lifetime measurements are currently underway and will presented at the meeting. This paper will describe the operational features and first optical and electrical test results of the new SXGA demonstrator microdisplay.

  3. ROLE OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTERS IN HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-09-20

    In this paper we explore the possibility of using diamond secondary emitter in a high average current electron injector to amplify the current from the photocathode and to isolate the cathode and the injector from each other to increase the life time of the cathode and preserve the performance of the injector. Secondary electron yield of 225 and current density of 0.8 a/cm{sup 2} have been measured in the transmission mode from type 2 a natural diamond. Although the diamond will be heated during normal operation in the injector, calculations indicate that by cryogenically cooling the diamond, the temperature gradient along the diamond can be maintained within the acceptable range. The electron energy and temporal distributions are expected to be narrow from this device resulting in high brightness beams. Plans are underway to measure the SEY in emission mode, fabricate photocathode-diamond capsule and test diamond and capsule in superconducting RF injector.

  4. High-brightness injectors for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The counterrotating beams in collider rings consist of trains of beam bunches with N{sub B} particles per bunch, spaced a distance S{sub B} apart. When the bunches collide, the interaction rate is determined by the luminosity, which is defined as the interaction rate per unit cross section. For head-on collisions between cylindrical Gaussian beams moving at speed {beta}c, the luminosity is given by L = N{sub B}{sup 2}{beta}c/4{pi}{sigma}{sup 2}S{sub B}, where {sigma} is the rms beam size projected onto a transverse plane (the two transverse planes are assumed identical) at the interaction point. This beam size depends on the rms emittance of the beam and the focusing strength, which is a measure of the 2-D phase-space area in each transverse plane, and is defined in terms of the second moments of the beam distribution. Our convention is to use the rms normalized emittance, without factors of 4 or 6 that are sometimes used. The quantity {tilde {beta}} is the Courant-Synder betatron amplitude function at the interaction point, a characteristic of the focusing lattice and {gamma} is the relativistic Lorentz factor. Achieving high luminosity at a given energy, and at practical values of {tilde {beta}} and S{sub B}, requires a large value for the ratio N{sub B}{sup 2}/{var epsilon}{sub n}, which implies high intensity and small emittance. Thus, specification of the luminosity sets the requirements for beam intensity and emittance, and establishes the requirements on the performance of the injector to the collider ring. In general, for fixed N{sub B}, the luminosity can be increased if {var epsilon}{sub n} can be reduced. The minimum emittance of the collider is limited by the performance of the injector; consequently the design of the injector is of great importance for the ultimate performance of the collider.

  5. OPTICS FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS AND HIGH CURRENT ERL PROJECT AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    KAYRAN, D.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CALAGA, R.; CHANG, X.Y.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    An energy recovery linac (ERL), under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory [1,2], will push ERLs further towards high current and high brightness beams. This R&D ERL will operate in two modes: a high current mode and a high charge mode. In this paper we present a lattice of the machine and PARMELA simulations from the cathode to the beam dump. We discuss the design considerations and present main parameters for various modes of operation.

  6. Development of a High-Brightness and High-Current Electron Gun for High-Flux γ-Ray Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimori, N.; Nagai, R.; Matsuba, S.; Hajima, R.; Yamamoto, M.; Honda, Y.; Miyajima, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuriki, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-flux mono-energetic γ-ray beam can be generated via Compton scattering of high-power laser by high-brightness electron beam. We have developed a high-brightness and high-current electron gun for generation of the high-flux γ-ray beam. Recently we demonstrated 500 keV electron beam generation, which meets the high-brightness requirement, from our DC photocathode gun at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The gun was transported to High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and connected to the following accelerator system. The gun operational status at KEK and our plan to develop a multialkali photocathode with a long lifetime are presented.

  7. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Benitiez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Marshall, F.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray /gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log v-log v Fv representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(sub ro) , and optical to X-ray, alpha(sub ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup S) (sub peak)) is positioned between 10(exp 12.5) and 10(exp 14) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than

  8. High-brightness ion and electron rf linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    In the past, development work to increase the energy and intensity of particle accelerators tended to be pursued in separate directions, but now almost all modern applications have to achieve an intensity as high as possible at the desired energy, along with a very good beam quality in terms of the beam confinement, aiming, or focusing. The figure of merit used is the beam brightness, defined as the beam power (or current when the energy is fixed) divided by the phase space appropriate to the problem at hand. Phase space for the beam as a whole is six-dimensional, describing the physical size of the beam and change in size with time or distance; the area projected on one plane is called emittance. Achieving high intensity and good quality simultaneously is difficult, primarily because of nonlinear space- charge and focusing forces at nonrelativistic velocities and because of beam-breakup effects for relativistic beams. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding the physics of these effects; some aspects are reviewed here and related to their impact on practical design aspects. 7 refs.

  9. Search for very high energy γ radiation from the radio bright region DR4 of the SNR G78.2+2.1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosch, C.; Feigl, E.; Plaga, R.; Arqueros, F.; Cortina, J.; Fernandez, J.; Fernandez, P.; Fonseca, V.; Funk, B.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Haustein, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Karle, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Kuehn, M.; Lindner, A.; Lorenz, E.; Magnussen, N.; Martinez, S.; Matheis, V.; Merck, M.; Meyer, H.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moeller, H.; Moralejo, A.; Mueller, N.; Padilla, L.; Prahl, J.; Rhode, W.; Samorski, M.; Sanchez, J. A.; Sander, H.; Schmele, D.; Stamm, W.; Wahl, H.; Westerhoff, S.; Wiebel-Sooth, B.; Willmer, M.

    1996-10-01

    Data from the HEGRA air shower array are used to set an upper limit on the emission of γ-radiation above 25(18)TeV from the direction of the radio bright region DR4 within the SNR G78.2+2.1 of 2.5(7.1)x10^-13^cm^-2^/s. The shock front of SNR G78.2+2.1 probably recently overtook the molecular cloud Cong 8 which then acts as a target for the cosmic rays produced within the SNR, thus leading to the expectation of enhanced γ-radiation. Using a model of Drury, Aharonian and Voelk which assumes that SNRs are the sources of galactic cosmic rays via first order Fermi acceleration, we calculated a theoretical prediction for the γ-ray flux from the DR4 region and compared it with our experimental flux limit. Our `best estimate' value for the predicted flux lies a factor of about 18 above the upper limit for γ-ray energies above 25TeV. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  10. High-brightness displays in integrated weapon sight systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Tim; Hogan, Tim

    2014-06-01

    In the past several years Kopin has demonstrated the ability to provide ultra-high brightness, low power display solutions in VGA, SVGA, SXGA and 2k x 2k display formats. This paper will review various approaches for integrating high brightness overlay displays with existing direct view rifle sights and augmenting their precision aiming and targeting capability. Examples of overlay display systems solutions will be presented and discussed. This paper will review significant capability enhancements that are possible when augmenting the real-world as seen through a rifle sight with other soldier system equipment including laser range finders, ballistic computers and sensor systems.

  11. Latest advances in high brightness disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Vincent; Gottwald, Tina; Stolzenburg, Christian; Schad, Sven-Silvius; Killi, Alexander; Ryba, Tracey

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade diode pumped solid state lasers have become an important tool for many industrial materials processing applications. They combine ease of operation with efficiency, robustness and low cost. This paper will give insight in latest progress in disk laser technology ranging from kW-class CW-Lasers over frequency converted lasers to ultra-short pulsed lasers. The disk laser enables high beam quality at high average power and at high peak power at the same time. The power from a single disk was scaled from 1 kW around the year 2000 up to more than 10 kW nowadays. Recently was demonstrated more than 4 kW of average power from a single disk close to fundamental mode beam quality (M²=1.38). Coupling of multiple disks in a common resonator results in even higher power. As an example we show 20 kW extracted from two disks of a common resonator. The disk also reduces optical nonlinearities making it ideally suited for short and ultrashort pulsed lasers. In a joint project between TRUMPF and IFSW Stuttgart more than 1.3 kW of average power at ps pulse duration and exceptionally good beam quality was recently demonstrated. The extremely low saturated gain makes the disk laser ideal for internal frequency conversion. We show >1 kW average power and >6 kW peak power in multi ms pulsed regime from an internally frequency doubled disk laser emitting at 515 nm (green). Also external frequency conversion can be done efficiently with ns pulses. >500 W of average UV power was demonstrated.

  12. High-brightness 800nm fiber-coupled laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Yuri; Levy, Moshe; Rappaport, Noam; Tessler, Renana; Peleg, Ophir; Shamay, Moshe; Yanson, Dan; Klumel, Genadi; Dahan, Nir; Baskin, Ilya; Shkedi, Lior

    2014-03-01

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. Single emitters offer reliable multi-watt output power from a 100 m lateral emission aperture. By their combination and fiber coupling, pump powers up to 100 W can be achieved from a low-NA fiber pigtail. Whilst in the 9xx nm spectral range the single emitter technology is very mature with <10W output per chip, at 800nm the reliable output power from a single emitter is limited to 4 W - 5 W. Consequently, commercially available fiber coupled modules only deliver 5W - 15W at around 800nm, almost an order of magnitude down from the 9xx range pumps. To bridge this gap, we report our advancement in the brightness and reliability of 800nm single emitters. By optimizing the wafer structure, laser cavity and facet passivation process we have demonstrated QCW device operation up to 19W limited by catastrophic optical damage to the 100 μm aperture. In CW operation, the devices reach 14 W output followed by a reversible thermal rollover and a complete device shutdown at high currents, with the performance fully rebounded after cooling. We also report the beam properties of our 800nm single emitters and provide a comparative analysis with the 9xx nm single emitter family. Pump modules integrating several of these emitters with a 105 μm / 0.15 NA delivery fiber reach 35W in CW at 808 nm. We discuss the key opto-mechanical parameters that will enable further brightness scaling of multi-emitter pump modules.

  13. The BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog. 1; High Time Resolution Spectroscopy of Bright Bursts Using High Energy Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first in a series of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy catalogs from the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Abstract: Observatory, each covering a different aspect of burst phenomenology. In this paper, we present time-sequences of spectral fit parameters for 156 bursts selected either for their high peak flux or fluence.

  14. High brightness sources for MeV microprobe applications

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Alton, G.D.; Maskrey, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    State of the art MeV ion microprobe facilities are now approaching current density limitations on targets imposed by the fundamental nature of conventional gaseous ion sources. With a view to addressing this problem efforts are under way which have the ultimate objective of developing high brightness Li liquid metal ion sources suitable for MeV ion microprobe applications. Prototype Li/sup +/ and Ga/sup +/ liquid metal ion sources have been designed, fabricated and are undergoing preliminary testing. This paper describes the first total emittance and brightness measurements of a Ga liquid metal ion source. The effect of the geometry of the ion extraction system is investigated and the brightness data are compared to those of a radio frequency ion source.

  15. A high brightness proton injector for the Tandetron accelerator at Jožef Stefan Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, Primož; Podaru, Nicolae C.; Vavpetič, Primož; Jeromel, Luka; Ogrinc Potocnik, Nina; Ondračka, Simon; Gottdang, Andreas; Mous, Dirk J. M.

    2014-08-01

    Jožef Stefan Institute recently commissioned a high brightness H- ion beam injection system for its existing tandem accelerator facility. Custom developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa, the multicusp ion source has been tuned to deliver at the entrance of the Tandetron™ accelerator H- ion beams with a measured brightness of 17.1 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1 at 170 μA, equivalent to an energy normalized beam emittance of 0.767 π mm mrad MeV1/2. Upgrading the accelerator facility with the new injection system provides two main advantages. First, the high brightness of the new ion source enables the reduction of object slit aperture and the reduction of acceptance angle at the nuclear microprobe, resulting in a reduced beam size at selected beam intensity, which significantly improves the probe resolution for micro-PIXE applications. Secondly, the upgrade strongly enhances the accelerator up-time since H and He beams are produced by independent ion sources, introducing a constant availability of 3He beam for fusion-related research with NRA. The ion beam particle losses and ion beam emittance growth imply that the aforementioned beam brightness is reduced by transport through the ion optical system. To obtain quantitative information on the available brightness at the high-energy side of the accelerator, the proton beam brightness is determined in the nuclear microprobe beamline. Based on the experience obtained during the first months of operation for micro-PIXE applications, further necessary steps are indicated to obtain optimal coupling of the new ion source with the accelerator to increase the normalized high-energy proton beam brightness at the JSI microprobe, currently at 14 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1, with the output current at 18% of its available maximum.

  16. High-brightness electron beams for production of high intensity, coherent radiation for scientific and industrial applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.-J.

    1999-01-15

    Relativistic electron beams with high six-dimensional phase space densities, i.e., high-brightness beams, are the basis for efficient generation of intense and coherent radiation beams for advanced scientific and industrial applications. The remarkable progress in synchrotrons radiation facilities from the first generation to the current, third-generation capability illustrates this point. With the recent development of the high-brightness electron gun based on laser-driven rf photocathodes, linacs have become another important option for high-brightness electron beams. With linacs of about 100 MeV, megawatt-class infrared free-electron lasers can be designed for industrial applications such as power beaming. With linacs of about 10 GeV, 1-{angstrom} x-ray beams with brightness and time resolution exceeding by several orders of magnitude the current synchrotrons radiation sources can be generated based on self-amplified spontaneous emission. Scattering of a high-brightness electron beam by high power laser beams is emerging as a compact method of generating short-pulse, bright x-rays. In the high-energy frontier, photons of TeV quantum energy could be generated by scattering laser beams with TeV electron beams in future linear colliders.

  17. Progress on high-power high-brightness VCSELs and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Delai; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Zhao, Pu; Xu, Bing; Chen, Tong; Van Leeuwen, Robert; Matheussen, Joseph; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2015-03-01

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are attractive for many pumping and direct-diode applications due to combined advantages in low cost, high reliability, narrow and thermally stable spectrum, high power scalability, and easy system integration, etc. We report our progress on electrically pumped, GaAs-based, high- power high-brightness VCSELs and 2D arrays in the infrared wavelength range. At 976nm, over 5.5W peak CW output and 60% peak power conversion efficiency (PCE) were demonstrated with 225um oxide-confined device. For 5x5mm arrays, peak PCE of 54% and peak power of >450W at 976nm, peak PCE of 46% and peak power of >110W at 808nm were achieved respectively under QCW conditions. External cavity configuration was used to improve the VCSEL brightness. Single mode output of 280mW and 37% PCE were realized from 80um device. For large 325um device, we obtained single mode (M2=1.1) CW output of 2.1W, corresponding to a brightness of 160MW/cm2*sr. Three major areas of applications using such VCSELs are discussed: 1. High brightness fiber output; 2. High power, high efficiency green lasers from 2nd harmonic generation. 3.34W green output with 21.2% PCE were achieved; 3. Pumping solid state lasers for high energy pulse generation. We have demonstrated Q-switched pulses with 16.1mJ at 1064nm and 4.9mJ with 1W average power at 473nm.

  18. Advanced Diagnostics for Developing High-Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.-J.; Yakimenko, V.

    1998-11-24

    The production of high-brightness particle beams calls for the development of advanced beam diagnostics. High brightness beams, meaning beams with a high density in phase space, are important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and advanced accelerator systems. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a high charge. This diagnostic system has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One component of the system is the measurement of a slice emittance which provides a measurement of transverse beam properties (such as emittance) as a function of the longitudinal position. Changing the laser pulse profile of a photocathode RF gun has been suggested as one way to achieve non-linear emittance compensation and improve the brightness and that can be diagnosed by the slice emittance system. The other element of the diagnostic is the tomographic reconstruction of the transverse phase. In our work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This high precision phase space tomography together with the ability to modify the radial charge distribution of the electron beam presents an opportunity to improve the emittance and apply non-linear radial emittance corrections. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics leads to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections. This should lead to great improvements in the beam brightness.

  19. ADVANCED DIAGNOSTICS FOR DEVELOPING HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    1998-11-24

    The production of high-brightness particle beams calls for the development of advanced beam diagnostics. High brightness beams, meaning beams with a high density in phase space, are important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and advanced accelerator systems. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a high charge. This diagnostic system has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One component of the system is the measurement of a slice emittance which provides a measurement of transverse beam properties (such as emittance) as a function of the longitudinal position. Changing the laser pulse profile of a photocathode RF gun has been suggested as one way to achieve non-linear emittance compensation and improve the brightness and that can be diagnosed by the slice emittance system. The other element of the diagnostic is the tomographic reconstruction of the transverse phase. In our work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This high precision phase space tomography together with the ability to modify the radial charge distribution of the electron beam presents an opportunity to improve the emittance and apply non-linear radial emittance corrections. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics leads to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections. This should lead to great improvements in the beam brightness.

  20. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  1. MEASURED PROPERTIES OF THE DUVFEL HIGH BRIGHTNESS, ULTRASHORT ELECTRON BEAM.

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, W.S.; CARR, G.L.; DIMAURO, L.F.; DOYURAN, A.; HEESE, R.; JOHNSON, E.D.; KRINSKY, S.; NEUMAN, C.; RAKOWSKY, G.; ROSE, J.; ROTHMAN, J.; RUDATI, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; SHEEHY, B.; SKARITKA, J.; YU, L.H.; DOWELL, D.H.; EMMA, P.

    2001-06-18

    The DUVFEL electron linac is designed to produce sub-picosecond, high brightness electron bunches to drive an ultraviolet FEL. The accelerator consists of a 1.6 cell S-band photoinjector, variable pulse length Ti:Sapp laser, 4 SLAC-type S-band accelerating sections, and 4-dipole chicane bunch compressor. In preparation for FEL operation, the compressed electron beam has been fully characterized. Measurement of the beam parameters and simulation of the beam are presented.

  2. Primary optics for efficient high-brightness LED colour mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, A.; Mohedano, R.; Dross, O.; Hernandez, M.; Benítez, P.; Miñano, J. C.; Vilaplana, J.; Chaves, J.

    2012-10-01

    In SSL general illumination, there is a clear trend to high flux packages with higher efficiency and higher CRI addressed with the use of multiple color chips and phosphors. However, such light sources require the optics provide color mixing, both in the near-field and far-field. This design problem is specially challenging for collimated luminaries, in which diffusers (which dramatically reduce the brightness) cannot be applied without enlarging the exit aperture too much. In this work we present first injection molded prototypes of a novel primary shell-shaped optics that have microlenses on both sides to provide Köhler integration. This shell is design so when it is placed on top of an inhomogeneous multichip Lambertian LED, creates a highly homogeneous virtual source (i.e, spatially and angularly mixed), also Lambertian, which is located in the same position with only small increment of the size (about 10-20%, so the average brightness is similar to the brightness of the source). This shell-mixer device is very versatile and permits now to use a lens or a reflector secondary optics to collimate the light as desired, without color separation effects. Experimental measurements have shown optical efficiency of the shell of 95%, and highly homogeneous angular intensity distribution of collimated beams, in good agreement with the ray-tracing simulations.

  3. High Brightness and high polarization electron source using transmission photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Jin Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Mano, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Yasuhide; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Okumi, Shoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Konomi, Taro; Ohshima, Takashi; Saka, Takashi; Kato, Toshihiro; Horinaka, Hiromichi; Yasue, Tsuneo; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2009-08-04

    A transmission photocathode was fabricated based on GaAs-GaAsP strained superlattice layers on a GaP substrate and a 20 kV-gun was built to generate the polarized electron beams with the diameter of a few micro-meter. As the results, the reduced brightness of 1.3x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}/sr and the polarization of 90% were achieved.

  4. High Brightness GaN-Based Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ya-Ju; Lu, Tien-Chang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Wang, Shing-Chung

    2007-06-01

    This paper reviews our recent progress of GaN-based high brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Firstly, by adopting chemical wet etching patterned sapphire substrates in GaN-based LEDs, not only could increase the extraction quantum efficiency, but also improve the internal quantum efficiency. Secondly, we present a high light-extraction 465-nm GaN-based vertical light-emitting diode structure with double diffuse surfaces. The external quantum efficiency was demonstrated to be about 40%. The high performance LED was achieved mainly due to the strong guided-light scattering efficiency while employing double diffuse surfaces.

  5. A high-brightness thermionic microwave electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.

    1991-02-01

    In a collaborative effort by SSRL, AET Associates, and Varian Associates, a high-brightness microwave electron gun using a thermionic cathode has been designed, built, tested, and installed for use with the SSRL 150 MeV linear accelerator. This thesis discusses the physics behind the design and operation of the gun and associated systems, presenting predictions and experimental tests of the gun's performance. The microwave gun concept is of increasing interest due to its promise of providing higher-current, lower-emittance electron beams than possible from conventional, DC gun technology. In a DC guns, accelerating gradients are less than 8 MV/m, while those in a microwave gun can exceed 100 MV/m, providing much more rapid initial acceleration, thereby reducing the deleterious effects of space-charge. Microwave guns produce higher momentum beams than DC guns, thus lessening space-charge effects during subsequent beam transport. Typical DC guns produce kinetic energies of 80--400 KeV, compared to 2--3 MeV for the SSRL microwave gun. State-of-the-art'' microwave gun designs employ laser-driven photocathodes, providing excellent performance but with greater complexity and monetary costs. A thermionic microwave gun with a magnetic bunching system is comparable in cost and complexity to a conventional system, but provides performance that is orders of magnitude better. Simulations of the SSRL microwave gun predict a normalized RMS emittance at the gun exist of < 10 {pi} {center dot} m{sub e}c {center dot} {mu}m for a beam consisting of approximately 50% of the particles emitted from the gun, and having a momentum spread {plus minus}10%. These emittances are for up to 5 {times} 10{sup 9}e{sup {minus}} per bunch. Chromatic aberrations in the transport line between the gun and linear accelerator increase this to typically < 30 {pi} {center dot} m{sub e} {center dot} {mu}m.

  6. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G.; Lindle, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  7. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  8. High-brightness 9xxnm fiber coupled diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Jiang, Xiaochen; Yang, Thomas; He, Xiaoguang; Gao, Yanyan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Tujia; Guo, Weirong; Wang, Baohua; Guo, Zhijie; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Louisa

    2015-03-01

    We developed a high brightness fiber coupled diode laser module providing more than 140W output power from a 105μm NA 0.15 fiber at the wavelength of 915nm.The high brightness module has an electrical to optical efficiency better than 45% and power enclosure more than 90% within NA 0.13. It is based on multi-single emitters using optical and polarization beam combining and fiber coupling technique. With the similar technology, over 100W of optical power into a 105μm NA 0.15 fiber at 976nm is also achieved which can be compatible with the volume Bragg gratings to receive narrow and stabilized spectral linewidth. The light within NA 0.12 is approximately 92%. The reliability test data of single and multiple single emitter laser module under high optical load are also presented and analyzed using a reliability model with an emitting aperture optimized for coupling into 105μm core fiber. The total MTTF shows exceeding 100,000 hours within 60% confidence level. The packaging processes and optical design are ready for commercial volume production.

  9. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C. . Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  10. A high-brightness thermionic microwave electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.

    1991-02-01

    In a collaborative effort by SSRL, AET Associates, and Varian Associates, a high-brightness microwave electron gun using a thermionic cathode has been designed, built, tested, and installed for use with the SSRL 150 MeV linear accelerator. This thesis discusses the physics behind the design and operation of the gun and associated systems, presenting predictions and experimental tests of the gun`s performance. The microwave gun concept is of increasing interest due to its promise of providing higher-current, lower-emittance electron beams than possible from conventional, DC gun technology. In a DC guns, accelerating gradients are less than 8 MV/m, while those in a microwave gun can exceed 100 MV/m, providing much more rapid initial acceleration, thereby reducing the deleterious effects of space-charge. Microwave guns produce higher momentum beams than DC guns, thus lessening space-charge effects during subsequent beam transport. Typical DC guns produce kinetic energies of 80--400 KeV, compared to 2--3 MeV for the SSRL microwave gun. ``State-of-the-art`` microwave gun designs employ laser-driven photocathodes, providing excellent performance but with greater complexity and monetary costs. A thermionic microwave gun with a magnetic bunching system is comparable in cost and complexity to a conventional system, but provides performance that is orders of magnitude better. Simulations of the SSRL microwave gun predict a normalized RMS emittance at the gun exist of < 10 {pi} {center_dot} m{sub e}c {center_dot} {mu}m for a beam consisting of approximately 50% of the particles emitted from the gun, and having a momentum spread {plus_minus}10%. These emittances are for up to 5 {times} 10{sup 9}e{sup {minus}} per bunch. Chromatic aberrations in the transport line between the gun and linear accelerator increase this to typically < 30 {pi} {center_dot} m{sub e} {center_dot} {mu}m.

  11. Lattice Development for Pep-X High Brightness Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Cai, Yunhai; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    Design of PEP-X high brightness light source machine is under development at SLAC. The PEP-X is a proposed replacement for the PEP-II in the existing 2.2 km tunnel. Two of the PEP-X six arcs contain DBA type lattice providing 30 dispersion free straights suitable for 3.5 m long undulators. The lattice contains TME cells in the other four arcs and 89.3 m wiggler in a long straight section yielding a horizontal emittance of {approx}0.1 nm-rad at 4.5 GeV. The recent lattice modifications are aimed at increasing the predicted brightness and improving beam dynamic properties. The standard DBA cells are modified into supercells for providing low-{beta} undulator straights. The DBA and TME cell phase advance is better optimized. Harmonic sextupoles are added to minimize the sextupole driven resonance effects and amplitude dependent tune shift. Finally, the injection scheme is changed from vertical to horizontal plane in order to avoid large vertical amplitudes of injected beam within small vertical aperture of undulators.

  12. Digital Light Processing for high-brightness high-resolution applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbeck, Larry J.

    1997-05-01

    Electronic projection display technology for high-brightness applications had its origins in the Gretag Eidophor, an oil film-based projection system developed in the early 1940s. A number of solid state technologies have challenged the Eidophor, including CRT-addressed LCD light valves and active-matrix-addressed LCD panels. More recently, in response to various limitations of the LCD technologies, high-brightness systems have been developed based on Digital Light Processing technology. At the heart of the DLP projection display is the Digital Micromirror Device, a semiconductor-based array of fast, reflective digital light switches that precisely control a light source using a binary pulsewidth modulation technique. This paper describes the design, operation, performance, and advantages of DLP- based projection systems for high-brightness, high- resolution applications. It also presents the current status of high-brightness products that will soon be on the market.

  13. PLEIADES: High Peak Brightness, Subpicosecond Thomson Hard-X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuba, J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Harteman, F V; Le Sage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-12-15

    The Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) facility, is a unique, novel, tunable (10-200 keV), ultrafast (ps-fs), hard x-ray source that greatly extends the parameter range reached by existing 3rd generation sources, both in terms of x-ray energy range, pulse duration, and peak brightness at high energies. First light was observed at 70 keV early in 2003, and the experimental data agrees with 3D codes developed at LLNL. The x-rays are generated by the interaction of a 50 fs Fourier-transform-limited laser pulse produced by the TW-class FALCON CPA laser and a highly focused, relativistic (20-100 MeV), high brightness (1 nC, 0.3-5 ps, 5 mm.mrad, 0.2% energy spread) photo-electron bunch. The resulting x-ray brightness is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} ph/mm{sup 2}/s/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW. The beam is well-collimated (10 mrad divergence over the full spectrum, 1 mrad for a single color), and the source is a unique tool for time-resolved dynamic measurements in matter, including high-Z materials.

  14. Emittance Characteristics of High-Brightness H- Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Thomason, J.; Sherman, J.; Alessi, J.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of emittance characteristics from high-brightness, H- ion sources has been undertaken. Representative examples of each important type of H- source for accelerator application are investigated: A magnetron surface plasma source (BNL) a multi-cusp-surface-conversion source (LANL) a Penning source (RAL-ISIS) and a multi-cusp-volume source (LBNL). Presently, comparisons between published emittance values from different ion sources are difficult largely because of different definitions used in reported emittances and the use of different data reduction techniques in analyzing data. Although seldom discussed in the literature, rms-emittance values often depend strongly on the method employed to separate real beam from background. In this work, the problem of data reduction along with software developed for emittance analysis is discussed. Raw emittance data, obtained from the above laboratories, is analyzed using a single technique and normalized rms and 90% area-emittance values are determined along with characteristic emittance versus beam fraction curves.

  15. High Brightness Plasmon-Enhanced Nanostructured Gold Photoemitters

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Kong, Lingmei; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-30

    Plasmonic nanohole arrays are fabricated in gold thin films by focused ion beam (FIB) lithography. Subsequent heat treatment creates sub 100 nm nanometric structures including tips, rods and flakes, all localized in the nanohole array region. The combined nanohole array and nanostructured surface comprise an efficient photoemitter. High brightness photoemission is observed from this construct using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), following 780 nm femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation. By comparing our observables to results of finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations, we demonstrate that photoemission from the sub-100 nm structures is enhanced in the region of propagating surface plasmons launched from the nanohole arrays. Additionally, by tuning hole diameter and separation in the nanohole array, the photoemission intensity of nanostructured photoemitters can be controlled. We observe a photoemission enhancement of over 108, relative to photoemission from the flat region of the gold substrate at laser intensities well below the ablation threshold.

  16. Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1997-11-01

    The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

  17. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  18. Clarinet laser: Semiconductor laser design for high-brightness applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borruel, Luis; Esquivias, Ignacio; Moreno, Pablo; Krakowski, Michel; Auzanneau, Sophie Charlotte; Calligaro, Michel; Parillaud, Olivier; Lecomte, Michel; Sujecki, Slawomir; Wykes, Jim; Larkins, Eric C.

    2005-09-01

    High-power and high-brightness continuous-wave (cw) operation has been achieved with an optimized design of fully index-guided tapered laser emitting at 975 nm. The device achieves simultaneously negligible astigmatism and stable low divergence in the lateral axis at high-power operation. By using a quasi-three-dimensional simulation model, the different mechanisms modifying the slow axis beam divergence at high power have been carefully balanced in the clarinet design, easing the use of collective optics in laser bars. The devices consist of a relatively long ridge-waveguide filtering section coupled to a relatively short tapered section with an aperture angle of 2°. InGaAs /InGaAsP lasers were fabricated with this design, demonstrating an output power of 1 W cw, a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 50%, negligible astigmatism, a slow-axis far-field divergence (measured at 1/e2) of 5° at 1 W and beam quality parameter M2<3.

  19. A low emittance and high efficiency visible light photocathode for high brightness accelerator-based X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchione, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dowell, D.H.; Feng, J.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.; Padmore, H.A.

    2011-07-21

    Free-electron lasers and energy recovery linacs represent a new generation of ultra-high brightness electron accelerator based x-ray sources. Photocathodes are a critical performance-limiting component of these systems. Here, we describe the development of photocathodes based on potassium-cesium-antimonide that satisfy many of the key requirements of future light sources, such as robustness, high quantum efficiency when excited with visible light, and low transverse emittance.

  20. A low emittance and high efficiency visible light photocathode for high brightness accelerator-based X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchione, T.; Feng, J.; Wan, W.; Padmore, H. A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dowell, D. H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.

    2011-07-18

    Free-electron lasers and energy recovery linacs represent a new generation of ultra-high brightness electron accelerator based x-ray sources. Photocathodes are a critical performance-limiting component of these systems. Here, we describe the development of photocathodes based on potassium-cesium-antimonide that satisfy many of the key requirements of future light sources, such as robustness, high quantum efficiency when excited with visible light, and low transverse emittance.

  1. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  2. Niobium resonator development for high-brightness ion beam acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    Two niobium resonant cavities for high-brightness ion beam acceleration have been constructed and tested. The first was based on a coaxial quarter-wave geometry and was optimized for phase velocity {beta}{sub o} = 0.15. This cavity, which resonates at 400 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average (wall-to-wall) accelerating gradient of 12.9 MV/m under continuous-wave (cw) fields. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured. The second was based on a coaxial half-wave geometry and was optimized for {beta}{sub o} = 0.12. This cavity, which resonates at 355 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average accelerating gradient of 18.0 MV/m under cw fields. This is the highest average accelerating gradient achieved to date in low-velocity structures designed for cw operation. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured.

  3. Optimization of epitaxial layer design for high brightness tapered lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijero, J. M. G.; Rodriguez, D.; Borruel, L.; Sujecki, S.; Larkins, E. C.; Esquivias, I.

    2005-04-01

    A comparative simulation study of the optical output characteristics of tapered lasers with different epitaxial structure was performed. The simulation model self-consistently solves the steady state electrical and optical equations for the flared unstable resonator and was previously backed by experiments on one of the simulated structures. Three different epitaxial designs emitting at 975 nm were analyzed: a standard single quantum well symmetrically located in the confinement region (s-SQW), a double quantum well also symmetrically located (s-DQW) and an asymmetrically located double quantum well (a-DQW). The symmetric structures have different confinement factor but a similar ratio between the active layer thickness and the confinement factor, dQW/Γ, while the a-DQW has similar confinement factor than the s-SQW, but double dQW/Γ. A better performance is predicted for the a-DQW design, reaching considerably higher output power with good beam quality. The results are interpreted in terms of a lower density of power in the QW in the case of the a-DQW design, thus delaying to higher output power the onset of the non-linear effects that degrade the beam quality. The role of dQW/Γ as a figure of merit for high brightness tapered lasers is emphasized.

  4. A Compact High-Brightness Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Halaxa, E; Kwan, J W; Bieniosek, F

    2005-05-11

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerators, we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. In an 80-kV 20-microsecond experiment, the RF plasma source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet. An extraction current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} was achieved, and the thermal temperature of the ions was below 1 eV. We have tested at full voltage gradient the first 4 gaps of an injector design. Einzel lens were used to focus the beamlets while reducing the beamlet to beamlet space charge interaction. We were able to reach greater than 100 kV/cm in the first four gaps. We also performed experiments on a converging 119 multi-beamlet source. Although the source has the same optics as a full 1.6 MV injector system, these test were carried out at 400 kV due to the test stand HV limit. We have measured the beam's emittance after the beamlets are merged and passed through an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ). Our goal is to confirm the emittance growth and to demonstrate the technical feasibility of building a driver-scale HIF injector.

  5. COMMISSIONING OF A HIGH-BRIGHTNESS PHOTOINJECTOR FOR COMPTON SCATTERING X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Messerly, M; Shverdin, M; Siders, C W; Tremaine, A M; Barty, C J; Badakov, H; Frigola, P; Fukasawa, A; OShea, B; Rosenzweig, J B

    2007-06-21

    Compton scattering of intense laser pulses with ultrarelativistic electron beams has proven to be an attractive source of high-brightness x-rays with keV to MeV energies. This type of x-ray source requires the electron beam brightness to be comparable with that used in x-ray free-electron lasers and laser and plasma based advanced accelerators. We describe the development and commissioning of a 1.6 cell RF photoinjector for use in Compton scattering experiments at LLNL. Injector development issues such as RF cavity design, beam dynamics simulations, emittance diagnostic development, results of sputtered magnesium photo-cathode experiments, and UV laser pulse shaping are discussed. Initial operation of the photoinjector is described.

  6. Conductively cooled high-power high-brightness bars and fiber-coupled arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hailong; Mondry, Mark; Fouksman, Michael; Weiss, Eli; Anikitchev, Serguei; Kennedy, Keith; Li, Jun; Zucker, Erik; Rudy, Paul; Kongas, Jukka; Haapamaa, Jouko; Lehkonen, Sami

    2005-03-01

    Solid-state-laser and fiber laser pumping, reprographics, medical and materials processing applications require high power, high-brightness bars and fiber-coupled arrays. Conductively cooled laser diode bars allow customers to simplify system design and reduce operational size, weight, and costs. We present results on next generation high brightness, high reliability bars and fiber-coupled arrays at 790-830 nm, 940 nm and 980 nm wavelengths. By using novel epitaxial structures, we have demonstrated highly reliable 808 nm, 30% fill-factor conductively cooled bars operating at 60W CW mode, corresponding to a linear power density (LPD) of 20 mW/&mum. At 25°C, the bars have shown greater than 50% wall-plug-efficiency (WPE) when operating at 60W. Our novel approach has also reduced the fast-axis divergence FWHM from 31° to less than 24°. These bars have a 50% brightness improvement compared to our standard products with this geometry. At 980nm, we have demonstrated greater than 100W CW from 20% fill-factor conductively cooled bars, corresponding to a LPD of 50 mW/μm. At 25°C, the WPE for 976nm bars consistently peaks above 65% and remains greater than 60% at 100W. We coupled the beam output from those high-brightness bars into fiber-array-packages ("FAPs"), and we also achieved high-brightness and high-efficiency FAPs. We demonstrated 60W from a 600μm core-diameter fiber-bundle with a high WPE of 55%, and a low numerical aperture of 0.115. The brightness of such FAPs is four times higher than our standard high-power 40W FAP products at Coherent. Ongoing life test data suggests an extrapolated lifetime greater than 10,000 hours at 80W CW operating-condition based on 30%FF conductively cooled bar geometry.

  7. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    This thesis explores the use of ultrashort bunches generated by a radiofrequency electron photoinjector driven by a femtosecond laser. Rf photoinjector technology has been developed to generate ultra high brightness beams for advanced accelerators and to drive advanced light source applications. The extremely good quality of the beams generated by this source has played a key role in the development of 4th generation light sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source, thus opening the way to studies of materials science and biological systems with high temporal and spatial resolution. At the Pegasus Photoinjector Lab, we have developed the application of a BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6-cell rf photoinjector as a tool for ultrafast science in its own right. It is the aim of this work to explore the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, give descriptions of the novel ultrafast diagnostics developed to be able to characterize the electron bunch and synchronize it with a pump laser, and share some of the scientific results that were obtained with this technology at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. This dissertation explains the requirements of the drive laser source and describes the principles of rf photoinjector design and operation necessary to produce electron bunches with an rms longitudinal length < 100 femtoseconds containing 107 - 108 electrons per bunch. In this condition, when the laser intensity is sufficiently high, multiphoton photoemission is demonstrated to be more efficient in terms of charge yield than single photon photoemission. When a short laser pulse hits the cathode the resulting beam dynamics are dominated by a strong space charge driven longitudinal expansion which leads to the creation of a nearly ideal uniformly filled ellipsoidal distribution. These beam distributions are characterized by linear space charge forces and hence by high peak brightness and small transverse emittances. This regime of operation of the RF photoinjector is also termed the

  8. High brightness, high current injector design for the ATF upgrade at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-04-01

    Brookhaven National Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is in the process of moving to a new place and upgrading its major capabilities: The electron beam energy and CO2 laser power. Specifically, the maximum electron beam energy will be first projected to 100-150 MeV and then upgraded to 500 MeV while at the same time the laser power will increase 100 fold, thus making the new ATF a powerful tool in advanced accelerator concept research. The bright electron bunch produced by the new state-of-the-art photocathode rf gun will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. The injector is a key element of this accelerator upgrade. It must deliver a high average current beam with very small transverse and longitudinal emittances, at a sufficiently high energy that space charge effects are under control. We review here the detailed injector design and present first results from beam dynamics simulations. We give emphasis in the production of compressed flat beams which have important applications in novel light-source concepts and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. We present a theoretical model and with the aid of simulation examine the influence of space charge, bunch compression and suggest a operating regime with minimal phase space dilutions.

  9. A significant hardening and rising shape detected in the MeV/GeV νFν spectrum from the recently discovered very-high-energy blazar S4 0954+65 during the bright optical flare in 2015 February

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; Itoh, Ryosuke; Finke, Justin D.; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ojha, Roopesh; Carpenter, Bryce; Lindfors, Elina; Krauß, Felicia; Desiante, Rachele; Shiki, Kensei; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie E.; Buson, Sara; Nilsson, Kari; Fallah Ramazani, Vandad; Reinthal, Riho; Takalo, Leo; Pursimo, Tapio; Boschin, Walter

    2016-08-01

    We report on Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and multi-wavelength results on the recently discovered very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) blazar S4 0954+65 (z = 0.368) during an exceptionally bright optical flare in 2015 February. During the time period (2015 February 13/14, or MJD 57067) when the MAGIC telescope detected VHE γ-ray emission from the source, the Fermi-LAT data indicated a significant spectral hardening at GeV energies, with a power-law photon index of 1.8 ± 0.1-compared with the 3FGL (The Fermi LAT 4-Year Point Source Catalog) value (averaged over four years of observation) of 2.34 ± 0.04. In contrast, Swift X-Ray Telescope data showed a softening of the X-ray spectrum, with a photon index of 1.72 ± 0.08 (compared with 1.38 ± 0.03 averaged during the flare from MJD 57066 to 57077), possibly indicating a modest contribution of synchrotron photons by the highest-energy electrons superposed on the inverse Compton component. Fitting of the quasi-simultaneous (<1 d) broad-band spectrum with a one-zone synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model revealed that GeV/TeV emission could be produced by inverse-Compton scattering of external photons from the dust torus. We emphasize that a flaring blazar showing high flux of ≳1.0 × 10-6 photons cm-2 s-1 (E > 100 MeV) and a hard spectral index of ΓGeV < 2.0 detected by Fermi-LAT on daily timescales is a promising target for TeV follow-up by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes to discover high-redshift blazars, investigate their temporal variability and spectral features in the VHE band, and also constrain the intensity of the extragalactic background light.

  10. A significant hardening and rising shape detected in the MeV/GeV νFν spectrum from the recently discovered very-high-energy blazar S4 0954+65 during the bright optical flare in 2015 February

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; Itoh, Ryosuke; Finke, Justin D.; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ojha, Roopesh; Carpenter, Bryce; Lindfors, Elina; Krauß, Felicia; Desiante, Rachele; Shiki, Kensei; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie E.; Buson, Sara; Nilsson, Kari; Fallah Ramazani, Vandad; Reinthal, Riho; Takalo, Leo; Pursimo, Tapio; Boschin, Walter

    2016-05-01

    We report on Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and multi-wavelength results on the recently discovered very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) blazar S4 0954+65 (z = 0.368) during an exceptionally bright optical flare in 2015 February. During the time period (2015 February 13/14, or MJD 57067) when the MAGIC telescope detected VHE γ-ray emission from the source, the Fermi-LAT data indicated a significant spectral hardening at GeV energies, with a power-law photon index of 1.8 ± 0.1-compared with the 3FGL (The Fermi LAT 4-Year Point Source Catalog) value (averaged over four years of observation) of 2.34 ± 0.04. In contrast, Swift X-Ray Telescope data showed a softening of the X-ray spectrum, with a photon index of 1.72 ± 0.08 (compared with 1.38 ± 0.03 averaged during the flare from MJD 57066 to 57077), possibly indicating a modest contribution of synchrotron photons by the highest-energy electrons superposed on the inverse Compton component. Fitting of the quasi-simultaneous (<1 d) broad-band spectrum with a one-zone synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model revealed that GeV/TeV emission could be produced by inverse-Compton scattering of external photons from the dust torus. We emphasize that a flaring blazar showing high flux of ≳1.0 × 10-6 photons cm-2 s-1 (E > 100 MeV) and a hard spectral index of ΓGeV < 2.0 detected by Fermi-LAT on daily timescales is a promising target for TeV follow-up by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes to discover high-redshift blazars, investigate their temporal variability and spectral features in the VHE band, and also constrain the intensity of the extragalactic background light.

  11. A compact high brightness laser synchrotron light source for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    1999-07-01

    The present high-brightness hard X-ray sources have been developed as third generation synchrotron light sources based on large high energy electron storage rings and magnetic undulators. Recently availability of compact terawatt lasers arouses a great interest in the use of lasers as undulators. The laser undulator concept makes it possible to construct an attractive compact synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed as a laser synchrotron light source. This paper proposes a compact laser synchrotron light source for mediacal applications, such as an intravenous coronary angiography and microbeam therapy.

  12. Evolution of laser-produced Sn extreme ultraviolet source diameter for high-brightness source

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in; Arai, Goki; Hara, Hiroyuki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Ohashi, Hayato; Sunahara, Atsushi; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Miura, Taisuke; Mocek, Tomas; Endo, Akira

    2014-08-18

    We have investigated the effect of irradiation of solid Sn targets with laser pulses of sub-ns duration and sub-mJ energy on the diameter of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emitting region and source conversion efficiency. It was found that an in-band EUV source diameter as low as 18 μm was produced due to the short scale length of a plasma produced by a sub-ns laser. Most of the EUV emission occurs in a narrow region with a plasma density close to the critical density value. Such EUV sources are suitable for high brightness and high repetition rate metrology applications.

  13. Measured Properties of the DUVFEL High Brightness, Ultrashort Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, Paul J

    2002-08-20

    The DUVFEL electron linac is designed to produce sub-picosecond, high brightness electron bunches to drive an ultraviolet FEL. The accelerator consists of a 1.6 cell S-band photoinjector, variable pulse length Ti:Sapp laser, 4 SLAC-type S-band accelerating sections, and 4-dipole chicane bunch compressor. In preparation for FEL operation, the compressed electron beam has been fully characterized. Measurement of the beam parameters and simulation of the beam are presented. The properties of the laser and photoinjector are summarized in Table 1. In typical running, 10 mJ of IR light is produced by the Spectraphyics Tsunami Ti:Sapphire oscillator and TSA50 amplifier, which is frequency tripled to produce 450 uJ of UV light. After spatial filtering and aperturing of the gaussian mode to produce a nearly uniform laser spot, about 200-300 uJ is delivered to the cathode. This produces 300 pC of charge at the accelerating phase of 30 degrees. The RF cavity is a Gun IV [1] with copper cathode that has been modified for better performance [2]. In principle, the laser pulse length may be adjusted from 100 fs to 10 ps, however there are practical limitations on the range of adjustment due to dispersion characteristics and efficiency of the BBO crystals. The thickness of the harmonic crystals is optimized for pulse lengths from 1-5 ps. Within this range of pulse lengths there is evidence [3] of variations in the time profile of the UV light that are sensitive to the phase-matching angle of the crystal.

  14. High Precision Photometry of Bright Transiting Exoplanet Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Eastman, Jason; Johnson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the past two decades, the successful search for exoplanets and the characterization of their physical properties have shown the immense progress that has been made towards finding planets with characteristics similar to Earth. For most exoplanets with a radius about the size of Earth, evaluating their physical properties, such as the mass, radius and equilibrium temperature, cannot be determined with satisfactory precision. The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) was recently built to obtain spectroscopic and photometric measurements to find, confirm, and characterize Earth-like exoplanets. MINERVA's spectroscopic survey targets the brightest, nearby stars which are well-suited to the array's capabilities, while its primary photometric goal is to search for transits around these bright targets. Typically, it is difficult to find satisfactory comparison stars within a telescope's field of view when the primary target is very bright. This issue is resolved by using one of MINERVA's telescopes to observe the primary bright star while the other telescopes observe a distinct field of view that contains satisfactory bright comparison stars. We describe the code used to identify nearby comparison stars, schedule the four telescopes, produce differential photometry from multiple telescopes, and show the first results from this effort.This work has been funded by the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program, the ERAU Honors Program, the ERAU Undergraduate Research Spark Fund, and the Banneker Institute at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

  15. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  16. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  17. High-brightness switchable multiwavelength remote laser in air

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan; Zeng Bin; Li Guihua; Chu Wei; Ni Jielei; Zhang Haisu; Xu Huailiang; Chin, See Leang

    2011-11-15

    We demonstrate a harmonic-seeded switchable multiwavelength laser in air driven by intense midinfrared femtosecond laser pulses, in which population inversion occurs at an ultrafast time scale (i.e., less than {approx}200 fs) owing to direct formation of excited molecular nitrogen ions by strong-field ionization of inner-valence electrons. The bright multiwavelength laser in air opens the perspective for remote detection of multiple pollutants based on nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

  18. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  19. Brightness-enhanced high-efficiency single emitters for fiber laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Shamay, Moshe; Cohen, Shalom; Berk, Yuri; Klumel, Genadi; Don, Yaroslav; Peleg, Ophir; Levy, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Reliable single emitters delivering <10W in the 9xx nm spectral range, are common energy sources for fiber laser pumps. The brightness (radiance) of a single emitter, which connotes the angular concentration of the emitted energy, is just as important a parameter as the output power alone for fiber coupling applications. We report on the development of high-brightness single emitters that demonstrate <12W output with 60% wall-plug efficiency and a lateral emission angle that is compatible with coupling into 0.15 NA delivery fiber. Using a purpose developed active laser model, simulation of far-field patterns in the lateral (slow) axis can be performed for different epitaxial wafer structures. By optimizing both the wafer and chip designs, we have both increased the device efficiency and improved the slow-axis divergence in high-current operation. Device reliability data are presented. The next-generation emitters will be integrated in SCD's NEON fiber pump modules to upgrade the pump output towards higher ex-fiber powers with high efficiency.

  20. Low-NA fiber laser pumps powered by high-brightness single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levy, Moshe; Peleg, Ophir; Rappaport, Noam; Shamay, Moshe; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Berk, Yuri; Baskin, Ilya

    2015-03-01

    Fiber laser manufacturers demand high-brightness laser diode pumps delivering optical pump energy in both a compact fiber core and narrow angular content. A pump delivery fiber of a 105 μm core and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) is typically used, where the fiber NA is under-filled to ease the launch of laser diode emission into the fiber and make the fiber tolerant to bending. At SCD, we have developed high-brightness NEON multi-emitter fiber-coupled pump modules that deliver 50 W output from a 105 μm, 0.15 NA fiber enabling low-NA power delivery to a customer's fiber laser network. Brightness-enhanced single emitters are engineered with ultra-low divergence for compatibility with the low-NA delivery fiber, with the latest emitters delivering 14 W with 95% of the slow-axis energy contained within an NA of 0.09. The reduced slow-axis divergence is achieved with an optimized epitaxial design, where the peak optical intensity is reduced to both lessen filamentation within the laser cavity and reduce the power density on the output facet thus increasing the emitter reliability. The low mode filling of the fiber allows it to be coiled with diameters down to 70 mm at full operating power despite the small NA and further eliminates the need for mode-stripping at fiber combiners and splices downstream from our pump modules. 50W fiber pump products at 915, 950 and 975 nm wavelengths are presented, including a wavelengthstabilized version at 976 nm.

  1. Advances in high power and high brightness laser bars with enhanced reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haiyan; Jiang, Ching-Long (John); Xiong, Yihan; Inyang, Aloysius; Zhang, Qiang; Lewin, Alexander; Strohmaier, Stephan; Treusch, Georg

    2013-02-01

    The advances in laser-diode technology have enabled high efficiency direct diode base modules to emerge as a building block for industrial high power laser systems. Consequently, these systems have been implemented with advance robust, higher-brightness and reliable laser sources for material processing application. Here at the company, we use low-fill factor bars to build fiber-coupled and passively cooled modules, which form the foundation for "TruDiode," the series of TRUMPF direct diode laser systems that can perform in the multi-kilowatt arena with high beam quality. However, higher reliable output power, additional efficiency and greater slow axis beam quality of the high power laser bars are necessary to further increase the brightness and reduce the cost of the systems. In order to improve the slow axis beam quality, we have optimized the bar epitaxial structures as well as the lateral design. The detailed near field and far field studies of the slow axis for each individual emitters on the bar provide us with information about the dependency of beam quality as a function of the drive current. Based on these study results for direct diode application, we have optimized the high brightness bar designs at 900-1070nm wavelengths. In addition, high power and high efficiency laser bars with high fill factors have been used to build the pump sources for thin disc laser systems at TRUMPF Photonics. For better system performances with lower costs, we have further optimized bar designs for this application. In this paper, we will give an overview of our recent advances in high power and brightness laser bars with enhanced reliability. We will exhibit beam quality study, polarization and reliability test results of our laser bars in the 900-1070nm wavelengths region for coarse wavelength multiplexing. Finally, we will also present the performance and reliability results of the 200W bar, which will be used for our next generation thin disk laser pump source.

  2. Design of a high-power, high-brightness Nd:YAG solar laser.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dawei; Almeida, Joana; Garcia, Dário

    2014-03-20

    A simple high-power, high-brightness Nd:YAG solar laser pumping approach is presented in this paper. The incoming solar radiation is both collected and concentrated by four Fresnel lenses and redirected toward a Nd:YAG laser head by four plane-folding mirrors. A fused-silica secondary concentrator is used to compress the highly concentrated solar radiation to a laser rod. Optimum pumping conditions and laser resonator parameters are found through ZEMAX and LASCAD numerical analysis. Solar laser power of 96 W is numerically calculated, corresponding to the collection efficiency of 24  W/m². A record-high solar laser beam brightness figure of merit of 9.6 W is numerically achieved. PMID:24663463

  3. High Brightness Electron Beam diode for the DARHT (*) Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eylon, Shmuel; Abbott, Steve

    1999-11-01

    An injector for the second axis of the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility (DARHT) is been built at LBNL. The proposed injector consists of a single gap diode extracting 2 kA, 3.5 MV electrons from a thermionic dispenser cathode and powered through a high voltage ceramic insulator column by a Marx generator. The key issues in the design are the control of beam quality to meet the DARHT 2nd axis final focus requirements and to minimize high-voltage breakdown risks. We will present the physics design, preliminary engineering and diagnostics layouts of the injector diode as well as preliminary results on a scaled experiment using the Berkeley RTA facility. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract AC03-76SF00098.

  4. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  5. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-02

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  6. High-power high-brightness solar laser approach for renewable Mg recovery from MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Joana; Liang, Dawei

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen and heat energy from the reaction of magnesium with water can be used for engines and fuel cells. However, at least 4000 K is necessary for magnesium oxide reduction. Ultra high brightness solar-pumped lasers become essential to make this renewable process technology efficient and economically competitive. 2.3 mg/kJ solar laser - induced magnesium production efficiency has been achieved by T. Yabe et al., in 2012, by focusing a 53 W solar laser beam on a mixture of MgO with Si as reducing agent. This result is however far from the 12.1 mg/kJ attained with 2 kW/mm2 CO2 laser beam. To improve substantially the solar laser - induced Mg production efficiency, a simple high-power, high brightness Nd:YAG solar laser pumping approach is proposed. The solar radiation is both collected and concentrated by four Fresnel lenses, and redirected towards a Nd:YAG laser head by four plane folding mirrors. A fused-silica secondary concentrator is used to compress the highly concentrated solar radiation to a laser rod. Optimum pumping conditions and laser resonator parameters are found through ZEMAXand LASCADnumerical analysis. High-record solar laser beam brightness figure of merit - defined as the ratio between laser power and the product of Mx 2 and My 2 - of 10.5 W is numerically achieved, being 5.5 times higher than the previous record and about 1600 times more than that of the most powerful Nd:YAG solar laser. 8340 W/mm2 is numerically achieved at its focal region, which can quadruple the magnesium production efficiency with clean energy.

  7. Numerical simulations of novel high-power high-brightness diode laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucke, Konstantin; Rogg, Joseph; Kelemen, Marc T.; Poprawe, Reinhart; Weimann, Guenter

    2001-07-01

    One of the key topics in today's semiconductor laser development activities is to increase the brightness of high-power diode lasers. Although structures showing an increased brightness have been developed specific draw-backs of these structures lead to a still strong demand for investigation of alternative concepts. Especially for the investigation of basically novel structures easy-to-use and fast simulation tools are essential to avoid unnecessary, cost and time consuming experiments. A diode laser simulation tool based on finite difference representations of the Helmholtz equation in 'wide-angle' approximation and the carrier diffusion equation has been developed. An optimized numerical algorithm leads to short execution times of a few seconds per resonator round-trip on a standard PC. After each round-trip characteristics like optical output power, beam profile and beam parameters are calculated. A graphical user interface allows online monitoring of the simulation results. The simulation tool is used to investigate a novel high-power, high-brightness diode laser structure, the so-called 'Z-Structure'. In this structure an increased brightness is achieved by reducing the divergency angle of the beam by angular filtering: The round trip path of the beam is two times folded using internal total reflection at surfaces defined by a small index step in the semiconductor material, forming a stretched 'Z'. The sharp decrease of the reflectivity for angles of incidence above the angle of total reflection leads to a narrowing of the angular spectrum of the beam. The simulations of the 'Z-Structure' indicate an increase of the beam quality by a factor of five to ten compared to standard broad-area lasers.

  8. Bright Semiconductor Scintillator for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Olena E.; Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas

    2011-08-16

    We report on a novel approach to produce oxygen-doped zinc telluride (ZnTe:O), a remarkable group II-VI semiconductor scintillator, fabricated in the columnar-structured or polycrystalline forms needed to fulfill the needs of many demanding X-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging applications. ZnTe:O has one of the highest conversion efficiencies among known scintillators, emission around 680 nm (which is ideally suited for CCD sensors), high density of 6.4 g/cm{sup 3}, fast decay time of {approx}1 {micro}s with negligible afterglow, and orders of magnitude higher radiation resistance compared to commonly used scintillators. These properties allow the use of ZnTe:O in numerous applications, including X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine (particularly SPECT), room temperature radioisotope identification, and homeland security. Additionally, ZnTe:O offers distinct advantages for synchrotron-based high resolution imaging due to the absence of atomic absorption edges in the low energy range, which otherwise reduce resolution due to secondary X-ray formations. We have fabricated films of ZnTe:O using a vapor deposition technique that allows large-area structured scintillator fabrication in a time- and cost-efficient manner, and evaluated its performance for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at an Argonne National Laboratory synchrotron beamline. Details of the fabrication and characterization of the optical, scintillation and imaging properties of the ZnTe:O films are presented in this paper.

  9. Beam combining techniques for high-power high-brightness diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschke, Bastian; Fritsche, Haro; Kern, Holger; Hagen, Thomas; Pahl, Ulrich; Koch, Ralf; Grohe, Andreas; Gries, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Laser diodes are efficient and compact devices operating in a wide range of wavelengths. Boosting power by beam combining while maintaining good beam quality has been a long-standing challenge. We discuss various approaches for beam combining with emphasis on solutions pursued at DirectPhotonics. Our design employs single emitter diodes as they exhibit highest brightness and excellent reliability. In a first step, after fast axis collimation, all single emitter diodes on one subunit are stacked side-by-side by a monolithic slow-axis-collimator thus scaling the power without enhancing the brightness. The emissions of all diodes on a subunit are locked by a common Volume Bragg grating (VBG), resulting in a bandwidth < 0.5nm and high wavelength stability. Second, two subunits with identical wavelength are polarization coupled forming one wavelength channel with doubled power and brightness. Third, up to five channels are serially spectrally combined using dichroic filters. The stabilized wavelengths enable dense spectral combining, i.e. narrow channel spacing. This module features over 500W output power within 20nm bandwidth and a beam parameter product better than 3.5mm*mrad x 5mm*mrad (FA x SA) allowing for a 100μm, 0.15NA delivery fiber [1]. The small bandwidth of a 500-W-module enables subsequent coarse spectral combining by thin film filters, thus further enhancing the brightness. This potential can only be fully utilized by automated manufacturing ensuring reproducibility and high yield. A precision robotic system handles and aligns the individual fast axis lenses. Similar technologies are deployed for aligning the VBGs and dichroic filters.

  10. High-brightness liquid-crystal light-valve projector using a new polarization converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masao; Sakamoto, Mikio; Kubota, Keiichi; Kato, Yuji; Nishida, Nobuo

    1990-08-01

    A high-brightness liquid crystal light valve (LCLV) projector, in which three amorphous Si TFT-addressed LCLVs are used, has been developed for laroe screen displays. By using a newly developed polarization converter, about twice the brightness has been realized compared to using a conventional sheet polarizer. The polarization converter principle is to efficiently convert an unpolarized light from a light source into a linearly polarized light, used to illuminate a twisted nematic LCLV. The LCLV has 240 x 756 pixels in the 4.3 inch diagonal area. High-brightness full-color images with 120 ft-L brightness have been obtained, when projected onto a 5.0 gain 80 inch diagonal screen using a 300W Xenon arc lamp.

  11. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D.; Posilović, K.; Pohl, J.; Weyers, M.

    2014-10-20

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  12. High Brightness and High Polarization Electron Source for Spin-LEEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, T.; Yamamoto, N.; Mano, A.; Nakagawa, Y.; Konomi, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Okumi, S.; Jin, X.; Ujihara, T.; Takeda, Y.; Ohshima, T.; Kohashi, T.; Yasue, T.; Koshikawa, T.; Saka, T.; Kato, T.

    2009-08-01

    A point-like emission mechanism is required for a GaAs polarized electron source to produce an electron beam with high brightness. This is realized by changing the direction of injection laser from a front-side to a back-side of the photocathode. Based on this concept, a 20 keV gun (JPES-1) was constructed and a transmission photocathode including an active layer of a GaAs-GaAsP superlattice was installed. It produced a laser spot diameter as small as 1.3 μm for the 760˜810 nm laser wavelength, and the brightness of ˜2×107 Aṡcm-2ṡsr-1 corresponding to a reduced brightness of ˜1.0×107 Aṡcm-2ṡsr-1ṡV-1 was obtained for an extracted current of 5.3 μA. This brightness is still smaller than those of W-field-emitters, but one order of magnitude higher than those of LaB6 emitters. The peak polarization of ˜90% was achieved at the same time by the photocathode which has an inserted GaAs thin layer between the GaAsP substrate and the GaAaP buffer layer. It demonstrated that the strain-control of the GaAsP buffer layer is indispensable to achieve the highest polarization. The charge density lifetime of 1.8×108 C/cm2 was observed for an extracted current of ˜3 μA. The second gun system (JPES-2) was already constructed and mounted to a LEEM apparatus operated at OECU.

  13. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  14. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-02-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  15. Yb:YAG power oscillator with high brightness and linear polarization.

    PubMed

    Goodno, G D; Palese, S; Harkenrider, J; Injeyan, H

    2001-11-01

    A diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser with a novel end-pumped zigzag slab architecture has been developed. This architecture provides uniform transverse pump profiles, conduction cooling of the laser crystal, mechanical robustness, and ready scalability to higher powers. At room temperature the laser emits 415 W of cw power with 30% optical conversion efficiency. An image-inverting stable resonator permits a high-brightness output of 252 W with linear polarization and an average M(2) beam quality of 1.45. Q-switched pulse energies of as much as 20 mJ and average Q-switched powers of as much as 150 W were obtained while M(2) was maintained at <1.5. PMID:18049695

  16. Transport of a high brightness proton beam through the Munich tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Greubel, C.; Carli, W.; Peeper, K.; Reichart, P.; Urban, B.; Vallentin, T.; Dollinger, G.

    2015-04-01

    Basic requirement for ion microprobes with sub-μm beam focus is a high brightness beam to fill the small phase space usually accepted by the ion microprobe with enough ion current for the desired application. We performed beam transport simulations to optimize beam brightness transported through the Munich tandem accelerator. This was done under the constraint of a maximum ion current of 10 μA that is allowed to be injected due to radiation safety regulations and beam power constrains. The main influence of the stripper foil in conjunction with intrinsic astigmatism in the beam transport on beam brightness is discussed. The calculations show possibilities for brightness enhancement by using astigmatism corrections and asymmetric filling of the phase space volume in the x- and y-direction.

  17. Current development and patents on high-brightness white LED for illumination.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wen-Yuan; Lo, Ikai; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Chou, Ming-Chi; Shih, Cheng-Hung

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the current development and patents for the application of high-brightness and high-efficiency white light-emitting diode (LED). The high-efficiency GaN nanostructures, such as disk, pyramid, and rod were grown on LiAlO(2) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy, and a model was developed to demonstrate the growth of the GaN nanostructures. Based on the results, the GaN disk p-n junction was designed for the application of high brightness and high efficiency white LED. PMID:20214653

  18. Employment from Solar Energy: A Bright but Partly Cloudy Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeltzer, K. K.; Santini, D. J.

    A comparison of quantitative and qualitative employment effects of solar and conventional systems can prove the increased employment postulated as one of the significant secondary benefits of a shift from conventional to solar energy use. Current quantitative employment estimates show solar technology-induced employment to be generally greater…

  19. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1987-12-01

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1 to 5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, has been consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approximately 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser type cathodes.

  20. Design of high-brightness TEM00-mode solar-pumped laser for renewable material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, D.; Almeida, J.

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sunlight into laser light by direct solar pumping is of ever-increasing importance because broadband, temporally constant, sunlight is converted into laser light, which can be a source of narrowband, collimated, rapidly pulsed, radiation with the possibility of obtaining extremely high brightness and intensity. Nonlinear processes, such as harmonic generation, might be used to obtain broad wavelength coverage, including the ultraviolet wavelengths, where the solar flux is very weak. The direct excitation of large lasers by sunlight offers the prospect of a drastic reduction in the cost of coherent optical radiation for high average power materials processing. This renewable laser has a large potential for many applications such as high-temperature materials processing, renewable magnesium-hydrogen energy cycle and so on. We propose here a scalable TEM00 mode solar laser pumping scheme, which is composed of four firststage 1.13 m diameter Fresnel lenses with its respective folding mirrors mounted on a two-axis automatic solar tracker. Concentrated solar power at the four focal spots of these Fresnel lenses are focused individually along a common 3.5 mm diameter, 70 mm length Nd:YAG rod via four pairs of second-stage fused-silica spherical lenses and third-stage 2D-CPCs (Compound Parabolic Concentrator), sitting just above the laser rod which is also double-pass pumped by four V-shaped pumping cavities. Distilled water cools both the rod and the concentrators. 15.4 W TEM00 solar laser power is numerically calculated, corresponding to 6.7 times enhancement in laser beam brightness.

  1. High-brightness electron beam diagnostics at the ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1996-07-01

    The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is a dedicated user facility for accelerator physicists. Its design is optimized to explore laser acceleration and coherent radiation production. To characterize the low-emittance, picoseconds long electron beam produced by the ATF`s photocathode RF gun, we have installed electron beam profile monitors for transverse emittance measurement, and developed a new technique to measure electron beam pulse length by chirping the electron beam energy. We have also developed a new technique to measure the ps slice emittance of a 10 ps long electron beam. Stripline beam position monitors were installed along the beam to monitor the electron beam position and intensity. A stripline beam position monitor was also used to monitor the timing jitter between the RF system and laser pulses. Transition radiation was used to measure electron beam energy, beam profile and electron beam bunch length.

  2. High-resolution high-brightness liquid crystal projector for workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Keiichi; Imai, Masao; Kaneko, Setsuo; Tashiro, Yoshiharu; Mochizuki, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Mikio; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    1995-04-01

    A new liquid crystal projector for a work station with high resolution, high level brightness and multisynchronous functions has been developed. It produces a high quality image showing 1280 X 1024 color pixels through a-Si TFT liquid crystal light valves and a high luminous flux at 400 lm through the use of a novel polarization converter. The projection mechanism can be employed not only in front and rear projector, with a screen projection size of up to 200', but also in a novel console type projector with a 70' screen. These projectors can be used for multi media displays, for example, as an electrical overhead projector or a tele-conference system, connected to a work station or a personal computer in the office.

  3. High brightness symmetric emittance rf photoinjector preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Ostiguy, J.F.; Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    A preliminary design for a high bunch charge (8 nC), low emittance (< 20 mm-mr) radiofrequency electron photoinjector matched to the requirements of the Tesla Test Facility is presented. A 1.5 cell iris coupled {pi}mode structure with high average accelerating gradient is chosen for its high shunt impedance, simplicity, and ability to accommodate an externally mounted solenoid for simultaneous beam divergence control and emittance compensation. Beam optics are optimized for an overall injector consisting of the electron gun followed by one linac capture section, a dipole chicane for magnetic bunch compression to achieve a bunch length corresponding to {sigma}{sub z} = 1 mm. Electrical and beam dynamical aspects of the photoinjector design are presented. A description of the proposed experimental program is included.

  4. Experimental characterization of high-brightness electron photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Babzien, M.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pogorelsky, R.M.I.; Qui, X.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1995-10-09

    Operational experience of the emittance compensated photoinjector at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is presented in this paper. The photoinjector has demonstrated the stability and reliability required for UV and X-ray FEL applications. The RF gun has been routinely running at more than 100 MV/m peak acceleration field; the laser system of the photoinjector has achieved 2% peak to peak energy stability, 0.5% point stability and better than 2 ps timing jitter. The highest measured quantum efficiency of the Cu cathode is 0.05%. The electron beam bunch length was measured to be 10 ps using a linac RF phase scan. The normalized rms emittance for a 0.5 nC charge was measured, to be from 1 to 2 mm-mrad, which agrees with PARMELA simulations.

  5. Current State of the Art in High Brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craford, George

    2007-03-01

    LED's have been commercially available since the 1960's. For many years they were used primarily for indicator applications. The remarkable increase in materials technology and efficiency that has been achieved since the early 1990's for AlInGaP red and amber LEDs, and InGaN green and blue LEDs, has enabled the penetration of markets such as outdoor display, signaling, and automotive brake light and turn signal applications. White LEDs, which are either blue LEDs combined with a phosphor, or a combination of red, green, and blue LEDs, are being used in emerging applications such as cell phone flash, television backlights, projection, and automotive headlights. In addition, to efficiency improvements these applications have required the development of higher power packages and, in some of these applications which are etendue limited, higher luminance devices. High power devices are commercially available which are capable of 140 lumens output and have an efficacy of around 70 lm/W for white emission. New package and chip technologies have been demonstrated which have a luminance of 38 mega nits (Mcd/m^2), approximately 50% more luminance than that of an automotive headlamp halogen bulb (˜25 mega nits). The recent progress in materials technology, packaging, and chip technology makes it clear that LED's will become important for general illumination applications. The rate of LED penetration of this market will depend upon continued increases in performance and lower costs as well as better control of the white spectral emission. Efficiency, current density, and costs are closely linked because the cost in dollars/lumen is inversely proportional to how many lumens can be realized from each unit of device area for a given device type. Performance as high as 138 lm/W, and over 40% wall plug efficiency, has been reported for low power research devices and over 90 lm/W for high power research devices. It is clear that high power commercial products with performance in

  6. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blomberg, Ben; Mihalcea, Daniel; Panuganti, Harsha; Piot, Philippe; Brau, Charles; Choi, Bo; Gabella, William; Ivanov, Borislav; Mendenhall, Marcus; Lynn, Christopher; Sen, Tanaji; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  7. High brightness photocathode injector for BNL Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.; Young, L.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the BNL photocathode (1-1/2 cell) Gun'' operating at 2856 MHZ, is presented. The beam parameters including beam energy, and emittance are calculated. A review of the Gun parameters and full input and output of our analysis with program PARMELA, is given in Section 2, some of our results, are tabulated. The phase plots and the beam parameters, at downstream ends of the elements, from cathode through the cavity, first cell is labeled as element 2; and second cell is labeled as element to the exit of the GUN. The analysis was made for 3 cases, using three different initial values (EO) for the average accelerating gradient (MV/m), for comparison with previous works. For illustration, the field obtained with program SUPERFISH is given, and conclusion including shunt impedances obtained for the cells and the cavity are given in Section 6. PARMELA is used as a standard design program at ATF. At the request of some of the users of program PARMELA, this request of some of the users of program PARMELA, this report include and illustrates some of our data, in the input and output format of the program PARMELA. 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, W.D.; Bender, S.; Meier, K.; Thode, L.E.; Watson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The 10-/mu/m Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (/lambda//sub w/ = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 100 /mu/m when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150/degree/ bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. Although the initial experimental program of the upgraded facility will be to test the single accelerator-master oscillator/power amplifier configuration, some portion of the operational time of the facility can be dedicated to user experiments. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. High-brightness source based on luminescent concentration.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Dick K G; Bruls, Dominique; Jagt, Henri

    2016-07-11

    The concept of a high-luminance light source based on luminescent conversion of LED light and optical concentration in a transparent phosphor is explained. Experiments on a realized light source show that a luminous flux of 8500 lm and a luminance of 500 cd/mm2 can be attained using 56 pump LEDs at 330 W electrical input power. The measurement results are compared to optical simulations, showing that the experimental optical efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The present status enables applications like mid-segment digital projection using LED technology, whereas the concept is scalable to higher fluxes. PMID:27410894

  10. The winds of high luminosity late-type bright stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Carpenter, K. G.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of the Fe II line asymmetries were studied to determine the radial dependence of the wind velocity for each star. The dependence of the Fe II profiles on spectral type and luminosity class and thus the variation of the velocity fields with stellar type was also investigated. This allows the generality of the results reported for alpha Ori by Carpenter (1984b) to be judged. In addition, new atomic data was used along with observations of the C II (UV 0.01) multiplet to estimate N(sub e) in the stellar winds. Measures of relative Fe II fluxes can be used in a probability-of-escape model to determine the opacity and hydrogen column density versus height in the chromosphere of each star. Finally, analysis of the fluorescent Fe II lines (pumped by Ly alpha) near 2507 A will yield estimates of the intrinsic stellar Ly alpha flux that cannot be measured directly because of interstellar and circumstellar absorption. One important goal of the effort was to acquire high resolution spectra of the whole 2300 to 3200 A region of 13 luminous K and M stars as a data base that will be enormously valuable in planning observations with the Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph. It is also proposed to follow up the recent discovery of significant variations in the Fe II chromospheric emission line profiles from the M-giant Gamma Cru for the purpose of determining the underlying cause of the variations.

  11. A 3D Parallel Beam Dynamics Code for Modeling High Brightness Beams in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Lidia, S.; Ryne, R.D.; Limborg, C.; /SLAC

    2006-02-13

    In this paper we report on IMPACT-T, a 3D beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and rf linacs. IMPACT-T is one of the few codes used in the photoinjector community that has a parallel implementation, making it very useful for high statistics simulations of beam halos and beam diagnostics. It has a comprehensive set of beamline elements, and furthermore allows arbitrary overlap of their fields. It is unique in its use of space-charge solvers based on an integrated Green function to efficiently and accurately treat beams with large aspect ratio, and a shifted Green function to efficiently treat image charge effects of a cathode. It is also unique in its inclusion of energy binning in the space-charge calculation to model beams with large energy spread. Together, all these features make IMPACT-T a powerful and versatile tool for modeling beams in photoinjectors and other systems. In this paper we describe the code features and present results of IMPACT-T simulations of the LCLS photoinjectors. We also include a comparison of IMPACT-T and PARMELA results.

  12. A 3d Parallel Beam Dynamics Code for Modeling High BrightnessBeams in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Lidia, S.; Ryne, R.; Limborg, C.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper we report on IMPACT-T, a 3D beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and rf linacs. IMPACT-T is one of the few codes used in the photoinjector community that has a parallel implementation, making it very useful for high statistics simulations of beam halos and beam diagnostics. It has a comprehensive set of beamline elements, and furthermore allows arbitrary overlap of their fields. It is unique in its use of space-charge solvers based on an integrated Green function to efficiently and accurately treat beams with large aspect ratio, and a shifted Green function to efficiently treat image charge effects of a cathode. It is also unique in its inclusion of energy binning in the space-charge calculation to model beams with large energy spread. Together, all these features make IMPACT-T a powerful and versatile tool for modeling beams in photoinjectors and other systems. In this paper we describe the code features and present results of IMPACT-T simulations of the LCLS photoinjectors. We also include a comparison of IMPACT-T and PARMELA results.

  13. Toward high brightness, multi-kilowatt solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Manes, K.R.

    1990-11-01

    High average power (HAP) solid state laser output with improved beam quality has introduced new capabilities in materials processing. At the 500 W level and with a beam quality of a few'' times the diffraction limit, the General Electric NY slab is able to drill 5 cm of stainless steel in a few seconds. We expect that 2--3 kW of near infrared laser output in a low order spatial mode would enable metal working now unknown to industry. The HAP output of slab lasers is limited by the size of the available laser crystals and the pump power. Core free, six cm diameter NY boules have been grown on an experimental basis. High optical quality NG can be obtained up to 10 cm in diameter. We present the results of our modeling based on these crystals pumped by advanced arc-lamps or laser diode arrays. We project HAP laser outputs of 1.6 kW from an existing Vortek pumped NG oscillator and about 2 kW from diode pumped NY device. Several kW of laser output can be expected from two such slabs in a MOPA configuration before optical damage limits are reached. The three dimensional stress-optic code which we used to optimize our designs, was normalized to available experimental data obtained with the above NG slab at the 500 W level and a 40 W diode pumped NY test bed. Our calculations indicate the essential parameters for attainment of high beam quality. Cooling uniformity across the pumped faces of the slab is critical and the location of the transition between pumped and un-pumped regions towards the slab tips is very important. A flat pumping profile was found to be desirable and predicted one wave of distortion which should be correctable over about 75% of the aperture however, an even better wavefront was predicted over 90% of the aperture when the regions near the edges of the slab were slightly over-pumped relative to the central regions and the regions near to the ends were tapered to compensate for transition effects.

  14. High-brightness fiber-coupled single emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Stefan; Regaard, Boris; Schmidt, Torsten; Lewis, Ben

    2009-02-01

    Commercial high power fiber coupled diode lasers reach power levels of 200W from a 0.2mm fiber, NA=0.2. 2D fiber coupled single emitter (SE) arrays are described delivering 500W from a 0.2mm fiber. The beam quality of standard 90μm single emitter (SE) is 6mm*mrad (slow axis) and 0.7mm*mrad (fast axis) including errors from fast axis lensing. 3 SEs (24) can be arranged in slow axis (fast axis) to fill the aperture for coupling into a 0.2mm fiber, NA=0.2. For high efficiency, beam shaping optics are avoided. A lens array for slow axis collimation and a focusing optic complete the fiber coupled module. 44 SEs' are arranged as a 2D array, polarization multiplexed and coupled into a 0.2mm fiber, NA=0.2. 62% optical to optical and 75% coupling efficiency are achieved, close to the modeled coupling efficiency of 80%. Alignment tolerances in the system do account for additional losses. Precise manufacturing processes are essential. The SEs on submounts are soldered in one reflow process to a common heatsink and FAC-lensing station automatically aligns the lens based on image processing ensuring minimum total lensing errors (focusing and pointing) of each SE to <15% of total spot size. Tighter tolerances during SE mounting, improved fast axis collimation and a redesigned coupling optic will increase the coupling efficiency to 80% resulting in 410W linear polarized output from the 0.2mm fiber, NA=0.2. Polarization (800W) and dense wavelength multiplexing (1.4kW) open the door to kilowatt level.

  15. High-Precision Measurements of the Brightness Variation of Nereid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Yoichi

    2013-04-01

    Nereid, the outer satellite of Neptune, has a highly eccentric prograde orbit with a semimajor axis of larger than 200 in units of Neptune's radius, and is classified as an irregular satellite. Although the capture origin of irregular satellites has been widely accepted, several previous studies suggest that Nereid was formed in the circumplanetary disk of Neptune and ejected outward to the present location by Triton. A series of our photometric observations confirm that Nereid's rotation period, 11.5 hr, is stable and nonchaotic, as indicated by Grav, Holman, and Kavelaars (2003, ApJ, 591, L71). The optical colors of Nereid are indistinguishable from those of trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs, especially from these objects with neutral colors. We also found the consistency of Nereid's rotation period based on the size-rotation distribution of small outer bodies. It is likely that Nereid originated as an immigrant body captured from the heliocentric orbit that was 4-5 AU away from Neptune's orbit.

  16. Spatial light modulators for high-brightness projection displays.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, K; Fujii, T; Kikuchi, H; Fujikake, H; Kawakita, M; Hirano, Y; Sato, F

    1999-09-10

    We fabricated polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal light valves (PDLCLV's) consisting of a 30-microm-thick hydrogenated amorphous-silicon film and a 10-microm-thick polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC) film composed of nematic liquid-crystal (LC) microdroplets surrounded by polymer. The device can modulate high-power reading light, because the PDLC becomes transparent or opalescent independent of the polarization state of the reading light when either sufficient or no writing light is incident on the PDLCLV. This device has a limiting resolution of 50 lp/mm (lp indicates line pairs), a reading light efficiency of 60%, a ratio of intensity of light incident on the PDLC layer to intensity of light radiated from the layer, and an extinction ratio of 130:1. The optically addressed video projection system with three PDLCLV's, LC panels of 1048 x 480 pixels as input image sources, a 1-kW Xe lamp, and a schlieren optical system projected television (TV) pictures of 600 and 450 TV lines in the horizontal and the vertical directions on a screen with a diagonal length of 100 in. The total output flux of this system was 1500 lm. PMID:18324076

  17. Designing and optimizing highly efficient grating for high-brightness laser based on spectral beam combining

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying-Ying E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Wang, Li-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xue-Chun E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn

    2015-03-14

    A highly efficient nano-periodical grating is theoretically investigated for spectral beam combining (SBC) and is experimentally implemented for attaining high-brightness laser from a diode laser array. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis with the S matrix method is employed to optimize the parameters of the grating. According the optimized parameters, the grating is fabricated and plays a key role in SBC cavity. The diffraction efficiency of this grating is optimized to 95% for the output laser which is emitted from the diode laser array. The beam parameter product of 3.8 mm mrad of the diode laser array after SBC is achieved at the output power of 46.3 W. The optical-to-optical efficiency of SBC cavity is measured to be 93.5% at the maximum operating current in the experiment.

  18. High power, high brightness Al-free active region tapered lasers at 915 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassiaoui, I.; Michel, N.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Calligaro, M.; Krakowski, M.

    2006-04-01

    To achieve high power and high brightness, we have developed tapered diode lasers based on an Al-free active region at 915 nm. The material structure was grown by MOCVD (Metallorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition). It shows very low internal losses of only 0.5 cm -1, a very low transparency current density of 86 A/cm2, an excellent internal quantum efficiency of 86%, and a high characteristic temperature T 0 of 171 K. Based on these good results, at first, we have realised index-guided tapered lasers (IG1) with a narrow output width and a narrow taper angle, which deliver 1 W CW, together with an M2 beam quality parameter of 2.9 at 1/e2, and a narrow divergence angle in the slow axis of 5.1° FWHM and 7.5° at 1/e2. We have also fabricated new index-guided tapered lasers with a Clarinet shape, which were recently proposed to achieve high brightness together with a very narrow divergence angle. The Clarinet lasers deliver 0.6W CW, together with an excellent M2 beam quality factor of 1.2 at 1/e2, and a very narrow divergence angle in the slow axis of only 2.5° FWHM, and 3.9° at 1/e2, which is stable with current. These very narrow divergences are very advantageous for the collective coupling of tapered bars into optical fibers. In this work we have also investigated the influence of taper length on the output power and beam quality.

  19. High brightness sub-nanosecond Q-switched laser using volume Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian M.; Hale, Evan; Venus, George; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Glebov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    The design of Q-switched lasers capable of producing pulse widths of 100's of picoseconds necessitates the cavity length be shorter than a few centimeters. Increasing the amount of energy extracted per pulse requires increasing the mode area of the resonator that for the same cavity length causes exciting higher order transverse modes and decreasing the brightness of the output radiation. To suppress the higher order modes of these multimode resonators while maintaining the compact cavity requires the use of intra-cavity angular filters. A novel Q-switched laser design is presented using transmitting Bragg gratings (TBGs) as angular filters to suppress the higher order transverse modes. The laser consists of a 5 mm thick slab of Nd:YAG, a 3 mm thick slab of Cr:YAG with a 20% transmission, one TBG aligned to suppress the higher order modes along the x-axis, and a 40% output coupler. The gratings are recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass, which has a high damage threshold that can withstand both the high peak powers and high average powers present within the resonator. Using a 4.1 mrad TBG in a 10.8 mm long resonator with an 800μm x 400 μm pump beam, a nearly diffraction limited beam quality of M2 = 1.3 is obtained in a 0.76 mJ pulse with a pulse width of 614 ps.

  20. Three-Dimensional Quasistatic Model for High Brightness Beam Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Lidia, S.; Ryne, R.D.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; /SLAC

    2006-06-19

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional quasistatic model for high brightness beam dynamics simulation in rf/dc photoinjectors, rf linacs, and similar devices on parallel computers. In this model, electrostatic space-charge forces within a charged particle beam are calculated self-consistently at each time step by solving the three-dimensional Poisson equation in the beam frame and then transforming back to the laboratory frame. When the beam has a large energy spread, it is divided into a number of energy bins or slices so that the space-charge forces are calculated from the contribution of each bin and summed together. Image-charge effects from conducting photocathode are also included efficiently using a shifted-Green function method. For a beam with large aspect ratio, e.g., during emission, an integrated Green function method is used to solve the three-dimensional Poisson equation. Using this model, we studied beam transport in one Linac Coherent Light Sources photoinjector design through the first traveling wave linac with initial misalignment with respect to the accelerating axis.

  1. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1988-04-01

    Large diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1-5-microsec electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, approximately 300,000 A/sq cm sq rad has been consistently measured. To obtain this high-current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between about 1600 and 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure 10 to the -6th to -10 to the -5th Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  2. High-power high-brightness 808nm QCW laser diode mini bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hua; Wang, Jun; DeVito, Mark; Bao, Ling; Hodges, Aaron; Zhang, Shiguo; Wise, Damian; Grimshaw, Mike; Xu, Dapeng; Bai, Chendong

    2010-02-01

    A new class of high power high brightness 808 nm QCW laser diode mini bars has been developed. With nLight's nXLT facet passivation technology and improvements in epitaxial structure, mini bars of 3 mm bar width with high efficiency design have tested to over 280 W peak power with peak efficiency over 64% on conduction cooled CS packages, equivalent to output power density near 130 mW/μm. These mini laser bars open up new applications as compact, portable, and low current pump sources. Liftests have been carried out on conduction cooled CS packages and on QCW stacks. Over 370 million (M) shots lifetest with high efficiency design has been demonstrated on CS so far without failure, and over 80 M shots on QCW stacks with accelerated stress lifetest have also proven high reliability on mini bars with high temperature design. Failure analysis determined that the failure mechanism was related to bulk defects, showing that mini laser bars are not prone to facet failure, which is consistent with the large current pulse test and failure analysis on high power single emitters.

  3. Untangling the contributions of image charge and laser profile for optimal photoemission of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Makino, K.; Ruan, C. Y.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2014-11-07

    Using our model for the simulation of photoemission of high brightness electron beams, we investigate the virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge), laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform, and elliptical), and aspect ratios (pancake- and cigar-like) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length, and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for ultrafast electron microscope systems that take into account constraints on the number of generated electrons and on the required time resolution.

  4. Untangling the contributions of image charge and laser profile for optimal photoemission of high-brightness electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Makino, K.; Ruan, C. Y.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2014-11-01

    Using our model for the simulation of photoemission of high brightness electron beams, we investigate the virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge), laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform, and elliptical), and aspect ratios (pancake- and cigar-like) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length, and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for ultrafast electron microscope systems that take into account constraints on the number of generated electrons and on the required time resolution.

  5. Structural, electrical and optical characterization of high brightness phosphor-free white light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiya, Hiromasa

    Much interest currently exists in GaN and related materials for applications such as light-emitting devices operating in the amber to ultraviolet range. Solid-state lighting (SSL) using these materials is widely being investigated worldwide, especially due to their high-energy efficiency and its impact on environmental issues. A new approach for solid-state lighting uses phosphor-free white light emitting diodes (LEDs) that consist of blue, green, and red quantum wells (QW), all in a single device. This approach leads to improved color rendering, and directionality, compared to the conventional white LEDs that use yellow phosphor on blue or ultraviolet emitters. Improving the brightness of these phosphor-free white LEDs should enhance and accelerate the development of SSL technology. The main objective of the research reported in this dissertation is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the nature of the multiple quantum wells used in phosphor-free white LEDs. This dissertation starts with an introduction to lighting history, the fundamental concepts of nitride semiconductors, and the evolution of LED technology. Two important challenges in LED technology today are metal-semiconductor contacts and internal piezoelectric fields present in quantum well structures. Thus, the main portion of this dissertation consists of three parts dealing with metal-semiconductor interfaces, single quantum well structures, and multiple quantum well devices. Gold-nickel alloys are widely used as contacts to the p-region of LEDs. We have performed a detailed study for its evolution under standard annealing steps. The atomic arrangement of gold at its interface with GaN gives a clear explanation for the improved ohmic contact performance. We next focus on the nature of InGaN QWs. The dynamic response of the QWs was studied with electron holography and time-resolved cathodoluminescence. Establishing the correlation between energy band structure and the light emission spectra

  6. Highly bright X-ray generator using heat of fusion with a specially designed rotating anticathode

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, N.; Ohsawa, S.; Sugimura, T.; Ikeda, M.; Tawada, M.; Watanabe, N.; Sasaki, K.; Ohshima, K.; Wakatsuki, M.; Sakabe, K.

    2008-01-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator has been developed, in which the electron beam irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped anticathode (Cu). A high-flux electron beam is focused on the inner surface by optimizing the shape of the bending magnet. The power of the electron beam can be increased to the point at which the irradiated part of the inner surface is melted, because a strong centrifugal force fixes the melted part on the inner surface. When the irradiated part is melted, a large amount of energy is stored as the heat of fusion, resulting in emission of X-rays 4.3 times more brilliant than can be attained by a conventional rotating anticathode. Oscillating translation of the irradiated position on the inner surface during use is expected to be very advantageous for extending the target life. A carbon film coating on the inner surface is considered to suppress evaporation of the target metal and will be an important technique in further realization of highly bright X-ray generation. PMID:18421146

  7. Highly bright X-ray generator using heat of fusion with a specially designed rotating anticathode.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, N; Ohsawa, S; Sugimura, T; Ikeda, M; Tawada, M; Watanabe, N; Sasaki, K; Ohshima, K; Wakatsuki, M; Sakabe, K

    2008-05-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator has been developed, in which the electron beam irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped anticathode (Cu). A high-flux electron beam is focused on the inner surface by optimizing the shape of the bending magnet. The power of the electron beam can be increased to the point at which the irradiated part of the inner surface is melted, because a strong centrifugal force fixes the melted part on the inner surface. When the irradiated part is melted, a large amount of energy is stored as the heat of fusion, resulting in emission of X-rays 4.3 times more brilliant than can be attained by a conventional rotating anticathode. Oscillating translation of the irradiated position on the inner surface during use is expected to be very advantageous for extending the target life. A carbon film coating on the inner surface is considered to suppress evaporation of the target metal and will be an important technique in further realization of highly bright X-ray generation. PMID:18421146

  8. High Brightness Electron Guns for Next-Generation Light Sources and Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    H. Bluem; M.D. Cole; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; I. Ben-Zvi; T. Srinivasan-Rao; P. Colestock; D.C. Nguyen; R.L. Wood; L. Young; D. Janssen; J. Lewellen; G. Neil; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2004-07-01

    Advanced Energy Systems continues to develop advanced electron gun and injector concepts. Several of these projects have been previously described, but the progress and status of each will be updated. The project closest to completion is an all superconducting RF (SRF) gun, being developed in collaboration with the Brookhaven National Laboratory, that uses the niobium of the cavity wall itself as the photocathode material. This gun has been fabricated and will shortly be tested with beam. The cavity string for a closely-coupled DC gun and SRF cavity injector that is expected to provide beam quality sufficient for proposed ERL light sources and FELs will be assembled at the Jefferson Laboratory later this year. We are also collaboration with Los Alamos on a prototype CW normal-conducting RF gun with similar performance, that will undergo thermal testing in late 2004. Another CW SRF gun project that uses a high quantum efficiency photocathode, similar to the FZ-Rossendorf approach, has just begun. Finally, we will present the RF design and cold test results for a fully axisymmetric, ultra-high-brightness x-band RF gun.

  9. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  10. Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Chu, Tak Sum; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  11. Next generation high-brightness diode lasers offer new industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, Andre; Meinschien, Jens; Bruns, Peter; Burke, Colin; Bartoschewski, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    So far, diode laser systems could not compete against CO II-lasers or DPSSL in industrial applications like marking or cutting due to their lower brightness. Recent developments in high-brightness diode laser bars and beam forming systems with micro-optics have led to new direct diode laser applications. LIMO presents 400W output from a 200μm core fibre with an NA of 0.22 at one wavelength. This is achieved via the combination of newly designed laser diode bars on passive heat sinks coupled with optimized micro-optical beam shaping. The laser is water cooled with a housing size of 375mm x 265mm x 70mm. The applications for such diode laser modules are mainly in direct marking, cutting and welding of metals and other materials, but improved pumping of fibre lasers and amplifiers is also possible. The small spot size leads to extremely high intensities and therefore high welding speeds in cw operation. For comparison: The M2 of the fibre output is 70, which gives a comparable beam parameter product (22mm*mrad) to that of a CO II laser with a M2 of 7 because of the wavelength difference. Many metals have a good absorption within the wavelength range of the laser diodes (NIR, 808nm to 980nm), which permits the cutting of thin sheets of aluminium or steel with a 200W version of this laser. First welding tests show reduced splatters and pores owing to the optimized process behaviour in cw operation with short wavelengths. The availability of a top-hat profile proves itself to be advantageous compared to the traditional Gaussian beam profiles of fibre, solid-state and gas lasers in that the laser energy is evenly distributed over the working area. For the future, we can announce an increase of the output power up to 1200W out of a 200μm fibre (0.22 NA). This will be achieved by further sophistication and optimisation of the coupling technique and the coupling of three wavelengths. The beam parameter product will then remain at 22mm*mrad with a power density of 3.8 MW

  12. High brightness LEDs for general lighting applications Using the new ThinGaNTM-Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerle, V.; Hahn, B.; Kaiser, S.; Weimar, A.; Bader, S.; Eberhard, F.; Plössl, A.; Eisert, D.

    2004-09-01

    During the last years GaN-technology has proven to fulfill the requirements of solid state lighting. Lighting requirements are mainly driven by brightness, operation voltage and lifetime. Brigthness is determined by internal efficiency as well as extraction efficiency whereas the ohmic losses determining the operating voltage are dominated by series resistance and contact resistance. Both, brightness and voltage, strongly depend on the device structure as well as the chip design. SiC based [1, 2] as well as Sapphire based LEDs [3] have proven their capability for high brightness devices, still suffering from various compromises such as cost, ESD-stability, high series resistance etc.Recently OSRAM-OS has demonstrated its newly developed product line based on the so called ThinGaNTM technology, a true thinfilm approach that overcomes most of the compromises mentioned. The technology allows highest brightness levels at lowest operating voltage, is scalable and supports all wavelengths. The devices act as true surface emitters with a lambertian emission pattern.

  13. Nanoluciferase signal brightness using furimazine substrates opens bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to widefield microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiho; Grailhe, Regis

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, BRET) techniques are powerful tools for studying protein-protein interactions in cellular assays. In contrast to fluorescent proteins, chemiluminescent proteins do not require excitation light, known to trigger autofluorescence, phototoxicity, and photobleaching. Regrettably, low signal intensity of luciferase systems restricts their usage as they require specialized microscopes equipped with ultra low-light imaging cameras. In this study, we report that bioluminescence quantification in living cells using a standard widefield automated microscope dedicated to screening and high content analysis is possible with the newer luciferase systems, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With such equipment, we showed that robust intramolecular BRET can be measured using a combination of Nluc and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Using the human Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1) dimer model, we next validated that intermolecular BRET could be quantified at a single cell level. The enhanced signal brightness of Nluc enabling BRET imaging to widefield microscopy shows strong potential to open up single cell protein-protein interactions studies to a wider audience. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27144967

  14. Reduced-mode (REM) diodes enable high brightness fiber-coupled modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanskar, M.; Bao, L.; Chen, Z.; Dawson, D.; DeVito, M.; Dong, W.; Grimshaw, M.; Guan, X.; Hemenway, M.; Kennedy, K.; Martinsen, R.; Urbanek, W.; Zhang, S.

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for high-power, high-brightness diode lasers from 8xx nm to 9xx nm for applications such as fiber laser pumping, materials processing, solid-state laser pumping, and consumer electronics manufacturing. The kilowatt CW fiber laser pumping (915 nm - 976 nm), in particular, requires the diode lasers to have both high power and high brightness in order to achieve high-performance and reduced manufacturing costs. This paper presents continued progress in the development of high brightness fiber-coupled product platform, elementTM. Further brightness improvement and power-scaling have been enabled by both the rise in chip brightness as well as the increase in number of chips used to couple into a given numerical aperture. We have developed a new generation of high power broad area laser known as reduced-mode diode (REM-diode) which suppresses many of the higher order modes in the slow axis and reduces divergence up to two times at the same operating conditions. To date, we have achieved slow-axis brightness as high as 4.3 W/mm-mrad for devices with thermal resistance of ~2.5 C/W. As a result, we have achieved >75 watts from a 1×6 elementTMin the 9xx nm spectral range; and 177 watts of peak power from a 2×6 elementTM. We have also improved our optics for fiber-coupling which accommodates 7 emitters per polarization in the same numerical aperture. Using this configuration, we project 200 watts of peak power from a 2×7 elementTM with a reliable product at 176 W of power from 105 μm and 0.15 NA fiber. REM-diodes can also be wavelength stabilized using VBGs. The reliability of REM-diodes are equal or better than broad area lasers (BALs). We present current status on ongoing reliability assessment of chip-on-submount.

  15. Improvement of the temporal and spatial contrast of high-brightness laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmári, S.; Dajka, R.; Barna, A.; Gilicze, B.; Földes, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    A novel method is suggested for temporal and spatial cleaning of high-brightness laser pulses, which seems more energy-scalable than that based on crossed polarizers and offers better contrast improvement compared to the plasma mirror technique. The suggested arrangement utilizes nonlinear modulation of the beam in the Fourier-plane leading both to directional and to temporal modulation. By the use of a ‘conjugate’ aperture arrangement before and after the nonlinear spatial selector, intensity dependent transmission is obtained; simultaneous temporal and spatial filtering can be realized both for amplitude and phase modulation. In the case of phase modulation introduced by plasma generation in noble gases the experimental observations are in good agreement with the theory; demonstrating  >103 improvement in the temporal contrast, ~40% throughput, associated with effective spatial filtering. Due to the broad spectral and power durability of the optical arrangement used here, the method is widely applicable for energetic beams even of UV wavelengths, where most of the former techniques have limited throughput.

  16. Double Bright Band Observations with High-Resolution Vertically Pointing Radar, Lidar, and Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber E.; Demoz, Belay; Vermeesch, Kevin; Hicks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    On 11 May 2010, an elevated temperature inversion associated with an approaching warm front produced two melting layers simultaneously, which resulted in two distinct bright bands as viewed from the ER-2 Doppler radar system, a vertically pointing, coherent X band radar located in Greenbelt, MD. Due to the high temporal resolution of this radar system, an increase in altitude of the melting layer of approximately 1.2 km in the time span of 4 min was captured. The double bright band feature remained evident for approximately 17 min, until the lower atmosphere warmed enough to dissipate the lower melting layer. This case shows the relatively rapid evolution of freezing levels in response to an advancing warm front over a 2 h time period and the descent of an elevated warm air mass with time. Although observations of double bright bands are somewhat rare, the ability to identify this phenomenon is important for rainfall estimation from spaceborne sensors because algorithms employing the restriction of a radar bright band to a constant height, especially when sampling across frontal systems, will limit the ability to accurately estimate rainfall.

  17. Bright, rapid, highly polarized radio spikes from the M dwarf AD Leonis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. R.; Bookbinder, J.; Golub, L.; Davis, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid sequence of highly polarized spikes was observed during the gradual rise of a longer lasting event in an Arecibo Observatory study of a radio burst at 1400 MHz from the main sequence radio star AD Leo. The maximum flux density of the spikes was 130 mJy, and they had rise times of less than about 200 msec. The rise times provide an upper limit to the linear size of the emitter of 6 billion cm, and an area of less than 0.03 of the star's surface area is inferred, for a spike brightness temperature of more than about 10 to the 13th K. The high brightness temperatures and high degrees of circular polarization are explained in terms of electron-cyclotron maser emission at the second harmonic of the gyrofrequency, in longitudinal magnetic fields of about 250 G.

  18. Highly bright avidin-based affinity probes carrying multiple lanthanide chelates.

    PubMed

    Wirpsza, Laura; Pillai, Shyamala; Batish, Mona; Marras, Salvatore; Krasnoperov, Lev; Mustaev, Arkady

    2012-11-01

    Lanthanide ion luminescence has a long lifetime enabling highly sensitive detection in time-gated mode. The sensitivity can be further increased by using multiple luminescent labels attached to a carrier molecule, which can be conjugated to an object of interest. We found that up to 30 lanthanide chelates can be attached to avidin creating highly bright constructs. These constructs with Eu(3+) chelates display synergistic effect that enhance the brightness of heavily modified samples, while the opposite effect was observed for Tb(3+) chelates thereby significantly reducing their light emission. This undesirable quenching of Tb(3+) luminophores was completely suppressed by the introduction of an aromatic spacer between the chelate and the protein attachment site. The estimated detection limit for the conjugates is in the 10(-14)-10(-15) M range. We demonstrated a high sensitivity for the new probes by using them to label living cells of bacterial and mammalian origin. PMID:23018156

  19. Electron beam measurements on the first stage of the HPMC high brightness gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talmadge, S.; Burke, W.; Fornaca, S.; Hauss, B. I.; Higgins, L.; Lee, P. S.; Texter, S.; Thompson, H. R.

    1989-12-01

    The TRW High Power Modular Components (HPMC) program is developing the technology for a high average current ( Iavg = 100 mA) superconducting linac for FEL applications. To test the concepts a high brightness injector system is under construction. The injector incorporates a CW 500 kV high voltage electron gun and a pre-accelerator to raise the energy to 1 MeV where the beam may be finally bunched with minimal emittance growth in the face of the large space charge in the bunch. The injector gun cathode is grid modulated to produce beam pulses with 2 A peak current, 500 ps flat-top at 100 MHz repetition rate. The gun was modeled using both steady state (E-GUN) and time dependent (MASK) codes. The modelling using the MASK code showed that because the space charge in the beam is not in equilibrium with the gun focussing elements during the rise and fall of the pulse large emittance growth can occur. We have therefore designed for the rise and fall periods to be as short as possible with a flat-top peak current. We have constructed a test stand to simulate the first stage of the gun, which operates at 100 kV. On the test stand we have demonstrated 500 ps wide flat-topped beam pulses with rise and fall times of approximately 300 ps. The pulser is capable of repetition rates of up to 100 MHz. Measurements have begun of the beam emittance, which has been yielding values for normalized emittance, thus far, of approximately 15π mm mrad. Work is underway to further characterize the gun.

  20. Operational experience on the generation and control of high brightness electron bunch trains at SPARC-LAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostacci, A.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Cardelli, F.; Castellano, Michele; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Croia, M.; Di Giovenale, Domenico; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Filippi, Francesco; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Giribono, Anna; Innocenti, L.; Marocchino, A.; Petrarca, M.; Piersanti, L.; Pioli, S.; Pompili, Riccardo; Romeo, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea Renato; Shpakov, V.; Scifo, J.; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio; Weiwei, L.

    2015-05-01

    Sub-picosecond, high-brightness electron bunch trains are routinely produced at SPARC-LAB via the velocity bunching technique. Such bunch trains can be used to drive multi-color Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and plasma wake field accelerators. In this paper we present recent results at SPARC-LAB on the generation of such beams, highlighting the key points of our scheme. We will discuss also the on-going machine upgrades to allow driving FELs with plasma accelerated beams or with short electron pulses at an increased energy.

  1. Bright high-order harmonic generation with controllable polarization from a relativistic plasma mirror.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources with a controllable polarization state are powerful tools for investigating the structural and electronic as well as the magnetic properties of materials. However, such light sources are still limited to only a few free-electron laser facilities and, very recently, to high-order harmonic generation from noble gases. Here we propose and numerically demonstrate a laser-plasma scheme to generate bright XUV pulses with fully controlled polarization. In this scheme, an elliptically polarized laser pulse is obliquely incident on a plasma surface, and the reflected radiation contains pulse trains and isolated circularly or highly elliptically polarized attosecond XUV pulses. The harmonic polarization state is fully controlled by the laser-plasma parameters. The mechanism can be explained within the relativistically oscillating mirror model. This scheme opens a practical and promising route to generate bright attosecond XUV pulses with desirable ellipticities in a straightforward and efficient way for a number of applications. PMID:27531047

  2. Bright high-order harmonic generation with controllable polarization from a relativistic plasma mirror

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources with a controllable polarization state are powerful tools for investigating the structural and electronic as well as the magnetic properties of materials. However, such light sources are still limited to only a few free-electron laser facilities and, very recently, to high-order harmonic generation from noble gases. Here we propose and numerically demonstrate a laser–plasma scheme to generate bright XUV pulses with fully controlled polarization. In this scheme, an elliptically polarized laser pulse is obliquely incident on a plasma surface, and the reflected radiation contains pulse trains and isolated circularly or highly elliptically polarized attosecond XUV pulses. The harmonic polarization state is fully controlled by the laser–plasma parameters. The mechanism can be explained within the relativistically oscillating mirror model. This scheme opens a practical and promising route to generate bright attosecond XUV pulses with desirable ellipticities in a straightforward and efficient way for a number of applications. PMID:27531047

  3. High-brightness electron beams for ultrafast electron microdiffraction and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tianyin; Zhou, Faran; Chang, Kiseok; Tao, Zhensheng; Williams, Joe; Ruan, Chong-Yu; MSU UEM Collaboration

    Currently the ultrafast electron diffraction has achieved sub-picosecond temporal resolution and atomic resolution. However, direct ultrafast imaging of a nanometer scale specimen through coherent single-particle diffraction has not been achieved largely due to insufficient intensity when tuned to a coherence length that matches the size of the specimen under the projected phase space density. Utilizing a recently implemented high-brightness electron source with flexible optical design, we test the performance of ultrafast electron microdiffraction and coherence imaging. We demonstrate the feasibilities of single-shot microdiffraction on a single micrometer-sized domain in Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) and coherent diffractive imaging of 10 nm scale charge-ordered domain structures in single-crystal complex materials, as validated by the measured brightness at the sample plane. These initial results show that source-limited performance even from a sub-relativistic electron beamline can drastically improve the current performance of ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  4. High brightness field emission from printed carbon nanotubes in an S-band microwave gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qilong; Li, Xiangkun; Di, Yusong; Yu, Cairu; Zhang, Xiaobing; Li, Ming; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were applied as cold cathode and placed into an S-band microwave gun operating at 2856 MHz with the pulse duration of 2.8 μs. High brightness field emission was demonstrated and the current density achieves the value more than 4.2 A/cm2. The emittance of field emission beam is calculated to be nearly 21 μm based on the beam profile of emission electrons monitored via yttrium aluminum garnet screen. The infrared image of printed CNTs confirms that the emitters in the center contributed more electrons and the heat generated during the large current density field emission. The results in the paper imply that randomly distributed printed CNTs have the potential to be applied as the high brightness electron sources for free electron lasers.

  5. Numerical evaluation of a 13.5-nm high-brightness microplasma extreme ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Hiroyuki Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Jiang, Weihua; Miura, Taisuke; Endo, Akira; Ejima, Takeo; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2015-11-21

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission and its spatial distribution as well as plasma parameters in a microplasma high-brightness light source are characterized by the use of a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The expected EUV source size, which is determined by the expansion of the microplasma due to hydrodynamic motion, was evaluated to be 16 μm (full width) and was almost reproduced by the experimental result which showed an emission source diameter of 18–20 μm at a laser pulse duration of 150 ps [full width at half-maximum]. The numerical simulation suggests that high brightness EUV sources should be produced by use of a dot target based microplasma with a source diameter of about 20 μm.

  6. Ultra-high brightness (10 sup 21 W/cm sup 2 ) laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Hunt, J.T.; Keane, C.; Szoke, A. ); Mourou, G.; Bado, P.; Maine, P. )

    1990-03-21

    New short-pulse laser technology has made possible the production of extremely bright laser sources. The use of these new techniques on large scale Nd:Glass based laser systems would make it possible to produce 1000 TW (Petawatt) pulses. Such pulses would yield focused intensities exceeding 10{sup 21}W/cm{sup 2} corresponding to an electric field in excess of 100 e/a{sub 0}{sup 2} and an energy density equivalent to that of a 10 keV blackbody. Such a source would have important applications in x-ray laser research and lead to a fundamentally new class of experiments in atomic, nuclear, solid state, plasma and high-energy density physics. Such a facility could be constructed with existing chirped-pulse'' technology. A one-year period of research addressing outstanding technical questions can extend the technology resulting in a more compact and cost effective design. For this reason, we are seeking a Director's Initiative grant in the amount of $590,000 for FY89 to investigate these issues. An equivalent amount in personnel and facilities would be provided by Y-Division. The study will include development of a chirped-pulse'' front-end capable of producing laser pulses of 2 J at 1.053 {mu}m with a 1 psec pulsewidth laser. Upon completion, this front-end will be installed on the Nova laser system in order to investigate propagation and compression issues associated with amplification of a chirped-pulse. Our goal is to demonstrate the production of 100 TW pulses using a portion of a Nova beamline.

  7. Production of high brightness H- beam by charge exchange of hydrogen atom beam in sodium jet

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V.; Zelenski, A.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

    2010-11-16

    Production of H{sup -} beam for accelerators applications by charge exchange of high brightness hydrogen neutral beam in a sodium jet cell is experimentally studied in joint BNL-BINP experiment. In the experiment, a hydrogen-neutral beam with 3-6 keV energy, equivalent current up to 5 A and 200 microsecond pulse duration is used. The atomic beam is produced by charge exchange of a proton beam in a pulsed hydrogen target. Formation of the proton beam is performed in an ion source by four-electrode multiaperture ion-optical system. To achieve small beam emittance, the apertures in the ion-optical system have small enough size, and the extraction of ions is carried out from the surface of plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of {approx}0.2 eV formed as a result of plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. Developed for the BNL optically pumped polarized ion source, the sodium jet target with recirculation and aperture diameter of 2 cm is used in the experiment. At the first stage of the experiment H{sup -} beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}0.15 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained. To increase H{sup -} beam current ballistically focused hydrogen neutral beam will be applied. The effects of H{sup -} beam space-charge and sodium-jet stability will be studied to determine the basic limitations of this approach.

  8. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  9. High-brightness low-power consumption microLED arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonar, James R.; Valentine, Gareth J.; Gong, Zheng; Small, James; Gorton, Steve

    2016-03-01

    microLED arrays are a route to providing emissive displays with high brightness and low power consumption performance. In this talk we will discuss results pertaining to sub 10 μm LED pixels, the challenges posed and performance achieved in forming microLED arrays. In particular, pixel pitch, backplane capabilities and colourisation. The applications which can benefit from this approach will also be discussed.

  10. High-power high-brightness ridge-waveguide tapered diode lasers at 14xx nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, Senta; Kelemen, Marc T.; Aidam, Rolf; Losch, Rainer; Kaufel, Gudrun; Mikulla, Michael; Weimann, Guenter

    2005-04-01

    High-power spatially single-mode diode lasers at 1.4 - 1.5 μm wavelength are of interest as pump lasers for Raman and rare-earth doped fiber amplifiers as well as for material processing and for Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) at eye-safe wavelengths. A cost-efficient way to realize high-power high-brightness devices is the tapered resonator concept. We demonstrate InGaAsP/InP based diode lasers with compressively strained quantum wells and wavelengths around 1480 nm which were grown by solid source MBE. From broad area lasers with variations in quantum well number and waveguide layer thickness, parameters for the logarithmic gain model are deduced. With their implementation in 2-dimensional BPM simulations, an optimized resonator geometry is derived. Devices employ a 500 μm ridge section followed by a 2000 μm taper section with 6° angle. Continuous-wave (cw) output powers reach more than 1.5 W. Beam quality is characterized in terms of near field and far field distribution, M2, and astigmatism. An excellent agreement is found between measurement and simulation. For narrow-linewidth operation, devices are provided with anti-reflection coatings on both facets and spectrally stabilized with an external grating. We achieve 0.7 W single mode power and a side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 42 dB. Reliability is tested in terms of facet stability and lifetime. Pulsed measurements reveal a power stability up to more than 5 MW/cm2. From cw aging tests at 1 W output power, lifetimes of about 6,000 h are extrapolated.

  11. REX, a 5-MV pulsed-power source for driving high-brightness electron beam diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.L.; Kauppila, T.J.; Ridlon, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Relativistic Electron-beam Experiment, or REX accelerator, is a pulsed-power source capable of driving a 100-ohm load at 5 MV, 50 kA, 45 ns (FWHM) with less than a 10-ns rise and 15-ns fall time. This paper describes the pulsed-power modifications, modelling, and extensive measurements on REX to allow it to drive high impedance (100s of ohms) diode loads with a shaped voltage pulse. A major component of REX is the 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick Lucite insulator with embedded grading rings that separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. A radially tailored, liquid-based resistor provides a stiff voltage source that is insensitive to small variations of the diode current and, in addition, optimizes the electric field stress across the vacuum side of the insulator. The high-current operation of REX employs both multichannel peaking and point-plane diverter switches. This mode reduces the prepulse to less than 2 kV and the postpulse to less than 5% of the energy delivered to the load. Pulse shaping for the present diode load is done through two L-C transmission line filters and a tapered, glycol-based line adjacent to the water PFL and output switch. This has allowed REX to drive a diode producing a 4-MV, 4.5-kA, 55-ns flat-top electron beam with a normalized Lapostolle emittance of 0.96 mm-rad corresponding to a beam brightness in excess of 4.4 {times} 10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2} {minus}rad{sup 2}. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Physics design of the high brightness linac for the advanced free-electron laser initiative at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, R. L.; Browman, M. J.; Carlsten, B. E.; Young, L. M.

    1992-07-01

    Free-electron lasers and high energy physics accelerators have increased the demand for very high brightness electron-beam sources. This paper describes the design of an accelerator that can produce beams of greater than 7×1011A/m2 (brightness equal to 21/ɛ2, with ɛ = 90% normalized emittance, equivalent to four times the rms emittance). The beam emittance growth in the accelerator is minimized by: producing a short electron bunch in a high gradient rf cavity, using a focusing solenoid to correct the emittance growth caused by space charge, and designing the coupling slots between accelerator cavities to minimize quadrupole effects. The simulation code PARMELA was modified for this design effort. This modified version uses SUPERFISH output files for the accelerator cavity fields, MAFIA output files for the 3-D perturbation fields caused by the coupling slots in the accelerator cells, and POISSON output files for the solenoid field in the gun region. The results from simulations are, at 2.3 nC, a peak current of 180 A and a 90% emittance of 6.4π mm mrad, and, at 4 nC a peak current of 300 A and a 90% emittance of 9.4π mrad. The exit energy from the linac is 20 MeV for both cases. A magnetic pulse compressor can be used to further increase the peak current.

  13. Physics design of the high brightness linac for the advanced free-electron laser initiative at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, R. L.; Browman, M. J.; Carlsten, B. E.; Young, L. M.

    Free electron lasers and high energy physics accelerators have increased the demand for very high brightness electron beam sources. This paper describes the design of an accelerator which can produce beams of greater than 7 x 10(exp 11) A/m(exp 2) (brightness equals 2 asterisk 1/(var epsilon)(sup 2), with (var epsilon) equals 90 percent normalized emittance equals 4 asterisk rms emittance). The beam emittance growth in the accelerator is minimized by the following: producing a short electron bunch in a high gradient RF cavity, using a focusing solenoid to correct the emittance growth due to space charge, and designing the coupling slots between accelerator cavities to minimize quadruple effects. The simulation code PARMELA was modified for this design effort. This modified version uses SUPERFISH output files for the accelerator cavity field, MAFIA output files for the 3-D perturbation fields due to the coupling slots in the accelerator cells, and POISSON output files for the solenoid field in the gun region. The results from simulations are, at 2.3 nC, a peak current of 180 A and a 90 percent emittance of 9.4 (pi) mm-mmrad. The exit energy from the linac is 20 MeV for both cases. A magnetic pulse compressor can be used to further increase the peak current.

  14. High Brightness Picture Technology In SD-P40 Projection TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Shinichi

    1987-04-01

    Pioneer Electric Company has developed a new generation 40-inch rear projection SD-P40 television, a revolutionary, new television that realizes white peak brightness of 300 ft-I and high contrast. The combination of high brightness and high contrast is made possible primarily by newly developed optical-coupling technology that utilizes newly developed concepts. This new optical coupling technology cools the CRT quite efficiently, making it possible to greatly increase the CRT power input to obtain high brightness and at the same time provides greater reliability than direct view televisions. The new optical-coupling technology also makes it possible to almost completely eliminate the reflectance at the boundaries between the CRT and the lens and air, which gives much higher contrast than previous televisions. Not only does this optical-coupling technology provide high performance, in addition since the liquid coolant it employs functions as a liquid lens, the coupling lens can be designed to a uniform thinness and a small aperture. This greatly reduces the cost of the lens. Our newly developed optical-coupling technology is the ultimate form of cooling for the CRT tubes of projection televisions and coupling with the lens and will become the mainstream technology in the future. It is forecast that other manufacturers will also adopt this type of technology. The optical lens section, which is the heart of a projection television, is a hybrid structure with three aspherical plastic lenses and one glass spherical lens. It has higher performance image formation and greater temperature stability than previous televisions. The plastic lenses are all finished with multi-coating to hold down light loss and maximize transparency. This con-tributes greatly to increasing the brightness for a projection television. Previous 3-tube type projection televisions were bothered by low color uniformity, color shift, and low color rela-tive illumination. This model uses three bends

  15. High-power fiber-coupled diode lasers with superior brightness, efficiency, and reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Keith; Hemenway, Marty; Urbanek, Wolfram; Hoener, Kylan; Price, Kirk; Bao, Ling; Dawson, David; Kanskar, Manoj; Haden, Jim

    2014-03-01

    Advances in high performance fiber coupled diode lasers continue to enable new applications as well as strengthen existing uses through progressive improvements in power and brightness [1]. These improvements are most notable in multi-kW direct diode systems and kW fiber laser platforms that effectively transform better beam quality into superior system performance and in DPSS (Diode pumped solid state) application striving to scale TEM00 (fundamental transverse mode) power. We report on our recent single-emitter based fiber-coupled product platform, the elementTM, that addressed these applications at 8xx/9xx nm with optical powers over 200W in a range of fiber core sizes down to 105um and 0.14NA (Numerical Aperture). The product is a culmination of numerous packaging improvements: improving wall plug efficiencies ( 50% electrical-to-optical) while improving volume manufacturability, enabling lower costs, improving usable chip brightness by, < 20% over previous generation chips, and increasing the reliable output power to 15W per chip. We additionally report on current developments to extend the power of the product platform to as high as 300W. This will be realized primarily through new chip architectures projected to further increase the useable chip brightness by an additional 20 % and correspondingly scaling reliable output powers. Second order improvements are proposed in packaging enhancements that capitalize on the increased chip power and brightness as well as expand the package's thermal capabilities. Finally, an extended performance roadmap will translate expected power advances and increasing volumes into a projection of relative $/W decreases over the next several years.

  16. An Increasing Stellar Baryon Fraction in Bright Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Papovich, Casey; Milosavljević, Miloš; Dekel, Avishai; Narayanan, Desika; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Cooray, Asantha; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salmon, Brett; Willner, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately {M}{UV}*˜ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 173 bright, MUV < -21 galaxies at z = 4-7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that {M}{UV}* galaxies at z = 4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/M⊙) = 9.6-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z = 4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z = 2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation for a fixed dust-attenuation curve. Matching the abundances of these bright z = 4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi ΛCDM simulation implies that the typical halo masses in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies decrease from log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.9 at z = 4 to log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.4 at z = 7. Thus, although we are studying galaxies at a similar stellar mass across multiple redshifts, these galaxies live in lower mass halos at higher redshift. The stellar baryon fraction in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies in units of the cosmic mean Ωb/Ωm rises from 5.1% at z = 4 to 11.7% at z = 7; this evolution is significant at the ˜3σ level. This rise does not agree with simple expectations of how galaxies grow, and implies that some effect, perhaps a diminishing efficiency of feedback, is allowing a higher fraction of available baryons to be converted into stars at high redshifts.

  17. High-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules in fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Marty; Urbanek, Wolfram; Hoener, Kylan; Kennedy, Keith W.; Bao, Ling; Dawson, David; Cragerud, Emily S.; Balsley, David; Burkholder, Gary; Reynolds, Mitch; Price, Kirk; Haden, Jim; Kanskar, Manoj; Kliner, Dahv A.

    2014-03-01

    High-power, high-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules enable high-performance industrial fiber lasers with simple system architectures, multi-kW output powers, excellent beam quality, unsurpassed reliability, and low initial and operating costs. We report commercially available (element™), single-emitter-based, 9xx nm pump sources with powers up to 130 W in a 105 μm fiber and 250 W in a 200 μm fiber. This combination of high power and high brightness translates into improved fiber laser performance, e.g., simultaneously achieving high nonlinear thresholds and excellent beam quality at kW power levels. Wavelength-stabilized, 976 nm versions of these pumps are available for applications requiring minimization of the gain-fiber length (e.g., generation of high-peak-power pulses). Recent prototypes have achieved output powers up to 300 W in a 200 μm fiber. Extensive environmental and life testing at both the chip and module level under accelerated and real-world operating conditions have demonstrated extremely high reliability, with innovative designs having eliminated package-induced-failure mechanisms. Finally, we report integrated Pump Modules that provide < 1.6 kW of fiber-coupled power conveniently formatted for fiber-laser pumping or direct-diode applications; these 19" rack-mountable, 2U units combine the outputs of up to 14 elements™ using fused-fiber combiners, and they include high-efficiency diode drivers and safety sensors.

  18. Characterizing near-infrared sky brightness in the Canadian high arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Graham, James R.; Abraham, Roberto; Tekatch, Anthony; Steinbring, Eric; Ngan, Wayne; Welch, Doug L.; Law, Nicholas M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the first measurements of the near-infrared (NIR), specifically the J-band, sky background in the Canadian High Arctic. There has been considerable recent interest in the development of an astronomical observatory in Ellesmere Island; initial site testing has shown promise for a world-class site. Encouragement for our study came from sky background measurements on the high Antarctic glacial plateau in winter that showed markedly lower NIR emission when compared to good mid-latitude astronomical sites due to reduced emission from the Meinel bands, i.e. hydroxyl radical (OH) airglow lines. This is possibly a Polar effect and may also be present in the High Arctic. To test this hypothesis, we carried out an experiment which measured the the J-band sky brightness in the High Arctic during winter. We constructed a zenith-pointing, J-band photometer, and installed it at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) near Eureka, Nunavut (latitude: 80° N). We present the design of our ruggedized photometer and our results from our short PEARL observing campaign in February 2012. Taken over a period of four days, our measurements indicate that the J-band sky brightness varies between 15.5-15.9 mag arcsec2 with a measurement uncertainty of 0.15 mag. The uncertainty is entirely dominated by systematic errors present in our radiometric calibration. On our best night, we measured a fairly consistent sky brightness of 15.8 +/- 0.15 mag arcsec2. This is not corrected for atmospheric extinction, which is typically < 0.1 mag in the J-band on a good night. The measured sky brightness is comparable to an excellent mid-latitude site, but is not as dark as claimed by the Antarctic measurements. We discuss possible explanations of why we do not see as dark skies as in the Antarctic. Future winter-long sky brightness measurements are anticipated to obtain the necessary statistics to make a proper comparison with the Antarctic measurements.

  19. High-Brightness Picosecond Proton Beam Source Based on BNL TW CO2 Laser: Proof-of-Principle Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Pavlishin, I. V.; Yakimenko, V.; Shkolnikov, P. L.; Pukhov, A.

    2006-11-27

    We initiate study of a high-brightness multi-MeV ion and proton beam source driven by a picosecond CO2 laser. High-energy, collimated particle beams will originate from the rear surface of laser-irradiated foils by a process called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA). The expected advantage of using a CO2 gas laser for this application rather than the ultra-fast solid state lasers is the 100-fold increase of the electron ponderomotive potential for the same laser intensity due to a 10 times longer CO2 laser wavelength. This promises to provide substantial enhancement in energy efficiency and particle yield, and will facilitate the advancement of the TNSA technique towards practical applications.

  20. High Precision Bright-Star Astrometry with the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secrest, Nathan; Dudik, Rachel; Berghea, Ciprian; Hennessy, Greg; Dorland, Bryan

    2015-08-01

    While GAIA will provide excellent positional measurements of hundreds of millions of stars between 5 < mag < 20, an ongoing challenge in the field of high-precision differential astrometry is the positional accuracy of very bright stars (mag < 5), due to the enormous dynamic range between bright stars of interest, such as those in the Hipparcos catalog, and their background field stars, which are especially important for differential astrometry. Over the past few years, we have been testing the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System (UAHC), which utilizes an H4RG-10 detector in windowing mode, as a possible solution to the NOFS USNO Bright Star Astrometric Database (UBAD). In this work, we discuss the results of an astrometric analysis of single-epoch Hipparcos data taken with the UAHC from the 1.55m Kaj Strand Astrometric Reflector at NOFS from June 27-30, 2014. We discuss the calibration of this data, as well as an astrometric analysis pipeline we developed that will enable multi-epoch differential and absolute astrometry with the UAHC. We find that while the overall differential astrometric stability of data taken with the UAHC is good (5-10 mas single-measurement precision) and comparable to other ground-based astrometric camera systems, bright stars in the detector window suffer from several systematic effects, such as insufficient window geometry and centroiding failures due to read-out artifacts—both of which can be significantly improved with modifications to the electronics, read-out speed and microcode.

  1. A high-brightness SRF photoelectron injector for FEL light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, A.; Büttig, H.; Janssen, D.; Kamps, T.; Klemz, G.; Lehmann, W. D.; Lehnert, U.; Lipka, D.; Marhauser, F.; Michel, P.; Möller, K.; Murcek, P.; Schneider, Ch.; Schurig, R.; Staufenbiel, F.; Stephan, J.; Teichert, J.; Volkov, V.; Will, I.; Xiang, R.

    2008-08-01

    Most of the proposed electron accelerator projects for future FELs, ERLs or 4th generation light sources require electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance, and high average current. In all projects photoguns will be applied: DC-photoguns, normal conducting RF-photoguns (NC-guns), and superconducting RF photoguns (SRF-guns). While the concepts of DC- and NC-guns are well proofed, the SRF-gun development still possesses a high risk. Challenges are the design of the superconducting cavity, the choice of the photocathode type, its life time, a possible cavity contamination, the difficulty of coupling high average power into the gun, and, finally, the risk of beam excitation of higher-order cavity modes. In combination with SRF linacs, the SRF-guns seem to be the best solution for high average currents. Several R&D projects of SRF-gun have been launched. In this paper, we will give an overview of the progress of the SRF photoinjector development. In detail, the technical concept, the performance and the status of the Dresden Rossendorf SRF-gun project, a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, MBI and FZD, will be presented. The main design parameters of this SRF-gun are the final electron energy of 9.5 MeV, 1 mA average current, and transverse normalized emittances (rms) of 1 mm mrad at 77 pC and 2.5 mm mrad at 1 nC bunch charge. The 1.3 GHz cavity consists of three TESLA-shaped cells, a specially designed half-cell where the photocathode is placed and a choke filter in order to prevent RF losses at the cathode side. The normal-conducting photocathode with a Cs 2Te photoemission layer is cooled by liquid nitrogen. The SRF-gun cryostat consists of a stainless steel vacuum vessel, a warm magnetic shield, a liquid nitrogen-cooled thermal shield and a titanium He tank with a two-phase supply tube. The 10 kW fundamental power coupler is adopted from the ELBE cryomodule. In a first commissioning and test period the gun will be operated in

  2. Developing High-Resolution Inundation Estimates through a Downscaling of Brightness Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. K.; Wood, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    There is currently a large demand for high-resolution estimates of inundation extent and flooding for applications in water management, risk assessment and hydrologic modeling. In many regions of the world it is possible to examine the extent of past inundation from visible and infrared imagery provided by sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS); however, this is not possible in regions that are densely vegetated or are under persistent cloud cover. As a result of this, there is a need for alternative methodologies that make use of other remotely sensed data sources to inform high-resolution estimates of inundation. One such data source is the AMSR-E/Aqua 37 GHz vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperature measurements, which have been used in previous studies to estimate the extent of inundated areas and which can make observations in vegetated or cloudy regions. The objective of this work was to develop a decision tree classifier based downscaling methodology by which inundation extent can be obtained at a high resolution, based on microwave brightness temperature measurements and high resolution topographic information. Using a random forest classifier that combined the AMSR-E 37GHz brightness temperatures (~12km mean spatial resolution) and a number of high-resolution topographic indices derived from the National Elevation Dataset for the United States (30m spatial resolution), a high-resolution estimate of inundation was created. A case study of this work is presented for the severe flooding that occurred in Iowa during the summer of 2008. Training and validation data for the random forest classifier were derived from an ensemble of previously existing estimates of inundation from sources such as MODIS imagery, as well as simulated inundation extents generated from a hydrologic routing model. Results of this work suggest that the decision tree based downscaling has skill in producing high-resolution estimates

  3. Single-crystal phosphors for high-brightness white LEDs/LDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víllora, Encarnación G.; Arjoca, Stelian; Inomata, Daisuke; Shimamura, Kiyoshi

    2016-03-01

    White light-emitting diodes (wLEDs) are the new environmental friendly sources for general lighting purposes. For applications requiring a high-brightness, current wLEDs present overheating problems, which drastically decrease their emission efficiency, color quality and lifetime. This work gives an overview of the recent investigations on single-crystal phosphors (SCPs), which are proposed as novel alternative to conventional ceramic powder phosphors (CPPs). This totally new approach takes advantage of the superior properties of single-crystals in comparison with ceramic materials. SCPs exhibit an outstanding conversion efficiency and thermal stability up to 300°C. Furthermore, compared with encapsulated CPPs, SCPs possess a superior thermal conductivity, so that generated heat can be released efficiently. The conjunction of all these characteristics results in a low temperature rise of SCPs even under high blue irradiances, where conventional CPPs are overheated or even burned. Therefore, SCPs represent the ideal, long-demanded all-inorganic phosphors for high-brightness white light sources, especially those involving the use of high-density laser-diode beams.

  4. Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, B. L.; Robertson, J. L.; Iverson, Erik B.; Selby, D. L.

    2009-05-03

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a super-critical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source at reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 Å to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

  5. Computational and experimental characterization of high-brightness beams for femtosecond electron imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Tao, Z.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.; Ruan, C.-Y.

    2013-12-16

    Using a multilevel fast multipole method, coupled with the shadow imaging of femtosecond photoelectron pulses for validation, we quantitatively elucidate the photocathode, space charge, and virtual cathode physics, which fundamentally limit the spatiotemporal and spectroscopic resolution and throughput of ultrafast electron microscope (UEM) systems. We present a simple microscopic description to capture the nonlinear beam dynamics based on a two-fluid picture and elucidate an unexpected dominant role of image potential pinning in accelerating the emittance growth process. These calculations set theoretical limits on the performance of UEM systems and provide useful guides for photocathode design for high-brightness electron beam systems.

  6. High-brightness fiber-coupling schemes for diode laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Peter; Hoefer, Bernd; Dannberg, Peter; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2005-08-01

    Fiber-coupling of high-brightness laser diode bars requires shaping and superposition of the images of the individual emitters on the fiber facet. Employment of micro-optical elements together with bulk-optical components enables the design and manufacturing of efficient coupling schemes with small form-factor. In this presentation we describe optical system design, manufacturing of micro-optical elements, system integration and characterization of two coupling schemes: The beam twister approach uses tilted cylindrical mirolens telescopes to rotate the images of the individual emitters by 90° with subsequent beam compression and focusing optics, while a skew ray coupling scheme applies an array of blazed diffractive elements in the pupil plane of a relay optics to superpose the images of the individual emitters. The optics design is based on raytracing procedures, taking into account diffractive effects, which could lower coupling efficiency. Micro-optical components are realized by polymer-on-glass replication of reflow lenses or grating structures manufactured by laser-lithography. System assembly is based on precise glueing with active alignment in the submicrometer range. We realized several optics schemes for coupling of high-power, high-brightness laser diode bars into fibers with 100µm core diameter. The systems are compared with each other with respect to achievable coupling efficiency, adjustment tolerances and pointing stability.

  7. High brightness neutral hydrogen in M31: A new probe of interstellar pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert; Walterbos, Rene

    1990-01-01

    An observational parameter of our own Galaxy, the peak brightness temperature of neutral hydrogen in emission, was determined almost twenty years ago (Burton 1970). This quantity, although possessing a degree of local variations, has a remarkably consistent peak value of 125 K towards spiral arm segments with a few isolated peaks extending to 135 K, once sufficient spatial and velocity resolution are used (less than or equal to 70 pc, less than or equal to 5 km/s) to resolve the emission peaks. The higher spatial and velocity resolution of more recent surveys has not led to the detection of higher brightnesses. For many years this remarkable observational result has received little attention, primarily because similar data for other galaxies, which would allow a meaningful comparison and analysis, did not exist. Recently this situation has changed. A Westerbork survey of M33 (Deul and Van der Hulst 1987, and private comm.) with 40 pc x 8 km/s resolution has revealed consistent peak values of only 95 plus or minus 5 K (although there is still some question of whether the velocity resolution was sufficient in this case), while a Very Large Array (VLA) survey of M31 (Braun 1989a) with 35 pc x 5 km/s resolution has shown consistent peak values but at a temperature of 155 to 165 K. It has become clear that although peak HI brightness seems to be a well-defined quantity within individual galaxies (with a degree of local variation) there are very significant differences in this quantity amongst different galaxies. Researchers embarked on an observational program directed at a sample of 11 nearby galaxies: NGC 55, 247, 7793, 3031, 2366, 2403, 4236, 4826, 4736, 4244, and 5457. They hope to determine the gas properties and phases as a function of both galaxy type and position within the galaxies utilizing high resolution HI observations and optical narrow band imagery and spectroscopy which are now underway.

  8. Color and contrast sensitivity after glare from high-brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, H.-D.

    2008-02-01

    The color contrast capability was investigated for 3 volunteers with 7 specially developed test charts in red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow and black as a reference, namely without and after glare from 4 colored high-brightness LEDs. Each subject completed 56 tests in order to check especially the ability to discriminate low contrast. It was found that a contrast decrease of one level is equivalent to an increase of about 4 s in the required identification time and in addition a delay time between about 14 s and 16 s has been measured at the beginning of the respective test as a result of the dazzling glare from an LED. In addition trials have been performed with 4 different pseudoisochromatic color plates designed by Ishihara for color vision. These plates have been used to determine temporary color deficiencies after an exposure from a high-brightness LED. For this purpose 40 volunteers have been included in a laboratory test. Color vision was impaired for periods between 27 s and 186 s depending on the applied color plate and respective LED color.

  9. Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

    2006-08-17

    This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as “on the fly” adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include • AC Power Factor Correction; • High power efficiency; • Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular “white” light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

  10. Ultra high brightness laser diode arrays for pumping of compact solid state lasers and direct applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Andreas; Fillardet, Thierry; Laugustin, Arnaud; Rabot, Olivier

    2012-10-01

    High Power Laser Diodes (HPLD) are increasingly used in different fields of applications such as Industry, Medicine and Defense. Our significant improvements of performances (especially in power and efficiency) and a reproducible manufacturing process have led to reliable, highly robust components. For defense and security applications these devices are used predominantly for pumping of solid state lasers (ranging, designation, countermeasures, and sensors). Due to the drastically falling price per watt they are more and more replacing flash lamps as pump sources. By collimating the laser beam even with a bar to bar pitch of only 400μm. cutting edge brightness of our stacks.is achieved Due the extremely high brightness and high power density these stacks are an enabling technology for the development of compact highly efficient portable solid state lasers for applications as telemeters and designators on small platforms such as small UAVs and handheld devices. In combination with beam homogenizing optics their compact size and high efficiency makes these devices perfectly suited as illuminators for portable active imaging systems. For gated active imaging systems a very short pulse at high PRF operation is required. For this application we have developed a diode driver board with an efficiency several times higher than that of a standard driver. As a consequence this laser source has very low power consumption and low waste heat dissipation. In combination with its compact size and the integrated beam homogenizing optics it is therefore ideally suited for use in portable gated active imaging systems. The kWatt peak power enables a range of several hundred meters. The devices described in this paper mostly operate at wavelength between 800 nm and 980nm. Results from diodes operating between 1300 nm and 1550 nm are presented as well.

  11. High brightness potassium ion gun for the HIF neutralized transport experiment (NTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high intensity beam to a small spot requires a high brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable size provides the capability to vary the beam perveance and to significantly reduce the beam emittance. We shall report on the gun characterization including current density profile, phase space distributions and the control of electrons generated by the beam scraping at the aperture. Comparison with particle simulations using the EGUN code will be presented.

  12. Method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam

    DOEpatents

    Hannon, Fay

    2016-08-02

    A method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam. The method includes 1) determining the bunch charge and the initial kinetic energy of the highly space-charge dominated input beam; 2) applying the bunch charge and initial kinetic energy properties of the highly space-charge dominated input beam to determine the number of accelerator cavities required to accelerate the bunches to relativistic speed; 3) providing the required number of accelerator cavities; and 4) setting the gradient of the radio frequency (RF) cavities; and 5) operating the phase of the accelerator cavities between -90 and zero degrees of the sinusoid of phase to simultaneously accelerate and bunch the charged particles to maximize brightness, and until the beam is relativistic and emittance-dominated.

  13. Properties and Frequency Conversion of High-Brightness Diode-Laser Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Beier, Bernard; Wallenstein, Richard

    An overview of recent developments in the field of high-power, high-brightness diode-lasers, and the optically nonlinear conversion of their output into other wavelength ranges, is given. We describe the generation of continuous-wave (CW) laser beams at power levels of several hundreds of milliwatts to several watts with near-perfect spatial and spectral properties using Master-Oscillator Power-Amplifier (MOPA) systems. With single- or double-stage systems, using amplifiers of tapered or rectangular geometry, up to 2.85 W high-brightness radiation is generated at wavelengths around 810nm with AlGaAs diodes. Even higher powers, up to 5.2W of single-frequency and high spatial quality beams at 925nm, are obtained with InGaAs diodes. We describe the basic properties of the oscillators and amplifiers used. A strict proof-of-quality for the diode radiation is provided by direct and efficient nonlinear optical conversion of the diode MOPA output into other wavelength ranges. We review recent experiments with the highest power levels obtained so far by direct frequency doubling of diode radiation. In these experiments, 100mW single-frequency ultraviolet light at 403nm was generated, as well as 1W of single-frequency blue radiation at 465nm. Nonlinear conversion of diode radiation into widely tunable infrared radiation has recently yielded record values. We review the efficient generation of widely tunable single-frequency radiation in the infrared with diode-pumped Optical Parametric Oscillators (OPOs). With this system, single-frequency output radiation with powers of more than 0.5W was generated, widely tunable around wavelengths of 2.1,m and 1.65,m and with excellent spectral and spatial quality. These developments are clear indicators of recent advances in the field of high-brightness diode-MOPA systems, and may emphasize their future central importance for applications within a vast range of optical

  14. High resolution deep imaging of a bright radio quiet QSO at z ~ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; He, Wei; Yamada, Toru; Tanaka, Ichi; Iye, Masanori; Ji, Tuo

    2015-05-01

    We have obtained deep J and Ks-band images centered on a bright radio quiet QSO UM 402 (zem = 2.856) using the IRCS camera and adaptive optics systems that are part of the Subaru Telescope, as well as retrieved WFC3/F140W archive images of this object. A faint galaxy (mk = 23.32±0.05 in the Vega magnitude system) that lies ~ 2.4″ north of the QSO sightline has been clearly resolved in all three deep high resolution datasets, and appears as an irregular galaxy with two close components in the Ks-band images (separation ~ 0.3″). Given the small impact parameter (b = 19.6 kpc, at zlls = 2.531), as well as the red color of (J - Ks)Vega ~ 1.6, it might be a candidate galaxy giving rise to the Lyman Limit system absorption at zabs = 2.531 seen in the QSO spectrum. After carefully subtracting the point spread function from the QSO images, the host galaxy of this bright radio quiet QSO at z ~ 3 was marginally revealed. We placed a lower limit on the host component of mk ~ 23.3 according to our analyses. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  15. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. High-brightness AlGaInP light-emitting diodes using surface texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Norbert; Kugler, Siegmar; Stauss, Peter; Streubel, Klaus P.; Wirth, Ralph; Zull, Heribert

    2001-05-01

    There is a large number of new applications in lighting and display technology where high-brightness AlGaInP-LEDs can provide cost-efficient solutions for the red to yellow color range. Osram Opto Semiconductors has developed a new generation of MOVPE-grown AlInGaP-LEDs to meet these demands. Our structures use optimized epitaxial layer design, improved contact geometry and a new type of surface texturing. Based on this technology we achieve luminous efficiencies of more than 30 lm/W and wallplug efficiencies exceeding 10% of LEDs on absorbing GaAs substrates. The epitaxial structure does not require the growth of extremely thick window layer and standard processes are used for the chip fabrication. This allows for high production yields and cost-efficient production.

  17. High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Barletta, William A.; Jiang, Ximan; Ji, Lili

    2009-10-27

    Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

  18. Quantitative in situ determination of hydration of bright high-sulfate Martian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Gellert, R.; Lee, M.; Mallett, C. L.; Maxwell, J. A.; O'Meara, J. M.

    2008-04-01

    The total water content of soils and rocks encountered by the Spirit rover has been determined by a new analysis method applied to the existing data from the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). This approach employs Monte Carlo simulation of the intensities of the photon scatter peaks in the APXS spectra, together with extraction of these intensities from the spectra. For any individual sample, the water detection limits (~6 wt %) and error bars are high due to low counting statistics in the spectra, but combining the data from a well-defined group of similar samples improves the error bars and lowers the limit. Thus typical basaltic surface soils are found to be essentially dry (<1 wt % water) and basaltic rocks are very close to dry (<3.5 wt % water). For four bright subsurface soils in Gusev Crater the water content lies in the range 6-18 wt % these soils contain sulfur at unusually high levels (>12 wt %, 30 wt % SO3) relative to the soils common at other landing sites. Mass balance mixing calculations of available cations infer the presence of Fe-, Mg-, and Ca-sulfates in these bright soils. Together with constraints from mineralogy, our results imply that highly hydrated ferric sulfates are the most important carrier of the bound water found in these four spots. In conjunction with the complementary available chemical and mineralogical information they reveal additional information about present bound water reservoirs on Mars, their mineralogy and their spatial and lateral distribution along the Spirit rover's traverse.

  19. Bright high z SnIa: A challenge for {lambda}CDM

    SciTech Connect

    Perivolaropoulos, L.; Shafieloo, A.

    2009-06-15

    It has recently been pointed out by Kowalski et. al.[Astrophys. J. 686, 749 (2008).] that there is 'an unexpected brightness of the SnIa data at z>1'. We quantify this statement by constructing a new statistic which is applicable directly on the type Ia supernova (SnIa) distance moduli. This statistic is designed to pick up systematic brightness trends of SnIa data points with respect to a best fit cosmological model at high redshifts. It is based on binning the normalized differences between the SnIa distance moduli and the corresponding best fit values in the context of a specific cosmological model (e.g. {lambda}CDM). These differences are normalized by the standard errors of the observed distance moduli. We then focus on the highest redshift bin and extend its size toward lower redshifts until the binned normalized difference (BND) changes sign (crosses 0) at a redshift z{sub c} (bin size N{sub c}). The bin size N{sub c} of this crossing (the statistical variable) is then compared with the corresponding crossing bin size N{sub mc} for Monte Carlo data realizations based on the best fit model. We find that the crossing bin size N{sub c} obtained from the Union08 and Gold06 data with respect to the best fit {lambda}CDM model is anomalously large compared to N{sub mc} of the corresponding Monte Carlo data sets obtained from the best fit {lambda}CDM in each case. In particular, only 2.2% of the Monte Carlo {lambda}CDM data sets are consistent with the Gold06 value of N{sub c} while the corresponding probability for the Union08 value of N{sub c} is 5.3%. Thus, according to this statistic, the probability that the high redshift brightness bias of the Union08 and Gold06 data sets is realized in the context of a (w{sub 0},w{sub 1})=(-1,0) model ({lambda}CDM cosmology) is less than 6%. The corresponding realization probability in the context of a (w{sub 0},w{sub 1})=(-1.4,2) model is more than 30% for both the Union08 and the Gold06 data sets indicating a much better

  20. High-current, high-brightness, and high-duty factor ion injectors. AIP conference proceedings No. 139

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, G.H.; Kuo, Yu-Yun; Keefe, D. Wangler, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    One of the important frontier areas in accelerator physics today is the search for ever better ways of simultaneously achieving higher beam currents with very low emittance, and preserving both properties throughout the acceleration process. This workshop focused on the basic and applied physics encountered with intense ion beams in the low velocity end of a linac. a primary objective of this workshop was to review in depth the different approaches to intense ion injectors, and the phenomena associated with high-current and high-brightness beams. A second objective was to provide a forum for discussion for those people active in this specialized field, and thereby stimulate suggestions and recommendations regarding future work in these areas. The subject material was grouped under five main headings: diagnostics, theory (including simulation), high-current beam transport, cw radio frequency quadrupole accelerators, and multiple beams (including funneling). Following introductory reviews by experts in each of these areas, participants divided themselves among five corresponding working groups. The review papers and the working group summaries and conclusions form the main body of this Proceedings. In addition, four contributed reports on new work presented at the workshop are also included. The workshop papers were cataloged separately.

  1. Broadband and high-brightness light source: glass-clad Ti:sapphire crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Chang; Yang, Teng-I; Jheng, Dong-Yo; Hsu, Chun-Yang; Yang, Tzu-Te; Ho, Tuan-Shu; Huang, Sheng-Lung

    2015-12-01

    High-brightness near-infrared broadband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was generated by glass-clad Ti:sapphire crystal fibers, which were developed using the co-drawing laser-heated pedestal growth method. As much as 29.2 mW of ASE power was generated using 520 nm laser diodes as the excitation source on an a-cut, 18 μm core-diameter Ti:sapphire crystal fiber (CF). The 3 dB bandwidth was 163.8 nm, and the radiance was 53.94  W·mm(-2) sr(-1). The propagation loss of the glass-clad sapphire CF measured using the cutback method was 0.017  cm(-1) at 780 nm. For single-mode applications, more than 100 μW of power was coupled into a SM600 single-mode fiber. PMID:26625059

  2. Design, conditioning, and performance of a high voltage, high brightness dc photoelectron gun with variable gap

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, Jared; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Dobbins, John; Liu, Xianghong; Smolenski, Karl

    2014-09-15

    A new high voltage photoemission gun has been constructed at Cornell University which features a segmented insulator and a movable anode, allowing the cathode-anode gap to be adjusted. In this work, we describe the gun's overall mechanical and high voltage design, the surface preparation of components, as well as the clean construction methods. We present high voltage conditioning data using a 50 mm cathode-anode gap, in which the conditioning voltage exceeds 500 kV, as well as at smaller gaps. Finally, we present simulated emittance results obtained from a genetic optimization scheme using voltage values based on the conditioning data. These results indicate that for charges up to 100 pC, a 30 mm gap at 400 kV has equal or smaller 100% emittance than a 50 mm gap at 450 kV, and also a smaller core emittance, when placed as the source for the Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector with bunch length constrained to be <3 ps rms. For 100 pC up to 0.5 nC charges, the 50 mm gap has larger core emittance than the 30 mm gap, but conversely smaller 100% emittance.

  3. Research on the high-brightness traffic variable message sign based on laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Li-li; Huang, Hai-tao; Ruan, Chi

    2015-10-01

    Researches indicate that foggy weather is one of the most critical factors that restrict human's traffic activities and cause traffic accidents. It will reduce the visibility of traffic message board, which could cause the insecurity of transportation. Commonly, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were used as light source for variable message sign, which could not be seen clearly in the foggy low visibility condition. A high-brightness light source which could be used for variable information board was firstly put forward in this paper. And a new type of variable message sign used in low visibility condition was also introduced. Besides, the attenuation characteristics of laser diode (LD) and light-emitting diode (LED) were analyzed respectively. Calculation and simulation show that the attenuation of red light source is fastest, and the yellow LED light has the better transmittance property. In the experiment, LDs were used to make variable message board for verifying image definition. A 16*16 array structure composed of LDs was designed and could display Chinese characters. By comparing the display effect of LDs and LEDs driven with same power, they were placed in fog chamber of the visibility less than 5 meters. And experiment results show that the penetrability of red LD light is better than that of red LED. So traffic variable message sign based on LDs could improve the image definition and the information could be seen more clearly in the foggy weather. In addition to the high-brightness, good coherence, good direction, experimental results show that traffic variable message board based on LD has better visual effect in low visibility condition.

  4. High-intensity, high-brightness polarized and unpolarized beam production in charge-exchange collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.; Ritter, J.; Zubets, V.; Steski, D.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

    2011-03-28

    Basic limitations on the high-intensity H{sup -} ion beam production were experimentally studied in charge-exchange collisions of the neutral atomic hydrogen beam in the Na-vapour jet ionizer cell. These studies are the part of the polarized source upgrade (to 10 mA peak current and 85% polarization) project for RHIC. In the source the atomic hydrogen beam of a 5-10 keV energy and total (equivalent) current up to 5 A is produced by neutralization of proton beam in pulsed hydrogen gas target. Formation of the proton beam (from the surface of the plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature {approx}0.2 eV) is produced by four-electrode spherical multi-aperture ion-optical system with geometrical focusing. The hydrogen atomic beam intensity up to 1.0 A/cm{sup 2} (equivalent) was obtained in the Na-jet ionizer aperture of a 2.0 cm diameter. At the first stage of the experiment H-beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}1.0 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained using the flat grids and magnetic focusing.

  5. High brightness cathode experiments on the experimental test accelerator (ETA). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, L.; Proulx, G.

    1984-01-01

    The experiments performed on the ETA during the months of September through October of 1984 were intended to accomplish two objectives; to discover or develop a source capable of producing an electron beam whose brightness is substantially higher than that of previous sources, and to determine, if possible, the mechanisms which limit the source brightness so that further enhancements might be obtained. The results of the experiments met these objectives to a limited degree. A cathode material (velvet) and a diode geometry were identified which resulted in more than a factor of two improvements in brightness over that obtained with previous flashboard cathodes. Experiments were performed which have yielded information about mechanisms which may limit beam brightness, and have suggested approaches for further work to improve brightness. However, the desired brightness of 10/sup 5/ A/(cm/sup 2/-rad/sup 2/) was not achieved in these experiments. This report contains a discussion of the cathodes used, the diode geometries employed, the diagnostics, the typical characteristics of a single beam experiment, and the characteristics of the collimator used to measure the brightness. The entire ensemble of brightness data is presented and broken down into classes of experiments. In addition, the results of an EBQ calculation of one diode geometry are discussed, and differences between the results of similar experiments on ETA and ATA are noted. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  6. Tunable high-power high-brightness vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li

    The extraction of high power with high beam quality from semiconductor lasers has long been a goal of semiconductor laser research. Optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) have already shown the potential for their high power high brightness operation. In addition, the macroscopic nature of the external cavity in these lasers makes intracavity nonlinear frequency conversion quite convenient. High-power high-brightness VECSELs with wavelength flexibility enlarge their applications. The drawbacks of the VECSELs are their poor spectral characteristics, thermal-induced wavelength shift and a few-nm-wide linewidth. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate tunable high-power high-brightness VECSELs with spectral and polarization control. The low gain and microcavity resonance of the VECSEL are the major challenges for developing tunable high-power VECSELs with large tunability. To overcome these challenges, the V-shaped cavity, where the anti-reflection coated VECSEL chip serves as a folding mirror, and an extremely low-loss (at tuned wavelength) intracavity birefringent filter at Brewster's angle are employed to achieved the high gain, low-loss wavelength selectivity and the elimination of microcavity. This cavity results in multi-watt TEM00 VECSELs with a wavelength tuning range of 20˜30 nm about 975 nm. Also the longitudinal mode discrimination introduced by birefringent filter makes the linewidth narrow down to 0.5 nm. After the tunable linearly polarized fundamental beam is achieved, the tunable blue-green VECSELs are demonstrated by using type I intracavity second-harmonic generation. The spectral control of VECSELs makes it possible to apply them as an efficient pump source for Er/Yb codoped single-mode fiber laser and to realize the spectral beam combining for multi-wavelength high-brightness power scaling. In this dissertation, theory, design, fabrication and characterization are presented. Rigorous microscopic

  7. Design and optimization of dielectric optical coatings for GaN based high bright LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Yan; Yang, Hua; Yi, Xiaoyan; Wang, Liangchen; Wang, Guohong; Yang, Fuhua; Li, Jinmin

    2008-03-01

    Different types of dielectric optical coatings for GaN based high bright LEDs were designed and discussed. The optical coatings included the anti-reflection (AR) coating, high-reflection (HR) coating, and omni-directional high reflection coating. Main materials for the optical coatings were dielectric materials such as SiO II, Ta IIO 5 and Al IIO 3, which were different from the metallic reflector such as Ag usually used now. For the application of anti-reflection coating in GaN LEDs, it was introduced into the design of transparent electrodes with transparent materials such as ITO to form combined transparent electrodes. With the design of P, N transparent electrodes using the AR coating and ITO for GaN LEDs, the extraction efficiency was improved by about 15% experimentally. For the dielectric high-reflection coating, it has higher reflectivity and lower absorption than the metal reflector, and it was supposed to improve the extraction efficiency obviously. While the dielectric omni-directional reflection coating using dielectric materials was also designed and discussed in this article, since which was anticipated to improve the extraction efficiency furthermore. Using SiO II and Ta IIO 5, the average reflectivity of a design of all dielectric omni-directional high reflection coating on the sapphire surface was over 94%.

  8. The effect of surface brightness dimming in the selection of high-z galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Calvi, V.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradley, L.; Pizzella, A.; Kim, S.

    2014-12-01

    Cosmological surface brightness (SB) dimming of the form (1 + z){sup –4} affects all sources. The strong dependence of SB dimming on redshift z suggests the presence of a selection bias when searching for high-z galaxies, i.e., we tend to detect only those galaxies with a high SB. However, unresolved knots of emission are not affected by SB dimming, thus providing a way to test the clumpiness of high-z galaxies. Our strategy relies on the comparison of the total flux detected for the same source in surveys characterized by different depth. For all galaxies, deeper images permit the better investigation of low-SB features. Cosmological SB dimming makes these low-SB features hard to detect when going to higher and higher redshifts. We used the GOODS and HUDF Hubble Space Telescope legacy data sets to study the effect of SB dimming on low-SB features of high-z galaxies and compare it to the prediction for smooth sources. We selected a sample of Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 4 (i.e., B {sub 435}-band dropouts) detected in all of the data sets and found no significant trend when comparing the total magnitudes measured from images with different depth. Through Monte Carlo simulations we derived the expected trend for galaxies with different SB profiles. The comparison to the data hints at a compact distribution for most of the rest-frame ultraviolet light emitted from high-z galaxies.

  9. The Effect of Surface Brightness Dimming in the Selection of High-z Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvi, V.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradley, L.; Pizzella, A.; Kim, S.

    2014-12-01

    Cosmological surface brightness (SB) dimming of the form (1 + z)-4 affects all sources. The strong dependence of SB dimming on redshift z suggests the presence of a selection bias when searching for high-z galaxies, i.e., we tend to detect only those galaxies with a high SB. However, unresolved knots of emission are not affected by SB dimming, thus providing a way to test the clumpiness of high-z galaxies. Our strategy relies on the comparison of the total flux detected for the same source in surveys characterized by different depth. For all galaxies, deeper images permit the better investigation of low-SB features. Cosmological SB dimming makes these low-SB features hard to detect when going to higher and higher redshifts. We used the GOODS and HUDF Hubble Space Telescope legacy data sets to study the effect of SB dimming on low-SB features of high-z galaxies and compare it to the prediction for smooth sources. We selected a sample of Lyman-break galaxies at z ~ 4 (i.e., B 435-band dropouts) detected in all of the data sets and found no significant trend when comparing the total magnitudes measured from images with different depth. Through Monte Carlo simulations we derived the expected trend for galaxies with different SB profiles. The comparison to the data hints at a compact distribution for most of the rest-frame ultraviolet light emitted from high-z galaxies.

  10. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium–tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  11. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium–tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 ± 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  12. High-brightness power delivery for fiber laser pumping: simulation and measurement of low-NA fiber guiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levy, Moshe; Peleg, Ophir; Rappaport, Noam; Shamay, Moshe; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Berk, Yuri; Baskin, Ilya

    2015-02-01

    Fiber laser manufacturers demand high-brightness laser diode pumps delivering optical pump energy in both a compact fiber core and narrow angular content. A pump delivery fiber of a 105 μm core and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) is typically used, where the fiber NA is under-filled to ease the launch of laser diode emission into the fiber and make the fiber tolerant to bending. At SCD, we have developed multi-emitter fiber-coupled pump modules that deliver 50 W output from a 105 μm, 0.15 NA fiber at 915, 950 and 976 nm wavelengths enabling low-NA power delivery to a customer's fiber laser network. In this work, we address the challenges of coupling and propagating high optical powers from laser diode sources in weakly guiding step-index multimode fibers. We present simulations of light propagation inside the low-NA multimode fiber for different launch conditions and fiber bend diameters using a ray-racing tool and demonstrate how these affect the injection of light into cladding-bounded modes. The mode filling at launch and source NA directly limit the bend radius at which the fiber can be coiled. Experimentally, we measure the fiber bend loss using our 50 W fiber-coupled module and establish a critical bend diameter in agreement with our simulation results. We also employ thermal imaging to investigate fiber heating caused by macro-bends and angled cleaving. The low mode filling of the 0.15 NA fiber by our brightness-enhanced laser diodes allows it to be coiled with diameters down to 70 mm at full operating power despite the low NA and further eliminates the need for mode-stripping at fiber combiners and splices downstream from our pump modules.

  13. Design of a high-brightness, high-duty factor photocathode electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, I.S.; Birnbaum, I.A.; Fixler, S.Z.; Heuer, R.L.; Siddiqi, S.; Sheedy, E. ); Ben-Zvi, I.; Batchelor, K.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Srinivasan-Rao, T. ); Warren, G.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The proposed UV-FEL user's facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory will require a photocathode gun capable of producing short (< 6 psec) bunches of electrons in high repetition rates (5 kHz), low energy spread (< 1.5.%), a peak current of 300 A (after compression) and a total bunch charge of up to 2 nC. At the highest charge the normalized transverse emittance should be less than 7 {pi} mm-mrad. We are presently designing a gun that is expected to exceed these requirements. This gun will consist of 3{1/2} cells, constructed of GlidCop-15, an aluminum oxide dispersion strengthened copper alloy. The gun will be capable of operating at duty factors in excess of 1%. Extensive beam dynamics studies of the gun were used to determine the effect of varying the length of the first cell, shaping the apertures between cells, and increasing the number of cells. In addition, a detailed thermal and mechanical study of the gun was performed to ensure that the thermal stresses were well within the allowable limits and that copper erosion of the water channels would not occur.

  14. Design of a high-brightness, high-duty factor photocathode electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, I.S.; Birnbaum, I.A.; Fixler, S.Z.; Heuer, R.L.; Siddiqi, S.; Sheedy, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Batchelor, K.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Warren, G.D.

    1991-09-01

    The proposed UV-FEL user`s facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory will require a photocathode gun capable of producing short (< 6 psec) bunches of electrons in high repetition rates (5 kHz), low energy spread (< 1.5.%), a peak current of 300 A (after compression) and a total bunch charge of up to 2 nC. At the highest charge the normalized transverse emittance should be less than 7 {pi} mm-mrad. We are presently designing a gun that is expected to exceed these requirements. This gun will consist of 3{1/2} cells, constructed of GlidCop-15, an aluminum oxide dispersion strengthened copper alloy. The gun will be capable of operating at duty factors in excess of 1%. Extensive beam dynamics studies of the gun were used to determine the effect of varying the length of the first cell, shaping the apertures between cells, and increasing the number of cells. In addition, a detailed thermal and mechanical study of the gun was performed to ensure that the thermal stresses were well within the allowable limits and that copper erosion of the water channels would not occur.

  15. High brightness MEMS mirror based head-up display (HUD) modules with wireless data streaming capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanovic, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Hachtel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    A high brightness Head-Up Display (HUD) module was demonstrated with a fast, dual-axis MEMS mirror that displays vector images and text, utilizing its ~8kHz bandwidth on both axes. Two methodologies were evaluated: in one, the mirror steers a laser at wide angles of <48° on transparent multi-color fluorescent emissive film and displays content directly on the windshield, and in the other the mirror displays content on reflective multi-color emissive phosphor plates reflected off the windshield to create a virtual image for the driver. The display module is compact, consisting of a single laser diode, off-the-shelf lenses and a MEMS mirror in combination with a MEMS controller to enable precise movement of the mirror's X- and Y-axis. The MEMS controller offers both USB and wireless streaming capability and we utilize a library of functions on a host computer for creating content and controlling the mirror. Integration with smart phone applications is demonstrated, utilizing the mobile device both for content generation based on various messages or data, and for content streaming to the MEMS controller via Bluetooth interface. The display unit is highly resistant to vibrations and shock, and requires only ~1.5W to operate, even with content readable in sunlit outdoor conditions. The low power requirement is in part due to a vector graphics approach, allowing the efficient use of laser power, and also due to the use of a single, relatively high efficiency laser and simple optics.

  16. Rear-side resonator architecture for the passive coherent combining of high-brightness laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, G; Doyen-Moldovan, I; Janicot, S; Hanna, M; Decker, J; Crump, P; Blume, G; Erbert, G; Georges, P; Lucas-Leclin, G

    2016-03-01

    We describe a new coherent beam combining architecture based on passive phase locking of emitters in an extended cavity on the rear facet and their coherent combination on the front facet. This rear-side technique provides strong optical feedback for phase locking while maintaining a high electrical-to-optical efficiency. Two high-brightness high-power tapered laser diodes are coherently combined using a Michelson-based cavity. The combining efficiency is above 82% and results in an output power of 6.7 W in a nearly diffraction-limited beam with an M(4σ)(2)≤1.2. A semi-active automatic adjustment of the current enhances the long-term stability of the combination, while the short-term stability is passively ensured by the extended cavity. This new laser configuration exhibits the simplicity of passive self-organizing architectures while providing a power conversion efficiency of 27% that is comparable to master oscillator power amplifier architectures. PMID:26974088

  17. Generation of bright phase-matched circularly-polarized extreme ultraviolet high harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kfir, Ofer; Grychtol, Patrik; Turgut, Emrah; Knut, Ronny; Zusin, Dmitriy; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Popmintchev, Tenio; Nembach, Hans; Shaw, Justin M.; Fleischer, Avner; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret; Cohen, Oren

    2015-02-01

    Circularly-polarized extreme ultraviolet and X-ray radiation is useful for analysing the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of materials. To date, such radiation has only been available at large-scale X-ray facilities such as synchrotrons. Here, we demonstrate the first bright, phase-matched, extreme ultraviolet circularly-polarized high harmonics source. The harmonics are emitted when bi-chromatic counter-rotating circularly-polarized laser pulses field-ionize a gas in a hollow-core waveguide. We use this new light source for magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the M-shell absorption edges of Co. We show that phase-matching of circularly-polarized harmonics is unique and robust, producing a photon flux comparable to linearly polarized high harmonic sources. This work represents a critical advance towards the development of table-top systems for element-specific imaging and spectroscopy of multiple elements simultaneously in magnetic and other chiral media with very high spatial and temporal resolution.

  18. The complex evolutionary paths of local infrared bright galaxies: a high angular resolution mid-infrared view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Poulton, R.; Roche, P. F.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Aretxaga, I.; Martínez-Paredes, M.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Colina, L.; Esquej, P.; González-Martín, O.; Ichikawa, K.; Imanishi, M.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Telesco, C.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the evolutionary connection between local IR-bright galaxies (log LIR ≥ 11.4 L⊙) and quasars. We use high angular resolution (˜ 0.3-0.4 arcsec˜ few hundred parsecs) 8 - 13 μm ground-based spectroscopy to disentangle the AGN mid-IR properties from those of star formation. The comparison between the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH feature emission and that measured with Spitzer/IRS indicates that the star formation is extended over a few kpc in the IR-bright galaxies. The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity of IR-bright galaxies is lower than in quasars. Although the dust distribution is predicted to change as IR-bright galaxies evolve to IR-bright quasars and then to optical quasars, we show that the AGN mid-IR emission of all the quasars in our sample is not significantly different. In contrast, the nuclear emission of IR-bright galaxies with low AGN contributions appears more heavily embedded in dust although there is no clear trend with the interaction stage or projected nuclear separation. This suggests that the changes in the distribution of the nuclear obscuring material may be taking place rapidly and at different interaction stages washing out the evidence of an evolutionary path. When compared to normal AGN, the nuclear star formation activity of quasars appears to be dimming whereas it is enhanced in some IR-bright nuclei, suggesting that the latter are in an earlier star-formation dominated phase.

  19. Experience with a high-brightness storage ring: the NSLS 750 MeV vuv ring

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J.

    1984-01-01

    The NSLS vuv ring is the first implementation of the proposals of R. Chasman and G.K. Green for a synchrotron radiation source with enhanced brightness: its lattice is a series of achromatic bends with two zero-gradient dipoles each, giving small damped emittance; and these bends are connected by straight sections with zero dispersion to accommodate wigglers and undulators without degrading the radiation damping properties of the ring. The virtues of the Chasman-Green lattice, its small betatron and synchrotron emittances, may be understood with some generality; e.g. the electron ..gamma..m/sub 0/c/sup 2/ energy and the number of achromatic bends M sets a lower limit on the betatron emittance of e/sub x/ > 7.7 x 10/sup -13/ ..gamma../sup 2//M meter-radians. There is strong interest in extrapolation of this type of lattice to 6 GeV and to 32 achromatic bends. The subject of this report is the progress toward achieving performance in the vuv ring limited by the radiation damping parameters optimized in its design. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Active Detection and Imaging of Nuclear Materials with High-Brightness Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G G; Betts, S M; Berry, R D; Fisher, S E; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P

    2009-02-26

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and {gamma}-ray results are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photo-electron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  1. Optimization of a high brightness photoinjector for a seeded FEL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, G.; Allaria, E.; Badano, L.; Cinquegrana, P.; Craievich, P.; Danailov, M.; Demidovich, A.; Ivanov, R.; Lutman, A.; Rumiz, L.; Sigalotti, P.; Spezzani, C.; Trovò, M.; Veronese, M.

    2013-05-01

    The FERMI@Elettra project is a seeded free electron laser (FEL) source, based on the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) scheme. It is designed to supply photons in a spectral range from 65 to 20 nm with the first undulator line (FEL-1) and from 20 nm to 4 nm with the second undulator line (FEL-2). After a first period of commissioning of the electron beam up to 100 MeV at low charge, started in August 2009, several phases of installations and beam commissioning periods have been alternated through the 2010. On December 2010 the first FEL light in the FEL-1 line was obtained at 65 nm and 43 nm by adopting as an initial seed the third harmonic of a TiSa laser. The complete optimization and commissioning of the photo-injector has been carried on in parallel with the Linac and FEL commissioning, from a conservative set-up to the final designed configuration. This paper reports the electron beam characterization in the injector area, the comparison with the theoretical expectations and the experimental process which resulted in a high brightness electron beam. This beam was optimized to be compressed and then transported through the undulators of FEL-1 where intense photons ranging from 65 nm to 20 nm were generated [1,2].

  2. High-brightness blue organic light emitting diodes with different types of guest-host systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jing-shuang; Peng, Cui-yun; Guo, Kun-ping; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate high-brightness blue organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) using two types of guest-host systems. A series of blue OLEDs were fabricated using three organic emitters of dibenz anthracene (perylene), di(4-fluorophenyl) amino-di (styryl) biphenyl (DSB) and 4,4'-bis[2-(9-ethyl-3-carbazolyl)vinyl]biphenyl (BCzVBi) doped into two hosting materials of 4,4'-bis(9-carbazolyl) biphenyl (CBP) and 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5(4-tert-butyl-phenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) as blue emitting layers, respectively. We achieve three kinds of devices with colors of deep-blue, pure-blue and sky-blue with the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.16, 0.10), (0.15, 0.15) and (0.17, 0.24), respectively, by employing PBD as host material. In addition, we present a microcavity device using the PBD guest-host system and achieve high-purity blue devices with narrowed spectrum.

  3. High-efficient and brightness white organic light-emitting diodes operated at low bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Yu, Junsheng; Yuan, Kai; Jian, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) used for display application and lighting need to possess high efficiency, high brightness, and low driving voltage. In this work, white OLEDs consisted of ambipolar 9,10-bis 2-naphthyl anthracene (ADN) as a host of blue light-emitting layer (EML) doped with tetrabutyleperlene (TBPe) and a thin codoped layer consisted of N, N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPB) as a host of yellow light-emitting layer doped with 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidin-4-yl-vinyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) were investigated. With appropriate tuning in the film thickness, position, and dopant concentration of the co-doped layer, a white OLED with a luminance yield of 10.02 cd/A with the CIE coordinates of (0.29, 0.33) has been achieved at a bias voltage of 9 V and a luminance level of over 10,000 cd/m2. By introducing the PIN structure with both HIL and bis(10- hydroxybenzo-quinolinato)-beryllium (BeBq2) ETL, the power efficiency of white OLED was improved.

  4. Generation of High Brightness X-rays with the PLEIADES Thomson X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LeSage, G P; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M; Rosenzweig, J B; Gibson, D J

    2003-05-28

    The use of short laser pulses to generate high peak intensity, ultra-short x-ray pulses enables exciting new experimental capabilities, such as femtosecond pump-probe experiments used to temporally resolve material structural dynamics on atomic time scales. PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron InterAction for Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) is a next generation Thomson scattering x-ray source being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Ultra-fast picosecond x-rays (10-200 keV) are generated by colliding an energetic electron beam (20-100 MeV) with a high intensity, sub-ps, 800 nm laser pulse. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm2/mrad2. Simulations of the electron beam production, transport, and final focus are presented. Electron beam measurements, including emittance and final focus spot size are also presented and compared to simulation results. Measurements of x-ray production are also reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  5. Longitudinal Profile Diagnostic Scheme with Subfemtosecond Resolution for High-Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Andonian, G.; Hemsing, E.; Xiang, D.; Musumeci, P.; Murokh, A.; Tochitsky, S.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; /UCLA

    2012-05-03

    High-resolution measurement of the longitudinal profile of a relativistic electron beam is of utmost importance for linac based free-electron lasers and other advanced accelerator facilities that employ ultrashort bunches. In this paper, we investigate a novel scheme to measure ultrashort bunches (subpicosecond) with exceptional temporal resolution (hundreds of attoseconds) and dynamic range. The scheme employs two orthogonally oriented deflecting sections. The first imparts a short-wavelength (fast temporal resolution) horizontal angular modulation on the beam, while the second imparts a long-wavelength (slow) angular kick in the vertical dimension. Both modulations are observable on a standard downstream screen in the form of a streaked sinusoidal beam structure. We demonstrate, using scaled variables in a quasi-1D approximation, an expression for the temporal resolution of the scheme and apply it to a proof-of-concept experiment at the UCLA Neptune high-brightness injector facility. The scheme is also investigated for application at the SLAC NLCTA facility, where we show that the subfemtosecond resolution is sufficient to resolve the temporal structure of the beam used in the echo-enabled free-electron laser. We employ beam simulations to verify the effect for typical Neptune and NLCTA parameter sets and demonstrate the feasibility of the concept.

  6. High-efficiency high-brightness diode lasers at 1470 nm/1550 nm for medical and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallup, Kendra; Ungar, Jeff; Vaissie, Laurent; Lammert, Rob; Hu, Wentao

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers in the 1400 nm to 1600 nm regime are used in a variety of applications including pumping Er:YAG lasers, range finding, materials processing, aesthetic medical treatments and surgery. In addition to the compact size, efficiency, and low cost advantages of traditional diode lasers, high power semiconductor lasers in the eye-safe regime are becoming widely used in an effort to minimize the unintended impact of potentially hazardous scattered optical radiation from the laser source, the optical delivery system, or the target itself. In this article we describe the performance of high efficiency high brightness InP laser bars at 1470nm and 1550nm developed at QPC Lasers for applications ranging from surgery to rangefinding.

  7. Transverse emittance-preserving arc compressor for high-brightness electron beam-based light sources and colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-03-01

    Bunch length magnetic compression is used in high-brightness linacs driving free-electron lasers (FELs) and particle colliders to increase the peak current of the injected beam. To date, it is performed in dedicated insertions made of few degrees bending magnets and the compression factor is limited by the degradation of the beam transverse emittance owing to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). We reformulate the known concept of CSR-driven optics balance for the general case of varying bunch length and demonstrate, through analytical and numerical results, that a 500 pC charge beam can be time-compressed in a periodic 180 deg arc at 2.4 GeV beam energy and lower, by a factor of up to 45, reaching peak currents of up to 2 kA and with a normalized emittance growth at the 0.1 μ \\text{m} rad level. The proposed solution offers new schemes of beam longitudinal gymnastics; an application to an energy recovery linac driving FEL is discussed.

  8. Production of quasi ellipsoidal laser pulses for next generation high brightness photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rublack, T.; Good, J.; Khojoyan, M.; Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Hartl, I.; Schreiber, S.; Andrianov, A.; Gacheva, E.; Khazanov, E.; Mironov, S.; Potemkin, A.; Zelenogorskii, V. V.; Syresin, E.

    2016-09-01

    The use of high brightness electron beams in Free Electron Laser (FEL) applications is of increasing importance. One of the most promising methods to generate such beams is the usage of shaped photocathode laser pulses. It has already demonstrated that temporal and transverse flat-top laser pulses can produce very low emittance beams [1]. Nevertheless, based on beam simulations further improvements can be achieved using quasi-ellipsoidal laser pulses, e.g. 30% reduction in transverse projected emittance at 1 nC bunch charge. In a collaboration between DESY, the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science (IAP RAS) in Nizhny Novgorod and the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna such a laser system capable of producing trains of laser pulses with a quasi-ellipsoidal distribution, has been developed. The prototype of the system was installed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY in Zeuthen (PITZ) and is currently in the commissioning phase. In the following, the laser system will be introduced, the procedure of pulse shaping will be described and the last experimental results will be shown.

  9. Determining contrast sensitivity functions for monochromatic light emitted by high-brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Vasudha; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Raghavan, Ramesh; Boyce, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is becoming the choice for many lighting applications that require monochromatic light. However, one potential problem with LED-based lighting systems is uneven luminance patterns. Having a uniform luminance distribution is more important in some applications. One example where LEDs are becoming a viable alternative and luminance uniformity is an important criterion is backlighted monochromatic signage. The question is how much uniformity is required for these applications. Presently, there is no accepted metric that quantifies luminance uniformity. A recent publication proposed a method based on digital image analysis to quantify beam quality of reflectorized halogen lamps. To be able to employ such a technique to analyze colored beams generated by LED systems, it is necessary to have contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) for monochromatic light produced by LEDs. Several factors including the luminance, visual field size, and spectral power distribution of the light affect the CSFs. Although CSFs exist for a variety of light sources at visual fields ranging from 2 degrees to 20 degrees, CSFs do not exist for red, green, and blue light produced by high-brightness LEDs at 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields and at luminances typical for backlighted signage. Therefore, the goal of the study was to develop a family of CSFs for 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields illuminated by narrow-band LEDs at typical luminances seen in backlighted signs. The details of the experiment and the results are presented in this manuscript.

  10. An Electroless-Ag Reflector Developed for High-Brightness White LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. C.; Chung, T. Y.; Chen, Y. H.; Hsiao, C. Y.; Lin, C. P.; Liu, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the reflectivity and the reflectivity stability of the electroless (Ag) metallization of reflectors used in high-brightness white GaN light-emitting diode packages. Two main reflector metallization schemes were studied: (1) electroless-Ag/electroless-pure-Pd/electroless-Ni plating and (2) electroless-Ag/electroless-Pd(P)/electroless-Ni plating. The reflectivity achieved using all reflector-metallization schemes was >85% in the visible range. However, in the electroless-Ag/electroless-pure-Pd/electroless-Ni reflector, reflectivity exhibited substantial thermal degradation; this was because of two principal factors: (1) the change in the surface morphology of the electroless-Ag surface grains; and (2) the alloying effect on the Ag layer exerted by the interdiffusion occurring with the underlying Pd layer. In this study, P was added to the Pd layer, and the thermal degradation of the annealed electroless-Ag/electroless-Pd(P)/electroless-Ni reflector was measured to be less than that of the electroless-Ag/electroless-pure-Pd/electroless-Ni reflector. The P content retarded the interdiffusion between the Ag and Pd(P) layers and preserved the faceted surface of the electroless-Ag layer, which enhanced the stability of the reflectivity of the electroless-Ag reflector. Furthermore, increasing the thickness of the electroless-Ag layer reduced the amount of Pd diffusing through the Ag layer, which helped retain the reflectivity of the Ag surface.

  11. High-brightness 9xx and 14xx single-mode emitter array laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, Norbert; Manz, Yvonne; Mauron, Pascal; Fily, Arnaud; Schmidt, Berthold E.; Mueller, Juergen; Pawlik, Susanne; Sverdlov, Boris; Weiss, Stefan; Thies, Achim; Harder, Christoph S.

    2005-03-01

    In this communication we report on the successful realization of Single-mode Emitter Array Laser (SEAL) bars. Various laser bars with a cavity length of 2.4 mm containing between 25 to 350 narrow stripe lateral single-mode emitters have been realized and mounted epi-side down onto expansion matched heatsinks using a stable AuSn-solder technology. Optical power in excess of 1 W per emitter has been obtained resulting in more than 200 W total output power for the highest emitter density. While these total power levels are comparable to conventional broad-area laser bars (BALB), the brightness of each of the emitters is drastically improved over the BALB approach making theses bars ideal candidates for beam-shaping concepts. Lateral farfield measurements with smooth gaussian patterns, high electro-optical conversion efficiency well above 60% and threshold currents as low as 0.5 A are presented. Similar devices realized from the InGaAsP/InP material system deliver in excess of 20 W from 100 NS emitters at wavelengths around 1480 nm.

  12. Efficient high-brightness diode laser modules offer new industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revermann, Markus; Timmermann, Andre; Meinschien, Jens; Bruns, Peter

    2007-02-01

    We present new developed high power diode laser modules which are performing at outstanding brightness and their applications. The combination of recently designed laser diode bars on passive heat sinks and optimized micro-optics results to laser modules up to 50W out of a 100μm fibre with a 0.22 NA at one single wavelength based on broad area laser bars (BALB) and up to 50W out of 50μm fibre with a 0.22 NA based on single-mode emitter array laser (SEAL) bars. The fibre coupled systems are based on diode lasers with a collimated beam of superior beam data, namely < 10 mm x 10 mm beam diameter (FW1/e2) and < 2mrad x 2mrad divergence (FW1/e2). Such free beam diode lasers deliver 30 W or 60 W output power. The applications for such laser diode modules varies from direct marking, cutting and welding of metals and other materials up to pumping of fibre lasers and amplifiers. Marking speed with up to 30mm/s on stainless steel was observed with 20W laser power and 50μm fibre with a conventional marking setup. Cutting speed of about 1m/min of 0.2mm Kovar sheet was shown with a diode laser module with 50W laser power from a 100μm fibre.

  13. High-power high-brightness tapered lasers with an Al-free active region at 915 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, N.; Hassiaoui, I.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Calligaro, M.; Krakowski, M.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed high power and high brightness tapered lasers based on an Al-free active region at 915 nm. The material structure, which was grown by MOCVD (Metallorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition), has very low internal losses of 0.5 cm -1, a very low transparency current density of 86 A/cm2, a high internal quantum efficiency of 86%, and a high characteristic temperature T 0 of 171 K. Based on these good results, we have realised index-guided tapered lasers (IG1) with a narrow output width of a few tens of microns, a narrow taper angle of less than 1 °, which deliver 1 W CW, together with an M2 beam quality parameter of 3.0, and a divergence angle in the slow axis of 6 ° FWHM and 10.2 ° at 1/e2. We have also realised a small array of six IG1 lasers, which delivers 4 W CW, together with a divergence angle of 5.6 ° FWHM and 10.2 ° at 1/e2. Clarinet lasers were also fabricated. These devices were recently proposed to achieve high brightness together with a very narrow divergence angle, which is stable with current. These index-guided tapered lasers have also a narrow output width, but a larger taper angle of 2 °. The Clarinet lasers at 915 nm deliver 0.65 W CW, together with an M2 beam quality factor of less than 1.5 at 1/e2, and a very narrow divergence angle of 2.6 ° FWHM, and 4.8 ° at 1/e2.

  14. Effects of packaging on the performances of high brightness 9xx nm CW mini-bar diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingwei; Feng, Feifei; Liu, Yalong; Yu, Dongshan; Zhang, Pu; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    9xx nm CW mini-bar diode lasers and stacks with high brightness and reliability are desired for pumping fiber lasers and direct fiber coupling applications. For the traditional cm-bar with 1mm-2mm cavity, it can provide CW output power up to 80W-100W and high reliability, whereas the brightness is relatively low. In comparison, mini-bar based diode lasers with 4mm cavity offer a superior performance balance between power, brightness, and reliability. However, the long cavity and large footprint of mini-bar diode laser renders its sensitivity towards thermal stress formed in packaging process, which directly affects the performances of high bright mini-bar diode lasers. In this work, the thermal stress correlating with package structure and packaging process are compared and analyzed. Based on the experiment and analysis results, an optimized package structure of CW 60W 976 nm mini-bar diode lasers is designed and developed which relieves thermal stress.

  15. Dark current studies on a normal-conducting high-brightness very-high-frequency electron gun operating in continuous wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C. F.; Qian, H.; Sannibale, F.; Zolotorev, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements and analysis of a field-emitted electron current in the very-high-frequency (VHF) gun, a room temperature rf gun operating at high field and continuous wave (CW) mode at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The VHF gun is the core of the Advanced Photo-injector Experiment (APEX) at LBNL, geared toward the development of an injector for driving the next generation of high average power x-ray free electron lasers. High accelerating fields at the cathode are necessary for the high-brightness performance of an electron gun. When coupled with CW operation, such fields can generate a significant amount of field-emitted electrons that can be transported downstream the accelerator forming the so-called "dark current." Elevated levels of a dark current can cause radiation damage, increase the heat load in the downstream cryogenic systems, and ultimately limit the overall performance and reliability of the facility. We performed systematic measurements that allowed us to characterize the field emission from the VHF gun, determine the location of the main emitters, and define an effective strategy to reduce and control the level of dark current at APEX. Furthermore, the energy spectra of isolated sources have been measured. A simple model for energy data analysis was developed that allows one to extract information on the emitter from a single energy distribution measurement.

  16. Energy Migration Engineering of Bright Rare-Earth Upconversion Nanoparticles for Excitation by Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yeteng; Rostami, Iman; Wang, Zihua; Dai, Hongjie; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2015-11-01

    A novel Nd(3+) -sensitized upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP) that can be excited by near-infrared 740 nm light-emitting diode (LED) lamps with bright upconversion luminescence is designed. Yb(3+) ion distribution is engineered to increase the energy migration efficiency. The benefit of the novel LED-excited UCNPs is demonstrated by imaging of breast cancer cells and enabling an economic handheld semiquantitative visual measurement device. PMID:26393770

  17. Bright attosecond soft X-ray pulse trains by transient phase-matching in two-color high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Bernd; Weber, Paul; Kovács, Katalin; Balogh, Emeric; Major, Balázs; Tosa, Valer; Han, Songhee; Vrakking, Marc J J; Varjú, Katalin; Rouzée, Arnaud

    2015-12-28

    We study two-color high-order harmonic generation in Neon with 790 nm and 1300 nm driving laser fields and observe an extreme-ultraviolet continuum that extends to photon energies of 160 eV. Using a 6-mm-long, high pressure gas cell, we optimize the HHG yield at high photon energies and investigate the effect of ionization and propagation under phase-matching conditions that allow us to control the temporal structure of the XUV emission. Numerical simulations that include the 3D propagation of the two-color laser pulse show that a bright isolated attosecond pulse with exceptionally high photon energies can be generated in our experimental conditions due to an efficient hybrid optical and phase-matching gating mechanism. PMID:26832053

  18. Cesium telluride cathodes for the next generation of high-average current high-brightness photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Filippetto, D. Qian, H.; Sannibale, F.

    2015-07-27

    We report on the performances of a Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode under extreme conditions of high peak time-dependent accelerating fields, continuous wave operations, and MHz pulse extraction with up to 0.3 mA average current. The measurements, performed in a normal conducting cavity, show extended lifetime and robustness, elucidate the main mechanisms for cathode degradation, and set the required system vacuum performance for compatibility with the operations of a high average power X-ray free electron laser user facility, opening the doors to the next generation of MHz-scale ultrafast scientific instruments.

  19. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, A; Senft, C; Thompson, K F; Feng, J; Cabrini, S; Schuck, P J; Padmore, H A; Peppernick, S J; Hess, W P

    2013-02-15

    In this Letter, we report on the efficient generation of electrons from metals using multiphoton photoemission by use of nanostructured plasmonic surfaces to trap, localize, and enhance optical fields. The plasmonic surface increases absorption over normal metals by more than an order of magnitude, and due to the localization of fields, this results in over 6 orders of magnitude increase in effective nonlinear quantum yield. We demonstrate that the achieved quantum yield is high enough for use in rf photoinjectors operating as electron sources for MHz repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers. PMID:25166390

  20. Compact radiation sources for increased access to high brightness x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Finn Henry

    experiment itself, the 9 keV x-rays from the source are Bragg reflected from a Silicon crystal as a precursor to a pump-probe experiment which uses the inverse Compton scattered x-rays as a diagnostic. The experiment shows that the characteristics of the produced x-ray beam can be predicted by the input parameters. With sources like the LCLS accepting one quarter of proposals for beam time, it is clear that there is demand for high brightness x-ray sources. Both of these technologies have the potential to increase access not just to x-rays but also to the sources themselves, potentially allowing proliferation of the number of locations for users to access diagnostic tools as well as creating a community of university scale operators.

  1. Recent developments in the application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1991-12-31

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high- brightness ion beams. Since the last workshop, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm{sup 2}) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam impingement and cumulative beam breakup have also yielded encouraging results. Consequently, a section of superconducting resonators and focusing elements has been designed for tests with high-current deuteron beams. In addition, considerable data pertaining to the rf properties of high-{Tc} superconductors has been collected at rf-field amplitudes and frequencies of interest in connection with accelerator operation. This paper summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will build upon it.

  2. Recent developments in the application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1991-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high- brightness ion beams. Since the last workshop, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm{sup 2}) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam impingement and cumulative beam breakup have also yielded encouraging results. Consequently, a section of superconducting resonators and focusing elements has been designed for tests with high-current deuteron beams. In addition, considerable data pertaining to the rf properties of high-{Tc} superconductors has been collected at rf-field amplitudes and frequencies of interest in connection with accelerator operation. This paper summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will build upon it.

  3. Designing new classes of high-power, high-brightness VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloney, J. V.; Zakharian, A. R.; Hader, J.; Koch, Stephan W.

    2005-10-01

    Optically-pumped vertical external cavity semiconductor lasers offer the exciting possibility of designing kW-class solid state lasers that provide significant advantages over their doped YAG, thin-disk YAG and fiber counterparts. The basic VECSEL/OPSL (optically-pumped semiconductor laser) structure consists of a very thin (approximately 6 micron thick) active mirror consisting of a DBR high-reflectivity stack followed by a multiple quantum well resonant periodic (RPG) structure. An external mirror (reflectivity typically between 94%-98%) provides conventional optical feedback to the active semiconductor mirror chip. The "cold" cavity needs to be designed to take into account the semiconductor sub-cavity resonance shift with temperature and, importantly, the more rapid shift of the semiconductor material gain peak with temperature. Thermal management proves critical in optimizing the device for serious power scaling. We will describe a closed-loop procedure that begins with a design of the semiconductor active epi structure. This feeds into the sub-cavity optimization, optical and thermal transport within the active structure and thermal transport though the various heat sinking elements. Novel schemes for power scaling beyond current record performances will be discussed.

  4. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux of high brightness undulators by gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z. )

    1995-02-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  5. High brightness laser-diode device emitting 160 watts from a 100 μm/NA 0.22 fiber.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-11-10

    A practical method of achieving a high-brightness and high-power fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and ZEMAX software simulation, which is obtained by a beam transformation system, free-space beam combining, and polarization beam combining based on a mini-bar laser-diode chip. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output power from the multimode fiber with 100 μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) could reach 174 W, with equalizing brightness of 14.2  MW/(cm2·sr). By this method, much wider applications of fiber-coupled laser-diodes are anticipated. PMID:26560762

  6. High brightness laser-diode device emitting 500 W from a 200 μm/NA0.22 fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junhong, Yu; Linhui, Guo; Hualing, Wu; Zhao, Wang; Hao, Tan; Songxin, Gao; Deyong, Wu; Kai, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A practical method of achieving high brightness and high power fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and ZEMAX software simulation, which is obtained by technologies of precision beam collimation, free space beam combining and polarization beam combining based on mini-bar diode laser chip. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output power from the multimode fiber with 200 μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) could reach 528 W, equalizing brightness is 11.0 MW/(cm2 sr) and electro-optical efficiency (defined as fiber output power divided by voltage and current of the module) is 43.0%. By this method, much wider applications of fiber-coupled laser-diode are anticipated.

  7. Advancements in high-power high-brightness laser bars and single emitters for pumping and direct diode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haiyan; Jiang, Ching-Long J.; Xiong, Yihan; Zhang, Qiang; Inyang, Aloysius; Felder, Jason; Lewin, Alexander; Roff, Robert; Heinemann, Stefan; Schmidt, Berthold; Treusch, Georg

    2015-03-01

    We have continuously optimized high fill factor bar and packaging design to increase power and efficiency for thin disc laser system pump application. On the other hand, low fill factor bars packaged on the same direct copper bonded (DCB) cooling platform are used to build multi-kilowatt direct diode laser systems. We have also optimized the single emitter designs for fiber laser pump applications. In this paper, we will give an overview of our recent advances in high power high brightness laser bars and single emitters for pumping and direct diode application. We will present 300W bar development results for our next generation thin disk laser pump source. We will also show recent improvements on slow axis beam quality of low fill factor bar and its application on performance improvement of 4-5 kW TruDiode laser system with BPP of 30 mm*mrad from a 600 μm fiber. Performance and reliability results of single emitter for multiemitter fiber laser pump source will be presented as well.

  8. Note: Development of a volume-limited dot target for a high brightness extreme ultraviolet microplasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Thanh Hung Suzuki, Yuhei; Hara, Hiroyuki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryoichi; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2014-11-15

    We report on production of volume-limited dot targets based on electron beam lithographic and sputtering technologies for use in efficient high brightness extreme ultraviolet microplasma sources. We successfully produced cylindrical tin (Sn) targets with diameters of 10, 15, and 20 μm and a height of 150 nm. The calculated spectrum around 13.5 nm was in good agreement with that obtained experimentally.

  9. High brightness fiber laser pump sources based on single emitters and multiple single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Torsten; Wagner, Lars; Wolf, Jürgen; Bonati, Guido; Dörfel, Falk; Gabler, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Driven by the potential of the fiber laser market, the development of high brightness pump sources has been pushed during the last years. The main approaches to reach the targets of this market had been the direct coupling of single emitters (SE) on the one hand and the beam shaping of bars and stacks on the other hand, which often causes higher cost per watt. Meanwhile the power of single emitters with 100μm emitter size for direct coupling increased dramatically, which also pushed a new generation of wide stripe emitters or multi emitters (ME) of up to 1000μm emitter size respectively "minibars" with apertures of 3 to 5mm. The advantage of this emitter type compared to traditional bars is it's scalability to power levels of 40W to 60W combined with a small aperture which gives advantages when coupling into a fiber. We show concepts using this multiple single emitters for fiber coupled systems of 25W up to 40W out of a 100μm fiber NA 0.22 with a reasonable optical efficiency. Taking into account a further efficiency optimization and an increase in power of these devices in the near future, the EUR/W ratio pushed by the fiber laser manufacturer will further decrease. Results will be shown as well for higher power pump sources. Additional state of the art tapered fiber bundles for photonic crystal fibers are used to combine 7 (19) pump sources to output powers of 100W (370W) out of a 130μm (250μm) fiber NA 0.6 with nominal 20W per port. Improving those TFB's in the near future and utilizing 40W per pump leg, an output power of even 750W out of 250μm fiber NA 0.6 will be possible. Combined Counter- and Co-Propagated pumping of the fiber will then lead to the first 1kW fiber laser oscillator.

  10. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  11. Lightweight high-brightness helmet-mounted head-up display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Mathieu; North, Thibault; Bourquin, Stéphane; Kilcher, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    We present a compact binocular head-up display for integration in a motorcycle helmet. A 2D MEMS-mirror reflecting laser beams enables the formation of a bright image superimposed on the user vision by means of retinal scanning. A 3d-printed prototype including the required optical components is presented and characterized. It fits the morphology of most users thanks to several degrees of freedom accessible to the user for fine-tuning.

  12. High brightness InP micropillars grown on silicon with Fermi level splitting larger than 1 eV.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thai-Truong D; Sun, Hao; Ng, Kar Wei; Ren, Fan; Li, Kun; Lu, Fanglu; Yablonovitch, Eli; Chang-Hasnain, Constance J

    2014-06-11

    The growth of III-V nanowires on silicon is a promising approach for low-cost, large-scale III-V photovoltaics. However, performances of III-V nanowire solar cells have not yet been as good as their bulk counterparts, as nanostructured light absorbers are fundamentally challenged by enhanced minority carriers surface recombination rates. The resulting nonradiative losses lead to significant reductions in the external spontaneous emission quantum yield, which, in turn, manifest as penalties in the open-circuit voltage. In this work, calibrated photoluminescence measurements are utilized to construct equivalent voltage-current characteristics relating illumination intensities to Fermi level splitting ΔF inside InP microillars. Under 1 sun, we show that splitting can exceed ΔF ∼ 0.90 eV in undoped pillars. This value can be increased to values of ΔF ∼ 0.95 eV by cleaning pillar surfaces in acidic etchants. Pillars with nanotextured surfaces can yield splitting of ΔF ∼ 0.90 eV, even though they exhibit high densities of stacking faults. Finally, by introducing n-dopants, ΔF of 1.07 eV can be achieved due to a wider bandgap energy in n-doped wurzite InP, the higher brightness of doped materials, and the extraordinarily low surface recombination velocity of InP. This is the highest reported value for InP materials grown on a silicon substrate. These results provide further evidence that InP micropillars on silicon could be a promising material for low-cost, large-scale solar cells with high efficiency. PMID:24841253

  13. Detection of a High Brightness Temperature Radio Core in the Active-galactic-nucleus-driven Molecular Outflow Candidate NGC 1266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, Kristina; Alatalo, Katherine; Wrobel, J. M.; Young, Lisa M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, Susana; Bureau, Martin

    2013-12-01

    We present new high spatial resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) H I absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active-galactic-nucleus-(AGN-)driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation (SF) in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate of 13 M ⊙ yr-1 in NGC 1266 reported by Alatalo et al. exceeds SF rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution H I absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P rad = 1.48 × 1020 W Hz-1, and a brightness temperature T b > 1.5 × 107 K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  14. Detection of a high brightness temperature radio core in the active-galactic-nucleus-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Wrobel, J. M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, Susana; Bureau, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present new high spatial resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) H I absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active-galactic-nucleus-(AGN-)driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation (SF) in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate of 13 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in NGC 1266 reported by Alatalo et al. exceeds SF rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution H I absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P {sub rad} = 1.48 × 10{sup 20} W Hz{sup –1}, and a brightness temperature T {sub b} > 1.5 × 10{sup 7} K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  15. Diagnostics of high-brightness short-pulse lasers and the plasmas they generate

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Cobble, J.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.

    1994-02-01

    The properties of a laser influence the interaction of the intense laser light with materials. The authors will describe some of the diagnostics that they have implemented at the Los Alamos Bright Source to correlate the changes in the x-ray spectrum and temporal history of a laser generated silicon plasmas with the changes of the incident XeCl laser light. One property is of special interest, the existence of a short prepulse. They find that the prepulse enhances the generation of the x-rays from a later pulse.

  16. Extremely High Brightness from Polymer-Encapsulated Quantum Dots for Two-photon Cellular and Deep-tissue Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanyan; Liu, Helin; Han, Rongcheng; Huang, Lu; Shi, Hao; Sha, Yinlin; Jiang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Materials possessing high two photon absorption (TPA) are highly desirable for a range of fields, such as three-dimensional data storage, TP microscopy (TPM) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Specifically, for TPM, high TP excitation (TPE) brightness (σ × ϕ, where σ is TPA cross-sections and ϕ is fluorescence quantum yield), excellent photostability and minimal cytotoxicity are highly desirable. However, when TPA materials are transferred to aqueous media through molecule engineering or nanoparticle formulation, they usually suffer from the severely decrease of quantum yield (QY). Here, we report a convenient and efficient method for preparing polymer-encapsulated quantum dots (P-QD). Interestingly, the QY was considerably enhanced from original 0.33 (QDs in THF) to 0.84 (P-QD in water). This dramatic enhancement in QY is mainly from the efficiently blocking nonradiative decay pathway from the surface trap states, according to the fluorescence decay lifetimes analysis. The P-QD exhibits extremely high brightness (σ × ϕ up to 6.2 × 106 GM), high photostability, excellent colloidal stability and minimal cytotoxicity. High quality cellular TP imaging with high signal-to-background ratio (> 100) and tissue imaging with a penetration depth of 2200 μm have been achieved with P-QD as probe. PMID:25909393

  17. Stable High-Brightness Electron Beam System with a Photocathode RF Gun for Short Pulse X-Ray Generation by Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Fumio; Yang, Jinfeng; Yorozu, Masafumi; Okada, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Endo, Akira

    2002-03-01

    A high-brightness electron accelerator system with a photocathode RF gun and an all-solid stable laser for the photocathode was installed, and a commissioning test was performed to generate short-pulse X-ray beams by the Thomson scattering method. Electron energy was boosted by a linear accelerator (linac) up to 14 MeV. Energy dispersion of the electron beams was measured to be 0.7% (rms). The normalized emittance of the electron beam was 4 πmm-mrad with a 0.4 nC bunch charge. The electron beam size at the interaction point, where the electron beams and high peak power laser light interacted, was measured to be 100 μm (rms). Good stability in the spatial and temporal domains was also obtained.

  18. High-Brightness Electron Accelerator Injection System and Experimental Studies of Laser-Induced Explosive Electron Emission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xijie

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the Brookhaven Accelerator Test facility (ATF) injection system are presented. The injection system consists of a high-brightness electron source (photocathode RF gun) and a low-energy transport line. Cavity properties of the RF gun were measured, and found to agree with the calculated results obtained using the computer program SUPERFISH. We also studied the effect of using a non-symmetrical laser spot and RF focusing techniques to reduce the emittance growth in the injection system. A tracking program was developed to investigate higher-order effects on the transverse emittance and the bunch length of the electron beam in the transport line. Field-related electron emissions, i.e., field emission, the Schottky effect in photoemission and field -assisted thermionic emission, were measured. The effect of these electron emissions on the performance of the photocathode RF gun was studied. The possibility of using the momentum of the field emission current for measurement of the RF power in the RF gun was considered. Laser-induced explosive electron emission (EEE) was observed for the first time. It was found that the thresholds of the laser power for RF (80 MV/m) and DC (10 MV/m) cases are 10^9 W/cm ^2 and 10^{11} W/cm^2, respectively. No laser frequency dependence was detected. We infer a 1 muC charge with 20 A average current in RF case, and measured 0.17 muC for the DC situation from laser-induced EEE. The temporal structure of laser-induced EEE was measured. We discussed the possibility of using laser-induced EEE as electron and ion sources.

  19. Detection of a high brightness temperature radio core in the AGN-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, K.; Alatalo, K.; Wrobel, J. M.; Young, L. M.; Morganti, R.; Davis, T. A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, S.; Bureau, M.

    2014-05-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) Hi absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN)-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate reported in Alatalo et al. (2011) in NGC 1266 of 13 M⊙ year-1 exceeds star formation rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution Hi absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P rad = 1.48 × 1020 W Hz-1, and a brightness temperature T b > 1.5 × 107 K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs, with supermassive black hole masses similar to Sgr A*, may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  20. Smart light random memory sprays Retinex: a fast Retinex implementation for high-quality brightness adjustment and color correction.

    PubMed

    Banić, Nikola; Lončarić, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Removing the influence of illumination on image colors and adjusting the brightness across the scene are important image enhancement problems. This is achieved by applying adequate color constancy and brightness adjustment methods. One of the earliest models to deal with both of these problems was the Retinex theory. Some of the Retinex implementations tend to give high-quality results by performing local operations, but they are computationally relatively slow. One of the recent Retinex implementations is light random sprays Retinex (LRSR). In this paper, a new method is proposed for brightness adjustment and color correction that overcomes the main disadvantages of LRSR. There are three main contributions of this paper. First, a concept of memory sprays is proposed to reduce the number of LRSR's per-pixel operations to a constant regardless of the parameter values, thereby enabling a fast Retinex-based local image enhancement. Second, an effective remapping of image intensities is proposed that results in significantly higher quality. Third, the problem of LRSR's halo effect is significantly reduced by using an alternative illumination processing method. The proposed method enables a fast Retinex-based image enhancement by processing Retinex paths in a constant number of steps regardless of the path size. Due to the halo effect removal and remapping of the resulting intensities, the method outperforms many of the well-known image enhancement methods in terms of resulting image quality. The results are presented and discussed. It is shown that the proposed method outperforms most of the tested methods in terms of image brightness adjustment, color correction, and computational speed. PMID:26560928

  1. Much Ado about Microbunching: Coherent Bunching in High Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    The push to provide ever brighter coherent radiation sources has led to the creation of correspondingly bright electron beams. With billions of electrons packed into normalized emittances (phase space) below one micron, collective effects may dominate both the preservation and use of such ultra-bright beams. An important class of collective effects is due to density modulations within the bunch, or microbunching. Microbunching may be deleterious, as in the case of the Microbunching Instability (MBI), or it may drive radiation sources of unprecedented intensity, as in the case of Free Electron Lasers (FELs). In this work we begin by describing models of microbunching due to inherent beam shot noise, which sparks both the MBI as well as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first hard X-ray laser. We first use this model to propose a mechanism for reducing the inherent beam shot noise as well as for predicting MBI effects. We then describe experimental measurements of the resulting microbunching at LCLS, including optical radiation from the MBI, as well as the first gain length and harmonic measurements from a hard X-ray FEL. In the final chapters, we describe schemes that use external laser modulations to microbunch light sources of the future. In these sections we describe coherent light source schemes for both both linacs and storage rings.

  2. Reflected-light-source-based three-dimensional display with high brightness.

    PubMed

    Lv, Guo-Jiao; Wu, Fei; Zhao, Wu-Xiang; Fan, Jun; Zhao, Bai-Chuan; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A reflected-light-source (RLS)-based 3D display is proposed. This display consists of an RLS and a 2D display panel. The 2D display panel is located in front of the RLS. The RLS consists of a light source, a light guide plate (LGP), and a reflection cavity. The light source and the LGP are located in the reflection cavity. Light from the light source can enter into the LGP and reflect continuously in the reflection cavity. The reflection cavity has a series of slits, and light can exit only from these slits. These slits can work as a postpositional parallax barrier, so when they modulate the parallax images on the 2D display, 3D images are formed. Different from the conventional 3D display based on a parallax barrier, this RLS has less optical loss, so it can provide higher brightness. A prototype of this display is developed. Experimental results show that this RLS-based 3D display can provide higher brightness than the conventional one. PMID:27140355

  3. Enhancement of imagery of objects with highly dynamic brightness and large rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Kanaev, Andrey V; Miller, Christopher W; Seanor, Collin J; Murray-Krezan, Jeremy

    2014-05-01

    We report on application of multi-frame super-resolution (SR) to sampling limited imagery that models space objects (SOs). The difficulties of multi-frame image processing of SOs include abrupt illumination changes and complex in scene SO motion. These conditions adversely affect the accuracy of motion estimation necessary for resolution enhancement. We analyze the motion estimation errors from the standpoint of an optical flow (OF) interpolation error metric and show dependence of the object tracking accuracy on brightness changes and on the pixel displacement values between subsequent images. Despite inaccuracies of motion estimation, we demonstrate spatial acuity enhancement of the pixel limited resolution of model SO motion imagery by applying a SR algorithm that accounts for OF errors. In addition to visual inspection, image resolution improvement attained in the experiments is assessed quantitatively; a 1.8× resolution enhancement is demonstrated. PMID:24921888

  4. EUV light source with high brightness at 13.5 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, V M; Prokof'ev, A V; Khristoforov, O B; Koshelev, K N; Khadzhiyskiy, F Yu

    2014-11-30

    The results of the studies on the development of a highbrightness radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range are presented. The source is intended for using in projection EUV lithography, EUV mask inspection, for the EUV metrology, etc. Novel approaches to creating a light source on the basis of Z-pinch in xenon allowed the maximal brightness [130 W(mm{sup 2} sr){sup -1}] to be achieved in the vicinity of plasma for this type of radiation sources within the 2% spectral band centred at the wavelength of 13.5 nm that corresponds to the maximal reflection of multilayer Mo/Si mirrors. In this spectral band the radiation power achieves 190 W in the solid angle of 2π at a pulse repetition rate of 1.9 kHz and an electric power of 20 kW, injected into the discharge. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. The influence of snow depth and surface air temperature on satellite-derived microwave brightness temperature. [central Russian steppes, and high plains of Montana, North Dakota, and Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.; Allison, L. J.; Diesen, B. C., III

    1980-01-01

    Areas of the steppes of central Russia, the high plains of Montana and North Dakota, and the high plains of Canada were studied in an effort to determine the relationship between passive microwave satellite brightness temperature, surface air temperature, and snow depth. Significant regression relationships were developed in each of these homogeneous areas. Results show that sq R values obtained for air temperature versus snow depth and the ratio of microwave brightness temperature and air temperature versus snow depth were not as the sq R values obtained by simply plotting microwave brightness temperature versus snow depth. Multiple regression analysis provided only marginal improvement over the results obtained by using simple linear regression.

  6. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  7. Nonlinear Dynamics of High-Brightness Electron Beams and Beam-Plasma Interactions: Theories, Simulations, and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Bohn , P. Piot and B. Erdelyi

    2008-05-31

    According to its original Statement of Work (SOW), the overarching objective of this project is: 'To enhance substantially the understanding of the fundamental dynamics of nonequilibrium high-brightness beams with space charge.' Our work and results over the past three and half years have been both intense and fruitful. Inasmuch as this project is inextricably linked to a larger, growing research program - that of the Beam Physics and Astrophysics Group (BPAG) - the progress that it has made possible cannot easily be separated from the global picture. Thus, this summary report includes major sections on 'global' developments and on those that can be regarded as specific to this project.

  8. High-power, high-brightness pseudospark-produced electron beam driven by improved pulse line accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Junbino Zhu; Mingchang Wang; Zhijiang Wang

    1995-12-31

    A high power (200KV), intense current density, low emittance (71mmmrad), high brightness (8x10{sup 10}A/m rad) electron beam was generated in the 10cm long, high-voltage-resistive multi-gap hollow cathode pseudospark chamber filled with 15pa nitrogen and driven by an improved pulse line accelerator. The beam was ejected with the 1mm diameter, the 2.2KA beam current, and the 400ns pulse length, and could propagated 20cm in the drift tube. At a distance of 5cm from the anode it penetrated consecutively an acid-sensitive discoloring film and a 0.05mm-thick copper foil both stuck closely, left 0.6mm and 0.3mm holes on them, respectively. That 10 shots on an acid-sensitive film produced a hole of 1.6mm at 7cm downstream of anode showed its good repeatability. After 60 shots the pseudospark discharge chamber was disassembled and observed that almost no destructive damage traces left on the surfaces of its various electrodes and insulators. But on almost all the surfaces of changeable central hole parts installed on intermediate electrodes there are traces of electron emission from the sides facing the anode and of bombardment on the sides facing the cathode, in contrast with which on the front- and back-surfaces of hollow cathode no visible traces of electron emission from then was observed. In addition, there were different tints, strip-like regions on the side of anode facing the cathode. Another interesting phenomenon was that there were a set of concentric circular or elliptical ring pattern on the acid-sensitive discoloring film got at 5cm from the anode and observed tinder a metallograph. It seems that the pseudospark electron beam is Laminar beam i.e, being possessed of a multi-layer structure, at least in the case of multi-gap pseudospark discharge chamber. It was found experimentally that the quality of pseudospark electron beam is much better than that of the cold-cathode electron beam.

  9. Conical crystal spectrograph for high brightness x-ray Kα spectroscopy in subpicosecond laser-solid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinolli, E.; Koenig, M.; Boudenne, J. M.; Perelli, E.; Batani, D.; Hall, T. A.

    2004-06-01

    A high brightness crystal spectrograph was designed and successfully used to study the x-ray Kα spectrum of aluminum as a diagnostic for target heating due to suprathermal electrons in subpicosecond laser-solid interaction experiments. Conical geometry was chosen in order to enhance spatial focusing, since an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio was expected for the photon flux, and to have a reasonable spectral range while occupying only a small solid angle within the target chamber. Very high image brightness is obtained through strong spatial focusing, as well as good spectral resolution. A simple analytical model and three-dimensional numerical simulation are presented to describe the crystal characteristics. The performance of the spectrograph was tested both on an optical bench and with a ray-tracing code. The experimental spectra allowed us to estimate the target temperature and characterize the fast electron transport. The spectrograph is considered to be particularly useful, in the configuration described here, for high power laser experiments where the solid angle accessible to the spectrograph is small and blast and debris damage from the laser produced plasma is significant.

  10. Through the Looking Glass: Bright, Highly Magnified Galaxy Candidates at z ~ 7 behind A1703

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, L. D.; Bouwens, R. J.; Zitrin, A.; Smit, R.; Coe, D.; Ford, H. C.; Zheng, W.; Illingworth, G. D.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T. J.

    2012-03-01

    We report the discovery of seven strongly lensed Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z ~ 7 detected in Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of A1703. The brightest candidate, called A1703-zD1, has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.0 AB (26σ) in the WFC3/IR F160W band, making it 0.2 mag brighter than the z 850-dropout candidate recently reported behind the Bullet Cluster and 0.7 mag brighter than the previously brightest known z ~ 7.6 galaxy, A1689-zD1. With a cluster magnification of ~9, this source has an intrinsic magnitude of H 160 = 26.4 AB, a strong z 850 - J 125 break of 1.7 mag, and a photometric redshift of z ~ 6.7. Additionally, we find six other bright LBG candidates with H 160-band magnitudes of 24.9-26.4, photometric redshifts z ~ 6.4 - 8.8, and magnifications μ ~ 3-40. Stellar population fits to the Advanced Camera for Surveys, WFC3/IR, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera data for A1703-zD1 and A1703-zD4 yield stellar masses (0.7 - 3.0) × 109 M ⊙, stellar ages 5-180 Myr, and star formation rates ~7.8 M ⊙ yr-1, and low reddening with AV <= 0.7. The source-plane reconstruction of the exceptionally bright candidate A1703-zD1 exhibits an extended structure, spanning ~4 kpc in the z ~ 6.7 source plane, and shows three resolved star-forming knots of radius r ~ 0.4 kpc. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  11. Performance of the high brightness linac for the Advanced Free Electron Laser Initiative at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, R. L.; Austin, R. H.; Chan, K. D. C.; Gierman, S. M.; Kinross-Wright, J. M.; Kong, S. H.; Nguyen, D. C.; Russell, S. J.; Timmer, C. A.

    1993-08-01

    The AFEL accelerator has produced beams of greater than 2 x 10(exp 12) A/m(exp 2) at 1 nC (brightness = 2*I/(var epsilon)(exp 2), with I greater than 100 A and (var epsilon) of than 2(pi) mm-mrad normalized ms emittance). The 1300 MHz standing-wave accelerator uses on-axis coupling cells. The electron source is a photoinjector with a CsK2Sb photocathode. The photoinjector is an integral part of a single 11-cell accelerator structure. The accelerator operates between 12 and 18 MeV. The beam emittance growth in the accelerator is minimized by using a photoinjector, a focusing solenoid to correct the emittance growth due to space charge, and a special design of the coupling slots between accelerator cavities to minimize quadrupole effects. This paper describes the experimental results and compares those results with PARMELA simulation. The simulation code PARMELA was modified for this effort. This modified version uses SUPERFISH files for the accelerator cavity fields, MAFIA files for the fields due to the coupling slots in the accelerator cells, and POISSON files for the solenoid field in the gun region.

  12. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-01-01

    We present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm2). This allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use as transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer. PMID:25705085

  13. X-ray bright points and high-speed wind streams: A preliminary analysis from Yohkoh and Ulysses data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, Giannina; Suess, Steven T.; Khan, J. I.; Uchida, Y.; Hiei, E.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Strong, K. T.; Harvey, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The following aspect of the solar wind mass flux, and of its variation, is examined: whether coronal plumes might be responsible for the long-term variability of the mass flux in high-speed streams emanating from coronal holes. The assumption that plumes are rooted in coronal bright points (BP's) is made. The behavior of X-ray BP's, imaged by the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT), during a seven month period when Ulysses experiments observed a series of recurrent high-speed streams, is analyzed. If plumes/BP's are sources of the wind mass flux, changes in the coronal hole BP density to mimic changes of the mass flux in high-speed streams are expected. SOHO will have the capability of measuring the solar wind speed/density at small heliocentric distances while simultaneously observing coronal BP's and coronal plumes.

  14. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-05-15

    Here we present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm2). Lastly, this allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use asmore » transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer.« less

  15. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    SciTech Connect

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-05-15

    Here we present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm2). Lastly, this allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use as transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer.

  16. Rainbow brightness.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, S D

    1982-08-15

    A theory for the brightness of rainbows is presented. The light reaching the observer consists of a beam of singly scattered sunlight, originating from the directly illuminated portion of a rainswath, which, in turn, has suffered depletion by scattering or absorption in its path through the atmosphere. The model incorporates the relevant features of cloud geometry and solar position in relation to the observer appropriate to rainbows. The model helps explain why the bottom (or near-horizon portion) of the rainbow tends to be both brighter and redder than the top (or horizontal portion furthest above the ground) when the sun is near the horizon. The greater brightness of the bottom of the bow derives principally from the greater length of the directly illuminated part of the rainswath near the horizon, while the increased redness of the bow's bottom is due to the severe depletion of the short-wavelength contribution to the rainbow beam in its passage through the atmosphere. PMID:20396168

  17. Development of a high-brightness electron beam system towards femtosecond microdiffraction and imaging and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kiseok

    To make a `molecular movie', an `ultrafast camera' with simultaneously very high spatial and temporal resolution to match the atomic dynamics is required. The ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) technique based on femtosecond laser technology can provide a basic framework for realizing such an `ultrafast camera' although this technology has not achieved its full utility as a universal imaging and spectroscopy tool, due to limitations in generation and preservation of a high-brightness electron beam in the ultrafast regime. With moderate electron pulse intensity (103-10 4 electrons per pulse), UED experiments have been successfully applied to investigate photo-induced non-thermal melting processes, structural phase transitions, and transient surface charge dynamics. Based on the previous development of ultrafast electron diffractive voltammetry (UEDV), we extend the UEDV with an aim to identify the different constituents of the measured transient surface voltage (TSV) and discuss their respective roles in Coulomb refraction. From applying this methodology on Si/SiO2 interface and surfaces decorated with nano-structures, we are able to elucidate localized charge injection, dielectric relaxation, carrier diffusion, and enhancements on such processes through surface plasmon resonances, with direct resolution in the charge state and possibly correlated structural dynamics at these interfaces. These new results highlight the high sensitivity of the interfacial charge transfer to the nanoscale modification, environment, and surface plasmonics enhancement and demonstrate the diffraction-based ultrafast surface voltage probe as a unique method to resolve the nanometer scale charge carrier dynamics. The future applications of the UED and UEDV techniques lie in the direct visualization and site-selected studies such as nano-structured interfaces, a single nanoparticle or domain, which can be enabled by the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron beam system for

  18. High-J CO Sleds in Nearby Infrared Bright Galaxies Observed By Herschel/PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, N.; Sturm, E.; Sternberg, A.; Janssen, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Fischer, J.; Contursi, A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Poglitsch, A.; Veilleux, S.; Davies, R.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L.; Verma, A.; Weiß, A.; Polisensky, E.; Nikola, T.

    2015-04-01

    We report the detection of far-infrared (FIR) CO rotational emission from nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and starburst galaxies, as well as several merging systems and Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs). Using the Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), we have detected transitions in the Jupp = 14-30 range. The PACS CO data obtained here provide the first reference of well-sampled FIR extragalactic CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) for this range. We find a large range in the overall SLED shape, even among galaxies of similar type, demonstrating the uncertainties in relying solely on high-J CO diagnostics to characterize the excitation source of a galaxy. Combining our data with low-J line intensities taken from the literature, we present a CO ratio-ratio diagram and discuss its value in distinguishing excitation sources and physical properties of the molecular gas. The position of a galaxy on such a diagram is less a signature of its excitation mechanism, than an indicator of the presence of warm, dense molecular gas. We then quantitatively analyze the CO emission from a subset of the detected sources with single-component and two-component large velocity gradient (LVG) radiative transfer models to fit the CO SLEDs. From these fits we derive the molecular gas mass and the corresponding CO-to-H2 conversion factor, {{α }CO}, for each respective source. For the ULIRGs we find α values in the canonical range 0.4- 5M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1, while for the other objects, α varies between 0.2 and 14. Finally, we compare our best-fit LVG model results with previous studies of the same galaxies and comment on any differences. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  19. Diode-pumped high-efficiency high-brightness Q-switched ND:YAG slab laser.

    PubMed

    Armandillo, E; Norrie, C; Cosentino, A; Laporta, P; Wazen, P; Maine, P

    1997-08-01

    A high-efficiency diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG oscillator designed for future spaceborne applications has been demonstrated and characterized. The laser is based on a side-pumped slab geometry and uses an unstable resonator with a radially variable-reflectivity output coupler. The laser provides an output pulse energy of 100 mJ at a 100-Hz repetition rate, with a near-diffraction-limited beam and an overall electrical optical efficiency exceeding 6%. PMID:18185784

  20. Surface-plasmon resonance-enhanced multiphoton emission of high-brightness electron beams from a nanostructured copper cathode.

    PubMed

    Li, R K; To, H; Andonian, G; Feng, J; Polyakov, A; Scoby, C M; Thompson, K; Wan, W; Padmore, H A; Musumeci, P

    2013-02-15

    We experimentally investigate surface-plasmon assisted photoemission to enhance the efficiency of metallic photocathodes for high-brightness electron sources. A nanohole array-based copper surface was designed to exhibit a plasmonic response at 800 nm, fabricated using the focused ion beam milling technique, optically characterized and tested as a photocathode in a high power radio frequency photoinjector. Because of the larger absorption and localization of the optical field intensity, the charge yield observed under ultrashort laser pulse illumination is increased by more than 100 times compared to a flat surface. We also present the first beam characterization results (intrinsic emittance and bunch length) from a nanostructured photocathode. PMID:25166375

  1. 1.2-kW single-mode fiber laser based on 100-W high-brightness pump diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbo; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Liao, Kai-Hsiu; Segall, Jeff; Muendel, Martin H.; Morehead, James J.; Shen, Jane; Kutsuris, Matt; Luu, Johnny; Franke, Justin; Nguyen, Kelvin; Woods, Dave; Vance, Fred; Vecht, David; Meng, David; Duesterberg, Richard; Xu, Lei; Skidmore, Jay; Peters, Matthew; Guerin, Nicolas; Guo, James; Cheng, Jane; Du, Jihua; Johnson, Brad; Yin, Dongliang; Hsieh, Allen; Cheng, Peter; Demir, Abdullah; Cai, Jason; Gurram, Rupa; Lee, Kong-Weng; Raju, Reddy; Zou, Daniel; Srinivasan, Raman; Saini, Mandeep; Zavala, Laura; Rossin, Victor; Zucker, Erik P.; Ishiguro, Hiroaki; Sako, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    We have demonstrated a monolithic (fully fused), 1.2-kW, Yb-doped fiber laser with near-single-mode beam quality. This laser employs a new generation of high-brightness, fiber-coupled pump sources based on spatially multiplexed single emitters, with each pump providing 100 W at 915 nm within 0.15 NA from a standard 105/125 μm fiber. The fiber laser is end pumped through the high-reflector FBG using a 19:1 fused-fiber pump combiner, eliminating the need for pump/signal combiners. The output wavelength is 1080 nm, with a linewidth of < 0.5 nm FWHM. A peak power of 1.5 kW was reached in modulated operation (1-ms pulse duration) with M2 < 1.2.

  2. How Bright Is the Sun?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  3. Periodic energy switching of bright solitons in mixed coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with linear self-coupling and cross-coupling terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanna, T.; Vijayajayanthi, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2007-07-01

    The bright soliton solutions of the mixed coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with two components (2-CNLS) with linear self- and cross-coupling terms have been obtained by identifying a transformation that transforms the corresponding equation to the integrable mixed 2-CNLS equations. The study on the collision dynamics of bright solitons shows that there exists periodic energy switching, due to the coupling terms. This periodic energy switching can be controlled by the new type of shape changing collisions of bright solitons arising in a mixed 2-CNLS system, characterized by intensity redistribution, amplitude dependent phase shift, and relative separation distance. We also point out that this system exhibits large periodic intensity switching even with very small linear self-coupling strengths.

  4. Can we use TRMM-PR bright band heights to estimate the snow-rain transition in high mountain regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauwecker, Simone; Rohrer, Mario; Schwarb, Manfred; Huggel, Christian; Suarez, Wilson; Arias, Sandro; Salzmann, Nadine; Gurgiser, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Field and modelling based research indicates that for tropical glaciers, variations in snow cover and the altitude of the snow line via albedo effects are among the most crucial factors to explain the differences in annual glacier mass balance variability. It is therefore essential to identify the height of the phase change during precipitation events and its coupling with glacier mass balance. This knowledge is also fundamental to assess possible future impacts of e.g. changing air temperatures on glacier mass balances at low latitudes. However, the knowledge on heights of phase changes and air temperature during precipitation events is severely limited by the small number of meteorological measurements at high altitudes in the tropics and the Himalaya. Additionally, their one-dimensional type of observation that cannot appropriately account for the variations along the vertical dimension. Remote sensing data are promising tools to fill these data gaps. Before using remote sensing products for studying surface processes, it is crucial to know their accuracies and limitations. Here, we use the the bright band (BB) calulation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) as provided in the product 2A23. The bright band is a horizontal layer of stronger radar reflectivity produced by the melting of precipitation at the level where solid precipitation turns into rain. It may be thus a good proxy for the snowline during precipitation events at high mountain regions. To our knowledge, the potential of this product in studies of glacier surface processes has not been further evaluated so far. In a first step, the altitude of the bright band is compared with estimations of the freezing line and the melting zone based on measurements of precipitation amount, precipitation phase and air temperature at the Pyramid AWS station in the Khumbu valley, Nepal. Further on, we identify monthly, seasonal and interannual variability in phase changes for

  5. Direct Measurement of the Double Emittance Minimum in the Beam Dynamics of the Sparc High-Brightness Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrario, M.; Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Clozza, A.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Filippetto, D.; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Ligi, C.; Pace, E.; Pellegrino, L.

    2007-12-07

    In this Letter we report the first experimental observation of the double emittance minimum effect in the beam dynamics of high-brightness electron beam generation by photoinjectors; this effect, as predicted by the theory, is crucial in achieving minimum emittance in photoinjectors aiming at producing electron beams for short wavelength single-pass free electron lasers. The experiment described in this Letter was performed at the SPARC photoinjector site, during the first stage of commissioning of the SPARC project. The experiment was made possible by a newly conceived device, called an emittance meter, which allows a detailed and unprecedented study of the emittance compensation process as the beam propagates along the beam pipe.

  6. Effect of chip and bonding defects on the junction temperatures of high-brightness light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton E., Jr.

    2005-11-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a strong candidate for the next-generation general illumination applications. LEDs are making great strides in brightness performance and reliability; however, the barrier to widespread use in general illumination still remains the cost (dollars per lumen). LED packaging designers are pushing the LED performance to its limits. This is resulting in increased drive currents and thus the need for lower-thermal-resistance packaging. The efficiency and reliability of solid-state lighting devices strongly depends on successful thermal management, because the junction temperature of the chip is the prime driver for effective operation. As the power density continues to increase, the integrity of the package electrical and thermal interconnects becomes extremely important. Experimental results with high-brightness LED packages show that chip attachment defects can cause significant thermal gradients across the LED chips, leading to premature failures. Perfect chip and interconnect structures for highly conductive substrates showed only a 2 K temperature variation over a chip area of approximately 1 mm2, while defective chips experienced greater than 40 K temperature variations over an identical area. A further numerical study was also carried out with parametric finite-element models to understand the temperature profile variation of the chip active layer due to the bump defects. Finite-element models were utilized to evaluate the effects of hot spots in the chip active layer. The importance of zero defects in one of the more popular interconnect schemes--the epi-down soldered flip-chip configuration--is investigated and demonstrated.

  7. A Bright Shining Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurowitz, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Sometimes students come up with crazy ideas. When this author first started teaching at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia five years ago, she had a sophomore share such an idea with her. He wanted to put solar panels on the school's roof as a way to reduce the school's carbon footprint and set a bright clean…

  8. A high-brightness, electron-based source of polarized photons and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. E.

    1999-06-01

    A compact and comparatively inexpensive system that is practical for universities is described based on a low-energy, electron storage ring with at least one undulator based oscillator to store photons. If the oscillator cavity length is relativistically corrected to be an harmonic of the ring circumference (LC=βLRn/nB with nB the number of bunches), higher-energy, secondary photons from Compton backscattering may become significant. Then, besides synchrotron radiation from the ring dipoles and damping wigglers as well as undulator photons, there are frequency upshifted Compton photons and photoneutrons from low Q-value targets such as Beryllium (Qn=-1.66) or Deuterium (Qn=-2.22 MeV). For 100 MeV electron bunches, an adjustable-phase, planar, helical undulator can be made to produce circularly polarized UV photons having a fundamental ɛγ1=11.1 eV. If these photons are stored in a multimode, hole-coupled resonator they produce a Compton endpoint energy up to ɛγ2=1.7 MeV. When incident on a Be conversion target these secondary photons make unmoderated, epithermal neutrons having mean energy ɛn=24.8±6.8 keV from the two-body reaction Be9+γ→n+Be8(→2α)with negligible, residual radioactivity. The system is shown in Fig. 1. When the target is unpolarized, one expects neutron rates of 1011 epithermal n/s for 1015 Comptons/s and a circulating current of 1 A with polarizations PRHC(n⃗)=-0.5, PLHC(n⃗)=0.5, both with reduced flux, and PLin(n⃗)=0. With a 1 cm thick cylindrical tungsten sheath surrounding the Be to attenuate scattered photons exiting at 90° to the incident photons, there is a peak neutron flux of ≈109 epithermal n/s/cm2 cylindrically symmetric around the surface. No attempt was made to optimize this because there is still no accepted treatment protocol (dose rates or preferred neutron energy distribution). Although these factors depend on the individual case, several thousand BNCT treatments per year appear feasible. A potential clinical

  9. Brightness and coherence of synchrotron radiation and high-gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1986-10-01

    The characteristics of synchrotron radiation are reviewed with particular attention to its phase-space properties and coherence. The transition of the simple undulator radiation to more intense, more coherent high-gain free electron lasers, is discussed.

  10. Brightness and coherence of radiation from undulators and high-gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang-Je

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the radiation characteristics of undulators and high-gain free electron lasers (FELs). The topics covered are: a phase-space method in wave optics and synchrotron radiation, coherence from the phase-space point of view, discussions of undulator performances in next-generation synchrotron radiation facility and the characteristics of the high-gain FELs and their performances. (LSP)

  11. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  12. Harvesting uniform and high bright Sm complex via microwave ultrasound method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jing; Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2015-09-01

    The uniform ball-like luminescence down-shifting (LDS) Sm(TTA)3Phen materials have been synthesized by microwave ultrasonic method. Microwave ultrasonic plays a synergistic effect of microwave with ultrasonic, including thermal effect, dipole vortex and air bombard make the particles aggregation reach to the lowest energy. Through this method, we successfully synthesised 1-4 μm ball-like uniform Sm(TTA)3Phen clusters. The Sm(TTA)3Phen can transfer violet light to red-orange flourescence with a feature large Stokes shift and completely avoid self-absorption losses.

  13. Six-dimensional measurements of trains of high brightness electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G. P.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Innocenti, L.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2015-08-01

    Trains of ultrashort electron pulses with THz repetition rate, so-called comblike beams, are assuming an ever growing interest in plasma-based acceleration. In particle-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), a train of driver bunches with separation of the order of plasma wavelength, i.e., 300 μ m , resonantly excites a plasma wake, which accelerates a trailing witness bunch, injected at the accelerating phase. Comblike beams have great potentialities in different fields of applications. In particular, radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers and THz radiation, take advantage from the possibility to tailor electron beams modulated both in time and energy, to customize emission bandwidth and temporal properties. In these scenarios, the manipulation of longitudinal phase space to investigate different bunch configurations, in terms of energy and time separation, is founded on the knowledge of the 6D phase space of each bunch in the train. In this paper we present the methods developed at the SPARC_LAB test facility in order to fulfill the requirements. Starting from conventional diagnostics, therefore applying well-known tools using more than one diagnostic at the same time, we have completely characterized not only the full 6D phase space of a comblike electron beam with THz repetition rate, but also each single bunch within the train. To our knowledge, this is the first time such a measurement has been performed. Experimental results for multibunch trains in different configurations, suitable for PWFA applications, will be shown and discussed.

  14. Bright MeV-energy x-ray beams from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2012-10-01

    Bright MeV energy x-ray beams produced by conventional inverse-Compton-scattering sources are used for nuclear physics research, but their large size (>100-m) restricts accessibility and utilization for real-world radiological applications. By developing a method to integrate a compact laser-driven accelerator with Compton scattering, we have developed a source that produces MeV energy x-rays, but with a four orders-of-magnitude increase in peak brightness, and yet has a size (< 10 m) small enough to fit in a hospital laboratory, or even on a portable platform. Our design employs two independently adjustable laser pulses---one to accelerate electrons by means of a high-gradient laser wakefield, and one to Compton scatter. The use of two separate pulses from the same high-peak-power laser system allowed us to independently optimize the electron accelerator and the Compton scattering process. It also allowed the electron bunch and scattering laser pulse to be spatially overlapped on the micron scale, and be synchronized with femtosecond timing accuracy. The resulting x-ray photon energy was peaked at 1 MeV, and reached up to 4 MeV, which is twenty times higher than from an earlier all-laser-driven Compton source with a different design [K. Ta Phuoc et al., Nature Photonics 6, 308 (2012)]. The total photon number was measured to be 2x10^7; the source size was 5 μm; and the beam divergence angle was ˜10 mrad. The measurements were found to be consistent with a theoretical model that included realistic beams. We also discuss the results of the first application of the source, namely, the diagnosis---with micron resolution---of both the radiation source size and the emittance of a laser-wakefield-accelerated electron beam. Ultrafast nuclear science can also be enabled by MeV x-ray energy combined with ultrashort pulse duration (fs).

  15. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Robinson, Joseph S.; Ranitovic, Predrag; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2015-06-11

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. In this article, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s-1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10-5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Finally, spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications.

  16. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Robinson, Joseph S.; Ranitovic, Predrag; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. Here, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s−1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10−5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications. PMID:26067922

  17. High gain-production efficiency and large brightness X-UV laser at Palaiseau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeglé, P.; Carillon, A.; Dhez, P.; Goedtkindt, P.; Jamelot, G.; Klisnick, A.; Rus, B.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Jacquemot, S.; Mazataud, D.; Mens, A.; Chauvineau, J. P.

    1995-05-01

    A large gain has been measured for the J=0-1 line of neonlike Zn at λ=21.2 nm. The time evolutions and the localization of emission zones of the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines are compared. It is shown that a train of very small prepulses before the main pulse has an important role in the J=0=1 emission. A half-cavity has been successfully used to attain a nearly saturated intensity with a 2 cm long plasma. The X-UV pulse energy is of 400 μJ, the laser power of 5 MW. The driving laser is the 0.4 KJ, 600 ps laser of LULI.

  18. Illusory brightness step in the Chevreul illusion.

    PubMed

    Morrone, M C; Burr, D C; Ross, J

    1994-06-01

    It is well known that a staircase luminance profile is not seen veridically, but appears as the scallopy-like Chevreul illusion. We have shown that adding thin lines (either light or dark) to the centre of each step creates an illusory brightness change at the point of the line. The regions between the added lines and the edges seem to be uniform, with a clear change in brightness at the point where the line was added. The conditions under which the illusion occurred were measured systematically, both by contrast matching and by annulment. One model that can readily account for the illusion is the local-energy model of feature detection (Morrone & Burr, 1988 Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 235, 221-245). Adding the bar to the step creates a peak in local energy at all scales. At the higher scales, the phase of the energy is near zero, the signal for a line; but at the lower scales the phase is near pi/2, the signal for an edge. We propose that the edge signal of the lower scales causes the brightness illusion and that this brightness difference is structured by the feature defined sharply by the higher scales (even though that feature is not an edge). As well as predicting the existence of the illusion, simulations with the energy model predicted quantitatively the apparent contrast of the illusion as a function of stimulus contrast, bar-position and high-pass filter frequency. PMID:7941364

  19. RNA mango aptamer-fluorophore: a bright, high-affinity complex for RNA labeling and tracking.

    PubMed

    Dolgosheina, Elena V; Jeng, Sunny C Y; Panchapakesan, Shanker Shyam S; Cojocaru, Razvan; Chen, Patrick S K; Wilson, Peter D; Hawkins, Nancy; Wiggins, Paul A; Unrau, Peter J

    2014-10-17

    Because RNA lacks strong intrinsic fluorescence, it has proven challenging to track RNA molecules in real time. To address this problem and to allow the purification of fluorescently tagged RNA complexes, we have selected a high affinity RNA aptamer called RNA Mango. This aptamer binds a series of thiazole orange (fluorophore) derivatives with nanomolar affinity, while increasing fluorophore fluorescence by up to 1,100-fold. Visualization of RNA Mango by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, together with injection and imaging of RNA Mango/fluorophore complex in C. elegans gonads demonstrates the potential for live-cell RNA imaging with this system. By inserting RNA Mango into a stem loop of the bacterial 6S RNA and biotinylating the fluorophore, we demonstrate that the aptamer can be used to simultaneously fluorescently label and purify biologically important RNAs. The high affinity and fluorescent properties of RNA Mango are therefore expected to simplify the study of RNA complexes. PMID:25101481

  20. Highly surface functionalized carbon nano-onions for bright light bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasconi, Marco; Maffeis, Viviana; Bartelmess, Juergen; Echegoyen, Luis; Giordani, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials functionalized with fluorescent and water-soluble groups have emerged as platforms for biological imaging because of their low toxicity and ability to be internalized by cells. The development of imaging probes based on carbon nanomaterials for biomedical studies requires the understanding of their biological response as well as the efficient and safety exposition of the nanomaterial to the cell compartment where it is designed to operate. Here, we present a fluorescent probe based on surface functionalized carbon nano-onions (CNOs) for biological imaging. The modification of CNOs by chemical oxidation of the defects on the outer shell of these carbon nanoparticles results in an extensive surface functionalization with carboxyl groups. We have obtained fluorescently labelled CNOs by a reaction involving the amide bond formation between fluoresceinamine and the carboxylic acids groups on the surface of the CNOs. The functionalized CNOs display high emission properties and dispersability in water due to the presence of high surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups that translate in an efficient fluorescent probe for in vitro imaging of HeLa cells, without significant cytotoxicity. The resulting nanomaterial represents a promising platform for biological imaging applications due to the high dispersability in water, its efficient internalization by cancer cells and localization in specific cell compartments.

  1. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  2. Critical issues for high-brightness heavy-ion beams- prioritized

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R; Davidson, R; Faltens, A; Friedman, A; Grisham, L; Grote, D P; Haber, I; Kaganovich, I; Covo, M K; Kwan, J W; Lee, E; Logan, B G; Lund, S M; Qin, H; Seidl, P A; Sharp, W M; Vay, J L; Yu, S S

    2007-02-28

    This study group was initiated to consider whether there were any ''show-stopper'' issues with accelerators for heavy-ion warm-dense matter (WDM) and heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF), and to prioritize them. Showstopper issues would appear as limits to beam current; that is, the beam would be well-behaved below the current limit, and significantly degraded in current or emittance if the current limit were exceeded at some region of an accelerator. We identified 14 issues: 1-6 could be addressed in the near term, 7-10 are potentially attractive solutions to performance and cost issues but are not yet fully characterized, 11-12 involve multibeam effects that cannot be more than partially studied in near-term facilities, and 13-14 involve new issues that are present in some novel driver concepts. Comparing the issues with the new experimental, simulation, and theoretical tools that we have developed, it is apparent that our new capabilities provide an opportunity to re-examine and significantly increase our understanding of the number one issue--halo growth and mitigation.

  3. Bright x-ray sources from laser irradiation of foams with high concentration of Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, F. Patterson, J. R.; May, M.; Colvin, J. D.; Biener, M. M.; Wittstock, A.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Satcher, J. H.; Gammon, S. A.; Poco, J. F.; Fournier, K. B.; Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Ishihara, K.; Tanaka, N.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nishimura, H.

    2014-02-15

    Low-density foams irradiated by a 20 kJ laser at the Omega laser facility (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY, USA) are shown to convert more than 5% of the laser energy into 4.6 to 6.0 keV x rays. This record efficiency with foam targets is due to novel fabrication techniques based on atomic-layer-deposition of Ti atoms on an aerogel scaffold. A Ti concentration of 33 at. % was obtained in a foam with a total density of 5 mg/cm{sup 3}. The dynamics of the ionization front through these foams were investigated at the 1 kJ laser of the Gekko XII facility (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan). Hydrodynamic simulations can reproduce the average electron temperature but fail to predict accurately the heat front velocity in the foam. This discrepancy is shown to be unrelated to the possible water adsorbed in the foam but could be attributed to effects of the foam micro-structure.

  4. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  5. Combined Radiometer-Radar Microphysical Profile Estimations with Emphasis on High Frequency Brightness Temperature Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Wang, James R.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Hood, Robbie; Manning, Will; Meneghini, Robert; Weinman, James A.; Hildebrand, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Information about the vertical microphysical cloud structure is useful in many modeling and predictive practices. Radiometers and radars are used to observe hydrometeor properties. This paper describes an iterative retrieval algorithm that combines the use of airborne active and wideband (10 to 340 GHz) passive observations to estimate the vertical content and particle size distributions of liquid and frozen hydrometeors. The physically-based retrieval algorithm relies on the high frequencies (greater than 89 GHz) to provide details on the frozen hydrometeors. Neglecting the high frequencies yielded acceptable estimates of the liquid profiles, but the ice profiles were poorly retrieved. Airborne radar and radiometer observations from the third Convection and Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX-3) were used in the retrieval algorithm as constraints. Nadir profiles were estimated for a minute each of flight time (approximately 12.5 km along track) from an anvil, convection, and quasi- stratiform rain. The complex structure of the frozen hydrometeors required the most iterations for convergence for the anvil cloud type. The wideband observations were found to more than double the estimated frozen hydrometeor content as compared to retrievals using only 90-GHz and below. The convective and quasi-stratiform quickly reached convergence (minimized difference between observations and calculations using the estimated profiles). A qualitative validation using coincident in situ CAMEX-3 observations shows that the retrieved particle size distributions are well corroborated with independent measurements.

  6. Coherent Bremsstrahlung effect observed during STEM analysis of dopant distribution in silicon devices using large area silicon drift EDX detectors and high brightness electron source.

    PubMed

    Pantel, R

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, during dopant analysis of silicon devices, we have observed a phenomenon generally neglected in EDX analysis: the coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB). We discussed the reason why and came to the conclusion that the analytical TEM used for these experiments presents a configuration and performances, which makes this equipment very sensitive to the CB effect. This is due to large collection solid angle and high counting rate of the four silicon drift EDX detectors (SDD), a high brightness electron source providing large probe current and moreover a geometry favorable to on axis crystal observations. We analyzed silicon devices containing Si [110] and Si [100] crystal areas at different energies (80-120-200keV). We also observed relaxed SiGe (27 and 40at% of Ge). The CB effect, whose intensity is maximum near zone axis beam alignment, manifests as characteristic broad peaks present in the X-ray spectrum background. The peak energies are predicted by a simple formula deduced for the CB models found in the literature and that we present simply. We evaluate also the CB peak intensities and discuss the importance of this effect on the detection and quantification traces of impurities. The CB peaks also give information on the analyzed crystal structure (measurement of the periodicity along the zone axis) and allow, in every particular experiment or system, to determine the median take off angle of the EDX detectors. PMID:21946001

  7. Watt-level continuous-wave diode lasers at 1180 nm with high spectral brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, K.; Blume, G.; Brox, O.; Bugge, F.; Fricke, J.; Feise, D.; Hofmann, J.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.

    2015-03-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) tapered lasers emitting near 1180 nm were developed. The integration of DBR surface gratings in an edge-emitting laser structure with a highly strained quantum well and a tapered laser geometry allows nearly diffraction limited emission into a single longitudinal mode with an optical output power of more than 2 W. The laser will allow direct second harmonic generation (SHG) in a single pass configuration and hence will enable the manufacturing of miniaturized laser modules near 590 nm for out-of-the-lab applications. An integration of a heater element at the DBR grating allows the tuning of the emission wavelength of more than 2 nm without the mechanical movement of gratings. This easy tuning simplifies the phase matching to a SHG crystal.

  8. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  9. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  10. The lowest spatial frequency channel determines brightness perception.

    PubMed

    Perna, A; Morrone, M C

    2007-05-01

    This study investigates the role played by individual spatial scales in determining the apparent brightness of greyscale patterns. We measured the perceived difference in brightness across an edge in the presence of notch filtering and high-pass filtering for two stimulus configurations, one that elicits the perception of transparency and one that appears opaque. For both stimulus configurations, the apparent brightness of the surfaces delimited by the border decreased monotonically with progressive (ideal) high-pass filtering, with a critical cut-off at 1 c/deg. Using two octave ideal notch filtering, the maximum detrimental effect on apparent brightness was observed at about 1c/deg. Critical frequencies for apparent brightness did not vary with contrast, viewing distance, or surface size, suggesting that apparent brightness is determined by the channel tuned at 1 c/deg. Modelling the data with the local energy model [Morrone, M. C., & Burr, D. C. (1988). Feature detection in human vision: a phase dependent energy model. Proceedings of the Royal Society (London), B235, 221-245] at 1c/deg confirmed the suggestion that this channel mediates apparent brightness for both opaque and transparent borders, with no need for pooling or integration across spatial channels. PMID:17395237

  11. Multi-kW high brightness Yb:YAG thin disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y. H.; Lim, Y. X.; Cheng, James; Tan, Y. B.; Lau, Ernest; Lai, K. S.

    2013-03-01

    Simple stable laser resonators with a single Yb:YAG thin disk module have been designed and demonstrated to produce up to 5 kW CW laser output at 1030 nm with M2 factor of 7. Pumped with 940 nm diodes, the optical-to-optical efficiencies were >50 % at full power. Simple I and V-shaped resonators consisting of only two and three optical elements were implemented, including the 16 mm diameter Yb doped thin disk acting as an active mirror. No additional adaptive optics for aberration or mode control was used; instead the results were achieved with laser cavity designs that take into account the changing radius of curvature of the pumped thin disk. The designs ensured the laser always operated well within the stable cavity zone and with an optimised and relatively large fundamental laser mode size on the thin disk. The low optical aberrations and effective thermal management of the thin disk, mounted on a diamond cooled heat sink, together with the above cavity design approach, enabled the realization of such high power and good beam quality thin disk laser in a simple single disk laser oscillator.

  12. The emittances and brightnesses of high-intensity negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; McConnell, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The emittances of high-intensity ion beams extracted from cesium sputter negative ion sources equipped with cylindrical and ellipsoidal solid tungsten and spiral-wound tantalum (General Ionex Corporation, Model 860), and cesium surface ionizers have been measured for several ion species, including /sup 12/C/sup -/, /sup 28/Si/sup -/, /sup 58/Ni/sup -/, and /sup 197/Au/sup -/. While certain sets of data from the ellipsoidal and cylindrical geometry ionizer sources suggest a moderate growth in emittance with increasing negative ion beam intensity I over the range of intensities investigated (5 less than or equal to 1 less than or equal to 60 ..mu..A) of perhaps 20%, not all data exhibit this dependence, especially those from the Model 860 source. As well, no evidence of an emittance dependence on ion mass of a monotonic nature was found. The emittances of ion beams at the 80% intensity level from the Model 860 source are found to be higher on the average by factors of 1.8 and 1.7, respectively, than those from sources equipped with ellipsoidal and cylindrical geometry cesium surface ionizers.

  13. Adamantane-based wide-bandgap host material: blue electrophosphorescence with high efficiency and very high brightness.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu; Zhu, Liping; Li, Yifan; Yu, Ling; Wu, Kailong; Chen, Tianheng; Huang, Manli; Wang, Feng; Gong, Shaolong; Ma, Dongge; Qin, Jingui; Yang, Chuluo

    2015-05-26

    An adamantane-based host material, namely, 4-{3-[4-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]adamantan-1-yl}benzonitrile (CzCN-Ad), was prepared by linking an electron-donating carbazole unit and an electron-accepting benzonitrile moiety through an adamantane bridge. In this approach, two functional groups were attached to tetrahedral points of adamantane to construct an "sp(3)" topological configuration. This design strategy endows the host material with a high triplet energy of 3.03 eV due to the disruption of intramolecular charge transfer. Although CzCN-Ad has a low molecular weight, the rigid nonconjugated adamantane bridge results in a glass transition temperature of 89 °C. These features make CzCN-Ad suitable for fabricating blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). The devices based on sky-blue phosphor bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridinato-N,C(2')](picolinato)iridium(III) (FIrpic) achieved a high maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 24.1%, which is among the best results for blue PhOLEDs ever reported. Furthermore, blue PhOLEDs with bis(2,4-difluorophenylpyridinato)-tetrakis(1-pyrazolyl)borate iridium(III) (FIr6) as dopant exhibited a maximum EQE of 14.2% and a maximum luminance of 34 262 cd m(-2). To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest luminance ever reported for FIr6-based PhOLEDs. PMID:25900890

  14. Method of high-speed process study in experiments with thin foils heated by high-brightness laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsenko, A. V.; Lebo, Ivan G.; Matzveiko, A. A.; Mikhailov, Yu. A.; Rozanov, Vladislav B.; Sklizkov, G. V.; Starodub, A. N.

    1999-06-01

    The results of the experiments at the installation 'PICO' with thin foils heating by laser radiation pulses of nanosecond duration are reported. The Al foils with thickness in the range from 3 (mu) up to 40 (mu) where used as a targets. The flux density was varied from 1013 W/cm2 to 1014 W/cm2. The sharp dependence of the portion of laser energy passed through the target on foil thickness was observed. This phenomena was accompanied by relatively small decrease of the passed radiation pulse duration. The anomalously high speed burning through of thin foil was observed in these experiments and the conclusion on possible mechanism of this phenomena has been done on the base of comparison of experimental data with theoretical calculations. The observed phenomena can be interpreted on the base of conjecture about the local burning through of a target in the small areas at the target surface with much more values of flux density than average one and following laser radiation self-focusing and formation of 'hot spots.'

  15. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  16. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  17. Differential responses to high- and low-dose ultraviolet-B stress in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shinya; Kojo, Kei H.; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Endo, Masaki; Toki, Seiichi; Isoda, Hiroko; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation leads to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, growth inhibition, and cell death. To evaluate the UV-B stress–induced changes in plant cells, we developed a model system based on tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells. Both low-dose UV-B (low UV-B: 740 J m−2) and high-dose UV-B (high UV-B: 2960 J m−2) inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death; these effects were more pronounced at high UV-B. Flow cytometry showed cell cycle arrest within 1 day after UV-B irradiation; neither low- nor high-UV-B–irradiated cells entered mitosis within 12 h. Cell cycle progression was gradually restored in low-UV-B–irradiated cells but not in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. UV-A irradiation, which activates cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, reduced inhibition of cell proliferation by low but not high UV-B and suppressed high-UV-B–induced cell death. UV-B induced CPD formation in a dose-dependent manner. The amounts of CPDs decreased gradually within 3 days in low-UV-B–irradiated cells, but remained elevated after 3 days in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. Low UV-B slightly increased the number of DNA single-strand breaks detected by the comet assay at 1 day after irradiation, and then decreased at 2 and 3 days after irradiation. High UV-B increased DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay 1 and 3 days after irradiation. Caffeine, an inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) checkpoint kinases, reduced the rate of cell death in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. Our data suggest that low-UV-B–induced CPDs and/or DNA strand-breaks inhibit DNA replication and proliferation of BY-2 cells, whereas larger contents of high-UV-B–induced CPDs and/or DNA strand-breaks lead to cell death. PMID:25954287

  18. High brightness three-dimensional light field display based on the aspheric substrate Fresnel-lens-array with eccentric pupils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Xunbo; Cao, Xuemei; Chen, Zhidong; Yan, Binbin; Yuan, Jinhui; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-02-01

    The brightness and viewing field of the reproductive three-dimensional (3D) image are crucial factors to realize a comfortable 3D perception for the light field display based on the liquid crystal device (LCD). To improve the illuminance of 3D image with sub-image-units with small aperture angles and enlarge the viewing field, the illuminance of the Fresnel-lens combining with the sub-images on LCD is analyzed and designed. Theoretical and experimental results show that the Fresnel-lens-array with eccentric pupil(FAEP) can address above problems. A 3D light field display based on LCD with FAEP and directional diffuser screen are used to reconstruct the target 3D field. 25 parallax sub-images are projected to the directional diffuser screen to verify the improvement of illuminance and viewing field. To reduce eccentric aberration introduced by eccentric pupil, a novel structure of Fresnel-lens-array is presented to reduce the aberration. The illuminance and viewing field are well promoted at the same time. 3D image with the high quality can be achieved.

  19. Bright Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how to upgrade lighting technology in schools to reduce energy consumption and cut operating costs. Explores fixture efficiency using ballast and lamp upgrades and compact fluorescent lights. Other ideas include changing exit signs to ones that use less wattage, improving luminary efficiency through use of reflectors and shielding…

  20. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  1. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  2. High energy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Canizares, Claude; Catura, Richard C.; Clark, George W.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Friedman, Herbert; Giacconi, Riccardo; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Helfand, David J.; Holt, Stephen S.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) important scientific problems for high energy astrophysics (stellar activity, the interstellar medium in galaxies, supernovae and endpoints of stellar evolution, nucleosynthesis, relativistic plasmas and matter under extreme conditions, nature of gamma-bursts, identification of black holes, active nuclei, accretion physics, large-scale structures, intracluster medium, nature of dark matter, and the X- and gamma-ray background); (2) the existing experimental programs (Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), U.S. participation in foreign missions, and attached Shuttle and Space Station Freedom payloads); (3) major missions for the 1990's; (4) a new program of moderate missions; (5) new opportunities for small missions; (6) technology development issues; and (7) policy issues.

  3. High energy transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A meeting was convened on the campus of the University of California at Santa Cruz during the two-week interval July 11 through July 22, 1983. Roughly 100 participants were chosen so as to give broad representation to all aspects of high energy transients. Ten morning review sessions were held in which invited speakers discussed the current status of observations and theory of the above subjects. Afternoon workshops were also held, usually more than one per day, to informally review various technical aspects of transients, confront shortcomings in theoretical models, and to propose productive courses for future research. Special attention was also given to the instrumentation used to study high energy transient and the characteristics and goals of a dedicated space mission to study transients in the next decade were determined. A listing of articles written by various members of the workshop is included.

  4. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey data. I. Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since z ~ 1.2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; R. Perfecto; Song, J.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; et al

    2016-01-14

    Here, using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift.

  5. The synchro-Compton limit of the brightness temperature of nonstationary radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slysh, V. I.

    1992-06-01

    The brightness temperature of synchrotron emission from nonstationary radio sources during the cooling down by the inverse Compton effect is calculated. It is shown that brightness temperatures as high as 5 x 10 exp 15 K at 1 GHz are allowed during the first day after injection of relativistic electrons of sufficiently high energy. This is about four orders of magnitude higher than the canonical synchro-Compton limit introduced by Kellermann and Pauliny-Toth (1969) for stationary radio sources. A stationary situation with the in situ first-order Fermi acceleration will give a brightness temperature of about 10 exp 15 K at 1 GHz due to the compensation of the inverse Compton losses by particle acceleration. The high brightness temperature effect is most pronounced at low frequencies and is proposed as the explanation of the LF variability phenomenon. Strong high-energy emission is predicted during phases of high brightness temperature.

  6. High Energy Density Microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the RF98 Workshop entitled `High Energy Density Microwaves` held in California in October, 1998. The topics discussed were predominantly accelerator{minus}related. The Workshop dealt, for the most part, with the generation and control of electron beams, the amplification of RF signals, the design of mode converters, and the effect of very high RF field gradients. This Workshop was designed to address the concerns of the microwave tube industry worldwide, the plasma physicists who deal with very high beam currents and gigawatts of RF power, and researchers in accelerator centers around the world. Papers were presented on multibeam klystrons, gyrotron development, plasmas in microwave tubes, RF breakdown, and alternatives to conventional linear coliders at 1 TeV and above. The Workshop was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy. There were 46 papers presented at the conference,out of which 19 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  7. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  8. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source.

    PubMed

    Wells, R P; Ghiorso, W; Staples, J; Huang, T M; Sannibale, F; Kramasz, T D

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described. PMID:26931840

  9. The Relationship Between Solar Coronal X-Ray Brightness and Active Region Magnetic Fields: A Study Using High-Resolution Hinode Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Soumitra; Nandy, Dibyendu; Ravindra, B.

    2015-03-01

    By using high-resolution observations of nearly co-temporal and co-spatial Solar Optical Telescope spectropolarimeter and X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray data onboard Hinode, we revisit the problematic relationship between global magnetic quantities and coronal X-ray brightness. Co-aligned vector magnetogram and X-ray data were used for this study. The total X-ray brightness over active regions is well correlated with integrated magnetic quantities such as the total unsigned magnetic flux, the total unsigned vertical current, and the area-integrated square of the vertical and horizontal magnetic fields. On accounting for the inter-dependence of the magnetic quantities, we inferred that the total magnetic flux is the primary determinant of the observed integrated X-ray brightness. Our observations indicate that a stronger coronal X-ray flux is not related to a higher non-potentiality of active-region magnetic fields. The data even suggest a slightly negative correlation between X-ray brightness and a proxy of active-region non-potentiality. Although there are small numerical differences in the established correlations, the main conclusions are qualitatively consistent over two different X-ray filters, the Al-poly and Ti-poly filters, which confirms the strength of our conclusions and validate and extend earlier studies that used low-resolution data. We discuss the implications of our results and the constraints they set on theories of solar coronal heating.

  10. Simultaneous fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field imaging with aberration correction over a wide field-of-view with Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to acquire both fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field images with correction for the spatially varying aberrations over a microscope's wide field-of-view (FOV). First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, FPM algorithm is able to leverage on the redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images to estimate the microscope aberrations, which usually deteriorate in regions further away from the FOV's center. Second, the procedure acquires a raw wide-FOV fluorescence image within the same setup. Lack of moving parts allows us to use the FPM-estimated aberration map to computationally correct for the aberrations in the fluorescence image through deconvolution. Overlaying the aberration-corrected fluorescence image on top of the high-resolution bright-field image can be done with accurate spatial correspondence. This can provide means to identifying fluorescent regions of interest within the context of the sample's bright-field information. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of ~18.

  11. High-energy transients.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K

    2013-06-13

    We present an overview of high-energy transients in astrophysics, highlighting important advances over the past 50 years. We begin with early discoveries of γ-ray transients, and then delve into physical details associated with a variety of phenomena. We discuss some of the unexpected transients found by Fermi and Swift, many of which are not easily classifiable or in some way challenge conventional wisdom. These objects are important insofar as they underscore the necessity of future, more detailed studies. PMID:23630376

  12. Very high energy colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-05-01

    The required emittance in very high energy machines are small. It will be a real challenge to produce these small emittances and to maintain them during acceleration. The small emittances probably make acceleration by laser techniques easier, if such techniques will be practical at all. The beam spot sizes are very small indeed. It will be a challenge to design beam transport systems with the necessary freedom from aberration required for these small spot sizes. It would of course help if the beta functions at the collision points could be reduced. Beam power will be large - to paraphrase the old saying, power is money - and efficient acceleration systems will be required.

  13. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  14. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Jay W.; Allen, Graham S.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Barty, Chrisopher B. J.

    2015-10-27

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  15. Building block diode laser concept for high brightness laser output in the kW range and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Fabio; Fritsche, Haro; Grohe, Andreas; Hagen, Thomas; Kern, Holger; Koch, Ralf; Kruschke, Bastian; Reich, Axel; Sanftleben, Dennis; Steger, Ronny; Wallendorf, Till; Gries, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The modular concept of DirectPhotonics laser systems is a big advantage regarding its manufacturability, serviceability as well as reproducibility. By sticking to identical base components an economic production allows to serve as many applications as possible while keeping the product variations minimal. The modular laser design is based on single emitters and various combining technics. In a first step we accept a reduction of the very high brightness of the single emitters by vertical stacking several diodes in fast axis. This can be theoretically done until the combined fast axis beam quality is on a comparable level as the individual diodes slow axis beam quality without loosing overall beam performance after fiber coupling. Those stacked individual emitters can be wavelength stabilized by an external resonator, providing the very same feedback to each of those laser diodes which leads to an output power of about 100 W with BPP of <3.5 mm*mrad (FA) and <5 mm*mrad (SA). In the next steps, further power scaling is accomplished by polarization and wavelength multiplexing yielding high optical efficiencies of more than 80% and resulting in a building block module with about 500 W launched into a 100 μm fiber with 0.15 NA. Higher power levels can be achieved by stacking those building blocks using the very same dense spectral combing technique up to multi kW Systems without further reduction of the BPP. The 500 W building blocks are consequently designed in a way that they feature a high flexibility with regard to their emitting wavelength bandwidth. Therefore, new wavelengths can be implemented by only exchanging parts and without any additional change of the production process. This design principal theoretically offers the option to adapt the wavelength of those blocks to any applications, from UV, visible into the far IR as long as there are any diodes commercially available. This opens numerous additional applications like laser pumping, scientific

  16. Bright field illumination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Edward D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A Bright Field Illumination system for inspecting a range of characteristically different kinds of defects, depressions, and ridges in a selected material surface. The system has an illumination source placed near a first focus of an elliptical reflector. In addition, a camera facing the inspected area is placed near the illumination source and the first focus. The second focus of the elliptical reflector is located at a distance approximately twice the elliptical reflector's distance above the inspected surface. The elliptical reflector directs the light from the source onto the inspected surface. Due to the shape of the elliptical reflector, light that is specularly reflected from the inspected surface is directed into the camera is which located at the position of the reflected second focus of the ellipse. This system creates a brightly lighted background field against which damage sites appear as high contrast dark objects which can be easily detected by a person or an automated inspection system. In addition, the Bright Field Illumination system and method can be used in combination with a vision inspection system providing for multiplexed illumination and data handling of multiple kinds of surface characteristics including abrupt and gradual surface variations and differences between measured characteristics of different kinds and prior instruments.

  17. Prospects at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-11-01

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs.

  18. Bright Ideas for Educators: Creative Projects by Recipients of FirstEnergy's Mathematics, Science and Technology Education Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Delores

    This document presents some of the projects that were highly rated and recommended for funding by the FirstEnergy Educational Advisory Council. A panel of educators and school administrators evaluated and endorsed the educational resources made available to schools and community groups. Project titles; teacher, school, and contact information; the…

  19. Cooled Transmission-Mode NEA-Photocathode with a Band-Graded Active Layer for High Brightness Electron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L. B.; Rozhkov, S. A.; Bakin, V. V.; Kosolobov, S. N.; Militsyn, B. L.; Scheibler, H. E.; Smith, S. L.; Terekhov, A. S.

    2009-08-01

    A Free-Electron Laser (FEL) places many exacting demands on a Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) photocathode, such as the need for an ultra-fast response time, low energy spread for emitted electrons, high quantum efficiency (Q.E.) and a high average photocurrent. However, these key requirements are conflicting, and cannot be fulfilled by conventional photocathode design. For example, to achieve ˜10 ps response time, the photocathode active layer should be thinned to ˜100-150 nm, but this thickness is insufficient to provide near-complete absorption of light with hv≈ɛg so high Q.E. cannot be achieved. Complete optical absorption and high Q.E. can be obtained using a thin active layer at higher photon energies, but this generates photoelectrons with excess kinetic energy within the semiconductor. These photoelectrons do not thermalise in a thin active layer, so yield a broad energy distribution in the emitted electrons. Moreover, cooling of the conventional semiconductor photocathode structure is ineffective due to its fragility, so it cannot be pressed firmly to a heat sink to attain good thermal contact. Consequently, the maximum CW photocurrent is limited to a few miiliamps. The goal of our work is to develop a new design of NEA-photocathode which is optimised for FEL applications.

  20. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C D

    2015-07-24

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications. PMID:26252685

  1. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C. D.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications.

  2. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  3. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  4. Multi-kW high-brightness fiber coupled diode laser based on two dimensional stacked tailored diode bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Andreas; Unger, Andreas; Köhler, Bernd; Küster, Matthias; Dürsch, Sascha; Kissel, Heiko; Irwin, David A.; Bodem, Christian; Plappert, Nora; Kersten, Maik; Biesenbach, Jens

    2016-03-01

    The demand for high brightness fiber coupled diode laser devices in the multi kW power region is mainly driven by industrial applications for materials processing, like brazing, cladding and metal welding, which require a beam quality better than 30 mm x mrad and power levels above 3kW. Reliability, modularity, and cost effectiveness are key factors for success in the market. We have developed a scalable and modular diode laser architecture that fulfills these requirements through use of a simple beam shaping concept based on two dimensional stacking of tailored diode bars mounted on specially designed, tap water cooled heat sinks. The base element of the concept is a tailored diode laser bar with an epitaxial and lateral structure designed such that the desired beam quality in slow-axis direction can be realized without using sophisticated beam shaping optics. The optical design concept is based on fast-axis collimator (FAC) and slow-axis collimator (SAC) lenses followed by only one additional focusing optic for efficient coupling into a 400 μm fiber with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.12. To fulfill the requirements of scalability and modularity, four tailored bars are populated on a reduced size, tap water cooled heat sink. The diodes on these building blocks are collimated simply via FAC and SAC. The building blocks can be stacked vertically resulting in a two-dimensional diode stack, which enables a compact design of the laser source with minimum beam path length. For a single wavelength, up to eight of these building blocks, implying a total of 32 tailored bars, can be stacked into a submodule, polarization multiplexed, and coupled into a 400 μm, 0.12NA fiber. Scalability into the multi kW region is realized by wavelength combining of replaceable submodules in the spectral range from 900 - 1100 nm. We present results of a laser source based on this architecture with an output power of more than 4 kW and a beam quality of 25 mm x mrad.

  5. High Energy Astrophysics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Ormes, Jonathan F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nature of gravity and its relationship to the other three forces and to quantum theory is one of the major challenges facing us as we begin the new century. In order to make progress we must challenge the current theories by observing the effects of gravity under the most extreme conditions possible. Black holes represent one extreme, where the laws of physics as we understand them break down. The Universe as whole is another extreme, where its evolution and fate is dominated by the gravitational influence of dark matter and the nature of the Cosmological constant. The early universe represents a third extreme, where it is thought that gravity may somehow be unified with the other forces. NASA's "Cosmic Journeys" program is part of a NASA/NSF/DoE tri-agency initiative designed to observe the extremes of gravity throughout the universe. This program will probe the nature of black holes, ultimately obtaining a direct image of the event horizon. It will investigate the large scale structure of the Universe to constrain the location and nature of dark matter and the nature of the cosmological constant. Finally it will search for and study the highest energy processes, that approach those found in the early universe. I will outline the High Energy Astrophysics part of this program.

  6. A multi-scale and model approach to estimate future tidal high water statistics in the southern German Bright

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, H.; Mai, S.; Mayer, B.; Pohlmann, T.; Barjenbruch, U.

    2012-04-01

    The interactions of tides, external surges, storm surges and waves with an additional role of the coastal bathymetry define the probability of extreme water levels at the coast. Probabilistic analysis and also process based numerical models allow the estimation of future states. From the physical point of view both, deterministic processes and stochastic residuals are the fundamentals of high water statistics. This study uses a so called model chain to reproduce historic statistics of tidal high water levels (Thw) as well as the prediction of future statistics high water levels. The results of the numerical models are post-processed by a stochastic analysis. Recent studies show, that for future extrapolation of extreme Thw nonstationary parametric approaches are required. With the presented methods a better prediction of time depended parameter sets seems possible. The investigation region of this study is the southern German Bright. The model-chain is the representation of a downscaling process, which starts with an emissions scenario. Regional atmospheric and ocean models refine the results of global climate models. The concept of downscaling was chosen to resolve coastal topography sufficiently. The North Sea and estuaries are modeled with the three-dimensional model HAMburg Shelf Ocean Model. The running time includes 150 years (1950 - 2100). Results of four different hindcast runs and also of one future prediction run are validated. Based on multi-scale analysis and the theory of entropy we analyze whether any significant periodicities are represented numerically. Results show that also hindcasting the climate of Thw with a model chain for the last 60 years is a challenging task. For example, an additional modeling activity must be the inclusion of tides into regional climate ocean models. It is found that the statistics of climate variables derived from model results differs from the statistics derived from measurements. E.g. there are considerable shifts in

  7. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  8. Application of a transverse phase-space measurement technique for high-brightness, H{sup {minus}} beams to the GTA H{sup {minus}} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Garcia, R.C.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sander, O.R.; Sandoval, D.P.; Shinas, M.A.; Smith, M.; Yuan, V.W.; Connolly, R.C.

    1995-05-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) had the objective Of Producing a high-brightness, high-current H-beam. The major components were a 35 keV injector, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), an intertank matching section (IMS), and a drift tube linac (DTL), consisting of 10 modules. A technique for measuring the transverse phase-space of high-power density beams has been developed and tested. This diagnostic has been applied to the GTA H-beam. Experimental results are compared to the slit and collector technique for transverse phase-space measurements and to simulations.

  9. High Energy Polarization of Blazars: Detection Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  10. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  11. High energy plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.

    1985-05-01

    Colinear intense laser beams ..omega../sub 0/, kappa/sub 0/ and ..omega../sub 1/, kappa/sub 1/ shone on a plasma with frequency separation equal to the electron plasma frequency ..omega../sub pe/ are capable of creating a coherent large longitudinal electric field E/sub L/ = mc ..omega../sub pe//e of the order of 1GeV/cm for a plasma density of 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ through the laser beat excitation of plasma oscillations. Accompanying favorable and deleterious physical effects using this process for a high energy beat-wave accelerator are discussed: the longitudinal dephasing, pump depletion, the transverse laser diffraction, plasma turbulence effects, self-steepening, self-focusing, etc. The basic equation, the driven nonlinear Schroedinger equation, is derived to describe this system. Advanced accelerator concepts to overcome some of these problems are proposed, including the plasma fiber accelerator of various variations. An advanced laser architecture suitable for the beat-wave accelerator is suggested. Accelerator physics issues such as the luminosity are discussed. Applications of the present process to the current drive in a plasma and to the excitation of collective oscillations within nuclei are also discussed.

  12. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10{sup 5} Z`s by the end of 1989 and 10{sup 6} in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry.

  13. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  14. Dynamical behaviour of photospheric bright points during merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscuoli, S.; Stangalini, M.; Ermolli, I.; Zuccarello, F.; Cristaldi, A.; Falco, M.; Guglielmino, S.; Giorgi, F.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the merging of bright points observed at high spatial and temporal resolution with CRISP/SST in a quiet region region. We analyze the MHD perturbations excited during the merging, their role in the energy budget of the magnetic structure and the potential role that they can play in heating the upper layers of the Sun's atmosphere.

  15. Highly efficient single-pass blue-light generation at 488 nm using a PPKTP waveguide crystal and high-brightness diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jechow, Andreas; McNeil, Shirley; Kaleva, Christopher; Skoczowsky, Danilo; Menzel, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    The combination of high brightness laser diodes and periodically poled (PP) waveguide crystals for the generation of blue light at the technically interesting wavelength of 488 nm is promising. Although PPKTP has a lower nonlinear coefficient compared to PPLN it is of interest for the use in such devices. Because of its higher photorefractive damage threshold, it is well suited for operation at room temperature. In this work, a DFB laser as well as a tunable external cavity enhanced broad area diode laser (ECDL) are used for second harmonic generation using a waveguide PPKTP crystal. Both lasers yield several hundred Miliwatts of diffraction limited light around a center wavelength of 976 nm with excellent spectral properties. The ECDL system is further tunable over a broad range of 40 nm. The PPKTP crystal has a length of 12 mm and the 4 μm x 8 μm waveguides are manufactured by ion exchange followed by a patented submount poling technique. By using a DFB laser diode as pump source a laser to waveguide coupling efficiency of more than 55% could be achieved. A maximum output power of 66.7 mW could be generated out of 220 mW infrared light inside the waveguide channel at room temperature. This results in a conversion efficiency of more than 260%/W.

  16. High Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.

    INTRODUCTION PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS GENERAL REQUIRED LUMINOSITY FOR LEPTON COLLIDERS THE EFFECTIVE PHYSICS ENERGIES OF HADRON COLLIDERS HADRON-HADRON MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST CIRCULAR e^{+}e^- MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST e^{+}e^- LINEAR COLLIDERS LUMINOSITY CONVENTIONAL RF SUPERCONDUCTING RF AT HIGHER ENERGIES γ - γ COLLIDERS μ ^{+} μ^- COLLIDERS ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES DESIGN STUDIES STATUS AND REQUIRED R AND D COMPARISION OF MACHINES CONCLUSIONS DISCUSSION

  17. Flare physics at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  18. PERFORMANCE LIMITATIONS IN HIGH-ENERGY ION COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-05-16

    High-energy ion colliders (hadron colliders operating with ions other than protons) are premier research tools for nuclear physics. The collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operations considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species, including asymmetric collisions. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams limits are set by space charge, charge exchange, and intrabeam scattering effects. The latter leads to luminosity lifetimes of only a few hours for intense heavy ions beams. Currently, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the only operating high-energy ion collider. Later this decade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN, will also run with heavy ions.

  19. Measurement of brightness temperature of two-dimensional electron gas in channel of a high electron mobility transistor at ultralow dissipation power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, A. M.; Shulga, V. M.; Turutanov, O. G.; Shnyrkov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    A technically simple and physically clear method is suggested for direct measurement of the brightness temperature of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the channel of a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). The usage of the method was demonstrated with the pseudomorphic HEMT as a specimen. The optimal HEMT dc regime, from the point of view of the "back action" problem, was found to belong to the unsaturated area of the static characteristics possibly corresponding to the ballistic electron transport mode. The proposed method is believed to be a convenient tool to explore the ballistic transport, electron diffusion, 2DEG properties and other electrophysical processes in heterostructures.

  20. Plasma conditions generated by interaction of a high brightness, prepulse free Raman amplified KrF laser pulse with solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Khattak, F.Y.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Viana, S.M.; Willi, O. )

    1992-12-28

    A high brightness, Raman amplified KrF laser has been used to irradiate solid targets with 12 ps laser pulses at intensities above 10[sup 15] W/cm[sup 2] without the presence of a preformed plasma caused by low level amplified spontaneous emission prepulse. Time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy of the [ital K]-shell emission from aluminum was used to infer electron densities in excess of 10[sup 23] cm[sup [minus]3] at temperatures of several hundred electronvolts.

  1. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  2. High energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation covers three broad topics: a brief introduction to the field of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies; a discussion of several topics illustrating what`s been learned after more than a decade of fixed target experiments; and an indication of what the future may bring at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) planned at CERN.

  3. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 z > 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ∼ ‑22 mag or z AB ∼ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  4. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 z > 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ˜ ‑22 mag or z AB ˜ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  5. Effects of space charge on the acceptance of brightness measuring devices

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1985-08-14

    Attempts to measure high electron beam brightness at low values of beam energy are plagued by the effects of space charge forces. These forces can substantially lower the phase space acceptance of various brightness measuring devices. This report considers several models for the effects of space charge upon the acceptance of both the field free, double aperture system and the magnetic ''emittance selector'' and compares them for some recent experiments on ATA and the High Brightness Test Stand. Reasonably conservative correction factors for the acceptances of these devices are derived.

  6. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    PubMed

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light. PMID:26698776

  7. Emission Lines and the High Energy Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Quasars show many striking relationships between line and continuum radiation whose origins remain a mystery. FeII, [OIII], Hbeta, and HeII emission line properties correlate with high energy continuum properties such as the relative strength of X-ray emission, and X-ray continuum slope. At the same time, the shape of the high energy continuum may vary with luminosity. An important tool for studying global properties of Quasi Stellar Objects (QSOs) is the co-addition of data for samples of QSOS. We use this to show that X-ray bright (XB) QSOs show stronger emission lines in general, but particularly from the narrow line region. The difference in the [OIII]/Hbeta ratio is particularly striking, and even more so when blended FeII emission is properly subtracted. Weaker narrow forbidden lines ([OII] and NeV) are enhanced by factors of 2 to 3 in both UV and optical XB composite spectra. The physical origin of these diverse and interrelated correlations has yet to be determined. Unfortunately, many physically informative trends intrinsic to QSOs may be masked by dispersion in the data due to either low signal-to-noise or variability. An important tool for studying global properties of QSOs is the co-addition of data for samples of QSOS. We use this to show that X-ray bright (XB) QSOs show stronger emission lines in general, but particularly from the narrow line region. The difference in the [OIII]/Hbeta ratio is particularly striking, and even more so when blended Fell emission is properly subtracted. Weaker narrow forbidden lines ([OII] and NeV) are enhanced by factors of 2 to 3 in both UV and optical XB composite spectra. We describe a large-scale effort now underway to probe these effects in large samples, using both data and analysis as homogeneous as possible. Using an HST FOS Atlas of QSO spectra, with primary comparison to ROSAT PSPC spectral constraints, we will model the Big Blue Bump, its relationship to luminosity and QSO type, and we will analyze and

  8. Brightness of Moonlight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garstang, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of the brightness of moonlight by comparison with lamp-light from a low wattage light bulb is an elementary project in astronomy which illustrates scientific principles for the freshman level. Two methods used for the comparison (shadow brightness method and grease spot method) are explained, with suggestions and expected answers. (DH)

  9. Bright is the New Black - Multi-Year Performance of Generic High-Albedo Roofs in an Urban Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, S. R.; Imhoff, M.; Rosenzweig, C.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Pasqualini, A.; Kong, A. Y. Y.; Grillo, D.; Freed, A.; Hillel, D.; Hartung, E.

    2012-01-01

    High-albedo white and cool roofing membranes are recognized as a fundamental strategy that dense urban areas can deploy on a large scale, at low cost, to mitigate the urban heat island effect. We are monitoring three generic white membranes within New York City that represent a cross-section of the dominant white membrane options for U.S. flat roofs: (1) an ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber membrane; (2) a thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) membrane and; (3) an asphaltic multi-ply built-up membrane coated with white elastomeric acrylic paint. The paint product is being used by New York City s government for the first major urban albedo enhancement program in its history. We report on the temperature and related albedo performance of these three membranes at three different sites over a multi-year period. The results indicate that the professionally installed white membranes are maintaining their temperature control effectively and are meeting the Energy Star Cool Roofing performance standards requiring a three-year aged albedo above 0.50. The EPDM membrane however shows evidence of low emissivity. The painted asphaltic surface shows high emissivity but lost about half of its initial albedo within two years after installation. Given that the acrylic approach is an important "do-it-yourself," low-cost, retrofit technique, and, as such, offers the most rapid technique for increasing urban albedo, further product performance research is recommended to identify conditions that optimize its long-term albedo control. Even so, its current multi-year performance still represents a significant albedo enhancement for urban heat island mitigation.

  10. Bright is the new black—multi-year performance of high-albedo roofs in an urban climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffin, S. R.; Imhoff, M.; Rosenzweig, C.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Pasqualini, A.; Kong, A. Y. Y.; Grillo, D.; Freed, A.; Hillel, D.; Hartung, E.

    2012-03-01

    High-albedo white and cool roofing membranes are recognized as a fundamental strategy that dense urban areas can deploy on a large scale, at low cost, to mitigate the urban heat island effect. We are monitoring three generic white membranes within New York City that represent a cross section of the dominant white membrane options for US flat roofs: (1) an ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber membrane; (2) a thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) membrane; and (3) an asphaltic multi-ply built-up membrane coated with white elastomeric acrylic paint. The paint product is being used by New York City’s government for the first major urban albedo enhancement program in its history. We report on the temperature and related albedo performance of these three membranes at three different sites over a multi-year period. The results indicate that the professionally installed white membranes are maintaining their temperature control effectively and are meeting the Energy Star Cool Roofing performance standards requiring a three-year aged albedo above 0.50. The EPDM membrane shows evidence of low emissivity; however this had the interesting effect of avoiding any ‘winter heat penalty’ for this building. The painted asphaltic surface shows high emissivity but lost about half of its initial albedo within two years of installation. Given that the acrylic approach is such an important ‘do-it-yourself’, low-cost, retrofit technique, and, as such, offers the most rapid technique for increasing urban albedo, further product performance research is recommended to identify conditions that optimize its long-term albedo control. Even so, its current multi-year performance still represents a significant albedo enhancement for urban heat island mitigation.

  11. Development of a high-brightness and low-divergence lithium neutral beam for a Zeeman polarimetry on JT-60U.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Atshushi; Kamiya, Kensaku; Iguchi, Harukazu; Fujita, Takaaki; Kakiuchi, Hideto; Kamada, Yutaka

    2008-09-01

    A high-brightness and low-divergence neutral beam is obtained for a Zeeman polarimetry of edge plasmas on JT-60U. The electron density and the pitch angle of the magnetic field line, thus the plasma current density distribution, can be measured by the Zeeman polarimetry using the lithium beam. A thermionic ion source heated by an electron beam is developed in order to obtain the ion beam current extraction over 10 mA. The beam optics is designed after detailed numerical simulation taking the space charge effects into account because a low-divergence angle of the neutral lithium beam leads to a narrow spectrum of the beam emission. It is also necessary to keep the beam radius small for good spatial resolution due to a long beam line of 6.5 m. The newly developed ion gun is operated on a test stand which simulates the diagnostic arrangement on JT-60U. The ion beam current of 10 mA at a beam energy of 10 keV is successfully extracted from the ion source operated at the temperature over 1300 degrees C and focused by Einzel lens. The full width at half maximum radius of the ion beam at the neutralizer is about 9 mm. A sodium vapor neutralizer neutralizes the collimated ion beam fully at the temperature of 300 degrees C. The neutral beam profiles are measured at two locations of the beam line at Z=2.3 m (beam monitor position) and Z=6.5 m (plasma region). The half-width at half maximum radius of the neutral beam of 26 mm and the equivalent beam current of 3 mA with the beam divergence angle of 0.2 deg which is the half-angle divergence are obtained. Those parameters satisfy the requirements of the Zeeman polarimetry. Furthermore, a long pulse extraction with a current of 10 mA and duration of 50 s is attained. PMID:19044408

  12. Development of a high-brightness and low-divergence lithium neutral beam for a Zeeman polarimetry on JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Atshushi; Kamiya, Kensaku; Iguchi, Harukazu; Fujita, Takaaki; Kakiuchi, Hideto; Kamada, Yutaka

    2008-09-01

    A high-brightness and low-divergence neutral beam is obtained for a Zeeman polarimetry of edge plasmas on JT-60U. The electron density and the pitch angle of the magnetic field line, thus the plasma current density distribution, can be measured by the Zeeman polarimetry using the lithium beam. A thermionic ion source heated by an electron beam is developed in order to obtain the ion beam current extraction over 10mA. The beam optics is designed after detailed numerical simulation taking the space charge effects into account because a low-divergence angle of the neutral lithium beam leads to a narrow spectrum of the beam emission. It is also necessary to keep the beam radius small for good spatial resolution due to a long beam line of 6.5m. The newly developed ion gun is operated on a test stand which simulates the diagnostic arrangement on JT-60U. The ion beam current of 10mA at a beam energy of 10keV is successfully extracted from the ion source operated at the temperature over 1300°C and focused by Einzel lens. The full width at half maximum radius of the ion beam at the neutralizer is about 9mm. A sodium vapor neutralizer neutralizes the collimated ion beam fully at the temperature of 300°C. The neutral beam profiles are measured at two locations of the beam line at Z =2.3m (beam monitor position) and Z =6.5m (plasma region). The half-width at half maximum radius of the neutral beam of 26mm and the equivalent beam current of 3mA with the beam divergence angle of 0.2deg which is the half-angle divergence are obtained. Those parameters satisfy the requirements of the Zeeman polarimetry. Furthermore, a long pulse extraction with a current of 10mA and duration of 50s is attained.

  13. Maximizing Brightness in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Tomizawa, H.; /JAERI-RIKEN, Hyogo

    2011-11-30

    If the laser pulse driving photoinjectors could be arbitrarily shaped, the emittance growth induced by space charge effects could be totally compensated for. In particular, for RF guns the photo-electron distribution leaving the cathode should have a 3D-ellipsoidal shape. The emittance at the end of the injector could be as small as the cathode emittance. We explore how the emittance and the brightness can be optimized for photoinjector based on RF gun depending on the peak current requirements. Techniques available to produce those ideal laser pulse shapes are also discussed. If the laser pulse driving photoinjectors could be arbitrarily shaped, the emittance growth induced by space charge effects could be totally compensated for. In particular, for RF guns, the photo-electron distribution leaving the cathode should be close to a uniform distribution contained in a 3D-ellipsoid contour. For photo-cathodes which have very fast emission times, and assuming a perfectly uniform emitting surface, this could be achieved by shaping the laser in a pulse of constant fluence and limited in space by a 3D-ellipsoid contour. Simulations show that in such conditions, with the standard linear emittance compensation, the emittance at the end of the photo-injector beamline approaches the minimum value imposed by the cathode emittance. Brightness, which is expressed as the ratio of peak current over the product of the two transverse emittance, seems to be maximized for small charges. Numerical simulations also show that for very high charge per bunch (10nC), emittances as small as 2 mm-mrad could be reached by using 3D-ellipsoidal laser pulses in an S-Band gun. The production of 3D-ellipsoidal pulses is very challenging, but seems worthwhile the effort. We briefly discuss some of the present ideas and difficulties of achieving such pulses.

  14. High-brightness table-top hard X-ray source driven by sub-100-femtosecond mid-infrared pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaupt, Jannick; Juvé, Vincent; Holtz, Marcel; Ku, Shinan; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas; Ališauskas, Skirmantas; Pugžlys, Audrius; Baltuška, Andrius

    2014-12-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in the condensed phase represents a key topic of current physics, chemistry and materials science. Femtosecond hard X-ray pulses are important structure probes that have been applied in time-resolved X-ray absorption and diffraction. Optical pump/X-ray probe schemes with compact laser-driven table-top sources have allowed for tiny changes of diffracted intensity to be measured with X-ray photon statistics, which has set the ultimate sensitivity limit. To address the strong quest for a higher X-ray flux, here we present the first hard X-ray plasma source driven by intense mid-infrared sub-100-fs pulses at 3.9 μm. The comparably long optical period allows for accelerating electrons from the Cu target to very high kinetic energies and for generating a characteristic Kα flux of 109 photons per pulse, 25 times more than with our 800 nm driver. Theoretical simulations account for the experimental results in a wide range of driving fields and predict a further enhancement of X-ray flux.

  15. Two-beam interferometric encoding of photoluminescent gratings in LiF crystals by high-brightness tabletop soft x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tomassetti, G.; Ritucci, A.; Reale, A.; Arrizza, L.; Flora, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.

    2004-11-01

    Two-beam interferometric encoding of periodic lines of permanent color centers in LiF has been obtained by use of an intense and high spatially coherent soft x-ray laser beam. A spatial resolution of the lines less than 1 {mu}m is demonstrated. We have used the 46.9 nm laser pulses (0.3 mJ, 1.7 ns at 0.2 Hz) produced in compact capillary discharges. Due to the low penetration depth of their radiation, their high brightness and spatial coherence, soft x-ray lasers can represent a powerful tool to encode integrated optical devices having low dimensionality and high spatial resolution inside optically transparent dielectrics, in extremely short exposure times.

  16. Experimental High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, Carla

    2005-10-12

    Neutrinos are considered promising probes for high energy astrophysics. More than four decades after deep water Cerenkov technique was proposed to detect high energy neutrinos. Two detectors of this type are successfully taking data: BAIKAL and AMANDA. They have demonstrated the feasibility of the high energy neutrino detection and have set first constraints on TeV neutrino production astrophysical models. The quest for the construction of km3 size detectors have already started: in the South Pole, the IceCube neutrino telescope is under construction; the ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR Collaborations are working towards the installation of a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea.

  17. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON): a high brightness detection platform based on a dye-doped silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shibsekhar; Dixit, Chandra K; Woolley, Robert; O'Kennedy, Richard; McDonagh, Colette

    2012-05-29

    A highly bright and photostable, fluorescent nanohybrid particle is presented which consists of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) embedded in dye-doped silica in a core-shell configuration. The dye used is the near-infrared emitting 4,5-benzo-5'-(iodoacetaminomethyl)-1',3,3,3',3'-pentamethyl-1-(4-sulfobutyl) indodicarbo cyanine. The nanohybrid architecture comprises a GNP core which is separated from a layer of dye molecules by a 15 nm buffer layer and has an outer protective, undoped silica shell. Using this architecture, a brightness factor of 550 has been achieved compared to the free dye. This hybrid system, referred to as Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON) in this paper, is the first nanohybrid construct to our knowledge which demonstrates such tunable fluorescence property. NEON has enhanced photostability compared to the free dye and compared to a control particle without GNPs. Furthermore, the NEON particle, when used as a fluorescent label in a model bioassay, shows improved performance over assays using a conventional single dye molecule label. PMID:22568772

  19. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  20. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  1. Self-consistent simulation of radiation and space-charge in high-brightness relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, David R.

    2007-12-01

    The ability to preserve the quality of relativistic electron beams through transport bend elements such as a bunch compressor chicane is increasingly difficult as the current increases because of effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and space-charge. Theoretical CSR models and simulations, in their current state, often make unrealistic assumptions about the beam dynamics and/or structures. Therefore, we have developed a model and simulation that contains as many of these elements as possible for the purpose of making high-fidelity end-to-end simulations. Specifically, we are able to model, in a completely self-consistent, three-dimensional manner, the sustained interaction of radiation and space-charge from a relativistic electron beam in a toroidal waveguide with rectangular cross-section. We have accomplished this by combining a time-domain field solver that integrates a paraxial wave equation valid in a waveguide when the dimensions are small compared to the bending radius with a particle-in-cell dynamics code. The result is shown to agree with theory under a set of constraints, namely thin rigid beams, showing the stimulation resonant modes and including comparisons for waveguides approximating vacuum, and parallel plate shielding. Using a rigid beam, we also develop a scaling for the effect of beam width, comparing both our simulation and numerical integration of the retarded potentials. We further demonstrate the simulation calculates the correct longitudinal space-charge forces to produce the appropriate potential depression for a converging beam in a straight waveguide with constant dimensions. We then run fully three-dimensional, self-consistent end-to-end simulations of two types of bunch compressor designs, illustrating some of the basic scaling properties and perform a detailed analysis of the output phase-space distribution. Lastly, we show the unique ability of our simulation to model the evolution of charge/energy perturbations on a

  2. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z[degrees] resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s] for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  3. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z{degrees} resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}{gamma}. We also began a major upgrade of the L3 luminosity monitor by replacing PWC chamber by a Si strip system in front of the BGO calorimeters. Finally we have continued our SSC R&D work on BaF{sub 2} by joining the GEM collaboration.

  4. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  5. Bright superior mirages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.

    2003-01-01

    Superior mirages of unusual brightness are occasionally observed. Two such cases, photographed over the frozen surface of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, are documented. Visually, these mirages appear as featureless bright barriers far out on the lake. They are just images of the lake ice, yet the luminance in one case was 2.5 times (in the other, 1.7 times) the luminance of the ice surface in front of the mirage. The mirage itself can be modeled by means of a conduction inversion, but a proper explanation of the brightness is not yet available.

  6. Star Light, Star Bright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iadevaia, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a technique for obtaining a rough measure of the brightness among different stars. Materials needed include a standard 35-mm camera, a plastic ruler, and a photo enlarger. Although a telescope can be used, it is not essential. (JN)

  7. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmogorov, A.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ritter, J.; Stupishin, N.; Zelenski, A.

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H- ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ˜0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  8. High-brightness semipolar (2021¯) blue InGaN/GaN superluminescent diodes for droop-free solid-state lighting and visible-light communications.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Leonard, John T; Pourhashemi, Arash; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P; Speck, James S; Alyamani, Ahmed Y; El-Desouki, Munir M; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-06-01

    A high-brightness, droop-free, and speckle-free InGaN/GaN quantum well blue superluminescent diode (SLD) was demonstrated on a semipolar (2021¯) GaN substrate. The 447-nm emitting SLD has a broad spectral linewidth of 6.3 nm at an optical power of 123 mW. A peak optical power of 256 mW was achieved at 700 mA CW injection current. By combining YAG:Ce phosphor, SLD-generated white light shows a color-rendering index (CRI) of 68.9 and a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4340 K. The measured frequency response of the SLD revealed a -3  dB bandwidth of 560 MHz, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the device for both solid-state lighting (SSL) and visible-light communication (VLC) applications. PMID:27244426

  9. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kolmogorov, A. Stupishin, N.; Atoian, G.; Ritter, J.; Zelenski, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2014-02-15

    The RHIC polarized H{sup −} ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H{sub 2} gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce “geometrical” beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  10. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade.

    PubMed

    Kolmogorov, A; Atoian, G; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Ritter, J; Stupishin, N; Zelenski, A

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H(-) ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench. PMID:24593468

  11. Evaluations of the new LiF-scintillator and optional brightness enhancement films for neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iikura, H.; Tsutsui, N.; Nakamura, T.; Katagiri, M.; Kureta, M.; Kubo, J.; Matsubayashi, M.

    2011-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the neutron scintillator jointly with Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd. In this study, we evaluated the new ZnS(Ag):Al/ 6Li scintillator developed for neutron imaging. It was confirmed that the brightness increased by about double while maintaining equal performance for the spatial resolution as compared with a conventional scintillator. High frame-rate imaging using a high-speed video camera system and this new scintillator made it possible to image beyond 10 000 frames per second while still having enough brightness. This technique allowed us to obtain a high-frame-rate visualization of oil flow in a running car engine. Furthermore, we devised a technique to increase the light intensity of reception for a camera by adding brightness enhancement films on the output surface of the scintillator. It was confirmed that the spatial resolution degraded more than double, but the brightness increased by about three times.

  12. How bright is the Io UV footprint?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfond, Bertrand; Grodent, Denis; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Radioti, Aikaterini; Hess, Sébastien

    2010-05-01

    The electro-magnetic interaction between Io and the Jovian magnetosphere generates a perturbation in the magnetospheric plasma which propagates along the magnetic field lines and creates auroral footprint emissions in both hemispheres. Recent results showed that this footprint is formed of several spots and an extended tail. Each feature is suggested to correspond to a different step in the propagation of the perturbation and in the electron energization processes. The present study focuses on the variations of the spots' brightness at different timescales from minutes to years through the rotation period of Jupiter. It relies on FUV images acquired with the STIS and ACS instruments onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Since the footprint is composed of several localized features, a good understanding of the emission region geometry is critical to derive the actual vertical brightness and thus the precipitated energy flux. We developed a 3D emission model in order to assess as precisely as possible the respective contribution of each individual feature and to correctly estimate the precipitating energy flux. As far as the brightness variations on timescales of minutes are concerned, we will present results from the high time resolution campaign executed during summer 2009. On timescale of several hours, we will show that the variation of the emitted power as a function of the location of Io in the plasma torus suggests that the Jovian surface magnetic field strength is an important controlling parameter. Finally, the measured precipitated power and particle fluxes will be discussed in comparison with recent simulations considering both Alfvén waves filamentation and electron acceleration when the Alfvén waves become inertial.

  13. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Gleckman, Philip L.; O'Gallagher, Joseph J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  14. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  15. Bright three-band white light generated from CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot-assisted Sr{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}:Ce{sup 3+},Li{sup +}-based white light-emitting diode with high color rendering index

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Ho Seong; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Jeon, Duk Young; Yang, Heesun

    2009-10-19

    In this study, bright three-band white light was generated from the CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot (QD)-assisted Sr{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}:Ce{sup 3+},Li{sup +}-based white light-emitting diode (WLED). The CdSe/ZnSe core/shell structure was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CdSe/ZnSe QDs showed high quantum efficiency (79%) and contributed to the high luminous efficiency ({eta}{sub L}) of the fabricated WLED. The WLED showed bright natural white with excellent color rendering property ({eta}{sub L}=26.8 lm/W, color temperature=6140 K, and color rendering index=85) and high stability against the increase in forward bias currents from 20 to 70 mA.

  16. Relative brightness of the O{sup +}({sup 2} D-{sup 2} P) doublets in low-energy aurorae

    SciTech Connect

    Whiter, D. K.; Lanchester, B. S.; Gustavsson, B.; Jallo, N. I. B.; Jokiaho, O.; Dahlgren, H.; Ivchenko, N.

    2014-12-10

    The ratio of the emission line doublets from O{sup +} at 732.0 nm (I {sub 732}) and 733.0 nm (I {sub 733}) has been measured in auroral conditions of low-energy electron precipitation from Svalbard (78.°20 north, 15.°83 east). Accurate determination of R = I {sub 732}/I {sub 733} provides a powerful method for separating the density of the O{sup +} {sup 2} P{sub 1} {sub /2,3} {sub /2}{sup o} levels in modeling of the emissions from the doublets. A total of 383 spectra were included from the winter of 2003-2004. The value obtained is R = I {sub 732}/I {sub 733} = 1.38 ± 0.02, which is higher than theoretical values for thermal equilibrium in fully ionized plasma, but is lower than reported measurements by other authors in similar auroral conditions. The continuity equations for the densities of the two levels are solved for different conditions, in order to estimate the possible variations of R. The results suggest that the production of ions in the two levels from O ({sup 3} P {sub 1}) and O ({sup 3} P {sub 2}) does not follow the statistical weights, unlike astrophysical calculations for plasmas in nebulae. The physics of auroral impact ionization may account for this difference, and therefore for the raised value of R. In addition, the auroral solution of the densities of the ions, and thus of the value of R, is sensitive to the temperature of the neutral atmosphere. Although the present work is a statistical study, it shows that it is necessary to determine whether there are significant variations in the ratio resulting from non-equilibrium conditions, from auroral energy deposition, large electric fields, and changes in temperature and composition.

  17. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  18. Cavity Light-Emitting Diode for Durable, High-Brightness and High-Efficiency Lighting Applications: First Budget Period Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yijian Shi

    2009-09-30

    A COLED device consists of a top electrode (anode) and a bottom electrode (cathode) separated by a thin dielectric layer. In this metal/dielectric stack, numerous small wells, or cavities, are etched through the top electrode and the dielectric layer. These cavities are subsequently filled with LEP molecules. When a voltage is applied between the top and bottom electrodes, holes (from the top electrode) and electrons (from the bottom electrode) are injected into the polymer. Light emission is generated upon recombination of holes and electrons within the polymer along the perimeters of cavities. Figure 1 compares the structures of the COLED and the traditional OLED. The existing COLED fabrication process flow is illustrated in Figure 2. A COLED can potentially be 5 times more efficient and can operate at as much as 100 times higher current density with much longer lifetime than an OLED. To fully realize these potential advantages, the COLED technology must overcome the following technical barriers, which were the technical focused points for Years 1 and 2 (Phase I) of this project: (1) Construct optimum thickness dielectric layer: In the traditional OLED structure, the optimal thickness of the LEP film is approximately 80-100 nm. In a COLED device, the effective LEP thickness roughly equals the thickness of the dielectric layer. Therefore, the optimal dielectric thickness for a COLED should also be roughly equal to 80-100 nm. Generally speaking, it is technically challenging to produce a defect-free dielectric layer at this thickness with high uniformity, especially over a large area. (2) Develop low-work-function cathode: A desired cathode should have a low work function that matches the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of the LEP molecules. This is usually achieved by using a low-work-function metal such as calcium, barium, lithium, or magnesium as the cathode. However, these metals are very vulnerable to oxygen and water. Since the cathode of the

  19. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; Barthelmy, Scott; Palmer, David; Mitchell, John; Esposito, Joseph; Sreekumar, P.; Hua, Xin-Min; Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Chan, Kai-Wing; Soong, Yang; Barrett, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  20. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Holdridge, David V.; Norris, J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  1. Dynamic compensation of thermal lensing and birefringence in a high-brightness Nd:Cr:GSGG oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshe, Inon; Jackel, Steven M.; Lallouz, Raphael; Tzuk, I.

    1997-09-01

    In this work, five fundamental concepts were combined to a low development of high efficiency, low divergence, narrow bandwidth, flashlamp pumped oscillators capable of operation over a broad operating range. These concepts were: flashlamp pumped Nd:Cr:GSGG to achieve high efficiency, a 'Reentrant Cavity' to eliminate birefringence losses, a variable radius back mirror in a hemispherical cavity to achieve maximum Gaussian beam fill factor, a very high damage threshold, spectrum narrowing output coupler fabricated using a stack of uncoated etalons to form a resonant reflector, a cylindrical zoom lens to completely eliminate astigmatism. The results were successful, and yielded an oscillator that produced 10 mJ, TEM00 300 MHz bandwidth, 75 ns pulses, over a repetition rate of 1-20 Hz, and at a slope efficiency of 2 percent. These techniques were also successfully applied to a YLF oscillator. They may, in part, be adapted for use to unstable resonators.

  2. Bright and Beautiful: High Achieving Girls, Ambivalent Femininities, and the Feminization of Success in the Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renold, Emma; Allan, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    This paper refocuses attention on and problematizes girls' experiences of school achievement and the construction of schoolgirl femininities. In particular, it centres on the relatively neglected experiences and identity work of high achieving primary school girls. Drawing upon ethnographic data (observations, interviews, and pupil diaries) from a…

  3. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOEpatents

    Zolotorev, Max

    2010-07-13

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  4. Bright laser source with high-power single-mode-emitting diode laser stacked array assembly and fiber coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrer, M.; Moser, H.; Gisler, T.; Spinola Durante, G.; Pierer, J.; Bosshard, C.; Krejci, M.; Lichtenstein, N.

    2011-03-01

    Single-mode-emitting high-power diode laser arrays (SM-HPDLA) are available industrially with more than 50 W emission power per bar. Based on this platform an expandable prototype solution is realized for fiber coupling of a stacked array with more than 100 W to an optical fiber with diameter of 200 micron and NA of 0.11. Advanced methods of controlled assembly of micro-optics by infrared laser-soldering have been developed therefore. We present a compact and scalable concept with scalability on 2 internal and 2 external factors. Internal factors are the increasing beam quality and power stability of high-power single-mode-emitting arrays and the improved assembly accuracy for diode bar and micro-optics. External factors are the interlaced coupling of stacked beam emission from the stacked array and the further option to use optimized polarisation coupling with several diode laser stacks.

  5. High-energy neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Michele Rhea

    2001-12-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for the radiation protection quantity effective dose were calculated for neutrons, photons and protons with energies up to 2 GeV using the MCNPX code. The calculations were performed using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory versions of the MIRD-V male and female anthropomorphic phantoms modified to include the skin and esophagus. The latest high-energy neutron evaluated cross-section libraries and the recommendations given in ICRP Publication 60 and ICRP Publication 74 were utilized to perform the calculations. Sets of fluence-to- effective dose conversion coefficients are given for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral, right-lateral and rotational irradiation geometries. This is the first set of dose conversion coefficients over this energy range calculated for the L-LAT irradiation geometry. A unique set of high-energy neutron depth-dose benchmark experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center/Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE/WNR) complex. The experiments consisted of filtered neutron beams with energies up to 800 MeV impinging on a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 tissue-equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose was measured in the phantom at various depths with tissue-equivalent ion chambers. The phantom and the experimental set-up were modeled using MCNPX. Comparisons of the experimental and computational depth- dose distributions indicate that the absorbed dose calculated by MCNPX is within 13% for neutrons with energies up to 750 MeV. This experiment will serve as a benchmark experiment for the testing of high-energy radiation transport codes for the international radiation protection community.

  6. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  7. High energy density electrochemical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, J. J.; Williams, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Primary cell has an anode of lithium, a cathode containing dihaloisocyanuric acid, and a nonaqueous electrolyte comprised of a solution of lithium perchlorate in methyl formate. It produces an energy density of 213 watt hrs/lb and can achieve a high current density.

  8. Bright patches on Ariel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Distinct bright patches are visible on Ariel, the brightest of Uranus' five largest satellites. Voyager 2 obtained this image Jan. 22, 1986, from a distance of 2.52 million kilometers (1.56 million miles). The clear-filter image, obtained with the narrow-angle camera, shows a resolution of 47 km (29 miles). Ariel is about 1,300 km (800 mi) in diameter. This image shows several distinct bright areas that reflect nearly 45 percent of the incident sunlight; on average, the satellite displays a reflectivity of about 25-30 percent. The bright areas are probably fresh water ice, perhaps excavated by impacts. The south pole of Ariel is slightly off center of the disk in this view. Voyager 2 will obtain its best views of the satellite on Jan. 24, at a closest-approach distance of 127,000 km (79,000 mi). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  9. The brightness ratio of H Lyman-α/H2 bands in FUV auroral emissions: A diagnosis for the energy of precipitating electrons and associated magnetospheric acceleration processes applied to Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chihiro; Lamy, Laurent; Prangé, Renée.

    2014-10-01

    We propose that the ratio of the auroral brightness of H Lyman-α to that of far ultraviolet H2 and the absolute value of the H2 brightness provide good indicators of the acceleration versus nonacceleration processes for field-aligned auroral electron precipitation in the Saturn magnetosphere-ionosphere coupled system. This finding is based on model results indicating that this ratio is a decreasing function of the auroral electron energy over the whole auroral energy range, as previously suggested by Cassini observations. For electron energies above 5 keV, the results agree with the Knight relation, as in the environments of the Earth and Jupiter. On the other hand, decreasing electron flux with increasing electron energies below a few keV is also found and alternately explained as a nonacceleration reflecting the magnetospheric plasma distribution and/or wave-particle interactions.

  10. Generation and application of a subpicosecond high brightness electron single bunch at the S-band linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kozawa, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Ueda, Toru; Miya, Kenzo

    1996-04-01

    A subpicosecond 37-MeV electron single bunch was generated at the S-band linear accelerator of the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. An original single bunch with a pulse width (FWHM) of less than 10 picoseconds was successfully compressed to a subpicosecond time domain by achromatic magnetic pulse compression. The energy modulation was optimally matched to the magnetic optics to achieve the most effective compression by tuning RF power and phase of the microwave. A femtosecond streak camera with a time resolution of 200 fs was used to measure the pulse shape of electron bunches by one shot via Cherenkov radiation emitted by the electrons in air. The specification of optical components was also optimized to avoid pulse broadening due to optical dispersion. Finally, the shortest pulse width in FWHM is 0.7ps in the best operating mode. The compressed bunch has an electric charge of 1 nC (6.2×109 electrons) on average. The subpicosecond electron single bunch will be utilized for exploration of ultrafast and fundamental radiation physics and chemistry. As the next project, we propose a femtosecond ultrafast quantum phenomena research facility where both 100-fs electron and laser pulses will be available. Especially, an X-band (11.424-GHz) femtosecond electron linac is under design.

  11. Low resistance and high work-function WO3/Ag/MoO2 multilayer as transparent anode for bright organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shun-Wei; Lee, Chih-Chien; Cheng, An-Kuei; Lin, Chun-Feng; Li, Ya-Ze; Su, Tsung-Hao

    2015-03-01

    The authors report efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using a highly conductive transparent WAM multilayer as anode electrode [WAM = WO3 (30 nm)/Ag (10 nm)/MoO2 (5 nm)], which was prepared by thermal evaporation in room temperature conditions to form a smooth morphology on the anode surface, leading to reduction of the injection barrier between the metal/organic interface. The WAM anode shows a low sheet resistance of 8.27 Ω/sq, suitable injection work function of ˜5.65 eV, and high optical transmittance of ˜80% at a range of visible light from 400 to 550 nm. In addition, a hole-only WAM-device by atomic force microscopy and electrical characterizations demonstrates that an efficient hole injection property exists at the WAM/N,N‧-bis(naphthalene-l-yl)-N,N‧-bis(phenyl)-benzidine interface as compared with the standard transparent conductive oxide of indium tin oxide. From the device characterization, the device performance of a green fluorescent OLED based on WAM anode exhibiting a high brightness of 120000 cd/m2 and current efficiency of 20 cd/A at a driving voltage of 8 V has been achieved. The operational lifetime of WAM-device was measured to be 10 h (T88 lifetime) at an initial luminance of 3450 cd/m2 because of WAM anode with stable electrical properties in air environment.

  12. Bright upconversion luminescence and increased Tc in CaBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}:Er high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Dengfeng; Wang Xusheng; Yao Xi; Xu Chaonan; Lin Jian; Sun Tiantuo

    2012-05-15

    Er{sup 3+} doped CaBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (CBT) bismuth layered-structure high temperature piezoelectric ceramics were synthesized by the traditional solid state method. The upconversion (UC) emission properties of Er{sup 3+} doped CBT ceramics were investigated as a function of Er{sup 3+} concentration and incident pump power. A bright green upconverted emission was obtained under excitation 980 nm at room temperature. The observed strong green and weak red emission bands corresponded to the transitions from {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} to {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, respectively. The dependence of UC emission intensity on pumping power indicated that a three-photon process was involved in UC emissions. Studies of dielectric with temperature have also been carried out. Introduction of Er increased the Curie temperature of CBT, thus, making this ceramic suitable for sensor applications at higher temperatures. Because of its strong up-converted emission and increased Tc, the multifunctional high temperature piezoelectric ceramic may be useful in high temperature sensor, fluorescence thermometry, and optical-electro integration applications.

  13. Theory and simulation of high-brightness electron beam production from laser-irradiated photocathodes in the presence of dc and rf electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Peter, W.

    1986-01-01

    To take advantage of properties of laser-controlled photodiodes to produce electron beams, a new set of diode design criteria are needed. An analytical and numerical study of the geometrical and temporal factors that affect the design of high-brightness electron beams is presented. This study extends our previous work on this concept to include the effects of laser pulse shape, and emittance effects in the presence of rf fields. In general, the diode will not be space-charge limited. Therefore, the conventional Pierce electrode shapes are not appropriate. Furthermore, the finite temporal profile of the electron beams introduces a time-dependent space charge into the design problem. The approach taken here to minimize the emittance growth from the temporal profile of the space charge is to operate at low perveance. To obtain high currents, large electric fields are required. We exploit the fact that the electron emission is controlled by the laser and is independent of the voltage on the diode. The diode can then be driven by an rf field. In principle, operating at higher frequency allows higher breakdown limits, so the perveance can be made very small. However, operating at too high an rf frequency introduces other detrimental effects.

  14. Atmospheric CO2 remote sensing system based on high brightness semiconductor lasers and single photon counting detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Serrano, Antonio; Vilera, Maria Fernanda; Esquivias, Ignacio; Faugeron, Mickael; Krakowski, Michel; van Dijk, Frédéric; Kochem, Gerd; Traub, Martin; Adamiec, Pawel; Barbero, Juan; Ai, Xiao; Rarity, John G.; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Ehret, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    We propose an integrated path differential absorption lidar system based on all-semiconductor laser sources and single photon counting detection for column-averaged measurements of atmospheric CO2. The Random Modulated Continuous Wave (RM-CW) approach has been selected as the best suited to semiconductor lasers. In a RM-CW lidar, a pseudo random sequence is sent to the atmosphere and the received signal reflected from the target is correlated with the original sequence in order to retrieve the path length. The transmitter design is based on two monolithic Master Oscillator Power Amplifiers (MOPAs), providing the on-line and off-line wavelengths close to the selected absorption line around 1.57 µm. Each MOPA consists of a frequency stabilized distributed feedback master oscillator, a bent modulator section, and a tapered amplifier. This design allows the emitters to deliver high power and high quality laser beams with good spectral properties. An output power above 400 mW with a SMSR higher than 45 dB and modulation capability have been demonstrated. On the side of the receiver, our theoretical and experimental results indicate that the major noise contribution comes from the ambient light and detector noise. For this reason narrow band optical filters are required in the envisioned space-borne applications. In this contribution, we present the latest progresses regarding the design, modeling and characterization of the transmitter, the receiver, the frequency stabilization unit and the complete system.

  15. HST/NICMOS IMAGING OF BRIGHT HIGH-REDSHIFT 24 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXIES: MERGING PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zamojski, Michel; Yan Lin; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Surace, Jason; Helou, George; Sajina, Anna; Heckman, Tim

    2011-04-01

    We present new results on the physical nature of infrared-luminous sources at 0.5 < z < 2.8 as revealed by HST/NICMOS imaging and Infrared Spectrograph mid-infrared spectroscopy. Our sample consists of 134 galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m with a flux of S(24 {mu}m)>0.9 mJy. We find many ({approx}60%) of our sources to possess an important bulge and/or central point source component, most of which reveal additional underlying structures after subtraction of a best-fit Sersic (or Sersic+PSF) profile. Based on visual inspection of the NIC2 images and their residuals, we estimate that {approx}80% of all our sources are mergers. We calculate lower and upper limits on the merger fraction to be 62% and 91%, respectively. At z < 1.5, we observe objects in early (pre-coalescence) merging stages to be mostly disk and star formation dominated, while we find mergers to be mainly bulge dominated and active galactic nucleus (AGN)-starburst composites during coalescence and then AGN dominated in late stages. This is analogous to what is observed in local ULIRGs. At z {>=} 1.5, we find a dramatic rise in the number of objects in pre-coalescence phases of merging, despite an increase in the preponderance of AGN signatures in their mid-IR spectra and luminosities above 10{sup 12.5} L{sub sun}. We further find the majority of mergers at those redshifts to retain a disk-dominated profile during coalescence. We conclude that, albeit still driven by mergers, these high-z ULIRGs are substantially different in nature from their local counterparts and speculate that this is likely due to their higher gas content. Finally, we observe obscured ({tau}{sub 9.7{mu}m}>3.36) quasars to live in faint and compact hosts and show that these are likely high-redshift analogs of local dense-core mergers. We find late-stage mergers to possess predominantly unobscured AGN spectra, but do not observe other morphological classes to carry any specific combination of {tau}{sub 9.7{mu}m} and polycyclic aromatic

  16. CRYSTALLINE BEAMS AT HIGH ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; OKAMOTO, H.; YURI, Y.; SESSLER, A.; MACHIDA, S.

    2006-06-23

    Previously it was shown that by crystallizing each of the two counter-circulating beams, a much larger beam-beam tune shift can be tolerated during the beam-beam collisions; thus a higher luminosity can be reached for colliding beams [1]. On the other hand, crystalline beams can only be formed at energies below the transition energy ({gamma}{sub T}) of the accelerators [2]. In this paper, we investigate the formation of crystals in a high-{gamma}{sub T} lattice that also satisfies the maintenance condition for a crystalline beam [3].

  17. Bright Fireball Over Georgia

    NASA Video Gallery

    A camera in Cartersville, Ga., captured this view of a bright fireball over Georgia on the night of Mar. 7, 2012, at approx. 10:19:11 EST. The meteor was first recorded at an altitude of 51.5 miles...

  18. Brightness predictions for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Daniel W. E.; Marsden, Brian G.; Morris, Charles S.

    2001-02-01

    Daniel W E Green, Brian G Marsden and Charles S Morris write with the aim of illuminating the issue of cometary light curves and brightness predictions, following the publication in this journal last October of the letter by John McFarland (2000).

  19. Probing the high energy universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, John K.

    1988-04-01

    Techniques and programs involved with gamma-ray astronomy are discussed. The way in which information about high energy processes in the universe can be obtained from the study of gamma-ray emissions is reviewed. Coded mask telescopes, the French and Soviet Gamma-1 project to study gamma-rays in the 100-300 MeV energy range, and the French Sigma hard X-ray/medium energy gamma-ray experiment are considered. The planned NASA Gamma-Ray Observatory mission is described, including the burst and transient source, experiment, the Compton telescope, the energetic gamma-ray experimental telescope, and the oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment. Also, the proposed ESA Gamma-Ray Astronomy with Spectroscopy and Positioning mission is examined.

  20. Bright Streak on Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These two images of Jupiter's small, irregularly shaped moon Amalthea, obtained by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft in August 1999(left) and November 1999 (right), form a 'stereo pair' that helps scientists determine this moon's shape and the topography of its surface features. Features as small as 3.8 kilometers (2.4 miles) across can be resolved in these images, making them among the highest-resolution images ever taken of Amalthea.

    The large impact crater visible in both images, near the right-hand edge of Amalthea's disk, is about 40 kilometers (about 29 miles) across; two ridges, tall enough to cast shadows, extend from the top of the crater in a V-shape reminiscent of a 'rabbit ears' television antenna. To the left of these ridges, in the top center portion of Amalthea's disk, is a second large impact crater similar in size to the first crater. To the left of this second crater is a linear 'streak' of relatively bright material about 50 kilometers (31 miles) long. In previous spacecraft images of Amalthea taken from other viewing directions, this bright feature was thought to be a small, round, bright 'spot' and was given the name Ida. These new images reveal for the first time that Ida is actually a long, linear 'streak.' This bright streak may represent material ejected during the formation of the adjacent impact crater, or it may just mark the crest of a local ridge. Other patches of relatively bright material can be seen elsewhere on Amalthea's disk, although none of these other bright spots has Ida's linear shape.

    In both images, sunlight is coming from the left and north is approximately up. Note that the north pole of Amalthea is missing in the right-hand image (it was cut off by the edge of the camera frame). The bright streak, Ida, is on the side of the moon that faces permanently away from Jupiter, and the crater near the right-hand edge of the disk is in the center of Amalthea's leading side (the side of the moon that 'leads

  1. Evidence for Temporally-Extended, High-Energy Emission from Gamma Ray Burst 990104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, D. N.; Bertsch, D. L.; Ritz, S.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV - GeV) has been observed in several gamma ray bursts and temporally-extended emission from lower-energy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. Observations of extended, high-energy emission are, however, scarce. Here we present evidence for a gamma ray burst emission that is both high-energy and extended, coincident with lower energy emissions. For the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104, we show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) trigger and initial burst emission. Between the initial output and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a period of approx. 100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma ray bursts.

  2. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  3. Cosmology for high energy physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1987-11-01

    The standard big bang model of cosmology is presented. Although not perfect, its many successes make it a good starting point for most discussions of cosmology. Places are indicated where well understood laboratory physics is incorporated into the big bang, leading to successful predictions. Much less established aspects of high energy physics and some of the new ideas they have introduced into the field of cosmology are discussed, such as string theory, inflation and monopoles. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  4. High energy overcurrent protective device

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical loads connected to capacitance elements in high voltage direct current systems are protected from damage by capacitance discharge overcurrents by connecting between the capacitance element and the load, a longitudinal inductor comprising a bifilar winding wound about a magnetic core, which forms an incomplete magnetic circuit. A diode is connected across a portion of the bifilar winding which conducts a unidirectional current only. Energy discharged from the capacitance element is stored in the inductor and then dissipated in an L-R circuit including the diode and the coil winding. Multiple high voltage circuits having capacitance elements may be connected to loads through bifilar windings all wound about the aforementioned magnetic core.

  5. High energy electron positron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Soding, P.

    1987-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA in a year from now, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics will come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of a few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way more useful to any high energy physicist in particular to newcomers in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions. It includes the most relevant data, parametrizations, theoretical background, and a chapter on detectors. Contents: Foreword; Detectors for High Energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ Physics; Lepton Pair Production and Electroweak Parameters; Hadron Production, Strong and Electroweak Properties; tau Physics; Recent Results on the Charm Sector; Bottom Physics; Lifetime Measurements of tau, Charmed and Beauty Hadrons; UPSILON Spectroscopy; Hadronic Decays of the UPSILON; Quark and Gluon Fragmentation in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ Continuum; Jet Production and QCD; Two Photon Physics; Search for New Particles.

  6. Migration of CD8+ T Cells into the Central Nervous System Gives Rise to Highly Potent Anti-HIV CD4dimCD8bright T Cells in a Wnt Signaling-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Richards, Maureen H; Narasipura, Srinivas D; Seaton, Melanie S; Lutgen, Victoria; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The role of CD8(+) T cells in HIV control in the brain and the consequences of such control are unclear. Approximately 3% of peripheral CD8(+) T cells dimly express CD4 on their surface. This population is known as CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells. We evaluated the role of CD4(dim)CD8(bright) and CD8 single positive T cells in HIV-infected brain using NOD/SCID/IL-2rcγ(-/-) mice reconstituted with human PBMCs (NSG-huPBMC). All three T cell populations (CD4 single positive, CD8 single positive, and CD4(dim)CD8(bright)) were found in NSG-huPBMC mouse brain within 2 wk of infection. Wnts secreted from astrocytes induced CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells by 2-fold in vitro. Injection of highly purified CD8 single positive T cells into mouse brain induced CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells by 10-fold, which were proliferative and exhibited a terminally differentiated effector memory phenotype. Brain CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells from HIV-infected mice exhibited anti-HIV-specific responses, as demonstrated by induction of CD107ab post exposure to HIV peptide-loaded targets. Further, higher frequency of CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells (R = -0.62; p ≤ 0.001), but not CD8 single positive T cells (R = -0.24; p ≤ 0.27), negatively correlated with HIV gag mRNA transcripts in HIV-infected NSG-huPBMC brain. Together, these studies indicate that single positive CD8(+) T cells entering the CNS during HIV infection can give rise to CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells, likely through a Wnt signaling-dependent manner, and that these cells are associated with potent anti-HIV control in the CNS. Thus, CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells are capable of HIV control in the CNS and may offer protection against HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26582945

  7. Through BAL Quasars Brightly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartas, George

    2003-01-01

    We report on an observation of the broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1115+080 performed with the XMM-Newton observatory. Spectral analysis reveals the second case of a relativistic X-ray-absorbing outflow in a BAL quasar. The first case was revealed in a recent observation of APM 08279+5255 with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. As in the case of APM 08279+5255, the observed flux of PG 1115+080 is greatly magnified by gravitational lensing. The relatively high redshift (z=1.72) of the quasar places the redshifted energies of resonant absorption features in a sensitive portion of the XMM- Newton spectral response. The spectrum indicates the presence of complex low-energy absorption in the 0.2-0.6 keV observed energy band and high-energy absorption in the 2-5 keV observed energy band. The high-energy absorption is best modeled by two Gaussian absorption lines with rest-frame energies of 7.4 and 9.5 keV. Assuming that these two lines axe produced by resonant absorption due to Fe XXV, we infer that the X-ray absorbers are outflowing with velocities of approx. 0.10c and approx. 0.34c respectively. We have detected significant variability of the energies and widths of the X-ray BALs in PG 1115+080 and APM 08279+5255 over timescales of 19 and 1.8 weeks (proper time), respectively. The BAL variability observed from APM 08279+5255 supports our earlier conclusion that these absorbers are most likely launched at relatively small radii of less than 10(exp 16)(Mbh/M8)(sup 1/2) cm. A comparison of the ionization properties and column densities of the low-energy and high-energy absorbers indicates that these absorbers are likely distinct; however, higher spectral resolution is needed to confirm this result. Finally, we comment on prospects for constraining the kinematic and ionization properties of these X-ray BALs with the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  8. High-brightness diode pump sources for solid-state and fiber laser pumping across 8xx-9xx nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamant, Ronen; Berk, Yuri; Cohen, Shalom; Klumel, Genady; Levy, Moshe; Openhaim, Yaki; Peleg, Ophir; Yanson, Dan; Karni, Yoram

    2011-06-01

    Advanced solid state laser architectures place increasingly demanding requirements on high-brightness, low-cost QCW laser diode pump sources, with custom apertures both for side and end rod pumping configurations. To meet this need, a new series of scalable QCW pump sources at 808nm and 940nm was developed. The stacks, available in multiple output formats, allow for custom aperture filling by varying both the length and quantity of stacked laser bars. For these products, we developed next-generation laser bars based on improved epitaxial wafer designs delivering power densities of 20W/mm of emission aperture. With >200W of peak QCW power available from a full-length 1cm bar, we have demonstrated power scaling to over 2kW in 10-bar stacks with 55% wall plug efficiency. We also present the design and performance of several stack configurations using full-length and reduced-length (mini) bars that demonstrate the versatility of both the bar and packaging designs. We illustrate how the ROBUST HEAD packaging technology developed at SCD is capable of accommodating variable bar length, pitch and quantity for custom rod pumping geometries. The excellent all-around performance of the stacks is supported by reliability data in line with the previously reported 20 Gshot space-grade qualification of SCD's stacks.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum Transfected with Ultra Bright NanoLuc Luciferase Offers High Sensitivity Detection for the Screening of Growth and Cellular Trafficking Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, Brendan; Charnaud, Sarah C.; Sanders, Paul R.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Gilson, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery is a key part of malaria control and eradication strategies, and could benefit from sensitive and affordable assays to quantify parasite growth and to help identify the targets of potential anti-malarial compounds. Bioluminescence, achieved through expression of exogenous luciferases, is a powerful tool that has been applied in studies of several aspects of parasite biology and high throughput growth assays. We have expressed the new reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase in Plasmodium falciparum and showed it is at least 100 times brighter than the commonly used firefly luciferase. Nluc brightness was explored as a means to achieve a growth assay with higher sensitivity and lower cost. In addition we attempted to develop other screening assays that may help interrogate libraries of inhibitory compounds for their mechanism of action. To this end parasites were engineered to express Nluc in the cytoplasm, the parasitophorous vacuole that surrounds the intraerythrocytic parasite or exported to the red blood cell cytosol. As proof-of-concept, these parasites were used to develop functional screening assays for quantifying the effects of Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of protein secretion, and Furosemide, an inhibitor of new permeation pathways used by parasites to acquire plasma nutrients. PMID:25392998

  10. Plasmodium falciparum transfected with ultra bright NanoLuc luciferase offers high sensitivity detection for the screening of growth and cellular trafficking inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Mauro F; Nie, Catherine Q; Elsworth, Brendan; Charnaud, Sarah C; Sanders, Paul R; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery is a key part of malaria control and eradication strategies, and could benefit from sensitive and affordable assays to quantify parasite growth and to help identify the targets of potential anti-malarial compounds. Bioluminescence, achieved through expression of exogenous luciferases, is a powerful tool that has been applied in studies of several aspects of parasite biology and high throughput growth assays. We have expressed the new reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase in Plasmodium falciparum and showed it is at least 100 times brighter than the commonly used firefly luciferase. Nluc brightness was explored as a means to achieve a growth assay with higher sensitivity and lower cost. In addition we attempted to develop other screening assays that may help interrogate libraries of inhibitory compounds for their mechanism of action. To this end parasites were engineered to express Nluc in the cytoplasm, the parasitophorous vacuole that surrounds the intraerythrocytic parasite or exported to the red blood cell cytosol. As proof-of-concept, these parasites were used to develop functional screening assays for quantifying the effects of Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of protein secretion, and Furosemide, an inhibitor of new permeation pathways used by parasites to acquire plasma nutrients. PMID:25392998

  11. Fabrication of microfluidic mixers and artificial vasculatures using a high-brightness diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser direct write method.

    PubMed

    Lim, Daniel; Kamotani, Yoko; Cho, Brenda; Mazumder, Jyotirmoy; Takayama, Shuichi

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes a direct write laser technology, which is fast and flexible, for fabricating multiple-level microfluidic channels. A high brightness diode-pumped Nd-YAG laser with slab geometry was used for its excellent beam quality. Channels with flat walls and staggered herringbone ridges on the floor have been successfully fabricated and their ability to perform passive mixing of liquid is discussed. Also, a multi-width multi-depth microchannel has been fabricated to generate biomimetic vasculatures whose channel diameters change according to Murray's law, which states that the cube of the radius of a parent vessel equals the sum of the cubes of the radii of the daughters. The multi-depth architecture allows for flow patterns to resemble physiological vascular systems with lower overall resistance and more uniform flow velocities throughout the network compared to planar patterning techniques which generate uniformly thin channels. The ability to directly fabricate multiple level structures using relatively straightforward laser technology enhances our ability to rapidly prototype complex lab-on-a-chip systems and to develop physiological microfluidic structures for tissue engineering and investigations in biomedical fluidics problems. PMID:15007466

  12. A tuneable ultra-compact high-power, ultra-short pulsed, bright gamma-ray source based on bremsstrahlung radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Vieux, G.; Issac, R. C.; Brunetti, E.; Ersfeld, B.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M. P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Shea, V. O.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Bendoyro, R. A.; Dias, J. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Ibbotson, T. P. A.; and others

    2012-03-15

    The laser driven plasma wakefield accelerator is a very compact source of high energy electrons. When the quasi-monoenergetic beam from these accelerators passes through dense material, high energy bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a collimated beam with high flux. We show how a source based on this emission process can produce more than 10{sup 9} photons per pulse with a mean energy of 10 MeV. We present experimental results that show the feasibility of this method of producing high energy photons and compare the experimental results with GEANT4 Montecarlo simulations, which also give the scaling required to evaluate its suitability as method to produce radioisotopes via photo-nuclear reactions or for imaging applications.

  13. Pion exchange at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    The state of Regge pion exchange calculations for high-energy reactions is reviewed. Experimental evidence is summarized to show that (i) the pion trajectory has a slope similar to that of other trajectories; (ii) the pion exchange contribution can dominate contributions of higher trajectories up to quite a large energy; (iii) many two-body cross sections with large pion contributions can be fit only by models which allow for kinematical conspiracy at t=0. The theory of kinematic conspiracy is reviewed for two-body amplitudes, and calculations of the conspiring pion--Pomeron cut discussed. The author then summarizes recent work on pion exchange in Reggeized Deck models for multiparticle final states, with emphasis on the predictions of various models (with and without resonances) for phases of the partial wave amplitudes.

  14. High Energy Laser Diagnostic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, James R.; Goddard, Douglas N.; Lewis, Jay; Thomas, David

    2010-10-01

    Recent advancements in high energy laser (HEL) sources have outpaced diagnostic tools capable of accurately quantifying system performance. Diagnostic tools are needed that allow system developers to measure the parameters that define HEL effectiveness. The two critical parameters for quantifying HEL effectiveness are the irradiance on target and resultant rise in target temperature. Off-board sensing has its limitations, including unpredictable changes in the reflectivity of the target, smoke and outgassing, and atmospheric distortion. On-board sensors overcome the limitations of off-board techniques but must survive high irradiance levels and extreme temperatures. We have developed sensors for on-target diagnostics of high energy laser beams and for the measurement of the thermal response of the target. The conformal sensors consist of an array of quantum dot photodetectors and resistive temperature detectors. The sensor arrays are lithographically fabricated on flexible substrates and can be attached to a variety of laser targets. We have developed a nanoparticle adhesive process that provides good thermal contact with the target and that ensures the sensor remains attached to the target for as long as the target survives. We have calibrated the temperature and irradiance sensors and demonstrated them in a HEL environment.

  15. Duke University high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  16. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  17. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  18. The High-velocity System: Infall of a Giant Low-surface-brightness Galaxy toward the Center of the Perseus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Alice P.-Y.; Lim, Jeremy; Ohyama, Youichi; Chan, Jeffrey C.-C.; Broadhurst, T.

    2015-12-01

    The high-velocity system (HVS) lies just north-west of the center and is moving at a speed of 3000 km s-1 toward NGC 1275, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Perseus cluster. We report imaging spectroscopy of the HVS in Hα and [N ii] that resolves both the nature of this galaxy and its physical relationship with NGC 1275. The HVS exhibits a distorted disk having a projected rotational velocity that rises steadily to ˜200 km s-1 at a radius of ˜12 kpc, the same maximal extent detectable in neutral gas and dust. We discover highly blueshifted emission at relative velocities of up to ˜800 km s-1 distributed throughout and confined almost entirely within the projected area of the disk, tracing gas stripped by ram pressure. The distribution of the stripped gas implies that the HVS is moving essentially along our sightline closely toward the center of NGC 1275. We show that the speed of the HVS is consistent with it having fallen from rest at the virial radius of the Perseus cluster and reached ˜100 kpc from the cluster center. Despite having an overall metallicity (inferred from [N ii]/Hα) significantly lower than that of star-forming disk galaxies, the HVS exhibits a current star formation rate of ˜3.6 M⊙ yr-1 and numerous young star clusters projected against giant H ii regions. The evidence assembled implicates a progenitor giant low-surface-brightness galaxy that, because of galaxy harassment and/or the cluster tidal field, has developed two prominent spiral arms along which star formation is strongly elevated.

  19. Retrieval of Maps of PM2.5 Aerosol in the Problematic California Valleys: Bright, Speckled Reflectances, Thin AOT, but High Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley suffers from severe episodes of respirable aerosol (PM2.5) in wintertime. We provide maps of aerosol episodes using daily snapshots of PM2.5 and its changing features despite numerous difficulties inherent to sampling the region, with special focus on the DISCOVER-AQ period, Jan-Feb 2013, which had many supporting measurements. Both high pollution and retrieval difficulties tend to occur in many Mediterranean agricultural regions. One difficulty is the relatively bright surfaces with considerable exposed soil. NASA's MAIAC and MODIS Deep Blue retrieval techniques are shown to have considerable skill even at low aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, as evaluated by concurrent AERONET sunphotometer measurements. More significantly, these AOT values can correspond to high daytime PM2.5 since aerosol mixed layer depth is thin and variable, 200m - 600 m. The thin layers derive from typical subsidence of dry air between more stormy periods. This situation provides an advantage: water vapor column is also almost completely limited to a similar mixed layer depth, and can thus serve as a measure of aerosol dilution. The ratio of AOT to column-water-vapor from MODIS products provides two advantages: (1) it can provide a measure related to particle density, via a mixed-layer proxy, and (2) it can ratio out some errors that crop up in the retrieval of very low AOT, e.g. bidirectional reflectance and other angular dependences. These effects are combined, so we disentangle them using AERONET data. Data from the NASA Langley HSRL-2 lidar and in-situ measurements from DISCOVER-AQ are also helpful. At the time of abstract submission, sporadic errors in the column water estimates provide the greatest limitation. Looking to the near future, we suggest why the use of geostationary TEMPO data will allow multiple sampling opportunities per day, supplementary or alternative information for AOT, aerosol absorption, and even column water.

  20. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  1. High-Energy-Density Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenes, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Capacitors capable of storing energy at high densities are being developed for use in pulse-power circuits in such diverse systems as defibrillators, particle- beam accelerators, microwave sources, and weapons. Like typical previously developed energy-storage capacitors, these capacitors are made from pairs of metal/solid-dielectric laminated sheets that are wound and pressed into compact shapes to fit into cans, which are then filled with dielectric fluids. Indeed, these capacitors can be fabricated largely by conventional fabrication techniques. The main features that distinguish these capacitors from previously developed ones are improvements in (1) the selection of laminate materials, (2) the fabrication of the laminated sheets from these materials, and (3) the selection of dielectric fluids. In simplest terms, a high-performance laminated sheet of the type used in these capacitors is made by casting a dielectric polymer onto a sheet of aluminized kraft paper. The dielectric polymer is a siloxane polymer that has been modified with polar pendant groups to increase its permittivity and dielectric strength. Potentially, this polymer is capable of withstanding an energy density of 7.5 J/cm3, which is four times that of the previous state-of-the-art-capacitor dielectric film material. However, the full potential of this polymer cannot be realized at present because (1) at thicknesses needed for optimum performance (.8.0 m), the mechanical strength of a film of this polymer is insufficient for incorporation into a wound capacitor and (2) at greater thickness, the achievable energy density decreases because of a logarithmic decrease in dielectric strength with increasing thickness. The aluminized kraft paper provides the mechanical strength needed for processing of the laminate and fabrication of the capacitor, and the aluminum film serves as an electrode layer. Because part of the thickness of the dielectric is not occupied by the modified siloxane polymer, the

  2. Surface brightness measurements of supernova remanants in the energy band 0.15 - 4 keV and an XUV survey from an altitude controlled rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, G. P.; Riegler, G.

    1973-01-01

    Reports are presented concerning the flight of Aerobee 170, 13.063 UG. The papers presented include: soft X-rays for Cygnus X-1 and Cygnus X-2; X-ray spectrum of the entire Cygnus loop; X-ray surface brightness of the Cygnus loop; and observations of He II 304 A and He I 584 a nightglow.

  3. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 15-20 Sept. 1993 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on 20 Sept. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured FWHM distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0.30 sec) and an average value of 250 km (0.35 sec). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0.17 sec) and the largest is 600 km (O.69 sec). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this area fraction measurement in the context of

  4. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 1993 September 15-20 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on September 20. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0 sec .30) and an average value of 250 km (0 sec .35). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0 sec .17) and the largest is 600 km (O sec .69). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this

  5. Evidence for ubiquitous high-equivalent-width nebular emission in z ∼ 7 galaxies: toward a clean measurement of the specific star-formation rate using a sample of bright, magnified galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, R.; Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Zheng, W.; Lemze, D.; Ford, H.; Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Postman, M.; Donahue, M.; Moustakas, J.; Umetsu, K.; Zitrin, A.; Bartelmann, M.; Gonzalez, V.; Benítez, N.; Jimenez-Teja, Y.; Grillo, C.; Infante, L.; and others

    2014-03-20

    Growing observational evidence indicates that nebular line emission has a significant impact on the rest-frame optical fluxes of z ∼ 5-7 galaxies. This line emission makes z ∼ 5-7 galaxies appear more massive, with lower specific star-formation rates (sSFRs). However, corrections for this line emission have been difficult to perform reliably because of huge uncertainties on the strength of such emission at z ≳ 5.5. In this paper, we present the most direct observational evidence thus far for ubiquitous high-equivalent-width (EW) [O III] + Hβ line emission in Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 7, and we present a strategy for an improved measurement of the sSFR at z ∼ 7. We accomplish this through the selection of bright galaxies in the narrow redshift window z ∼ 6.6-7.0 where the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 4.5 μm flux provides a clean measurement of the stellar continuum light, in contrast with the 3.6 μm flux, which is contaminated by the prominent [O III] + Hβ lines. To ensure a high signal-to-noise ratio for our IRAC flux measurements, we consider only the brightest (H {sub 160} < 26 mag) magnified galaxies we have identified behind galaxy clusters. It is remarkable that the mean rest-frame optical color for our bright seven-source sample is very blue, [3.6]-[4.5] = –0.9 ± 0.3. Such blue colors cannot be explained by the stellar continuum light and require that the rest-frame EW of [O III] + Hβ is greater than 637 Å for the average source. The four bluest sources from our seven-source sample require an even more extreme EW of 1582 Å. We can also set a robust lower limit of ≳ 4 Gyr{sup –1} on the sSFR of our sample based on the mean spectral energy distribution.

  6. Large, Bright Wind Ripples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-397, 20 June 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, relatively bright ripples of windblown sediment in the Sinus Sabaeus region south of Schiaparelli Basin. The surrounding substrate is thickly mantled by very dark material, possibly windblown silt that settled out of the atmosphere. The picture is located near 7.1oS, 343.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  7. Large Bright Ripples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 February 2004 Wind is the chief agent of change on Mars today. Wind blows dust and it can move coarser sediment such as sand and silt. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows bright ripples or small dunes on the floors of troughs northeast of Isidis Planitia near 31.1oN, 244.6oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  8. Tactical high-energy laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwartz, Josef; Wilson, Gerald T.; Avidor, Joel M.

    2002-06-01

    The Nautilus Project was started in 1995 as a joint US-Israel feasibility study for using laser systems to defend against short-range artillery rockets. It has now matured into a successful laser weapon demonstration program - the Tactical High Energy Laser (THEL) Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) Program. By now the THEL Demonstrator has engaged and destroyed a large number of artillery rockets in mid-flight in an extended series of demonstration tests at the US Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The THEL ACTD hardware and development process are described in this paper, as well as the major test results. The paper also describes the operational concept for a deployed THEL weapon system and some possible growth paths for the THEL ACTD Program.

  9. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  10. High energy femtosecond pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassonde, Philippe; Mironov, Sergey; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Payeur, Stéphane; Khazanov, Efim; Sergeev, Alexander; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mourou, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    An original method for retrieving the Kerr nonlinear index was proposed and implemented for TF12 heavy flint glass. Then, a defocusing lens made of this highly nonlinear glass was used to generate an almost constant spectral broadening across a Gaussian beam profile. The lens was designed with spherical curvatures chosen in order to match the laser beam profile, such that the product of the thickness with intensity is constant. This solid-state optics in combination with chirped mirrors was used to decrease the pulse duration at the output of a terawatt-class femtosecond laser. We demonstrated compression of a 33 fs pulse to 16 fs with 170 mJ energy.

  11. A High Yield of New Sightlines for the Study of Intergalactic Helium: Far-UV-Bright Quasars from the SDSS, GALEX, AND HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, David; Anderson, Scott F.; Zheng, Wei; Haggard, Daryl; Meiksin, Avery; Chiu, Kuenley; Hogan, Craig; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of He II Lyα (304 Å rest-frame) absorption toward a half-dozen quasars at z ~ 3-4 have demonstrated the great potential of helium studies of the intergalactic medium, but the current critically small sample size of clean sightlines for the He II Gunn-Peterson test limits confidence in cosmological inferences, and a larger sample is required. Although the unobscured quasar sightlines to high redshift are extremely rare, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6 provides thousands of z > 2.8 quasars. We have cross-correlated these SDSS quasars with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) GR2/GR3 to establish a catalog of 200 higher-confidence (~70% secure) cases of quasars at z = 2.8-5.1 potentially having surviving far-UV (rest-frame) flux. We also catalog another 112 likely far-UV-bright quasars from GALEX cross-correlation with other (non-SDSS) quasar compilations. Reconnaissance UV prism observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of 24 of our SDSS/GALEX candidates confirm 12 as detected in the far-UV, with at least nine having flux extending to very near the He II break; with refinements our success rate is even higher. Our SDSS/GALEX selection approach is thereby confirmed to be an order of magnitude more efficient than previous He II quasar searches, more than doubles the number of spectroscopically confirmed clean sightlines to high redshift, and provides a resource list of hundreds of high-confidence sightlines for upcoming He II and other far-UV studies from the HST. Our reconnaissance HST prism spectra suggest some far-UV diversity, confirming the need to obtain a large sample of independent quasar sightlines across a broad redshift range to assess such issues as the epoch(s) of helium reionization, while averaging over individual-object pathology and/or cosmic variance. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities

  12. Laser acceleration of low emittance, high energy ions and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julien; Audebert, Patrick; Borghesi, Marco; Pépin, Henri; Willi, Oswald

    2009-03-01

    Laser-accelerated ion sources have exceptional properties, i.e. high brightness and high spectral cut-off (56 MeV at present), high directionality and laminarity (at least 100-fold better than conventional accelerators beams), short burst duration (ps). Thanks to these properties, these sources open new opportunities for applications. Among these, we have already explored their use for proton radiography of fields in plasmas and for warm dense matter generation. These sources could also stimulate development of compact ion accelerators or be used for medical applications. To extend the range of applications, ion energy and conversion efficiency must however be increased. Two strategies for doing so using present-day lasers have been successfully explored in LULI experiments. In view of applications, it is also essential to control (i.e. collimate and energy select) these beams. For this purpose, we have developed an ultra-fast laser-triggered micro-lens providing tuneable control of the beam divergence as well as energy selection. To cite this article: J. Fuchs et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  13. Low Energy Building for High Energy People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The Huston Huffman Center at the University of Oklahoma's Norman campus has a jogging track as well as facilities for exercise and court games that are fully accessible to the handicapped. The building is set eight feet in the ground both to reduce its bulk and to conserve energy. (Author/MLF)

  14. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these

  15. Lightness, brightness, and anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barton L; Whitbread, Michael; de Silva, Chamila

    2014-01-01

    The majority of work in lightness perception has evaluated the perception of lightness using flat, matte, two-dimensional surfaces. In such contexts, the amount of light reaching the eye contains a conflated mixture of the illuminant and surface lightness. A fundamental puzzle of lightness perception is understanding how it is possible to experience achromatic surfaces as specific achromatic shades in the face of this ambiguity. It has been argued that the perception of lightness in such contexts implies that the visual system imposes an "anchoring rule" whereby a specific relative luminance (the highest) serves as a fixed point in the mapping of image luminance onto the lightness scale ("white"). We conducted a series of experiments to explicitly test this assertion in contexts where this mapping seemed most unlikely-namely, low-contrast images viewed in dim illumination. Our results provide evidence that the computational ambiguity in mapping luminance onto lightness is reflected in perceptual experience. The perception of the highest luminance in a two-dimensional Mondrian display varied monotonically with its brightness, ranging from midgray to white. Similar scaling occurred for the lowest luminance and, by implication, all other luminance values. We conclude that the conflation between brightness and lightness in two-dimensional Mondrian displays is reflected in perception and find no support for the claim that any specific relative luminance value acts as a fixed anchor point in this mapping function. PMID:25104828

  16. Characteristics of Lunar Lava Ponds as Indicators of Magma Transport Mechanisms and Local-Scale Geology of Ganymede Bright Terrain as Shown by Galileo Very High Resolution Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, Robin Aileen

    1998-10-01

    The characteristics of 305 small lunar mare deposits (ponds) considered best estimates for individual eruptive phases were analyzed in a global survey. Typical lunar eruptive episodes are relatively smooth and lack features such as large domes and calderas normally associated with shallow magma reservoirs. This suggests deep reservoirs may be prevalent. Mean deposit volume is 370 km3, indicating high volumes per eruption by terrestrial standards. Ponds often are associated with relatively thin crust, suggesting a link between crustal thickness and magma transport. Based upon this estimate of an average lunar flow, potentially ~27,000 separate flows comprise the majority of the contiguous maria, while individual maria may each represent 100s to 1000s of flows. The size of an ideal spherical reservoir associated with an average flow of 370 km3 is estimated to be ~100 km in diameter. These observations and estimates are consistent with a model in which plumes rising diapirically from depth stall at the base of the crust and overpressurize, driving dikes to the surface. Comparison of source region sizes predicted by the model to those using the independently-derived size estimates stated above show that reservoirs of 75-150 km yield overpressure values producing observed volumes. These results are also consistent with the above model. Using very-high resolution images of Xibalba Sulci bright terrain, Ganymede, we have classified three major geological units-craters, massifs and plains-and analyzed their various degradation states in terms of local-scale geological and regolith processes. The lack of many small craters, the distribution of rubble blocks, mantling of hills bases, and the texture of smooth plains all suggest the presence of a fragmental layer, (regolith). Candidates for regolith formation processes include tectonic fragmentation of massifs, downslope movement and impact generation. Evidence for tectonism is observed in N-S trending massifs and lineaments

  17. Bright gamma-ray flares of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1222+216 observed at the highest energies with Fermi-LAT and VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errando, Manel

    2014-08-01

    Flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are the most powerful sources continuously detected at gamma-ray energies, with luminosities exceeding 1048 erg s-1. The high-energy emission of quasars peaks in the MeV-GeV band, and only a few episodic detections have been reported at very high energies (VHE, E>100 GeV). We will present the first results from an observing campaign on the FSRQ 3C 279 in April 2014 during the brightest gamma-ray outburst ever recorded for this object, with flux exceeding the historic 1991 flare seen by EGRET. Observations include simultaneous coverage with the Fermi-LAT satellite and the VERITAS ground-based array spanning four decades in energy from 100 MeV to 1 TeV with unprecedented sensitivity. We will also report on the detection of persistent VHE emission from the quasar PKS 1222+216 over a week-long period in March 2014. These observations present strong challenges to current models of energy dissipation in relativistic jets. The implications of the absence/presence of VHE emission in connection with flaring activity in the MeV-GeV regime will be discussed, especially concerning the role of ambient photon fields in the radiation mechanisms, and the size and location of the gamma-ray emission region.

  18. Bright tunable femtosecond x-ray emission from laser irradiated micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Tong-Pu Hu, Li-Xiang; Yin, Yan; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Luo, Wen; Pukhov, Alexander

    2014-09-15

    It is demonstrated that bright femtosecond X-rays can be obtained by irradiating a moderate laser onto a helium micro-droplet. The laser ponderomotive force continuously sweeps electrons from the droplets and accelerates them forward. The electrons exposed in the outrunning laser field oscillate transversely and emit photons in the forward direction. The total flux of photons with energies above 1 keV is as high as 10{sup 9}/shot which is about 10-fold enhancement compared with betatron oscillation under similar laser conditions. The maximum achieved peak brightness is up to 10{sup 21} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW. By adjusting laser and droplet parameters, we can get tunable X-rays with required brightness and energy.

  19. Analysis of Bright Harvest Remote Analysis for Residential Solar Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Nangle, John; Simon, Joseph

    2015-06-17

    Bright Harvest provides remote shading analysis and design products for residential PV system installers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the NREL Commercialization Assistance Program, completed comparative assessments between on-site measurements and remotely calculated values to validate the accuracy of Bright Harvest’s remote shading and power generation.

  20. Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Tilted Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Ye; Haferman, Jeffrey L.; Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft and ground-based radar data from the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled-Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) show that convective systems are not always vertical. Instead, many are tilted from vertical. Satellite passive microwave radiometers observe the atmosphere at a viewing angle. For example, the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) on the TRMM satellite have an incident angle of about 50deg. Thus, the brightness temperature measured from one direction of tilt may be different than that viewed from the opposite direction due to the different optical depth. This paper presents the investigation of passive microwave brightness temperatures of tilted convective systems. To account for the effect of tilt, a 3-D backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been applied to a simple tilted cloud model and a dynamically evolving cloud model to derive the brightness temperature. The radiative transfer results indicate that brightness temperature varies when the viewing angle changes because of the different optical depth. The tilt increases the displacements between high 19 GHz brightness temperature (Tb(sub 19)) due to liquid emission from lower level of cloud and the low 85 GHz brightness temperature (Tb(sub 85)) due to ice scattering from upper level of cloud. As the resolution degrades, the difference of brightness temperature due to the change of viewing angle decreases dramatically. The dislocation between Tb(sub 19) and Tb(sub 85), however, remains prominent.

  1. Compact, high energy gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stapleton, Robert E.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1976-08-03

    An electrically pumped gas laser amplifier unit having a disc-like configuration in which light propagation is radially outward from the axis rather than along the axis. The input optical energy is distributed over a much smaller area than the output optical energy, i.e., the amplified beam, while still preserving the simplicity of parallel electrodes for pumping the laser medium. The system may thus be driven by a comparatively low optical energy input, while at the same time, owing to the large output area, large energies may be extracted while maintaining the energy per unit area below the threshold of gas breakdown.

  2. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  3. High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's challenge on advanced concept activity in the propulsion area, we initiated a new program entitled "High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion Studies" within the current cooperative agreement in 1998. The goals of this work are to gain further understanding of the engine of the AIMStar spacecraft, a concept which was developed at Penn State University, and to develop a prototype concept for the engine. The AIMStar engine concept was developed at Penn State University several years ago as a hybrid between antimatter and fusion technologies. Because of limited amounts of antimatter available, and concurrently the demonstrated ability for antiprotons to efficiently ignite nuclear fusion reactions, it was felt that this was a very good match. Investigations have been made concerning the performance of the reaction trap. This is a small Penning-like electromagnetic trap, which is used to simultaneously confine antiprotons and fusion fuels. Small DHe3 or DT droplets, containing a few percent molar of a fissile material, are injected into the trap, filled with antiprotons. We have found that it is important to separate the antiprotons into two adjacent wells, to inject he droplet between them and to simultaneously bring the antiprotons to the center of the trap, surrounding the droplet. Our previous concept had the droplet falling onto one cloud of antiprotons. This proved to be inefficient, as the droplet tended to evaporate away from the cloud as it interacted on its surface.

  4. Bright Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    9 June 2004 Martian dust devils sometimes disrupt thin coatings of surface dust to create dark streak patterns on the surface. However, not all dust devils make streaks, and not all dust devil streaks are dark. In Syria Planum, the streaks are lighter than the surrounding plains. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an example from Syria near 8.8oS, 103.6oW. The thin coating of surface dust in this region is darker than the substrate beneath it. This is fairly unusual for Mars, because most dust is bright. This image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/lower left.

  5. Identification and Quantification of Metallo–Chlorophyll Complexes in Bright Green Table Olives by High-Performance Liquid Chromatrography–Mass Spectrometry Quadrupole/Time-of-Flight

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio-Ruiz, Ramón; Riedl, Ken M.; Schwartz, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Five different samples of table olives, two regular Spanish table olives and three “bright green table olives”, have been analyzed by HPLC–MS/MS to determine their pigment profile. Typical pigment profiles of almost all table olives show primarily chlorophyll derivatives lacking metals (e.g., pheophytin a/b and 152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6). Bright green table olives have a unique profile including metallo–chlorophyll complexes (Cu-152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6 with 26–48% and Cu-pheophytin a with 3–18%) as their major pigments. New tentative structures have been identified by MS such as 152-Me-phytol-rhodin g7, 152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6, 152-Me-phytol-isochlorin e4, Cu-152-Me-phytol-rhodin g7, Cu-152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6, and Cu-152-Me-phytol-isochlorin e4, and new MS/MS fragmentation patterns are reported for Cu-152-Me-phytol-rhodin g7, Cu-152-Me-phytol-chlorin e6, Cu-pheophytin b, Cu-pheophytin a, Cu-pyropheophytin b, and Cu-pyropheophytin a. The presence of metallo–chlorophyll derivatives is responsible for the intense color of bright green table olives, but these metallo–chlorophyll complexes may be regarded as a “green staining” defect that is unacceptable to consumers. PMID:21905735

  6. Identification and quantification of metallo-chlorophyll complexes in bright green table olives by high-performance liquid chromatrography-mass spectrometry quadrupole/time-of-flight.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Ruiz, Ramón; Riedl, Ken M; Schwartz, Steven J

    2011-10-26

    Five different samples of table olives, two regular Spanish table olives and three "bright green table olives", have been analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS to determine their pigment profile. Typical pigment profiles of almost all table olives show primarily chlorophyll derivatives lacking metals (e.g., pheophytin a/b and 15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6)). Bright green table olives have a unique profile including metallo-chlorophyll complexes (Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6) with 26-48% and Cu-pheophytin a with 3-18%) as their major pigments. New tentative structures have been identified by MS such as 15(2)-Me-phytol-rhodin g(7), 15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6), 15(2)-Me-phytol-isochlorin e(4), Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-rhodin g(7), Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6), and Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-isochlorin e(4), and new MS/MS fragmentation patterns are reported for Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-rhodin g(7), Cu-15(2)-Me-phytol-chlorin e(6), Cu-pheophytin b, Cu-pheophytin a, Cu-pyropheophytin b, and Cu-pyropheophytin a. The presence of metallo-chlorophyll derivatives is responsible for the intense color of bright green table olives, but these metallo-chlorophyll complexes may be regarded as a "green staining" defect that is unacceptable to consumers. PMID:21905735

  7. Ultra-bright alkylated graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lan; Tang, Xing-Yan; Zhong, Yun-Xin; Liu, Yue-Wen; Song, Xue-Huan; Deng, Shun-Liu; Xie, Su-Yuan; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The photocatalytic rate is ca. 5.9 times higher than that of pure P25, indicating that AGQDs could harness the visible spectrum of sunlight for energy conversion or environmental therapy.Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The

  8. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  9. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  10. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  11. High energy gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Michael Richard

    This thesis presents a design study into gamma ray collimation techniques for use in high energy radiation imaging devices for the nuclear industry. Such technology is required to provide information on the nature and location of isotopes within nuclear facilities that have reached the end of their useful life. The work has concentrated on the use of two different techniques, namely mechanical collimation using the Anger camera and electronic collimation using a Compton camera. The work has used computational models to evaluate the performance of such systems and thereby suggest optimal design parameters for use in prototype devices. Ray tracing models have been constructed to simulate both parallel hole and tapered bore diverging collimators. Investigations have been carried out to measure the effects on the spatial resolution of changing various design parameters of the collimators. The effects of varying the hole size, septal thickness and collimator length over a range of source to collimator distances likely to be encountered in an industrial scenario have been examined. Some new insight into the nature of the point spread function of mechanical collimators has been gained and the limitations of the conventional analytical approach to collimator evaluation have been highlighted. Modifications to the standard equations used in collimator design have subsequently been suggested. An analytical description of tapered bore collimators has been derived. Monte Carlo models have been developed to model a single scatter Compton camera. Germanium, silicon and sodium iodide have been investigated as candidates for the scattering detector in such a device. A model of a complete ring array Compton camera system has been used to evaluate performance. The data from the Monte Carlo model has been reconstructed to form images. The quality of the images generated have then been compared with images obtained from parallel hole and focusing mechanical collimators.

  12. Evaluation of the Sky Brightness at Two Argentinian Astronomical Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubé, M.; Fortin, N.; Turcotte, S.; García, B.; Mancilla, A.; Maya, J.

    2014-11-01

    Light pollution is a growing concern at many levels, especially for the astronomical community. Indeed, not only does artificial lighting veil celestial objects, it disturbs the measurement of many atmospheric phenomena. The sky brightness is one of the most relevant parameters for astronomical site selection. Our goal is to evaluate the sky brightness of two Argentinian observation sites: LEO ++ and El Leoncito. Both sites were preselected to host the Cherenkov Telescope Array. This project consists of an arrangement of many telescopes that can measure high-energy gamma ray emissions via their Cherenkov radiation produced when entering the earth's atmosphere. In this paper, we describe the measurement methods used to determine whether those sites are valuable or not. We compared our results with the sky radiance of different renowned astronomical sites (Kitt Peak, Arizona, and Mont-Mégantic, Québec, Canada). Among our results, we found that LEO ++ is a good site, however the presence of a low layer of local aerosol can introduce uncertainties in the measurements. Consequently, El Leoncito would be a better option for such an installation. This latter site shows very low sky brightness levels, which are optimal for low light detection.

  13. Theory of high-energy messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  14. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  15. High Energy Continuum of High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion with the RXTE team at GSFC showed that a sufficiently accurate background subtraction procedure had now, been derived for sources at the flux level of PKS 2126-158. However this solution does not apply to observations carried out before April 1997, including our observation. The prospect of an improved solution becoming available soon is slim. As a result the RXTE team agreed to re-observe PKS2126-158. The new observation was carried out in April 1999. Quasi-simultaneous optical observations were obtained, as Service observing., at the 4-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope, and ftp-ed from the AAT on 22April. The RXTE data was processed in late June, arriving at SAO in early July. Coincidentally, our collaborative Beppo-SAX observation of PKS2126-158 was made later in 1999, and a GTO Chandra observation (with which we are involved) was made on November 16. Since this gives us a unique monitoring data for a high redshift quasar over a broad pass-band we are now combining all three observations into a single comprehensive study Final publication of the RXTE data will thus take place under another grant.

  16. Simultaneous brightness contrast of foraging Papilio butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Takahashi, Yuki; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the sense of brightness in the foraging Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. We presented two red discs of different intensity on a grey background to butterflies, and trained them to select one of the discs. They were successfully trained to select either a high intensity or a low intensity disc. The trained butterflies were tested on their ability to perceive brightness in two different protocols: (i) two orange discs of different intensity presented on the same intensity grey background and (ii) two orange discs of the same intensity separately presented on a grey background that was either higher or lower in intensity than the training background. The butterflies trained to high intensity red selected the orange disc of high intensity in protocol 1, and the disc on the background of low intensity grey in protocol 2. We obtained similar results in another set of experiments with purple discs instead of orange discs. The choices of the butterflies trained to low intensity red were opposite to those just described. Taken together, we conclude that Papilio has the ability to learn brightness and darkness of targets independent of colour, and that they have the so-called simultaneous brightness contrast. PMID:22179808

  17. Ultra-bright alkylated graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lan; Tang, Xing-Yan; Zhong, Yun-Xin; Liu, Yue-Wen; Song, Xue-Huan; Deng, Shun-Liu; Xie, Su-Yuan; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2014-11-01

    Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The photocatalytic rate is ca. 5.9 times higher than that of pure P25, indicating that AGQDs could harness the visible spectrum of sunlight for energy conversion or environmental therapy. PMID:25192187

  18. High Energy Density Electrolytic Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A new type of electrolytic capacitor which combines an electrolytic capacitor anode with an electrochemical capacitor cathode was developed. The resulting capacitor has a four time higher energy density than standard electrolytic capacitors, with comparable electric performance. The prototype, a 480 microFarad, 200 V device, has an energy density exceeding 4 J/cc. Now a 680 microFarad 50 V, MIL-style all tantalum device has been constructed and is undergoing qualification testing. Pending a favorable outcome, work will begin on other ratings. The potential for commercially significant development exists in applying this technology to aluminum-based electrolytic capacitors. It is possible to at least double the energy density of aluminum electrolytics, while using existing manufacturing methods, and without adding material expense. Data presented include electrical characteristics and performance measurements of the 200 V and 50 V hybrid capacitors and results from ongoing qualification testing of the MIL-style tantalum capacitors.

  19. High energy density electrolytic capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Recently a new type of electrolytic capacitor was developed. This capacitor, the Evans Hybrid, combines an electrolytic capacitor anode with an electrochemical capacitors cathode. The resulting capacitor has four times the energy density of other electrolytic capacitors, with comparable electrical performance. The prototype, a 480 micro F, 200 V device, had an energy density exceeding 4 J/cc. Now, a 680 micro F, 50 V, MIL-style all tantalum device has been constructed and is undergoing qualification testing. Pending a favorable outcome, work will begin on other ratings. Potential for commercially significant development exists in applying this technology to aluminum-based electrolytic capacitors. It is possible to at least double the energy density of aluminum electrolytics, while using existing manufacturing methods, and without adding material expense. Data presented include electrical characteristics and performance measurements of the 200 V and 50 V Hybrid capacitors and results of ongolng qualification status of the MJL-style tantalum.

  20. Stellar activity effects on high energy exoplanet transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llama, Joe; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2016-01-01

    High energy (X-ray / UV) observations of transiting exoplanets have revealed the presence of extended atmospheres around a number of systems. At such high energies, stellar radiation is absorbed high up in the planetary atmosphere, making X-ray and UV observations a potential tool for investigating the upper atmospheres of exoplanets. At these high energies, stellar activity can dramatically impact the observations. At short wavelengths the stellar disk appears limb-brightened, and active regions appear as extended bright features that evolve on a much shorter timescale than in the optical making it difficult . These features impact both the transit depth and shape, affecting our ability to measure the true planet-to-star radius ratio.I will show results of simulated exoplanet transit light curves using Solar data obtained in the soft X-ray and UV by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to investigate the impact of stellar activity at these wavelengths. By using a limb-brightened transit model coupled with disk resolved Solar images in the X-ray, extreme- and far-UV I will show how both occulted and unocculted active regions can mimic an inflated planetary atmosphere by changing the depth and shape of the transit profile. I will also show how the disk integrated Lyman-alpha Solar irradiance varies on both short and long timescales and how this variability can impact our ability to recover the true radius ratio of a transiting exoplanet.Finally, I will present techniques on how to overcome these effects to determine the true planet-to-star radius in X-ray and UV observations.

  1. Exploring the blazar zone in high-energy flares of FSRQs

    SciTech Connect

    Pacciani, L.; Donnarumma, I.; Tavecchio, F.; Stamerra, A.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Uemura, M.

    2014-07-20

    The gamma-ray emission offers a powerful diagnostic tool to probe jets and their surroundings in flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). In particular, sources emitting at high energies (>10 GeV) give us the strongest constraints. This motivates us to start a systematic study of flares with bright emission above 10 GeV, examining archival data of the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray telescope. At the same time, we began to trigger Target of Opportunity observations to the Swift observatory at the occurrence of high-energy flares, obtaining a wide coverage of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for several FSRQs during flares. Among others, we investigate the SED of a peculiar flare of 3C 454.3, showing a remarkably hard gamma-ray spectrum, quite different from the brightest flares of this source, and a bright flare of CTA 102. We modeled the SED in the framework of the one-zone leptonic model, using also archival optical spectroscopic data to derive the luminosity of the broad lines and thus estimate the disk luminosity, from which the structural parameters of the FSRQ nucleus can be inferred. The model allowed us to evaluate the magnetic field intensity in the blazar zone and to locate the emitting region of gamma-rays in the particular case in which gamma-ray spectra show neither absorption from the broad-line region (BLR) nor the Klein-Nishina curvature expected in leptonic models assuming the BLR as the source of seed photons for the External Compton scenario. For FSRQs bright above 10 GeV, we were able to identify short periods lasting less than one day characterized by a high rate of high-energy gamma-rays and hard gamma-ray spectra. We discussed the observed spectra and variability timescales in terms of injection and cooling of energetic particles, arguing that these flares could be triggered by magnetic reconnection events or turbulence in the flow.

  2. Bright fission: singlet fission into a pair of emitting states.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David

    2015-06-01

    This paper reintroduces and explores the generation of two bright states from a single photon via a singlet fission mechanism in organic materials. This particular photophysical process is labeled here as bright fission (BF). The central part of the study is devoted to set the theoretical foundations of BF by discussing possible electronic mechanisms, the role of different excited states with various physical nature, the presence of competing deactivation channels, and the possible requirements for the BF viability. In a second part, some of the properties related to BF are computationally explored in anthracene. The analysis of computed high-lying excited states identifies several optical transitions as good candidates to trigger BF in anthracene. The approximation of excitonic couplings of these high energy levels to other electronic states within the same energy range suggests possible paths to populate electronic configurations potentially able to split in two independent spin singlets, i.e. singlet-singlet states. The study also explores the electronic structure of the energetically lowest singlet-singlet states in anthracene dimers and discusses the presence of charge transfer configurations and their relation to the singlet-singlet manifold. The computational results suggest fast relaxation to the lowest singlet-singlet state, from which the excitonic fission may occur. All in all, the present work aims at motivating to pursue further efforts in the study of the BF process in organic materials. PMID:26575561

  3. Energy Activities for Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, David; And Others

    This document is a collection of six energy education activities for junior high school science. Its purpose is to help promote knowledge about energy, provide laboratory experiences, provoke inquiry, and relate energy to society through the science curriculum. The six activities are designed to take one to three class periods. Two of the…

  4. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  5. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    be a very important field for diverse applications such as muon cooling, fusion energy research, and ultra-bright particle and radiation generation with high intensity lasers. We had several talks on these and other subjects, and many joint sessions with the Computational group, the EM Structures group, and the Beam Generation group. We summarize our groups' work in the following categories: vacuum acceleration schemes; ion acceleration; particle transport in solids; and applications to high energy density phenomena.

  6. Polarimeter for high energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Tedeschi, David; Danagulian, Samuel; Litvienko, Vladimir; Pinayev, Igor

    1999-11-01

    The physics program at TJNAF includes fundamental experiments with polarized photon beam in few GeV energy range. Development of the Polarimeter for use in Hall B experiments is the subject of present abstract. We have proposed to take advantage of the recent progress in silicon micro strip detectors for measurement of the geometry and angle correlation in electron positron pair production from an amorphous converter. A detailed analysis of the setup including MC simulation shows an experimental asymmetry σ_allel/σ_⊥ ~ 1.7 in a wide range of the photon energies. This asymmetry value is confirmed by our experimental results obtained using 100 percent polarized 40 MeV γ rays at Duke FEL.

  7. Multiplicities in high energy interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1984-01-01

    Charged particle multiplicities in hadronic collision have been measured for all energies up to ..sqrt..s = 540 GeV in the center of mass. Similar measurements in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation cover the much smaller range - up to ..sqrt..s = 40 GeV. Data are also available from deep inelastic neutrino scattering up to ..sqrt..s approx. 10 GeV. The experiments measure the mean charged multiplicity , the rapidity density at y = O, and the distributions in prong number. The mean number of photons associated with the events can be used to measure the ..pi../sup 0/ and eta/sup 0/ multiplicities. Some information is also available on the charged pion, kaon, and nucleon fractions as well as the K/sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/ rates and for the higher energy data, the identically equal fraction. We review this data and consider the implications of extrapolations to SSC energies. 13 references.

  8. High energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  9. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  10. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  11. GEANT4: Applications in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Tariq; Zafar, Abrar Ahmed; Hussain, Talib; Rashid, Haris

    2007-02-14

    GEANT4 is a detector simulation toolkit aimed at studying, mainly experimental high energy physics. In this paper we will give an overview of this software with special reference to its applications in high energy physics experiments. A brief of process methods is given. Object-oriented nature of the simulation toolkit is highlighted.

  12. Black holes and high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grib, A. A.; Pavlov, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    Three mechanisms of getting high energies in particle collisions in the ergosphere of the rotating black holes are considered. The consequences of these mechanisms for observation of ultra high energy cosmic rays particles on the Earth as result of conversion of superheavy dark matter particles into ordinary particles are discussed.

  13. β-Ga2O3 and single-crystal phosphors for high-brightness white LEDs and LDs, and β-Ga2O3 potential for next generation of power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víllora, Encarnación G.; Arjoca, Stelian; Shimamura, Kiyoshi; Inomata, Daisuke; Aoki, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    β-Ga2O3 is the most transparent conductive oxide, well known since several decades for its large bandgap of 4.8 eV. Its potential as semiconductor material, however, is just emerging in recent years. Present work shows the development of βGa2O3 for semiconductor applications and its current state-of-the-art. The discussion is focused on three different aspects: (1) Advantageous growth from melt of large-size β-Ga2O3single-crystals. High-crystalline quality and carrier control make possible the production of conductive and semi-insulating wafers. (2) β-Ga2O3as substrate for homoepitaxy as well as for heteroepitaxial deposition of GaN-based devices. High-brightness blue-LEDs with vertical current injection are demonstrated. (3) Potential of β-Ga2O3for high-power devices with higher breakdown voltage than GaN and SiC counterparts. The first Schottky barrier diode is shown, as well as first transistors (MESFET and MOSFET) are indicated. Single-crystal phosphors are introduced as novel alternative to currently used powder phosphors. In connection with high-brightness white light-sources, based on LEDs or LDs plus phosphor converters, single-crystal phosphors possess advantageous features. These avoid the use of resins and exhibit a very high internal quantum efficiency, which remains stable with the temperature increase.

  14. Investigation of the thermally induced laser beam distortion associated with vacuum compressor gratings in high energy and high average power femtosecond laser systems.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Serbanescu, C; Lecherbourg, L; Payeur, S; Martin, F; Kieffer, J C

    2009-01-01

    We report successful compensation of the thermally induced laser beam distortion associated with high energy 110 mJ and high average power femtosecond laser system of 11 Watts operated with vacuum compressor gratings. To enhance laser-based light source brightness requires development of laser systems with higher energy and higher average power. Managing the high thermal loading on vacuum optical components is a key issue in the implementation of this approach. To our knowledge this is the first time that such thermal induced distortions on the vacuum compressor gratings are characterized and compensated. PMID:19129886

  15. Investigation of the thermally induced laser beam distortion associated with vacuum compressor gratings in high energy and high average power femtosecond laser systems

    PubMed Central

    Fourmaux, S.; Serbanescu, C.; Lecherbourg, L.; Payeur, S.; Martin, F.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report successful compensation of the thermally induced laser beam distortion associated with high energy 110 mJ and high average power femtosecond laser system of 11 Watts operated with vacuum compressor gratings. To enhance laser-based light source brightness requires development of laser systems with higher energy and higher average power. Managing the high thermal loading on vacuum optical components is a key issue in the implementation of this approach. To our knowledge this is the first time that such thermal induced distortions on the vacuum compressor gratings are characterized and compensated. PMID:19129886

  16. Brightness enhancement of plasma ion source by utilizing anode spot for nano applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Park, Man-Jin; Moon, Dae Won

    2012-02-15

    Anode spots are known as additional discharges on positively biased electrode immersed in plasmas. The anode spot plasma ion source (ASPIS) has been investigated as a high brightness ion source for nano applications such as focused ion beam (FIB) and nano medium energy ion scattering (nano-MEIS). The generation of anode spot is found to enhance brightness of ion beam since the anode spot increases plasma density near the extraction aperture. Brightness of the ASPIS has been estimated from measurement of emittance for total ion beam extracted through sub-mm aperture. The ASPIS is installed to the FIB system. Currents and diameters of the focused beams with/without anode spot are measured and compared. As the anode spot is turned on, the enhancement of beam current is observed at fixed diameter of the focused ion beam. Consequently, the brightness of the focused ion beam is enhanced as well. For argon ion beam, the maximum normalized brightness of 12 300 A/m{sup 2} SrV is acquired. The ASPIS is applied to nano-MEIS as well. The ASPIS is found to increase the beam current density and the power efficiency of the ion source for nano-MEIS. From the present study, it is shown that the ASPIS can enhance the performance of devices for nano applications.

  17. A Stable High-Brightness Electron Gun with Zr/W-tip for Nanometer Lithography. I. Emission Properties in Schottky- and Thermal Field-Emission Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoto, Norihiko; Shimizu, Ryuichi; Hashimoto, Hatsujiro; Tamura, Nobuaki; Gamo, Kenji; Namba, Susumu

    1985-06-01

    A Zr/W-tip consisting of a < 100>-oriented tungsten emitter with an overlayer of zirconium was mounted in a new electron gun system designed for the basic study of nanometer lithography, and the emission properties of the tip were investigated. The tip performed excellently, exhibiting a brightness of ˜ 2× 108 A/(cm2\\cdotsr) at 50 kV, a current stability of less than 0.2%/h, and an angular current density of ˜ 3.4 mA/sr at 20 kV. The work function of the Zr/W-tip operating in the Schottky emission region was roughly estimated as 3.2 eV.

  18. Studies of hot B subdwarfs. Part 2: Energy distributions of three bright sdB/sdOB stars in the 950-5500 angstrom range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesemael, F.; Holberg, J. B.; Veilleux, S.; Lamontagne, R.; Fontaine, G.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the subdwarf B or OB stars HD 205805, UV 1758+36 and Feige 66 are presented. All three objects display the H I Layman series in absorption. These observations are combined with low dispersion IUE spectrophotometry and with Stroemgren photometry to construct virtually complete energy distributions, which extend over the range 950-5500 angstroms. Effective temperatures based on model atmosphere calculations for high gravity, hydrogen rich stars are determined. Our analyses yield T Sub e 28,200 + or - 1300 K for HD 205805, T sub e 31, 800 + or - 1100 K for UV 1758+36, and T sub e 35,700 + or - 1500 K for Feige 66. The importance of far ultraviolet observations below L sub alpha in reducing the uncertainties associated with the interstellar extinction and the degradation of the IUE sensitivity is emphasized.

  19. Studies of hot B subdwarfs. II - Energy distributions of three bright sdB/sdOB stars in the 950-5500 A range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesemael, F.; Veilleux, S.; Lamontagne, R.; Fontaine, G.; Holberg, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the subdwarf B or OB stars HD 205805, UV 1758+36 and Feige 66 are presented. All three objects display the H I Layman series in absorption. These observations are combined with low dispersion IUE spectrophotometry and with Stromgren photometry to construct virtually complete energy distributions, which extend over the range 950-5500 angstroms. Effective temperatures based on model atmosphere calculations for high gravity, hygrogen rich stars are determined. Our analyses yield T sub e 28,200 + or - 1300 K for HD 205805, T sub e 31, 800 + or - 1100 K for UV 1758+36, and T sub e 35,700 + or 1500 K for Feige 66. The importance of far ultraviolet observations below L sub alpha in reducing the uncertainties associated with the interstellar extinction and the degradation of the IUE sensitivity is emphasized.

  20. Probing QCD at high energy via correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2011-04-26

    A hadron or nucleus at high energy or small x{sub Bj} contains many gluons and may be described as a Color Glass Condensate. Angular and rapidity correlations of two particles produced in high energy hadron-hadron collisions is a sensitive probe of high gluon density regime of QCD. Evolution equations which describe rapidity dependence of these correlation functions are derived from a QCD effective action.