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Sample records for energy hydrogen ion

  1. Angle-resolved intensity and energy distributions of positive and negative hydrogen ions released from tungsten surface by molecular hydrogen ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, S.; Tanaka, N.; Sasao, M.; Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Yamaoka, H.

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen ion reflection properties have been investigated following the injection of H+, H2+ and H3+ ions onto a polycrystalline W surface. Angle- and energy-resolved intensity distributions of both scattered H+ and H- ions are measured by a magnetic momentum analyzer. We have detected atomic hydrogen ions reflected from the surface, while molecular hydrogen ions are unobserved within our detection limit. The reflected hydrogen ion energy is approximately less than one-third of the incident beam energy for H3+ ion injection and less than a half of that for H2+ ion injection. Other reflection properties are very similar to those of monoatomic H+ ion injection. Experimental results are compared to the classical trajectory simulations using the ACAT code based on the binary collision approximation.

  2. Use of low energy hydrogen ion implants in high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1985-01-01

    This program is a study of the use of low energy hydrogen ion implantation for high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. The first quarterly report focuses on two tasks of this program: (1) an examination of the effects of low energy hydrogen implants on surface recombination speed; and (2) an examination of the effects of hydrogen on silicon regrowth and diffusion in silicon. The first part of the project focussed on the measurement of surface properties of hydrogen implanted silicon. Low energy hydrogen ions when bombarded on the silicon surface will create structural damage at the surface, deactivate dopants and introduce recombination centers. At the same time the electrically active centers such as dangling bonds will be passivated by these hydrogen ions. Thus hydrogen is expected to alter properties such as the surface recombination velocity, dopant profiles on the emitter, etc. In this report the surface recombination velocity of a hydrogen emplanted emitter was measured.

  3. Improvement in both giant magnetoresistance and exchange bias through hydrogen ion irradiation at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Jaechul; Han, Yoonsung; Lee, Jinwon; Hong, Jongill

    2008-09-01

    Irradiation of IrMn-based spin valves with 550 eV hydrogen ions increased their giant magnetoresistance and exchange bias by 20% and 60%, respectively. This significant enhancement stems from the strong (111) texture and small mosaic spread of the IrMn antiferromagnet that resulted from the microstructural reconstruction caused by the energy transfer during the bombardment by hydrogen ions, as well as by the narrow dispersion in the exchange bias. Irradiation with the hydrogen ion at low energy can improve the properties of spin valves without resulting in undue degradation in the performance or the microstructure.

  4. Energy-loss and straggling of hydrogen and helium ions in silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaard, J.; Conradie, J.; Friedland, E.

    1983-10-01

    Energy-loss and straggling of protons, deuterons and 4He ions in silver were measured in the energy range between 0.14 MeV and 2.6 MeV. For energies between 0.25 and 0.60 MeV/amu the stopping powers of the hydrogen ions in silver are up to 10% lower than the semi-empirical values of Andersen and Ziegler. Better agreement is obtained with the shell-correction fit for energies above 0.6 MeV/amu. In the case of the helium ions the measured values are between 8% to 13% lower than the semi-empirical values of Ziegler. The reduced straggling for the 4He and hydrogen ions is energy independent above 0.3 MeV/amu with the He values the same as predicted by the Bohr estimate but the hydrogen values are about 15% lower.

  5. Energy-loss and straggling of hydrogen and helium ions in selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradie, J.; Lombaard, J.; Friedland, E.

    1983-01-01

    Using a transmission technique, the energy-loss and straggling of protons, deuterons and helium ions in Se were measured in the energy range between 0.3 and 2.5 MeV. The experimental stopping powers of the various ions are the same as the semiempirical values of Andersen and Ziegler, except in the vicinity of the stopping power maximum. The reduced straggling for the helium and hydrogen ions is energy independent above 0.25 MeV/amu with the helium values the same as predicted by Bohr but the hydrogen values are somewhat lower.

  6. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, R. Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  7. Characterization of hydrogen binding to tungsten and beryllium surfaces using low energy ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, Robert; Whaley, Josh

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we use low energy ion beam analysis to determine how hydrogen interacts with tungsten and beryllium surfaces. The goal of this work is to provide insight into processes that contribute to recycling from plasma-facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices. Here we have applied low energy ion scattering (LEIS) to enable detection of adsorbed hydrogen at sub-monolayer resolution and to provide isotopic sensitivity. We probe the surfaces of interest with He + and Ne + at energies less than 5 keV to determine the structure and composition of the first few atomic layers. This approach enables us to examine how hydrogen surface concentrations evolve in real time, providing insight into adsorption kinetics. In addition, we have developed a means of determining the hydrogen binding configuration at different temperatures by exploiting mechanisms of ion channeling along surfaces. Using these methods, we have been able to identify hydrogen binding configurations for the W(100) +H, W(110) +H, and Be(0001) +H adsorption systems. We also report on our efforts to more accurately and efficiently model atomic collisions during scattering, key steps needed to extract structural information from LEIS signals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Use of low-energy hydrogen ion implants in high-efficiency crystalline-silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.; Sigh, R.; Mu, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of low-energy hydrogen implants in the fabrication of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells was investigated. Low-energy hydrogen implants result in hydrogen-caused effects in all three regions of a solar cell: emitter, space charge region, and base. In web, Czochralski (Cz), and floating zone (Fz) material, low-energy hydrogen implants reduced surface recombination velocity. In all three, the implants passivated the space charge region recombination centers. It was established that hydrogen implants can alter the diffusion properties of ion-implanted boron in silicon, but not ion-implated arsenic.

  9. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  10. Low-energy measurements of electron capture by multicharged ions from excited hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C. ); Haque, M.A. ); Smith, A.C.H. ); Urbain, X. ); Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6374 )

    1993-06-05

    For very low collision energies electron capture from excited hydrogen by multicharged ions is characterized by enormous cross sections, the predicted maximum being comparable to the geometric size of the Rydberg atom. The ion-atom merged-beams technique is being used to study these collisions for the variety of charge states and the wide range of energies (0.1 to 1000 eV/amu) accessible to the apparatus. A neutral D beam containing a Rydberg atom population proportional to 1/n[sup 3] is produced by collisional electron detachment of 8 keV D[sup [minus

  11. Low-energy measurements of electron capture by multicharged ions from excited hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C. ); Haque, M.A. ); Smith, A.C.H. ); Urbain, X. ); Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN (United Sta

    1992-01-01

    For very low collision energies electron capture from excited hydrogen by multicharged ions is characterized by enormous cross sections, the predicted maximum being comparable to the geometric size of the Rydberg atom. The ion-atom merged-beams technique is being used to study these collisions for the variety of charge states and the wide range of energies (0.1 to 1000 eV/amu) accessible to the apparatus. A neutral D beam containing a Rydberg atom population proportional to 1/n[sup 3] is produced by collisional electron detachment of 8 key D[sup [minus

  12. Hydrogen Bonding between Metal-Ion Complexes and Noncoordinated Water: Electrostatic Potentials and Interaction Energies.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Jelena M; Misini-Ignjatović, Majda Z; Murray, Jane S; Politzer, Peter; Zarić, Snežana D

    2016-07-01

    The hydrogen bonding of noncoordinated water molecules to each other and to water molecules that are coordinated to metal-ion complexes has been investigated by means of a search of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and through quantum chemical calculations. Tetrahedral and octahedral complexes that were both charged and neutral were studied. A general conclusion is that hydrogen bonds between noncoordinated water and coordinated water are much stronger than those between noncoordinated waters, whereas hydrogen bonds of water molecule in tetrahedral complexes are stronger than in octahedral complexes. We examined the possibility of correlating the computed interaction energies with the most positive electrostatic potentials on the interacting hydrogen atoms prior to interaction and obtained very good correlation. This study illustrates the fact that electrostatic potentials computed for ground-state molecules, prior to interaction, can provide considerable insight into the interactions. PMID:26989883

  13. Hydrogen energy.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P P; Kuznetsov, V L; David, W I F

    2007-04-15

    The problem of anthropogenically driven climate change and its inextricable link to our global society's present and future energy needs are arguably the greatest challenge facing our planet. Hydrogen is now widely regarded as one key element of a potential energy solution for the twenty-first century, capable of assisting in issues of environmental emissions, sustainability and energy security. Hydrogen has the potential to provide for energy in transportation, distributed heat and power generation and energy storage systems with little or no impact on the environment, both locally and globally. However, any transition from a carbon-based (fossil fuel) energy system to a hydrogen-based economy involves significant scientific, technological and socio-economic barriers. This brief report aims to outline the basis of the growing worldwide interest in hydrogen energy and examines some of the important issues relating to the future development of hydrogen as an energy vector. PMID:17272235

  14. Ion energy distributions at the electrodes of high pressure capacitive dual-frequency hydrogen discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüngel, Edmund; Mohr, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharges are widely used for surface processing applications, such as thin film solar cell manufacturing. In order to optimize the plasma surface interactions, the fluxes and energy distributions of radicals and ions at the substrate need to be controlled. In particular, the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) plays a crucial role. Previous investigations have shown that the mean ion energy can be changed in low pressure argon discharges via the Electrical Asymmetry Effect (EAE). Here, two consecutive harmonics are applied to the powered electrode. The main control parameter is the phase angle between the frequencies, which allows to adjust the symmetry of the discharge, the DC self bias, and the sheath voltages. In this work, the EAE is investigated in a parallel plate CCRF discharge operated in pure hydrogen at pressures of several hundred Pa. The axial component of the IEDF of the dominant ion species, H3^+, is measured at the grounded electrode using a plasma process monitor. The results focus on the question how the shape of the IEDF, the mean ion energy, and the total ion flux change as a function of the phase angle. Funded by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (0325210B).

  15. Hydrogen ion microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Deb, Satyen K.

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is a hydrogen ion microlithography process for use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. The process comprises the steps of providing a single layer of either an amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon material. A pattern is recorded in a selected layer of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon materials by preferentially implanting hydrogen ions therein so as to permit the selected layer to serve as a mask-resist wafer suitable for subsequent development and device fabrication. The layer is developed to provide a surface pattern therein adaptable for subsequent use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing.

  16. Hydrogen ion microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Deb, S.K.

    1990-10-02

    Disclosed is a hydrogen ion microlithography process for use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. The process comprises the steps of providing a single layer of either an amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon material. A pattern is recorded in a selected layer of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon materials by preferentially implanting hydrogen ions therein so as to permit the selected layer to serve as a mask-resist wafer suitable for subsequent development and device fabrication. The layer is developed to provide a surface pattern therein adaptable for subsequent use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. 6 figs.

  17. Precise Determination of the Lyman-1 Transition Energy in Hydrogen-like Gold Ions with Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Kilbourne, C.; Kiselev, O.; McCammon, D.; Scholz, P.

    2014-09-01

    The precise determination of the transition energy of the Lyman-1 line in hydrogen-like heavy ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields. We report the determination of the Lyman-1 transition energy of gold ions (Au) with microcalorimeters at the experimental storage ring at GSI. X-rays produced by the interaction of 125 MeV/u Au ions with an internal argon gas-jet target were detected. The detector array consisted of 14 pixels with silicon thermistors and Sn absorbers, for which an energy resolution of 50 eV for an X-ray energy of 59.5 keV was obtained in the laboratory. The Lyman-1 transition energy was determined for each pixel in the laboratory frame, then transformed into the emitter frame and averaged. A Dy-159 source was used for energy calibration. The absolute positions of the detector pixels, which are needed for an accurate correction of the Doppler shift, were determined by topographic measurements and by scanning a collimated Am-241 source across the cryostat window. The energy of the Lyman-1 line in the emitter frame is eV, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty in the position of the cryostat relative to the interaction region of beam and target.

  18. Precise energy eigenvalues of hydrogen-like ion moving in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.; Saha, Jayanta K.; Mukherjee, T. K.

    2015-06-15

    The analytic form of the electrostatic potential felt by a slowly moving test charge in quantum plasma is developed. It has been shown that the electrostatic potential is composed of two parts: the Debye-Huckel screening term and the near-field wake potential. The latter depends on the velocity of the test charge as well as on the number density of the plasma electrons. Rayleigh-Ritz variational calculation has been done to estimate precise energy eigenvalues of hydrogen-like carbon ion under such plasma environment. A detailed analysis shows that the energy levels gradually move to the continuum with increasing plasma electron density while the level crossing phenomenon has been observed with the variation of ion velocity.

  19. Effect of low-energy hydrogen ion implantation on dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a low-energy (0.4 keV), short-time (2-min), heavy-dose (10 to the 18th/sq cm) hydrogen ion implant on dendritic web silicon solar cells and material was investigated. Such an implant was observed to improve the cell open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current appreciably for a number of cells. In spite of the low implant energy, measurements of internal quantum efficiency indicate that it is the base of the cell, rather than the emitter, which benefits from the hydrogen implant. This is supported by the observation that the measured minority-carrier diffusion length in the base did not change when the emitter was removed. In some cases, a threefold increase of the base diffusion length was observed after implantation. The effects of the hydrogen implantation were not changed by a thermal stress test at 250 C for 111 h in nitrogen. It is speculated that hydrogen enters the bulk by traveling along dislocations, as proposed recently for edge-defined film-fed growth silicon ribbon.

  20. Surface degeneration of W crystal irradiated with low-energy hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hongyu; You, Yuwei; Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Liu, Lu; Benstetter, Günther; Liu, Dongping; Liu, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    The damage layer of a W (100) crystal irradiated with 120 eV hydrogen ions at a fluence of up to 1.5 × 10(25)/m(2) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). The periodic surface degeneration of the W crystal at a surface temperature of 373 K was formed at increasing hydrogen fluence. Observations by CCD camera and CAFM indicate the existence of ultrathin surface layers due to low-energy H irradiation. The W surface layer can contain a high density of nanometer-sized defects, resulting in the thermal instability of W atoms in the surface layer. Our findings suggest that the periodic surface degeneration of the W crystal can be ascribed to the lateral erosion of W surface layers falling off during the low-energy hydrogen irradiation. Our density functional theory calculations confirm the thermal instability of W atoms in the top layer, especially if H atoms are adsorbed on the surface. PMID:27020839

  1. Surface degeneration of W crystal irradiated with low-energy hydrogen ions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hongyu; You, Yuwei; Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Liu, Lu; Benstetter, Günther; Liu, Dongping; Liu, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    The damage layer of a W (100) crystal irradiated with 120 eV hydrogen ions at a fluence of up to 1.5 × 1025/m2 was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). The periodic surface degeneration of the W crystal at a surface temperature of 373 K was formed at increasing hydrogen fluence. Observations by CCD camera and CAFM indicate the existence of ultrathin surface layers due to low-energy H irradiation. The W surface layer can contain a high density of nanometer-sized defects, resulting in the thermal instability of W atoms in the surface layer. Our findings suggest that the periodic surface degeneration of the W crystal can be ascribed to the lateral erosion of W surface layers falling off during the low-energy hydrogen irradiation. Our density functional theory calculations confirm the thermal instability of W atoms in the top layer, especially if H atoms are adsorbed on the surface. PMID:27020839

  2. Effect of inelastic and elastic energy losses of Xe ions on the evolution of hydrogen blisters in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, V. F.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Sokhatskii, A. S.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the effect of irradiation by heavy ions on the formation of blisters on the silicon surface preliminarily ion-doped with hydrogen. An attempt is made at differentiating inelastic and elastic processes of interaction between ions and Si atoms using bombardment of the sample with high-energy charged particles through a bent absorbing filter by varying the radiation doses and the energy of bombarding Xe ions. It is found that irrespective of specific ionization energy losses of heavy ions, the blister formation is completely suppressed in the zone of the inelastic interaction during postradiation annealing. Conversely, stimulated development of hydrogen porosity takes place at the same time in the zone of elastic interaction, which is manifested in the form of blisters and flaking.

  3. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions.

    PubMed

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D; Ziegler, James F

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u(-1) to 450 MeV u(-1) or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity. PMID:27530803

  4. Ordered arrangement of irradiation-induced defects of polycrystalline tungsten irradiated with low-energy hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Fan, Hongyu; Liu, Lu; Berthold, Tobias; Benstetter, Günther; Liu, Dongping

    2015-09-01

    Low-energy (20-520 eV) hydrogen ion irradiations were performed at W surface temperature of 373-1073 K and a fluence ranging from 5.0 × 1023 to 1.0 × 1025/m2. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a nondestructive analytical technique was successfully used to detect irradiation-induced defects in polycrystalline W. The size and density of these nanometer-sized defects were strongly dependent on the fluence of hydrogen ions. Both ion energy (E) and temperature (T) play a crucial role in determining the ordering of nanometer-sized defects. Ordered arrangements were formed at relatively high E and T. This can be attributed to the stress-driven ripple effect of defect growth at crystal grains, resulting in the movement of W lattice along one certain crystal planes.

  5. Rotational energy of the hydrogen molecular ion in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Maluendes, S.A.; Fernandez, F.M.; Castro, E.A.

    1983-10-01

    A general method which combines hypervirial relations with the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and perturbation theory is applied in order to calculate the rotational eigenvalues of the hydrogen molecular ion in a magnetic field. Analytical expressions as well as numerical results are presented for both low and high field strengths.

  6. Effects of roughness and temperature on low-energy hydrogen positive and negative ion reflection from silicon and carbon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Kato, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Wada, M.; Nishiura, M.; Tsumori, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Yamaoka, H.

    2014-02-15

    Angle-resolved energy distribution functions of positive and negative hydrogen ions produced from a rough-finished Si surface under 1 keV proton irradiation have been measured. The corresponding distribution from a crystalline surface and a carbon surface are also measured for comparison. Intensities of positive and negative ions from the rough-finished Si are substantially smaller than those from crystalline Si. The angular distributions of these species are broader for rough surface than the crystalline surface. No significant temperature dependence for positive and negative ion intensities is observed for all samples in the temperature range from 300 to 400 K.

  7. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-08

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H{sup −} ions. The influence is particularly large for H{sup −} ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H{sup −} ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H{sup −} ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  8. Inhibited flammability and surface inactivation of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Mateum, Philip Edward R.; Orille, Ross William M.; Ramos, Rafael Julius U.; Monasterial, Jonathan Lee C.; Ramos, Henry J.; Bo-ot, Luis Ma. T.

    2007-06-01

    Changes on the properties of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS) were examined. The experimental facility employed was an in-house constructed, compact gas discharge ion source with beam energies maintained approximately in the 1 keV range fixed at 1 mA discharge current, 3 mTorr gas filling pressure. Wood specimens used were of species endemic in the Philippines namely Shorea sp., Shorea polysperma and Cocos nucifera. Results showed the processed samples manifested characteristics of inhibited flammability, and became relatively hydrophobic after the treatment. In the fire resistance test, it was also observed during initial flaming that the processed surfaces accumulated less soot attesting to a much lower smoldering rate, i.e. lesser combustibility. To assess the increase in fire endurance time for the processed wood against the control substrates, a non-directional, two-tailed t-test was utilized. Significant at the 0.05 level, the t-statistic measured 9.164 as opposed to only 4.303 in its corresponding critical value at two degrees of freedom. Hence, the treatment appeared to show strong statistical evidence of being effective in enhancing fire resistance. The processed specimens also exhibited moisture absorptive inhibition time of more than 10 min versus an average absorption period of just 8 s for the unprocessed samples. Spectroscopy using a cast steel mass analyzer indicated a predominance of H+ with faint signals of H2+in the ion showers. It is hypothesized that the monatomic ion plays an essential participatory role in the surface modification process. Data from an earlier work using Narra wood (Pterocarpus indicus) [G.Q. Blantocas, H.J. Ramos, M. Wada, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 45 (2006) 8498] was extended in the current study to substantiate this hypothesis. The data is now presented as current density ratio H+ /H2+versus the change rate constant K of the wetting model equation. It is shown that wood affinity to water decreased as the

  9. Benchmark binding energies of ammonium and alkyl-ammonium ions interacting with water. Are ammonium-water hydrogen bonds strong?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, Valérie; Masella, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl-ammonium ion/water interactions are investigated using high level quantum computations, yielding thermodynamics data in good agreement with gas-phase experiments. Alkylation and hydration lead to weaken the NHsbnd O hydrogen bonds. Upon complete hydration by four water molecules, their main features are close to those of the OHsbnd O bond in the isolated water dimer. Energy decomposition analyses indicate that hydration of alkyl-ammonium ions are mainly due to electrostatic/polarization effects, as for hard monoatomic cations, but with a larger effect of dispersion.

  10. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-15

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  11. Nano-welding and junction formation in hydrogen titanate nanowires by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, Satyanarayan; Chatterjee, Shyamal; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Bapat, Rudheer; Ayyub, Pushan

    2015-06-01

    Crystalline hydrogen titanate (H2Ti3O7) nanowires were irradiated with N+ ions of different energies and fluences. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that at relatively lower fluence the nanowires are bent and start to adhere strongly to one another as well as to the silicon substrate. At higher fluence, the nanowires show large-scale welding and form a network of mainly ‘X’ and ‘Y’ junctions. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering studies confirm a high degree of amorphization of the nanowire surface after irradiation. We suggest that while ion-irradiation induced defect formation and dangling bonds may lead to chemical bonding between nanowires, the large scale nano-welding and junction network formation can be ascribed to localized surface melting due to heat spike. Our results demonstrate that low energy ion irradiation with suitable choice of fluence may provide an attractive route to the formation and manipulation of large-area nanowire-based devices.

  12. Nano-welding and junction formation in hydrogen titanate nanowires by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dhal, Satyanarayan; Chatterjee, Shyamal; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Tribedi, Lokesh C; Bapat, Rudheer; Ayyub, Pushan

    2015-06-12

    Crystalline hydrogen titanate (H2Ti3O7) nanowires were irradiated with N(+) ions of different energies and fluences. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that at relatively lower fluence the nanowires are bent and start to adhere strongly to one another as well as to the silicon substrate. At higher fluence, the nanowires show large-scale welding and form a network of mainly 'X' and 'Y' junctions. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering studies confirm a high degree of amorphization of the nanowire surface after irradiation. We suggest that while ion-irradiation induced defect formation and dangling bonds may lead to chemical bonding between nanowires, the large scale nano-welding and junction network formation can be ascribed to localized surface melting due to heat spike. Our results demonstrate that low energy ion irradiation with suitable choice of fluence may provide an attractive route to the formation and manipulation of large-area nanowire-based devices. PMID:25990259

  13. Effect of the Acceleration Energy of Hydrogen Ion Irradiation on Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy in CoOx/Pd Multilayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang Chul; Kim, Sanghoon; Han, Jungjin; Hong, Jongill; Kang, Shinill

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic stripes were achieved from hydrogen-ion-irradiated areas separated by the nonirradiated areas masked by UV-imprinted polymeric patterns. A perpendicular magnetic anistropy with a squareness of 0.96 and a coercivity of 2 kOe in (CoOx/Pd)10 multilayer films was induced via deoxidization, which heavily depended on the acceleration energy of hydrogen ion irradiation in the range of 400 eV. These phenomena were demonstrated via deoxidization of cobalt oxide to pure cobalt as observed by X-ray diffraction, accompanying the formation of a CoPd(111) phase indicating perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to the preferential removal or reduction of oxygen atoms in multilayer films.

  14. Electron capture by multicharged ions from hydrogen atoms at eV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Nesnidal, M.P.; Porter, M.R.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    To quantitatively study electron capture during collisions of multiply charged ions with neutral atoms at near-thermal energies, keV-energy multicharged ion beams are merged with ground-state beams of H or D atoms of chosen velocity such that collisions in the relative energy range 1--1000 eV/amu result. Recent data for O{sup 3+}, O{sup 4+} + H(D) are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Recently completed modifications to the apparatus are described that will provide a significant improvement in signal-to-background and angular collection. These improvements will allow measurements to be extended to lower energies, where effects due to the ion-induced dipole attraction may be evident.

  15. Global model analysis of negative ion generation in low-pressure inductively coupled hydrogen plasmas with bi-Maxwellian electron energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Jung, Bong-Ki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Yong-Seok; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2015-03-15

    A global model was developed to investigate the densities of negative ions and the other species in a low-pressure inductively coupled hydrogen plasma with a bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution. Compared to a Maxwellian plasma, bi-Maxwellian plasmas have higher populations of low-energy electrons and highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules that are generated efficiently by high-energy electrons. This leads to a higher reaction rate of the dissociative electron attachment responsible for negative ion production. The model indicated that the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution at low pressures is favorable for the creation of negative ions. In addition, the electron temperature, electron density, and negative ion density calculated using the model were compared with the experimental data. In the low-pressure regime, the model results of the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distributions agreed well quantitatively with the experimental measurements, unlike those of the assumed Maxwellian electron energy distributions that had discrepancies.

  16. Two-center effect on low-energy electron emission in collisions of 1-MeV/u bare ions with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and helium. I. Atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Richard, P.; Gulyás, L.; Rudd, M. E.; Moshammer, R.

    2001-06-01

    We have investigated ionization mechanisms in fast ion-atom collisions by measuring the low-energy electron emission cross sections in a pure three-body collision involving bare carbon ions (v=6.35 a.u.) colliding with atomic hydrogen targets. The measurements have also been extended to molecular hydrogen and helium targets. In this paper we provide the energy and angular distributions of double differential cross sections of low-energy electron emission for atomic hydrogen targets. The Slevin rf source with a high degree of dissociation was used to produce the atomic H target. It is found that the two-center effect has a major influence on the observed large forward-backward angular asymmetry. A detailed comparison is presented with calculations based on the continuum distorted-wave (CDW) and CDW-EIS (eikonal initial-state) approximations. Both the continuum distorted-wave calculations provide a very good understanding of the data, whereas the first Born calculation predicts almost symmetric forward-backward distributions that do not agree with the data. The two-center effect is slightly better represented by the CDW calculations compared to the CDW-EIS calculation. The total cross sections are, however, in good agreement with the theories used. The results for molecular hydrogen and helium will be discussed in the following paper.

  17. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  18. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  19. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  20. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T.

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  1. Ground state of the hydrogen negative ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreshkov, Boyan

    2009-03-01

    Based on recently developed variational many-body Schr"odinger equation for electrons with Coulomb interactions [1], we provide first numerical results for the ground state electron structure of the hydrogen negative ion. It is shown that Fermi-Teller promotion effect together with non-adiabatic screening effects due to the Pauli's exclusion principle are responsible for the weak binding of the anion. The calculated ionization potential J=-1/2 - 2 λ+ <1/r12> of the hydrogen negative ion is compared with the experiment, where λ is the mean binding energy per one electron in the ground state.[0pt] [1] B. D. Obreshkov , Phys. Rev. A 78, 032503 (2008).

  2. Hydrogen retention in ion irradiated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, J.D.; Lewis, M.B.; Lee, E.H.

    1998-11-01

    In the future 1--5 MW Spallation Neutron Source, target radiation damage will be accompanied by high levels of hydrogen and helium transmutation products. The authors have recently carried out investigations using simultaneous Fe/He,H multiple-ion implantations into 316 LN stainless steel between 50 and 350 C to simulate the type of radiation damage expected in spallation neutron sources. Hydrogen and helium were injected at appropriate energy and rate, while displacement damage was introduced by nuclear stopping of 3.5 MeV Fe{sup +}, 1 {micro}m below the surface. Nanoindentation measurements showed a cumulative increase in hardness as a result of hydrogen and helium injection over and above the hardness increase due to the displacement damage alone. TEM investigation indicated the presence of small bubbles of the injected gases in the irradiated area. In the current experiment, the retention of hydrogen in irradiated steel was studied in order to better understand its contribution to the observed hardening. To achieve this, the deuterium isotope ({sup 2}H) was injected in place of natural hydrogen ({sup 1}H) during the implantation. Trapped deuterium was then profiled, at room temperature, using the high cross-section nuclear resonance reaction with {sup 3}He. Results showed a surprisingly high concentration of deuterium to be retained in the irradiated steel at low temperature, especially in the presence of helium. There is indication that hydrogen retention at spallation neutron source relevant target temperatures may reach as high as 10%.

  3. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E.

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  4. Low-energy Rutherford backscattering-ion channeling measurement system with the use of several tens keV hydrogen and a time-of-flight spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masataka; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hayashi, Nobuyuki

    1996-10-01

    We have developed a low-energy Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)-ion channeling measurement system for the analysis of thin films and solid surfaces with the use of several tens keV hydrogen ions and a time-of-flight spectrometer which was originally developed by Mendenhall and Weller. The depth resolution of our system is better than that of a conventional RBS system with MeV helium ions and silicon surface barrier detectors. This measurement system is very small in size compared to the conventional RBS-ion channeling measurement system with the use of MeV He ions, because of the small ion accelerator for several tens keV ions. The analysis of crystalline thin films which utilizes ion channeling effect can be performed with the use of this low-energy RBS-ion channeling measurement system. The in situ observation of the thermal reaction between iron and silicon substrate with the use of this measurement system is also demonstrated.

  5. Chemiosmotic energy conservation with Na(+) as the coupling ion during hydrogen-dependent caffeate reduction by Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Imkamp, Frank; Müller, Volker

    2002-04-01

    Cell suspensions of Acetobacterium woodii prepared from cultures grown on fructose plus caffeate catalyzed caffeate reduction with electrons derived from molecular hydrogen. Hydrogen-dependent caffeate reduction was strictly Na(+) dependent with a K(m) for Na(+) of 0.38 mM; Li(+) could substitute for Na(+). The sodium ionophore ETH2120, but not protonophores, stimulated hydrogen-dependent caffeate reduction by 280%, indicating that caffeate reduction is coupled to the buildup of a membrane potential generated by primary Na(+) extrusion. Caffeate reduction was coupled to the synthesis of ATP, and again, ATP synthesis coupled to hydrogen-dependent caffeate reduction was strictly Na(+) dependent and abolished by ETH2120, but not by protonophores, indicating the involvement of a transmembrane Na(+) gradient in ATP synthesis. The ATPase inhibitor N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) abolished ATP synthesis, and at the same time, hydrogen-dependent caffeate reduction was inhibited. This inhibition could be relieved by ETH2120. These experiments are fully compatible with a chemiosmotic mechanism of ATP synthesis with Na(+) as the coupling ion during hydrogen-dependent caffeate reduction by A. woodii. PMID:11889102

  6. Surface modifications of hydrogen storage alloy by heavy ion beams with keV to MeV irradiation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Tokuhira, Shinnosuke; Uchida, Hirohisa; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    This study deals with the effect of surface modifications induced from keV to MeV heavy ion beams on the initial reaction rate of a hydrogen storage alloy (AB5) in electrochemical process. The rare earth based alloys like this sample alloy are widely used as a negative electrode of Ni-MH (Nickel-Metal Hydride) battery. We aimed to improve the initial reaction rate of hydrogen absorption by effective induction of defects such as vacancies, dislocations, micro-cracks or by addition of atoms into the surface region of the metal alloys. Since defective layer near the surface can easily be oxidized, the conductive oxide layer is formed on the sample surface by O+ beams irradiation, and the conductive oxide layer might cause the improvement of initial reaction rate of hydriding. This paper demonstrates an effective surface treatment of heavy ion irradiation, which induces catalytic activities of rare earth oxides in the alloy surface.

  7. Surface Production of Hydride Ions by Backscattering Hyperthermal Hydrogen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Brian Seungwhan

    The thesis experimentally demonstrates the surface production of H^- ions by backscattering hyperthermal hydrogen atoms of energy 1-10 eV from clean molybdenum and cesiated molybdenum surfaces. Hyperthermal hydrogen atoms are produced by electron impact dissociation through Frank-Condon excitation process in a hydrogen plasma. Theoretical calculations of the hyperthermal hydrogen atom flux density in various plasmas are made by using particle balance equations. A Lisitano-Coil interdigital slow wave structure is used for plasma production. The efficient production of hyperthermal hydrogen atoms by electron impact dissociation makes the discharge source an excellent source of hyperthermal hydrogen atom beams. The total H^- ion yield, which is the ratio of the H^- ion flux density to the atom flux density, is estimated taking a Maxwellian beam distribution and a cosine angular scattering distribution of H atoms on the basis of theoretical calculation of surface charge transfer probability. More than 20% of total H^- ion yield is expected for atomic hydrogen beams of a few eV temperature from cesiated metal surfaces with an extraction electric field of thousands Volts/cm. The abundant presence of hyperthermal hydrogen atoms and the high H^- ion yield suggest that major parts of H^ - ions in most H^- ion sources are produced by the surface process by backscattering hyperthermal hydrogen atoms from cesiated walls. H^ - ions produced on external converter surfaces, located outside the plasma, are analyzed by magnetic spectroscopy developed for this purpose. The measured parallel energy distribution of H^- ions follows a Maxwellian with temperature of a few eV. Several experimental results of parallel energy distributions are obtained for different operating conditions. Experimental data on production of H^ - ions from clean molybdenum and cesiated molybdenum converter surfaces as functions of discharge power and H_2 gas flow rate for several operating modes are presented

  8. Negative-ion surface production in hydrogen plasmas: Determination of the negative-ion energy and angle distribution function using mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, J. P. J.; Achkasov, K.; Kogut, D.; Ahmad, A.; Layet, J. M.; Simonin, A.; Cartry, G.

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on the understanding of the production mechanism of negative-ions on surface in low pressure plasmas of H2/D2. The negative ions are produced on a Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite sample negatively biased with respect to plasma potential. The negative ions created under the positive ion bombardment are accelerated towards the plasma, self-extracted, and detected according to their energy and mass by a mass spectrometer placed in front of the sample. The shape of the measured Negative-Ion Energy Distribution Function (NIEDF) strongly differs from the NIEDF of the ions emitted by the sample because of the limited acceptance angle of the mass spectrometer. To get information on the production mechanisms, we propose a method to obtain the distribution functions in energy and angle (NIEADFs) of the negative-ions emitted by the sample. It is based on an a priori determination of the NIEADF and on an a posteriori validation of the choice by comparison of the modelled and experimental NIEDFs.

  9. A hollow cathode hydrogen ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    High current density ion sources have been used to heat plasmas in controlled thermonuclear reaction experiments. High beam currents imply relatively high emission currents from cathodes which have generally taken the form of tungsten filaments. A hydrogen ion source is described which was primarily developed to assess the emission current capability and design requirements for hollow cathodes for application in neutral injection devices. The hydrogen source produced ions by electron bombardment via a single hollow cathode. Source design followed mercury ion thruster technology, using a weak magnetic field to enhance ionization efficiency.

  10. Historical Development of the Hydrogen Ion Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Carl E.; Jaselskis, Bruno; Florian, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The concept of a positive hydrogen entity, later called the hydrogen ion and proton, seems to have started with Theodor von Grotthuss in 1805. The conception proposed by von Grotthuss has evolved via the works of many scientists; especially the contributions of Justus Liebig, Svante Arrhenius, S. P. L. Sorensen, I. M. Kolthoff, and R. P. Bell.…

  11. Hydrogen fuel - Universal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, A. G.; Burg, J. A.

    The technology for the production, storage, transmission, and consumption of hydrogen as a fuel is surveyed, with the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen examined as they affect its use as a fuel. Sources of hydrogen production are described including synthesis from coal or natural gas, biomass conversion, thermochemical decomposition of water, and electrolysis of water, of these only electrolysis is considered economicially and technologically feasible in the near future. Methods of production of the large quantities of electricity required for the electrolysis of sea water are explored: fossil fuels, hydroelectric plants, nuclear fission, solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, tidal power, wave motion, electrochemical concentration cells, and finally ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The wind power and OTEC are considered in detail as the most feasible approaches. Techniques for transmission (by railcar or pipeline), storage (as liquid in underwater or underground tanks, as granular metal hydride, or as cryogenic liquid), and consumption (in fuel cells in conventional power plants, for home usage, for industrial furnaces, and for cars and aircraft) are analyzed. The safety problems of hydrogen as a universal fuel are discussed, noting that they are no greater than those for conventional fuels.

  12. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  13. Hydrogen Reduction of Ferric Ions for Use in Copper Electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    Karl S. Noah; Debby F. Bruhn; John E. Wey; Robert S. Cherry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional copper electrowinning process uses the water hydrolysis reaction as the anodic source of electrons. However this reaction generates acid mist and requires large quantities of energy. In order to improve energy efficiency and avoid acid mist, an alternative anodic reaction of ferrous ion oxidation has been proposed. This reaction does not involve evolution of acid mist and can be carried out at a lower cell voltage than the conventional process. However, because ferrous ions are converted to ferric ions at the anode in this process, there is a need for reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions to continue this process. The most promising method for this reduction is the use of hydrogen gas since the resulting byproduct acid can be used elsewhere in the process and, unlike other reductants, hydrogen does not introduce other species that need subsequent removal. Because the hydrogen reduction technology has undergone only preliminary lab scale testing, additional research is needed to evaluate its commercial potential. Two issues for this research are the potentially low mass transfer rate of hydrogen into the electrolyte stream because of its low solubility in water, and whether other gaseous reductants less expensive than hydrogen, such as natural gas or syngas, might work. In this study various reductants were investigated to carry out the reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions using a simulated electrolyte solution recycled through a trickle bed reactor packed with catalyst. The gases tested as reductants were hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and a 50/50 mixture of H2 and CO. Nitrogen was also tested as an inert control. These gases were tested because they are constituents in either natural gas or syngas. The catalysts tested were palladium and platinum. Two gas flow rates and five electrolyte flow rates were tested. Pure hydrogen was an effective reductant of ferric ion. The rates were similar with both palladium and platinum. The ferric

  14. Energy conservation by oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen via a sodium ion current in a hyperthermophilic archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Mayer, Florian; Kang, Sung Gyun; Müller, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is known to grow by the anaerobic oxidation of formate to CO2 and H2, a reaction that operates near thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we demonstrate that this reaction is coupled to ATP synthesis by a transmembrane ion current. Formate oxidation leads to H+ translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane that then drives Na+ translocation. The ion-translocating electron transfer system is rather simple, consisting of only a formate dehydrogenase module, a membrane-bound hydrogenase module, and a multisubunit Na+/H+ antiporter module. The electrochemical Na+ gradient established then drives ATP synthesis. These data give a mechanistic explanation for chemiosmotic energy conservation coupled to formate oxidation to CO2 and H2. Because it is discussed that the membrane-bound hydrogenase with the Na+/H+ antiporter module are ancestors of complex I of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport these data also shed light on the evolution of ion transport in complex I-like electron transport chains. PMID:25049407

  15. An advanced negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, Alexey A; Dobrovolsky, Andrey N; Goretskii, Victor P

    2016-02-01

    The results of investigation of emission productivity of negative particles source with cesiated combined discharge are presented. A cylindrical beam of negative hydrogen ions with density about 2 A/cm(2) in low noise mode on source emission aperture is obtained. The total beam current values are up to 200 mA for negative hydrogen ions and up to 1.5 A for all negative particles with high divergence after source. The source has simple design and can produce stable discharge with low level of oscillation. PMID:26931996

  16. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  17. Helium-ion-induced release of hydrogen from graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The ion-induced release of hydrogen from AXF-5Q graphite was studied for 350-eV helium ions. The hydrogen was implanted into the graphite with a low energy (approx.200 eV) and to a high fluence. This achieved a thin (approx.10-nm), saturated near-surface region. The release of hydrogen was measured as a function of helium fluence. A model that includes ion-induced detrapping, retrapping, and surface recombination was used to analyze the experimental data. A value of (1.65 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2/ was obtained from the detrapping cross section, and a value of (0.5 to 4) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 4//atoms was obtained for the recombination coefficient. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Ionic hydrogen bond and ion solvation. 6. Interaction energies of the acetate ion with organic molecules. Comparison of CH/sub 3/COO/sup -/ with Cl/sup -/, CN/sup -/, and SH/sup -/

    SciTech Connect

    Meot-Ner Mautner, M.

    1988-06-08

    The interaction energies of CH/sub 3/COO/sup -/ with protic and aprotic molecules were measured by pulsed high-pressure mass spectrometry. The attachment energies of the first three water molecules are 15.8, 12.8, and 11.8 kcal/mol. The rapid approach to ..delta..H/sub condsn/(H/sub 2/O) shows that ionic interactions are accounted for mostly by the first two solvent molecules. CH/sub 3/COO/sup -/ hydrogen bonds strongly to NH acids such as pyrrole, amides, and aniline, with ..delta..H/sup 0//sub D/ = 25-31 kcal/mol. With the carbon acids CH/sub 3/CHO, CH/sub 3/COCH/sub 3/, and CH/sub 3/CN as ligands, the attachment energies are 14-16 kcal/mol and the interactions may involve multiple O/sup -/..HC bonds. Despite the fact that the ions CH/sub 3/COO/sup -/, Cl/sup -/, CN/sup -/, and SH/sup -/ differ in size, structure, electronegativity, isotropy, and available bonding sites, they bond with similar strengths to most OH, NH, and CH hydrogen donors, from H/sub 2/O to large organic molecules such as the dipeptide analogue CH/sub 3/CO-Ala-OCH/sub 3/. Also, the four ions show similar clustering energies with n H/sub 2/O and HCN molecules (n = 1-4).

  19. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing hydrogen as an energy vector is considered, with special attention given to means of hydrogen production. The state-of-the-art in thermochemical processes is reviewed, and criteria for the technical and economic feasibility of large-scale thermochemical water splitting processes are presented. The production of hydrogen from coal and from photolysis of water is discussed.

  20. Surface production of H(-) ions by hyperthermal hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Brian S.; Seidl, M.

    1992-12-01

    Hyperthermal atomic hydrogen of energy in the range of 1-10 eV has been produced by electron impact dissociation in a CW 2.45 GHz microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge using a Lisitano-Coil (Lisitano, 1970). The flux and the energy of the hydrogen atoms have been measured by negative surface ionization of the atoms backscattered from pure and cesiated metal surfaces. A hyperthermal atomic hydrogen flux density equivalent to more than 0.5 A/sq cm and a temperature of about 5 eV has been produced for 420 W discharge power under CW condition. These hydrogen atoms can be directed onto an external converter located outside the discharge. This opens up new possibilities for H(-) ion source design.

  1. Hydrogen production from solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenstadt, M. M.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Three alternatives for hydrogen production from solar energy have been analyzed on both efficiency and economic grounds. The analysis shows that the alternative using solar energy followed by thermochemical decomposition of water to produce hydrogen is the optimum one. The other schemes considered were the direct conversion of solar energy to electricity by silicon cells and water electrolysis, and the use of solar energy to power a vapor cycle followed by electrical generation and electrolysis. The capital cost of hydrogen via the thermochemical alternative was estimated at $575/kW of hydrogen output or $3.15/million Btu. Although this cost appears high when compared with hydrogen from other primary energy sources or from fossil fuel, environmental and social costs which favor solar energy may prove this scheme feasible in the future.

  2. Hydrogen as an energy medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    Coal, though abundant in certain geographical locations of the USA poses environmental problems associated with its mining and combustion. Also, nuclear fission energy appears to have problems regarding safety and radioactive waste disposal that are as yet unresolved. The paper discusses hydrogen use and market projection along with energy sources for hydrogen production. Particular attention is given to hydrogen production technology as related to electrolysis and thermochemical water decomposition. Economics of hydrogen will ultimately be determined by the price and availability of future energy carriers such as electricity and synthetic natural gas. Thermochemical methods of hydrogen production appear to offer promise largely in the efficiency of energy conversion and in capital costs over electrolytic methods.

  3. The charge spectrum of positive ions in a hydrogen aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, J.; Pulliam, D.; Leach, R.; Scherb, F.

    1976-01-01

    An auroral ion charge spectrometer was flown into a hydrogen aurora on a Javelin sounding rocket launched from Churchill, Manitoba. The instrument contained an electrostatic analyzer which selected particles with incident energy per unit charge up to 20 keV/charge and an 80-kV power supply which accelerated these ions onto an array of solid state detectors. Ions tentatively identified as H(+), He(+2), and O(+) were detected from 225 to 820 km in altitude. The experiment did not discriminate between H(+) and He(+), or between O(+), N(+), and C(+). Upper limits of highly charged heavy ion abundances have been set at 20% of the He(+2) and 0.15% of the H(+). It is concluded that both terrestrial and solar wind sources play significant roles in auroral ion precipitation.

  4. Hydrogen and OUr Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Tidball; Stu Knoke

    2009-03-01

    In 2003, President George W. Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to accelerate the research and development of hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies that would enable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to reach the commercial market in the 2020 timeframe. The widespread use of hydrogen can reduce our dependence on imported oil and benefit the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutant emissions that affect our air quality. The Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, reinforces Federal government support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Title VIII, also called the 'Spark M. Matsunaga Hydrogen Act of 2005' authorizes more than $3.2 billion for hydrogen and fuel cell activities intended to enable the commercial introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2020, consistent with the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. Numerous other titles in the Act call for related tax and market incentives, new studies, collaboration with alternative fuels and renewable energy programs, and broadened demonstrations--clearly demonstrating the strong support among members of Congress for the development and use of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. In 2006, the President announced the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI) to accelerate research on technologies with the potential to reduce near-term oil use in the transportation sector--batteries for hybrid vehicles and cellulosic ethanol--and advance activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The AEI also supports research to reduce the cost of electricity production technologies in the stationary sector such as clean coal, nuclear energy, solar photovoltaics, and wind energy.

  5. Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the objectives of a hydrogen energy systems technology study directed toward determining future demand for hydrogen based on current trends and anticipated new uses and identifying the critical research and technology advancements required to meet this need with allowance for raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects. Attention is focused on historic production and use of hydrogen, scenarios used as a basis for projections, projections of energy sources and uses, supply options, and technology requirements and needs. The study found more than a billion dollar annual usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs, supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks. Evaluation of the progress in developing nuclear fusion and solar energy sources relative to hydrogen production will be necessary to direct the pace and character of research and technology work in the advanced water-splitting areas.

  6. Hydrogen: A Future Energy Mediator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen may be the fuel to help the United States to a non fossil energy source. Although hydrogen may not be widely used as a fuel until after the turn of the century, special applications may become feasible in the short term. Costs, uses, safety, and production methods are discussed. (BT)

  7. Negative hydrogen ion source for TOKAMAK neutral beam injector (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Y.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kashiwagi, M.; Kitagawa, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Morishita, T.; Hanada, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Watanabe, K.

    2000-02-01

    Intense negative ion source producing multimegawatt hydrogen/deuterium negative ion beams has been developed for the neutral beam injector (NBI) in TOKAMAK thermonuclear fusion machines. Negative ions are produced in a cesium seeded multi-cusp plasma generator via volume and surface processes, and accelerated with a multistage electrostatic accelerator. The negative ion source for JT-60U has produced 18.5 A/360 keV (6.7 MW) H- and 14.3 A/380 keV (5.4 MW) D- ion beams at average current densities of 11 mA/cm2 (H-) and 8.5 mA/cm2 (D-). A high energy negative ion source has been developed for the next generation TOKAMAK such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The source has demonstrated to accelerate negative ions up to 1 MeV, the energy required for ITER. Higher negative ion current density of more than 20 mA/cm2 was obtained in the ITER concept sources. It was confirmed that the consumption rate of cesium is small enough to operate the source for a half year in ITER-NBI without maintenance.

  8. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  9. Hydrogen transport through oxide metal surface under atom and ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L.; Dvoychenkova, O.; Evsin, A.; Kaplevsky, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya; Schitov, N.; Vergasov, S.; Yurkov, D.

    2014-11-01

    Both the latest and earlier achieved results on gas exchange processes on metal surfaces (including stainless steel, titanium, zirconium, tungsten with deposited aluminum oxide coating) under hydrogen atom or plasma irradiation with occasional oxygen impurity are presented in the paper. Mechanisms and regularities of these processes are discussed. It is demonstrated that surface oxide layer properties as a diffusion barrier strongly depend on external influence on the surface. In particular, it is revealed that low energy hydrogen ion irradiation could slow down hydrogen desorption from metals. Hydrogen atom or ion irradiation combined with simultaneous oxygen admixture accelerates hydrogen desorption from metals.

  10. Negative hydrogen ion beam extracted from a Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N.; Wada, M.

    2011-09-26

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup -}) ion beam was produced without cesium seeding by a Bernas-type ion source with a coaxial hot cathode. The amount of H{sup -} ion beam current extracted from an original Bernas-type ion source using a hairpin shape filament as a hot cathode was 1 {mu}A with the 0.4 A arc current, while that 300 eV beam energy. In the other hand, H{sup -} ion beam current using the Bernas-type ion source with a coaxial hot cathode reached 4 {mu}A under the same condition. Production efficiency was enhanced by the focused plasma produced by a coaxial hot cathode.

  11. Hydrogen: the future energy carrier.

    PubMed

    Züttel, Andreas; Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas; Friedrichs, Oliver

    2010-07-28

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century the limitations of the fossil age with regard to the continuing growth of energy demand, the peaking mining rate of oil, the growing impact of CO2 emissions on the environment and the dependency of the economy in the industrialized world on the availability of fossil fuels became very obvious. A major change in the energy economy from fossil energy carriers to renewable energy fluxes is necessary. The main challenge is to efficiently convert renewable energy into electricity and the storage of electricity or the production of a synthetic fuel. Hydrogen is produced from water by electricity through an electrolyser. The storage of hydrogen in its molecular or atomic form is a materials challenge. Some hydrides are known to exhibit a hydrogen density comparable to oil; however, these hydrides require a sophisticated storage system. The system energy density is significantly smaller than the energy density of fossil fuels. An interesting alternative to the direct storage of hydrogen are synthetic hydrocarbons produced from hydrogen and CO2 extracted from the atmosphere. They are CO2 neutral and stored like fossil fuels. Conventional combustion engines and turbines can be used in order to convert the stored energy into work and heat. PMID:20566514

  12. Chemical/hydrogen energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-06-01

    This report describes activities conducted during 1986 within the Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Systems (C/HES) Program, for which Bookhaven National Laboratory provides technical and management support to the U.S. Department of Energy. Research and exploratory efforts under this program have been directed towards developing a base technology that will apply to hydrogen production, storage, and transport. Major areas of interest include: (1) High Temperature Water Vapor Electrolysis for Hydrogen Generation (Westinghouse); (2) Evaluation of Materials for Medium Temperature Water Vapor Electrolysis; (3) Cryoadsorption of Hydrogen on Activated Carbon (Syracuse). Contributions in 1986 made by private sector contractors, university, researchers, and BNL in-house technical staff are summarized in the report. Also included is a summary of related International Energy Agency (IEA) cooperative efforts as well as plans and major activities scheduled for 1987.

  13. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, K.; Tawada, Y.; Lee, H. T.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, N.; Sasao, M.; Kisaki, M.; Nishiura, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yamaoka, H.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H+ beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions.

  14. A fluorescence enhancement-based sensor for hydrogen sulfate ion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Tse; Liao, De-Jhong; Chen, Shau-Jiun; Hu, Ching-Han; Wu, An-Tai

    2012-04-01

    Sugar-aza-crown ether-based cavitand 1 can act as a selective turn-on fluorescence sensor for hydrogen sulfate ion in methanol among a series of tested anions. Spectroscopic studies, particularly NMR spectroscopy, revealed that the C-H hydrogen bonding between 1,2,3-triazole ring of cavitand 1 and hydrogen sulfate ion is crucial for the high selectivity of the receptor for hydrogen sulfate. PMID:22363932

  15. Hydrogen removal from e-beam deposited alumina thin films by oxygen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Arijeet Mukharjee, C. Rajiv, K. Bose, Aniruddha Singh, S. D. Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Joshi, S. C.; Deb, S. K.; Phase, D. M.

    2014-04-24

    Hydrogen interstitials and oxygen vacancies defects create energy levels in the band gap of alumina. This limits the application of alumina as a high-k dielectric. A low thermal budget method for removal of hydrogen from alumina is discussed. It is shown that bombardment of alumina films with low energy oxygen ion beam during electron beam evaporation deposition decreases the hydrogen concentration in the film significantly.

  16. Nickel-Hydrogen and Lithium Ion Space Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert O., II

    2004-01-01

    The tasks of the Electrochemistry Branch of NASA Glenn Research Center are to improve and develop high energy density and rechargeable, life-long batteries. It is with these batteries that people across the globe are able to power their cell phones, laptop computers, and cameras. Here, at NASA Glenn Research Center, the engineers and scientists of the Electrochemistry branch are leading the way in the development of more powerful, long life batteries that can be used to power space shuttles and satellites. As of now, the cutting edge research and development is being done on nickel-hydrogen batteries and lithium ion batteries. Presently, nickel-hydrogen batteries are common types of batteries that are used to power satellites, space stations, and space shuttles, while lithium batteries are mainly used to power smaller appliances such as portable computers and phones. However, the Electrochemistry Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center is focusing more on the development of lithium ion batteries for deep space use. Because of the limitless possibilities, lithium ion batteries can revolutionize the space industry for the better. When compared to nickel-hydrogen batteries, lithium ion batteries possess more advantages than its counterpart. Lithium ion batteries are much smaller than nickel-hydrogen batteries and also put out more power. They are more energy efficient and operate with much more power at a reduced weight than its counterpart. Lithium ion cells are also cheaper to make, possess flexibility that allow for different design modifications. With those statistics in hand, the Electrochemistry Branch of NASA Glenn has decided to shut down its Nickel-Hydrogen testing for lithium ion battery development. Also, the blackout in the summer of 2003 eliminated vital test data, which played a part in shutting down the program. from the nickel-hydrogen batteries and compare it to past data. My other responsibilities include superheating the electrolyte that is used in the

  17. Optical model analyses of heavy ion fragmentation in hydrogen targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical optical-model methods for calculating cross sections for the fragmentation of high-energy heavy ions by hydrogen targets are presented. The cross sections are calculated with a knockout-ablation collision formalism which has no arbitrary fitting parameters. Predictions of elemental production cross sections from the fragmentation of 1.2A Ge(V(La-139) nuclei and of isotope production cross sections from the fragmentation of 400A MeV(S-32) nuclei are in good agreement with recently reported experimental measurements.

  18. Negative ion extraction from hydrogen plasma bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Oudini, N.; Taccogna, F.; Minelli, P.

    2013-10-15

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model has been developed and used to study low electronegative magnetized hydrogen plasma. A configuration characterized by four electrodes is used: the left electrode is biased at V{sub l} = −100 V, the right electrode is grounded, while the upper and lower transversal electrodes are biased at an intermediate voltage V{sub ud} between 0 and −100 V. A constant and homogeneous magnetic field is applied parallel to the lateral (left/right) electrodes. It is shown that in the magnetized case, the bulk plasma potential is close to the transversal electrodes bias inducing then a reversed sheath in front of the right electrode. The potential drop within the reversed sheath is controlled by the transversal electrodes bias allowing extraction of negative ions with a significant reduction of co-extracted electron current. Furthermore, introducing plasma electrodes, between the transversal electrodes and the right electrode, biased with a voltage just above the plasma bulk potential, increases the negative ion extracted current and decreases significantly the co-extracted electron current. The physical mechanism on basis of this phenomenon has been discussed.

  19. Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, D.P.; Peters, J.; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

    2005-08-01

    A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

  20. Formation process of dislocation loops in iron under irradiations with low-energy helium, hydrogen ions or high-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, K.; Mori, H.; Ono, K.

    2002-12-01

    Formation processes of interstitial-type dislocation loops (I loops) in high-purity Fe under irradiations with 5 keV H + ions or 1000 keV electrons are examined by in situ transmission electron microscopy at temperatures below room temperature, and the results are compared with that obtained under He + ion irradiation. For the electron irradiation, conventional model of I-loop nucleation based on the assumption that di-interstitial atoms are stable nuclei of I loops is questioned. The volume density of I loops by H + ion irradiation is one-order of magnitude higher than that by electron irradiation, and several times lower than that by He + ion irradiation. The temperature dependence of the volume density of I loops by H + ion irradiation supports the idea that such enhancement of I-loop formation is due to trapping of self-interstitial atoms by gas atom-vacancy complexes.

  1. Hydrogen energy. A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen Energy is a continuing bibliographic summary with abstracts of research and projections on the subject of hydrogen as a secondary fuel and as an energy carrier. This update to Hydrogen Energy cites additional references identified during the fourth quarter of 1978. It is the fourth in a 1978 quarterly series intended to provide current awareness to those interested in hydrogen energy. A series of cross indexes are included which track directly with those of the cumulative volume.

  2. Ion-Pair States in Triplet Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setzer, W.; Baker, B. C.; Ashman, S.; Morgan, T. J.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental search is underway to observe the long range triplet ionic states H+ H- of molecular hydrogen. Resonantly enhanced multi-photon ionization of the metastable c 3∏u- 2 pπ state is used access to the R(1)nd1 n = 21 Rydberg state that serves as an intermediate stepping stone state to probe the energy region above the ionization limit with a second tunable laser photon. The metastable state is prepared by electron capture of 6 keV H2+ions in potassium in a molecular beam. Formation of the H+ H- triplet configuration involves triplet excited states of the H- ion, especially the 2p23Pe state, the second bound state of H- predicted to exist with a lifetime long compared to typical auto ionization lifetimes but not yet observed experimentally. Details of the experiment and preliminary results to date will be presented at the conference.

  3. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. L.; Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H+ beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H- beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H- ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  4. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  5. Negative hydrogen ion production in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, J. Corr, C. S.; Manoharan, R.; O'Byrne, S.

    2015-09-15

    In order to develop very high energy (>1 MeV) neutral beam injection systems for applications, such as plasma heating in fusion devices, it is necessary first to develop high throughput negative ion sources. For the ITER reference source, this will be realised using caesiated inductively coupled plasma devices, containing either hydrogen or deuterium discharges, operated with high rf input powers (up to 90 kW per driver). It has been suggested that due to their high power coupling efficiency, helicon devices may be able to reduce power requirements and potentially obviate the need for caesiation due to the high plasma densities achievable. Here, we present measurements of negative ion densities in a hydrogen discharge produced by a helicon device, with externally applied DC magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 8.5 mT at 5 and 10 mTorr fill pressures. These measurements were taken in the magnetised plasma interaction experiment at the Australian National University and were performed using the probe-based laser photodetachment technique, modified for the use in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. A peak in the electron density is observed at ∼3 mT and is correlated with changes in the rf power transfer efficiency. With increasing magnetic field, an increase in the negative ion fraction from 0.04 to 0.10 and negative ion densities from 8 × 10{sup 14 }m{sup −3} to 7 × 10{sup 15 }m{sup −3} is observed. It is also shown that the negative ion densities can be increased by a factor of 8 with the application of an external DC magnetic field.

  6. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by ion-beam sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, V. E.; Henin, N.; Tu, C.-W.; Tavakolian, H.; Sites, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films 1/2 to 1 micron thick were deposited on metal and glass substrates using ion-beam sputtering techniques. The 800 eV, 2 mA/sq cm beam was a mixture of argon and hydrogen ions. The argon sputtered silicon from a pure (7.6 cm) single crystal wafer, while the hydrogen combined with the sputtered material during the deposition. Hydrogen to argon pressure ratios and substrate temperatures were varied to minimize the defect state density in the amorphous silicon. Characterization was done by electrical resistivity, index of refraction and optical absorption of the films.

  7. Positive ion polymerization in hydrogen diluted silane plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M.

    2008-12-08

    Mass spectra of positive ions (cations) and neutrals have been measured in hydrogen diluted silane plasmas at gas pressures of 0.1-10 Torr. The mass spectrum of ions changes with the pressure, while that of neutrals maintains a similar shape. The dominant ion species varies from a hydrogen ion group at < or approx. 0.5 Torr to a monosilicon hydride ion group at {approx_equal}0.5-1 Torr and polysilicon hydride ion groups at > or approx. 1 Torr, which is determined from ionization channels and consecutive ion-molecule reactions. The ion bombardment is suppressed with the pressure, from several tens of eV at < or approx. 1 Torr to a few eV at > or approx. 7 Torr.

  8. Effect of ion bombardment on plasma-driven superpermeation of hydrogen isotopes through a niobium membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notkin, M. E.; Livshits, A. I.; Bruneteau, A. M.; Bacal, M.

    2001-08-01

    Hydrogen plasma-driven permeation through the superpermeable niobium membrane was investigated under bombardment of the input membrane surface with hydrogen, deuterium and helium ions with energy 0-250 eV over the range of membrane temperature 910-1420 K. The membrane surface was covered with a nonmetal monolayer generating a potential barrier responsible for the superpermeability to suprathermal hydrogen particles. Both an increase of ion energy and an increase of mass of sputtering ions result in a significant decrease of permeability due to destruction of the nonmetal monolayer, when the ion energy is higher than the threshold energy of surface film sputtering. On the contrary, the increase of the membrane temperature results in the decrease of the ion bombardment effect and in the increase of the membrane permeability due to recovery of the surface barrier through segregation of impurities dissolved in the membrane bulk onto the membrane surface. To increase the membrane ability to recover the potential barrier, oxygen was dissolved in the membrane bulk up to a concentration of 2.5 at.%. This resulted in a significant decrease of the damaging effect of ion bombardment and in the extension of the range of the membrane temperature and ion energy over which plasma-driven superpermeability was observed.

  9. Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen production technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The future vision for hydrogen is that it will be cost-effectively produced from renewable energy sources and made available for widespread use as an energy carrier and a fuel. Hydrogen can be produced from water and when burned as a fuel, or converted to electricity, joins with oxygen to again form water. It is a clean, sustainable resource with many potential applications, including generating electricity, heating homes and offices, and fueling surface and air transportation. To achieve this vision, researchers must develop advanced technologies to produce hydrogen at costs competitive with fossil fuels, using sustainable sources. Hydrogen is now produced primarily by steam reforming of natural gas. For applications requiring extremely pure hydrogen, production is done by electrolysis. This is a relatively expensive process that uses electric current to dissociate, or split, water into its hydrogen and oxygen components. Technologies with the best potential for producing hydrogen to meet future demand fall into three general process categories: photobiological, photoelectrochemical, and thermochemical. Photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes generally use sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Thermochemical processes, including gasification and pyrolysis systems, use heat to produce hydrogen from sources such as biomass and solid waste.

  10. Development of a volume production type hydrogen negative ion source by using sheet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoki; Iijima, Takaaki; Tonegawa, Akira; Sato, Kohnosuke; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    2014-10-01

    Stationary production of negative ions are important to play an essential role in Neutral beam injection (NBI). Cesium seeded Surface-production of negative ion sources are used for NBI. However, Cesium seeded surface- production of negative ion sources are not desirable from the point of view of operating steady state ion sources. We carried out the development of negative ion sources by volume-production in hydrogen sheet plasma. Production of hydrogen negative ions through volume processes needs both high energy electron region and low energy electron region. The sheet plasma is suitable for the production of negative ions, because the electron temperature in the central region of the plasma as high as 10-15 eV, whereas in the periphery of the plasma, a low temperature of a few eV of obtained. The hydrogen negative ions density were detected using an omegatron mass analyzer, while the electron density and temperature were measured using a Langmuir probe. Negative ions current extracted from the grid are measured by Faraday-cup.

  11. Precision studies of the hydrogen molecular ion and its isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekbayev, A. K.; Aznabayev, D. T.; Korobov, V. I.

    2015-08-01

    We present systematic calculations of the leading order relativistic corrections including the hyperfine splitting (HFS) for a wide range of rotational and vibrational states of the HT+ molecular ion. We also calculate the DC and AC Stark effects for the molecular hydrogen ions and H D + in the non-relativistic approximation. The influence of the DC Stark polarizability effect on the hyperfine substates of a ro-vibrational state is carefully analyzed. Our results enable the detailed evaluation of certain systematic shifts of the transition frequencies for the purpose of ultra-high-precision optical, microwave, or radio-frequency spectroscopy of the hydrogen molecular ions in a trap.

  12. High-precision spectroscopy of hydrogen molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhen-Xiang; Tong, Xin; Yan, Zong-Chao; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we overview recent advances in high-precision structure calculations of the hydrogen molecular ions ( and HD+), including nonrelativistic energy eigenvalues and relativistic and quantum electrodynamic corrections. In combination with high-precision measurements, it is feasible to precisely determine a molecular-based value of the proton-to-electron mass ratio. An experimental scheme is presented for measuring the rovibrational transition frequency (v,L) : (0,0) → (6,1) in HD+, which is currently underway at the Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11474316, 11004221, 10974224, and 11274348), the “Hundred Talent Program” of Chinese Academy of Sciences. Yan Zong-Chao was supported by NSERC, SHARCnet, ACEnet of Canada, and the CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams.

  13. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of storing large amounts of energy in a free radical system such as atomic hydrogen is analyzed. Attention is focused on theoretical calculations of the ground state properties of spin-aligned atomic triplet hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium. The solid-liquid phase transition in atomic hydrogen is also examined.

  14. Hydrogen: The Ultimate Fuel and Energy Carrier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinga, Gustav P.

    1988-01-01

    Lists 24 frequently asked questions concerning hydrogen as a fuel with several responses given to each question. Emphasized are hydrogen production, storage, transmission, and application to various energy-consuming sectors. Summarizes current findings and research on hydrogen. An extensive bibliography is included. (ML)

  15. Small radio frequency driven multicusp ion source for positive hydrogen ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.T.; Herz, P.R.; Leung, K.N.; Pickard, D.S. )

    1994-04-01

    A compact, 2.5 cm diam rf-driven multicusp ion source has been developed and tested for H[sup +] ion production in pulse mode operation. The source is optimized for atomic hydrogen ion species and extractable current. It is found that hydrogen ion beam current densities in excess of 650 mA/cm[sup 2] can be achieved with H[sup +] species above 80%. The geometry and position of the porcelain-coated copper antenna were found to be of great significance in relation to the efficiency of the ion source.

  16. Geometries and electronic structures of the hydrogenated diamond (100) surface upon exposure to active ions: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng-Bin; Li, Jing-Lin; Chen, Wen-Bin; Cui, Yan; Jiao, Zhi-Wei; Yan, Hong-Juan; Qu, Min; Di, Jie-Jian

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the effects of physisorbed active ions on the geometries and electronic structures of hydrogenated diamond films, models of HCO 3 - , H3O+, and OH- ions physisorbed on hydrogenated diamond (100) surfaces were constructed. Density functional theory was used to calculate the geometries, adsorption energies, and partial density of states. The results showed that the geometries of the hydrogenated diamond (100) surfaces all changed to different degrees after ion adsorption. Among them, the H3O+ ion affected the geometry of the hydrogenated diamond (100) surfaces the most. This is well consistent with the results of the calculated adsorption energies, which indicated that a strong electrostatic attraction occurs between the hydrogenated diamond (100) surface and H3O+ ions. In addition, electrons transfer significantly from the hydrogenated diamond (100) surface to the adsorbed H3O+ ion, which induces a downward shift in the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the H3O+ ion. However, for active ions like OH- and HCO 3 - , no dramatic change appears for the electronic structures of the adsorbed ions.

  17. Cesium in hydrogen negative-ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Belchenko, Yu.I.; Davydenko, V.I.

    2006-03-15

    Experimental data on the dynamics of cesium particles in the pulsed magnetron and Penning surface-plasma ion sources are presented. Cesium escape from the source emission apertures and the cesium ion current to discharge electrodes was measured. The low value of cesium flux from the source was detected. An intense cesium ion current to the cathode (up to 0.8 A/cm{sup 2}) was measured. The high value of cesium ion current to surface-plasma source cathode confirms the cesium circulation near the cathode.

  18. Surface and bulk-loss reduction research by low-energy hydrogen doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S.

    1985-01-01

    Surface and bulk loss reduction by low energy hydrogen doping of silicon solar cells was examined. Hydrogen ions provided a suppression of space charge recombination currents. Implantation of hydrogen followed by the anneal cycle caused more redistribution of boron than the anneal which could complicate processing. It was demonstrated that passivation leads to space charge current reduction.

  19. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  20. Hydrogen Plasmas for Negative Ion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, D.; Gorse, C.; Capitelli, M.

    2005-05-16

    We have improved a zero-dimensional model, built to simulate the operating conditions in the excitation ('driver') region of a multicusp ion source optimized for negative ion production of great interest in thermonuclear applications. The new approach to couple heavy particle and electron kinetics is discussed.

  1. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  2. Periodic orbits of the hydrogen molecular ion and their quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y.; Yuan, J.; Bao, C.

    1995-11-01

    In a classical study of the hydrogen molecular ion beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), we have found that segments of trajectories resemble that of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation periodic orbits. The importance of this fact to the classical understanding of chemical bonding leads us to a systematic study of the periodic orbits of the planar hydrogen molecular ion within the BOA. Besides introducing a classification scheme for periodic orbits, we discuss the convergence properties of families of periodic orbits and their bifurcation patterns according to their types. Semiclassical calculations of the density of states based on these periodic orbits yield results in agreement with the exact quantum eigenvalues of the hydrogen molecular ion system.

  3. Product distributions and rate constants for ion-molecule reactions in water, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Pinizzotto, R. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal energy, bimolecular ion-molecule reactions occurring in gaseous water, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and methane have been identified and their rate constants determined using ion cyclotron resonance methods. Absolute rate constants were determined for the disappearance of the primary ions by using the trapped ion method, and product distributions were determined for these reactions by using the cyclotron ejection method. Previous measurements are reviewed and compared with the results using the present methods. The relative rate constants for hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer, and charge transfer are also determined for reactions of the parent ions.

  4. An ion species model for positive ion sources: II. Analysis of hydrogen isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrey, E.; Holmes, A. J. T.

    2015-02-01

    A one-dimensional model of the magnetic multipole volume plasma source has been developed for application to intense ion/neutral atom beam injectors. The model uses plasma transport coefficients for particle and energy flow to create a detailed description of the plasma parameters along an axis parallel to that of the extracted beam. In this paper the isotopic modelling of positive hydrogenic ions is considered and compared with experimental data from the neutral beam injectors of the Joint European Torus. The use of the code to gain insights into the processes contributing to the ratios of the ionic species is demonstrated and the conclusion is drawn that 75% of the atomic ion species arises from ionization of dissociated molecules and 25% from dissociation of the molecular ions. However, whilst the former process is independent of the filter field, the latter is sensitive to the change in distribution of fast and thermal electrons produced by the magnetic filter field and an optimum combination of field strength and depth exists. Finally, the code is used to predict the species ratios for the JET source operating in tritium and hence the neutral beam power injected into the plasma in the JET tritium campaign planned for 2016.

  5. Trapping of hydrogen atoms inside small beryllium clusters and their ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumkin, F. Y.; Wales, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    Structure, stability and electronic properties are evaluated computationally for small Ben (n = 5-9) cluster cages accommodating atomic H inside and forming core-shell species. These parameters are predicted to vary significantly upon insertion of H, for ionic derivatives, and with the system size. In particular, the energy barrier for H-atom exit from the cage changes significantly for ions compared to the neutral counterparts. The corresponding effects predicted for cage assemblies suggest the possibility of efficient charge-control of hydrogen release. This, together with a high capacity for storing hydrogen in extended such assemblies might indicate a possible way towards feasible hydrogen-storage solutions.

  6. KeV Ion Beam Induced Surface Modification of SiC Hydrogen Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Muntele, C.I.; Ila, D.; Williams, E.K.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1999-11-29

    Silicon carbide, a wide-bandgap semiconductor, is currently used to fabricate an efficient high temperature hydrogen sensor. When a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of silicon carbide, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. Rather than applying a palladium film, we have implanted palladium ions into the silicon face of 6H, n-type Sic samples. The implantation energies and fluences, as well as the results obtained by monitoring the current through the sample in the presence of hydrogen are included in this paper.

  7. Operation of RF driven negative ion source in a pure-hydrogen mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrashitov, G.; Belchenko, Yu.; Ivanov, A. A.; Gusev, I.; Senkov, D.; Sanin, A.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Sotnikov, O.; Kondakov, A.

    2015-04-01

    The production of negative hydrogen ions in the radio-frequency driven long-pulsed source with external antenna is studied. RF drivers with various geometry of external antenna, Faraday shield and magnets at the rear flange were examined. H- beam extraction through the single emission aperture was performed in the source pure-hydrogen mode with no external seed of alkali additives. H- beam with ion emission current density up to 5 mA/cm2 and energy up to 75 keV was regularly obtained in the 1 s pulses of the pure-hydrogen mode. The regular temporal increase of H- ion production due to deposition of impurities on the plasma grid surface was recorded. The H- emission current density increased up to 9 mA/cm2 in this case.

  8. Operation of RF driven negative ion source in a pure-hydrogen mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abdrashitov, G.; Belchenko, Yu. Gusev, I.; Senkov, D.; Sanin, A.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Kondakov, A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Sotnikov, O.

    2015-04-08

    The production of negative hydrogen ions in the radio-frequency driven long-pulsed source with external antenna is studied. RF drivers with various geometry of external antenna, Faraday shield and magnets at the rear flange were examined. H- beam extraction through the single emission aperture was performed in the source pure-hydrogen mode with no external seed of alkali additives. H- beam with ion emission current density up to 5 mA/cm{sup 2} and energy up to 75 keV was regularly obtained in the 1 s pulses of the pure-hydrogen mode. The regular temporal increase of H- ion production due to deposition of impurities on the plasma grid surface was recorded. The H- emission current density increased up to 9 mA/cm{sup 2} in this case.

  9. Radio frequency sustained ion energy

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Hooke, William M.

    1977-01-01

    Electromagnetic (E.M.) energy injection method and apparatus for producing and sustaining suprathermal ordered ions in a neutral, two-ion-species, toroidal, bulk equilibrium plasma. More particularly, the ions are produced and sustained in an ordered suprathermal state of existence above the average energy and velocity of the bulk equilibrium plasma by resonant rf energy injection in resonance with the natural frequency of one of the ion species. In one embodiment, the electromagnetic energy is injected to clamp the energy and velocity of one of the ion species so that the ion energy is increased, sustained, prolonged and continued in a suprathermal ordered state of existence containing appreciable stored energy that counteracts the slowing down effects of the bulk equilibrium plasma drag. Thus, selective deuteron absorption may be used for ion-tail creation by radio-frequency excitation alone. Also, the rf can be used to increase the fusion output of a two-component neutral injected plasma by selective heating of the injected deuterons.

  10. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Li, L H; Liu, H T; Yu, K M; Xu, Y; Zuo, X J; Zhu, P Z; Ma, Y F; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering. PMID:24985818

  11. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H.; Liu, H. T.; Yu, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  12. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Yu, K. M.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-15

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  13. Solar-hydrogen energy system for Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Lutfi, N.

    1990-01-01

    A solar-hydrogen energy system has been proposed for Pakistan as the best replacement for the present fossil fuel based energy system. It has been suggested to produce hydrogen via photovoltaic-electrolysis, utilizing the available non-agricultural sunny terrain in Baluchistan region. There will be a desalination plant for sea water desalination. The area under the photovoltaic panels with the availability of water would provide suitable environment for growing some cash crops. This would change the cast useless desert land into green productive farms. In order to show the quantitative benefits of the proposed system, future trends of important energy and economical parameters have been studied with and without hydrogen introduction. The following parameters have been included: population, energy demand (fossil + hydrogen), energy production (fossil + hydrogen), gross national product, fossil energy imports, world energy prices, air pollution, quality of life, environmental savings due to hydrogen introduction, savings due to the higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen, by-product credit, agricultural income, income from hydrogen sale, photovoltaic cell area, total land area, water desalination plant capacity, capital investment, operating and maintenance cost, and total income from the system. The results indicate that adopting the solar-hydrogen energy system would eliminate the import dependency of fossil fuels, increase gross product per capita, reduce pollution, improve quality of life and establish a permanent and clean energy system. The total annual expenditure on the proposed system is less than the total income from the proposed system. The availability of water, the cash crop production, electricity and hydrogen would result in rapid development of Baluchistan, the largest province of Pakistan.

  14. Pumping of helium and hydrogen by sputter-ion pumps. II. Hydrogen pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.; Pate, D.J.; Todd, R.J. )

    1994-05-01

    The pumping of helium by various forms of sputter-ion pumps (i.e., SIPs) is given in part I [K. M. Welch, D. J. Pate, and R. J. Todd, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A [bold 11], 1607 (1993)]. The pumping of hydrogen in diode and triode SIPs is herein discussed. The type of cathode material used in these pumps is shown to have a significant impact on the effectiveness with which hydrogen is pumped. Examples of this include data for pumps with aluminum, titanium, and titanium-alloy cathodes. Diode pumps with aluminum cathodes are shown to be no more effective in the pumping of hydrogen than in the pumping of helium. The use of titanium anodes and titanium [ital shielding] of a pump body is also shown to impact measurably the speed of a pump at very low pressures. This stems from the fact that hydrogen is [times]10[sup 6] more soluble in titanium than in stainless steel. Hydrogen becomes resident in the anodes because of fast neutral burial. Ions and fast neutrals of hydrogen are also buried in the walls of pump bodies. Outgassing of this hydrogen from the anodes and pump bodies results in a gradual increase in pump base pressure and consequential decrease in hydrogen pump speed at very low base pressures.

  15. Hydrogen energy - An inexhaustible abundant clean energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayar, M. G.

    1981-04-01

    A review is presented of various hydrogen production processes from possible primary energy resources. The processes covered are nuclear coal gasification, thermochemical hydrogen production, and hydrogen production by electrolysis, which includes solid polymer electrolyte-based electrolyzers, high-temperature electrolyzers, and photoelectrochemical decomposition of water. Attention is given to hydrogen transport and storage (in metal hydride systems) and to its application as an automotive fuel. Hydrogen as a secondary energy source is also discussed, and its uses as an off-peak power storage medium and as an energy transmission medium are described. Costs, flow diagrams and chemical formulas are analyzed in detail.

  16. A Cartoon in One Dimension of the Hydrogen Molecular Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutta, Sourav; Ganguly, Shreemoyee; Dutta-Roy, Binayak

    2008-01-01

    To illustrate the basic methodology involved in the quantum mechanics of molecules, a one-dimensional caricature of the hydrogen molecular ion (H[superscript +][subscript 2]) is presented, which is exactly solvable, in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in terms of elementary functions. The purpose of the exercise is to elucidate in a simple…

  17. Cavity Ringdown Technique for negative-hydrogen-ion measurement in ion source for neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Shibuya, M.; Geng, S.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2016-03-01

    The Cavity Ringdown Technique (CRD) is applied for negative hydrogen ion (H-) density measurement in H- source for the neutral beam injector. The CRD is one of the laser absorption techniques. Nd:YAG pulse laser was utilized for negative-hydrogen-ion photodetachment. The H- density related to extracted H- beam was successfully observed by a fixed position CRD. A two-dimensional movable CRD has been developed to measure the H- density profile. Measured profiles were consistent with expected profiles from the H- production area in pure hydrogen and cesium seeded plasmas. By applying absorption saturation in the optical cavity, negative hydrogen ion temperature was evaluated and was confirmed as being a similar value measured with other diagnostics.

  18. A hollow cathode hydrogen ion source. [for controlled fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    High current density ion sources have been used to heat plasmas in controlled thermonuclear reaction experiments. High beam currents imply relatively high emission currents from cathodes which have generally taken the form of tungsten filaments. This paper describes a hydrogen ion source which was primarily developed to assess the emission current capability and design requirements for hollow cathodes for application in neutral injection devices. The hydrogen source produced ions by electron bombardment via a single hollow cathode. Source design followed mercury ion thruster technology, using a weak magnetic field to enhance ionization efficiency. A 1.3-cm-diam hollow cathode using a low work function material dispenser performed satisfactorily over a discharge current range of 10-90 A. Cylindrical probe measurements taken without ion extraction indicate maximum ion number densities on the order of 10 trillion/cu cm. Discharge durations ranged from 30 sec to continuous operation. Tests with beam extraction at 2.5 keV and 30 A discharge current yield average ion beam current densities of 0.1 A/sq cm over a 5-cm extraction diameter. Results of this study can be used to supply the baseline information needed to scale hollow cathodes for operation at discharge currents of hundreds of amperes using distributed cathodes.

  19. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-01

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H-) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H- current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  20. A future, intense source of negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefken, Hugh; Stein, Charles

    1994-01-01

    By directly heating lithium hydride in a vacuum, up to 18 micro-A/sq cm of negative hydrogen has been obtained from the crystal lattice. The amount of ion current extracted and analyzed is closely related to the temperature of the sample and to the rate at which the temperature is changed. The ion current appears to be emission limited and saturates with extraction voltage. For a fixed extraction voltage, the ion current could be maximized by placing a grid between the sample surface and the extraction electrode. Electrons accompanying the negative ions were removed by a magnetic trap. A Wein velocity filter was designed and built to provide definitive mass analysis of the extracted ion species. This technique when applied to other alkali hydrides may produce even higher intensity beams possessing low values of emittance.

  1. Elastic recoil detection analysis of hydrogen with 7Li ions using a polyimide foil as a thick hydrogen reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, Primož; Razpet, Alenka; Markelj, Sabina; Čadež, Iztok; Budnar, Miloš

    2005-01-01

    Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) with an absorber foil using a 4.2 MeV 7Li2+ beam was utilized for evaluation of hydrogen depth profiles. Since recoil cross-sections when using Li ions as projectiles are not well known, the energy dependent ratio between the experimental yield and the yield calculated using the Rutherford recoil cross-section was obtained from an ERDA spectrum of a thick polyimide (Kapton) sample. It was estimated that this ratio does not significantly depend on sample composition. Therefore it was used for correction of measured spectra analyzed by existing simulation and evaluation programs in which the Rutherford recoil cross-sections were applied. The correction procedure has been verified in round-robin measurements of well-characterized Si:H thin layers. Application of the method for determination of a hydrogen depth concentration profile in hydrogen-containing graphite samples is presented.

  2. Hydrogen Energy: A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Bibliographic series cites documents relating to use of hydrogen as energy carrier. In addition to cumulative volume, annual supplement is available for 1974, and quarterly update program serves 1975 and current calendar year.

  3. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  8. Estimating the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in chitosan oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, G. P.; Lazarev, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The effect the number of chitosan monomer units CTS n ( n = 1-5), the protonation of chitosan dimers, and the interaction between CTS n ( n = 1-3) and acetate ions have on the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds is investigated by means of QTAIM analysis and solving the vibrational problem within the cluster-continuum model. It is established that the number of H-bonds in CTS n is 2 n - 1 and the total energy of H-bonds grows by ~20 kJ/mol. It is concluded that the hydrogen bonds between CTS and acetate ions play a major role in the stabilization of polyelectrolyte complexes in dilute acetic acid solutions of CTS.

  9. Detector and energy analyzer for energetic-hydrogen in beams and plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bastasz, R.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Wampler, W.R.

    1988-11-01

    A detector for detecting energetic hydrogen ions and atoms ranging in energy from about 1 eV up to 1 keV in an evacuated environment includes a Schottky diode with a palladium or palladium-alloy gate metal applied to a silicon-dioxide layer on an n-silicon substrate. An array of the energetic-hydrogen detectors having a range of energy sensitivities form a plasma energy analyzer having a rapid response time and a sensitivity for measuring fluxes of energetic hydrogen. The detector is sensitive to hydrogen and its isotopes but is insensitive to non-hydrogenic particles. The array of energetic-hydrogen detectors can be formed on a single silicon chip, with thin-film layers of gold metal applied in various thicknesses to successive detectors in the array. The gold layers serve as particle energy-filters so that each detector is sensitive to a different range of hydrogen energies. 4 figs.

  10. Detector and energy analyzer for energetic-hydrogen in beams and plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bastasz, Robert J.; Hughes, Robert C.; Wampler, William R.

    1988-01-01

    A detector for detecting energetic hydrogen ions and atoms ranging in energy from about 1 eV up to 1 keV in an evacuated environment includes a Schottky diode with a palladium or palladium-alloy gate metal applied to a silicondioxide layer on an n-silicon substrate. An array of the energetic-hydrogen detectors having a range of energy sensitivities form a plasma energy analyzer having a rapid response time and a sensitivity for measuring fluxes of energetic hydrogen. The detector is sensitive to hydrogen and its isotopes but is insensitive to non-hydrogenic particles. The array of energetic-hydrogen detectors can be formed on a single silicon chip, with thin-film layers of gold metal applied in various thicknesses to successive detectors in the array. The gold layers serve as particle energy-filters so that each detector is sensitive to a different range of hydrogen energies.

  11. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  12. Hydrogen ions associated with the dry deposition of pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, K.E.; Khalili, E.K. )

    1988-01-01

    The data provided in this paper demonstrates that pollen can generate significant amounts of hydrogen ions when added to water and that the deposition of tree pollen in forested areas represents a significant hydrogen ion source. Measurements of dry deposition of pollen were made during the months of May and June, 1987 in Northern Wisconsin, using a smooth surrogate surface. Rain samples were also collected. Deposited particles were weighed to determine mass fluxes, then washed and ion chromatographed for SO {sub 4} = and NO {sub 3} {minus} analysis. Species of pollen collected from different types of trees during the sampling period were analyzed for SO{sub 4} = NO {sub 3} and other trace constituents. The micrograms of hydrogen ions (protons) generated per gram for different types of pollen added to water, were measured. From 56 to 566 gm were generated per gram or pollen added. The amount generated varied with pollen type. Based on this information, the equivalent protons from the dry deposition of pollen were calculated and compared with the wet deposition proton data. The sulfate, nitrate, and protons associated with dry deposition were of a magnitude comparable with wet deposition.

  13. Graphitic clusters in hydrogenated amorphous carbon induced by keV-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnini, G.; Foti, G.; Reitano, R. ); Mondio, G. )

    1990-12-10

    Energy gap and hydrogen concentration have been measured in hydrogenated amorphous carbon ({ital a}-C:H) after bombardment with 100 keV He{sup +} and 300 keV Ar{sup +} ion beams, up to ion fluences 3{times}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. {ital a}-C:H films have been obtained by ion irradiation at low ion fluences of polystyrene layers and with a subsequent low-temperature annealing (400 {degree}C, 10 min). Experimental values for the energy gap (2.5--0.5 eV) and hydrogen concentration (7.4{times}10{sup 22}--1.8{times}10{sup 22} H atoms/cm{sup 3}) have been interpreted in terms of a graphitic cluster structure with a different size (3--20 A). We were able to determine experimentally the value of the bond integral {vert bar}{beta}{vert bar} and we found it in good agreement with the calculated one for graphite.

  14. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  15. Use of predissociation to enhance the atomic hydrogen ion fraction in ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1979-01-01

    A duopigatron ion source is modified by replacing the normal oxide-coated wire filament cathode of the ion source with a hot tungsten oven through which hydrogen gas is fed into the arc chamber. The hydrogen gas is predissociated in the hot oven prior to the arc discharge, and the recombination rate is minimized by hot walls inside of the arc chamber. With the use of the above modifications, the atomic H.sub.1.sup.+ ion fraction output can be increased from the normal 50% to greater than 70% with a corresponding decrease in the H.sub.2.sup.+ and H.sub.3.sup.+ molecular ion fraction outputs from the ion source.

  16. Displacement of the proton in hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride by beryllium and magnesium ions

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Sean A. C.

    2009-05-14

    The displacement of the proton by a beryllium ion and by a magnesium ion from hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride, of varying hydrogen bond strengths, was investigated theoretically using ab initio methods. Stable metal-containing species were obtained from all of the hydrogen-bonded complexes regardless of the strength of the hydrogen bond. It was found that the beryllium ion was energetically very effective in displacing the proton from hydrogen bonds, whereas the magnesium ion was unable to do so. The high stability of the beryllium-containing complexes is mainly due to the strong electrostatic bonding between the beryllium and fluoride atoms. This work supports the recent finding from a multidisciplinary bioinorganic study that beryllium displaces the proton in many strong hydrogen bonds.

  17. Hydrogen energy systems studies. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.; Kartha, S.; Iwan, L.

    1996-08-13

    The results of previous studies suggest that the use of hydrogen from natural gas might be an important first step toward a hydrogen economy based on renewables. Because of infrastructure considerations (the difficulty and cost of storing, transmitting and distributing hydrogen), hydrogen produced from natural gas at the end-user`s site could be a key feature in the early development of hydrogen energy systems. In the first chapter of this report, the authors assess the technical and economic prospects for small scale technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas (steam reformers, autothermal reformers and partial oxidation systems), addressing the following questions: (1) What are the performance, cost and emissions of small scale steam reformer technology now on the market? How does this compare to partial oxidation and autothermal systems? (2) How do the performance and cost of reformer technologies depend on scale? What critical technologies limit cost and performance of small scale hydrogen production systems? What are the prospects for potential cost reductions and performance improvements as these technologies advance? (3) How would reductions in the reformer capital cost impact the delivered cost of hydrogen transportation fuel? In the second chapter of this report the authors estimate the potential demand for hydrogen transportation fuel in Southern California.

  18. Conclusions. [hydrogen-based energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Conclusions are presented according to general areas of technology with some specific examples of research and technology needs identified. These conclusions provide a base for the future development of detailed program plans and identify research needs that are not being given attention or are not being supported at a sufficient level. Emphasis is placed on hydrogen production and use.

  19. Measurement of Gas Temperature in Negative Hydrogen Ion Source by Wavelength-Modulated Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; NIFS-NBI Team

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of the energy distribution of hydrogen atom is important and essential to understand the production mechanism of its negative ion (H-) in cesium-seeded negative ion sources. In this work, we evaluated the temperature of atomic hydrogen in the large-scale arc-discharge negative hydrogen ion source in NIFS by wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy. The laser beam was passed through the adjacent region to the grid electrode for extracting negative ions. The frequency of the laser was scanned slowly over the whole range of the Doppler width (100 GHz in 1s). A sinusoidal frequency modulation at 600 Hz with a width of 30 GHz was superposed onto the slow modulation. The transmitted laser was detected using a photodiode, and its second harmonic component of the sinusoidal modulation was amplified using a lock-in amplifier. The obtained spectrum was in good agreement with an expected spectrum of the Doppler-broadened Balmer- α line. The estimated temperature of atomic hydrogen was approximately 3000 K. The absorption increased with the arc-discharge power, while the temperature was roughly independent of the power. This work is supported by the NIFS Collaboration Research Program NIFS13KLER021.

  20. Hydrogen Attachment/Abstraction Dissociation (HAD) of Gas-Phase Peptide Ions for Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Sekiya, Sadanori; Nishikaze, Takashi; Kodera, Kei; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Wada, Motoi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Dissociation of gas-phase peptide ions through interaction with low-energy hydrogen (H) radical (∼0.15 eV) was observed with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. The H radical generated by thermal dissociation of H2 molecules passing through a heated tungsten capillary (∼2000 °C) was injected into the ion trap containing target peptide ions. The fragmentation spectrum showed abundant c-/z- and a-/x-type ions, attributable to H attachment/abstraction to/from peptide ion. Because the low-energy neutral H radical initiated the fragmentation, the charge state of the precursor ion was maintained during the dissociation. As a result, precursor ions of any charge state, including singly charged positive and negative ions, could be analyzed for amino acid sequence. The sequence coverage exceeding 90% was obtained for both singly protonated and singly deprotonated substance P peptide. This mass spectrometry also preserved labile post-translational modification bonds. The modification sites of triply phosphorylated peptide (kinase domain of insulin receptor) were identified with the sequence coverage exceeding 80%. PMID:27002918

  1. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  2. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-01

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution. PMID:25553956

  3. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh; R, Kamal Raj.; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  4. Hydrogen combustion in tomorrow's energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschka, W.

    The fundamental characteristics of hydrogen combustion and the current status of hydrogen energy applications technology are reviewed, with an emphasis on research being pursued at DFVLR. Topics addressed include reaction mechanisms and pollution, steady-combustion devices (catalytic heaters, H2/air combustors, H2/O2 rocket engines, H2-fueled jet engines, and gas and steam turbine processes), unsteady combustion (in internal-combustion engines with internal or external mixture formation), and feasibility studies of hydrogen-powered automobiles. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  5. Electrostatic ion (hydrogen) cyclotron and ion acoustic wave instabilities in regions of upward field-aligned current and upward ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, R.

    1984-02-01

    An investigation is made into the stability of electrostatic hydrogen ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in a model plasma where an ion beam, population 2, and oppositely directed drifting electrons pass through a stationary ion background, population 1. The excited wave properties are then compared with the characteristics of the unstable modes observed on the S3-3 satellite. Three temperature regimes are studied: (1) Te greater than Ti2 much greater than Ti1, (2) Ti2 greater than Te not less than Ti1, and (3) Te approximately equal to Ti1 greater than Ti2. It is found that the ion beam acts as a free energy source only in regime 1. This regime is also highly unstable to the electrons as a free energy source. Unstable modes in regimes 2 and 3 seem to best satisfy the electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron wave (EHC) properties at 1 earth radius. For these cases the electrons are the free energy source, the beam supplies damping.

  6. Electron emission and molecular fragmentation during hydrogen and deuterium ion impact on carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, A.; Schustereder, W.; Mair, C.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.; Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.

    2003-03-01

    Molecular fragmentation and electron emission during hydrogen ion impact on graphite surfaces has been investigated in the eV to keV impact energy region typical for fusion edge plasma conditions. As a target surface graphite tiles for the Tokamak experiment Tore Supra in CEA-Cadarache/France and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been used. For both surfaces studied, the experimentally observed threshold for electron emission is at about 50 eV/amu impact energy. Electron emission from the high conductivity side of the carbon tile is 15-20% less as compared to its low conductivity side, whereas results for HOPG are generally between these two cases. Deuterium and hydrogen ions are almost equally effective in liberating electrons from graphite when comparing results for the same impact velocity. Surface-induced dissociation of deuterium ions D 3+ upon impact on Tore Supra graphite tiles, in the collision energy range of 20-100 eV, produced only atomic fragment ions D +. The other possible fragment ion D 2+ could not be observed.

  7. The negative hydrogen Penning ion gauge ion source for KIRAMS-13 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    An, D. H.; Jung, I. S.; Kang, J.; Chang, H. S.; Hong, B. H.; Hong, S.; Lee, M. Y.; Kim, Y.; Yang, T. K.; Chai, J. S.

    2008-02-15

    The cold-cathode-type Penning ion gauge (PIG) ion source for the internal ion source of KIRAMS-13 cyclotron has been used for generation of negative hydrogen ions. The dc H-beam current of 650 {mu}A from the PIG ion source with the Dee voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.0 A is extrapolated from the measured dc extraction beam currents at the low extraction dc voltages. The output optimization of PIG ion source in the cyclotron has been carried out by using various chimneys with different sizes of the expansion gap between the plasma boundary and the chimney wall. This paper presents the results of the dc H-extraction measurement and the expansion gap experiment.

  8. Ion energy distribution near a plasma meniscus for multielement focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2009-05-01

    The axial ion energy spread near a plasma meniscus for multielement focused ion beams is investigated experimentally in atomic and molecular gaseous plasmas of krypton, argon, and hydrogen by tailoring the magnetic field in the region. In the case of magnetic end plugging, the ion energy spread reduces by approx50% near the meniscus as compared to the bulk plasma, thereby facilitating beam focusing. A quadrupole filter can be used to control the mean energy of the ions. Comparison with standard Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions with the same mean energy indicates that the ion energy distribution in the meniscus is deficient in the population of low and high energy tail ions, resulting in a Gaussian-like profile with a spread of approx4 and approx5 eV for krypton and argon ions, respectively. By carefully tuning the wave power, plasma collisionality, and the magnetic field in the meniscus, the spread can be made lower than that of liquid metal ion sources, for extracting focused ion beams of other elements with adequate current density, for research and applications in nanosystems

  9. The Behavior of Ion-Implanted Hydrogen in Gallium Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Headley, T.J.; Hills, C.R.; Han, J.; Petersen, G.A.; Seager, C.H.; Wampler, W.R.

    1999-01-07

    Hydrogen was ion-implanted into wurtzite-phase GaN, and its transport, bound states, and microstructural effects during annealing up to 980 C were investigated by nuclear-reaction profiling, ion-channeling analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and infrared (IR) vibrational spectroscopy. At implanted concentrations 1 at.%, faceted H{sub 2} bubbles formed, enabling identification of energetically preferred surfaces, examination of passivating N-H states on these surfaces, and determination of the diffusivity-solubility product of the H. Additionally, the formation and evolution of point and extended defects arising from implantation and bubble formation were characterized. At implanted H concentrations 0.1 at.%, bubble formation was not observed, and ion-channeling analysis indicated a defect-related H site located within the [0001] channel.

  10. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganić, I. N.; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  11. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  12. Preferential perpendicular acceleration of heavy ionospheric ions by interactions with electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1983-05-01

    Observations in recent years indicate the presence of energetic ions of ionospheric origin in various parts of the magnetosphere. These energetic ions have been found at all latitudes. Observations from the S3-3 satellite have made a great contribution toward an understanding of the energization of ionospheric ions. One of the most interesting observations is related to the finding that ion beams and electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves are highly correlated and that they show an abrupt increase in their occurrence rate at an altitude of about 5000 km. A statistical survey of upward flowing ion (UFI) events occurring between 6000 and 8000 km has shown that the average energy of O(+) has a strong correlation with that of the H(+) ions. The present investigation has the objective to examine critically the energetics of UFI events in view of the theory of the interaction of a single coherent EHC wave with O(+), He(+), and H(+) ions. It is found that preferential acceleration of heavy ions occurs when such ions interact with an EHC wave.

  13. Hydrogen - Energy carrier of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsch, Joachim; Steeb, Hartmut

    1986-11-01

    The potential of hydrogen as an energy carrier - in conventional burners, in internal-combustion or turbine engines, in fuel cells, in catalytic burners, or in steam generators - is discussed, and the current status of the Hysolar program is reviewed. Hysolar is a cooperative project of the University of Stuttgart, DFVLR, and Saudi Arabia to develop industrial-scale hydrogen-production facilities employing solar-cell arrays and electrolysis. Hysolar calls for basic research in photoelectrochemistry, electrolysis, and fuel-cell technology; studies of hydrogen production systems and application technology; training of personnel; and construction of a 2-kW laboratory installation at Jiddah, a 10-kW experimental installation at Stuttgart, and a 100-kW demonstration installation at Riad (producing about 44,000 N cu m of hydrogen per year). Diagrams, drawings, and tables are provided.

  14. Characterizations of Hydrogen Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Energetics Inc

    2003-04-01

    In 1996, Dr. Ed Skolnik of Energetics, Incorporated, began a series of visits to the locations of various projects that were part of the DOE Hydrogen Program. The site visits/evaluations were initiated to help the DOE Program Management, which had limited time and limited travel budgets, to get a detailed snapshot of each project. The evaluations were soon found to have other uses as well: they provided reviewers on the annual Hydrogen Program Peer Review Team with an in-depth look at a project--something that is lacking in a short presentation--and also provided a means for hydrogen stakeholders to learn about the R&D that the Hydrogen Program is sponsoring. The visits were conducted under several different contract mechanisms, at project locations specified by DOE Headquarters Program Management, Golden Field Office Contract Managers, or Energetics, Inc., or through discussion by some or all of the above. The methodology for these site-visit-evaluations changed slightly over the years, but was fundamentally as follows: Contact the Principal Investigator (PI) and arrange a time for the visit; Conduct a literature review. This would include a review of the last two or three years of Annual Operating Plan submittals, monthly reports, the paper submitted with the last two or three Annual Peer Review, published reviewers' consensus comments from the past few years, publications in journals, and journal publications on the same or similar topics by other researchers; Send the PI a list of questions/topics about a week ahead of time, which we would discuss during the visit. The types of questions vary depending on the project, but include some detailed technical questions that delve into some fundamental scientific and engineering issues, and also include some economic and goal-oriented topics; Conduct the site-visit itself including--Presentations by the PI and/or his staff. This would be formal in some cases, informal in others, and merely a ''sit around the table

  15. Computer Simulations of Resonant Coherent Excitation of Heavy Hydrogen-Like Ions Under Planar Channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, A. A.; Pivovarov, Yu L.

    2010-04-01

    Resonant coherent excitation (RCE) of relativistic hydrogen-like ions is investigated by computer simulations methods. The suggested theoretical model is applied to the simulations of recent experiments on RCE of 390 MeV/u Ar17+ ions under (220) planar channeling in a Si crystal performed by T.Azuma et al at HIMAC (Tokyo). Theoretical results are in a good agreement with these experimental data and clearly show the appearance of the doublet structure of RCE peaks. The simulations are also extended to greater ion energies in order to predict the new RCE features at the future accelerator facility FAIR OSI and as an example, RCE of II GeV/u U91+ ions is considered in detail.

  16. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - have been identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described. An awareness of probable shortages of strategic materials has been maintained in these suggested programs.

  17. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described.

  18. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H{sup −} current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  19. Electrical shielding box measurement of the negative hydrogen beam from Penning ion gauge ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; long, J. D.; He, X. Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, K. Z.; Zhang, L. W.

    2012-06-01

    The cold-cathode Penning ion gauge (PIG) type ion source has been used for generation of negative hydrogen (H-) ions as the internal ion source of a compact cyclotron. A novel method called electrical shielding box dc beam measurement is described in this paper, and the beam intensity was measured under dc extraction inside an electrical shielding box. The results of the trajectory simulation and dc H- beam extraction measurement were presented. The effect of gas flow rate, magnetic field strength, arc current, and extraction voltage were also discussed. In conclusion, the dc H- beam current of about 4 mA from the PIG ion source with the puller voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.31 A was extrapolated from the measurement at low extraction dc voltages.

  20. Electrical shielding box measurement of the negative hydrogen beam from Penning ion gauge ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Long, J. D.; He, X. Z.; Zhang, K. Z.; Zhang, L. W.; Wang, X.

    2012-06-15

    The cold-cathode Penning ion gauge (PIG) type ion source has been used for generation of negative hydrogen (H{sup -}) ions as the internal ion source of a compact cyclotron. A novel method called electrical shielding box dc beam measurement is described in this paper, and the beam intensity was measured under dc extraction inside an electrical shielding box. The results of the trajectory simulation and dc H{sup -} beam extraction measurement were presented. The effect of gas flow rate, magnetic field strength, arc current, and extraction voltage were also discussed. In conclusion, the dc H{sup -} beam current of about 4 mA from the PIG ion source with the puller voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.31 A was extrapolated from the measurement at low extraction dc voltages.

  1. A pseudo-state sensitivity study on hydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, C. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Smyth, E. S.

    2003-09-01

    An electron-impact excitation study of light hydrogenic ions has been carried out to quantify the effects of coupling to high bound/continuum states utilizing the R-matrix with pseudo-states method. As the ionization stage increases, the neglect of loss of flux into high-lying excitation/ionization channels impacts less upon excitation between the bound terms explicitly included within our close coupling expansion. C5+ is used as our benchmark study. The differences in Maxwell averaged collision strengths between a standard R-matrix calculation and those of a similar pseudo-state model across a range of temperatures shall be our criteria for judging differences. We carried out calculations for He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, C5+, O7+ and Ne9+ so as to provide excitation data amongst terms up to n = 5. Pseudo-state calculations were carried out for the first five ions, following a similar model to earlier neutral hydrogen work, whilst non-pseudo-state calculations sufficed for the remaining two ions. The results of these seven calculations will enhance existing excitation data sets for use in the modelling of controlled nuclear fusion plasma experiments.

  2. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    Several recent experiments designed to produce and store macroscopic quantities of atomic hydrogen are discussed. The bulk, ground state properties of atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium systems are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet potential. The conditions required to obtain this system, including inhibition of recombination through the energetically favorable singlet interaction, are discussed. The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility are calculated applying the Monte Carlo technique with a quantum mechanical variational wavefunction. The system studied consisted of 32 atoms in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K; i.e., the internal energy is positive at all molar volumes considered.

  3. Over-the-barrier electron detachment in the hydrogen negative ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M. Z.; Simonović, N. S.

    2016-09-01

    The electron detachment from the hydrogen negative ion in strong fields is studied using the two-electron and different single-electron models within the quasistatic approximation. Special attention is payed to over-the-barrier regime where the Stark saddle is suppressed below the lowest energy level. It is demonstrated that the single-electron description of the lowest state of the ion, that is a good approximation for weak fields, fails in this and partially in the tunnelling regime. The exact lowest state energies and detachment rates for the ion at different strengths of the applied field are determined by solving the eigenvalue problem of the full two-electron Hamiltonian. A simple formula for the rate, which is valid in both regimes, is determined by fitting the exact data to the expression estimated using single-electron descriptions.

  4. Apparent Velocity Threshold in the Electronic Stopping of Slow Hydrogen Ions in LiF

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, M.; Chenakin, S.P.; Markin, S.N.; Bauer, P.

    2005-09-09

    The electronic energy loss of hydrogen ions (protons and deuterons) in thin supported films of LiF has been studied in backscattering geometry for specific energies from 700 eV/u to 700 keV/u, using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and time-of-flight low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. For specific energies below 8 keV/u, our data confirm velocity proportionality for the stopping cross section {epsilon} (like in a metal) down to 3.8 keV/u, as observed previously for protons and antiprotons despite the large band gap (14 eV) of LiF. Below 3.8 keV/u, the present results indicate an apparent velocity threshold at about 0.1 a.u. for the onset of electronic stopping.

  5. Apparent velocity threshold in the electronic stopping of slow hydrogen ions in LiF.

    PubMed

    Draxler, M; Chenakin, S P; Markin, S N; Bauer, P

    2005-09-01

    The electronic energy loss of hydrogen ions (protons and deuterons) in thin supported films of LiF has been studied in backscattering geometry for specific energies from 700 eV/u to 700 keV/u, using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and time-of-flight low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. For specific energies below 8 keV/u, our data confirm velocity proportionality for the stopping cross section epsilon (like in a metal) down to 3.8 keV/u, as observed previously for protons and antiprotons despite the large band gap (14 eV) of LiF. Below 3.8 keV/u, the present results indicate an apparent velocity threshold at about 0.1 a.u. for the onset of electronic stopping. PMID:16197001

  6. Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station

    SciTech Connect

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2012-10-26

    This report presents the results of a 10-year project conducted by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to determine the feasibility of coproducing hydrogen with electricity. The primary objective was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell designed to produce power and hydrogen. This four-phase project had intermediate go/no-go decisions and the following specific goals: Complete a technical assessment and economic analysis of the use of high-temperature fuel cells, including solid oxide and molten carbonate, for the co-production of power and hydrogen (energy park concept). Build on the experience gained at the Las Vegas H2 Energy Station and compare/contrast the two approaches for co-production. Determine the applicability of co-production from a high-temperature fuel cell for the existing merchant hydrogen market and for the emerging hydrogen economy. Demonstrate the concept on natural gas for six months at a suitable site with demand for both hydrogen and electricity. Maintain safety as the top priority in the system design and operation. Obtain adequate operational data to provide the basis for future commercial activities, including hydrogen fueling stations. Work began with the execution of the cooperative agreement with DOE on 30 September 2001. During Phase 1, Air Products identified high-temperature fuel cells as having the potential to meet the coproduction targets, and the molten carbonate fuel cell system from FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FuelCell Energy) was selected by Air Products and DOE following the feasibility assessment performed during Phase 2. Detailed design, construction and shop validation testing of a system to produce 250 kW of electricity and 100 kilograms per day of hydrogen, along with site selection to include a renewable feedstock for the fuel cell, were completed in Phase 3. The system also completed six months of demonstration operation at the

  7. Reactors Save Energy, Costs for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    While examining fuel-reforming technology for fuel cells onboard aircraft, Glenn Research Center partnered with Garrettsville, Ohio-based Catacel Corporation through the Glenn Alliance Technology Exchange program and a Space Act Agreement. Catacel developed a stackable structural reactor that is now employed for commercial hydrogen production and results in energy savings of about 20 percent.

  8. Understanding the mechanism of DNA deactivation in ion therapy of cancer cells: hydrogen peroxide action*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatnytskyi, Dmytro V.; Zdorevskyi, Oleksiy O.; Perepelytsya, Sergiy M.; Volkov, Sergey N.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the medium of biological cells under ion beam irradiation has been considered as a possible cause of cell function disruption in the living body. The interaction of hydrogen peroxide, a long-lived molecular product of water radiolysis, with active sites of DNA macromolecule was studied, and the formation of stable DNA-peroxide complexes was considered. The phosphate groups of the macromolecule backbone were picked out among the atomic groups of DNA double helix as a probable target for interaction with hydrogen peroxide molecules. Complexes consisting of combinations including: the DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and Na+ counterion, were considered. The counterions have been taken into consideration insofar as under the natural conditions they neutralise DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. The energy of the complexes have been determined by considering the electrostatic and the Van der Waals interactions within the framework of atom-atom potential functions. As a result, the stability of various configurations of molecular complexes was estimated. It was shown that DNA phosphate groups and counterions can form stable complexes with hydrogen peroxide molecules, which are as stable as the complexes with water molecules. It has been demonstrated that the formation of stable complexes of H2O2-Na+-PO4- may be detected experimentally by observing specific vibrations in the low-frequency Raman spectra. The interaction of H2O2 molecule with phosphate group of the double helix backbone can disrupt DNA biological function and induce the deactivation of the cell genetic apparatus. Thus, the production of hydrogen peroxide molecules in the nucleus of living cells can be considered as an additional mechanism by which high-energy ion beams destroy tumour cells during ion beam therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene

  9. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  10. National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap: A National Hydrogen Vision (CD-ROM)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-12-01

    ''The National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap'' was unveiled by the Secretary of Energy, Spencer Abraham, November 12, 2002. The Roadmap provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. This CD-ROM also includes''A National Vision of America's Transition to a Hydrogen Economy-to 2030 and Beyond'', which was published in February 2002 as a result of the Hydrogen Vision Meeting. This document summarizes the potential role for hydrogen systems in America's energy future, outlining the common vision of the ''hydrogen economy.''

  11. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  12. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Young; Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y S

    2016-02-01

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H(-) ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ∼4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H(-) ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources. PMID:26931999

  13. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, June Young; Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-02-01

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H- ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ˜4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H- ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  14. Tomographic study of ion tracks by ion energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vacik, J.; Havranek, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Lavrentiev, V.; Horak, P.; Fink, D.; Apel, P.

    2013-04-19

    Ion energy loss spectroscopy is suggested to determine the shape of the (latent, etched and filled) ion tracks in polymers using ion probes of various beam sizes. For a milli-probe, it can be considered as a one-dimensional tomography of many identical (rotationally symmetric) objects. For a micro-probe, the technique can be understood as a micro-tomography of the single ion track. In both cases, the ion energy loss spectroscopy requires monoenergetic ions with a low intensity (< 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}) and a well defined angular beam set-up. Here we present a study of the possible use of the ion milli-and micro-probes in a tomographic study of the ion track 3D geometry and its evolution during chemical etching.

  15. Thomson parabola ion energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, James A; Flippo, Kirk A; Letzring, Samuel A; Lopez, Frank E; Offermann, Dustin T; Oertel, John A; Mastrosimone, Dino

    2010-01-01

    A new, versatile Thomson parabola ion energy (TPIE) analyzer has been designed and constructed for use at the OMEGA-EP facility. Multi-MeV ions from EP targets are transmitted through a W pinhole into a (5- or 8-kG) magnetic field and subsequently through a parallel electric field of up to 30 kV/cm. The ion drift region may have a user-selected length of 10, 50, or 80 cm. With the highest fields, 500-Me V C{sup 6+} and C{sup 5+} may be resolved. TPIE is TIM-mounted at OMEGA-EP and is qualified in all existing TIMs. The instrument runs on pressure-interlocked 15-VDC power available in EP TIM carts. It may be inserted to within several inches of the target to attain sufficient flux for a measurement. For additional flux control, the user may select a square-aperture W pinhole of 0.004-inch or 0.010-inch. The detector consists of CR-39 backed by an image plate. The fully relativistic design code and design features are discussed. Ion spectral results from first use at OMEGA-EP are expected.

  16. Wind-To-Hydrogen Energy Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Rebenitsch; Randall Bush; Allen Boushee; Brad G. Stevens; Kirk D. Williams; Jeremy Woeste; Ronda Peters; Keith Bennett

    2009-04-24

    WIND-TO-HYDROGEN ENERGY PILOT PROJECT: BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE In an effort to address the hurdles of wind-generated electricity (specifically wind's intermittency and transmission capacity limitations) and support development of electrolysis technology, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC) conducted a research project involving a wind-to-hydrogen system. Through this effort, BEPC, with the support of the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota, evaluated the feasibility of dynamically scheduling wind energy to power an electrolysis-based hydrogen production system. The goal of this project was to research the application of hydrogen production from wind energy, allowing for continued wind energy development in remote wind-rich areas and mitigating the necessity for electrical transmission expansion. Prior to expending significant funding on equipment and site development, a feasibility study was performed. The primary objective of the feasibility study was to provide BEPC and The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to make a determination whether or not to proceed with Phase II of the project, which was equipment procurement, installation, and operation. Four modes of operation were considered in the feasibility report to evaluate technical and economic merits. Mode 1 - scaled wind, Mode 2 - scaled wind with off-peak, Mode 3 - full wind, and Mode 4 - full wind with off-peak In summary, the feasibility report, completed on August 11, 2005, found that the proposed hydrogen production system would produce between 8000 and 20,000 kg of hydrogen annually depending on the mode of operation. This estimate was based on actual wind energy production from one of the North Dakota (ND) wind farms of which BEPC is the electrical off-taker. The cost of the hydrogen produced ranged from $20 to $10 per kg (depending on the mode of operation). The economic sensitivity analysis performed as part of the feasibility

  17. Project plan hydrogen energy systems technology. Phase 1: Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An overview of the potential need for hydrogen as a source of energy in the future was presented in order to identify and define the technology requirements for the most promising approaches to meet that need. The following study objectives were discussed: (1) determination of the future demand for hydrogen, based on current trends and anticipated new uses, (2) identification of the critical research and technology advances required to meet this need considering, to the extent possible, raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects, and (3) definition and recommendation of the scope and space of a National Hydrogen Energy Systems Technology Program and outline of a Program Development Plan.

  18. Note: Development of ESS Bilbao's proton ion source: Ion Source Hydrogen Positive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracoli, R.; Feuchtwanger, J.; Arredondo, I.; Belver, D.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Corres, J.; Djekic, S.; Echevarria, P.; Eguiraun, M.; Garmendia, N.; Muguira, L.

    2014-02-01

    The Ion Source Hydrogen positive is a 2.7 GHz off-resonance microwave discharge ion source. It uses four coils to generate an axial magnetic field in the plasma chamber around 0.1 T that exceeds the ECR resonance field. A new magnetic system was designed as a combination of the four coils and soft iron in order to increase the reliability of the source. The description of the simulations of the magnetic field and the comparison with the magnetic measurements are presented. Moreover, results of the initial commissioning of the source for extraction voltage until 50 kV will be reported.

  19. Relativistic effects in the photoionization of hydrogen-like ions with screened Coulomb interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, L. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2014-06-15

    The relativistic effects in the photoionization of hydrogen-like ion with screened Coulomb interaction of Yukawa type are studied for a broad range of screening lengths and photoelectron energies. The bound and continuum wave functions have been determined by solving the Dirac equation. The study is focused on the relativistic effects manifested in the characteristic features of photoionization cross section for electric dipole nl→ε,l±1 transitions: shape resonances, Cooper minima and cross section enhancements due to near-zero-energy states. It is shown that the main source of relativistic effects in these cross section features is the fine-structure splitting of bound state energy levels. The relativistic effects are studied in the photoionization of Fe{sup 25+} ion, as an example.

  20. Confinement of the hydrogen molecular ion H2+ under a magnetic field inside a spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinar, Martin

    2010-03-01

    A study of the confinement of the hydrogen molecular ion H2+ is done. The molecular ion is subject to the action of a magnetic field. In the Born -- Oppenheimer approximation, we solve numerically the Schr"odinger's equation, using trial functions and one algorithm that allows us to calculate the energies for different given values of the confinement parameters. We use the variational method in order to estimate the energy of the ground state. Some properties of the system as the pressure exerted by the confinement, the polarizability in the approximations of Kirkwood and Buckingham and the energies of the vibrational states are calculated. The behavior of the internuclear separation is analyzed for the geometry considered.

  1. Some properties of Stark states of hydrogenic atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2007-10-01

    The motivation for this work is the problem of providing accurate values of the atomic transition matrix elements for the Stark components of Rydberg Rydberg transitions in atomic hydrogen and hydrogenic ions, for use in spectral line broadening calculations applicable to cool, low-density plasmas, such as those found in H II regions. Since conventional methods of calculating these transition matrix elements cannot be used for the high principal quantum numbers now easily attained in radio astronomical spectra, we attempt to show that the recurrence relation (ladder operator) method recently employed by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889 97) and Hey (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641 64) can be taken over into the parabolic coordinate system used to describe the Stark states of the atomic (ionic) radiators. The present method is therefore suggested as potentially useful for extending the work of Griem (1967 Astrophys. J. 148 547 58, 2005 Astrophys. J. 620 L133 4), Watson (2006), Stambulchik et al (2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 016401(9 pp) on Stark broadening in transitions between states of high principal quantum number, to physical conditions where the binary, impact approximation is no longer strictly applicable to both electron and ion perturbers. Another possible field of application is the study of Stark mixing transitions in 'ultracold' Rydberg atoms perturbed by long-range interactions with slow atoms and ions. Preparatory to the derivation of recurrence relations for states of different principal quantum number, a number of properties and recurrence relations are also found for states of identical principal quantum number, including the analogue in parabolic coordinates to the relations of Pasternack (1937 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 23 91 4, 250) in spherical polar coordinates.

  2. Ground state of a hydrogen ion molecule immersed in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valdes, J.; Gutierrez, F. A.; Matamala, A. R.; Denton, C. D.; Vargas, P.; Valdes, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we have calculated the ground state energy of the hydrogen molecule, H2+, immersed in the highly inhomogeneous electron gas around a metallic surface within the local density approximation. The molecule is perturbed by the electron density of a crystalline surface of Au <1 0 0> with the internuclear axis parallel to the surface. The surface spatial electron density is calculated through a linearized band structure method (LMTO-DFT). The ground state of the molecule-ion was calculated using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a fixed-ion while the screening effects of the inhomogeneous electron gas are depicted by a Thomas-Fermi like electrostatic potential. We found that within our model the molecular ion dissociates at the critical distance of 2.35 a.u. from the first atomic layer of the solid.

  3. Charge exchange and ionization in hydrogen atom-fully stripped ion collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J. G.; He, B.; Qiu, Y. B.; Janev, R. K.

    2007-05-15

    The processes of charge exchange and ionization in collisions of ground state hydrogen atom with fully stripped ions in a weakly coupled plasma are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method in the collision energy range 10-900 keV/amu. The interparticle interactions are described by the Debye-Hueckel model with inclusion of dynamical effects associated with the projectile velocity. The microcanonical distribution of initial state electronic coordinates and momenta has been determined by inclusion of plasma screening effects. The cross section dependencies on plasma parameters and ion charge and velocity are investigated. It is shown that plasma effects on charge exchange and ionization cross sections are significant and particularly pronounced at low collision velocities. The results of systematic cross section calculations for different values of Debye screening length (in the range 1-50a{sub 0}) and ion charges (in the range 1-14) are presented.

  4. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described. PMID:26932065

  5. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  6. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes Using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2005-09-01

    Improving and maintaining the quantum efficiency (QE) of a metal photocathode in an s-band RF gun requires a process for cleaning the surface. In this type of gun, the cathode is typically installed and the system is vacuum baked to {approx}200 degrees C. If the QE is too low, the cathode is usually cleaned with the UV-drive laser. While laser cleaning does increase the cathode QE, it requires fluences close to the damage threshold and rastering the small diameter beam, both of which can produce nonuniform electron emission and potentially damage the cathode. This paper investigates the efficacy of a low energy hydrogen ion beam to produce high-QE metal cathodes. Measurements of the QE vs. wavelength, surface contaminants using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface roughness were performed on a copper sample, and the results showed a significant increase in QE after cleaning with a 1keV hydrogen ion beam. The H-ion beam cleaned an area approximately 1cm in diameter and had no effect on the surface roughness while significantly increasing the QE. These results and a comparison with theory as well as a scheme for installing an H-ion cleaner on an s-band gun are presented.

  7. Cavity Ring-Down System for Density Measurement of Negative Hydrogen Ion on Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Haruhisa; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nagaoka, Kenichi; Shibuya, Masayuki; Kisaki, Masashi; Ikeda, Katsunori; Osakabe, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu; Asano, Eiji; Kondo, Tomoki; Sato, Mamoru; Komada, Seiji; Sekiguchi, Haruo; Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Fantz, Ursel

    2011-09-26

    A Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) system was applied to measure the density of negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) in vicinity of extraction surface in the H{sup -} source for the development of neutral beam injector on Large Helical Device (LHD). The density measurement with sampling time of 50 ms was carried out. The measured density with the CRD system is relatively good agreement with the density evaluated from extracted beam-current with applying a similar relation of positive ion sources. In cesium seeded into ion-source plasma, the linearity between an arc power of the discharge and the measured density with the CRD system was observed. Additionally, the measured density was proportional to the extracted beam current. These characteristics indicate the CRD system worked well for H{sup -} density measurement in the region of H{sup -} and extraction.

  8. Optimization of plasma parameters with magnetic filter field and pressure to maximize H- ion density in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Kim, June Young; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-02-01

    Transverse magnetic filter field as well as operating pressure is considered to be an important control knob to enhance negative hydrogen ion production via plasma parameter optimization in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources. Stronger filter field to reduce electron temperature sufficiently in the extraction region is favorable, but generally known to be limited by electron density drop near the extraction region. In this study, unexpected electron density increase instead of density drop is observed in front of the extraction region when the applied transverse filter field increases monotonically toward the extraction aperture. Measurements of plasma parameters with a movable Langmuir probe indicate that the increased electron density may be caused by low energy electron accumulation in the filter region decreasing perpendicular diffusion coefficients across the increasing filter field. Negative hydrogen ion populations are estimated from the measured profiles of electron temperatures and densities and confirmed to be consistent with laser photo-detachment measurements of the H- populations for various filter field strengths and pressures. Enhanced H- population near the extraction region due to the increased low energy electrons in the filter region may be utilized to increase negative hydrogen beam currents by moving the extraction position accordingly. This new finding can be used to design efficient H- sources with an optimal filtering system by maximizing high energy electron filtering while keeping low energy electrons available in the extraction region.

  9. Optimization of plasma parameters with magnetic filter field and pressure to maximize H⁻ ion density in a negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Kim, June Young; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y S

    2016-02-01

    Transverse magnetic filter field as well as operating pressure is considered to be an important control knob to enhance negative hydrogen ion production via plasma parameter optimization in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources. Stronger filter field to reduce electron temperature sufficiently in the extraction region is favorable, but generally known to be limited by electron density drop near the extraction region. In this study, unexpected electron density increase instead of density drop is observed in front of the extraction region when the applied transverse filter field increases monotonically toward the extraction aperture. Measurements of plasma parameters with a movable Langmuir probe indicate that the increased electron density may be caused by low energy electron accumulation in the filter region decreasing perpendicular diffusion coefficients across the increasing filter field. Negative hydrogen ion populations are estimated from the measured profiles of electron temperatures and densities and confirmed to be consistent with laser photo-detachment measurements of the H(-) populations for various filter field strengths and pressures. Enhanced H(-) population near the extraction region due to the increased low energy electrons in the filter region may be utilized to increase negative hydrogen beam currents by moving the extraction position accordingly. This new finding can be used to design efficient H(-) sources with an optimal filtering system by maximizing high energy electron filtering while keeping low energy electrons available in the extraction region. PMID:26932018

  10. Experimental studies of the Negative Ion of Hydrogen. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Howard C.

    1999-06-30

    This document presents an overview of the results of the DOE'S support of experimental research into the structure and interactions of the negative ion of hydrogen conducted by the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of New Mexico at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The work involves many collaborations with scientists from both institutions, as well as others. Although official DOE support for this work began in 1977, the experiment that led to it was done in 1971, near the time the 800 MeV linear accelerator at Los Alamos (LAMPF) first came on line. Until the mid nineties, the work was performed using the relativistic beam at LAMFF. The most recent results were obtained using the 35 keV injector beam for the Ground Test Accelerator at Los Alamos. A list of all published results from this work is presented.

  11. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, K. Toussaint, U. von; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2014-10-07

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12 H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  12. Progress on producing polarized negative hydrogen ions by the ETHZ polarized ion source using the atomic beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, P. A.; Grüebler, W.

    1983-03-01

    The progress on the ETHZ polarized negative hydrogen ion source, based on the atomic beam method, is described. Particular improvements have been made in the double charge exchange from positive to negative hydrogen ions. At present the source produces over 100 μA H+ ions, which yields 5-6 μA polarized negative hydrogen ions. These ions have been accelerated, in a EN tandem accelerator. A record current of 2-3 μA of polarized deuterons with 89% polarization could be focused through a 3 mm diameter collimator on a target. Further improvements incorporating presently available techniques are discussed. It is shown that 50-100 μA of polarized H- and D- ions can be produced with this type of source.

  13. Vibrational States of Hydrogen Molecules in One Third LHD Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M.; Tsumori, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Wada, M.; Inoue, T.

    2011-09-26

    The effect of the cesium on hydrogen negative ions is discussed using the vacuum ultraviolet emissions (VUV) from vibrational states of hydrogen molecules. The VUV spectrum from 90 to 165 nm is related to the H{sup -} production from the dissociative attachment of electrons to hydrogen molecules. The VUV spectra in hydrogen plasmas are measured in the extraction region of a negative ion source for neutral beam injector. Under the pure hydrogen discharge, the cesium vapor is introduced into the ion source to enhance the hydrogen negative ion density. When the same arc power of {approx}99 kW is applied in both with and without cesium admixture cases, the ratio of the observed VUV spectrum without to with cesium is not changed clearly. Therefore the production process of H{sup -} related to the wall/electrode surface would be enhanced rather than the volume production process.

  14. Large scale silver nanowires network fabricated by MeV hydrogen (H+) ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honey, S.; Naseem, S.; Ishaq, A.; Maaza, M.; Bhatti, M. T.; Wan, D.

    2016-04-01

    A random two-dimensional large scale nano-network of silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) is fabricated by MeV hydrogen (H+) ion beam irradiation. Ag-NWs are irradiated under H+ ion beam at different ion fluences at room temperature. The Ag-NW network is fabricated by H+ ion beam-induced welding of Ag-NWs at intersecting positions. H+ ion beam induced welding is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the structure of Ag NWs remains stable under H+ ion beam, and networks are optically transparent. Morphology also remains stable under H+ ion beam irradiation. No slicings or cuttings of Ag-NWs are observed under MeV H+ ion beam irradiation. The results exhibit that the formation of Ag-NW network proceeds through three steps: ion beam induced thermal spikes lead to the local heating of Ag-NWs, the formation of simple junctions on small scale, and the formation of a large scale network. This observation is useful for using Ag-NWs based devices in upper space where protons are abandoned in an energy range from MeV to GeV. This high-quality Ag-NW network can also be used as a transparent electrode for optoelectronics devices. Project supported by the National Research Foundation of South Africa (NRF), the French Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique, iThemba-LABS, the UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences & Nanotechnology, the Third World Academy of Science (TWAS), Organization of Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSDW), the Abdus Salam ICTP via the Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), and the Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan.

  15. On the dynamics of the reaction of positive hydrogen cluster ions (H5+ to H23+) with para and normal hydrogen at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, W.; Lücke, B.; Schlemmer, S.; Gerlich, D.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamics of clustering and fragmentation reactions Hi+ + 2H2 [right harpoon over left] Hi+2+ + H2, for odd i, was studied at a nominal temperature of 10 K in a 22-pole radio-frequency ion trap in normal hydrogen and para-enriched hydrogen. Ternary association rate coefficients, k3, and binary fragmentation rate coefficients, kf, were extracted from the measured temporal evolution of the hydrogen cluster ion intensity, I(Hi+), for i = 3,...,23. Pure para hydrogen enhances the rate coefficients for association and fragmentation. For i > 9 this general trend is explained by a difference in the capture cross-sections, kc, for the two hydrogen nuclear spin modifications. Significant differences in k3 which remain for small clusters (i < 9) are due to the availability of the J = 1 rotational energy of the ortho modification when merging into the cluster. This surprising result is discussed in the framework of simple dynamical and energetic considerations. Possible structures of the cluster can be classified and estimates for the bond energy of the outermost H2 in the cluster as a function of cluster size are derived.

  16. Production of intense beams of polarized negative hydrogen ions by double charge exchange in alkali vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruëbler, W.; Schmelzbach, P. A.

    1983-07-01

    The intensity of the polarized negative hydrogen ion beam of the ETHZ atomic beam polarized ion source has been substantially improved by a new double charge exchange device. Increasing the diameter of the charge exchange canal to 1.4 cm results in a beam output of the source of 6 μA of polarized negative hydrogen ions. Further improvements of the charge exchanger are proposed and discussed. With an updated design of the atomic beam apparatus, beams of 0.5 mA polarized negative hydrogen ions may be obtained from such a source.

  17. ION SOURCES FOR ENERGY EXTREMES OF ION IMPLANTATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HERSCHCOVITCH,A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; BATALIN, V.A.; KROPACHEV, G.N.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; KULEVOY, T.V.; KOLOMIETS, A.A.; PERSHIN, V.I.; PETRENKO, S.V.; RUDSKOY, I.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; BUGAEV, A.S.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; LITOVKO, I.V.; OKS, E.M.; YUSHKOV, G. YU.; MASEUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.; POOLE, H.J.; STOROZHENKO, P.A.; SVAROVSKI, YA.

    2007-08-26

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques, which meet the two energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. For low energy ion implantation our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, Boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bemas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  18. A hydrogen energy carrier. Volume 1: Summary. [for meeting energy requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, R. L. (Editor); Blank, L. (Editor); Cady, T. (Editor); Cox, K. E. (Editor); Murray, R. (Editor); Williams, R. D. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The production, technology, transportation, and implementation of hydrogen into the energy system are discussed along with the fossil fuel cycle, hydrogen fuel cycle, and the demands for energy. The cost of hydrogen production by coal gasification; electrolysis by nuclear energy, and solar energy are presented. The legal aspects of a hydrogen economy are also discussed.

  19. Hydrogen in the U.S. energy picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.; Manvi, R.

    1979-01-01

    A study of hydrogen in the U.S. program performed by the Hydrogen Energy Systems Technology (HEST) investigation is reported. Historic production and use of hydrogen, hydrogen use projections, hydrogen supply, economics of hydrogen production and supply, and future research and development needs are discussed. The study found current U.S. hydrogen utilization to be dominated by chemical and petroleum industries, and to represent 3% of total energy consumption. Hydrogen uses are projected to grow by a factor of 5 to 20 during the remainder of this century, and new applications in synthetic fuel from coal manufacture and directly as energy storage or fuel are expected to develop. The study concluded that development of new methods of supplying hydrogen replacing natural gas and petroleum feedstocks with alternate sources such as coal and heavy oils, and electrolysis techniques is imperative.

  20. Warm target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for fragmentation of molecular hydrogen by ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wu, Jian; Czasch, Achim; Zeng, Heping

    2009-07-20

    We demonstrate warm target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for the fragmentation dynamics of the warm hydrogen molecules at room temperature. The thermal movement effect of the warm molecule is removed by using a correction algorithm in the momentum space. Based on the reconstructed three-dimensional momentum vectors as well as the kinetic energy release spectra, different vibrational states of the H(2)(+) ground state are clearly visible and the internuclear separation for charge resonance enhanced ionization of the second electron is identified. The results show adequate accordance with the former experiments using other techniques. PMID:19654636

  1. Status of Charge Exchange Cross Section Measurements for Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Schultz, D. R.; Seely, D. G.; Schultz, P. C.

    2011-05-01

    Total cross sections of charge exchange (CX) for C5+, N6+, and O7+ ions on ground state atomic hydrogen are measured in an extended collision energy range of 1 - 20,000 eV/u. Absolute CX measurements are performed using an improved merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source mounted on a high voltage platform. In order to improve the problematic H+ signal collection for these exoergic CX collisions at low relative energies, a new double focusing electrostatic analyzer was installed. Experimental CX data are in good agreement with all previous H-oven relative measurements at higher collision energies. We compare our results with the most recent molecular orbital close-coupling (MOCC) and atomic orbital close-coupling (AOCC) theoretical calculations. Work supported by the NASA Solar & Heliospheric Physics Program NNH07ZDA001N, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. DoE.

  2. Accelerated High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    The resolving power of differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) was dramatically increased recently by carrier gases comprising up to 75% He or various vapors, enabling many new applications. However, the need for resolution of complex mixtures is virtually open-ended and many topical analyses demand yet finer separations. Also, the resolving power gains are often at the expense of speed, in particular making high-resolution FAIMS incompatible with online liquid-phase separations. Here, we report FAIMS employing hydrogen, specifically in mixtures with N2 containing up to 90% H2. Such compositions raise the mobilities of all ions and thus the resolving power beyond that previously feasible, while avoiding the electrical breakdown inevitable in He-rich mixtures. The increases in resolving power and ensuing peak resolution are especially significant at H2 fractions above ~50%. Higher resolution can be exchanged for acceleration of the analyses by up to ~4 times, at least. For more mobile species such as multiply-charged peptides, this exchange is presently forced by the constraints of existing FAIMS devices, but future designs optimized for H2 should consistently improve resolution for all analytes. PMID:22074292

  3. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Haselton, Halsey H.; Stirling, William L.; Whealton, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  4. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  5. Extraction of negative hydrogen ions from a compact 14 GHz microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kasuya, T.; Nishida, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Maeno, S.; Nishiura, M.; Shinto, K.; Yamaoka, H.

    2012-02-15

    A pair of permanent magnets has formed enough intensity to realize electron cyclotron resonance condition for a 14 GHz microwave in a 2 cm diameter 9 cm long alumina discharge chamber. A three-electrode extraction system assembled in a magnetic shielding has formed a stable beam of negative hydrogen ions (H{sup -}) in a direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. The measured H{sup -} current density was about 1 mA/cm{sup 2} with only 50 W of discharge power, but the beam intensity had shown saturation against further increase in microwave power. The beam current decreased monotonically against increasing pressure.

  6. Molecular Ion Beam Transportation for Low Energy Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Kropachev, G. N.; Seleznev, D. N.; Yakushin, P. E.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kozlov, A. V.; Koshelev, V. A.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Polozov, S. M.; Poole, H. J.

    2011-01-07

    A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for 100's of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past five years. Current density limitation associated with extracting and transporting low energy ion beams result in lower beam currents that in turn adversely affects the process throughput. The transport channel with electrostatic lenses for decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}) and carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beams transportation was developed and investigated. The significant increase of ion beam intensity at the beam transport channel output is demonstrated. The transport channel simulation, construction and experimental results of ion beam transportation are presented.

  7. Annihilation of Low Energy Antiprotons in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, S.Yu.; Macek, J.H.

    2003-08-26

    The cross sections for annihilation of antiprotons in hydrogen are very important for designing the High-Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT). When antiprotons are trapped they undergo atomic reactions with background gases which remove them from the trap. First, antiprotons are captured into highly excited bound states by ejecting the bound electrons, then they are radiationally deexcited and, finally, they annihilate by nuclear interaction. An understanding of these process require reliable cross sections for low-energy collisions of antiprotons with atoms. We have developed a theoretical technique for accurate calculations of these cross sections.

  8. Spatial and temporal evolution of negative ions in a pulsed inductively coupled hydrogen plasma source across a magnetic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nulty, Stuart; Corr, Cormac

    2015-09-01

    Low-temperature electronegative plasmas have important applications in high-energy sources for fusion energy, plasma thrusters and materials processing. Neutral beam injection systems and space thruster technology such as the PEGASUS propulsion system rely on efficiently producing extractable negative ions. In this work we investigate the production of hydrogen negative ions in a pulsed inductively coupled plasma across a magnetic filter. The electron energy distribution function, plasma density and electron temperature are determined using an RF compensated Langmuir probe, and time-resolved laser photo-detachment is used to measure the negative ion fraction. The spatial and temporal evolution of these plasma parameters within the plasma source will be presented. Using a pulsed plasma and a magnetic filter, the electron temperature can be efficiently controlled and a higher density of negative ions compared to electrons can be obtained at certain locations within the source.

  9. Measurements of Lyman Alpha Radiation from Collisions, 100 EV to 4000EV, of Negative Hydrogen Ions on Various Target Gases and Positive Hydrogen Ions on Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenland, Glenn Blair

    This study reports measurements of cross sections for the production of Lyman alpha radiation from processes in which an ion is incident on a neutral target gas. Two kinds of processes were measured: the stripping of the extra electron from a negative hydro- gen ion leaving an excited neutral and the capture of an electron by a proton also leaving an excited neutral. In each case, radiation from the 2p state of the neutral hydrogen was detected. The projectile struck the static gas target with a kinetic energy between 100 and 4000 electron volts. The measurements used the ultraviolet absorption properties of molecular oxygen to isolate the Lyman alpha line. Cross sections for emission of Lyman alpha perpendicular to the incident beam were determined. The targets used in the stripping experiments were the atomic gases: helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon, and the molecular gases: hydrogen, nitrogen and methane. The cross sections are rela- tively flat over the energy range investigated. All are slightly below 10('-16) cm('2) at 1000 eV. Only with the neon target does the cross section fall below 2 x 10('0-17) cm('2) at 100 electron volts. While the data appear to support the modeling of stripping with excitation as a two step process, this modeling may not be valid for excitation above 2p. Only a xenon target was used in the capture experiments. Careful measurements did not substantiate an earlier report of unusual structure('1) in this cross section. ('1)P. J. Martin, Ph.D. Dissertation, Univ. of Nebraska, 1975.

  10. Size scaling of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source (H-, D-) for the international fusion experiment ITER has a width of 0.9 m and a height of 1.9 m and is based on a ⅛ scale prototype source being in operation at the IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU for many years. Among the challenges to meet the required parameters in a caesiated source at a source pressure of 0.3 Pa or less is the challenge in size scaling of a factor of eight. As an intermediate step a ½ scale ITER source went into operation at the IPP test facility ELISE with the first plasma in February 2013. The experience and results gained so far at ELISE allowed a size scaling study from the prototype source towards the ITER relevant size at ELISE, in which operational issues, physical aspects and the source performance is addressed, highlighting differences as well as similarities. The most ITER relevant results are: low pressure operation down to 0.2 Pa is possible without problems; the magnetic filter field created by a current in the plasma grid is sufficient to reduce the electron temperature below the target value of 1 eV and to reduce together with the bias applied between the differently shaped bias plate and the plasma grid the amount of co-extracted electrons. An asymmetry of the co-extracted electron currents in the two grid segments is measured, varying strongly with filter field and bias. Contrary to the prototype source, a dedicated plasma drift in vertical direction is not observed. As in the prototype source, the performance in deuterium is limited by the amount of co-extracted electrons in short as well as in long pulse operation. Caesium conditioning is much harder in deuterium than in hydrogen for which fast and reproducible conditioning is achieved. First estimates reveal a caesium consumption comparable to the one in the prototype source despite the large size.

  11. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  12. XUV-Exposed, Non-Hydrostatic Hydrogen-Rich Upper Atmospheres of Terrestrial Planets. Part II: Hydrogen Coronae and Ion Escape

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, Helmut; Holmström, Mats; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V.; Leitzinger, Martin; Khodachenko, Maxim L.; Kulikov, Yuri N.; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We studied the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and the hydrogen-rich upper atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and a “super-Earth” with a radius of 2 REarth and a mass of 10 MEarth, located within the habitable zone at ∼0.24 AU. We investigated the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pickup ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes that are 1, 10, 50, and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun were considered, and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions was modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, lead to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ∼1.0×1025 s−1 to ∼5.3×1030 s−1, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimated the long-time nonthermal ion pickup escape for the studied planets and compared them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, nonthermal escape of picked-up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime within the habitable zone of an M dwarf varies between ∼0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EOH) to <3 EOH and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates. Key Words: Stellar activity—Low-mass stars—Early atmospheres—Earth-like exoplanets—Energetic neutral

  13. Experimental investigations of trimer ion contributions in the low resolution mass spectrometry of hydrogen isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bidica, Nicolae

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on some preliminary experimental results of a work in progress regarding a problem involving the quantitative analysis of hydrogen isotopes by mass spectrometry of low resolution: the triatomic (trimer) ions interferences with the isotopic hydrogen species having the same mass/charge. These results indicate that, in complex mixtures of hydrogen isotopes, trimer ions are strongly affected by the presence of other species, and a new approach that takes into account the destruction mechanism of trimer ions is necessary for a proper determination of their contributions. PMID:23149602

  14. Excitation of atomic hydrogen by protons and helium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, C.E.

    1980-12-01

    The Vainshtein-Presnyakov-Sobel'man approximation (VPSA) is extended for heavy projectiles and applied to calculating cross sections for direct excitation of atomic hydrogen by proton and He/sup +/ impact. The contribution of the projectile-target core interaction to the transition matrix element is included here for the first time. In addition an effective charge zeta is introduced to minimize the effect of neglecting certain terms in the Schroedinger equation of the collision system; this term-neglecting process is inherent to the VPSA. It is found that the projectile-target core interaction contribution is, as expected for heavy projectiles, small for calculating total cross sections but becomes significant for differential cross sections and increasing scattering angles. Inclusion of the effective charge raises the cross sections at lower-impact energies. The developed formulation is applied to excitation of atomic hydrogen to the n=2, 3, 4, and 5 levels and comparison is made with the available experimental values for total and differential cross sections. The agreement is very good when the relative velocity is larger than approx.0.6upsilon/sub 0/(upsilon/sub 0/=..cap alpha..c=2.188 x 10/sup -8/ cm s/sup -1/). The present results are also compared with the ones obtained by typical alternative theoretical approaches of varying sophistication.

  15. Excitation of atomic hydrogen by protons and helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodosiou, Constantine E.

    1980-12-01

    The Vainshtein-Presnyakov-Sobel'man approximation (VPSA) is extended for heavy projectiles and applied to calculating cross sections for direct excitation of atomic hydrogen by proton and He+ impact. The contribution of the projectile-target core interaction to the transition matrix element is included here for the first time. In addition an effective charge ζ is introduced to minimize the effect of neglecting certain terms in the Schrödinger equation of the collision system; this term-neglecting process is inherent to the VPSA. It is found that the projectile-target core interaction contribution is, as expected for heavy projectiles, small for calculating total cross sections but becomes significant for differential cross sections and increasing scattering angles. Inclusion of the effective charge raises the cross sections at lower-impact energies. The developed formulation is applied to excitation of atomic hydrogen to the n=2,3,4, and 5 levels and comparison is made with the available experimental values for total and differential cross sections. The agreement is very good when the relative velocity is larger than ~0.6v0(v0=αc=2.188×10-8 cm s-1). The present results are also compared with the ones obtained by typical alternative theoretical approaches of varying sophistication.

  16. Fractionation of inorganic arsenic by adjusting hydrogen ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andrea; Gonzalez, Mario Henrique; Queiroz, Helena Müller; Cadore, Solange

    2016-12-15

    The inorganic fraction of arsenic species, iAs=∑[As(III)+As(V)] present in fish samples can be quantified in the presence of other arsenic species also found in fishes, such as: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and arsenobetaine (AsB). The toxic arsenic fraction was selected taking into account the dissociation constants of these arsenic species in different hydrogen ions concentration leading to the arsine formation from iAs compounds detected as As(III) by HG AAS. For thus, a microwave assisted extraction was carried out using HCl 1molL(-1) in order to maintain the integrity of the arsenic species in this mild extraction media. Recovery experiments were done for iAs fraction, in the presence of other arsenic species. The recovery values obtained for iAs fraction added were quantitative about 87-107% (for N=3, RSD⩽3%). The limit of detection (LOD), and the limit of quantification (LOQ), were 5μgkg(-1) and 16μgkg(-1) respectively. PMID:27451157

  17. Hydrogen recovery from extraterrestrial materials using microwave energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, D. S.; Vaniman, D. T.; Anderson, J. L.; Clinard, F. W., Jr.; Feber, R. C., Jr.; Frost, H. M.; Meek, T. T.; Wallace, T. C.

    The feasibility of recovering hydrogen from extraterrestrial materials (lunar and Martian soils, asteroids) using microwave energy is presented. Reasons for harvesting and origins and locations of hydrogen are reviewed. Problems of hydrogen recovery are discussed in terms of hydrogen release characteristics and microwave coupling to insulating materials. From results of studies of hydrogen diffusivities (oxides, glasses) and tritium release (oxides) as well as studies of microwave coupling to ilmenite, alkali basalt and ceramic oxides it is concluded that using microwave heating in hydrogen recovery from extraterrestrial materials could be the basis for a workable process.

  18. Process in high energy heavy ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinev, D.

    2009-03-01

    A review of processes that occur in high energy heavy ion acceleration by synchrotrons and colliders and that are essential for the accelerator performance is presented. Interactions of ions with the residual gas molecules/atoms and with stripping foils that deliberately intercept the ion trajectories are described in details. These interactions limit both the beam intensity and the beam quality. The processes of electron loss and capture lie at the root of heavy ion charge exchange injection. The review pays special attention to the ion induced vacuum pressure instability which is one of the main factors limiting the beam intensity. The intrabeam scattering phenomena which restricts the average luminosity of ion colliders is discussed. Some processes in nuclear interactions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions that could be dangerous for the performance of ion colliders are represented in the last chapter.

  19. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  20. Desalination and hydrogen, chlorine, and sodium hydroxide production via electrophoretic ion exchange and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Bahga, Supreet S; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate and analyze a novel desalination method which works by electrophoretically replacing sodium and chloride in feed salt water with a pair of ions, calcium and carbonate, that react and precipitate out. The resulting calcium carbonate precipitate is benign to health, and can be filtered or settled out, yielding low ionic strength product water. The ion exchange and precipitation employs self-sharpening interfaces induced by movement of multiple ions in an electric field to prevent contamination of the product water. Simultaneously, the electrolysis associated with the electromigration produces hydrogen gas, chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. We conducted an experimental study of this method's basic efficacy to desalinate salt water from 100 to 600 mol m(-3) sodium chloride. We also present physicochemical models of the process, and analyze replacement reagents consumption, permeate recovery ratio, and energy consumption. We hypothesize that the precipitate can be recycled back to replacement reagents using the well-known, commercially implemented Solvay process. We show that the method's permeate recovery ratio is 58% to 46%, which is on par with that of reverse osmosis. We show that the method's energy consumption requirement over and above that necessary to generate electrolysis is 3 to 10 W h l(-1), which is on par with the energy consumed by state-of-the-art desalination methods. Furthermore, the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure, and uses no specialized membranes. The process may be feasible as a part of a desalination-co-generation facility: generating fresh water, hydrogen and chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. PMID:22806549

  1. Hydrogen Highways: Lessons on the Energy Technology-Policy Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waegel, Alex; Byrne, John; Tobin, Daniel; Haney, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen economy has received increasing attention recently. Common reasons cited for investigating hydrogen energy options are improved energy security, reduced environmental impacts, and its contribution to a transition to sustainable energy sources. In anticipation of these benefits, national and local initiatives have been launched in the…

  2. Optimum plasma grid bias for a negative hydrogen ion source operation with Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, Marthe; Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; McAdams, Roy

    2016-02-01

    The functions of a biased plasma grid of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source for both pure volume and Cs seeded operations are reexamined. Proper control of the plasma grid bias in pure volume sources yields: enhancement of the extracted negative ion current, reduction of the co-extracted electron current, flattening of the spatial distribution of plasma potential across the filter magnetic field, change in recycling from hydrogen atomic/molecular ions to atomic/molecular neutrals, and enhanced concentration of H- ions near the plasma grid. These functions are maintained in the sources seeded with Cs with additional direct emission of negative ions under positive ion and neutral hydrogen bombardment onto the plasma electrode.

  3. Hydrogen based global renewable energy network

    SciTech Connect

    Akai, Makoto

    1993-12-31

    In the last quarter of this century, global environmental problem has emerged as a major scientific, political and social issue. Specific Problems include: depletion of ozone layer by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), acid rain, destruction of tropical forests and desertification, pollution of the sea and global wanning due to the greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide and others. Among these problems, particular attention of the world has been focused on the global warming because it has direct linkage to energy consumption which our economic development depends on so far. On the other hand, the future program of The Sunshine Project for alternative energy technology R&D, The Moonlight Project for energy conservation technology R&D, and The Global Environmental Technology Program for environmental problem mitigating technology R&D which are Japan`s national projects being promoted by their Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry have been reexamined in view of recent changes in the situations surrounding new energy technology. In this regard, The New Sunshine Program will be established by integrating these three activities to accelerate R&D in the field of energy and environmental technologies. In the reexamination, additional stress has been laid on the contribution to solving global environmental problem through development of clean renewable energies which constitute a major part of the {open_quotes}New Earth 21{close_quotes}, a comprehensive, long-term and international cooperative program proposed by MITI. The present paper discusses the results of feasibility study on hydrogen energy system leading to the concept of WE-NET following a brief summary on R&D status on solar and wind energy in Japan.

  4. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-28

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K(+) and SCN(-) ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions. PMID:27250298

  5. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  6. Tailored ion energy distributions on plasma electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2013-09-15

    As microelectronic device features continue to shrink approaching atomic dimensions, control of the ion energy distribution on the substrate during plasma etching and deposition becomes increasingly critical. The ion energy should be high enough to drive ion-assisted etching, but not too high to cause substrate damage or loss of selectivity. In many cases, a nearly monoenergetic ion energy distribution (IED) is desired to achieve highly selective etching. In this work, the author briefly reviews: (1) the fundamentals of development of the ion energy distribution in the sheath and (2) methods to control the IED on plasma electrodes. Such methods include the application of “tailored” voltage waveforms on an electrode in continuous wave plasmas, or the application of synchronous bias on a “boundary electrode” during a specified time window in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas.

  7. Effect of nickel grid parameters on production of negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Yokoyama, H.; Takeda, Toshiaki; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Kawata, K.

    2014-06-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a nickel grid. When positive ions passing through the grid are decelerated by an electric field, the extraction current density of passing positive ions is sharply reduced by neutralization and negative ionization of the ions. This phenomenon is found to depend on the specific surface area of the grid and the current density.

  8. Research Issues for Development of Hydrogen Energy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Masabumi

    It is generally considered that use of hydrogen in energy system is attractive because it produces no matters to cause air pollution or water pollution. Following this recognition, research to develop a car with low temperature fuel cell or hydrogen engine is extensively performed. The future energy system where hydrogen is used as the key material is shown in the figure below. To realize this system we must develop 1) the reasonable way to produce electricity or heat by using hydrogen as fuel, 2) the infrastructure to supply hydrogen to whole society, 3) energy sources and methods to produce huge amount of cheap hydrogen with minimum impact on nature, 4) together with assurance of resources to construct the system and 5) establishment of understanding about the basic behavior of hydrogen in various materials.

  9. The ejection of triatomic molecular hydrogen ions H3+ produced by the interaction of benzene molecules with ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaziannis, S.; Liontos, I.; Karras, G.; Corsi, C.; Bellini, M.; Kosmidis, C.

    2009-10-01

    The ejection process of triatomic molecular hydrogen ions produced by the interaction of benzene with ultrafast laser pulses of moderate strong intensity (˜1014 W/cm2) is studied by means of TOF mass spectrometry. The H3+ formation can only take place through the rupture of two C-H bonds and the migration of hydrogen atoms within the molecular structure. The H3+ fragments are released with high kinetic energy (typically 2-8 eV) and at laser intensities ≥1014 W/cm2, well above that required for the double ionization of benzene, suggesting that its formation is taking place within multiply charged parent ions. The relative ejection efficiency of H3+ molecular hydrogen ions with respect to the atomic ones is found to be strongly decreasing as a function of the laser intensity and pulse duration (67-25 fs). It is concluded that the H3+ formation is only feasible within parent molecular precursors of relatively low charged states and before significant elongation of their structure takes place, while the higher multiply charged molecular ions preferentially dissociate into H+ ions. The ejection of H2+ ions is also discussed in comparison to the production of H3+ and H+ ions. Finally, by recording the mass spectra of two deuterium label isotopes of benzene (1,2-C6H4D2, 1,4-C6H4D2) it is verified that the ejection efficiency of some molecular fragments, such as D2H+, DH+, is dependent on the specific position of hydrogen atoms in the molecular skeleton prior dissociation.

  10. XUV-exposed, non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets. Part II: hydrogen coronae and ion escape.

    PubMed

    Kislyakova, Kristina G; Lammer, Helmut; Holmström, Mats; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Leitzinger, Martin; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Kulikov, Yuri N; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    We studied the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and the hydrogen-rich upper atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and a "super-Earth" with a radius of 2 R(Earth) and a mass of 10 M(Earth), located within the habitable zone at ∼0.24 AU. We investigated the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pickup ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes that are 1, 10, 50, and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun were considered, and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions was modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, lead to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ∼1.0×10²⁵ s⁻¹ to ∼5.3×10³⁰ s⁻¹, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimated the long-time nonthermal ion pickup escape for the studied planets and compared them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, nonthermal escape of picked-up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime within the habitable zone of an M dwarf varies between ∼0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EO(H)) to <3 EO(H) and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates. PMID:24283926

  11. The green hydrogen report. The 1995 progress report of the Secretary of Energy`s Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report presents the idea that hydrogen and electricity, ultimately derived from renewable technologies, will serve as the clean, inexhaustible energy carriers in the next century. The widespread introduction of these energy forms would dramatically reduce the nation`s air pollution, enhance its energy security, and ameliorate potential global climate problems. The topics of the report include the role of hydrogen, research priorities, and use of hydrogen in surface transportation and aircraft.

  12. Size scaling of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U. Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-08

    The RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source (H{sup −}, D{sup −}) for the international fusion experiment ITER has a width of 0.9 m and a height of 1.9 m and is based on a ⅛ scale prototype source being in operation at the IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU for many years. Among the challenges to meet the required parameters in a caesiated source at a source pressure of 0.3 Pa or less is the challenge in size scaling of a factor of eight. As an intermediate step a ½ scale ITER source went into operation at the IPP test facility ELISE with the first plasma in February 2013. The experience and results gained so far at ELISE allowed a size scaling study from the prototype source towards the ITER relevant size at ELISE, in which operational issues, physical aspects and the source performance is addressed, highlighting differences as well as similarities. The most ITER relevant results are: low pressure operation down to 0.2 Pa is possible without problems; the magnetic filter field created by a current in the plasma grid is sufficient to reduce the electron temperature below the target value of 1 eV and to reduce together with the bias applied between the differently shaped bias plate and the plasma grid the amount of co-extracted electrons. An asymmetry of the co-extracted electron currents in the two grid segments is measured, varying strongly with filter field and bias. Contrary to the prototype source, a dedicated plasma drift in vertical direction is not observed. As in the prototype source, the performance in deuterium is limited by the amount of co-extracted electrons in short as well as in long pulse operation. Caesium conditioning is much harder in deuterium than in hydrogen for which fast and reproducible conditioning is achieved. First estimates reveal a caesium consumption comparable to the one in the prototype source despite the large size.

  13. Reduction of friction stress of ethylene glycol by attached hydrogen ions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinjin; Zhang, Chenhui; Deng, Mingming; Luo, Jianbin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, it is shown that the friction stress of ethylene glycol can decrease by an order of magnitude to achieve superlubricity if there are hydrogen ions attached on the friction surfaces. An ultra-low friction coefficient (μ = 0.004) of ethylene glycol between Si3N4 and SiO2 can be obtained with the effect of hydrogen ions. Experimental result indicates that the hydrogen ions adsorbed on the friction surfaces forming a hydration layer and the ethylene glycol in the contact region forming an elastohydrodynamic film are the two indispensable factors for the reduction of friction stress. The mechanism of superlubricity is attributed to the extremely low shear strength of formation of elastohydrodynamic film on the hydration layer. This finding may introduce a new approach to reduce friction coefficient of liquid by attaching hydrogen ions on friction surfaces. PMID:25428584

  14. Laser photodetachment diagnostics of a 1/3-size negative hydrogen ion source for NBI

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, S.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.

    2015-04-08

    To investigate the flows of charged particles in front of the plasma grid (PG) in a negative hydrogen ion source, the information of the local densities of electrons and negative hydrogen ions (H-) are necessary. For this purpose, the laser photodetachment is applied for pure hydrogen plasmas and Cs-seeded plasma in a 1/3-size negative hydrogen ion source in NIFS-NBI test stand. The H- density obtained by photodetachment is calibrated by the results from cavity ring-down (CRD). The pressure dependence and PG bias dependence of the local H- density are presented and discussed. The results show that H- density increases significantly by seeding Cs into the plasma. In Cs-seeded plasma, relativity exists between the H- ion density and plasma potential.

  15. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  16. Cross-section scaling for track structure simulations of low-energy ions in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, E; Friedland, W; Kundrát, P; Dingfelder, M; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    Radiation damage by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high biological efficiency of ion beams in distal Bragg peak regions as well as to the energy-dependent efficiency of neutron irradiation. To enable assessing biological effects of ions at energies <1 MeV u(-1) with track-structure based models, a Barkas-like scaling procedure is developed that provides ion cross sections in liquid water based on those for hydrogen ions. The resulting stopping power and range for carbon ions agree with the ICRU 73 database and other low-energy stopping power data. The method represents the basis for extending PARTRAC simulations of light ion track structures and biological effects down to the keV u(-1) range. PMID:25969528

  17. AMPHOTERIC COLLOIDS : I. CHEMICAL INFLUENCE OF THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION.

    PubMed

    Loeb, J

    1918-09-20

    1. It has been shown in this paper that while non-ionized gelatin may exist in gelatin solutions on both sides of the isoelectric point (which lies for gelatin at a hydrogen ion concentration of C(H) = 2.10(-5) or pH = 4.7), gelatin, when it ionizes, can only exist as an anion on the less acid side of its isoelectric point (pH > 4.7), as a cation only on the more acid side of its isoelectric point (pH < 4.7). At the isoelectric point gelatin can dissociate practically neither as anion nor as cation. 2. When gelatin has been transformed into sodium gelatinate by treating it for some time with M/32 NaOH, and when it is subsequently treated with HCl, the gelatin shows on the more acid side of the isoelectric point effects of the acid treatment only; while the effects of the alkali treatment disappear completely, showing that the negative gelatin ions formed by the previous treatment with alkali can no longer exist in a solution with a pH < 4.7. When gelatin is first treated with acid and afterwards with alkali on the alkaline side of the isoelectric point only the effects of the alkali treatment are noticeable. 3. On the acid side of the isoelectric point amphoteric electrolytes can only combine with the anions of neutral salts, on the less acid side of their isoelectric point only with cations; and at the isoelectric point neither with the anion nor cation of a neutral salt. This harmonizes with the statement made in the first paragraph, and the experimental results on the effect of neutral salts on gelatin published in the writer's previous papers. 4. The reason for this influence of the hydrogen ion concentration on the stability of the two forms of ionization possible for an amphoteric electrolyte is at present unknown. We might think of the possibility of changes in the configuration or constitution of the gelatin molecule whereby ionized gelatin can exist only as an anion on the alkaline side and as a cation on the acid side of its isoelectric point. 5. The

  18. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for three of the aryl radicals with isopropanol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of several different hydrogen-atom donors with a few selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X – H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of twenty-nine different aryl radicals and eighteen different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state as the energy difference between the neutral and ionic reactants decreases. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be “tuned” by structural changes that influence either

  19. Sputtering Threshold Energies of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter erosion in ion thrusters has been measured in lifetests at discharge voltages as low as 25 V. Thruster operation at this discharge voltage results in component erosion rates sufficiently low to satisfy most mission requirements. It has been recognized that most of the internal sputtering in ion thrusters is done by doubly charged ions. Knowledge of the sputtering threshold voltage of a xenon molybdenum system would be beneficial in understanding the sputtering process as well as making more accurate calculations of the sputtering rates of ion thruster components. Sputtering threshold energies calculated from various formulations found in the literature results in values ranging from 28 to 200 eV. It is evident that some of these formulations cannot be relied upon to provide sputtering thresholds with any degree of accuracy. This paper re-examines the threshold energies measurements made in the early sixties by Askerov and Sena, and Stuart and Wehner. The threshold voltages as derived by Askerov and au have been reevaluated by using a different extrapolation method of sputter yields at low ion energies. The resulting threshold energies are in general similar to those measured by Stuart and Wehner. An empirical relationship is derived,for mercury and xenon ions for the ratio of the sputtering threshold energy to the sublimation energy as a function of the ratio of target to ion atomic mass.

  20. The NASA Hydrogen Energy Systems Technology study - A summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laumann, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    This study is concerned with: hydrogen use, alternatives and comparisons, hydrogen production, factors affecting application, and technology requirements. Two scenarios for future use are explained. One is called the reference hydrogen use scenario and assumes continued historic uses of hydrogen along with additional use for coal gasification and liquefaction, consistent with the Ford technical fix baseline (1974) projection. The expanded scenario relies on the nuclear electric economy (1973) energy projection and assumes the addition of limited new uses such as experimental hydrogen-fueled aircraft, some mixing with natural gas, and energy storage by utilities. Current uses and supply of hydrogen are described, and the technological requirements for developing new methods of hydrogen production are discussed.

  1. The production of He-3 and heavy ion enrichment in He-3-rich flares by electromagnetic hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temerin, M.; Roth, I.

    1992-01-01

    A new model is presented for the production of He-3 and heavy ion enrichments in He-3-rich flares using a direct single-stage mechanism. In analogy with the production of electromagnetic hydrogen cyclotron waves in earth's aurora by electron beams, it is suggested that such waves should exist in the electron acceleration region of impulsive solar flares. Both analytic and test-particle models of the effect of such waves in a nonuniform magnetic field show that these waves can selectively accelerate He-3 and heavy ions to MeV energies in a single-stage process, in contrast to other models which require a two-stage mechanism.

  2. Thermochemical water decomposition. [hydrogen separation for energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    At present, nearly all of the hydrogen consumed in the world is produced by reacting hydrocarbons with water. As the supply of hydrocarbons diminishes, the problem of producing hydrogen from water alone will become increasingly important. Furthermore, producing hydrogen from water is a means of energy conversion by which thermal energy from a primary source, such as solar or nuclear fusion of fission, can be changed into an easily transportable and ecologically acceptable fuel. The attraction of thermochemical processes is that they offer the potential for converting thermal energy to hydrogen more efficiently than by water electrolysis. A thermochemical hydrogen-production process is one which requires only water as material input and mainly thermal energy, or heat, as an energy input. Attention is given to a definition of process thermal efficiency, the thermodynamics of the overall process, the single-stage process, the two-stage process, multistage processes, the work of separation and a process evaluation.

  3. Energy loss of hydrogen projectiles in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefermueller, A.; Golser, R.; Stohl, R.; Semrad, D. )

    1993-12-01

    The stopping cross sections of H[sub 2], D[sub 2], He, and Ne for hydrogen projectiles in the energy range 3--20 keV per nucleon have been measured by time of flight. We compare our experimental result to the sum of the individual contributions due to excitation and ionization of the target and of the projectile, respectively, and due to charge exchange, using published cross-section data. Satisfactory agreement is found only for the He target and only at moderate projectile velocities, whereas for H[sub 2] and D[sub 2] the calculated values are about 30% too low. A Monte Carlo program allows us to simulate the measured time-of-flight spectra and to explain minor trends in the experimental data: for increased Ne gas pressure, an increased specific energy loss has been found that can be traced to different regions of impact parameters selected in our transmission geometry. This also explains, in part, the increased specific energy loss for deuterons compared to protons of equal velocity that is most evident for Ne. In contrast, a decrease of the specific energy loss with increasing pressure for He may be explained by impurities in the target gas. If we correct for the effect of impurities, the stopping cross section of He at 4 keV per nucleon is slightly smaller (0.60[times]10[sup [minus]15] eV cm[sup 2]) than published earlier (0.72[times]10[sup [minus]15] eV cm[sup 2]) and depends on the 3.8th power of projectile velocity.

  4. Method and system for producing hydrogen using sodium ion separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Frost, Lyman

    2013-05-21

    A method of producing hydrogen from sodium hydroxide and water is disclosed. The method comprises separating sodium from a first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream in a sodium ion separator, feeding the sodium produced in the sodium ion separator to a sodium reactor, reacting the sodium in the sodium reactor with water, and producing a second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream and hydrogen. The method may also comprise reusing the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream by combining the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream with the first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream. A system of producing hydrogen is also disclosed.

  5. Hydrogen energy progress; Proceedings of the Third World Hydrogen Energy Conference, Tokyo, Japan, June 23-26, 1980. Volumes 1, 2, 3 & 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.; Fueki, K.; Ohta, T.

    Papers are presented in the areas of electrolytic hydrogen production, thermochemical and hybrid hydrogen production, innovative hydrogen production, hydrogen storage and transmission, vehicles and hydrogen combustion, chemical and metallurgical usage of hydrogen, overall systems, environmental and materials aspects of hydrogen energy, and industrial aspects of hydrogen energy. Specific topics include advanced alkaline water electrolysis plants, polyethylene-based solid polymer electrolytes, the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and char production by flash coal carbonization, photoassisted water electrolysis by Si electrodes, hydrogen production by a thermophilic blue-green alga, the hydrogen storage properties of Fe(1-x)Nb(x)Ti alloys, and hydrogen-fueled compression-ignition engines. Attention is also given to ammonia as an energy vector for the hydrogen economy, a solar hydrogen energy system for an isolated island, a photovoltaic electrolysis system, and the economics of synthetic fuel and chemical production from nuclear power and coal.

  6. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD that predict H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations. PMID:23277576

  7. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Shengbai

    2013-01-15

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD which predicts H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations.

  8. Measurements of low energy auroral ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, A.

    1981-12-01

    Ion measurements in the energy range 0.1-30 keV observed during the 'Substorm Phenomena' and 'Porcupine' campaigns are summarized. Acceleration of the ions by an electrostatic field aligned parallel to the magnetic field is identified and found to be accompanied by intense electron precipitation. On the other hand, deceleration of the ions is observed in other field-aligned current sheets which are indicated by the electron and magnetic field measurements. Temporal successive monoenergetic ion variations suggest energy dispersion and a location of the source region at 9 earth radii. What is more, ion fluxes higher than those of the electrons are measured at pitch angles parallel to the magnetic field. It is noted that each of the examples was observed during different flights.

  9. Utilization of solar energy for the production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeb, H.; Kleinkauf, W.; Mehrmann, A.

    1983-09-01

    The combination of photovoltaic solar generators and electrolyzers for hydrogen production was investigated. Two different small solar-hydrogen systems are described. The coupling of photovoltaics and electrolysis; the mode of operation of a unit for power processing; and practical operation experiences are discussed. The proposed active electronic adaptation unit can improve photovoltaic electrolyse systems. Solar energy can be converted into the energy carrier hydrogen with a total yearly average efficiency of 16%. This corresponds to 23 Ncum hydrogen per sqm active solar cell surface for a yearly radiation of 1000 kWh/sqm.

  10. Negative-ion production on carbon materials in hydrogen plasma: influence of the carbon hybridization state and the hydrogen content on H- yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Pardanaud, Cédric; Carrère, Marcel; Layet, Jean-Marc; Gicquel, Alix; Kumar, Pravin; Eon, David; Jaoul, Cédric; Engeln, Richard; Cartry, Gilles

    2014-02-01

    Highly oriented polycrystalline graphite (HOPG), boron-doped diamond (BDD), nanocrystalline diamond, ultra-nanocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon surfaces are exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma in a 13.56 MHz plasma reactor. Relative yields of surface-produced H- ions due to bombardment of positive ions from the plasma are measured by an energy analyser cum quadrupole mass spectrometer. Irrespective of plasma conditions (0.2 and 2 Pa), HOPG surfaces show the highest yield at room temperature (RT), while at high temperature (HT), the highest yield (˜3-5 times compared to HOPG surface at RT) is observed on BDD surfaces. The shapes of ion distribution functions are compared at RT and HT to demonstrate the mechanism of ion generation at the surface. Raman spectroscopy analyses of the plasma-exposed samples reveal surface modifications influencing H- production yields, while further analyses strongly suggest that the hydrogen content of the material and the sp3/sp2 ratio are the key parameters in driving the surface ionization efficiency of carbon materials under the chosen plasma conditions.

  11. Dissociation and ionization in capture of antiprotons by the hydrogen molecular ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, James S.

    2005-05-01

    Antiprotonic atoms and anti-hydrogen are hot areas of current experimental research. Cross sections for antiproton capture will soon be measured directly for the first time by the ASACUSA collaboration at the CERN antiproton decelerator and trap. In the present work [1], cross sections and initial quantum number distributions are calculated for capture of the antiproton (p) and the negative muon (^-) by the hydrogen molecular ion H2^+ using the fermion molecular dynamics (FMD) method. The capture of p is found to be almost entirely adiabatic, occurring via target dissociation without ionization, but nonadiabatic effects are found to play a significant role in the capture of ^-, especially at the higher capture energies. Generally good agreement is obtained with the recent adiabatic classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC-a) calculation of Sakimoto [2]. The capture properties of H2^+ are shown to be completely different from those previously calculated for both the H atom and neutral H2 molecule. Proposed experiments [3] on p capture by H, H2 and H2^+, at the same relative collision energies, will provide a major test of our theoretical understanding [4].[1] J.S. Cohen, J. Phys. B (to be published).[2] K. Sakimoto, J. Phys. B 37, 2255 (2004).[3] Y. Yamazaki et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 154, 174 (1999); 214, 196 (2004); Hyperfine Interact. 138, 141 (2001).[4] J.S. Cohen, Rep. Prog. Phys. 67, 1769 (2004).

  12. Liquid-liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Morales, Miguel A.; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25-30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization.

  13. Liquid-liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Morales, Miguel A; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25-30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization. PMID:27099295

  14. Liquid–liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron–ion Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron–ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25–30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization. PMID:27099295

  15. Distorted wave collision strengths for n-n(prime) transitions in hydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E. H.

    1990-05-01

    Distorted wave collision strengths have been calculated for n-n(prime) transitions in hydrogenic ions with n-n(prime) of 3-4, 3-5, 5-6, 5-7, 7-8, and 7-9. Nuclear charge numbers Z were 3, 10, and 26. For each transition at each Z, the energies, in threshold units, were 1.01, 1.2, 1.5, 1.9, 2.5, 4.0, 6.0, 10.0 and 15.0. These collision strengths should be useful in testing various semiempirical formulas for electron impact excitation collision strengths needed in plasma modeling codes. Comparison is made with two such formulas.

  16. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-14

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  17. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-01

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  19. A hydrogen energy carrier. Volume 2: Systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, R. L. (Editor); Blank, L. (Editor); Cady, T. (Editor); Cox, K. (Editor); Murray, R. (Editor); Williams, R. D. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A systems analysis of hydrogen as an energy carrier in the United States indicated that it is feasible to use hydrogen in all energy use areas, except some types of transportation. These use areas are industrial, residential and commercial, and electric power generation. Saturation concept and conservation concept forecasts of future total energy demands were made. Projected costs of producing hydrogen from coal or from nuclear heat combined with thermochemical decomposition of water are in the range $1.00 to $1.50 per million Btu of hydrogen produced. Other methods are estimated to be more costly. The use of hydrogen as a fuel will require the development of large-scale transmission and storage systems. A pipeline system similar to the existing natural gas pipeline system appears practical, if design factors are included to avoid hydrogen environment embrittlement of pipeline metals. Conclusions from the examination of the safety, legal, environmental, economic, political and societal aspects of hydrogen fuel are that a hydrogen energy carrier system would be compatible with American values and the existing energy system.

  20. The potential impact of hydrogen energy use on the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.

    2009-04-01

    Energy models show very different trajectories for future energy systems (partly as function of future climate policy). One possible option is a transition towards a hydrogen-based energy system. The potential impact of such hydrogen economy on atmospheric emissions is highly uncertain. On the one hand, application of hydrogen in clean fuel cells reduces emissions of local air pollutants, like SOx and NOx. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen from system leakages are expected to change the atmospheric concentrations and behaviour (see also Price et al., 2007; Sanderson et al., 2003; Schultz et al., 2003; Tromp et al., 2003). The uncertainty arises from several sources: the expected use of hydrogen, the intensity of leakages and emissions, and the atmospheric chemical behaviour of hydrogen. Existing studies to the potential impacts of a hydrogen economy on the atmosphere mostly use hydrogen emission scenarios that are based on simple assumptions. This research combines two different modelling efforts to explore the range of impacts of hydrogen on atmospheric chemistry. First, the potential role of hydrogen in the global energy system and the related emissions of hydrogen and other air pollutants are derived from the global energy system simulation model TIMER (van Vuuren, 2007). A set of dedicated scenarios on hydrogen technology development explores the most pessimistic and optimistic cases for hydrogen deployment (van Ruijven et al., 2008; van Ruijven et al., 2007). These scenarios are combined with different assumptions on hydrogen emission factors. Second, the emissions from the TIMER model are linked to the NCAR atmospheric model (Lamarque et al., 2005; Lamarque et al., 2008), in order to determine the impacts on atmospheric chemistry. By combining an energy system model and an atmospheric model, we are able to consistently explore the boundaries of both hydrogen use, emissions and impacts on atmospheric chemistry. References: Lamarque, J.-F., Kiehl, J. T

  1. Depopulation of metastable helium by radiative association with hydrogen and lithium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Augustovičová, L.; Soldán, P.; Kraemer, W. P.

    2014-02-10

    Depopulation of metastable He(2{sup 3}S) by radiative association with hydrogen and lithium ions is investigated using a fully quantal approach. Rate coefficients for spontaneous and stimulated radiative association of the HeH{sup +}, HeD{sup +}, and LiHe{sup +} molecular ions on the spin-triplet manifold are presented as functions of temperature considering the association to rotational-vibrational states of the lowest triplet electronic states a {sup 3}Σ{sup +} and b {sup 3}Σ{sup +} from the continuum states of the b {sup 3}Σ{sup +} electronic state. Evaluation of the rate coefficients is based on highly accurate quantum calculations, taking into account all possible state-to-state transitions at thermal energies (for spontaneous association) or at higher background energies (stimulated association). As expected, calculations show that the rate coefficients for radiative association to the a state are several orders of magnitude larger than the one for the b state formation. A noticeable effect by blackbody background radiation on the radiative association is only obtained for the b → b process. Aspects of the formation and abundance of the metastable HeH{sup +}(a {sup 3}Σ{sup +}) in astrophysical environments are briefly discussed.

  2. Electron capture by Ne{sup 4+} ions from atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Rejoub, R.; Vane, C.R.; Krause, H.F.; Savin, D.W.; Schnell, M.; Wang, J.G.; Stancil, P.C.

    2005-03-01

    Using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ion-atom merged-beams apparatus, the absolute total electron-capture cross section has been measured for collisions of Ne{sup 4+} with hydrogen and deuterium at relative energies in the center-of-mass frame between 0.10 and 1006 eV/u. Comparison with previous measurements shows large discrepancies between 80 and 600 eV/u. For energies below {approx}1 eV/u, a sharply increasing cross section is attributed to the ion-induced dipole attraction between the reactants. Multichannel Landau-Zener calculations are performed between 0.01 and 5000 eV/u and compare well to the measured total cross sections. Below {approx}5 eV/u, the present total cross section calculations show a significant target isotope effect. At 0.01 eV/u, the H:D total cross section ratio is predicted to be {approx}1.4 where capture is dominated by transitions into the Ne{sup 3+} (2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2}3d) configuration.

  3. Simulation of cesium injection and distribution in rf-driven ion sources for negative hydrogen ion generation

    SciTech Connect

    Gutser, R.; Wuenderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2010-02-15

    Cesium seeded sources for surface generated negative hydrogen ions are major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER. Stability and delivered current density depend highly on the cesium conditions during plasma-on and plasma-off phases of the ion source. The Monte Carlo code CSFLOW3D was used to study the transport of neutral and ionic cesium in both phases. Homogeneous and intense flows were obtained from two cesium sources in the expansion region of the ion source and from a dispenser array, which is located 10 cm in front of the converter surface.

  4. OTEC to hydrogen fuel cells - A solar energy breakthrough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roney, J. R.

    Recent advances in fuel cell technology and development are discussed, which will enhance the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)-hydrogen-fuel cell mode of energy utilization. Hydrogen obtained from the ocean solar thermal resources can either be liquified or converted to ammonia, thus providing a convenient mode of transport, similar to that of liquid petroleum. The hydrogen fuel cell can convert hydrogen to electric power at a wide range of scale, feeding either centralized or distributed systems. Although this system of hydrogen energy production and delivery has been examined with respect to the U.S.A., the international market, and especially developing countries, may represent the greatest opportunity for these future generating units.

  5. Modulating memristive performance of hexagonal WO3 nanowire by water-oxidized hydrogen ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Chang; Ling, Jing; Lei, Le; Zhou, Weichang; Tang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    In a two-terminal Au/hexagonal WO3 nanowire/Au device, ions drifting or carriers self-trapping under external electrical field will modulate the Schottky barriers between the nanowire and electrodes, and then result in memristive effect. When there are water molecules adsorbed on the surface of WO3 nanowire, hydrogen ions will generate near the positively-charged electrode and transport in the condensed water film, which will enhance the memristive performance characterized by analogic resistive switching remarkably. When the bias voltage is swept repeatedly under high relative humidity level, hydrogen ions will accumulate on the surface and then implant into the lattice of the WO3 nanowire, which leads to a transition from semiconducting WO3 nanowire to metallic HxWO3 nanowire. This insulator-metal transition can be realized more easily after enough electron-hole pairs being excited by laser illumination. The concentration of hydrogen ions in HxWO3 nanowire will decrease when the device is exposed to oxygen atmosphere or the bias voltage is swept in atmosphere with low relative humidity. By modulating the concentration of hydrogen ions, conductive hydrogen tungsten bronze filament might form or rupture near electrodes when the polarity of applied voltage changes, which will endow the device with memristive performance characterized by digital resistive switching. PMID:27600368

  6. Modulating memristive performance of hexagonal WO3 nanowire by water-oxidized hydrogen ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Chang; Ling, Jing; Lei, Le; Zhou, Weichang; Tang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    In a two-terminal Au/hexagonal WO3 nanowire/Au device, ions drifting or carriers self-trapping under external electrical field will modulate the Schottky barriers between the nanowire and electrodes, and then result in memristive effect. When there are water molecules adsorbed on the surface of WO3 nanowire, hydrogen ions will generate near the positively-charged electrode and transport in the condensed water film, which will enhance the memristive performance characterized by analogic resistive switching remarkably. When the bias voltage is swept repeatedly under high relative humidity level, hydrogen ions will accumulate on the surface and then implant into the lattice of the WO3 nanowire, which leads to a transition from semiconducting WO3 nanowire to metallic HxWO3 nanowire. This insulator-metal transition can be realized more easily after enough electron-hole pairs being excited by laser illumination. The concentration of hydrogen ions in HxWO3 nanowire will decrease when the device is exposed to oxygen atmosphere or the bias voltage is swept in atmosphere with low relative humidity. By modulating the concentration of hydrogen ions, conductive hydrogen tungsten bronze filament might form or rupture near electrodes when the polarity of applied voltage changes, which will endow the device with memristive performance characterized by digital resistive switching. PMID:27600368

  7. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, Andreas; Gupta, Prasanth; Mohr, Berit; Hübner, René; Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert; Becker, Hans-Werner

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction 1H(15N, αγ)12C (Eres = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0-10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp2 hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  8. Low energy ion loss at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, S.; Liemohn, M.; Fang, X.; Ma, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Current data observations and modeling efforts have indicated that the low-energy pick-up ions on Mars significantly contribute to the overall escape rate. Due to the lack of a dipole magnetic field, the solar wind directly interacts with the dayside upper atmosphere causing particles to be stripped away. In this study, we use a 3-D Monte Carlo test particle simulation with virtual detectors to observe low energy ions (< 50 eV) in the Mars space environment. We will present velocity space distributions that can capture the asymmetric and non-gyrotropic features of particle motion. The effect of different solar conditions will also be discussed with respect to ion fluxes at various spatial locations as well as overall loss in order to robustly describe the physical processes controlling the distribution of planetary ions and atmospheric escape.

  9. Hydrogen: Its Future Role in the Nation's Energy Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsche, W. E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Advocates the development of a hydrogen fuel economy as an alternative to the predominately electric economy based upon nuclear plants and depleting fossil fuel supplies. Evaluates the economic and environmental benefits of hydrogen energy delivery systems in the residential and transportation sectors. (JR)

  10. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1987-01-01

    A process for selectively neutralizing H.sup.- ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H.sup.- ions that are intersected by a beam of laser light. Photodetachment is effected in a uniform magnetic field that is provided around the beam of H.sup.- ions to spin polarize the H.sup.- ions and produce first and second populations or groups of ions, having their respective proton spin aligned either with the magnetic field or opposite to it. The intersecting beam of laser light is directed to selectively neutralize a majority of the ions in only one population, or given spin polarized group of H.sup.- ions, without neutralizing the ions in the other group thereby forming a population of H.sup.- ions each of which has its proton spin down, and a second group or population of H.sup.o atoms having proton spin up. Finally, the two groups of ions are separated from each other by magnetically bending the group of H.sup.- ions away from the group of neutralized ions, thereby to form an intense H.sup.- ion beam that is directed toward a predetermined objective.

  11. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak HBT'' (High Beta Tokamak)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Hua.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (n{sub e} {approx} 1 {minus} 5 {times} 10{sup 14} (cm{sup {minus}3}), T{sub e} {approx} 4 {minus} 10 (eV), B{sub t} {approx} 0.2 {minus} 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of C{sub II}(4267A, emitted by the C{sup +} ions) and C{sub III} (4647A, emitted by the C{sup ++} ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the H{sub {alpha}} emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time {tau}{sub p} is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time {tau}{sub E}; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy.

  12. Development of cesium-free negative hydrogen ion source by using sheet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Takuya; Iijima, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yuta; Takimoto, Tosikio; Tonegawa, Akira; Sato, Kohnosuke; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrated the production of hydrogen negative ions in cesium-free discharge by using the magnetized sheet plasma. Plasma crossed with a vertical gas flow system and extracting H- beams from the sheet plasma. Under a secondary hydrogen gas entering the hydrogen plasma, the peak position of the hydrogen plasma is localized in the periphery of the sheet plasma. The maximum negative ion beam is successfully extracted using grids located in the periphery of the sheet plasma. The extraction current density is about 8 mA/cm2 at extraction voltage is 2 kV and discharge current of 30 A. The extraction negative ion current density is saturated at the extraction voltage is 2 kV for the limit of the negative ion density in the periphery region of the sheet plasma. On the other hand, the extraction current is saturated (3 mA/cm2) with increasing extraction voltage and the negative ions are not detected without the secondary gas flow (0 sccm). This curve depends on the electrons present. Therefore, it is considered that the negative ion current against the extraction current is around 60% from the ratio of the extraction current and the extraction electron current.

  13. Ab initio molecular treatment for charge transfer by P{sup 3+} ions on hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, A.; Zaidi, A.; Lahmar, S.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.

    2010-02-15

    A theoretical treatment of charge-transfer processes induced by collision of phosphorus P{sup 3+}(3s{sup 2}){sup 1}S ions on atomic hydrogen and helium has been carried out using ab initio potential-energy curves and couplings at the multireference configuration interaction level of theory. The cross sections calculated by means of semiclassical collision methods show the existence of a significant charge transfer in the 0.1-700-keV laboratory energy range. Radial and rotational coupling interactions were analyzed for both collision systems.

  14. Operating modes of a hydrogen ion source based on a hollow-cathode pulsed Penning discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, E. M.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Vizir, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    An ion source based on a hollow-cathode Penning discharge was switched to a high-current pulsed mode (tens of amperes and tens of microseconds) to produce an intense hydrogen ion beam. With molecular hydrogen (H2), the ion beam contained three species: H+, H2+, and H3+. For all experimental conditions, the fraction of H2+ ions in the beam was about 10 ÷ 15% of the total ion beam current and varied little with ion source parameters. At the same time, the ratio of H+ and H3+ depended strongly on the discharge current, particularly on its distribution in the gap between the hollow and planar cathodes. Increasing the discharge current increased the H+ fraction in ion beam. The maximum fraction of H+ reached 80% of the total ion beam current. Forced redistribution of the discharge current in the cathode gap for increasing the hollow cathode current could greatly increase the H3+ fraction in the beam. At optimum parameters, the fraction of H3+ ions reached 60% of the total ion beam current.

  15. Green Energy: Advancing Bio-Hydrogen (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Alber, D.

    2007-07-01

    Developing a model of metabolism linked to H2 production in green algae. Develop tools for parameter discovery and optimization at organism level and advance knowledge of hydrogen-producting photosynthetic organisms.

  16. Theoretical study of electronic excitation, ion-pair formation, and mutual neutralization in cesium-hydrogen collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Lepetit, Bruno; Gadéa, Florent Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Inelastic cross sections for the excitation, deexcitation, ion-pair formation, and mutual neutralization processes in cesium-hydrogen collisions Cs (6 s ,6 p ,5 d ,7 s )+H and Cs ++H- are calculated by means of the recently proposed branching-probability-current method and the recently calculated accurate ab initio adiabatic potential energies. Scattering calculations are performed in the low-energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 keV. It is shown that among the endothermic processes, the highest values of the partial cross sections correspond to the ion-pair formation processes with the maximum values up to 23 Å2 . Among the exothermic processes in the low-energy range, the largest partial cross section corresponds to the mutual neutralization process into the Cs (5 d )+H final state.

  17. Effects of discharge chamber length on the negative ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Jung, Bong-Ki; An, YoungHwa; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    In a volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source, control of electron temperature is essential due to its close correlation with the generation of highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region as well as the generation of negative hydrogen ions by dissociative attachment in the extraction region. In this study, geometric effects of the cylindrical discharge chamber on negative ion generation via electron temperature changes are investigated in two discharge chambers with different lengths of 7.5 cm and 11 cm. Measurements with a radio-frequency-compensated Langmuir probe show that the electron temperature in the heating region is significantly increased by reducing the length of the discharge chamber due to the reduced effective plasma size. A particle balance model which is modified to consider the effects of discharge chamber configuration on the plasma parameters explains the variation of the electron temperature with the chamber geometry and gas pressure quite well. Accordingly, H{sup −} ion density measurement with laser photo-detachment in the short chamber shows a few times increase compared to the longer one at the same heating power depending on gas pressure. However, the increase drops significantly as operating gas pressure decreases, indicating increased electron temperatures in the extraction region degrade dissociative attachment significantly especially in the low pressure regime. It is concluded that the increase of electron temperature by adjusting the discharge chamber geometry is efficient to increase H{sup −} ion production as long as low electron temperatures are maintained in the extraction region in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  18. Effects of discharge chamber length on the negative ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Jung, Bong-Ki; An, YoungHwa; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Hwang, Y S

    2014-02-01

    In a volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source, control of electron temperature is essential due to its close correlation with the generation of highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region as well as the generation of negative hydrogen ions by dissociative attachment in the extraction region. In this study, geometric effects of the cylindrical discharge chamber on negative ion generation via electron temperature changes are investigated in two discharge chambers with different lengths of 7.5 cm and 11 cm. Measurements with a radio-frequency-compensated Langmuir probe show that the electron temperature in the heating region is significantly increased by reducing the length of the discharge chamber due to the reduced effective plasma size. A particle balance model which is modified to consider the effects of discharge chamber configuration on the plasma parameters explains the variation of the electron temperature with the chamber geometry and gas pressure quite well. Accordingly, H(-) ion density measurement with laser photo-detachment in the short chamber shows a few times increase compared to the longer one at the same heating power depending on gas pressure. However, the increase drops significantly as operating gas pressure decreases, indicating increased electron temperatures in the extraction region degrade dissociative attachment significantly especially in the low pressure regime. It is concluded that the increase of electron temperature by adjusting the discharge chamber geometry is efficient to increase H(-) ion production as long as low electron temperatures are maintained in the extraction region in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources. PMID:24593559

  19. Gadolinium-hydrogen ion exchange of zirconium phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D. C.; Power, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Gd(+3)/H(+) ion exchange on a commercial zirconium phosphate ion exchanger was investigated in chloride, sulfate, and phosphate solutions of Gd(+3) at gadolinium concentrations of 0.001 to 1 millimole per cc and in the pH range of 0 to 3.5. Relatively low Gd(+3) capacities, in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 millimole per g of ion exchanger were found at room temperature. A significant difference in Gd(+3) sorption was observed, depending on whether the ion exchanger was converted from initial conditions of greater or lesser Gd(+3) sorption than the specific final conditions. Correlations were found between decrease in Gd(+3) capacity and loss of exchanger phosphate groups due to hydrolysis during washing and between increase in capacity and treatment with H3PO4. Fitting of the experimental data to ideal ion exchange equilibrium expressions indicated that each Gd(+3) ion is sorbed on only one site of the ion exchanger. The selectivity quotient was determined to be 2.5 + or - 0.4 at room temperature on gadolinium desorption in chloride solutions.

  20. Method and source for producing a high concentration of positively charged molecular hydrogen or deuterium ions

    DOEpatents

    Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1988-01-01

    A high concentration of positive molecular ions of hydrogen or deuterium gas is extracted from a positive ion source having a short path length of extracted ions, relative to the mean free path of the gas molecules, to minimize the production of other ion species by collision between the positive ions and gas molecules. The ion source has arrays of permanent magnets to produce a multi-cusp magnetic field in regions remote from the plasma grid and the electron emitters, for largely confining the plasma to the space therebetween. The ion source has a chamber which is short in length, relative to its transverse dimensions, and the electron emitters are at an even shorter distance from the plasma grid, which contains one or more extraction apertures.

  1. Hydrogen and fuel cells - The clean energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohland, B.; Nitsch, J.; Wendt, H.

    1992-01-01

    A strategy where hydrogen is effectively converted into useful energies like electricity and heat by fuel cells in the cogeneration mode is presented. A scenario is presented where renewable energies are used in an extensive but technologically achievable way. Renewable shares of 13 percent (2005), 36 percent (2025), and 69 percent (2050) on the total energy demand will lead to hydrogen shares of 11 percent in 2025 and 34 percent in 2050. Fuel cells provide high conversion efficiencies with respect to electricity and make it possible to use waste heat at different temperature levels. Low- and medium temperature fuel cells using pure hydrogen and high-temperature fuel cells for a mixed biogas-hydrogen conversion with a high energy yield are discussed.

  2. Optical and thermal energy discharge from tritiated solid hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Magnotta, F.; Mapoles, E.R.; Collins, G.W.; Souers, P.C.

    1991-04-02

    The authors are investigating mechanisms of energy storage and release in tritiated solid hydrogens, by a variety of techniques including ESR, NMR and thermal and optical emission. The nuclear decay of a triton in solid hydrogen initiates the conversion of nuclear energy into stored chemical energy by producing unpaired hydrogen atoms which are trapped within the molecular lattice. The ability to store large quantities of atoms in this manner has been demonstrated and can serve as a basis for new forms of high energy density materials. This paper presents preliminary results of a study of the optical emission from solid hydrogen containing tritium over the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral regions. Specifically, they have studied optical emission from DT and T{sub 2} using CCD, silicon diode and germanium diode arrays. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Systems Integration and the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper discusses how the Systems Integration Office assists the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program by using an integrated baseline approach to identify, define, and analyze requirements and tasks to achieve program goals.

  4. Hydrogen energy: A bibliography with abstracts. Cumulative volume, 1953 - 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    A bibliography on hydrogen as an energy source is presented. Approximately 8,000 documents are abstracted covering the period 1953 through 1973. Topics covered include: production, utilization, transmission, distribution, storage, and safety.

  5. A manual of recommended practices for hydrogen energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, W.; Leach, S.

    1997-12-31

    Technologies for the production, distribution, and use of hydrogen are rapidly maturing and the number and size of demonstration programs designed to showcase emerging hydrogen energy systems is expanding. The success of these programs is key to hydrogen commercialization. Currently there is no comprehensive set of widely-accepted codes or standards covering the installation and operation of hydrogen energy systems. This lack of codes or standards is a major obstacle to future hydrogen demonstrations in obtaining the requisite licenses, permits, insurance, and public acceptance. In a project begun in late 1996 to address this problem, W. Hoagland and Associates has been developing a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Systems intended to serve as an interim document for the design and operation of hydrogen demonstration projects. It will also serve as a starting point for some of the needed standard-setting processes. The Manual will include design guidelines for hydrogen procedures, case studies of experience at existing hydrogen demonstration projects, a bibliography of information sources, and a compilation of suppliers of hydrogen equipment and hardware. Following extensive professional review, final publication will occur later in 1997. The primary goal is to develop a draft document in the shortest possible time frame. To accomplish this, the input and guidance of technology developers, industrial organizations, government R and D and regulatory organizations and others will be sought to define the organization and content of the draft Manual, gather and evaluate available information, develop a draft document, coordinate reviews and revisions, and develop recommendations for publication, distribution, and update of the final document. The workshop, Development of a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Energy Systems, conducted on March 11, 1997 in Alexandria, Virginia, was a first step.

  6. Electron collisional detachment processes for a 250 keV D/sup -/ ion beam in a partially ionized hydrogen target

    SciTech Connect

    Savas, S.E.

    1980-09-01

    Neutral atom beams with energies above 200 keV may be required for various purposes in magnetic fusion devices following TFTR, JET and MFTF-B. These beams can be produced much more efficiently by electron detachment from negative ion beams than by electron capture by positive ions. We have investigated the efficiency with which such neutral atoms can be produced by electron detachment in partially ionized hydrogen plasma neutralizers.

  7. Using Hydrogen Balloons to Display Metal Ion Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, James H.

    2008-01-01

    We have optimized a procedure for igniting hydrogen-filled balloons containing metal salts to obtain the brightest possible flash while minimizing the quantity of airborne combustion products. We report air quality measurements in a lecture hall immediately after the demonstration. While we recommend that this demonstration be done outdoors or in…

  8. Absolute differential and total cross sections for neutral fragments from dissociative collisions of triatomic hydrogen like ions on He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, F. B.; Fuentes, B. E.; Martínez, H.

    2010-12-01

    Neutral fragment products from dissociative collisions of triatomic hydrogen like ions incident on He atoms were studied. Absolute differential and total cross sections are reported here in the energy range of 1.00-5.00 keV and scattering angles between -5.0° and 5.0°. The differential cross sections show decreasing behaviour with a slight structure around 2.0°. The total cross sections for all triatomic molecular ions studied in this work are found to be comparable for the same velocity (E/M). The measured cross sections are between 0.7 × 10-17 cm2 and 0.9 × 10-16 cm2. The present results for the neutral total cross section correlate very well with previously measured total ions cross section for H+3, D+3 and HD+2 on He.

  9. Spectroscopically Accurate Calculations of the Rovibrational Energies of Diatomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Jason

    2005-05-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation has been used to calculate the rotational and vibrational states of diatomic hydrogen. Because it is an approximation, our group now wants to use a Born-Oppenheimer potential to calculate the electronic energy that has been corrected to match closely with spectroscopic results. We are using a code that has corrections for adiabatic, relativistic, radiative, and non-adiabatic effects. The rovibrational energies have now been calculated for both bound and quasi-bound states. We also want to compute quadrupole transition probabilities for diatomic hydrogen. These calculations aspire to investigate diatomic hydrogen in astrophysical environments.

  10. Hydrogen: Its Future Role in the Nation's Energy Economy.

    PubMed

    Winsche, W E; Hoffman, K C; Salzano, F J

    1973-06-29

    In examining the potential role of hydrogen in the energy economy of the future, we take an optimistic view. All the technology required for implementation is feasible but a great deal of development and refinement is necessary. A pessimistic approach would obviously discourage further thinking about an important and perhaps the most reasonable alternative for the future. We have considered a limited number of alternative energy systems involving hydrogen and have shown that hydrogen could be a viable secondary source of energy derived from nuclear power; for the immediate future, hydrogen could be derived from coal. A hydrogen supply system could have greater flexibility and be competitive with a more conventional all-electric delivery system. Technological improvements could make hydrogen as an energy source an economic reality. The systems examined in this article show how hydrogen can serve as a general-purpose fuel for residential and automotive applications. Aside from being a source of heat and motive power, hydrogen could also supply the electrical needs of the household via fuel cells (19), turbines, or conventional "total energy systems." The total cost of energy to a residence supplied with hydrogen fuel depends on the ratio of the requirements for direct fuel use to the requirements for electrical use. A greater direct use of hydrogen as a fuel without conversion to electricity reduces the overall cost of energy supplied to the household because of the greater expense of electrical transmission and distribution. Hydrogen fuel is especially attractive for use in domestic residential applications where the bulk of the energy requirement is for thermal energy. Although a considerable amount of research is required before any hydrogen energy delivery system can be implemented, the necessary developments are within the capability of present-day technology and the system could be made attractive economically .Techniques for producing hydrogen from water by

  11. VUV Absorption Spectroscopy of a Penning Surface - Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, Eric John

    The demand for energetic, high-current H ^- beams is ever-growing. Because H ^- is efficiently neutralized at high energies, these beams are ideally suited to applications where energetic neutral beams of particles are required to propagate across magnetic fields. Prime examples are neutral-beam heating of magnetic fusion plasmas and directed-energy weapons for ballistic missile defense. Such applications place demanding requirements on sources of H^ - ions, particularly with respect to the parameters of beam current, brightness, quiescence, reliability, and duty-factor. A class of sources that holds great promise for meeting these stringent requirements is the surface-plasma source (SPS), and in particular, the Penning type of SPS. It has long been conjectured that atomic hydrogen plays an important role in both H^- formation and transport in these sources. Understanding the interdependence of atomic hydrogen properties and those of H^ -, and how this relationship might be exploited to improve source performance is the motivation for this research. An overview of SPS's is presented. Previous measurements on the discharge are reviewed. Absorption spectroscopy, the diagnostic technique used to gather all of the data presented here, is discussed. Techniques that may potentially be used to measure the properties of H^ - in the discharge are discussed. The two absorption spectrometers used in this experiment are described. Measurements of ground-state atomic hydrogen density and temperature in a Penning SPS are presented. These measurements are the first of this kind for this type of discharge. An upper limit on the H^- density in the extraction region of the source is measured by the application of a novel diagnostic technique: the hydrogen atom density following H^- photodetachment by a Nd:YAG beam is measured and compared to the equilibrium atomic density. A simple model is derived that describes the dependence of the atomic temperature on the externally

  12. Rates of complex formation in collisions of rotationally excited homonuclear diatoms with ions at very low temperatures: Application to hydrogen isotopes and hydrogen-containing ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashevskaya, E.I.; Litvin, I.; Nikitin, E.E.; Troe, J.

    2005-05-08

    State-selected rate coefficients for the capture of ground and rotationally excited homonuclear molecules by ions are calculated, for low temperatures, within the adiabatic channel classical (ACCl) approximation, and, for zero temperature, via an approximate calculation of the Bethe limit. In the intermediate temperature range, the accurate quantal rate coefficients are calculated for j=0 and j=1 states of hydrogen isotopes (H{sub 2}, HD, and D{sub 2}) colliding with hydrogen-containing ions, and simple analytical expressions are suggested to approximate the rate coefficients. For the ground rotational state of diatoms, the accurate quantal rate coefficients are higher compared to their ACCl counterparts, while for the first excited rotational state the reverse is true. The physical significance of quantum effects for low-temperature capture and the applicability of the statistical description of capture are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the role of Coriolis interaction. The relevance of the present capture calculations for rates of ortho-para conversion of H{sub 2} in collisions with hydrogen-containing ions at low temperatures is discussed.

  13. A time-of-flight spectrometer for detection of low-energy hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Toledo, W.; de Bree, A. R.; van Buuren, R.; de Kluiver, H.; Donné, A. J. H.

    1990-01-01

    This article deals with an application of the technique of converting hydrogen atoms into negative ions on a low-work-function surface, which is similar to the method nowadays utilized in H- surface sources. This conversion technique is the basis for a time-of-flight spectrometer, for which a proof of principle has recently been established. The conversion takes place on a tungsten (110) crystal target that is covered with cesium. By mounting this target in the detector part of the spectrometer, this apparatus is made sensitive to hydrogen atoms that have energy in the range 10-1000 eV. This feature makes the spectrometer a very powerful and unique tool for detection of low-energy hydrogen atoms. It is, for instance, capable of detecting low-energy hydrogen atoms that are emitted from the edge of a tokamak plasma, and therefore it can yield information on the hydrogen recycling inside the tokamak and hence on the energy balance of the plasma. In the paper we discuss the principle of the detection method, along with a presentation of some time-of-flight spectra that have been obtained from a tokamak plasma.

  14. Slow positron beam study of hydrogen ion implanted ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Xue, Xudong; Wu, Yichu

    2014-08-01

    The effects of hydrogen related defect on the microstructure and optical property of ZnO thin films were investigated by slow positron beam, in combination with x-ray diffraction, infrared and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The defects were introduced by 90 keV proton irradiation with doses of 1×1015 and 1×1016 ions cm-2. Zn vacancy and OH bonding (VZn+OH) defect complex were identified in hydrogen implanted ZnO film by positron annihilation and infrared spectroscopy. The formation of these complexes led to lattice disorder in hydrogen implanted ZnO film and suppressed the luminescence process.

  15. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  16. Studies of negative ions by collision-induced decomposition and hydrogen-deuterium exchange techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, D F; Sethi, S K; Shabanowitz, J

    1980-01-01

    Development of two new techniques for studying the gas phase chemistry of negative ions is reported. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of (M-1)- ions has been accomplished in a newly constructed triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometer. This instrument was assembled by adding two additional Finnigan quadrupole mass filters to a Finnigan Model 3200 CI mass spectrometer. Generation of (M-1)- ions is accomplished by allowing OH- and sample to react under CI conditions in the ion source. The first quadrupole mass filter, Q1, is then employed to selectively pass the (M-1)- ion into a second quadrupole filter containing argon or neon at 10(-3) torr. On collision with the inert gas the (M-1)- ions dissociate into fragments which are then mass analyzed in the third quadrupole filter, CID spectra of (M-1)- ions from twelve carbonyl compounds are presented in this paper. Ion molecule isotope exchange reactions in the CI ion source can be used to count the number of hydrogen atoms in many different chemical environments. Collisions between sample (M-1)- ions and deuterium-labeled reagent gases (ND3, D2O, EtOD) facilitate incorporation of deuterium into the negative ion if the basicities of the sample and reagent anions are similar. Thus it is possible to selectively incorporate deuterium into many organic samples by controlling the exothermicity of the acid base, ion-molecule chemistry. PMID:7428745

  17. Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee annual report: Summary of DOE hydrogen programs for FY 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee (HECC) was established over 14 years ago to ensure that the many varied aspects of hydrogen technology research and development within the Department are coordinated. Each year the committee brings together technical representatives within the Department to coordinate activities, share research results and discuss future priorities and directions. An annual report is published summarizing the work in progress. This summary is the fourteenth consecutive report. It provides an overview of the hydrogen-related programs of the DOE offices represented in the HECC.

  18. Roles of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.; McAdams, R.

    2015-04-01

    The plasma grid is electrically biased with respect to other parts of source chamber wall in both volume sources and sources seeded with alkali metals. The roles of the plasma grid in these two kinds of sources will be described. The main functions of the plasma grid in volume sources are: optimizing the extracted negative ion current, reducing the co-extracted electron current, controlling the axial plasma potential profile, recycling the hydrogen atoms to molecules, concentrating the negative ions near its surface and, when biased positive, depleting the electron population near its surface. These functions are maintained in the sources seeded with alkali metals. However an additional function appears in the Cs seeded sources, namely direct emission of negative ions under positive ion and neutral hydrogen bombardment.

  19. Roles of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.; McAdams, R.

    2015-04-08

    The plasma grid is electrically biased with respect to other parts of source chamber wall in both volume sources and sources seeded with alkali metals. The roles of the plasma grid in these two kinds of sources will be described. The main functions of the plasma grid in volume sources are: optimizing the extracted negative ion current, reducing the co-extracted electron current, controlling the axial plasma potential profile, recycling the hydrogen atoms to molecules, concentrating the negative ions near its surface and, when biased positive, depleting the electron population near its surface. These functions are maintained in the sources seeded with alkali metals. However an additional function appears in the Cs seeded sources, namely direct emission of negative ions under positive ion and neutral hydrogen bombardment.

  20. Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Zalbowitz, M.

    1997-02-01

    The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.

  1. Resource Assessment for Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production Potential from Fossil and Renewable Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Penev, M.; Heimiller, D.

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the energy resources required to produce 4-10 million metric tonnes of domestic, low-carbon hydrogen in order to fuel approximately 20-50 million fuel cell electric vehicles. These projected energy resource requirements are compared to current consumption levels, projected 2040 business as usual consumptions levels, and projected 2040 consumption levels within a carbonconstrained future for the following energy resources: coal (assuming carbon capture and storage), natural gas, nuclear (uranium), biomass, wind (on- and offshore), and solar (photovoltaics and concentrating solar power). The analysis framework builds upon previous analysis results estimating hydrogen production potentials and drawing comparisons with economy-wide resource production projections

  2. Hydrogen Storage Experiments for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course--Clean Energy: Hydrogen/Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Alla; Andrews, Lisa; Khot, Ameya; Rubin, Lea; Young, Jun; Allston, Thomas D.; Takacs, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    Global interest in both renewable energies and reduction in emission levels has placed increasing attention on hydrogen-based fuel cells that avoid harm to the environment by releasing only water as a byproduct. Therefore, there is a critical need for education and workforce development in clean energy technologies. A new undergraduate laboratory…

  3. Distortion effects in electron excitation of hydrogen atoms by impact of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, C.A.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Electron excitation from the fundamental state of hydrogen atoms by impact of bare ions is studied at intermediate and high collision velocities. Total cross sections for final {ital np} states by impact of protons, alpha particles, and He{sup +} ions are calculated using the symmetric eikonal approximation and compared with experimental data. This comparison supports the existence of distortion effects recently predicted by Bugacov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A {bold 47}, 1052 (1993)]. The validity of scaling laws is analyzed.

  4. Interaction of impurity ions with a weakly non-Maxwellian simple hydrogenic plasma. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, W.K.

    1988-03-01

    The average acceleration of an ensemble of /open quotes/test particles/close quotes/ in a plasma is called the /open quotes/dynamical friction/close quotes/; the average rate at which their velocity vectors spread out in velocity-space diffusion-rate tensor. These quantities are derived for impurity ions intereacting with a weakly non-Maxwellian simple hydrogenic plasma. The distribution functions for the plasma ions and electrons are written explicitly.

  5. Formation of silicon hydride using hyperthermal negative hydrogen ions (H -) extracted from an argon-seeded hydrogen sheet plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Marcedon S.; Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2008-12-01

    An E × B probe (a modified Wien filter) is constructed to function both as a mass spectrometer and ion implanter. The device, given the acronym EXBII selects negative hydrogen ions (H -) from a premixed 10% argon-seeded hydrogen sheet plasma. With a vacuum background of 1.0 × 10 -6 Torr, H - extraction ensues at a total gas feed of 1.8 mTorr, 0.5 A plasma discharge. The EXBII is positioned 3 cm distance from the sheet core as this is the region densely populated by cold electrons ( Te ˜ 2 eV, Ne ˜ 3.4 × 10 11 cm -3) best suited for H - formation. The extracted H - ions of flux density ˜0.26 A/m 2 are segregated, accelerated to hyperthermal range (<100 eV) and subsequently deposited into a palladium-coated 1.1 × 1.1 cm 2, n-type Si (1 0 0) substrate held at the rear end of the EXBII, placed in lieu of its Faraday cup. The palladium membrane plays the role of a catalyst initiating the reaction between Si atoms and H - ions simultaneously capping the sample from oxidation and other undesirable adsorbents. AFM and FTIR characterization tests confirm the formation of SiH 2. Absorbance peaks between 900-970 cm -1 (bending modes) and 2050-2260 cm -1 (stretching modes) are observed in the FTIR spectra of the processed samples. It is found that varying hydrogen exposure time results in the shifting of wavenumbers which may be interpreted as changes in the frequencies of vibration for SiH 2. These are manifestations of chemical changes accompanying alterations in the force constant of the molecule. The sample with longer exposure time exhibits an additional peak at 2036 cm -1 which are hydrides of nano-crystalline silicon.

  6. The trapping of hydrogen ions in vanadium and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Vykhodets, V. B.; Raspopova, G. A.

    1996-10-01

    The accumulation of implanted deuterium has been investigated at room temperature in vanadium, titanium and their alloys up to (2-15) × 10 17 ions cm -2 fluences by means of D(d, p)T reaction. The amount of accumulated D was measured using a 700 KeV D + ion beam during implantation. It is found that concentration of implanted deuterium in irradiated samples nonmonotonously increases the increasing fluence and in a complicated manner depends upon VTi alloy composition. These data are explained by concentration dependence of D diffusion coefficient in VTi alloys, structural ion irradiation induced inhomogeneity of alloys with > 5-8 at.% Ti, and irradiation-enhanced diffusion of deuterium.

  7. Test of the interaction potential energy for Na+-H2 by gaseous ion transport data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Larry A.; Buchachenko, Alexei A.

    2014-09-01

    Transport properties of Na+ ions in gaseous hydrogen are calculated using the recently developed "beyond Monchick-Mason" (BMM) approximation and an ab initio Na+-H2 potential energy surface. Good agreement with the experimental data on the reduced mobility and longitudinal diffusion coefficient proves the accuracy of the surface and the adequacy of the BMM method, allowing for its optimal parameterization.

  8. Unconventional hydrogen bonding to organic ions in the gas phase: Stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and protonated pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; El-Shall, M. Samy; Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G.

    2014-08-01

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes for the stepwise association of HCN molecules with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations forming the C5H5N+.(HCN)n and C4H4N2+.(HCN)n clusters, respectively, with n = 1-4. For comparison, the binding of 1-4 HCN molecules to the protonated pyridine C5H5NH+(HCN)n has also been investigated. The binding energies of HCN to the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations are nearly equal (11.4 and 12.0 kcal/mol, respectively) but weaker than the HCN binding to the protonated pyridine (14.0 kcal/mol). The pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations form unconventional carbon-based ionic hydrogen bonds with HCN (CHδ+⋯NCH). Protonated pyridine forms a stronger ionic hydrogen bond with HCN (NH+⋯NCH) which can be extended to a linear chain with the clustering of additional HCN molecules (NH+⋯NCH..NCH⋯NCH) leading to a rapid decrease in the bond strength as the length of the chain increases. The lowest energy structures of the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cation clusters containing 3-4 HCN molecules show a strong tendency for the internal solvation of the radical cation by the HCN molecules where bifurcated structures involving multiple hydrogen bonding sites with the ring hydrogen atoms are formed. The unconventional H-bonds (CHδ+⋯NCH) formed between the pyridine or the pyrimidine radical cations and HCN molecules (11-12 kcal/mol) are stronger than the similar (CHδ+⋯NCH) bonds formed between the benzene radical cation and HCN molecules (9 kcal/mol) indicating that the CHδ+ centers in the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations have more effective charges than in the benzene radical cation.

  9. Quantum energy teleportation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    We analyze a protocol of quantum energy teleportation that transports energy from the left edge of a linear ion crystal to the right edge by local operations and classical communication at a speed considerably greater than the speed of a phonon in the crystal. A probe qubit is strongly coupled with phonon fluctuation in the ground state for a short time and it is projectively measured in order to obtain information about this phonon fluctuation. During the measurement process, phonons are excited by the time-dependent measurement interaction and the energy of the excited phonons must be infused from outside the system. The obtained information is transferred to the right edge of the crystal through a classical channel. Even though the phonons excited at the left edge do not arrive at the right edge at the same time as when the information arrives at the right edge, we are able to soon extract energy from the ions at the right edge by using the transferred information. Because the intermediate ions of the crystal are not excited during the execution of the protocol, energy is transmitted in the energy-transfer channel without heat generation.

  10. Doubly Differential Cross Sections for Ejection of Electrons from Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen by 30-120 KEV HELIUM(+) Ion Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ying-Yuan

    Electrons ejected from atomic and molecular hydrogen in He^+ ion impacts were observed with projectile energies ranging from 30 to 120 keV. The ejection angles observed were 15^circ, 30^circ, 50^circ, 70^ circ, 90^circ, 110^circ, 130^circ and 160^circ with electron energies ranging from 1.5 to 130 eV. Ejected electrons were energy analyzed by an electrostatic analyzer with 5% resolution and were detected by a channel electron multiplier. A Slevin-type RF hydrogen atom source was used to generate a mixed target of atomic and molecular hydrogen. The dissociation fraction of the target was determined from the measurement of 9-eV H^+ ions coming from the break-up of the 2psigma_ {u} state of the H_2 ^+ molecular ion. Methods were devised to extract the electron ejection cross section ratio between hydrogen atoms and molecules. Cross sections for the hydrogen atom were then calculated from additional measurements on pure H_2.. The results are compared to plane-wave-Born approximation (PWBA) calculations, classical-trajectory-Monte-Carlo (CTMC) calculations, and continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial -state (CDW-EIS) calculations for proton impact. Electron loss cross sections are calculated with PWBA and used as a correction to the above calculations.

  11. The Dissociation Energy of Hydrogen and of Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Ashok

    The ab initio computation and experimental determination of the dissociation energy (D_0) of the hydrogen and deuterium molecules has long been an important problem in molecular spectroscopy. Kolos, Monkhorst, and Szalewicz (1986) have calculated D_0 with an accuracy of +/-0.1 cm^{-1} while including fine interactions such as relativistic effects, non-adiabatic mixing, and radiative shifts. These terms introduce corrections as small as 0.2 cm^{-1}, and experimental precision must exceed this to test the calculation in all of its aspects. In our experiment, a jet of H_2 (or D_2 ) was probed with coherent and tunable radiation at ~84 nm, near the second dissociation limit which leads to the products H(n = 2) + H(1s). Molecules in their ground state were excited into the highest vibronic levels of the electronic states B, B^' , and C, and into the dissociation continuum by tuning the radiation across the dissociation threshold. Metastable H(2s) photofragments were detected by applying a delayed electric field to mix the 2s with 2p states, thereby quenching H(2s) atoms to yield fluorescence at the Lyman- alpha wavelength. The onset of quenched fluorescence marked the second dissociation limit; from this energy, the atomic 2s-1s interval was subtracted, thus yielding D_0. We obtained the values D _0(H_2) = 36 118.11 +/- 0.08 cm^{ -1} and D_0(D _2) = 36 748.38 +/- 0.07 cm^{-1}, which are in excellent agreement with the most recent theoretical calculations. Thus, a long-standing discrepancy between experiment and theory has been resolved, and the ab initio calculation of D_0 appears to be successful. Finally, from our D_0 values, the dissociation energies of the molecular ions were deduced, and they also confirm the latest (1991) ab initio values of D_0(H_sp {2}{+}) and D_0 (D_sp{2}{+}).

  12. Superintense ion beam with high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Dudnikova, Galina

    2008-04-01

    The energy density of ion beam accumulated in a storage ring can be increased dramatically with using of space charge compensation as was demonstrated in experiments [1]. The intensity of said superintense beam can be far greater than a space charge limit without space charge compensation. The model of secondary plasma build up with secondary ion-electron emission as a source of delayed electrons has been presented and discussed. This model can be used for explanation of bunched beam instability with electron surviving after gap, for prediction of e-cloud generation in coasting and long bunches beam, and can be important for pressure rise in worm and cold sections of storage rings. A fast desorption by ion of physically adsorbed molecules can explain a ``first pulse Instability''. Application of this model for e-p instability selfstabilization and superintense circulating beam accumulation is considered. Importance of secondary plasma for high perveance ion beam stabilization in ion implantation will be considered. Preliminary results of simulation of electron and ion accumulation will be presented. [1]. Belchenko et al., Xth International Particle Accelerator Conference, Protvino, 1977, Vol. 2, p. 287.

  13. Convoy electron emission from resonant coherently excited 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Ito, T.; Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2003-12-01

    Energetic ions traveling through a single crystal are excited by an oscillating crystal field produced by a periodic arrangement of the atomic strings/planes, which is called Resonant Coherent Excitation (RCE). We have observed enhancement of convoy electron yields associated with RCE of 1s electron to the n=2 excited states of 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar 17+ ions passing through a Si crystal in the (2 2¯ 0) planar channeling condition. Lost electrons from projectile ions due to ionization contribute to convoy electrons emitted in the forward direction with the same velocity as the projectile ions. With combination of a magnet and a thick Si solid-state detector, we measured the energy spectra of convoy electrons of about 200 keV emitted at 0°. The convoy electron yield as a function of the transition energy, i.e. the resonance profile, has a similar structure to the resonance profile observed through the ionized fraction of the emerging ions. It is explained by the fact that both enhancements are due to increase in the fraction of the excited states from which electrons are more easily ionized by target electron impact in the crystal than from the ground state.

  14. How resonance assists hydrogen bonding interactions: an energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, John Frederick; Mo, Yirong

    2007-01-15

    Block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of the ab initio valence bond (VB) theory, was employed to explore the nature of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHBs) and to investigate the mechanism of synergistic interplay between pi delocalization and hydrogen-bonding interactions. We examined the dimers of formic acid, formamide, 4-pyrimidinone, 2-pyridinone, 2-hydroxpyridine, and 2-hydroxycyclopenta-2,4-dien-1-one. In addition, we studied the interactions in beta-diketone enols with a simplified model, namely the hydrogen bonds of 3-hydroxypropenal with both ethenol and formaldehyde. The intermolecular interaction energies, either with or without the involvement of pi resonance, were decomposed into the Hitler-London energy (DeltaEHL), polarization energy (DeltaEpol), charge transfer energy (DeltaECT), and electron correlation energy (DeltaEcor) terms. This allows for the examination of the character of hydrogen bonds and the impact of pi conjugation on hydrogen bonding interactions. Although it has been proposed that resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds are accompanied with an increasing of covalency character, our analyses showed that the enhanced interactions mostly originate from the classical dipole-dipole (i.e., electrostatic) attraction, as resonance redistributes the electron density and increases the dipole moments in monomers. The covalency of hydrogen bonds, however, changes very little. This disputes the belief that RAHB is primarily covalent in nature. Accordingly, we recommend the term "resonance-assisted binding (RAB)" instead of "resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RHAB)" to highlight the electrostatic, which is a long-range effect, rather than the electron transfer nature of the enhanced stabilization in RAHBs. PMID:17143867

  15. Simulation of low-energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langelaar, M. H.; Breeman, M.; Mijiritskii, A. V.; Boerma, D. O.

    A new simulation program `MATCH' has been developed for a detailed analysis of low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) and recoiling data. Instead of performing the full calculation of the three-dimensional trajectories through the sample from the ion source towards the detector, incoming trajectories as well as reversed-time outgoing trajectories are calculated, separately. Finally, these trajectories are matched to obtain the yield. The program has been tested for spectra and azimuthal scans of scattering and recoiling events of various sample species in different scattering geometries.

  16. Capacitively Coupled Radio Frequency Discharge Plasmas In Hydrogen: Particle Modeling and Negative Ion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Diomede, P.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2005-05-16

    We present a 1D(r)2D(v) particle code for capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasmas in hydrogen, which includes a rigorous kinetic modeling of ion transport and several solutions to speed up the convergence. In a test case the effect of surface atom recombination and molecule vibrational deactivation on H- concentration is investigated.

  17. Sampling of ions at atmospheric pressure: ion transmission and ion energy studied by simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große-Kreul, Simon; Hübner, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry of ions from atmospheric pressure plasmas is a challenging diagnostic method that has been applied to a large variety of cold plasma sources in the past. However, absolute densities can usually not be obtained, moreover, the process of sampling of ions and neutrals from such a plasma inherently influences the measured composition. These issues are studied in this contribution by a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Different numerical domains are sequentially coupled to calculate the ion transmission from the source to the mass analyzer. It is found that the energy of the sampled ions created by a radio-frequency microplasma operated in a He-N2 mixture at atmospheric pressure is of the order of 0.1 eV and that it depends linearly on the ion mass in good agreement with the expectation for seeded particles accelerated in a supersonic expansion. Moreover, the measured ion energy distribution from an afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma can be reproduced on basis of the particle trajectories in the sampling system. Eventually, an estimation of the absolute flux of ions to the detector is deduced.

  18. Capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas sustained by tailored voltage waveforms: excitation dynamics and ion flux asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, B.; Diomede, P.; Economou, D. J.; Longo, S.; Gans, T.; O’Connell, D.; Greb, A.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J.-P.

    2016-08-01

    Parallel plate capacitively coupled plasmas in hydrogen at relatively high pressure (~1 Torr) are excited with tailored voltage waveforms containing up to five frequencies. Predictions of a hybrid model combining a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions and a fluid model are compared to phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements, yielding information on the dynamics of the excitation rate in these discharges. When the discharge is excited with amplitude asymmetric waveforms, the discharge becomes electrically asymmetric, with different ion energies at each of the two electrodes. Unexpectedly, large differences in the \\text{H}2+ fluxes to each of the two electrodes are caused by the different \\text{H}3+ energies. When the discharge is excited with slope asymmetric waveforms, only weak electrical asymmetry of the discharge is observed. In this case, electron power absorption due to fast sheath expansion at one electrode is balanced by electron power absorption at the opposite electrode due to a strong electric field reversal.

  19. Hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Nazarova, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine unit is considered that can be used in both nuclear and centralized power industries. However, it is the most promising when used for power-generating plants based on renewable energy sources (RES). The basic feature of the energy storage system in question is combination of storing the energy in compressed air and hydrogen and oxygen produced by the water electrolysis. Such a process makes the energy storage more flexible, in particular, when applied to RES-based power-generating plants whose generation of power may considerably vary during the course of a day, and also reduces the specific cost of the system by decreasing the required volume of the reservoir. This will allow construction of such systems in any areas independent of the local topography in contrast to the compressed-air energy storage gas-turbine plants, which require large-sized underground reservoirs. It should be noted that, during the energy recovery, the air that arrives from the reservoir is heated by combustion of hydrogen in oxygen, which results in the gas-turbine exhaust gases practically free of substances hazardous to the health and the environment. The results of analysis of a hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are presented. Its layout and the principle of its operation are described and the basic parameters are computed. The units of the system are analyzed and their costs are assessed; the recovery factor is estimated at more than 60%. According to the obtained results, almost all main components of the hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are well known at present; therefore, no considerable R&D costs are required. A new component of the system is the H2-O2 combustion chamber; a difficulty in manufacturing it is the necessity of ensuring the combustion of hydrogen in oxygen as complete as possible and preventing formation of nitric oxides.

  20. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  1. The study of discharge characteristic of the cold-cathode negative hydrogen PIG-type ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Long, J. D.; Wang, T.; Lan, C. H.; Peng, Y. F.; Wei, T.; He, X. Z.; Zhang, K. Z.; Shi, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    The cold-cathode Penning ion gage (PIG)-type ion source is designed for the internal ion source of the compact cyclotron. This kind of ion source has been used for generation of the negative hydrogen (H-) ions for many decades. The discharge characteristics of the ion source are investigated systematically for hydrogen operation at different discharge currents, gas flow rates and magnetic fields, respectively. In this paper, optical emission spectroscopy measurement is carried out to diagnose the parameters of the hydrogen plasma in the ion source. The preliminary optimization of the H- formation with the gas flow rates is discussed and analyzed. Current experimental results can provide useful information for the design and operation of the negative ion source.

  2. Favorable target positions for intense laser acceleration of electrons in hydrogen-like, highly-charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, Liang-Wen; Starace, Anthony F.; Hu, S. X.

    2015-09-15

    Classical relativistic Monte Carlo simulations of petawatt laser acceleration of electrons bound initially in hydrogen-like, highly-charged ions show that both the angles and energies of the laser-accelerated electrons depend on the initial ion positions with respect to the laser focus. Electrons bound in ions located after the laser focus generally acquire higher (≈GeV) energies and are ejected at smaller angles with respect to the laser beam. Our simulations assume a tightly-focused linearly-polarized laser pulse with intensity approaching 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2}. Up to fifth order corrections to the paraxial approximation of the laser field in the focal region are taken into account. In addition to the laser intensity, the Rayleigh length in the focal region is shown to play a significant role in maximizing the final energy of the accelerated electrons. Results are presented for both Ne{sup 9+} and Ar{sup 17+} target ions.

  3. Effective collision strengths for optically allowed transitions among degenerate levels of hydrogenic ions with 2{<=}Z{<=}30

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, K.; Aggarwal, K.M.; Akita, K.; Igarashi, A.; Keenan, F.P.; Nakazaki, S.

    2010-09-15

    The Coulomb-Born approximation is used to calculate electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for optically allowed transitions among degenerate fine-structure levels of hydrogenic ions with 2{<=}Z{<=}30 and n{<=}5. Collision strengths are calculated over a wide range of energies up to E{sub j}/Z{sup 2}=10Ryd. Effective collision strengths are obtained over a wide temperature range up to 10{sup 8}K by integrating the collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities.

  4. In-tank hydrogen-ferric ion recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selverston, S.; Savinell, R. F.; Wainright, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    An H2sbnd Fe3+ recombination method is being developed for all-iron flow batteries. Working principles are described and a proof-of-concept in-tank reactor is demonstrated. A membrane-less galvanic reactor is characterized using potential, polarization and impedance measurements at hydrogen partial pressures ranging from 0.3 to 11.3 psig. Through a vertical reactor geometry, hydrogen recombination rates of up to 60 mA cm-2 were measured at PH2 = 4.5 psig for a reactor with a platinum loading of 3.2 mg cm-2, based on the geometric catalyzed area. This is equivalent to over 375 mA cm-2 with respect to the cross sectional area of the reactor at the waterline. This rate is sufficient that the reactor will readily fit inside the positive reservoir of a flow battery. The reactor was found to be resistant to degradation by flooding or catalyst loss.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide affects ion channels in lily pollen grain protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Breygina, M A; Abramochkin, D V; Maksimov, N M; Yermakov, I P

    2016-09-01

    Ion homeostasis plays a central role in polarisation and polar growth. In several cell types ion channels are controlled by reactive oxygen species (ROS). One of the most important cells in the plant life cycle is the male gametophyte, which grows under the tight control of both ion fluxes and ROS balance. The precise relationship between these two factors in pollen tubes has not been completely elucidated, and in pollen grains it has never been studied to date. In the present study we used a simple model - protoplasts obtained from lily pollen grains at the early germination stage - to reveal the effect of H2 O2 on cation fluxes crucial for pollen germination. Here we present direct evidence for two ROS-sensitive currents on the pollen grain plasma membrane: the hyperpolarisation-activated calcium current, which is strongly enhanced by H2 O2 , and the outward potassium current, which is modestly enhanced by H2 O2 . We used low concentrations of H2 O2 that do not cause an intracellular oxidative burst and do not damage cells, as demonstrated with fluorescent staining. PMID:27115728

  6. Distribution of hydrogen and oxygen ion species in the plasmasheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Jinbin; Liu, Wenlong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, using data obtained by Cluster 4 satellite from 2001 to 2012, we statistically investigate the spatial distributions of H+ and O+ in the magnetotail plasmasheet and their relation with geomagnetic indices. Our work outlines the existence of two regions with enhanced O+ concentration in the tail plasmasheet, one is located in the mid-tail plasmasheet at R > 17 RE, and the other is located near the inner boundary of plasmasheet at R < 10 RE. The existence of the depletion region of O+ between 10 RE < R < 17 RE indicates that the O+ ions in the mid-tail plasmasheet, which come from polar cap, are not likely to be able to make important contribution to the formation of ring current. Both the distributions of density and temperature of O+ ions have a dawn-dusk asymmetry. The number density of O+ during geomagnetic active time (Dst < -20 nT/AE > 200 nT/Kp ⩾ 3) is much larger than that during non-storm time (Dst > -20 nT/AE < 200 nT/Kp < 3). This dawn-dusk asymmetry and the number density of O+ varying with geomagnetic activity apply for both regions (R < 10 RE and R > 17 RE) of O+. Therefore both substorm and enhanced convection provide a large number of O+ ions to the plasmasheet, which makes favorable condition for the growth of the ring current.

  7. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  8. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  9. Cesium dynamics in long pulse operation of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, U.; Wimmer, C.

    2012-02-01

    Large scale negative hydrogen ion sources operating stable for 1 h (cw mode) are required for the neutral beam heating system of the fusion experiment ITER. The formation of negative hydrogen ions relies on the surface effect for which cesium is evaporated into the source. In order to monitor the cesium dynamics the laser absorption spectroscopy technique is applied to the long pulse test facility MANITU. In the vacuum phase, without plasma operation the evaporation of cesium and the built-up of the cesium in the source are measured. Typical neutral cesium densities are 1015 m-3. During plasma operation and after the plasma phase a high cesium dynamics is observed, showing also depletion of cesium during long pulses with low cesium amount. The co-extracted electron current decreases with the cesium amount to a certain level whereas the ion current indicates an optimum density range.

  10. Cesium dynamics in long pulse operation of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U.; Wimmer, C.

    2012-02-15

    Large scale negative hydrogen ion sources operating stable for 1 h (cw mode) are required for the neutral beam heating system of the fusion experiment ITER. The formation of negative hydrogen ions relies on the surface effect for which cesium is evaporated into the source. In order to monitor the cesium dynamics the laser absorption spectroscopy technique is applied to the long pulse test facility MANITU. In the vacuum phase, without plasma operation the evaporation of cesium and the built-up of the cesium in the source are measured. Typical neutral cesium densities are 10{sup 15} m{sup -3}. During plasma operation and after the plasma phase a high cesium dynamics is observed, showing also depletion of cesium during long pulses with low cesium amount. The co-extracted electron current decreases with the cesium amount to a certain level whereas the ion current indicates an optimum density range.

  11. High-performance atom-probe field ion microscope study of segregation and hydrogen cracking in Fe-0. 29 Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Kuk, Y.; Pickering, H.W.; Sakurai, T.

    1980-01-01

    With the greatly improved resolution now available in energy focused atom probes, hydrogen can be readily resolved even when combined with metals having several isotopes. In addition to finding that H, H/sub 2/, FeH and TiH/sub 2/ accumulate at segregated grain boundaries in Fe-0.29 wt % Ti, a striking observation was made - the formation and propagation of a microcrack when the (field ion microscope) tip was exposed to hydrogen gas at elevated temperature. A small crack (approx. 200 A in length) was first noticed at a grain-boundary intersection during field ion imaging. This was an open crack, formed by detachment of metal between the intersecting grain boundaries, which was observed to be much larger after the tip was reheated to 1300/sup 0/K for 10 min. in the presence of 10/sup 2/ Pa (1 torr) H/sub 2/. This crack could be easily reduced in size by gradually field evaporating the surface. Its propagation was repeated several times and reproducible results were obtained. Hydrogen was identified in quantity in the crack surface, though not elsewhere. The observation of H/sub 2/ is taken to mean that H/sub 2/ gas was trapped in the grain boundary. The grain boundary was also observed to be enriched in Ti, O, C and S, in agreement with earlier results for Fe-Ti.

  12. Hydrogen atom scrambling in ion-molecule reactions of methane and ethylene.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen atom exchange in the reaction, CH3(+) + CH4 yields C2H5(+) + H2, is determined by examining the product distribution for the reactions CH3(+) + CD4 and CD3(+) + CH4 as a function of relative kinetic energy from thermal energies to 10 eV. It is found that the reaction of CH4(+) with the parent neutral proceeds both via proton transfer and hydrogen abstraction accompanied by approximately 10% hydrogen atom exchange during the reaction.

  13. The effect of hydrogenation on the growth of carbon nanospheres and their performance as anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shijia; Fan, Yunxia; Zhu, Kai; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Shuanglong; Liu, Ran; Yao, Mingguang; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenated carbon nanomaterials exhibit many advantages in both mechanical and electrochemical properties, and thus have a wide range of potential applications. However, methods to control the hydrogenation and the effect of hydrogenation on the microstructure and properties of the produced nanomaterials have rarely been studied. Here we report the synthesis of hydrogenated carbon nanospheres (HCNSs) with different degrees of hydrogenation by a facile solvothermal method, in which C2H3Cl3/C2H4Cl2 was used as the carbon precursor and potassium as the reductant. The hydrogenation level of the obtained nanospheres depends on the reaction temperature and higher temperature leads to lower hydrogenation due to the fact that the breaking of C-H bonds requires more external energy. The reaction temperature also affects the diameter of the HCNSs and larger spheres are produced at higher temperatures. More importantly, the size and the degree of hydrogenation are both critical factors for determining the electrochemical properties of the HCNSs. The nanospheres synthesized at 100 °C have a smaller size and a higher hydrogenation degree and show a capacity of 821 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles, which is significantly higher than that of the HCNSs produced at 150 °C (450 mA h g-1). Our study opens a possible way for obtaining high-performance anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Comparison of measured and modelled negative hydrogen ion densities at the ECR-discharge HOMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauner, D.; Kurutz, U.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    As the negative hydrogen ion density nH- is a key parameter for the investigation of negative ion sources, its diagnostic quantification is essential in source development and operation as well as for fundamental research. By utilizing the photodetachment process of negative ions, generally two different diagnostic methods can be applied: via laser photodetachment, the density of negative ions is measured locally, but only relatively to the electron density. To obtain absolute densities, the electron density has to be measured additionally, which induces further uncertainties. Via cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the absolute density of H- is measured directly, however LOS-averaged over the plasma length. At the ECR-discharge HOMER, where H- is produced in the plasma volume, laser photodetachment is applied as the standard method to measure nH-. The additional application of CRDS provides the possibility to directly obtain absolute values of nH-, thereby successfully bench-marking the laser photodetachment system as both diagnostics are in good agreement. In the investigated pressure range from 0.3 to 3 Pa, the measured negative hydrogen ion density shows a maximum at 1 to 1.5 Pa and an approximately linear response to increasing input microwave powers from 200 up to 500 W. Additionally, the volume production of negative ions is 0-dimensionally modelled by balancing H- production and destruction processes. The modelled densities are adapted to the absolute measurements of nH- via CRDS, allowing to identify collisions of H- with hydrogen atoms (associative and non-associative detachment) to be the dominant loss process of H- in the plasma volume at HOMER. Furthermore, the characteristic peak of nH- observed at 1 to 1.5 Pa is identified to be caused by a comparable behaviour of the electron density with varying pressure, as ne determines the volume production rate via dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules.

  15. Multiple ionization bursts in laser-driven hydrogen molecular ion.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Norio; Becker, Andreas

    2010-11-12

    Theoretical study on H2(+) in an intense infrared laser field on the attosecond time scale reveals that the molecular ion shows multiple bursts of ionization within a half-cycle of the laser field oscillation, in contrast to the widely accepted tunnel ionization picture for an atom. These bursts are found to be induced by transient localization of the electron at one of the nuclei, and a relation between the time instants of the localization and the vector potential of the laser light is derived. A scheme is proposed to probe the localization dynamics by an extreme ultraviolet laser pulse. PMID:21231228

  16. Model for hydrogen retention reemission and H/He exchange in beryllium under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lomidze, M.A.; Gorodetsky, A.E.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-10-01

    In the model two states for accumulated hydrogen (soluble and molecular) are suggested. Under ion irradiation three reactions (events) take place: recombination of soluble hydrogen on irradiated surface; accumulation of molecular hydrogen; molecular percolation. The first reaction describes recombination under and after irradiation. The second reaction describes molecular hydrogen accumulation as statistical packing of the `traps`. The third one describes molecular percolation as a capturing of one more incoming particle in already packed `trap`, that is accompanied by the reemission of H{sub 2}, by the devastation of the `trap`, and by the increasing of the irradiated surface. Under steady state for molecular accumulation and surface formation, recombination flux approaches the value of incoming flux and no percolation acts take place. Molecular accumulation approaches the steady state prompter than surface formation. The cross sections for (helium/hydrogen) emission changing over hydrogen to helium beam and vice versa were calculated. Simulation of the model coincides with the experimental data of hydrogen retention, reemission, and post-implanted release. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Zhuang, ZB; Gao, MR; Zheng, J; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  18. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Gao, Minrui; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Jingguang G.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  19. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Gao, Minrui; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Jingguang G; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum. PMID:25569511

  20. A collisional radiative model of hydrogen plasmas developed for diagnostic purposes of negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanova, Snejana; Paunska, Tsvetelina

    2016-02-01

    A collisional radiative model of low-pressure hydrogen plasmas is elaborated and applied in optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a single element of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions. The model accounts for the main processes determining both the population densities of the first ten states of the hydrogen atom and the densities of the positive hydrogen ions H+, H2+, and H3+. In the calculations, the electron density and electron temperature are varied whereas the atomic and molecular temperatures are included as experimentally obtained external parameters. The ratio of the Hα to Hβ line intensities is calculated from the numerical results for the excited state population densities, obtained as a solution of the set of the steady-state rate balance equations. The comparison of measured and theoretically obtained ratios of line intensities yields the values of the electron density and temperature as well as of the degree of dissociation, i.e., of the parameters which have a crucial role for the volume production of the negative ions.

  1. Interaction between Low Energy Ions and the Complicated Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-12-01

    Low energy ions exist widely in natural world, but people pay a little attention on the interaction between low energy ions and matter, it is even more out of the question of studying on the relation of low energy ions and the complicated organism. The discovery of bioeffect induced by ion implantation has, however, opened a new branch in the field of ion beam application in life sciences. This paper reports recent advances in research on the role of low energy ions in chemical synthesis of the biomolecules and application in genetic modification.

  2. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  3. Nonadiabatic chemoelectron energy conversion in heterostructures for hydrogen power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankin, V. P.; Grankin, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    A relationship describing the probability of electron excitation in a solid crystal by the energy of a chemical reaction on its surface has been found. It is established that the probability of electron excitation in this reaction exponentially increases with decreasing energy of electron transition in the solid. A method of nonadiabatic chemoelectron energy conversion in heterostructures for hydrogen power engineering based on Schottky diodes is proposed and the efficiency of this method is calculated.

  4. In vitro hydrogen production--using energy from the sun.

    PubMed

    Krassen, Henning; Ott, Sascha; Heberle, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Using solar energy to produce molecular hydrogen is a promising way to supply the civilization with clean energy. Nature provides the key components to collect solar energy as well as to reduce protons, scientists have developed mimics of these enzymatic centers and also found new ways to catalyze the same reactions. This perspective article surveys the different components and in particular the various coupling possibilities of a light sensitizer and catalyst. Pros and cons are discussed. PMID:21103567

  5. A novel radial anode layer ion source for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification—Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon coatings from butane gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, Peter P.; Markwitz, Andreas; Suschke, Konrad; Futter, John

    2014-08-01

    We report a new ion source development for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification. The ion source deposits coatings simultaneously in a 360° radial geometry and can be used to coat inner walls of pipelines by simply moving the ion source in the pipe. Rotating parts are not required, making the source ideal for rough environments and minimizing maintenance and replacements of parts. First results are reported for diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on Si and stainless steel substrates deposited using a novel 360° ion source design. The ion source operates with permanent magnets and uses a single power supply for the anode voltage and ion acceleration up to 10 kV. Butane (C4H10) gas is used to coat the inner wall of pipes with smooth and homogeneous DLC coatings with thicknesses up to 5 μm in a short time using a deposition rate of 70 ± 10 nm min-1. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results showed that DLC coatings contain hydrogen up to 30 ± 3% indicating deposition of hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H) coatings. Coatings with good adhesion are achieved when using a multiple energy implantation regime. Raman spectroscopy results suggest slightly larger disordered DLC layers when using low ion energy, indicating higher sp3 bonds in DLC coatings. The results show that commercially interesting coatings can be achieved in short time.

  6. A novel radial anode layer ion source for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification--hydrogenated diamond-like carbon coatings from butane gas.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Peter P; Markwitz, Andreas; Suschke, Konrad; Futter, John

    2014-08-01

    We report a new ion source development for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification. The ion source deposits coatings simultaneously in a 360° radial geometry and can be used to coat inner walls of pipelines by simply moving the ion source in the pipe. Rotating parts are not required, making the source ideal for rough environments and minimizing maintenance and replacements of parts. First results are reported for diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on Si and stainless steel substrates deposited using a novel 360° ion source design. The ion source operates with permanent magnets and uses a single power supply for the anode voltage and ion acceleration up to 10 kV. Butane (C4H10) gas is used to coat the inner wall of pipes with smooth and homogeneous DLC coatings with thicknesses up to 5 μm in a short time using a deposition rate of 70 ± 10 nm min(-1). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results showed that DLC coatings contain hydrogen up to 30 ± 3% indicating deposition of hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H) coatings. Coatings with good adhesion are achieved when using a multiple energy implantation regime. Raman spectroscopy results suggest slightly larger disordered DLC layers when using low ion energy, indicating higher sp(3) bonds in DLC coatings. The results show that commercially interesting coatings can be achieved in short time. PMID:25173323

  7. Research progress on ionic plasmas generated in an intense hydrogen negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Takeiri, Y. Tsumori, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Ikeda, K.; Nakano, H.; Kisaki, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Osakabe, M.; Kondo, T.; Sato, M.; Shibuya, M.; Komada, S.; Sekiguchi, H.; Geng, S.

    2015-04-08

    Characteristics of ionic plasmas, observed in a high-density hydrogen negative ion source, are investigated with a multi-diagnostics system. The ionic plasma, which consists of hydrogen positive- and negative-ions with a significantly low-density of electrons, is generated in the ion extraction region, from which the negative ions are extracted through the plasma grid. The negative ion density, i.e., the ionic plasma density, as high as the order of 1×10{sup 17}m{sup −3}, is measured with cavity ring-down spectroscopy, while the electron density is lower than 1×10{sup 16}m{sup −3}, which is confirmed with millimeter-wave interferometer. Reduction of the negative ion density is observed at the negative ion extraction, and at that time the electron flow into the ionic plasma region is observed to conserve the charge neutrality. Distribution of the plasma potential is measured in the extraction region in the direction normal to the plasma grid surface with a Langmuir probe, and the results suggest that the sheath is formed at the plasma boundary to the plasma grid to which the bias voltage is applied. The beam extraction should drive the negative ion transport in the ionic plasma across the sheath formed on the extraction surface. Larger reduction of the negative ions at the beam extraction is observed in a region above the extraction aperture on the plasma grid, which is confirmed with 2D image measurement of the Hα emission and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The electron distribution is also measured near the plasma grid surface. These various properties observed in the ionic plasma are discussed.

  8. Three-Body Electron-Ion, Ion-Ion and Neutral-Neutral Recombination at Thermal and Ultra-Cold energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannery, M. R.

    1998-11-01

    The physical basis and the theory of Three-Body Recombination( Flannery, M. R., Electron-Ion and Ion-Ion Recombination in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Handbook), edited by G. W. F. Drake, New York: AIP Press, 1995, ch. 52, pp. 605-629. -- electron-ion, ion-ion, and neutral-neutral -- will be described. The microscopic theory developed( Flannery, M.R., Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc.) A 304 (1982), 447; J. Chem. Phys. 95 (1991), 8205. for three-body ion-ion recombination as a function of gas density will be reviewed. This serves as a prototype study not only for collisional ion-ion recombination,in particular, but also for transport influenced reactions in general. Various applications as (A) ultra-cold e-ion recombination at 5mK, (B) dimer formation by neutral-neutral recombination at nK and (C) anti-hydrogen formation by three body recombination at 4K will be discussed. In (A), for example, recombination proceeds via a very rapid production ( ~ T_e-4.5) of atoms in highly excited Rydberg levels (n,l), with almost circular orbits n ≈ l-1 which are very long lived (τr ~ n^5), towards radiative decay and collisional de-excitation. A new theory( Flannery, M. R., and Vrinceanu, D., in APS Topical Conference on Atomic Processes in Plasmas), edited by E. Oaks and M. S. Pindzola, AIP Press, to be published. of l-mixing collisions between Rydberg atoms and ions will be provided. This Stark mixing produces lower l-states. Recombination is then stabilized radiatively by decay (τr ~ n^3) to lower electronic levels. This is the rate limiting step which is pertinent also to anti-hydrogen production (C) but in direct contrast to electron-ion recombination at thermal (300K) and higher energies. A theory will also be provided molecular dimer formation (B) by three body recombination (^7Li + ^7Li + ^7Li arrow Li2 + Li) of significance to Bose Einstein Condensation at mK. Although, the temperature is insufficient to redissociate the higher vibrational level of Li2 with binding 0

  9. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  10. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.

    2006-06-01

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nmenergy deposition calculated for the incident ion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  11. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R G

    2005-10-14

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nm < SEM hole diameter < {approx}100 nm), the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  12. High-energy recoil-ion emission in keV heavy-ion surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Someren, B.; Rudolph, H.; Urazgil'din, I. F.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlmans; Niehaus, A.

    1997-11-01

    For keV Xe +, Kr + and Ar + ions incident at 30° on Cu(110) we have observed the emission of negatively charged particles with energies up to about 40% of the primary energy. By time-of-flight techniques we have found that electrons are emitted with energies up to 80 eV, whereas the negatively charged high-energy particles are Cu - recoil ions. High-energy Cu + ions have also been found. Simple energy and momentum conservation arguments show that such high recoil energies are indeed possible for multiple collision events in which the primary recoil ion scatters off one or more Cu atoms.

  13. Operation Status of the J-PARC Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, H.; Ikegami, K.; Ohkoshi, K.; Namekawa, Y.; Ueno, A.

    2011-09-26

    A cesium-free negative hydrogen ion source driven with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) filament is being operated without any serious trouble for approximately four years in J-PARC. Although the ion source is capable of producing an H{sup -} ion current of more than 30 mA, the current is routinely restricted to approximately 16 mA at present for the stable operation of the RFQ linac which has serious discharge problem from September 2008. The beam run is performed during 1 month cycle, which consisted of a 4-5 weeks beam operation and a few days down-period interval. At the recent beam run, approximately 700 h continuous operation was achieved. At every runs, the beam interruption time due to the ion source failure is a few hours, which correspond to the ion source availability of more than 99%. The R and D work is being performed in parallel with the operation in order to enhance the further beam current. As a result, the H{sup -} ion current of 61 mA with normalized rms emittance of 0.26 {pi}mm.mrad was obtained by adding a cesium seeding system to a J-PARC test ion source which has the almost same structure with the present J-PARC ion source.

  14. Development of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source for Spatial Beam Profile Measurement of a High Intensity Positive Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Wada, Motoi; Nishida, Tomoaki; Demura, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Daichi; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nishiura, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu; Kisaki, Masashi; Sasao, Mamiko

    2011-09-26

    We have been developing a negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -} ion) source for a spatial beam profile monitor of a high intensity positive ion beam as a new diagnostic tool. In case of a high intensity continuous-wave (CW) deuteron (D{sup +}) beam for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), it is difficult to measure the beam qualities in the severe high radiation environment during about one-year cyclic operation period. Conventional techniques are next to unusable for diagnostics in the operation period of about eleven months and for maintenance in the one-month shutdown period. Therefore, we have proposed an active beam probe system by using a negative ion beam and started an experimental study for the proof-of-principle (PoP) of the new spatial beam profile monitoring tool. In this paper, we present the status of development of the H{sup -} ion source as a probe beam source for the PoP experiment.

  15. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  16. Low Energy Ion-Molecule Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Farrar

    2004-05-01

    This objective of this project is to study the dynamics of the interactions of low energy ions important in combustion with small molecules in the gas phase and with liquid hydrocarbon surfaces. The first of these topics is a long-standing project in our laboratory devoted to probing the key features of potential energy surfaces that control chemical reactivity. The project provides detailed information on the utilization of specific forms of incident energy, the role of preferred reagent geometries, and the disposal of total reaction energy into product degrees of freedom. We employ crossed molecular beam methods under single collision conditions, at collision energies from below one eV to several eV, to probe potential surfaces over a broad range of distances and interaction energies. These studies allow us to test and validate dynamical models describing chemical reactivity. Measurements of energy and angular distributions of the reaction products with vibrational state resolution provide the key data for these studies. We employ the crossed beam low energy mass spectrometry methods that we have developed over the last several years.

  17. Gas Feeding System Supplying the U-400M Cyclotron Ion Source with Hydrogen Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Angilopov, V.V.; Apasov, V.A.

    2005-07-15

    Automated system feeding into ion source hydrogen isotopes as molecules with preset ratio of the fluxes is described. The control system automatically maintained the working parameters and provided graphic and digital representation of the controlled processes. The radiofrequency (RF) ion source installed at the axial injection line of the cyclotron produced ion beams of HD{sup +}, HT{sup +}, DT{sup +}, D{sub 2}H{sup +}, etc. At a several months DT{sup +} beam acceleration the tritium consumption was less than 108 Bq/hr. The intensity of a 58.2 MeV triton beam (T{sup +} ions) extracted from the cyclotron chamber was about 10 nA.

  18. Alkali-Metal-Ion-Assisted Hydrogen Atom Transfer in the Homocysteine Radical.

    PubMed

    Lesslie, Michael; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Lawler, John T; Siu, K W Michael; Oomens, Jos; Berden, Giel; Hopkinson, Alan C; Ryzhov, Victor

    2016-02-12

    Intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) was examined in homocysteine (Hcy) thiyl radical/alkali metal ion complexes in the gas phase by combination of experimental techniques (ion-molecule reactions and infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy) and theoretical calculations. The experimental results unequivocally show that metal ion complexation (as opposed to protonation) of the regiospecifically generated Hcy thiyl radical promotes its rapid isomerisation into an α-carbon radical via HAT. Theoretical calculations were employed to calculate the most probable HAT pathway and found that in alkali metal ion complexes the activation barrier is significantly lower, in full agreement with the experimental data. This is, to our knowledge, the first example of a gas-phase thiyl radical thermal rearrangement into an α-carbon species within the same amino acid residue and is consistent with the solution phase behaviour of Hcy radical. PMID:26836574

  19. Correlations between density distributions, optical spectra, and ion species in a hydrogen plasma (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study of plasma distributions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge operated at 100 Hz repetition rate is presented. Ultrafast photography, time integrated visible light emission spectra, time resolved Balmer-alpha emission, time resolved Fulcher Band emission, ion species mass spectra, and time resolved ion species fraction measurements have been implemented as diagnostic tools in a broad range of plasma conditions. Results of plasma distributions and optical emissions correlated with H+, H2 + , and H3 + ion currents by using a Wien filter system with optical observation capability are reported. The magnetic field distribution and strength is found as the most critical factor for transitions between different plasma patterns and ion populations.

  20. Correlations between density distributions, optical spectra, and ion species in a hydrogen plasma (invited).

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study of plasma distributions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge operated at 100 Hz repetition rate is presented. Ultrafast photography, time integrated visible light emission spectra, time resolved Balmer-alpha emission, time resolved Fulcher Band emission, ion species mass spectra, and time resolved ion species fraction measurements have been implemented as diagnostic tools in a broad range of plasma conditions. Results of plasma distributions and optical emissions correlated with H(+), H2 (+), and H3 (+) ion currents by using a Wien filter system with optical observation capability are reported. The magnetic field distribution and strength is found as the most critical factor for transitions between different plasma patterns and ion populations. PMID:26931922

  1. Hydrogen molecular ions: new schemes for metrology and fundamental physics tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karr, Jean-Philippe; Patra, Sayan; Koelemeij, Jeroen C. J.; Heinrich, Johannes; Sillitoe, Nicolas; Douillet, Albane; Hilico, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    High-accuracy spectroscopy of hydrogen molecular ions has important applications for the metrology of fundamental constants and tests of fundamental theories. Up to now, the experimental resolution has not surpassed the part-per-billion range. We discuss two methods by which it could be improved by a huge factor. Firstly, the feasibility of Doppler-free quasidegenerate two-photon spectroscopy of trapped and sympathetically cooled ensembles of HD+ ions is discussed, and it is shown that rovibrational transitions may be detected with a good signal-to-noise ratio. Secondly, the performance of a molecular quantum-logic ion clock based on a single Be+-H2 + ion pair is analyzed in detail. Such a clock could allow testing the constancy of the proton-to-electron mass ratio at the 10-17/yr level.

  2. The structure of the hydrogen ion (H(aq)+) in water.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Evgenii S; Stoyanova, Irina V; Reed, Christopher A

    2010-02-10

    The hydrogen ion in water, H(aq)(+), is a unique H(13)O(6)(+) entity that defines the boundary of positive-charge delocalization. Its central unit is neither a C(3v) H(3)O(+) Eigen-type ion nor a typical H(5)O(2)(+) Zundel-type ion. IR spectroscopy indicates that the H(13)O(6)(+) ion has an unexpectedly long central O...O separation (>2.43 A), showing that in comparison with the gas and solid phases, the environment of liquid water is uniquely proficient in delocalizing positive charge. These results will change the description of H(aq)(+) in textbooks of chemistry, and a more extensive delocalization of positive charge may need to be incorporated into descriptions of mechanisms of aqueous proton transport. PMID:20078058

  3. Energy utilization and efficiency analysis for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. M.; Hauer, K. H.; Ramaswamy, S.; Cunningham, J. M.

    This paper presents the results of an energy analysis for load-following versus battery-hybrid direct-hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The analysis utilizes dynamic fuel cell vehicle simulation tools previously presented [R.M. Moore, K.H. Hauer, J. Cunningham, S. Ramaswamy, A dynamic simulation tool for the battery-hybrid hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, Fuel Cells, submitted for publication; R.M. Moore, K.H. Hauer, D.J. Friedman, J.M. Cunningham, P. Badrinarayanan, S.X. Ramaswamy, A. Eggert, A dynamic simulation tool for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, J. Power Sources, 141 (2005) 272-285], and evaluates energy utilization and efficiency for standardized drive cycles used in the US, Europe and Japan.

  4. Excitation of broadband electrostatic noise and of hydrogen cyclotron waves by a perpendicular ion beam in multi-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malingre, M.; Pottelette, R.

    1985-05-01

    Results from the PORCUPINE experiment show that a perpendicular heavy ion beams, injected into an O(+) dominated plasma which contains a small concentration of H(+), induces a broadband electrostatic noise near the lower hybrid frequency and also discrete elecrostatic emissions at frequencies close to multiples of the hydrogen gyrofrequency. The dependence of these instabilities on the parameters characteristics of the beam-background plasma system is studied. It is shown that, provided the beam is of sufficiently high density and low temperature, the frequency range of the broadband noise extends continuously from zero frequency up to the lower hybrid frequency. In this case the harmonics of the hydrogen gyrofrequency are also excited but their growth rates are much lower than that of the broadband emission, up to two of three orders of magnitude for the first harmonics.

  5. Production of High Energy Ions Near an Ion Thruster Discharge Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, I. G.; Goebel, D. M.; Jameson, K. K.; Wirz, R.; Polk, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several researchers have measured ions leaving ion thruster discharge chambers with energies far greater than measured discharge chamber potentials. Presented in this paper is a new mechanism for the generation of high energy ions and a comparison with measured ion spectra. The source of high energy ions has been a puzzle because they not only have energies in excess of measured steady state potentials, but as reported by Goebel et. al. [1], their flux is independent of the amplitude of time dependent plasma fluctuations. The mechanism relies on the charge exchange neutralization of xenon ions accelerated radially into the potential trough in front of the discharge cathode. Previous researchers [2] have identified the importance of charge exchange in this region as a mechanism for protecting discharge cathode surfaces from ion bombardment. This paper is the first to identify how charge exchange in this region can lead to ion energy enhancement.

  6. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme

  7. Enhanced adhesion from high energy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, B. T.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Qui, Y.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    It has been found that the adhesion of thin metal films on insulators, semiconductors, and metals could be improved by subjecting the material to a high-energy ion bombardment. Griffith et al. (1982) have first suggested a use of this technique with insulators. The present investigation has the objective to determine the mechanism for the adhesion enhancement. A description is presented of a preliminary transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of thinned bonded samples of silver on silicon using electron diffraction. It is found that irradiation of a variety of thin film-substrate combinations by heavy ion beams will provide a remarkable improvement in the adherence of the film. The evidence for the mechanism involved in the enhancement of adhesion is discussed.

  8. Ion acceleration to cosmic ray energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Martin A.

    1990-01-01

    The acceleration and transport environment of the outer heliosphere is described schematically. Acceleration occurs where the divergence of the solar-wind flow is negative, that is at shocks, and where second-order Fermi acceleration is possible in the solar-wind turbulence. Acceleration at the solar-wind termination shock is presented by reviewing the spherically-symmetric calculation of Webb et al. (1985). Reacceleration of galactic cosmic rays at the termination shock is not expected to be important in modifying the cosmic ray spectrum, but acceleration of ions injected at the shock up to energies not greater than 300 MeV/charge is expected to occur and to create the anomalous cosmic ray component. Acceleration of energetic particles by solar wind turbulence is expected to play almost no role in the outer heliosphere. The one exception is the energization of interstellar pickup ions beyond the threshold for acceleration at the quasi-perpendicular termination shock.

  9. Plasma transfer process in hydrogen negative ions source based on reflective discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Goretsky, V.P.; Ryabtsev, A.V.; Soloshenko, I.A.; Tarasenko, A.F.; Schedrin, A.I.

    1996-07-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of stationary volume source of hydrogen negative ions based on reflective discharge are presented in the report. Measurements of plasma parameters and emission characteristics are accomplished, and the optimization of ion source geometry is provided. The best parameters of ion beam extracted from the source across a magnetic field are the following: current 40 mA, current density 80 mA/cm{sup 2}, emittance along a magnetic field 3{center_dot}10{sup {minus}5} cm{center_dot}rad, emittance across a magnetic field 1{center_dot}10{sup {minus}5} cm{center_dot}rad. The calculation of beam basic properties is performed by numeric solving of Boltzman equation for electrons, balance equations for more than 300 elementary processes in gas discharge plasma, and equations of ions and electrons motion. Calculated dependencies of hydrogen negative ions current density in a plane of emission slit on the gas pressure and the discharge current are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. EMR modelling of a hydrogen-based electrical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbli, K. S.; Hissel, D.; Péra, M.-C.; Doumbia, I.

    2011-05-01

    This paper deals with multi-physics modelling of the stationary system. This modelling is the first step to reach the fuel cell system dimensioning aim pursued. Besides this modelling approach based on the stationary energetic system, the novelty in this paper is both the new approach of the photovoltaic EMR modelling and the EMR of the hydrogen storage process. The granular modelling approach is used to model each component of the system. Considering a stand alone PEM fuel cell system, hydrogen is expected to be produced and stored on the spot from renewable energy (photovoltaic) in order to satisfy the fuel availability. In fact, to develop a generic and modular model, energetic macroscopic representation (EMR) is used as graphical modelling tool. Allowing to be easily grasped by the experts even not necessarily gotten used to the modelling formalism, EMR is helpful to model the multi-domains energetic chain. The solar energy through solar module is converted in electrical energy; part of this energy is transformed in chemical energy (hydrogen) thanks to an electrolyser. Then the hydrogen is compressed into a tank across a storage system. The latter part of the solar module energy is stored as electrical energy within supercapacitor or lead-acid battery. Using the modularity feature of the EMR, the whole system is modelled entity by entity; afterwards by putting them together the overall system has been reconstructed. According to the scale effect of the system entities, some simulation and/or experimental results are given. Given to the different aims which are pursued in the sustainable energy framework like prediction, control and optimisation, EMR modelling approach is a reliable option for the energy management in real time of energetic system in macroscopic point of view.

  11. Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-10-15

    This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

  12. Effect of hydrogen passivation on the photoluminescence of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatryb, G.; Klak, M. M.; Wojcik, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Mascher, P.; Podhorodecki, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, silicon-rich silicon oxide films containing terbium were prepared by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of hydrogen passivation on defects-mediated non-radiative recombination of excited Tb3+ ions was investigated by photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation, and photoluminescence decay measurements. Passivation was found to have no effect on shape and spectral position of the excitation spectra. In contrast, a gradual increase in photoluminescence intensity and photoluminescence decay time was observed upon passivation for the main 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb3+ ions. This observation was attributed to passivation of non-radiative recombination defects centers with hydrogen. It was found that the number of emitted photons increases upon passivation as a result of two effects: (1) longer Tb3+ lifetime in the 5D4 excited state and (2) optical activation of new Tb3+ emitters. The obtained results were discussed and compared with other experimental reports.

  13. Enhancing optical gains in Si nanocrystals via hydrogenation and cerium ion doping

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong-Chen; Li, Yan-Li; Song, Sheng-Chi; Guo, Wen-Ping; Lu, Ming; Chen, Jia-Rong

    2014-07-28

    We report optical gain enhancements in Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) via hydrogenation and Ce{sup 3+} ion doping. Variable stripe length technique was used to obtain gains. At 0.3 W/cm{sup 2} pumping power density of pulsed laser, net gains were observed together with gain enhancements after hydrogenation and/or Ce{sup 3+} ion doping; gains after loss corrections were between 89.52 and 341.95 cm{sup −1}; and the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime was found to decrease with the increasing gain enhancement. At 0.04 W/cm{sup 2} power density, however, no net gain was found and the PL lifetime increased with the increasing PL enhancement. The results were discussed according to stimulated and spontaneous excitation and de-excitation mechanisms of Si-NCs.

  14. Cr3+ ions in hydrogenated and proton exchanged lithium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiska, A.; Arizmendi, L.; Barcz, A.; Usakowska, E.; Suchocki, A.

    2004-01-01

    We studied influence of annealing in water vapour and proton exchange on high-pressure low-temperature luminescence spectra of near stoichiometric LN:Cr, MgO crystals, containing both CrLi and CrNb centers by using diamond-anvil cell technique. The observed changes of the spectra of Cr3+ ions are associated with the larger inhomogeneous broadening and increase of the splitting of the 2E level of the so called CrNb center. This shows that neither increase of hydrogen concentration in LN by almost two orders of magnitude (from 1018 to almost 1020 cm-3) nor proton-exchange procedure do not create any new optically active Cr3+ centers in those crystals. This does not support the hypothesis about the close compensation of Cr3+Nb sites in LiNbO3 crystals by hydrogen ions.

  15. Development of spectrally selective imaging system for negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, K. Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2014-02-15

    A spectrally selective imaging system has been developed to obtain a distribution of H{sub α} emissions at the extraction region in a hydrogen negative ion source. The diagnostic system consisted of an aspherical lens, optical filters, a fiber image conduit, and a charge coupled device detector was installed on the 1/3-scaled hydrogen negative ion source in the National Institute for Fusion Science. The center of sight line passes beside the plasma grid (PG) surface with the distance of 11 mm, and the viewing angle has coverage 35 mm from the PG surface. Two dimensional H{sub α} distribution in the range up to 20 mm from the PG surface was clearly observed. The reduction area for H{sub α} emission caused by beam extraction was widely distributed in the extraction region near the PG surface.

  16. Mean excitation energy for molecules of hydrogen and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Kamaratos, E.

    1981-01-01

    The Gordon-Kim electron gas model of molecular bonding is used to calculate correction factors for the Bragg rule for molecules of hydrogen and carbon. General rules for molecular mean excitation energies are obtained that agree to about 4% with experimental values.

  17. Orbital Energy Levels in Molecular Hydrogen. A Simple Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Christopher J.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the energetics involved in the formation of molecular hydrogen using concepts that should be familiar to students beginning the study of molecular orbital theory. Emphasized are experimental data on ionization energies. Included are two-electron atomic and molecular systems. (CW)

  18. High-energy Physics with Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.

    1958-03-07

    Recent experience with liquid hydrogen bubble chambers of 25 and 40 cm dia. in high-energy physics experiments is discussed. Experiments described are: interactions of K{sup -} mesons with protons, interactions of antiprotons with protons, catalysis of nuclear fusion reactions by muons, and production and decay of hyperons from negative pions. (W.D.M.)

  19. Assessment of methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Glatzmaier, G.; Blake, D.; Showalter, S.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy. The results of this work can be used to guide future work in the application of concentrated solar energy to hydrogen production. Specifically, the objectives were to: (1) determine the cost of hydrogen produced from methods that use concentrated solar thermal energy, (2) compare these costs to those of hydrogen produced by electrolysis using photovoltaics and wind energy as the electricity source. This project had the following scope of work: (1) perform cost analysis on ambient temperature electrolysis using the 10 MWe dish-Stirling and 200 MWe power tower technologies; for each technology, sue two cases for projected costs, years 2010 and 2020 the dish-Stirling system, years 2010 and 2020 for the power tower, (2) perform cost analysis on high temperature electrolysis using the 200 MWe power tower technology and projected costs for the year 2020, and (3) identify and describe the key technical issues for high temperature thermal dissociation and the thermochemical cycles.

  20. Resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar channeled in a crystal; Transition into the first excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, A.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2012-03-01

    The presented program is designed to simulate the characteristics of resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar-channeled in a crystal. The program realizes the numerical algorithm to solve the Schrödinger equation for the ion-bound electron at a special resonance excitation condition. The calculated wave function of the bound electron defines probabilities for the ion to be in the either ground or first excited state, or to be ionized. Finally, in the outgoing beam the fractions of ions in the ground state, in the first excited state, and ionized by collisions with target electrons, are defined. The program code is written on C++ and is designed for multiprocessing systems (clusters). The output data are presented in the table. Program summaryProgram title: RCE_H-like_1 Catalogue identifier: AEKX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2813 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 34 667 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (g++, icc compilers) Computer: Multiprocessor systems (clusters) Operating system: Any OS based on LINUX; program was tested under Novell SLES 10 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Contains MPI directives RAM: <1 MB per processor Classification: 2.1, 2.6, 7.10 External routines: MPI library for GNU C++, Intel C++ compilers Nature of problem: When relativistic hydrogen-like ion moves in the crystal in the planar channeling regime, in the ion rest frame the time-periodic electric field acts on the bound electron. If the frequency of this field matches the transition frequency between electronic energy levels, the resonant coherent excitation can take place. Therefore, ions in the different states may be

  1. Excitation of the projectile helium ion impacting on hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, R.P.

    1984-04-01

    The Vainshtein-Presnyakov-Sobel'man approximation (VPSA) has been applied to calculate the 2s excitation cross section of projectile He/sup +/ in the reaction He/sup +/(1s)+H(1s) ..-->..He/sup +/(2s)+H(1s). Calculations have been performed for both post and prior forms assuming the peaking approximation. Comparison is made with the existing theoretical calculations and experimental data. It is found that the VPSA (post form) cross sections agree reasonably well with the experimental data. The VPSA (prior form) is in disagreement with other theoretical calculations. At high energies all the theoretical calculations give identical results.

  2. Possible Fault Control of Hydrogen Ion Concentrations Near Schiaparelli Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevy, J. R.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Epithermal neutron flux maps of the equatorial region near Schiaparelli Crater in Mars eastern hemisphere indicate hydrogen ion concentrations in the shallow subsurface. Published maps of these hydrogen concentrations reveal anomalous linear concentrations of hydrogen with a northeast to southwest trend. The width and trend of these linear anomalies matches the width and trend of the graben between Scylla Scopulus and Charybdis Scopulus further to the south, west of Hellas Basin. These concentrations are believed to indicate locations of subsurface water ice. As such, the flux maps pinpoint locations where quantities of water may intermittently exist today or where liquid water may have pooled in the past. The possibility of life existing on Mars, either in the distant past or at present, depends on the availability of liquid water.

  3. Doubly excited states of the hydrogen negative ion and helium atom in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Pinghui; Kar, Sabyasachi; Zhou, Y.

    2013-01-15

    The nonthermal effects on the doubly excited resonance states of the hydrogen negative ion and helium atom are investigated in Lorentzian astrophysical plasma environments using highly correlated Hylleraas-type wave functions in the framework of the stabilization method. Resonance parameters (resonance position and width) are reported for the first time as functions of the spectral index and plasma parameter. The screening effects are more pronounced in the stronger screening region.

  4. Study of a polarized hydrogen ion source with deuterium plasma ionizer

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Derevyankin, G.E.; Dudnikov, V.G.; Klenov, V.S.; Nechaeva, L.P.; Plohinsky, Y.V.; Vasil`ev, G.A.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1995-07-15

    A description of the atomic beam polarized hydrogen ion source developed at the INR in Moscow is given. It is capable of producing polarized 100 {mu}sec long H{sup +} beams with currents up to 6 {mu}A. The beam is 85% polarized and has a normal emittance of 2{pi} mm mrad. Additionally polarized H{sup {minus}} beams have currents up to 200 {mu}A and normalized emittance 2.2 {pi} mm mrad. (AIP)

  5. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  6. Ion and laser microprobes applied to the measurement of corrosion-produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1971-01-01

    An ion microprobe and a laser microprobe were used to measure concentrations of corrosion-produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale. Hydrogen concentrations of several thousand ppm were measured by both analytical techniques below the fracture surfaces of hot-salt stress-corroded titanium alloy specimens. This segregation of hydrogen below fracture surfaces supports a previously proposed theory that corrosion-produced hydrogen is responsible for hot-salt stress-corrosion embrittlement and cracking of titanium alloys. These advanced analytical techniques suggest great potential for many areas of stress-corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement research, quality control, and field inspection applications.

  7. Universal FFM Hydrogen Spectral Line Shapes Applied to Ions and Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossé, C.; Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.; Bureyeva, L. A.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    2008-10-01

    We present a method for the calculation of hydrogen spectral line shapes based on two combined approaches: Universal Model and FFM procedure. We start with the analytical functions for the intensities of the Stark components of radiative transitions between highly excited atomic states with large values of principal quantum numbers n,n'γ1, with Δn = n-n'≪n for the specific cases of Hn-α line (Δn = 1) and Hn-β line (Δn = 2). The FFM line shape is obtained by averaging on the electric field of the Hooper's field distribution for ion and electron perturber dynamics and by mixing the Stark components with a jumping frequency rate ve (vi) where v = N1/3u (N is electron density and u is the ion or electron thermal velocity). Finally, the total line shape is given by convolution of ion and electron line shapes. Hydrogen line shape calculations for Balmer Hα and Hβ lines are compared to experimental results in low density plasma (Ne˜1016-1017cm-3) and low electron temperature in order of 10 000K. This method relying on analytic expressions permits fast calculation of Hn-α and Hn-β lines of hydrogen and could be used in the study of the Stark broadening of radio recombination lines for high principal quantum number.

  8. First experiments with Cs doped Mo as surface converter for negative hydrogen ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schiesko, L. Hopf, C.; Höschen, T.; Meisl, G.; Encke, O.; Heinemann, B.; Fantz, U.; Cartry, G.; Amsalem, P.; Achkasov, K.

    2015-08-21

    A study was conducted on the properties of molybdenum implanted with caesium as an approach to reduce the Cs consumption of negative hydrogen ion sources based on evaporated Cs. The depth profiles of the implanted Cs were simulated by SDTrimSP and experimentally determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling. In particular, one year after implantation, the depth profiles showed no signs of Cs diffusion into the molybdenum, suggesting long term stability of the implanted Cs atoms. The H{sup −} surface generation mechanisms on the implanted samples in hydrogen plasma were investigated, and the stability of the H{sup −} yield during four hours low power hydrogen plasma discharges was demonstrated. An estimation of the work function reduction (−0.8 eV) by the Cs implantation was performed, and a comparison of the relative negative ion yields between the implanted samples and highly oriented pyrolitic graphite showed that the Cs doped Mo negative ion yield was larger.

  9. Evidence of hydrogen ion secretion from the human gall bladder in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Plevris, J N; Hayes, P C; Harrison, D J; Bouchier, I A

    1992-01-01

    Gall bladder bile is more acid that hepatic bile and this has been attributed to bicarbonate absorption by the gall bladder epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the acid base changes that occur across the human gall bladder mucosa. Fresh gall bladder tissue was obtained at cholecystectomy and placed in an Ussing Chamber and perfused with Ringer-Krebs glucose bicarbonate solution. The viability of the gall bladder was assessed by measuring the potential differences across the epithelium and by the morphology of the epithelial cells at the end of the experiments. Aliquots from the solutions were taken at two, 45 and 70 minutes and pCO2, hydrogen ion and bicarbonate concentrations were measured. In the mucosal side of the chamber a consistent and significant decrease was observed from two minutes to 70 minutes in bicarbonate concentration while pCO2 and hydrogen ion concentrations significantly increased. The degree of inflammation correlated well with the ability for acidification, the more inflamed the tissue the less its ability to acidify. When the gall bladder was exposed to amiloride or sodium free solution acidification was abolished in the mucosal side. When tissue metabolism was irreversibly inhibited by exposure to formaldehyde, hydrogen ion concentration and pCO2 were significantly decreased in the mucosal side of the chamber compared with the viable gall bladder. The human gall bladder is capable of secreting acid and this may be an important mechanism for preventing calcium precipitation and gall stone formation. PMID:1582602

  10. Compression effects in inductively coupled, high-power radio-frequency discharges for negative hydrogen ion production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Rolf

    2003-02-01

    In the paper we present a simplified model description of inductively coupled plasma discharges operating at a rather high radio-frequency (rf) power. In this case the induced high plasma currents can cause periodic compressions over a substantial radial distance. Such conditions are obviously given in rf driven 1 MHz/150 kW plasma sources developed at the Institute for Plasma Physics Garching for negative (hydrogen) ion production in future neutral beam injection (NBI) systems for nuclear fusion research, such as the 1 MeV/50 MW NBI system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [T. Inoue, R. Hemsworth, V. Kulygin, and Y. Okumura, Fusion Eng. Design 55, 291 (2001)]. The given model describes quite well the compression and other features of the discharge. The results include the Ohmic power input (i.e., electron heating), the resulting density build-up, and—as a new feature—periodical plasma compressions, leading to a direct energy input also into the plasma ions. The model also explains the strange effect of small argon admixtures, which improve the negative ion yield in rf sources by a factor of up to 2-3 (but which have no effect in conventional dc arc sources). With the calculated dependencies from external parameters (e.g., rf-power and frequency, gas pressure, ion mass or the specific geometry), the modeling may help for the further optimization of the rf source.

  11. Effect of Hydrogen ion beam irradiation onto the FIR reflectivity of pulsed laser deposited mirror like Tungsten films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostako, A. T. T.; Khare, Alika; Rao, C. V. S.; Raole, Prakash M.; Vala, Sudhirsinh; Jakhar, Shrichand; Basu, T. K.; Abhangi, Mitul; Makwana, Rajinikant J.

    2012-04-01

    The optical quality of the First Mirrors (FMs) of a fusion device (burning plasma experiments, ITER) deteriorates due to the erosion by charge exchange neutrals, re-deposition of the eroded material and the lattice damage by the bombardment of the high energetic particles. This degradation of the optical quality of the plasma facing components in such a harsh environment is a serious concern for the reliability of the spectroscopic based optical diagnostics using FM of a fusion device. In this paper, the effect of 8 keV Hydrogen ion beam irradiation onto the FIR reflectivity of Tungsten thin film mirror is presented. The Tungsten thin films were prepared via Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique. The Tungsten mirrors were subjected to X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) for characterization. The specular reflectivities of the Tungsten mirrors before and after exposure to ion beam were recorded with Fourier Transform of Infra-Red (FTIR) technique. The ion penetration depth and straggle into Tungsten thin film and stainless steel (SS) substrate were estimated by Transport of Ions in Matter (TIRM) simulation code. The changes in post exposure IR reflectivity were interpreted in terms of these parameters.

  12. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  13. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) and Power-to-Gas Economic Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, Joshua

    2015-07-30

    This presentation summarizes opportunities for hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas and presents the results of a market analysis performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to quantify the value of energy storage. Hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas systems have the ability to integrate multiple energy sectors including electricity, transportation, and industrial. On account of the flexibility of hydrogen systems, there are a variety of potential system configurations. Each configuration will provide different value to the owner, customers and grid system operator. This presentation provides an economic comparison of hydrogen storage, power-to-gas and conventional storage systems. The total cost is compared to the revenue with participation in a variety of markets to assess the economic competitiveness. It is found that the sale of hydrogen for transportation or industrial use greatly increases competitiveness. Electrolyzers operating as demand response devices (i.e., selling hydrogen and grid services) are economically competitive, while hydrogen storage that inputs electricity and outputs only electricity have an unfavorable business case. Additionally, tighter integration with the grid provides greater revenue (e.g., energy, ancillary service and capacity markets are explored). Lastly, additional hours of storage capacity is not necessarily more competitive in current energy and ancillary service markets and electricity markets will require new mechanisms to appropriately compensate long duration storage devices.

  14. Effect of hydrogen ion beam treatment on Si nanocrystal/SiO2 superlattice-based memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Hui-Ju; Wu, Hsuan-Ta; Chuang, Bing-Ru; Shih, Chuan-Feng

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a novel route for synthesizing silicon-rich oxide (SRO)/SiO2 superlattice-based memory devices with an improved memory window and retention properties. The SiO2 and SRO superlattices are deposited by reactive sputtering. Specifically, the hydrogen ion beam is used to irradiate the SRO layer immediately after its deposition in the vacuum chamber. The use of the hydrogen ion beam was determined to increase oxygen content and the density of the Si nanocrystals. The memory window increased from 16 to 25.6 V, and the leakage current decreased significantly by two orders, to under ±20 V, for the hydrogen ion beam-prepared devices. This study investigates the mechanism into how hydrogen ion beam treatment alters SRO films and influences memory properties.

  15. Potential Energy Curves of Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the X(sup 1)sigma+ and V(sup 1)sigma+ states of HF and DF have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The results calculated from the different sets of data for HF and DF are found to be in very good agreement. The theoretical results of Karo are compared to the experimental results obtained here.

  16. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  17. PERFORMANCE LIMITATIONS IN HIGH-ENERGY ION COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-05-16

    High-energy ion colliders (hadron colliders operating with ions other than protons) are premier research tools for nuclear physics. The collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operations considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species, including asymmetric collisions. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams limits are set by space charge, charge exchange, and intrabeam scattering effects. The latter leads to luminosity lifetimes of only a few hours for intense heavy ions beams. Currently, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the only operating high-energy ion collider. Later this decade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN, will also run with heavy ions.

  18. The pumping of hydrogen and helium by sputter-ion pumps. Revision 3/93

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.; Pate, D.J.; Todd, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    The pumping of hydrogen in diode and triode sputter-ion pumps is discussed. The type of cathode material used in these pumps is shown to have a significant impact on the effectiveness with which hydrogen is pumped. Examples of this include data for pumps with aluminum and titanium-alloy cathodes. Diode pumps with aluminum cathodes are shown to be no more effective in the pumping of hydrogen than in the pumping of helium. The use of titanium or titanium alloy anodes is also shown to measurably impact on the speed of these pumps at.very low pressures. This stems from the fact that hydrogen is {times}10{sup 6} more soluble in titanium than in stainless steel. Hydrogen becomes resident in the anodes because of fast neutral burial. Lastly, quantitative data are given for the He speeds and capacities of both noble and conventional diode and triode pumps. The effectiveness of various pump regeneration procedures, subsequent to the pumping of He, is reported.These included bakeout and N{sub 2} glow discharge cleaning. The comparative desorption of He with the subsequent pumping of N{sub 2} is reported on. The N{sub 2} speed of these pumps was used as the benchmark for defining the size of the pumps vs. their respective He speeds.

  19. Hydrogenation effects on the lithium ion battery performance of TiOF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; Wang, Zhihui; Yan, Xiaodong; Tian, Lihong; Liu, Gao; Chen, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogenated titanium oxyfluorides (TiOF2) nanoparticles were synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal method and subsequent hydrogenation treatment. As anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the hydrogenated TiOF2 showed a superior rate performance compared to the pristine TiOF2. A charge capacity of 118.4 mA h g-1 was achieved at the current density of 1053 mA g-1 upon 150 cycles, which was 4 times higher than that of the pristine TiOF2. The rate performance of the hydrogenated TiOF2 at different current densities of 42, 210, 1053, 2106, 5265, 10530, 21060 and 52650 mA g-1 was 2.8, 6.0, 13.2, 14.7, 21.5, 30.6, 67.9 and 483.3 times higher than those of the pristine TiOF2 electrode at the corresponding rates, respectively. The remarkable improvement of the electrochemical performance was likely related to the size breakdown in the (001) direction after hydrogenation, instead of oxygen vacancies induced better charge transfer properties.

  20. Unconventional hydrogen bonding to organic ions in the gas phase: Stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and protonated pyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; El-Shall, M. Samy; Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G.

    2014-08-07

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes for the stepwise association of HCN molecules with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations forming the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} and C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} clusters, respectively, with n = 1–4. For comparison, the binding of 1–4 HCN molecules to the protonated pyridine C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}(HCN){sub n} has also been investigated. The binding energies of HCN to the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations are nearly equal (11.4 and 12.0 kcal/mol, respectively) but weaker than the HCN binding to the protonated pyridine (14.0 kcal/mol). The pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations form unconventional carbon-based ionic hydrogen bonds with HCN (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH). Protonated pyridine forms a stronger ionic hydrogen bond with HCN (NH{sup +}⋯NCH) which can be extended to a linear chain with the clustering of additional HCN molecules (NH{sup +}⋯NCH··NCH⋯NCH) leading to a rapid decrease in the bond strength as the length of the chain increases. The lowest energy structures of the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cation clusters containing 3-4 HCN molecules show a strong tendency for the internal solvation of the radical cation by the HCN molecules where bifurcated structures involving multiple hydrogen bonding sites with the ring hydrogen atoms are formed. The unconventional H-bonds (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) formed between the pyridine or the pyrimidine radical cations and HCN molecules (11–12 kcal/mol) are stronger than the similar (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) bonds formed between the benzene radical cation and HCN molecules (9 kcal/mol) indicating that the CH{sup δ+} centers in the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations have more effective charges than in the benzene radical cation.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a bottom-up costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with ® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target

  2. Plasma And Beam Homogeneity Of The RF-Driven Negative Hydrogen Ion Source For ITER NBI

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Wuenderlich, D.; Gutser, R.; Berger, M.

    2009-03-12

    The neutral beam injection (NBI) system of ITER is based on a large RF driven negative hydrogen ion source. For good beam transmission ITER requires a beam homogeneity of better than 10%. The plasma uniformity and the correlation with the beam homogeneity are being investigated at the prototype ion sources at IPP. Detailed studies are carried out at the long pulse test facility MANITU with a source of roughly 1/8 of the ITER source size. The plasma homogeneity close to plasma grid is measured by optical emission spectroscopy and by fixed Langmuir probes working in the ion saturation region. The beam homogeneity is measured with a spatially resolved H{sub {alpha}} Doppler-shifted beam spectroscopy system. The plasma top-to-bottom symmetry improves with increasing RF power and increasing bias voltage which is applied to suppress the co-extracted electron current. The symmetry is better in deuterium than in hydrogen. The boundary layer near the plasma grid determines the plasma symmetry. At high ion currents with a low amount of co-extracted electrons the plasma is symmetrical and the beam homogeneity is typically 5-10%(RMS). The size scaling and the influence of the magnetic field strength of the filter field created by a plasma grid current is studied at the test facility RADI (roughly a 1/2 size ITER source) at ITER relevant RF power levels. In volume operation in deuterium (non-cesiated source), the plasma illumination of the grid is satisfying.

  3. Brookhaven National Laboratory chemical/hydrogen energy systems program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, A.

    1981-01-01

    FY 81 status and highlights are summarized for each of the major activities (hydrogen production, hydrogen storage/transport, and chemical energy systems). The solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) water electrolysis project at General Electric was redirected in February 1981. The static feed water electrolysis concept pursued at Life Systems, Inc. continues to show promise as a low-cost, high-efficiency alternative to conventional as well as SPE systems. Advanced alkaline electrolysis component testing at Teledyne Energy Systems indicates that improved electrode, catalyst, and separator systems capable of operating in the 120/sup 0/C temperature regime can compete with the more realistic projections of SPE electrolyzer cost and performance characterization. Microcavity storage systems investigated by Robert J. Teitel Associates were found unsuitable for the cost-effective storage of hydrogen in either bulk or mobile storage applications. Natural gas supplementation with hydrogen was reevaluated at BNL. The use of ammonia as a hydrogen transport/storage alternative was examined at BNL. Hydrogen separation/purification from industrial waste streams is a project under investigation at APCI/Ergenics. Emphasis is being placed on identifying metal hydrides and their poison-resistant characteristics. H/sub 2/ recovery from H/sub 2/S investigations at SRI have proceeded successfully with reasonable success by having demonstrated that H/sub 2/S bubbled through molten copper results in a high purity (approx. 99% H/sub 2/ product and the molten reactant can be easily recycled. The H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//H/sub 2/O chemical heat pump development at Rocket Research Corporation has progressed on schedule.

  4. Analysis of Hydrogen and Competing Technologies for Utility-Scale Energy Storage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.

    2010-02-11

    Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's analysis of hydrogen energy storage scenarios, including analysis framework, levelized cost comparison of hydrogen and competing technologies, analysis results, and conclusions drawn from the analysis.

  5. Analysis of the theory of high energy ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures for the approximation of the transport of high-energy ions are discussed on the basis of available data on ion nuclear reactions. A straightahead approximation appears appropriate for space applications. The assumption that the secondary-ion-fragment velocity is equal to that of the fragmenting nucleus is inferior to straightahead theory but is of sufficient accuracy if the primary ions display a broad energy spectrum. An iterative scheme for the solution of the inhomogenous integral transport equations holds promise for practical calculation. A model calculation shows that multiple charged ion fragments penetrate to greater depths in comparison with the free path of a primary heavy ion.

  6. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.

    1979-10-25

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employing crossed electric and magnetic fields, separates the electrons from the ions as they are extracted from the ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90/sup 0/ to each other, the electrons remain at approximately the electrical potential at which they were generated. The electromagnetic forces cause the ions to be accelerated to the full accelerating supply voltage energy while being deflected through an angle of less than 90/sup 0/. The electrons precess out of the accelerating field region into an electron recovery region where they are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply energy. It is possible, by this method, to collect > 90% of the electrons extracted along with the negative ions from a negative ion source beam at < 4% of full energy.

  7. Sodium-ion electrolytes based on ionic liquids: a role of cation-anion hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Andreeva, Nadezhda A

    2016-08-01

    Recent success of the sodium-ion batteries fosters an academic interest for their investigation. Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) constitute universal solvents providing non-volatility and non-flammability to electrolytes. In the present work, we consider four families of RTILs as prospective solvents for NaBF4 and NaNO3 with an inorganic salt concentration of 25 and 50 mol%. We propose a methodology to rate RTILs according to their solvation capability using parameters of the computed radial distribution functions. Hydrogen bonds between the cations and the anions of RTILs were found to indirectly favor sodium solvation, irrespective of the particular RTIL and its concentration. The best performance was recorded in the case of cholinium nitrate. The reported observations and correlations of ionic structures and properties offer important assistance to an emerging field of sodium-ion batteries. Graphical Abstract Sodium-ion electrolytes. PMID:27381471

  8. A collisional radiative model for caesium and its application to an RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wünderlich, D. Wimmer, C.; Friedl, R.

    2015-04-08

    A collisional radiative (CR) model for caesium atoms in low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogen-caesium plasmas is introduced. This model includes the caesium ground state, 14 excited states, the singly charged caesium ion and the negative hydrogen ion. The reaction probabilities needed as input are based on data from the literature, using some scaling and extrapolations. Additionally, new cross sections for electron collision ionization and three-body recombination have been calculated. The relevance of mutual neutralization of positive caesium ions and negative hydrogen ions is highlighted: depending on the densities of the involved particle species, this excitation channel can have a significant influence on the population densities of excited states in the caesium atom. This strong influence is successfully verified by optical emission spectroscopy measurements performed at the IPP prototype negative hydrogen ion source for ITER NBI. As a consequence, population models for caesium in electronegative low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogen-caesium plasmas need to take into account the mutual neutralization process. The present CR model is an example for such models and represents an important prerequisite for deducing the total caesium density in surface production based negative hydrogen ion sources.

  9. Comparison of measured and modelled negative hydrogen ion densities at the ECR-discharge HOMER

    SciTech Connect

    Rauner, D.; Kurutz, U.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-08

    As the negative hydrogen ion density n{sub H{sup −}} is a key parameter for the investigation of negative ion sources, its diagnostic quantification is essential in source development and operation as well as for fundamental research. By utilizing the photodetachment process of negative ions, generally two different diagnostic methods can be applied: via laser photodetachment, the density of negative ions is measured locally, but only relatively to the electron density. To obtain absolute densities, the electron density has to be measured additionally, which induces further uncertainties. Via cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the absolute density of H{sup −} is measured directly, however LOS-averaged over the plasma length. At the ECR-discharge HOMER, where H{sup −} is produced in the plasma volume, laser photodetachment is applied as the standard method to measure n{sub H{sup −}}. The additional application of CRDS provides the possibility to directly obtain absolute values of n{sub H{sup −}}, thereby successfully bench-marking the laser photodetachment system as both diagnostics are in good agreement. In the investigated pressure range from 0.3 to 3 Pa, the measured negative hydrogen ion density shows a maximum at 1 to 1.5 Pa and an approximately linear response to increasing input microwave powers from 200 up to 500 W. Additionally, the volume production of negative ions is 0-dimensionally modelled by balancing H{sup −} production and destruction processes. The modelled densities are adapted to the absolute measurements of n{sub H{sup −}} via CRDS, allowing to identify collisions of H{sup −} with hydrogen atoms (associative and non-associative detachment) to be the dominant loss process of H{sup −} in the plasma volume at HOMER. Furthermore, the characteristic peak of n{sub H{sup −}} observed at 1 to 1.5 Pa is identified to be caused by a comparable behaviour of the electron density with varying pressure, as n{sub e} determines

  10. Magnetized retarding field energy analyzer measuring the particle flux and ion energy distribution of both positive and negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane; Dudin, Stanislav

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents the development of a magnetized retarding field energy analyzer (MRFEA) used for positive and negative ion analysis. The two-stage analyzer combines a magnetic electron barrier and an electrostatic ion energy barrier allowing both positive and negative ions to be analyzed without the influence of electrons (co-extracted or created downstream). An optimal design of the MRFEA for ion-ion beams has been achieved by a comparative study of three different MRFEA configurations, and from this, scaling laws of an optimal magnetic field strength and topology have been deduced. The optimal design consists of a uniform magnetic field barrier created in a rectangular channel and an electrostatic barrier consisting of a single grid and a collector placed behind the magnetic field. The magnetic barrier alone provides an electron suppression ratio inside the analyzer of up to 6000, while keeping the ion energy resolution below 5 eV. The effective ion transparency combining the magnetic and electrostatic sections of the MRFEA is measured as a function of the ion energy. It is found that the ion transparency of the magnetic barrier increases almost linearly with increasing ion energy in the low-energy range (below 200 eV) and saturates at high ion energies. The ion transparency of the electrostatic section is almost constant and close to the optical transparency of the entrance grid. We show here that the MRFEA can provide both accurate ion flux and ion energy distribution measurements in various experimental setups with ion beams or plasmas run at low pressure and with ion energies above 10 eV.

  11. A CW radiofrequency ion source for production of negative hydrogen ion beams for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J.; Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. P.

    2015-04-08

    A CW 13.56 MHz radiofrequency-driven ion source RADIS for production of H{sup −} and D{sup −} beams is under development for replacing the filament-driven ion source of the MCC30/15 cyclotron. The RF ion source has a 16-pole multicusp plasma chamber, an electromagnet-based magnetic filter and an external planar spiral RF antenna behind an AlN window. The extraction is a 5-electrode system with an adjustable puller electrode voltage for optimizing the beam formation, a water-cooled electron dump electrode and an accelerating einzel lens. At 2650 W of RF power, the source produces 1 mA of H{sup −} (2.6 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is the intensity needed at injection for production of 200 µA H{sup +} with the filament-driven ion source. A simple pepperpot device has been developed for characterizing the beam emittance. Plans for improving the power efficiency with the use of a new permanent magnet front plate is discussed.

  12. Unparticle contribution to the hydrogen atom ground state energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wondrak, Michael F.; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    In the present work we study the effect of unparticle modified static potentials on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom. By using Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory, we obtain the energy shift of the ground state and compare it with experimental data. Bounds on the unparticle energy scale ΛU as a function of the scaling dimension dU and the coupling constant λ are derived. We show that there exists a parameter region where bounds on ΛU are stringent, signaling that unparticles could be tested in atomic physics experiments.

  13. Status of photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen and electrical energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Walker, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The efficiency for conversion of electromagnetic energy to chemical and electrical energy utilizing semiconductor single crystals as photoanodes in electrochemical cells was investigated. Efficiencies as high as 20 percent were achieved for the conversion of 330 nm radiation to chemical energy in the form of hydrogen by the photoelectrolysis of water in a SrTiO3 based cell. The SrTiO3 photoanodes were shown to be stable in 9.5 M NaOH solutions for periods up to 48 hours. Efficiencies of 9 percent were measured for the conversion of broadband visible radiation to hydrogen using n-type GaAs crystals as photoanodes. Crystals of GaAs coated with 500 nm of gold, silver, or tin for surface passivation show no significant change in efficiency. By suppressing the production of hydrogen in a CdSe-based photogalvanic cell, an efficiency of 9 percent was obtained in conversion of 633 nm light to electrical energy. A CdS-based photogalvanic cell produced a conversion efficiency of 5 percent for 500 nm radiation.

  14. Surface modification using low energy ground state ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of effecting modifications at the surfaces of materials using low energy ion beams of known quantum state, purity, flux, and energy is presented. The ion beam is obtained by bombarding ion-generating molecules with electrons which are also at low energy. The electrons used to bombard the ion generating molecules are separated from the ions thus obtained and the ion beam is directed at the material surface to be modified. Depending on the type of ion generating molecules used, different ions can be obtained for different types of surface modifications such as oxidation and diamond film formation. One area of application is in the manufacture of semiconductor devices from semiconductor wafers.

  15. Melting of Dense Hydrogen during Heavy Ion Beam-Driven Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grinenko, A; Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-03-02

    Until now the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrogen continue to be understood unsatisfactory. A number of complex high pressure phases at relatively low temperatures has been confirmed [1]. However, conclusive answers on the existence of a plasma phase transition, the dissociation of hydrogen molecules at high densities, the metallization in the solid, and the melting line for pressures above 70GPa are still missing. A particularly interesting behavior has been predicted for the melting line at high pressures where it has a maximum and its slope changes sign [2]. In Ref. [3], we have shown that these states can be created using cylindrical compression driven by heavy ion beams. Employing ab initio simulations [4] and experimental data, a new wide range equation of state for hydrogen was constructed [3]. This new hydrogen EOS combined with hydrodynamic simulations is then used to describe the compression of hydrogen in LAPLAS targets [5] driven by heavy ion beams to be generated at the FAIR. The results shown in Fig. 1 indicate that the melting line up to its maximum as well as the transition from molecular fluids to fully ionized plasmas can be tested. By carefully tuning the number of particles in the beam, the compression can be adjusted to yield states at the solid-liquid phase transition (compare panels (a) and (b) in Fig. 1). This allows one to test the shape of the melting line beyond its maximum. It was demonstrated [3] that x-ray scattering [6] can be used to distinguish between the molecular solid and liquid phases as well as the metallic states. Hydrodynamic simulations have also highlighted the importance of temperature diagnostics, as it is more sensitive to the EOS than the density based diagnostic methods. Different materials have been considered as absorber. Although lead might seem to be the natural choice, the simulations show that aluminium is also a feasible option if slightly less compression is sufficient. Moreover, aluminium

  16. Performance improvement of gadolinium oxide resistive random access memory treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jer-Chyi Hsu, Chih-Hsien; Ye, Yu-Ren; Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa

    2014-03-15

    Characteristics improvement of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub x}O{sub y}) resistive random access memories (RRAMs) treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was investigated. With the hydrogen PIII treatment, the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs exhibited low set/reset voltages and a high resistance ratio, which were attributed to the enhanced movement of oxygen ions within the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} films and the increased Schottky barrier height at Pt/Gd{sub x}O{sub y} interface, respectively. The resistive switching mechanism of Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs was dominated by Schottky emission, as proved by the area dependence of the resistance in the low resistance state. After the hydrogen PIII treatment, a retention time of more than 10{sup 4} s was achieved at an elevated measurement temperature. In addition, a stable cycling endurance with the resistance ratio of more than three orders of magnitude of the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs can be obtained.

  17. Minimum energy, liquid hydrogen supersonic cruise vehicle study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential was examined of hydrogen-fueled supersonic vehicles designed for cruise at Mach 2.7 and at Mach 2.2. The aerodynamic, weight, and propulsion characteristics of a previously established design of a LH2 fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise vehicle (SCV) were critically reviewed and updated. The design of a Mach 2.2 SCV was established on a corresponding basis. These baseline designs were then studied to determine the potential of minimizing energy expenditure in performing their design mission, and to explore the effect of fuel price and noise restriction on their design and operating performance. The baseline designs of LH2 fueled aircraft were than compared with equivalent designs of jet A (conventional hydrocarbon) fueled SCV's. Use of liquid hydrogen for fuel for the subject aircraft provides significant advantages in performance, cost, noise, pollution, sonic boom, and energy utilization.

  18. Hydrogen negative-ion surface production on diamond materials in low-pressure H2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartry, Gilles; Achkasov, Kostiantyn; Pardanaud, Cédric; Layet, Jean-Marc; Simonin, Alain; Gicquel, Alix; PIIM Collaboration; IRFM Collaboration; LSPM Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    Negative-ion sources producing H-current density of ~200 A/m2 are required for the heating of the fusion plasma of the international project ITER. The only up-to-date solution to reach such a high H-negative-ion current is the use of cesium (Cs). Deposition of Cs on the negative-ion source walls lowers the material work function and allows for high electron-capture efficiency by incident particles and thus, high negative ion yields. However, severe drawbacks to the use of Cs have been identified and its elimination from the fusion negative-ion sources would be highly valuable. Volume production is not efficient enough at low-pressure to reach the high current required. Therefore, we are working on alternative solutions to produce high yield of H-negative-ions on surfaces in Cs-free H2 plasmas. In this communication, we will detail the methodology employed to study negative-ion surface production. In particular we will describe how the negative-ions are extracted from the plasma, and how we can obtain information on surface production mechanisms from the measurement of the H-energy distribution functions. We will present some results obtained on diamond surfaces and show that diamond is a promising candidate as a negative-ion enhancer material in low-pressure H2 plasmas. EFDA, FR-FCM, ANR, PACA are acknowledged for their support.

  19. Neutral beamline with improved ion-energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

    1981-04-13

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  20. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to the closed cycle hydrogen-oxygen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell (RFC), recently constructed at NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. Illustrated with explanatory graphics and figures, this report outlines the engineering motivations for the RFC as a solar energy storage device, the system requirements, layout and hardware detail of the RFC unit at NASA Glenn, the construction history, and test experience accumulated to date with this unit.

  1. Overview of Light Hydrogen-Based Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    This paper reviews light water and hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) including the different methodologies used to study these reactions and the results obtained. Reports of excess heat production, transmutation reactions, and nuclear radiation emission are cited. An aim of this review is to present a summary of the present status of light water LENR research and provide some insight into where this research is heading.

  2. Cluster-assisted generation of multi-charged ions in nanosecond laser ionization of pulsed hydrogen sulfide beam at 1064 and 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dong-Mei; Li, Hai-Yang; Luo, Xiao-Lin; Liang, Feng; Cheng, Shuang; Li, An-Lin

    2006-07-01

    The multi-charged sulfur ions of Sq+ (q<= 6) have been generated when hydrogen sulfide cluster beams are irradiated by a nanosecond laser of 1064 and 532 nm with an intensity of 1010~ 1012W.cm-2. S6+ is the dominant multi-charged species at 1064 nm, while S4+, S3+ and S2+ ions are the main multi-charged species at 532 nm. A three-step model (i.e., multiphoton ionization triggering, inverse bremsstrahlung heating, electron collision ionizing) is proposed to explain the generation of these multi-charged ions at the laser intensity stated above. The high ionization level of the clusters and the increasing charge state of the ion products with increasing laser wavelength are supposed mainly due to the rate-limiting step, i.e., electron heating by absorption energy from the laser field via inverse bremsstrahlung, which is proportional to λ2, λ being the laser wavelength.

  3. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy,and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Kwan, J. W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons - can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion - ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  4. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1]could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  5. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    L. Grisham and J.W. Kwan

    2008-08-12

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1] could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  6. Behavior of Negative Hydrogen Ion and its Beam by Bias and Beam Extraction Voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Haruhisa; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Kisaki, Masashi; Ikeda, Katsunori; Geng, Shaofei; Nagaoka, Kenichi; Osakabe, Masaki; Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Kaneko, Osamu; Serianni, Gianluigi; Agostinetti, Piero; Sartori, Emanuele; Brombin, Matteo; Wimmer, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Negative hydrogen ion (H-) dynamics from production to beam extraction in H- source for fusion have not been enough understood in cesium-seeded negative-hydrogen-ion sources. This dynamics understanding contributes constructions of higher performance ion sources. The H- is produced on and emitted from plasma grid electrode (PG) which is boundary electrode between source plasma and beam. The H- density in the vicinity of the PG decreased with bias voltage (between PG and arc chamber) by suppression of H- emission and/or yield. The H- density decrement was observed in H- beam extraction phase and penetrated to 30 mm depth from PG. The depth and H- beam current decreased with bias voltage. One of the possibilities which explain it is extracted H- coming from space in the vicinity of the PG. An object made of ceramic was inserted above the PG aperture. The H- beam intensity decreased if the object was set 9 mm from PG. This does not conflict with the possibility. This work is supported by NIFS Research Programs NIFS13ULRR008 and NIFS13ULRR702, and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 25800307 and 25249134.

  7. Energy options: real economics and the solar-hydrogen system

    SciTech Connect

    Bockris, J.O'M.

    1980-01-01

    All price comparisons being made at present, upon which energy decisions only effective decades later are being made, are irelevant, the author feels. The relevant economics is that of the time beyond the year 2000, when the fossil fuels will be playing a diminishing role in the energy mix, at energy prices greatly above those of the present time. This book attempts to put numbers in the various years concerned, and to discuss now the financing. It shows that the coal-nuclear policy, which is the basis of the present energy thrust in research and in financing, is incompatible with environmental and health considerations. However, Prof. Bockris notes that the alternatives are not those of having nuclear energy or having gross unemployment, but rather those of having nuclear energy or solar energy on a massive scale by means of collection in desert areas. Solar energy is not primarily a source for rooftops and water heating, but one which could supply factories, industries, commerce and transportation. The key to the difference in viewpoint is the introduction of hydrogen as a transmission, storage, and distribution medium, the hydrogen coming from the electrolysis of water, and the electricity for this coming from the solar source. The title of the book arises because of the newly introduced subjects of the Second Law economics and the real economics which takes into account the Second Law cost, but also the differing cost of health with each alternative-energy system. It is only if one takes into account economics from the point of view of the consumer of the energy that the relevant order of preference of the various energy options can be ascertained. 526 references, 148 figures, 94 tables.

  8. Amorphization and recrystallization of single-crystalline hydrogen titanate nanowires by N{sup +} ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Behera, Akshaya K.; Bandyopadyay, Malay K.; Chatterjee, Shyamal; Facsko, Stefan; Das, Siddhartha

    2014-06-21

    We report on the phase transformation of hydrogen titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}) nanowires induced by 50 keV N{sup +} ion irradiation at room temperature with fluences of 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Using transmission electron microscopy, the internal structure of the ion irradiated nanowires is analyzed. At low fluence, a transformation from crystalline H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} to amorphous TiO{sub 2} is observed. However, at higher fluence, a remarkable crystalline-amorphous TiO{sub 2} core-shell structure is formed. At this higher fluence, the recrystallization occurs in the core of the nanowire and the outer layer remains amorphous. The phase transformation and formation of core-shell structure are explained using the thermal spike model, radiation enhanced diffusion, and classical theory of nucleation and growth under non-equilibrium thermodynamics. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman scattering reveal further insight into the structure of the nanowires before and after ion irradiation.

  9. Online deuterium hydrogen exchange and protein digestion coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Arndt, James R; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-05-19

    Online deuterium hydrogen exchange (DHX) and pepsin digestion (PD) is demonstrated using drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) coupled with linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometry (MS) with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. DHX of deuterated ubiquitin, followed by subsequent quenching and digestion, is performed within ∼60 s, yielding 100% peptide sequence coverage. The high reproducibility of the IMS separation allows spectral feature matching between two-dimensional IMS-MS datasets (undeuterated and deuterated) without the need for dataset alignment. Extracted ion drift time distributions (XIDTDs) of deuterated peptic peptides are mobility-matched to corresponding XIDTDs of undeuterated peptic peptides that were identified using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Matching XIDTDs allows a straightforward identification and deuterium retention evaluation for labeled peptides. Aside from the mobility separation, the ion trapping capabilities of the LTQ, combined with ETD, are demonstrated to provide single-residue resolution. Deuterium retention for the c- series ions across residues M(1)-L(15) and N(25)-R(42) are in good agreement with the known secondary structural elements within ubiquitin. PMID:25893550

  10. Low-energy charge transfer between C5+ and atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Havener, Charles C; Seely, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Charge transfer with carbon ions has been identified as important in both magnetic fusion plasma devices and, more recently, in solar wind interactions with comets, planets, or neutrals in the heliosphere. A merged-beams technique is used to measure the absolute total charge-transfer cross section for C{sup 5+} and atomic H over four orders of magnitude in collision energy, from 12,000 to 0.64 eV/u. The present measurements are compared with previous measurements using an atomic hydrogen target and benchmark available classical trajectory Monte Carlo and molecular-orbital close-coupling calculations. An observed increasing cross section below 10 eV/u is attributed to trajectory effects due to the ion-induced dipole attraction between reactants.

  11. Low Energy Charge Transfer between C5+ and Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Charge transfer (CT) with carbon ions has been identified for a long time as important in both magnetic fusion plasma devices and more recently in solar wind interactions with comets, planets, or neutrals in the heliosphere. A merged-beams technique is used to measure the absolute total charge transfer cross section for C5+ and atomic H over four orders of magnitude in collision energy, from 12,000 eV/u to 0.64 eV/u. The present measurements are compared with previous measurements using an atomic hydrogen target and benchmark available classical trajectory Monte-Carlo and molecular-orbital close-coupling calculations. An increasing cross section below 10 eV/u is attributed to trajectory effects due to the ion-induced dipole attraction between reactants.

  12. De-excitation X rays from Resonant Coherently Excited 390-MeV/u Hydrogen-like Ar Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1999-08-01

    Resonant coherent excitation (RCE) of 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar{sup 17+} ions planar channeled in a Si crystal was investigated through measurements of the de-excitation X-rays as we11 as the charge state distribution of the transmitted ions. We observed enhancements of both the fraction of ionized Ar{sup 18+} ions and the intensity of the de-excitation X-rays under the RCE condition. The n=2 states of Ar{sup 17+} in the crystal are split into four energy levels due to spin-orbit interaction and Stark effect induced by the planar potential of the crystal. The intensities of the X-rays from the lower two levels were found to be smaller compared with those from the higher two levels, which is explained by the dominance of the 2s component not decaying via a single photon emission. The difference between the resonance profiles of the charge state and the X-ray reflects the nature of n=2 states in the crystal field.

  13. Tabulation of the bound-state energies of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present tables for the bound-state energies for atomic hydrogen. The tabulated energies include the hyperfine structure and thus this work extends the work of Mohr et al. [P. J. Mohr et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 84, 1527 (2012)], 10.1103/RevModPhys.84.1527, which excludes the hyperfine structure. The tabulation includes corrections of the hyperfine structure due to the anomalous moment of the electron, due to the finite mass of the proton, and due to off-diagonal matrix elements of the hyperfine Hamiltonian. These corrections are treated incorrectly in most other works. Simple formulas valid for all quantum numbers are presented for the hyperfine corrections. The tabulated energies have uncertainties of less than 1 kHz for all states. This accuracy is possible because of the recent precision measurement [R. Pohl et al., Nature (London) 466, 213 (2010)], 10.1038/nature09250 of the proton radius. The effect of this radius on the energy levels is also tabulated and the energies are compared to precision measurements of atomic hydrogen energy intervals.

  14. Free Energy Wells and Barriers to Ion Transport Across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Susan

    2014-03-01

    The flow of ions across cellular membranes is essential to many biological processes. Ion transport is also important in synthetic materials used as battery electrolytes. Transport often involves specific ions and fast conduction. To achieve those properties, ion conduction pathways must solvate specific ions by just the ``right amount.'' The right amount of solvation avoids ion traps due to deep free energy wells, and avoids ion block due to high free energy barriers. Ion channel proteins in cellular membranes demonstrate this subtle balance in solvation of specific ions. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between binding site structure and ion solvation free energies in biological ion binding sites. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites for fast transport of specific ions. We acknowledge support from Sandia's LDRD program. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  16. Statistical Examination of the a and a + 1 Fragment Ions from 193 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation Reveals Local Hydrogen Bonding Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Lindsay J.; Rosenberg, Jake A.; Singleton, Jonathan P.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-05-01

    Dissociation of proteins and peptides by 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) has gained momentum in proteomic studies because of the diversity of backbone fragments that are produced and subsequent unrivaled sequence coverage obtained by the approach. The pathways that form the basis for the production of particular ion types are not completely understood. In this study, a statistical approach is used to probe hydrogen atom elimination from a + 1 radical ions, and different extents of elimination are found to vary as a function of the identity of the C-terminal residue of the a product ions and the presence or absence of hydrogen bonds to the cleaved residue.

  17. Statistical Examination of the a and a + 1 Fragment Ions from 193 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation Reveals Local Hydrogen Bonding Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Lindsay J.; Rosenberg, Jake A.; Singleton, Jonathan P.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-09-01

    Dissociation of proteins and peptides by 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) has gained momentum in proteomic studies because of the diversity of backbone fragments that are produced and subsequent unrivaled sequence coverage obtained by the approach. The pathways that form the basis for the production of particular ion types are not completely understood. In this study, a statistical approach is used to probe hydrogen atom elimination from a + 1 radical ions, and different extents of elimination are found to vary as a function of the identity of the C-terminal residue of the a product ions and the presence or absence of hydrogen bonds to the cleaved residue.

  18. Energy degradation of fast electrons in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yueming; Mccray, Richard

    1991-01-01

    An equation is derived for calculating the energy distribution of fast electrons in a partially ionized gas and a method is provided to solve for the electron degradation spectrum and the energy deposition in different forms (ionization, excitation, or heating). As an example, the energy degradation of fast electrons in a gas of pure hydrogen is calculated, considering excitations to the lowest 10 atomic levels. The Bethe approximation and the continuous slowing-down approximation are discussed and it is concluded that these approximations are accurate to the order of 20 percent for electrons with initial energy of greater than about keV. The method and results can be used to determine heating, excitations, and ionizations by high-energy photoelectrons or cosmic-ray particles in various astrophysical circumstances, such as the interstellar medium, supernova envelopes, and QSO emission-line clouds.

  19. Modular Energy Storage System for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Janice

    2010-08-27

    The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles plug-in electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. The in-depth research into the complex interactions between the lower and higher voltage systems from data obtained via modeling, bench testing and instrumented vehicle data will allow an optimum system to be developed from a performance, cost, weight and size perspective. The subsystems are designed for modularity so that they may be used with different propulsion and energy delivery systems. This approach will allow expansion into new alternative energy vehicle markets.

  20. Charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with multiply charged ions in a hot plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V. A.; Baryshnikov, F. F.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    1980-08-01

    The symmetry properties of the hydrogen atom were used to calculate the charge exchange cross sections sigma of hydrogen with the nuclei of multiply charged ions, while allowance was made for the degeneration of final states. If the transitions between these states produced by rotation of the internuclear axis are taken into account, there is a qualitative change in the dependence of sigma on v for low values of v (a gradual decrease in the cross section instead of the exponential one in the Landau-Zener model) and also a considerable increase in the peak cross section. The cross sections are calculated for a wide range of velocities and charge values-Z. The distribution of final states over orbital angular momenta is found.

  1. The prospect for fusion energy with light ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1998-09-01

    Intense ion beams may be the best option for an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) driver. While light ions may be the long-term pulsed power approach to IFE, the current economic climate is such that there is no urgency in developing fusion energy sources. Research on light ion beams at Sandia will be suspended at the end of this fiscal year in favor of z-pinches studying ICF target physics, high yield fusion, and stewardship issues. The authors document the status of light ion research and the understanding of the feasibility of scaling light ions to IFE.

  2. Ab initio study of charge-transfer dynamics in collisions of C{sup 2+} ions with hydrogen chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsalyi, E.; Vibok, A.; Bene, E.; Halasz, G. J.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M. C.

    2011-05-15

    Ab initio quantum chemistry molecular calculations followed by a semiclassical dynamical treatment in the keV collision energy range have been developed for the study of the charge-transfer process in collisions of C{sup 2+} ions with hydrogen chloride. The mechanism has been investigated in detail in connection with avoided crossings between states involved in the reaction. A simple mechanism driven by a strong nonadiabatic coupling matrix element has been pointed out for this process. A comparative analysis with the halogen fluoride target corresponding to a similar electronic configuration shows a quite different charge-transfer mechanism leading to a very different behavior of the cross sections. Such behavior may be correlated to specific nonadiabatic interactions observed in these collision systems.

  3. NMR relaxation rate and the libron energy of solid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugawara, K.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    By taking the rotational relaxation of orthohydrogen (o-H2) in solid hydrogen into account, the authors have theoretically investigated the longitudinal NMR spin lattice relaxation rate of o-H2. The rate is characterized by an anomalous maximum, as a function of temperature, at temperatures close to the mean libron energy of o-H2. Application of the theory for o-H2 concentrations between 42% and 75% reveals a nearly concentration-independent mean libron energy equivalent to about 1 K. This qualitatively and quantitatively contradicts the conclusions of other theories, but agrees with recent experiments.

  4. Triggered energy releases in solid hydrogen hosts containing unpaired atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.W.; Fearon, E.M.; Maienschein, J.L.; Mapoles, E.R.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Souers, P.C. ); Gaines, J.R. )

    1990-07-23

    We have observed both triggered and spontaneous energy releases in tritiated solid hydrogens at temperatures above 1.2 K in several different experiments. These energy releases, which can be triggered by a temperature increase, were observed by monitoring the temperature excursion ( heat spike'') versus time, the atom spin density, and nuclear-magnetic-resonance signal heights. The heat spikes correlate with a disappearance of free-atom spin density so that fast atomic recombination is the probable cause. The spontaneous heat spikes may be suppressed by improved heat extraction.

  5. Low-Energy Ions from Laser-Cooled Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayeganrad, G.; Fioretti, A.; Guerri, I.; Tantussi, F.; Ciampini, D.; Allegrini, M.; Viteau, M.; Fuso, F.

    2016-05-01

    We report the features of an ion source based on two-color photoionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam outsourced from a pyramidal magneto-optical trap. The ion source operates in continuous or pulsed mode. At acceleration voltages below 300 V, it delivers some ten ions per bunch with a relative energy spread Δ Urms/U ≃0.032 , as measured through the retarding field-energy-analyzer approach. Space-charge effects are negligible thanks to the low ion density attained in the interaction volume. The performances of the ion beam in a configuration using focused laser beams are extrapolated on the basis of the experimental results. Calculations demonstrate that our low-energy and low-current ion beam can be attractive for the development of emerging technologies requiring the delivery of a small amount of charge, down to the single-ion level and its eventual focusing in the 10-nm range.

  6. An electron cyclotron resonance ion source based low energy ion beam platform.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Shang, Y; Ma, B H; Zhang, X Z; Feng, Y C; Li, X X; Wang, H; Guo, X H; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Zhang, Z M; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    To satisfy the requirements of surface and atomic physics study in the field of low energy multiple charge state ion incident experiments, a low energy (10 eV/q-20 keV/q) ion beam platform is under design at IMP. A simple test bench has been set up to test the ion beam deceleration systems. Considering virtues such as structure simplicity, easy handling, compactness, cost saving, etc., an all-permanent magnet ECRIS LAPECR1 [Lanzhou all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source No. 1] working at 14.5 GHz has been adopted to produce intense medium and low charge state ion beams. LAPECR1 source has already been ignited. Some intense low charge state ion beams have been produced on it, but the first test also reveals that many problems are existing on the ion beam transmission line. The ion beam transmission mismatches result in the depressed performance of LAPECR1, which will be discussed in this paper. To obtain ultralow energy ion beam, after being analyzed by a double-focusing analyzer magnet, the selected ion beam will be further decelerated by two afocal deceleration lens systems, which is still under design. This design has taken into consideration both ions slowing down and also ion beam focusing. In this paper, the conceptual design of deceleration system will be discussed. PMID:18315202

  7. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  8. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The laser ablation/ion storage facility at the UNLV Physics Department is dedicated to the study of atomic processes in low temperature plasmas. Our current program is directed to the study of charge transfer of multiply charged ions and neutrals that are of importance to astrophysics at energies less than 1 eV (about 10(exp 4) K). Specifically, we measure the charge transfer rate coefficient of ions such as N(2+), Si(3+), Si(3+), with helium and Fe(2+) with molecular and atomic hydrogen. All these ions are found in a variety of astrophysical plasmas. Their electron transfer reactions with neutral atoms can affect the ionization equilibrium of the plasma.

  9. Ion currents and energies in reactive low-voltage ion plating: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlinger, Johannes P.; Pulker, Hans K.

    1990-12-01

    Reactive Low-Voltage Ion Plating (RLVIP) is a plasma-assisted evaporation process that produces anorganic oxide- and nitride films with a closed microstructure. in order to better understand the process and the resulting film properties a BALZERS PPM 400 Plasmamonitor, a combination of a quadrupole mass filter and an energy selective ion optics, has been used to study the relative abundancies and energy distributions of the ions impinging on the growing film in the RLVIP process. The device is discussed and preliminary results are presented: The plasma is anisotropic. Surprisingly it contains ions with higher energies than expected from the self-bias potential.

  10. Study on Introduction of CO2 Free Energy to Japan with Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Shoji; Nishimura, Motohiko; Harada, Eichi

    In Japan, both CO2(Carbon dioxide) emission reduction and energy security are the very important social issues after Fukushima Daiichi accident. On the other hand, FCV (Fuel Cell Vehicle)using hydrogen will be on the market in 2015. Introducing large mass hydrogen energy is being expected as expanding hydrogen applications, or solution to energy issues of Japan.And then,the Japanese government announced the road map for introducing hydrogen energy supply chain in this June,2014. Under these circumstances, imported CO2 free hydrogen will be one of the solutions for energy security and CO2 reduction, if the hydrogen price is affordable. To achieve this, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) performed a feasibility studyon CO2-free hydrogen energy supply chainfrom Australian brown coal linked with CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) to Japan. In the study, hydrogen production systems utilizing brown coal gasificationandLH2 (liquid hydrogen)systems as storing and transporting hydrogen are examined.This paper shows the possibilityof realizingthe CO2 free hydrogen supply chain, the cost breakdown of imported hydrogen cost, its cost competitiveness with conventionalfossil, andLH2systems as key technologies of the hydrogen energy chain.

  11. Nucleation and growth of platelets in hydrogen-ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Nastasi, Michael; Hoechbauer, Tobias; Lee, Jung-Kun; Misra, Amit; Hirth, John P.; Ridgway, Mark; Lafford, Tamzin

    2005-04-11

    H ion implantation into crystalline Si is known to result in the precipitation of planar defects in the form of platelets. Hydrogen-platelet formation is critical to the process that allows controlled cleavage of Si along the plane of the platelets and subsequent transfer and integration of thinly sliced Si with other substrates. Here we show that H-platelet formation is controlled by the depth of the radiation-induced damage and then develop a model that considers the influence of stress to correctly predict platelet orientation and the depth at which platelet nucleation density is a maximum.

  12. Decay of electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves into ion acoustic modes in auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, R.; Hudson, M. K.

    1987-03-01

    The coherent three-wave decay of a linearly unstable electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) wave into stable EHC and ion acoustic modes is considered. The general problem of the three weakly interacting electrostatic normal modes in a Maxwellian plasma is discussed. EHC is examined in a fluid description, and the results are used to guide a similar study in a Vlasov plasma system intended to model the aurora acceleration region parameters. The time dependence of the decay in a simple three-wave interaction is presented in order to show how wave saturation can arise.

  13. On the meniscus formation and the negative hydrogen ion extraction from ITER neutral beam injection relevant ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a large area (Asource,ITER = 0.9 × 2 m2) hydrogen negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in construction of the neutral beam injectors of the international fusion reactor ITER. To understand the plasma behaviour in the boundary layer close to the extraction system the 3D PIC MCC code ONIX is exploited. Direct cross checked analysis of the simulation and experimental results from the ITER-relevant BATMAN source testbed with a smaller area (Asource,BATMAN ≈ 0.32 × 0.59 m2) has been conducted for a low perveance beam, but for a full set of plasma parameters available. ONIX has been partially benchmarked by comparison to the results obtained using the commercial particle tracing code for positive ion extraction KOBRA3D. Very good agreement has been found in terms of meniscus position and its shape for simulations of different plasma densities. The influence of the initial plasma composition on the final meniscus structure was then investigated for NIs. As expected from the Child-Langmuir law, the results show that not only does the extraction potential play a crucial role on the meniscus formation, but also the initial plasma density and its electronegativity. For the given parameters, the calculated meniscus locates a few mm downstream of the plasma grid aperture provoking a direct NI extraction. Most of the surface produced NIs do not reach the plasma bulk, but move directly towards the extraction grid guided by the extraction field. Even for artificially increased electronegativity of the bulk plasma the extracted NI current from this region is low. This observation indicates a high relevance of the direct NI extraction. These calculations show that the extracted NI current from the bulk region is low even if a complete ion-ion plasma is assumed, meaning that direct extraction from surface produced ions should be present in order to obtain sufficiently high extracted NI current density. The calculated extracted currents, both ions

  14. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2004-01-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  15. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2003-10-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  16. An ion beam deceleration lens for ultra-low-energy ion bombardment of naked DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    Study of low-energy ion bombardment effect on biological living materials is of significance. High-energy ion beam irradiation of biological materials such as organs and cells has no doubt biological effects. However, ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range. To investigate effects from very-low-energy ion bombardment on biological materials, an ion beam deceleration lens is necessary for uniform ion energy lower than keV. A deceleration lens was designed and constructed based on study of the beam optics using the SIMION program. The lens consisted of six electrodes, able to focus and decelerate primary ion beam, with the last one being a long tube to obtain a parallel uniform exiting beam. The deceleration lens was installed to our 30-kV bioengineering-specialized ion beam line. The final decelerated-ion energy was measured using a simple electrostatic field to bend the beam to range from 10 eV to 1 keV controlled by the lens parameters and the primary beam condition. In a preliminary test, nitrogen ion beam at 60 eV decelerated from a primary 20-keV beam bombarded naked plasmid DNA. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was possible to break DNA strands and thus potential to cause genetic modification of biological cells.

  17. Negative ion production by backscattering from alkali-metal surfaces bombarded by ions of hydrogen and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, P.J.

    1980-03-01

    Measurements have been made of the total backscattered D/sup -/ and H/sup -/ yields from thick, clean targets of Cs, Rb, K, Na, and Li, bombarded with H/sub 2//sup +/, H/sub 3//sup +/, D/sub 2//sup +/, and D/sub 3//sup +/ with incident energies from 0.15 to 4.0 keV/nucleus. All of the measurements were made at background pressures less than 10/sup -9/ Torr and the alkali-metal targets were evaporated onto a cold substrate (T = 77K) in situ to assure thick, uncontaminated targets. Measurements of the H/sup -/ yield from various transition metal targets with thin coverages of alkali-metals have also been made as a function of the surface work function. The negative ion yields are discussed in terms of the probabilities of reflection of the incident particles, of formation of the negative ion at the surface and of the survival of the negative ion leaving the surface. For each thick alkali-metal target, the negative ion yield measurements have been used in a least squares fit to determine two parameters in a theoretically derived expression for the negative ion yield. The parameters obtained from a thick Na target have been used to calculate the yield from a Cu target with thin coverage of Na (such that the surface work function is equal to thick Na).

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of silicon oxidation enhanced by energetic hydrogen ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizotani, Kohei; Isobe, Michiro; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics numerical simulations have been performed to clarify the mechanism of enhanced oxidation in Si during silicon gate etching by HBr/O2 plasmas. Such enhanced oxidation sometimes manifests itself as Si recess during gate etching processes. When a Si substrate is subject to energetic ion bombardment together with a flux of radical species, our study has identified the cause of such enhanced oxidation in Si as enhanced O diffusion arising from the momentum transfer from energetic H atoms to O atoms on the surface or in the subsurface of the Si substrate. No chemical effect such as hydrogenation of Si plays a role for the enhanced oxidation. Simulation results are found to be in good agreement with earlier experimental observations of ion-irradiation-enhanced oxidation obtained by beam experiments.

  19. Mechanism of 'GSI oscillations' in electron capture by highly charged hydrogen-like atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, V. P.

    2012-07-15

    We suggest a qualitative explanation of oscillations in electron capture decays of hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions observed recently in an ion experimental storage ring (ESR) of Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) mbH, Darmstadt, Germany. This explanation is based on the electron multiphoton Rabi oscillations between two Zeeman states of the hyperfine ground level with the total angular momentum F = 1/2. The Zeeman splitting is produced by a constant magnetic field in the ESR. Transitions between these states are produced by the second, sufficiently strong alternating magnetic field that approximates realistic fields in the GSI ESR. The Zeeman splitting amounts to only about 10{sup -5} eV. This allows explaining the observed quantum beats with the period 7 s.

  20. Hydrogen production in the K-Basin ion exchange columns, modules and cartridge filters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-21

    K-Basin uses ion exchange modules and ion exchange (IX) columns for removing radionuclides from the basin water. When the columns and modules are loaded, they are removed from service, drained and stored. After a few IX columns accumulate in storage, they are moved to a burial box. One of the burial box contains 33 columns and the other, six. The radionuclides act on the liquid left within and adhering to the beads to produce hydrogen. This report describes the generation rate, accumulation rate and significance of that accumulation. This summary also highlights those major areas of concern to the external (to Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC]) reviewers. Appendix H presents the comments made by the external reviewers and, on a separate sheet, the responses to those comments. The concerns regarding the details of the analytical approach, are addressed in Appendix H and in the appropriate section.

  1. Monitoring Surface Condition of Plasma Grid of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kasuya, T.; Tokushige, S.; Kenmotsu, T.

    2011-09-26

    Surface condition of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source is controlled so as to maximize the beam current under a discharge operation with introducing Cs into the ion source. Photoelectric current induced by laser beams incident on the plasma grid can produce a signal to monitor the surface condition, but the signal detection can be easily hindered by plasma noise. Reduction in size of a detection electrode embedded in the plasma grid can improve signal-to-noise ratio of the photoelectric current from the electrode. To evaluate the feasibility of monitoring surface condition of a plasma gird by utilizing photoelectric effect, a small experimental setup capable of determining quantum yields of a surface in a cesiated plasma environment is being assembled. Some preliminary test results of the apparatus utilizing oxide cathodes are reported.

  2. The U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Baseline Survey: Assessing Knowledge and opinions about Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Christy; Truett, Lorena Faith; Schmoyer, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    To design and maintain its education program, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program conducted a statistically-valid national survey to measure knowledge and opinions of hydrogen among key target audiences. The Hydrogen Baseline Knowledge Survey provides a reference for designing the DOE hydrogen education strategy and will be used in comparisons with future surveys to measure changes in knowledge and opinions over time. The survey sampled four U.S. populations: (1) public; (2) students; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen end-users in three business categories Questions measured technical understanding of hydrogen and opinions about hydrogen safety. Other questions assessed visions of the likelihood of future hydrogen applications and sources of energy information. Several important findings were discovered, including a striking lack of technical understanding across all survey groups, as well as a strong correlation between technical knowlege and opinions about safety: those who demonstrated an understanding of hydrogen technologies expressed the least fear of its safe use.

  3. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services (Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    Proceedings of an expert workshop convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, and hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board, May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California, to address the topic of hydrogen energy storage (HES). HES systems provide multiple opportunities to increase the resilience and improve the economics of energy sup supply systems underlying the electric grid, gas pipeline systems, and transportation fuels. This is especially the case when considering particular social goals and market drivers, such as reducing carbon emissions, increasing reliability of supply, and reducing consumption of conventional petroleum fuels. This report compiles feedback collected during the workshop, which focused on policy and regulatory issues related to HES systems. Report sections include an introduction to HES pathways, market demand, and the "smart gas" concept; an overview of the workshop structure; and summary results from panel presentations and breakout groups.

  4. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  5. Investigation of the heavy-ion mode in the FAIR High Energy Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, O.; Dolinskii, O.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stöhlker, T.

    2015-11-01

    High energy storage ring (HESR) as a part of the future accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) will serve for a variety of internal target experiments with high-energy stored heavy ions (SPARC collaboration). Bare uranium is planned to be used as a primary beam. Since a storage time in some cases may be significant—up to half an hour—it is important to examine the high-order effects in the long-term beam dynamics. A new ion optics specifically for the heavy ion mode of the HESR is developed and is discussed in this paper. The subjects of an optics design, tune working point and a dynamic aperture are addressed. For that purpose nonlinear beam dynamics simulations are carried out. Also a flexibility of the HESR ion optical lattice is verified with regard to various experimental setups. Specifically, due to charge exchange reactions in the internal target, secondary beams, such as hydrogen-like and helium-like uranium ions, will be produced. Thus the possibility of separation of these secondary ions and the primary {{{U}}}92+ beam is presented with different internal target locations.

  6. Importance of ion energy on SEU in CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, P.E.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Winokur, P.S.; Musseau, O.; Leray, J.L.

    1998-03-01

    The single-event upset (SEU) responses of 16 Kbit to 1 Mbit SRAMs irradiated with low and high-energy heavy ions are reported. Standard low-energy heavy ion tests appear to be sufficiently conservative for technologies down to 0.5 {micro}m.

  7. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  8. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Fujiwara, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm2) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (Eib ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when Eib is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  9. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge. PMID:26628125

  10. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  11. Single discharge of the matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: Influence of the neutral particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Paunska, Ts.; Todorov, D. Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    The study presents two-dimensional (2D) fluid-plasma-model description of a planar-coil inductively-driven discharge, considered as a single element of a matrix source of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions. Whereas the models developed up to now have been directed towards description of the charged particle behavior in the discharge, including that of the negative ions, this model stresses on the role of the neutral particle dynamics and of the surface processes in the formation of the discharge structure. The latter is discussed based on comparison of results obtained for discharges in a flowing gas and at a constant gas pressure as well as for different values of the coefficient of atom recombination on the walls. The conclusions are that the main plasma parameters – electron density and temperature and plasma potential – determining the gas discharge regime stay stable, regardless of changes in the redistribution of the densities of the neutral particles and of the positive ions. With regards to the volume production of the ions, which requires high density of (vibrationally excited) molecules, the impact on the degree of dissociation of the coefficient of atom recombination on the wall is discussed.

  12. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    Metal photocathodes are commonly used in high-field RF guns because they are robust, straightforward to implement and tolerate relatively poor vacuum compared to semi-conductor cathodes. However these cathodes have low quantum efficiency (QE) even at UV wavelengths, and still require some form of cleaning after installation in the gun. A commonly used process for improving the QE is laser cleaning. In this technique the UV drive laser is focused to a small diameter close to the metal's damage threshold and then moved across the surface to remove contaminants. This method does improve the QE, but can produce non-uniform emission and potentially damage the cathode. Ideally an alternative process which produces an atomically clean, but unaltered surface is needed. In this paper we explore using a hydrogen ion (H-ion) beam to clean a copper cathode. We describe QE measurements over the wavelength range of interest as a function of integrated exposure to an H-ion beam. We also describe the data analysis to obtain the work function and derive a formula of the QE for metal cathodes. Our measured work function for the cleaned sample is in good agreement with published values, and the theoretical QE as a function of photon wavelength is in excellent agreement with the cleaned copper experimental results. Finally, we propose an in-situ installation of an H-ion gun compatible with existing s-band RF guns.

  13. Rechargeable dual-metal-ion batteries for advanced energy storage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hu-Rong; You, Ya; Yin, Ya-Xia; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-14

    Energy storage devices are more important today than any time before in human history due to the increasing demand for clean and sustainable energy. Rechargeable batteries are emerging as the most efficient energy storage technology for a wide range of portable devices, grids and electronic vehicles. Future generations of batteries are required to have high gravimetric and volumetric energy, high power density, low price, long cycle life, high safety and low self-discharge properties. However, it is quite challenging to achieve the above properties simultaneously in state-of-the-art single metal ion batteries (e.g. Li-ion batteries, Na-ion batteries and Mg-ion batteries). In this contribution, hybrid-ion batteries in which various metal ions simultaneously engage to store energy are shown to provide a new perspective towards advanced energy storage: by connecting the respective advantages of different metal ion batteries they have recently attracted widespread attention due to their novel performances. The properties of hybrid-ion batteries are not simply the superposition of the performances of single ion batteries. To enable a distinct description, we only focus on dual-metal-ion batteries in this article, for which the design and the benefits are briefly discussed. We enumerate some new results about dual-metal-ion batteries and demonstrate the mechanism for improving performance based on knowledge from the literature and experiments. Although the search for hybrid-ion batteries is still at an early age, we believe that this strategy would be an excellent choice for breaking the inherent disadvantages of single ion batteries in the near future. PMID:26996438

  14. Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  15. Polymer processing by a low energy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Velardi, L.; Nassisi, V.; Paladini, F.; Visco, A. M.; Campo, N.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, D.; Giuffrida, L.; Rainò, A.

    2008-05-01

    Ion implantation is a process in which ions are accelerated toward a substrate at energies high enough to bury them just below the surface substrate in order to modify the surface characteristics. Laser-produced plasma is a very suitable and low cost technique in the production of ion sources. In this work, a laser ion source is developed by a UV pulsed laser of about 108 W/cm2 power density, employing a C target and a post ion acceleration of 40 kV to increase the ion energy. In this work, we implanted C ions on ultra-high-molecular-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE). We present the preliminary results of surface property modifications for both samples. In particular, we have studied the modifications of the surface micro-hardness of the polymers by applying the "scratch test" method as well as the hydrophilicity modifications by the contact angle measurements.

  16. The low-energy ion range in DNA.

    PubMed

    Yu, L D; Kamwanna, T; Brown, I G

    2009-08-21

    In fundamental studies of low-energy ion irradiation effects on DNA, calculation of the low-energy ion range, an important basic physical parameter, is often necessary. However, up to now a unified model and approach for range calculation is still lacking, and reported data are quite divergent and thus unreliable. Here we describe an approach for calculation of the ion range, using a simplified mean-pseudoatom model of the DNA target. Based on ion stopping theory, for the case of low-energy (< or = a few keV) ion implantation into DNA, the stopping falls in the low reduced energy regime, which gives a cube-root energy dependence of the stopping (E(1/3)). Calculation formulas of the ion range in DNA are obtained and presented to unify the relevant calculations. The upper limits of the ion energy as a function of the atomic number of the bombarding ion species are proposed for the low-energy case to hold. Comparison of the results of this approach with the results of some widely used computer simulation codes and with results reported by other groups indicates that the approach described here provides convincing and dependable results. PMID:19652287

  17. Crystal effects in the neutralization of He+ ions in the low energy ion scattering regime.

    PubMed

    Primetzhofer, D; Markin, S N; Juaristi, J I; Taglauer, E; Bauer, P

    2008-05-30

    Investigating possible crystal effects in ion scattering from elemental surfaces, measurements of the positive ion fraction P+ are reported for He+ ions scattered from single and polycrystalline Cu surfaces. In the Auger neutralization regime, the ion yield is determined by scattering from the outermost atomic layer. For Cu(110) P+ exceeds that for polycrystalline Cu by up to a factor of 2.5, thus exhibiting a strong crystal effect. It is much less pronounced at higher energies, i.e., in the reionization regime. However, there a completely different angular dependence of the ion yield is observed for poly- and single crystals, due to massive subsurface contributions in nonchanneling directions. PMID:18518602

  18. Measurement of the negative hydrogen ions temperature by using an omegatron mass analyzer in the sheet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takimoto, Toshikio; Iijima, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yuta; Hase, Takuya; Tonegawa, Akira; Sato, Kohnosuke; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    2015-09-01

    The production mechanisms of negative ions in hydrogen plasma are not easily understood because of the complex phenomena of atomic and molecular reactions. A mainstream measurement of H- is a laser photodetachment technique. We had measured negative ions using a laser photodetachment technique. Consequently, under a secondary hydrogen gas supply entering into the plasma, the H- is distributed in the periphery of the sheet plasma. In addition, it has been reported that the negative hydrogen ions transport velocity evaluated by the relaxation time of optically released electron current. Nevertheless, this technique a laser photodetachment cannot be used as a mass analyzer. In this paper, we have measured the temperature of the negative hydrogen ions TH- by using an omegatron mass analyzer in the sheet plasma. The TH- is determined by measuring the collection ion currents IH- as a function of the ion repeller voltage VG2 by using an omegatron mass analyzer. From the fitting an exponential region of the measured I-V characteristics curve, TH- is around 1.40 eV at the gas pressure of 0.23 Pa in the periphery region of the sheet plasma.

  19. Effect of hydrogen bonding and complexation with metal ions on the fluorescence of luotonin A.

    PubMed

    Miskolczy, Zsombor; Biczók, László

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescence characteristics of a biologically active natural alkaloid, luotonin A (LuA), were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The rate constant of the radiationless deactivation from the singlet-excited state diminished by more than one order of magnitude when the solvent polarity was changed from toluene to water. Dual emission was found in polyfluorinated alcohols of large hydrogen bond donating ability due to photoinitiated proton displacement along the hydrogen bond. In CH2Cl2, LuA produced both 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 hydrogen-bonded complexes with hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) in the ground state. Photoexcitation of the 1 : 2 complex led to protonated LuA, whose fluorescence appeared at a long wavelength. LuA served as a bidentate ligand forming 1 : 1 complexes with metal ions in acetonitrile. The stability of the complexes diminished in the series of Cd(2+) > Zn(2+) > Ag(+), and upon competitive binding of water to the metal cations. The effect of chelate formation on the fluorescent properties was revealed. PMID:23487318

  20. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H](3-) and [M - 5H](5-) insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å(2) and 808 ± 2 Å(2). [M - 4H](4-) ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å(2)) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å(2)) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H](4-) and [M - 5H](5-) ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis. PMID:26620531

  1. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  2. Ion Beam Energy Dependant Study of Nanopore Sculpting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledden, Brad

    2005-03-01

    Experiments show that ion beams of various energies (1keV, 3keV, and 5keV) can be used to controllably ``sculpt'' nanoscale features in silicon nitride films using a feedback controlled ion beam sculpting apparatus. We report on nanopore ion beam sculpting effects that depend on inert gas ion beam energy. We show that: (1) all ion beam energies enable single nanometer control of structural dimensions in nanopores; (2) the ion beam energies above show similar ion beam flux dependence of nanopore formation; (3) the thickness of nanopores differs depending on ion beam energy. Computer simulations (with SRIM and TRIM) and an ``adatom'' surface diffusion model are employed to explain the dynamics of nanoscale dimension change by competing sputtering and surface mass transport processes induced by different ion beam irradiation. These experiments and theoretical work reveal the surface atomic transport phenomena in a quantitative way that allows the extraction of parameters such as the adatom surface diffusion coefficients and average travel distances.

  3. Development of a novel radio-frequency negative hydrogen ion source in conically converging configuration.

    PubMed

    Jung, B K; Dang, J J; An, Y H; Chung, K J; Hwang, Y S

    2014-02-01

    Volume-produced negative ion source still requires enhancement of current density with lower input RF (radio-frequency) power in lower operating pressure for various applications. To confirm recent observation of efficient negative ion production with a short cylindrical chamber with smaller effective plasma size, the RF-driven transformer-coupled plasma H(-) ion source at Seoul National University is modified by adopting a newly designed quartz RF window to reduce the chamber length. Experiments with the reduced chamber length show a few times enhancement of H(-) ion beam current compared to that extracted from the previous chamber design, which is consistent with the measured H(-) ion population. Nevertheless, decrease in H(-) ion beam current observed in low pressure regime below ∼5 mTorr owing to insufficient filtering of high energy electrons in the extraction region needs to be resolved to address the usefulness of electron temperature control by the change of geometrical configuration of the discharge chamber. A new discharge chamber with conically converging configuration has been developed, in which the chamber diameter decreases as approaching to the extraction region away from the planar RF antenna such that stronger filter magnetic field can be utilized to prohibit high energy electrons from transporting to the extraction region. First experimental results for the H(-) ion beam extraction with this configuration show that higher magnetic filter field makes peak negative beam currents happen in lower operating pressure. However, overall decrease in H(-) ion beam current due to the change of chamber geometry still requires further study of geometrical effect on particle transport and optimization of magnetic field in this novel configuration. PMID:24593552

  4. Recombination and dissociative recombination of H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/ ions on surfaces with application to hydrogen negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hiskes, J.R.; Karo, A.M.

    1988-12-01

    A four-step model for recombination and dissociative recombination of H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/ ions on metal surfaces is discussed. Vibrationally excited molecules, H/sub 2/(v''), from H/sub 3//sup +/ recombination are produced in a broad spectrum that enhances the excited level distribution. The application of this latter process to hydrogen negative ion discharges is discussed. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Rydberg phases of Hydrogen and low energy nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsson, Sveinn; Holmlid, Leif

    2016-03-01

    For over the last 26 years the science of cold fusion/LENR has been researched around the world with slow pace of progress. Modest quantity of excess heat and signatures of nuclear transmutation and helium production have been confirmed in experiments and theoretical work has only resulted in a large flora of inadequate theoretical scenarios. Here we review current state of research in Rydberg matter of Hydrogen that is showing strong signature of nuclear processes. In the presentation experimental behavior of Rydberg matter of hydrogen is described. An extensive collaboration effort of surface physics, catalysis, atomic physics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum information is need to tackle the surprising experimental results that have so far been obtained. Rydberg matter of Hydrogen is the only known state of matter that is able to bring huge collection of protons to so short distances and for so long time that tunneling becomes a reasonable process for making low energy nuclear reactions. Nuclear quantum entanglement can also become realistic process at theses conditions.

  6. Continuous Self-Energy of Ions at the Dielectric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2014-04-01

    By treating both the short-range (solvation) and long-range (image force) electrostatic forces as well as charge polarization induced by these forces in a consistent manner, we obtain a simple theory for the self-energy of an ion that is continuous across the interface. Along with nonelectrostatic contributions, our theory enables a unified description of ions on both sides of the interface. Using intrinsic parameters of the ions, we predict the specific ion effect on the interfacial affinity of halogen anions at the water-air interface, and the strong adsorption of hydrophobic ions at the water-oil interface, in agreement with experiments and atomistic simulations.

  7. High energy implantation with high-charge-state ions in a vacuum arc ion implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E.M. |; Anders, A.; Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Ion implantation energy can in principal be increased by increasing the charge states of the ions produced by the ion source rather than by increasing the implanter operating voltage, providing an important savings in cost and size of the implanter. In some recent work the authors have shown that the charge states of metal ions produced in a vacuum arc ion source can be elevated by a strong magnetic field. In general, the effect of both high arc current and high magnetic field is to push the distribution to higher charge states--the mean ion charge state is increased and new high charge states are formed. The effect is significant for implantation application--the mean ion energy can be about doubled without change in extraction voltage. Here they describe the ion source modifications, the results of time-of-flight measurements of ion charge state distributions, and discuss the use and implications of this technique as a means for doing metal iron implantation in the multi-hundreds of keV ion energy range.

  8. Investigation of hydrogen and helium pumping by sputter ion pumps for Jupiter and outer planets mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomena of ion pumping is reviewed with emphasis on the pumping mechanism for hydrogen and helium. The experimental tests measure the performance of a small, flight proven ion pump which has a nominal four liter/second pumping speed for air. The speed of this pump for hydrogen and helium, and for hydrogen/helium mixes, is presented with particular detail regarding the time dependence. Pump test results are related to anticipated performance of the mass spectrometer by the pumping speeds for the gases to the partial pressure in the ion source. From this analysis, the pump specifications are quantified in terms of mission goals and in terms of observed pumping speeds for the various gases, load levels, and time periods.

  9. Recent Ion Energy Distribution Observations on MST RFP Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jerry; Titus, J. B.; Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A., III; Almagri, A. F.; Andeson, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Ion energy distribution and temperature measurements have been made on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) using the Florida A&M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA). The CNPA is a low energy (0.34-5.2 keV), high energy resolution (25 channels) neutral particle analyzer, with a radial view on MST. Recently, a retarding potential system was built to allow CNPA measurements to ensemble a complete ion energy distribution with high-energy resolution, providing insight into the dynamics of the bulk and fast ion populations. Recent work has also been done to improve the analysis techniques used to infer the ion temperature measurements, allowing us to understand temperature dynamics better during global magnetic reconnection events. Work supported in part by grants to FAMU and to UW from NSF and from Fusion Energy Sciences at DOE.

  10. Lithium polymer batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells as energy sources in hydrogen electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbo, P.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O.

    This paper deals with the application of lithium ion polymer batteries as electric energy storage systems for hydrogen fuel cell power trains. The experimental study was firstly effected in steady state conditions, to evidence the basic features of these systems in view of their application in the automotive field, in particular charge-discharge experiments were carried at different rates (varying the current between 8 and 100 A). A comparison with conventional lead acid batteries evidenced the superior features of lithium systems in terms of both higher discharge rate capability and minor resistance in charge mode. Dynamic experiments were carried out on the overall power train equipped with PEM fuel cell stack (2 kW) and lithium batteries (47.5 V, 40 Ah) on the European R47 driving cycle. The usage of lithium ion polymer batteries permitted to follow the high dynamic requirement of this cycle in hard hybrid configuration, with a hydrogen consumption reduction of about 6% with respect to the same power train equipped with lead acid batteries.

  11. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-11-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations. PMID:8580316

  12. Secondary batteries with multivalent ions for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengjun; Chen, Yanyi; Shi, Shan; Li, Jia; Kang, Feiyu; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-01-01

    The use of electricity generated from clean and renewable sources, such as water, wind, or sunlight, requires efficiently distributed electrical energy storage by high-power and high-energy secondary batteries using abundant, low-cost materials in sustainable processes. American Science Policy Reports state that the next-generation "beyond-lithium" battery chemistry is one feasible solution for such goals. Here we discover new "multivalent ion" battery chemistry beyond lithium battery chemistry. Through theoretic calculation and experiment confirmation, stable thermodynamics and fast kinetics are presented during the storage of multivalent ions (Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), or La(3+) ions) in alpha type manganese dioxide. Apart from zinc ion battery, we further use multivalent Ni(2+) ion to invent another rechargeable battery, named as nickel ion battery for the first time. The nickel ion battery generally uses an alpha type manganese dioxide cathode, an electrolyte containing Ni(2+) ions, and Ni anode. The nickel ion battery delivers a high energy density (340 Wh kg(-1), close to lithium ion batteries), fast charge ability (1 minute), and long cycle life (over 2200 times). PMID:26365600

  13. Hydrogen ion-implantation induced low resistive layer in KNbO3 bulk single crystal: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkawa, A.; Shibasaki, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Tanuma, C.; Kuriyama, K.

    2016-03-01

    Origins of low resistivity in H-ion implanted KNbO3 bulk single crystals are studied by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak ion fluence: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into KNbO3 is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The sheet resistance decreases from ∼108 Ω/□ for an un-implanted KNbO3 sample to 2.33 × 105 Ω/□ for as-implanted, 2.29 × 105 Ω/□ for 100 °C annealed, and 4.25 × 105 Ω/□ for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively. The ERDA experiment using the 1.5 MeV-4He+ beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to around 60 nm. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 1.5 MeV helium beam is 5.1 × 1014 cm-2 for un-implanted KNbO3 sample, 5.6 × 1014 cm-2 for as-implanted, 3.4 × 1014 cm-2 for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively, indicating that a part of hydrogen is diffused out by annealing. The low resistive layer induced in H-ion implanted KNbO3 suggests the existence of a shallow energy level related to the complex defect consisting of hydrogen interstitial and the proton induced defect such as oxygen vacancy.

  14. Losses of ion energy in the multicomponent beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanov, Ilkham S.; Gurbanov, Ilgar I.; Akbarov, Elchin M.

    2015-03-01

    Energy losses of near axis ions and decreases in ion current density in the center of a beam were observed in a liquid metal source operating under a charged nanodroplets (In, Sn, Au, Ge) generation regime. In experiments, nanodroplets with the sizes of 2-20 nanometers and a characteristic specific charge of 5 × 104 C/kg were revealed. Energy spectra of ions were defined by means of the filter of speeds with cross-section static electromagnetic fields. A reduction of 4% of the In+ ions energy was observed under the conditions of the curried out measurements. The stream of nanoparticles, in contrast to an ion beam, has a small radial divergence; outside of this stream, change of ion speeds is not observed. Energy losses of ions occur during their flight through small nanoparticles. Penetration depth of the accelerated ions in liquid indium is estimated within the framework of the Lindhard-Scharff-Schiott model. Similar interaction between components occurs in ion-beam systems of complex composition where there is a relative movement of various charged particles.

  15. Low energy spread ion source with a coaxial magnetic filter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    2000-01-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending magnetic filter consisting of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy spread utilizes a cylindrical magnetic filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial magnetic filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy spread in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).

  16. Plasma effect on fast-electron-impact-ionization from 2p state of hydrogen-like ions

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Y. Y.; Ning, L. N.; Wang, J. G.; Qu, Y. Z.

    2013-12-15

    Plasma effects on the high-energy electron-impact ionization process from 2p orbital of Hydrogen-like ions embedded in weakly coupled plasmas are investigated in the first Born approximation. The plasma screening of the Coulomb interaction between charged particles is represented by the Debye Hückel model. The screening of Coulomb interactions decreases the ionization energies and varies the wave functions for not only the bound orbital but also the continuum; the number of the summation for the angular-momentum states in the generalized oscillator strength densities is reduced with the plasma screening stronger when the ratio of ε/I{sub 2p} (I{sub 2p} is the ionization energy of 2p state and ε is the energy of the continuum electron) is kept, and then the contribution from the lower-angular-momentum states dominates the generalized oscillator strength densities, so the threshold phenomenon in the generalized oscillator strength densities and the double differential cross sections are remarkable: The accessional minima, the outstanding enhancement, and the resonance peaks emerge a certain energy region, whose energy position and width are related to the vicinity between δ and the critical value δ{sub nl}{sup c}, corresponding to the special plasma condition when the bound state |nl just enters the continuum; the multiple virtual-state enhancement and the multiple shape resonances in a certain energy domain also appear in the single differential cross section whenever the plasma screening parameter passes through a critical value δ{sub nl}{sup c}, which is similar to the photo-ionization process but different from it, where the dipole transition only happens, but multi-pole transition will occur in the electron-impact ionization process, so its multiple virtual-state enhancements and the multiple shape resonances appear more frequently than the photo-ionization process.

  17. A Negative Hydrogen-Ion Source for SNS Using a Helicon Plasma Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R. H.; Welton, R. F.; Baity, F. W.; Crisp, D. W.; Fadnek, A.; Kang, Y.; Murray, S. N.; Sparks, D. O.; Stockli, M. P.

    2007-09-28

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a world-class facility for materials research based on neutron scattering. It consists of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source, linear accelerator, proton accumulator ring, and liquid Hg target. A power upgrade is planned for the device, which will require significant improvements in the negative ion source, including the production of H-beam currents of 70-95 mA ({approx}2xthe present SNS source value), with a pulse length of 1 ms and duty factor of {approx}7%. No H-sources currently in existence meet these combined requirements. A proof-of-principle experiment is being constructed in which the rf inductive plasma generator in the present source is replaced by a helicon plasma generator. This is expected to produce a factor of three or better increase in the maximum source plasma density at a reduced rf power level, resulting in significantly increased negative ion current with reduced heat removal requirements.

  18. A Negative Hydrogen-Ion Source for SNS Using a Helicon Plasma Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, Richard Howell; Welton, Robert F; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Crisp, Danny W; Fadnek, Andy; Kang, Yoon W; Murray Jr, S N; Sparks, Dennis O; Stockli, Martin P

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Labo ratory is a world-class facility for materials research based on neutron scattering. It consists of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source, linear accelerator, proton accumulator ring, and liquid Hg target. A power up grade is planned for the device, which will require significant improvements in the negative ion source, including the production of H- beam currents of 70-95 mA (~2 the present SNS source value), with a pulse length of 1 ms and duty factor of ~ 7%. No H- sources currently in existence meet these combined requirements. A proof-of-principle experiment is being constructed in which the rf inductive plasma generator in the present source is replaced by a helicon plasma generator. This is expected to produce a factor of three or better in crease in the maximum source plasma density at a reduced rf power level, resulting in significantly increased negative ion current with reduced heat removal requirements.

  19. Quantification Of Cesium In Negative Hydrogen Ion Sources By Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U.; Wimmer, Ch.

    2011-09-26

    The use of cesium in negative hydrogen ion sources and the resulting cesium dynamics caused by the evaporation and redistribution in the vacuum and plasma phase makes a reliable and on-line monitoring of the cesium amount in the source highly desirable. For that purpose, a robust and compact laser absorption setup suitable for the ion source environment has been developed utilizing the Cs D{sub 2} resonance line at 852.1 nm. First measurements are taken in a small laboratory plasma chamber with cesium evaporation. A detection limit of {approx_equal}5x10{sup 13} m{sup -3} at a typical path length of 15 cm has been obtained with a dynamic range of more than three orders of magnitude, limited by line saturation at high densities. For on-line monitoring an automatic data analysis is established achieving a temporal resolution of 100 ms. The setup has then been applied to the ITER prototype ion sources developed at IPP. It is been shown that the method is well suited for routine measurements revealing a new insight into the cesium dynamics during source operation and cesium conditioning.

  20. Comparison of UV and high-energy ion irradiation of methanol:ammonia ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Dartois, E.; Boduch, P.; Rothard, H.; Domaracka, A.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: The main goal of this work is to compare the effects induced in ices of astrophysical relevance by high-energy ions, simulating cosmic rays, and by vacuum ultraviolet (UV) photons. Methods: This comparison relies on in situ infrared spectroscopy of irradiated CH3OH:NH3 ice. Swift heavy ions were provided by the GANIL accelerator. The source of UV was a microwave-stimulated hydrogen flow discharge lamp. The deposited energy doses were similar for ion beams and UV photons to allow a direct comparison. Results: A variety of organic species was detected during irradiation and later during ice warm-up. These products are common to ion and UV irradiation for doses up to a few tens of eV per molecule. Only the relative abundance of the CO product, after ice irradiation, was clearly higher in the ion irradiation experiments. Conclusions: For some ice mixture compositions, the irradiation products formed depend only weakly on the type of irradiation, swift heavy ions, or UV photons. This simplifies the chemical modeling of energetic ice processing in space.