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Sample records for energy proton radiation

  1. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  2. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  3. Determination of solar proton fluxes and energies at high solar latitudes by UV radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The latitudinal variation of the solar proton flux and energy causes a density increase at high solar latitudes of the neutral gas penetrating the heliosphere. Measurements of the neutral density by UV resonance radiation observations from interplanetary spacecraft thus permit deductions on the dependence of the solar proton flux on heliographic latitude. Using both the results of Mariner 10 measurements and of other off-ecliptic solar wind observations, the values of the solar proton fluxes and energies at polar heliographic latitudes are determined for several cases of interest. The Mariner 10 analysis, together with IPS results, indicate a significant decrease of the solar proton flux at polar latitudes.

  4. Hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration as a basis for producing high-energy proton bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Dover, N. P.; Najmudin, Z.

    2012-11-01

    The production of high-energy protons by the ‘hole-boring’ radiation pressure acceleration (HB-RPA) mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration is examined in the case where the plasma has a density less than a0nc in 2D. Previously this was examined in 1D (Robinson 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 056701) and was motivated by previous predictions of the non-linear criterion for an ultra-intense laser pulse to penetrate a dense plasma. By reducing the density well below a0nc the proton energies achieved increases considerably, thus leading to proton energies >100 MeV at laser intensities close to current capabilities. The results show that good quality proton beams with proton energies >100 MeV can be obtained via HB-RPA using targets with densities in the range 12-20nc and laser intensities in the range 5 × 1021-3 × 1022 W cm-2.

  5. Radiative Negative Pion Proton Capture and the Low Energy Theorem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kailin

    Four-point angular distributions of the differential cross section for the radiative capture reaction pi^-ptogamma n have been measured at pion laboratory energies of 9.8, 14.6 and 19.8 MeV. An undegraded pion beam was used, along with a bubble-free liquid hydrogen target of 1 cm thickness. The use of a high resolution NaI(Tl) spectrometer allowed us to resolve the in-flight capture gamma rays from those due to stopped pion capture at all pion beam energies and gamma-ray angles investigated. The lineshape response of the gamma-ray detector to ~130 MeV gamma rays was continuously measured over a broad energy range during the data collection with a second independent trigger. This allowed an accurate extraction of the in-flight capture yields and provided a precise measurement of the detector efficiency. From the measured angular distributions of cross section the electric dipole amplitude for capture of s-wave pions, E_{0+}, has been determined at each energy in a model-independent analysis. These data have been extrapolated to threshold by assuming an energy dependence given by the Born diagrams calculated with pseudovector coupling. The extrapolated E _{0+} value at threshold has been determined to be -34.7+/- 1.1 (10^ {-3}/m_pi) which is 9.4 +/- 3.2 percent larger in magnitude than the low energy theorem, which determines the threshold E_{0+} amplitude based upon the requirements of PCAC and electromagnetic gauge invariance.

  6. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, Sayed H.; Cossairt, J.Donald; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  7. High-energy proton radiation damage of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.; Varnell, L. S.; Metzger, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative studies of radiation damage in high-purity germanium gamma-ray detectors due to high-energy charged particles have been carried out; two 1.0 cm thick planar detectors were irradiated by 6 GeV/c protons. Under proton bombardment, degradation in the energy resolution was found to begin below 7 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm and increased proportionately in both detectors until the experiment was terminated at a total flux of 5.7 x 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm, equivalent to about a six year exposure to cosmic-ray protons in space. At the end of the irradiation, the FWHM resolution measured at 1332 keV stood at 8.5 and 13.6 keV, with both detectors of only marginal utility as a spectrometer due to the severe tailing caused by charge trapping. Annealing these detectors after proton damage was found to be much easier than after neutron damage.

  8. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  9. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 degrees continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 degrees split arc proton therapy (two 90 degrees arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  10. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, E.; Pérez-Andújar, A.; DeLuca, P. M.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180° continuous arc proton therapy and for 180° split arc proton therapy (two 90° arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle™ (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the proton kinetic

  11. Second dip as a signature of ultrahigh energy proton interactions with cosmic microwave background radiation.

    PubMed

    Berezinsky, V; Gazizov, A; Kachelrieb, M

    2006-12-01

    We discuss as a new signature for the interaction of extragalactic ultrahigh energy protons with cosmic microwave background radiation a spectral feature located at E= 6.3 x 10(19) eV in the form of a narrow and shallow dip. It is produced by the interference of e+e(-)-pair and pion production. We show that this dip and, in particular, its position are almost model-independent. Its observation by future ultrahigh energy cosmic ray detectors may give the conclusive confirmation that an observed steepening of the spectrum is caused by the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect. PMID:17280191

  12. Assessing Antibody Microarray for Space Missions: Effect of Long-term Storage, Gamma radiation and High Energy proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diego-Castilla, G.; Parro, V.

    2012-09-01

    Fluorescent antibody microarray has been proposed for Molecular biomarker detector in planetary exploration [1]. A number of different environmental stresses may affect the antibody performance, such as temperatures variations, highly penetrating radiation and high energy particles. Here we have tested the effect of gamma radiation, proton radiation and longterm storage on the microarray immunoassay and fluorocromes. Although different antibodies might have different susceptibilities we conclude that there was not significant reduction in the functionality of antibodies printed on the microarray and the fluorescent tracers antibodies, even in a extreme case of receiving a radiation dose 3000-fold than a biochip would receive in a trip mission to Mars. In summary, antibodies are suitable for use in planetary exploration purposes.

  13. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  14. Measuring Neutron-Proton Radiative Capture Cross-section at Low Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, To Chin; Kovash, Michael; Matthews, June; Yang, Hongwei; Yang, Yunjie

    2015-10-01

    The experiment aims to fill in a gap in our data for the cross-section of neutron-proton radiative capture (p(n,d γ)) at energies below 500 keV. Current measurements in this energy range are scarce and inconsistent with theoretical predictions and with each other. A well-determined cross-section of the capture reaction in the low energy range is useful in nuclear physics due to its fundamental nature. The measurement is also of interest in cosmology. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), the process by which light elements are formed in early universe, is very sensitive to the p(n,d γ) cross-section in the low energy range. The measurement enables us to put tighter constraints on the theoretical predictions of BBN. We have conducted preliminary measurements in the van de Graaff accelerator facility at the University of Kentucky. Our array of detectors consists of three plastic scintillators to serve as proton targets and deuteron detectors, and five BGO scintillators to detect γ-rays. The combination results in an over-determination of reaction kinematics that discriminates against scattering processes and other backgrounds. We have obtained some early results which show promise for the precise measurement of the p(n,d γ) cross-section.

  15. Radiative neutron capture on a proton at big-bang nucleosynthesis energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, S.; Cyburt, R. H.; Hong, S. W.; Hyun, C. H.

    2006-08-15

    The total cross section for radiative neutron capture on a proton, np{yields}d{gamma}, is evaluated at big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) energies. The electromagnetic transition amplitudes are calculated up to next-to-leading-order within the framework of pionless effective field theory with dibaryon fields. We also calculate the d{gamma}{yields}np cross section and the photon analyzing power for the d{gamma}(vector sign){yields}np process from the amplitudes. The values of low-energy constants that appear in the amplitudes are estimated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis using the relevant low-energy experimental data. Our result agrees well with those of other theoretical calculations except for the np{yields}d{gamma} cross section at some energies estimated by an R-matrix analysis. We also study the uncertainties in our estimation of the np{yields}d{gamma} cross section at relevant BBN energies and find that the estimated cross section is reliable to within {approx}1% error.

  16. Proton radiation damage in optical filter glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillot, Patrick N.; Rosenberg, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Schott BG-39 and Hoya CM-500 blue-green filter glass were subjected to proton radiation to determine their acceptability for spaceflight. Initial testing done with 2.7 MeV protons showed negligible change in optical transmittance with doses as high as 5.2 x 10 to the 14th protons per sq cm. Irradiation with protons of energy up to 63 MeV caused a significant reduction in transmittance in the Schott samples at doses of 5.3 x 10 to the 12th protons per sq cm, while negligible change occurred in the Hoya samples.

  17. High and low energy proton radiation damage in p/n InP MOCVD solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George; Weinberg, Irving; Scheiman, Dave; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    InP p(+)nn(+) MOCVD solar cells were irradiated with 0.2 MeV and 10 MeV protons to a fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. The degradation of power output, IV behavior, carrier concentration and defect concentration were observed at intermediate points throughout the irradiations. The 0.2 MeV proton irradiated solar cells suffered much greater and more rapid degradation in power output than those irradiated with 10 meV protons. The efficiency losses were accompanied by larger increases in the recombination currents in the 0.2 MeV proton irradiated solar cells. The low energy proton irradiations also had a larger impact on the series resistance of the solar cells. Despite the radiation induced damage, the carrier concentration in the base of the solar cells showed no reduction after 10 MeV or 0.2 MeV proton irradiations and even increased during irradiation with 0.2 MeV protons. In a DLTS study of the irradiated samples, the minority carrier defects H4 and H5 at E(v) + 0.33 and E(v) + 0.52 eV and the majority carrier defects E7 and E10 at E(c)- 0.39 and E(c)-0.74 eV, were observed. The defect introduction rates for the 0.2 MeV proton irradiations were about 20 times higher than for the 10 MeV proton irradiations. The defect E10, observed here after irradiation, has been shown to act as a donor in irradiated n-type InP and may be responsible for obscuring carrier removal. The results of this study are consistent with the much greater damage produced by low energy protons whose limited range causes them to stop in the active region of the solar cell.

  18. Development and creation of conditions for the radiation of biological objects with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, V. P.; Portman, A. I.; Sychkov, M. A.; Kolodkin, A. V.; Nikl, I.

    1974-01-01

    Depth distribution of an absorbed proton radiation dose was studied by both calculation and experimental methods on a cylindrical, homogeneous plexiglass phantom that represented the geometric form of a dog. The basis of the heterogeneous phantom was the natural skeleton of a dog, muscle tissue was simulated by a mixture of paraffin and silica filler, and lung tissue by gelatine capsules.

  19. New limit on the low-energy antiproton/proton ratio in the Galactic cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlen, S. P.; Beatty, J. J.; Barwick, S.; Gerbier, G.; Bower, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from a balloon-borne apparatus searching for low-energy antiprotons in the Galactic cosmic rays. For energies less than 640 MeV at the top of the atmosphere, no cosmic-ray antiprotons were observed. This yields an upper limit to the antiproton/proton ratio of 0.000046 at the 85-percent confidence level.

  20. Low energy proton radiation damage to (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R.; Kamath, S.; Knechtli, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-seven 2 times 2 sq cm (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells were fabricated and subjected to 50 keV, 100 keV, and 290 keV of proton irradiation along with eighteen high efficiency silicon solar cells. The results of the study further corroborate the advantages for space missions offered by GaAs cells over state of the art silicon cells. Thus, even though the GaAs cells showed greater degradation when irradiated by protons with energy less than 5 MeV, the solar cells were normally protected from these protons by the glass covers used in space arrays. The GaAs cells also offered superior end of life power capability compared with silicon. The change in the open circuit voltage, short circuit current, spectral response, and dark 1-5 characteristics after irradiation at each proton energy and fluence were found to be consistent with the explanation of the effect of the protons. Also dark 1-5 characteristics showed that a new recombination center dominates the current transport mechanism after irradiation.

  1. Medium energy proton radiation damage to (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R. Y.; Kamath, G. S.; Knechtli, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells irradiated by medium energy 2, 5, and 10 MeV protons was evaluated. The Si cells without coverglass and a number of GaAs solar cells with 12 mil coverglass were irradiated simultaneously with bare GaAs cells. The cell degradation is directly related to the penetration of depth of protons with GaAs. The influence of periodic and continuous thermal annealing on the GaAs solar cells was investigated.

  2. Updating the Jovian Proton Radiation Environment - 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry; Martinez-Sierra, Luz Maria; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Since publication in 1983 by N. Divine and H. Garrett, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's plasma and radiation models have been the design standard for NASA's missions to Jupiter. These models consist of representations of the cold plasma and electrons, the warm and auroral electrons and protons, and the radiation environment (electron, proton, and heavy ions). To date, however, the high-energy proton model has been limited to an L-shell of 12. With the requirement to compute the effects of the high energy protons and other heavy ions on the proposed Europa mission, the extension of the high energy proton model from approximately 12 L-shell to approximately 50 L-shell has become necessary. In particular, a model of the proton environment over that range is required to estimate radiation effects on the solar arrays for the mission. This study describes both the steps taken to extend the original Divine proton model out to an approximately 50 L-shell and the resulting model developed to accomplish that goal. In addition to hydrogen, the oxygen, sulfur, and helium heavy ion environments have also been added between approximately 6 L-shell and approximately 50 L-shell. Finally, selected examples of the model's predictions are presented to illustrate the uses of the tool.

  3. High and Low Energy Proton Radiation Damage in p/n InP MOCVD Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George; Weinberg, Irv; Scheiman, Dave; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Uribe, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    InP p(+)/n/n(+) solar cells, fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, (MOCVD) were irradiated with 0.2 MeV and 10 MeV protons to a fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. The power output degradation, IV behavior, carrier concentration and defect concentration were observed at intermediate points throughout the irradiations. The 0.2 MeV proton-irradiated solar cells suffered much greater and more rapid degradation in power output than those irradiated with 10 MeV protons. The efficiency losses were accompanied by larger increases in the recombination currents in the 0.2 MeV proton-irradiated solar cells. The low energy proton irradiations also had a larger impact on the series resistance of the solar cells. Despite the radiation induced damage, the carrier concentration in the base of the solar cells showed no reduction after 10 MeV or 0.2 MeV proton irradiations and even increased during irradiation with 0.2 MeV protons. In a deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study of the irradiated samples, the minority carrier defects H4 and H5 at E(sub v) + 0.33 and E(sub v) + 0.52 eV and the majority carrier defects E7 and El0 at E(sub c) - 0.39 and E(sub c) - 0.74 eV, were observed. The defect introduction rates for the 0.2 MeV proton irradiations were about 20 times higher than for the 10 MeV proton irradiations. The defect El0, observed here after irradiation, has been shown to act as a donor in irradiated n-type InP and may be responsible for obscuring carrier removal. The results of this study are consistent with the much greater damage produced by low energy protons whose limited range causes them to stop in the active region of the solar cell.

  4. Proton therapy monitoring by Compton imaging: influence of the large energy spectrum of the prompt-γ radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, Estelle; Sarrut, David; Peyrin, Françoise; Maxim, Voichiţa

    2016-04-01

    In proton therapy, the prompt-γ (PG) radiation produced by the interactions between protons and matter is related to the range of the beam in the patient. Tomographic Compton imaging is currently studied to establish a PG image and verify the treatment. However the quality of the reconstructed images depends on a number of factors such as the volume attenuation, the spatial and energy resolutions of the detectors, incomplete absorptions of high energy photons and noise from other particles reaching the camera. The impact of all these factors was not assessed in details. In this paper we investigate the influence of the PG energy spectrum on the reconstructed images. To this aim, we describe the process from the Monte Carlo simulation of the proton irradiation, through the Compton imaging of the PG distribution, up to the image reconstruction with a statistical MLEM method. We identify specific PG energy windows that are more relevant to detect discrepancies with the treatment plan. We find that for the simulated Compton device, the incomplete absorption of the photons with energy above about 2 MeV prevents the observation of the PG distributions at specific energies. It also leads to blurred images and smooths the distal slope of the 1D PG profiles obtained as projections on the central beam axis. We show that a selection of the events produced by γ photons having deposited almost all their energy in the camera allows to largely improve the images, a result that emphasizes the importance of the choice of the detector. However, this initial-energy-based selection is not accessible in practice. We then propose a method to estimate the range of the PG profile both for specific deposited-energy windows and for the full spectrum emission. The method relies on two parameters. We use a learning approach for their estimation and we show that it allows to detect few millimeter shifts of the PG profiles.

  5. Proton therapy monitoring by Compton imaging: influence of the large energy spectrum of the prompt-γ radiation.

    PubMed

    Hilaire, Estelle; Sarrut, David; Peyrin, Françoise; Maxim, Voichiţa

    2016-04-21

    In proton therapy, the prompt-γ (PG) radiation produced by the interactions between protons and matter is related to the range of the beam in the patient. Tomographic Compton imaging is currently studied to establish a PG image and verify the treatment. However the quality of the reconstructed images depends on a number of factors such as the volume attenuation, the spatial and energy resolutions of the detectors, incomplete absorptions of high energy photons and noise from other particles reaching the camera. The impact of all these factors was not assessed in details. In this paper we investigate the influence of the PG energy spectrum on the reconstructed images. To this aim, we describe the process from the Monte Carlo simulation of the proton irradiation, through the Compton imaging of the PG distribution, up to the image reconstruction with a statistical MLEM method. We identify specific PG energy windows that are more relevant to detect discrepancies with the treatment plan. We find that for the simulated Compton device, the incomplete absorption of the photons with energy above about 2 MeV prevents the observation of the PG distributions at specific energies. It also leads to blurred images and smooths the distal slope of the 1D PG profiles obtained as projections on the central beam axis. We show that a selection of the events produced by γ photons having deposited almost all their energy in the camera allows to largely improve the images, a result that emphasizes the importance of the choice of the detector. However, this initial-energy-based selection is not accessible in practice. We then propose a method to estimate the range of the PG profile both for specific deposited-energy windows and for the full spectrum emission. The method relies on two parameters. We use a learning approach for their estimation and we show that it allows to detect few millimeter shifts of the PG profiles. PMID:27008459

  6. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) Instrument on Board the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Spacecraft: Characterization of Earth's Radiation Belt High-Energy Particle Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Batiste, S.; Bolton, M.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Monk, S.; Reukauf, R.; Steg, S.; Westfall, J.; Belting, C.; Bolton, B.; Braun, D.; Cervelli, B.; Hubbell, K.; Kien, M.; Knappmiller, S.; Wade, S.; Lamprecht, B.; Stevens, K.; Wallace, J.; Yehle, A.; Spence, H. E.; Friedel, R.

    2013-11-01

    Particle acceleration and loss in the million electron Volt (MeV) energy range (and above) is the least understood aspect of radiation belt science. In order to measure cleanly and separately both the energetic electron and energetic proton components, there is a need for a carefully designed detector system. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) on board the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) pair of spacecraft consists of a stack of high-performance silicon solid-state detectors in a telescope configuration, a collimation aperture, and a thick case surrounding the detector stack to shield the sensors from penetrating radiation and bremsstrahlung. The instrument points perpendicular to the spin axis of the spacecraft and measures high-energy electrons (up to ˜20 MeV) with excellent sensitivity and also measures magnetospheric and solar protons to energies well above E=100 MeV. The instrument has a large geometric factor ( g=0.2 cm2 sr) to get reasonable count rates (above background) at the higher energies and yet will not saturate at the lower energy ranges. There must be fast enough electronics to avert undue dead-time limitations and chance coincidence effects. The key goal for the REPT design is to measure the directional electron intensities (in the range 10-2-106 particles/cm2 s sr MeV) and energy spectra (Δ E/ E˜25 %) throughout the slot and outer radiation belt region. Present simulations and detailed laboratory calibrations show that an excellent design has been attained for the RBSP needs. We describe the engineering design, operational approaches, science objectives, and planned data products for REPT.

  7. Astrophysical S-factor of the radiative proton capture on 14C at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, Sergey; Burtebaev, Nasurlla; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, Albert; Alimov, Dilshod

    2014-07-01

    The phase shift analysis for position location of the 2S1/2 resonance at 1.5 MeV was carried out on the basis of the known experimental measurements of the excitation functions of the p14C elastic scattering at four angles from 90° to 165° and more than 100 energy values in the range from 600-800 keV to 2200-2400 keV. Also, the possibility to describe the available experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor for the proton capture reaction on 14C to the ground state (GS) of 15N at astrophysical energies was considered in the frame of modified potential cluster model (MPCM).

  8. Acute Hematological Effects in Mice Exposed to the Expected Doses, Dose-rates, and Energies of Solar Particle Event-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Cengel, Keith A.; Wan, X. Steven; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during a SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hrs. post-radiation exposure. PMID:25202654

  9. Proton polarimetry by undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.U.; Conte, M.

    1998-12-31

    The authors show how spin light from an undulator can be used to measure the spin polarization of a proton beam in a high energy circular collider. They propose to perform left-right asymmetry measurements, employing lock-in amplification techniques.

  10. PROTON POLARIMETRY BY UNDULATOR RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO,A.U.

    1998-10-20

    We show how spin light from an undulator can be used to measure the spin polarization of a proton beam in a high energy circular collider. We propose to perform left-right asymmetry measurements, employing lock-in amplification techniques.

  11. High energy proton radiation damage to (AlGa)As-G aAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R.; Goldhammer, L.; Kamath, S.; Knechtli, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Twelve 2 + 2 sq cm (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells were fabricated and were subjected to 15.4 and 40 MeV of proton irradiation. The results showed that the GaAs cells degrade considerably less than do conventional and developmental K7 silicon cells. The detailed characteristics of the GaAs and silicon cells, both before and after irradiation, are described. Further optimization of the GaAs cells seems feasible, and areas for future work are suggested.

  12. The quantification of wound healing as a method to assess late radiation damage in primate skin exposed to high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    In an experiment examining the effects of space radiations on primates, different groups of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were exposed to single whole-body doses of 32- or 55-MeV protons. Survivors of those exposures, together with age-matched controls, have been monitored continuously since 1964 and 1965. Late effects of nominal proton doses ranging from 2-6 Gray have been measured in vitro using skin fibroblasts from the animals. A logical extension of that study is reported here, and it involves observations of wound healing after 3-mm diameter dermal punches were removed from the ears (pinnae) of control and irradiated monkeys. Tendencies in the reduction of competence to repair cutaneous wound have been revealed by the initial examinations of animals that received doses greater than 2 Gy more than 2 decades earlier. These trends indicate that this method of assessing radiation damage to skin exposed to high-energy radiations warrants further study.

  13. Proton irradiation of stem cells: Radiation damage and chemical radioprotection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, R. C.; Montour, J. L.; Gurney, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Effects of high energy protons on erythropoietic stem cells and radioprotection by chemicals were investigated in NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The effects of a parallel beam of 600 MeV protons. The fluence, when converted to dose, were referenced to the synchrocyclotron beam monitors which were then used to administer radiation exposures. Mice were given graded doses to 300 rads to determine dose-response curve. Other mice received saline, AET, or 5-hydroxytryptamine 10 to 15 minutes before exposure.

  14. Radiative corrections to polarization observables in electron-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisyuk, Dmitry; Kobushkin, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    We consider radiative corrections to polarization observables in elastic electron-proton scattering, in particular, for the polarization transfer measurements of the proton form factor ratio μGE/GM. The corrections are of two types: two-photon exchange (TPE) and bremsstrahlung (BS); in the present work we pay special attention to the latter. Assuming small missing energy or missing mass cutoff, the correction can be represented in a model-independent form, with both electron and proton radiation taken into account. Numerical calculations show that the contribution of the proton radiation is not negligible. Overall, at high Q2 and energies, the total correction to μGE/GM grows, but is dominated by TPE. At low energies both TPE and BS may be significant; the latter amounts to ˜0.01 for some reasonable cut-off choices.

  15. High-energy Coulomb breakup of proton-dripline nuclei as a tool to study radiative-capture reactions of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sümmerer, K.

    2007-11-01

    High-energy Coulomb dissociation (CD) can be used to investigate the time-reversed process, radiative capture, for unstable nuclei where the direct capture reaction is difficult or impossible to perform. At GSI, we have run a series of CD measurements involving the proton-halo nucleus 8B which plays a major role in solar-neutrino physics. We could show that for this case CD and direct proton capture yield the same result. Theoretical guidance is necessary, however, to make sure that contributions of different electro-magnetic multipolarities and nuclear dissociation processes are well under control. Recently, we have complemented the LAND/ALADIN experimental apparatus at GSI with new Si microstrip detectors and proton-drift-chambers to continue similar studies with radioactive beams from the fragment separator FRS at GSI. The first case of astrophysical interest to be studied will be the CD of 27P. Another case will be the 2-proton breakup of 17Ne to investigate radiative two-proton capture on 15O, a process which could modify the reaction flow of the rp-process.

  16. Proton minibeam radiation therapy: Experimental dosimetry evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.; Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Hierso, E.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding to a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth

  17. Inward diffusion and loss of radiation belt protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation belt protons in the kinetic energy range 24 to 76 MeV are being measured by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope on each of the two Van Allen Probes. Data have been processed for the purpose of studying variability in the trapped proton intensity during October 2013 to August 2015. For the lower energies (≲32 MeV), equatorial proton intensity near L = 2 showed a steady increase that is consistent with inward diffusion of trapped solar protons, as shown by positive radial gradients in phase space density at fixed values of the first two adiabatic invariants. It is postulated that these protons were trapped with enhanced efficiency during the 7 March 2012 solar proton event. A model that includes radial diffusion, along with known trapped proton source and loss processes, shows that the observed average rate of increase near L = 2 is predicted by the same model diffusion coefficient that is required to form the entire proton radiation belt, down to low L, over an extended (˜103 year) interval. A slower intensity decrease for lower energies near L = 1.5 may also be caused by inward diffusion, though it is faster than predicted by the model. Higher-energy (≳40 MeV) protons near the L = 1.5 intensity maximum are from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay. Their observed intensity is lower than expected by a factor ˜2, but the discrepancy is resolved by adding an unspecified loss process to the model with a mean lifetime ˜120 years.

  18. Proton Radius, Darwin-Foldy Term and Radiative Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    It is not an easy task to define the proton charge radius. Namely, by definition, the proton radius is the slope of the GESachs form factor of the proton at zero momentum transfer, provided one has subtracted from the scattering cross sections, all effects due to QED. That means that radiative corrections must be subtracted; these otherwise ``mask'' the proton structure from the surroundings. On the other hand, the self-energy of the proton (not of the electron or of the muon) also influence the spectrum of atomic hydrogen, or muonic hydrogen, respectively. In the talk, we shall review the difficulties faced by a consistent definition, offer a way to resolve them, and review the current status of Lamb shift predictions in muonic hydrogen, with a special reference to the current experimental-theoretical discrepancy, as reported by the CREMA collaboration.

  19. Hole-boring radiation pressure proton acceleration at high intensity in near-critical density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinqing; Dover, N. P.; Jin, Xiaolin; Li, Bin; Dangor, A. E.; Najmudin, Z.

    2014-10-01

    We will present high quality proton beams accelerated from hole-boring radiation pressure proton acceleration (HB-RPA) using three-dimension Particle-in-Cell simulation results. Scaling works on proton cut off energy with laser parameters such as laser intensity and laser pulse duration have been studied in detail by two-dimension Particle-in-Cell simulations. Optimal conditions for generating proton beam of narrow energy spread will be discussed.

  20. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  1. Multifactorial Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spores to High-Energy Proton Radiation: Role of Spore Structural Components and the Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Günther; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The space environment contains high-energy charged particles (e.g., protons, neutrons, electrons, α-particles, heavy ions) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources or trapped in the radiation belts. Protons constitute the majority (87%) of high-energy charged particles. Spores of Bacillus species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. In this study, spores of different Bacillus subtilis strains were used to study the effects of high energetic proton irradiation on spore survival. Spores of the wild-type B. subtilis strain [mutants deficient in the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathways and mutants deficient in various spore structural components such as dipicolinic acid (DPA), α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) formation, spore coats, pigmentation, or spore core water content] were irradiated as air-dried multilayers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons with 218 MeV protons [with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 0.4 keV/μm] to various final doses up to 2500 Gy. Spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to proton radiation than wild-type spores, indicating that both HR and NHEJ DNA repair pathways are needed for spore survival. Spores lacking DPA, α/β-type SASP, or with increased core water content were also significantly more sensitive to proton radiation, whereas the resistance of spores lacking pigmentation or spore coats was essentially identical to that of the wild-type spores. Our results indicate that α/β-type SASP, core water content, and DPA play an important role in spore resistance to high-energy proton irradiation, suggesting their essential function as radioprotectants of the spore interior. Key Words: Bacillus—Spores—DNA repair—Protection—High-energy proton radiation. Astrobiology 12, 1069–1077. PMID:23088412

  2. A plan to clear energetic protons from the radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-11-01

    The Earth's radiation belts have been a known hazard to satellites since at least 1962, when an American high-altitude nuclear weapons test named Starfish Prime produced an artificial belt that disabled the first commercial communications satellite, TelStar 1. In the years since the Cold War, thousands of satellites have been put into orbit, and surface charging, high-energy protons, high-energy electrons known as "killer electrons," and other hazards of the inner magnetosphere have continued to take their toll. Satellites can be hardened against these radiation hazards, but some researchers have recently floated a more radical idea: If specially designed transmitters are put into space and set to emit tightly tuned waves, known as electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, they could potentially push the highly energetic protons out of the Earth's inner radiation belt, clearing the satellite's path.

  3. Secondary Malignancy Risk Following Proton Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Bree R.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced secondary malignancies are a significant, yet uncommon cause of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. Secondary malignancy risk is dependent upon multiple factors including patient age, the biological and genetic predisposition of the individual, the volume and location of tissue irradiated, and the dose of radiation received. Proton therapy (PRT) is an advanced particle therapy with unique dosimetric properties resulting in reduced entrance dose and minimal to no exit dose when compared with standard photon radiation therapy. Multiple dosimetric studies in varying cancer subtypes have demonstrated that PRT enables the delivery of adequate target volume coverage with reduced integral dose delivered to surrounding tissues, and modeling studies taking into account dosimetry and radiation cell biology have estimated a significantly reduced risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy with PRT. Clinical data are emerging supporting the lower incidence of secondary malignancies after PRT compared with historical photon data, though longer follow-up in proton treated cohorts is awaited. This article reviews the current dosimetric and clinical literature evaluating the incidence of and risk factors associated with radiation-induced secondary malignancy following PRT. PMID:26636040

  4. Linear Energy Transfer Painting With Proton Therapy: A Means of Reducing Radiation Doses With Equivalent Clinical Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Fager, Marcus; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Kirk, Maura; Dolney, Derek; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Vapiwala, Neha; Carabe, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to propose a proton treatment planning method that trades physical dose (D) for dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub d}) while keeping the radiobiologically weighted dose (D{sub RBE}) to the target the same. Methods and Materials: The target is painted with LET{sub d} by using 2, 4, and 7 fields aimed at the proximal segment of the target (split target planning [STP]). As the LET{sub d} within the target increases with increasing number of fields, D decreases to maintain the D{sub RBE} the same as the conventional treatment planning method by using beams treating the full target (full target planning [FTP]). Results: The LET{sub d} increased 61% for 2-field STP (2STP) compared to FTP, 72% for 4STP, and 82% for 7STP inside the target. This increase in LET{sub d} led to a decrease of D with 5.3 ± 0.6 Gy for 2STP, 4.4 ± 0.7 Gy for 4STP, and 5.3 ± 1.1 Gy for 7STP, keeping the DRBE at 90% of the volume (DRBE, 90) constant to FTP. Conclusions: LET{sub d} painting offers a method to reduce prescribed dose at no cost to the biological effectiveness of the treatment.

  5. Pion-to-proton ratio for unaccompanied high-energy cosmic-ray hadrons at mountain altitude using transition-radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.; Ito, A. S.; MacFall, J. R.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Tonwar, S. C.; Viswanath, P. R.; Yodh, G. B.

    1983-05-01

    A transition-radiation (TR) detector, consisting of 24 modules of styrofoam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers, and an ionization calorimeter have been used to measure the pion-to-proton ratio among the unaccompanied cosmic-ray hadrons at a mountain altitude of 730 g cm-2. Using the characteristics of the TR detector obtained from calibrations with particle beams at accelerators, the πp ratio has been determined for cosmic-ray hadrons as πp=0.96+/-0.15 for hadron energy = 400-800 GeV, and πp=0.45+/-0.25 for energy > 800 GeV. Monte Carlo simulations of hadron cascades in the atmosphere using the approximate criterion of unaccompaniment suggest that the observed πp ratio as well as the previously reported neutral-to-charge ratio can be understood by assuming a value of about 13 for the charge exchange in nucleon-air-nucleus inelastic interactions at energies above 400 GeV.

  6. Pion-to-proton ratio for unaccompanied high-energy cosmic-ray hadrons at mountain altitude using transition-radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, R.W.; Ito, A.S.; MacFall, J.R.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Tonwar, S.C.; Viswanath, P.R.; Yodh, G.B.

    1983-05-01

    A transition-radiation (TR) detector, consisting of 24 modules of styrofoam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers, and an ionization calorimeter have been used to measure the pion-to-proton ratio among the unaccompanied cosmic-ray hadrons at a mountain altitude of 730 g cm/sup -2/. Using the characteristics of the TR detector obtained from calibrations with particle beams at accelerators, the ..pi../p ratio has been determined for cosmic-ray hadrons as ..pi../p = 0.96 +- 0.15 for hadron energy = 400--800 GeV, and ..pi../p = 0.45 +- 0.25 for energy >800 GeV. Monte Carlo simulations of hadron cascades in the atmosphere using the approximate criterion of unaccompaniment suggest that the observed ..pi../p ratio as well as the previously reported neutral-to-charge ratio can be understood by assuming a value of about (1/3) for the charge exchange in nucleon--air-nucleus inelastic interactions at energies above 400 GeV.

  7. Assessment of secondary radiation and radiation protection in laser-driven proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Faby, Sebastian; Wilkens, Jan J

    2015-06-01

    This work is a feasibility study of a radiation treatment unit with laser-driven protons based on a state-of-the-art energy selection system employing four dipole magnets in a compact shielded beamline. The secondary radiation emitted from the beamline and its energy selection system and the resulting effective dose to the patient are assessed. Further, it is evaluated whether or not such a compact system could be operated in a conventional treatment vault for clinical linear accelerators under the constraint of not exceeding the effective dose limit of 1 mSv per year to the general public outside the treatment room. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 is employed to simulate the secondary radiation generated while irradiating a hypothetical tumor. The secondary radiation inevitably generated inside the patient is taken into account as well, serving as a lower limit. The results show that the secondary radiation emanating from the shielded compact therapy system would pose a serious secondary dose contamination to the patient. This is due to the broad energy spectrum and in particular the angular distribution of the laser-driven protons, which make the investigated beamline together with the employed energy selection system quite inefficient. The secondary radiation also cannot be sufficiently absorbed in a conventional linear accelerator treatment vault to enable a clinical operation. A promising result, however, is the fact that the secondary radiation generated in the patient alone could be very well shielded by a regular treatment vault, allowing the application of more than 100 fractions of 2 Gy per day with protons. It is thus theoretically possible to treat patients with protons in such treatment vaults. Nevertheless, the results show that there is a clear need for alternative more efficient energy selection solutions for laser-driven protons. PMID:25267383

  8. Proton radiation testing of digital micromirror devices for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourspring, Kenneth; Ninkov, Zoran; Fodness, Bryan C.; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sally; Kim, Alex G.

    2013-09-01

    Scientists are interested in using digital micromirror devices (DMD) as slit-masks in multiobject spectrometers on future space missions. A favored orbit is at the second Lagrangian point (L2). A requirement for mission planning is to determine how long such microelectrical mechanical systems devices would remain operational given the L2 radiation environment, which is primarily composed of solar protons and cosmic rays. To this end, we initiated DMD proton testing. Three DMDs were irradiated with high-energy protons (35 to 50 MeV) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88 in. Cyclotron. Assuming a typical spacecraft shielding of 100 mils of aluminum, our tests imply that DMDs remain fully operable in a five-year mission at L2 with a margin of safety of 4.5.

  9. PMMA/MWCNT nanocomposite for proton radiation shielding applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhao; Chen, Siyuan; Nambiar, Shruti; Sun, Yonghai; Zhang, Mingyu; Zheng, Wanping; Yeow, John T W

    2016-06-10

    Radiation shielding in space missions is critical in order to protect astronauts, spacecraft and payloads from radiation damage. Low atomic-number materials are efficient in shielding particle-radiation, but they have relatively weak material properties compared to alloys that are widely used in space applications as structural materials. However, the issues related to weight and the secondary radiation generation make alloys not suitable for space radiation shielding. Polymers, on the other hand, can be filled with different filler materials for reinforcement of material properties, while at the same time provide sufficient radiation shielding function with lower weight and less secondary radiation generation. In this study, poly(methyl-methacrylate)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (PMMA/MWCNT) nanocomposite was fabricated. The role of MWCNTs embedded in PMMA matrix, in terms of radiation shielding effectiveness, was experimentally evaluated by comparing the proton transmission properties and secondary neutron generation of the PMMA/MWCNT nanocomposite with pure PMMA and aluminum. The results showed that the addition of MWCNTs in PMMA matrix can further reduce the secondary neutron generation of the pure polymer, while no obvious change was found in the proton transmission property. On the other hand, both the pure PMMA and the nanocomposite were 18%-19% lighter in weight than aluminum for stopping the protons with the same energy and generated up to 5% fewer secondary neutrons. Furthermore, the use of MWCNTs showed enhanced thermal stability over the pure polymer, and thus the overall reinforcement effects make MWCNT an effective filler material for applications in the space industry. PMID:27125319

  10. PMMA/MWCNT nanocomposite for proton radiation shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhao; Chen, Siyuan; Nambiar, Shruti; Sun, Yonghai; Zhang, Mingyu; Zheng, Wanping; Yeow, John T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation shielding in space missions is critical in order to protect astronauts, spacecraft and payloads from radiation damage. Low atomic-number materials are efficient in shielding particle-radiation, but they have relatively weak material properties compared to alloys that are widely used in space applications as structural materials. However, the issues related to weight and the secondary radiation generation make alloys not suitable for space radiation shielding. Polymers, on the other hand, can be filled with different filler materials for reinforcement of material properties, while at the same time provide sufficient radiation shielding function with lower weight and less secondary radiation generation. In this study, poly(methyl-methacrylate)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (PMMA/MWCNT) nanocomposite was fabricated. The role of MWCNTs embedded in PMMA matrix, in terms of radiation shielding effectiveness, was experimentally evaluated by comparing the proton transmission properties and secondary neutron generation of the PMMA/MWCNT nanocomposite with pure PMMA and aluminum. The results showed that the addition of MWCNTs in PMMA matrix can further reduce the secondary neutron generation of the pure polymer, while no obvious change was found in the proton transmission property. On the other hand, both the pure PMMA and the nanocomposite were 18%–19% lighter in weight than aluminum for stopping the protons with the same energy and generated up to 5% fewer secondary neutrons. Furthermore, the use of MWCNTs showed enhanced thermal stability over the pure polymer, and thus the overall reinforcement effects make MWCNT an effective filler material for applications in the space industry.

  11. Radiation safety considerations in proton aperture disposal.

    PubMed

    Walker, Priscilla K; Edwards, Andrew C; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2014-04-01

    Beam shaping in scattered and uniform scanned proton beam therapy (PBT) is made commonly by brass apertures. Due to proton interactions, these devices become radioactive and could pose safety issues and radiation hazards. Nearly 2,000 patient-specific devices per year are used at Indiana University Cyclotron Operations (IUCO) and IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC); these devices require proper guidelines for disposal. IUCO practice has been to store these apertures for at least 4 mo to allow for safe transfer to recycling contractors. The devices require decay in two staged secure locations, including at least 4 mo in a separate building, at which point half are ready for disposal. At 6 mo, 20-30% of apertures require further storage. This process requires significant space and manpower and should be considered in the design process for new clinical facilities. More widespread adoption of pencil beam or spot scanning nozzles may obviate this issue, as apertures then will no longer be necessary. PMID:24562073

  12. Dynamics of high-energy protons in the inner radiation belt during the 24th solar cycle on the data of the ARINA and VSPLESK low-orbit experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrin, Sergey; Mayorova, Marina; Koldashov, Sergey; Galper, Arkady; Zharaspayev, Temir

    2016-07-01

    Results of analysis of the inner radiation belt proton fluxes obtained in ARINA and VSPLESK satellite experiments are presented in this report The ARINA experiment is carried out on board the Russian low-orbit spacecraft Resurs-DK1 (altitude ˜600 km, inclination 70°, since 2006 till 2016). The VSPLESK experiment was fulfilled on board the International Space Station (altitude ~400 km, inclination 52°, since 2008 till 2013). The instruments register high-energy electrons and protons with energy range 3-30 MeV for electrons and 30-100 MeV for protons. The spectrometers allow measuring the particle energy with resolution 10% and angular resolution 7°. In this work the distribution of proton flux in the inner radiation belt (1.15proton intensity depends on the solar cycle phase (the minimum intensity value is in the solar maximum and vice versa) and varies 2-7 times for different L-shells.

  13. High energy protons generation by two sequential laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin

    2015-04-15

    The sequential proton acceleration by two laser pulses of relativistic intensity is proposed to produce high energy protons. In the scheme, a relativistic super-Gaussian (SG) laser pulse followed by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulse irradiates dense plasma attached by underdense plasma. A proton beam is produced from the target and accelerated in the radiation pressure regime by the short SG pulse and then trapped and re-accelerated in a special bubble driven by the LG pulse in the underdense plasma. The advantages of radiation pressure acceleration and LG transverse structure are combined to achieve the effective trapping and acceleration of protons. In a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, protons of 6.7 GeV are obtained from a 2 × 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} SG laser pulse and a LG pulse at a lower peak intensity.

  14. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy. PMID:12512712

  15. Neutron, Proton, and Photonuclear Cross Sections for Radiation Therapy and Radiation Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1998-09-10

    The authors review recent work at Los Alamos to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross section up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. For radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments, and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given.

  16. Effects of Proton and Combined Proton and (56)Fe Radiation on the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Allen, Antiño R; Sharma, Sourabh; Allen, Barrett; Rosi, Susanna; Olsen, Reid H J; Davis, Matthew J; Eiwaz, Massarra; Fike, John R; Nelson, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    The space radiation environment contains protons and (56)Fe, which could pose a significant hazard to space flight crews during and after missions. The space environment involves complex radiation exposures, thus, the effects of a dose of protons might be modulated by a dose of heavy-ion radiation. The brain, and particularly the hippocampus, may be susceptible to space radiation-induced changes. In this study, we first determined the dose-response effect of proton radiation (150 MeV) on hippocampus-dependent cognition 1 and 3 months after exposure. Based on those results, we subsequently exposed mice to protons alone (150 MeV, 0.1 Gy), (56)Fe alone (600 MeV/n, 0.5 Gy) or combined proton and (56)Fe radiations (protons first) with the two exposures separated by 24 h. At one month postirradiation, all animal groups showed novel object recognition. However, at three months postirradiation, mice exposed to either protons or combined proton and (56)Fe radiations showed impaired novel object recognition, which was not observed in mice irradiated with (56)Fe alone. The mechanisms in these impairments might involve inflammation. In mice irradiated with protons alone or (56)Fe alone three months earlier, there was a negative correlation between a measure of novel object recognition and the number of newly born activated microglia in the dentate gyrus. Next, cytokine and chemokine levels were assessed in the hippocampus. At one month after exposure the levels of IL-12 were higher in mice exposed to combined radiations compared with sham-irradiated mice, while the levels of IFN-γ were lower in mice exposed to (56)Fe radiation alone or combined radiations. In addition, IL-4 levels were lower in (56)Fe-irradiated mice compared with proton-irradiated mice and TNF-α levels were lower in proton-irradiated mice than in mice receiving combined radiations. At three months after exposure, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) and eotaxin levels were lower in mice receiving combined

  17. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, J.; Korfer, M.; Wanke, H. , Mainz ); Schroeder, A.N.F. ); Figes, D.; Dragovitsch, P. ); Englert, P.A.J. ); Starr, R.; Trombka, J.I. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Taylor, I. ); Drake, D.M.; Shunk, E.R. )

    1991-04-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10{sub 8} protons cm{sup {minus}2} (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific as well as engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage the detectors were stepwise annealed at temperatures T {le} 110{degrees}C while staying specially designed cryostats. This paper shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged particles environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  18. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Koerfer, M.; Waenke, H.; Schroeder, A. N. F.; Filges, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P. A. J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1991-01-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process, several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific and engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation, all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage, the detectors were stepwise-annealed at temperatures below 110 C, while kept in their specially designed cryostats. This study shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged-particle environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  19. Processes forming and sustaining Saturn's proton radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Roussos, E.; Paranicas, C.; Krupp, N.; Haggerty, D. K.

    2013-01-01

    Saturn's proton radiation belts extend over the orbits of several moons that split this region of intense radiation into several distinct belts. Understanding their distribution requires to understand how their particles are created and evolve. High-energy protons are thought to be dominantly produced by cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND). The source of the lower energies and the role of other effects such as charge exchange with the gas originating from Enceladus is still an open question. There is also no certainty so far if the belts exist independently from each other and the rest of the magnetosphere or if and how particles are exchanged between these regions. We approach these problems by using measurements acquired by the MIMI/LEMMS instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Protons in the range from 500 keV to 40 MeV are considered. Their intensities are averaged over 7 years of the mission and converted to phase space densities at constant first and second adiabatic invariant. We reproduce the resulting radial profiles with a numerical model that includes radial diffusion, losses from moons and interactions with gas, and a phenomenological source. Our results show that the dominating effects away from the moon sweeping corridors are diffusion and the source, while interactions with gas are secondary. Based on a GEANT4 simulation of the interaction of cosmic rays with Saturn's rings, we conclude that secondary particles produced within the rings can only account for the high-energy part of the source. A comparison with the equivalent processes within Earth's atmosphere shows that Saturn's atmosphere can contribute to the production of the lower energies and might be even dominating at the higher energies. Other possibilities to supply the belts and exchange particles between them, as diffusion and injections from outside the belts, or stripping of ENAs, can be excluded.

  20. Spectral Analyses and Radiation Exposures from Several Ground-Level Enhancement (GLE) Solar Proton Events: A Comparison of Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan; Dietrich, William; Badavi, Francis; Rojdev, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Several methods for analyzing the particle spectra from extremely large solar proton events, called Ground-Level Enhancements (GLEs), have been developed and utilized by the scientific community to describe the solar proton energy spectra and have been further applied to ascertain the radiation exposures to humans and radio-sensitive systems, namely electronics. In this paper 12 GLEs dating back to 1956 are discussed, and the three methods for describing the solar proton energy spectra are reviewed. The three spectral fitting methodologies are EXP [an exponential in proton rigidity (R)], WEIB [Weibull fit: an exponential in proton energy], and the Band function (BAND) [a double power law in proton rigidity]. The EXP and WEIB methods use low energy (MeV) GLE solar proton data and make extrapolations out to approx.1 GeV. On the other hand, the BAND method utilizes low- and medium-energy satellite solar proton data combined with high-energy solar proton data deduced from high-latitude neutron monitoring stations. Thus, the BAND method completely describes the entire proton energy spectrum based on actual solar proton observations out to 10 GeV. Using the differential spectra produced from each of the 12 selected GLEs for each of the three methods, radiation exposures are presented and discussed in detail. These radiation exposures are then compared with the current 30-day and annual crew exposure limits and the radiation effects to electronics.

  1. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders.

    PubMed

    Cimino, R; Baglin, V; Schäfers, F

    2015-12-31

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic vacuum issues, etc. If experimentally fully validated, a highly reflecting beam screen surface will provide a viable and solid solution to be eligible as a baseline design in FCC-hh projects to come, rendering them more cost effective and sustainable. PMID:26764998

  2. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimino, R.; Baglin, V.; Schäfers, F.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic vacuum issues, etc. If experimentally fully validated, a highly reflecting beam screen surface will provide a viable and solid solution to be eligible as a baseline design in FCC-hh projects to come, rendering them more cost effective and sustainable.

  3. Proton-minibeam radiation therapy: A proof of concept

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G. R.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This Monte Carlo simulation work aims at studying a new radiotherapy approach called proton-minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT). The main objective of this proof of concept was the evaluation of the possible gain in tissue sparing, thanks to the spatial fractionation of the dose, which could be used to deposit higher and potentially curative doses in clinical cases where tissue tolerances are a limit for conventional methods. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (GATE v.6) have been used as a method to calculate the ratio of the peak-to-valley doses (PVDR) for arrays of proton minibeams of 0.7 mm width and several center-to-center distances, at different depths in a water phantom. The beam penumbras were also evaluated as an important parameter for tissue sparing, for example, in the treatment of non-cancer diseases like epilepsy. Two proton energies were considered in this study: a clinically relevant energy (105 MeV) and a very high energy (1 GeV), to benefit from a reduced lateral scattering. For the latter case, an interlaced geometry was also evaluated. Results: Higher or similar PVDR than the ones obtained in x-rays minibeam radiation therapy were achieved in several pMBRT configurations. In addition, for the two energies studied, the beam penumbras are smaller than in the case of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Conclusions: The high PVDR obtained for some configurations and the small penumbras in comparison with existing radiosurgery techniques, suggest a potential gain in healthy tissue sparing in this new technique. Biological studies are warranted to assess the effects of pMBRT on both normal and tumoral tissues.

  4. Flame detector operable in presence of proton radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D. J.; Turnage, J. E.; Linford, R. M. F.; Cornish, S. D. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A detector of ultraviolet radiation for operation in a space vehicle which orbits through high intensity radiation areas is described. Two identical ultraviolet sensor tubes are mounted within a shield which limits to acceptable levels the amount of proton radiation reaching the sensor tubes. The shield has an opening which permits ultraviolet radiation to reach one of the sensing tubes. The shield keeps ultraviolet radiation from reaching the other sensor tube, designated the reference tube. The circuitry of the detector subtracts the output of the reference tube from the output of the sensing tube, and any portion of the output of the sensing tube which is due to proton radiation is offset by the output of the reference tube. A delay circuit in the detector prevents false alarms by keeping statistical variations in the proton radiation sensed by the two sensor tubes from developing an output signal.

  5. Proton-synchrotron radiation of large-scale jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F. A.

    2002-05-01

    The X-radiation of large-scale extragalactic jets poses a serious challenge for the conventional electron-synchrotron or inverse Compton models suggested to explain the overall non-thermal emission of the resolved knots and hotspots. In this paper I propose an alternative mechanism for X-ray emission - synchrotron radiation by extremely high-energy protons - and discuss implications of this model for the extended jet features resolved by Chandra in several prominent radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) - Pictor A, 3C 120, PKS 0637-752 and 3C 273. I show that if protons are indeed accelerated to energies E p >=1018 eV, it is possible to construct a realistic model that allows an effective cooling of protons via synchrotron radiation on quite `comfortable' time-scales of about 107 -108 yr, i.e. on time-scales that provide effective propagation of protons over the jet structures on kpc scales. This explains quite naturally the diffuse character of the observed X-ray emission, as well as the broad range of spectral X-ray indices observed from different objects. Yet, as long as the proton synchrotron cooling time is comparable with both the particle escape time and the age of the jet, the proton-synchrotron model offers an adequate radiation efficiency. The model requires relatively large magnetic field of about 1mG, and proton acceleration rates ranging from L p ~1043 to 1046 ergs-1 . These numbers could be reduced significantly if the jet structures are moving relativistically towards the observer. I discuss also possible contributions of synchrotron radiation by secondary electrons produced at interactions of relatively low energy (E p <=1013 eV) protons with the compressed gas in the jet structures. This is an interesting possibility which however requires a very large product of the ambient gas density and total amount of accelerated protons. Therefore it could be treated as a viable working hypothesis only if one can reduce the intrinsic X

  6. Radiation damage in proton irradiated indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    1986-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells exposed to 10 MeV proton irradiations were found to have significantly greater radiation resistance than either GaAs or Si. Performance predictions were obtained for two proton dominated orbits and one in which both protons and electrons were significant cell degradation factors. Array specific power was calculated using lightweight blanket technology, a SEP array structure, and projected cell efficiencies. Results indicate that arrays using fully developed InP cells should out-perform those using GaAs or Si in orbits where radiation is a significant cell degradation factor.

  7. Proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Kapustinsky, Jon; Nelson, Ron; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators. A 20 cm long LYSO crystal, a 15 cm long CeF3 crystal and four liquid scintillator based sealed quartz capillaries were irradiated by 800 MeV protons at Los Alamos up to 3.3 ×1014 p /cm2. Four 1.5 mm thick LYSO plates were irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN up to 6.9 ×1015 p /cm2. The results show an excellent radiation hardness of LYSO crystals against charged hadrons.

  8. Radiation pressure acceleration of protons to 93 MeV with circularly polarized petawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Hyung Taek; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been a challenging task in laser-driven proton/ion acceleration due to its stringent requirements in laser and target conditions. The realization of radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration requires irradiating ultrathin targets with an ultrahigh contrast and ultraintense laser pulses. We report the generation of 93-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 800-nm 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 × 10 20 W / cm 2 to 15-nm-thick polymer targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We expect this clear demonstration of RPA to facilitate the realization of laser-driven proton/ion sources delivering energetic and short-pulse particle beams for novel applications.

  9. Proton radiation damage in bulk n-GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D. C.; Blue, J. W.; Flood, D. J.; Stanchina, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Bulk samples of Te-doped n-type GaAs were irradiated using 10 MeV to 24 MeV protons to fluences between 2 x 10 to the 11th power protons/sq cm and 2 x 10 to the 14th power protons/sq cm. Majority carrier electrical effects were measured using the vanderPauw techniques and it was observed that radiation damage was minimal at the 10 to the 11th power proton/sq cm fluence. For the higher fluences, carrier removal was proportional to Delta E/Delta x for the protons indicating ionization interactions between the protons and atoms. Thermal annealing was observed at 155 C.

  10. Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering Excitation Functions at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bisplinghoff, J.; Daniel, R.; Diehl, O.; Engelhardt, H.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P.; Gro-Hardt, R.; Heider, S.; Heine, A.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Lahr, U.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mosel, F.; Rohdje, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Ro, U.; Scheid, H.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Schwarz, V.; Trelle, H.; Wiedmann, W.; Ziegler, R.; Albers, D.; Bollmann, R.; Bueer, K.; Dohrmann, F.; Gasthuber, M.; Greiff, J.; Gro, A.; Igelbrink, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Mueller, M.; Muenstermann, M.; Schirm, N.; Scobel, W.; Wellinghausen, A.; Woller, K.; Cloth, P.; Gebel, R.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sterzenbach, G.

    1997-03-01

    Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic scattering cross sections have been measured in narrow steps for projectile momenta p{sub p} (energies T{sub p}) from 1100 to 3300MeV/c (500 to 2500MeV) in the angular range 35{degree}{le}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{le}90{degree} with a detector providing {Delta}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{approx}1.4{degree} resolution. Measurements have been performed continuously during projectile acceleration in the cooler synchrotron COSY with an internal CH{sub 2} fiber target, taking particular care to monitor luminosity as a function of T{sub p}. The advantages of this experimental technique are demonstrated, and the excitation functions obtained are compared to existing cross section data. No evidence for narrow structures was found. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. ATS-6 - Synchronous orbit trapped radiation studies with an electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Swanson, R. L.; Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the University of Minnesota experiment on ATS-6 designed to study the origin and dynamics of high-energy electrons and protons in the outer radiation belt and in the near-earth plasma sheet. The experiment consists of two nearly identical detector assemblies, each of which is a magnetic spectrometer containing four gold-silicon surface barrier detectors. The instrument provides a clean separation between protons and electrons by the combination of pulse height analysis and magnetic deflection.

  12. Proton Radiation Belt Dynamics in Low Earth Orbits Interrelated with Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, Vitaly; Aleksandrin, Sergey; Mikhailov, Vladimir; Bakaldin, Alexey; Mayorov, Andrey; Mayorova, Marina; Koldashov, Sergey; Sharonova, Nadezhda; Galper, Arkady; Zharaspaev, Temir; Batischev, Alexey

    Existing empirical radiation belt models do not able to calculate trapped particle fluxes with taking into account changing solar activity. Widely using AP-8 model allows to evaluate proton fluxes just in two cases: for minimum or maximum of a solar cycle. New AP-9 model is under developing. Also new additional possibilities for experimental study of radiation belt dynamics is opened up. Since 2006 year PAMELA and ARINA experiments onboard satelite RESURS-DK1 are carried out. PAMELA is in the first place spectrometer to study antiparticles in cosmic rays. The ARINA instrument is intended studying high-energy charged particle bursts in the magnetosphere. Along with such fundamental goals these instruments give opportunity to carry out measurements of trapped particles in the inner radiation belt. Complex of two mentioned instruments covers proton energy range from 30 MeV up to energy limit for trapping (~2 GeV). Continuous measurements with PAMELA and ARINA include falling and rising phases of 23/24 solar cycles. In this report we present temporal profile of proton fluxes in the inner zone of the radiation belt (1.11proton fluxes on level of solar activity (sunspot number) was revealed. At that it was shown that proton fluxes of energies >30MeV at the solar minimum several times greater than at the solar maximum.

  13. Energy Production Demonstrator for Megawatt Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, Vitaly S.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Novitski, Igor; Tyutyunnikov, Sergey I.

    2014-07-16

    A preliminary study of the Energy Production Demonstrator (EPD) concept - a solid heavy metal target irradiated by GeV-range intense proton beams and producing more energy than consuming - is carried out. Neutron production, fission, energy deposition, energy gain, testing volume and helium production are simulated with the MARS15 code for tungsten, thorium, and natural uranium targets in the proton energy range 0.5 to 120 GeV. This study shows that the proton energy range of 2 to 4 GeV is optimal for both a natU EPD and the tungsten-based testing station that would be the most suitable for proton accelerator facilities. Conservative estimates, not including breeding and fission of plutonium, based on the simulations suggest that the proton beam current of 1 mA will be sufficient to produce 1 GW of thermal output power with the natU EPD while supplying < 8% of that power to operate the accelerator. The thermal analysis shows that the concept considered has a problem due to a possible core meltdown; however, a number of approaches (a beam rastering, in first place) are suggested to mitigate the issue. The efficiency of the considered EPD as a Materials Test Station (MTS) is also evaluated in this study.

  14. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  15. Innovative radiotherapy of sarcoma: Proton beam radiation.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F; Haas, Rick L M

    2016-07-01

    This review on proton beam radiotherapy (PBT) focusses on an historical overview, cost-effectiveness, techniques, acute and late toxicities and clinical results of PBT for sarcoma patients. PBT has gained its place among the armamentarium of modern radiotherapy techniques. For selected patients, it can be cost-effective. PMID:27258968

  16. Control of the energetic proton flux in the inner radiation belt by artificial means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.

    2009-07-01

    Earth's inner radiation belt located inside L = 2 is dominated by a relatively stable flux of trapped protons with energy from a few to over 100 MeV. Radiation effects in spacecraft electronics caused by the inner radiation belt protons are the major cause of performance anomalies and lifetime of Low Earth Orbit satellites. For electronic components with large feature size, of the order of a micron, anomalies occur mainly when crossing the South Atlantic Anomaly. However, current and future commercial electronic systems are incorporating components with submicron size features. Such systems cannot function in the presence of the trapped 30-100 MeV protons, as hardening against such high-energy protons is essentially impractical. The paper discusses the basic physics of the interaction of high-energy protons with low-frequency Shear Alfven Wave (SAW) under conditions prevailing in the radiation belts. Such waves are observed mainly in the outer belt, and it is believed that they are excited by an Alfven Ion Cyclotron instability driven by anisotropic equatorially trapped energetic protons. The paper derives the bounce and drift-averaged diffusion coefficients and uses them to determine the proton lifetime as a function of the spectrum and amplitude of the volume-averaged SAW resonant with the trapped energetic protons. The theory is applied to the outer and inner radiation belts. It is found that the resonant interaction of observed SAW with nT amplitude in the outer belt results in low flux of trapped protons by restricting their lifetime to periods shorter than days. A similar analysis for the inner radiation belt indicates that broadband SAW in the 1-10 Hz frequency range and average amplitude of 25 pT would reduce the trapped energetic proton flux by more than an order of magnitude within 2 to 3 years. In the absence of naturally occurring SAW waves, such reduction can be achieved by injecting such waves from ground-based transmitters. The analysis indicates

  17. Energies of backstreaming protons in the foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A predicted pattern of energy vs detector location in the cislunar region is displayed for protons of zero pitch angle traveling upstream away from the quasi-parallel bow shock. The pattern is implied by upstream wave boundary properties. In the solar ecliptic, protons are estimated to have a minimum of 1.1 times the solar wind bulk energy E sub SW when the wave boundary is in the early morning sector and a maximum of 8.2 E sub SW when the boundary is near the predawn flank.

  18. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  19. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J.; Friesen, L.; Lin, A.; Mabry, D.; Katz, N.; Dotan, Y.; George, J.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M.; Redding, M.; O'Brien, T. P.; Cha, J.; Birkitt, A.; Carranza, P.; Lalic, M.; Fuentes, F.; Galvan, R.; McNab, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ˜60 MeV to ˜2000 MeV. RPS will investigate decades-old questions about the inner Van Allen belt proton environment: a nearby region of space that is relatively unexplored because of the hazards of spacecraft operation there and the difficulties in obtaining accurate proton measurements in an intense penetrating background. RPS is designed to provide the accuracy needed to answer questions about the sources and losses of the inner belt protons and to obtain the measurements required for the next-generation models of trapped protons in the magnetosphere. In addition to detailed information for individual protons, RPS features count rates at a 1-second timescale, internal radiation dosimetry, and information about electrostatic discharge events on the RBSP spacecraft that together will provide new information about space environmental hazards in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  20. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Friesen, L.; Lin, A.; Mabry, D.; Katz, N.; Dotan, Y.; George, J. S.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Redding, M.; O'Brien, P. P.; Cha, J.; Birkitt, A.; Carranza, P.; Lalic, M.; Fuentes, F.; Galvan, R.; McNab, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ~60 MeV to ~2000 MeV. RPS will investigate decades-old questions about the inner Van Allen belt proton environment: a nearby region of space that is relatively unexplored because of the hazards of spacecraft operation there and the difficulties in obtaining accurate proton measurements in an intense penetrating background. RPS is designed to provide the accuracy needed to answer questions about the sources and losses of the inner belt protons and to obtain the measurements required for the next-generation models of trapped protons in the magnetosphere. In addition to detailed information for individual protons, RPS features count rates at a 1-second timescale, internal radiation dosimetry, and information about electrostatic discharge events on the RBSP spacecraft that together will provide new information about space environmental hazards in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  1. Charm quark energy loss in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Sascha; Gossiaux, Pol Bernard; Werner, Klaus; Aichelin, Jörg

    2013-03-01

    Heavy quarks, i.e. charm and bottom quarks are one of the crucial probes in the high energy nuclear collision program at current day accelerators. It has been shown at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) that heavy quarks show a remarkable medium suppression despite their high mass. In these proceedings we report on a study of heavy quark energy loss in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions at energies accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Recent experimental results from the LHC collaborations have shown that the notion of creating an interacting system is not completely off limits. The higher energies in LHC proton-proton collisions lead to multiplicities comparable to Cu+Cu collisions at RHIC. Within this environment high-momentum heavy quarks experience a non-negligible energy loss.

  2. Radiation shielding for 250 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, M.

    1987-04-01

    This paper is targetted at personnel who have the responsibility of designing the radiation shielding against neutron fluences created when protons interact with matter. Shielding of walls and roofs are discussed, as well as neutron dose leakage through labyrinths. Experimental data on neutron flux attenuation are considered, as well as some calculations using the intranuclear cascade calculations and parameterizations.

  3. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties and microstructural development of Alloy 718 irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Garner, F. A.; Hamilton, M. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a γ '(Ni 3(Al,Ti))-γ″(Ni 3Nb) hardenable superalloy with attractive strength, and corrosion resistance. This alloy is a candidate material for use in accelerator production of tritium (APT) target and blanket applications, where it would have to withstand low-temperature irradiation by high-energy protons and spallation neutrons. The existing data base, relevant to such irradiation conditions, is very limited. Alloy 718 has therefore been exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), closely matching those expected in the APT target and blanket applications. The yield stress of Alloy 718 increases with increasing dose up to ˜0.5 dpa, and then decreases with further increase in dose. The uniform elongation, however, drastically decreases with increasing dose at very low doses (<0.5 dpa), and does not recover when the alloy later softens somewhat. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of Alloy 718 shows that superlattice spots corresponding to the age-hardening precipitate phases γ ' and γ″ are lost from the diffraction patterns for Alloy 718 by only 0.6 dpa, the lowest proton-induced dose level achieved in this experiment. Examination of samples that were neutron irradiated to doses of only ˜0.1 dpa showed that precipitates are faintly visible in diffraction patterns but are rapidly becoming invisible. It is proposed that the γ ' and γ″ first become disordered (by <0.6 dpa), but remain as solute-rich aggregates that still contribute to the hardness at relatively low dpa levels, and then are gradually dispersed at higher doses.

  4. Calibration of a proton beam energy monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Coutrakon, G. B.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Shahnazi, K.; Koss, P.; Sanders, E.

    2007-06-15

    Delivery of therapeutic proton beams requires an absolute energy accuracy of {+-}0.64 to 0.27 MeV for patch fields and a relative energy accuracy of {+-}0.10 to 0.25 MeV for tailoring the depth dose distribution using the energy stacking technique. Achromatic switchyard tunes, which lead to better stability of the beam incident onto the patient, unfortunately limit the ability of switchyard magnet tesla meters to verify the correct beam energy within the tolerances listed above. A new monitor to measure the proton energy before each pulse is transported through the switchyard has been installed into a proton synchrotron. The purpose of this monitor is to correct and/or inhibit beam delivery when the measured beam energy is outside of the tolerances for treatment. The monitor calculates the beam energy using data from two frequency and eight beam position monitors that measure the revolution frequency of the proton bunches and the effective offset of the orbit from the nominal radius of the synchrotron. The new energy monitor has been calibrated by measuring the range of the beam through water and comparing with published range-energy tables for various energies. A relationship between depth dose curves and range-energy tables was first determined using Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport and energy deposition. To reduce the uncertainties associated with typical scanning water phantoms, a new technique was devised in which the beam energy was scanned while fixed thickness water tanks were sandwiched between two fixed parallel plate ionization chambers. Using a multitude of tank sizes, several energies were tested to determine the nominal accelerator orbit radius. After calibration, the energy reported by the control system matched the energy derived by range measurements to better than 0.72 MeV for all nine energies tested between 40 and 255 MeV with an average difference of -0.33 MeV. A study of different combinations of revolution frequency and radial

  5. Calibration of a proton beam energy monitor.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Coutrakon, G B; Ghebremedhin, A; Shahnazi, K; Koss, P; Sanders, E

    2007-06-01

    Delivery of therapeutic proton beams requires an absolute energy accuracy of +/-0.64 to 0.27 MeV for patch fields and a relative energy accuracy of +/-0.10 to 0.25 MeV for tailoring the depth dose distribution using the energy stacking technique. Achromatic switchyard tunes, which lead to better stability of the beam incident onto the patient, unfortunately limit the ability of switchyard magnet tesla meters to verify the correct beam energy within the tolerances listed above. A new monitor to measure the proton energy before each pulse is transported through the switchyard has been installed into a proton synchrotron. The purpose of this monitor is to correct and/or inhibit beam delivery when the measured beam energy is outside of the tolerances for treatment. The monitor calculates the beam energy using data from two frequency and eight beam position monitors that measure the revolution frequency of the proton bunches and the effective offset of the orbit from the nominal radius of the synchrotron. The new energy monitor has been calibrated by measuring the range of the beam through water and comparing with published range-energy tables for various energies. A relationship between depth dose curves and range-energy tables was first determined using Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport and energy deposition. To reduce the uncertainties associated with typical scanning water phantoms, a new technique was devised in which the beam energy was scanned while fixed thickness water tanks were sandwiched between two fixed parallel plate ionization chambers. Using a multitude of tank sizes, several energies were tested to determine the nominal accelerator orbit radius. After calibration, the energy reported by the control system matched the energy derived by range measurements to better than 0.72 MeV for all nine energies tested between 40 and 255 MeV with an average difference of -0.33 MeV. A study of different combinations of revolution frequency and radial

  6. Water-soluble core/shell nanoparticles for proton therapy through particle-induced radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Maeng Jun; Kim, Kye-Ryung

    2015-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), therapy, and drug delivery systems. Metallic nanoparticles as therapeutic tools have been demonstrated using radio-frequency magnetic fields or near-infrared light. Recently, therapeutic applications of metallic nanomaterials combined with proton beams have been reported. Particle-induced radiation from metallic nanoparticles, which can enhance the therapeutic effects of proton therapy, was released when the nanoparticles were bombarded by a high-energy proton beam. Core/shell nanoparticles, especially Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles, have drawn attention in biological applications due to their attractive characteristics. However, studies on the phase transfer of organic-ligand-based core/shell nanoparticles into water are limited. Herein, we demonstrated that hydrophobic core/shell structured nanomaterials could be successfully dispersed in water through chloroform/surfactant mixtures. The effects of the core/shell nanomaterials and the proton irradiation on Escherichia coli (E. coli) were also explored.

  7. Variability of the Inner Proton Radiation Belt Observed by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Selesnick, R.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Inner radiation belt protons with kinetic energy above 10 MeV are known to be highly stable, with a maximum intensity near L = 1.5 that varies little evenon solar-cycle time scales. However, for L = 2 and above, more rapid changes occur: (1) protons are trapped during solar particle events, (2) steady intensity changes near L = 2 may result from radial diffusion, (3) for L > 2 there are rapid losses during magnetic storms, and (4) the losses are replenished by albedo neutron decay. New measurements from Van Allen Probes describe each of the last three processes in detail (the first has not yet been observed). These data provide new constraints on theories of trapped proton dynamics and improved empirical estimates of transport coefficients for radiation belt modeling.

  8. Divergent Modification of Low-Dose 56Fe-Particle and Proton Radiation on Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shtifman, Alexander; Pezone, Matthew J.; Sasi, Sharath P.; Agarwal, Akhil; Gee, Hannah; Song, Jin; Perepletchikov, Aleksandr; Yan, Xinhua; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A.

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether loss of skeletal muscle mass and function experienced by astronauts during space flight could be augmented by ionizing radiation (IR), such as low-dose high-charge and energy (HZE) particles or low-dose high-energy proton radiation. In the current study adult mice were irradiated whole-body with either a single dose of 15 cGy of 1 GeV/n 56Fe-particle or with a 90 cGy proton of 1 GeV/n proton particles. Both ionizing radiation types caused alterations in the skeletal muscle cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis. 56Fe-particle irradiation also caused a reduction of depolarization-evoked Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The increase in the [Ca2+]i was detected as early as 24 h after 56Fe-particle irradiation, while effects of proton irradiation were only evident at 72 h. In both instances [Ca2+]i returned to baseline at day 7 after irradiation. All 56Fe-particle irradiated samples revealed a significant number of centrally localized nuclei, a histologic manifestation of regenerating muscle, 7 days after irradiation. Neither unirradiated control or proton-irradiated samples exhibited such a phenotype. Protein analysis revealed significant increase in the phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and rpS6k on day 7 in 56Fe-particle irradiated skeletal muscle, but not proton or unirradiated skeletal muscle, suggesting activation of pro-survival signaling. Our findings suggest that a single low-dose 56Fe-particle or proton exposure is sufficient to affect Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle. However, only 56Fe-particle irradiation led to the appearance of central nuclei and activation of pro-survival pathways, suggesting an ongoing muscle damage/recovery process. PMID:24131063

  9. Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energies: Theory, phenomenology, and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tai Tsun.

    1990-01-01

    This is a brief review of the progress in the understanding, during the past twenty years, of hadronic elastic scattering near the forward direction at high energies. On the basis of quantum gauge field theories, the Pomeron is found to be a branch cut above 1. Using the physical picture that this result implies, phenomenology for proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is constructed. Two noteworthy features are that, at high energies, both the total cross section and the ratio of the integrated elastic cross section to the total cross section to the total cross section are increasing functions of the center-of-mass energy. Detailed predictions are given for the elastic differential cross sections, Coulomb interference and the ratios of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes. These predictions have been extensively and accurately confirmed by experiments, and have also been given both for future experiments on existing accelerators and for experiments on future accelerators. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energies: Theory, phenomenology, and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tai Tsun

    1990-12-31

    This is a brief review of the progress in the understanding, during the past twenty years, of hadronic elastic scattering near the forward direction at high energies. On the basis of quantum gauge field theories, the Pomeron is found to be a branch cut above 1. Using the physical picture that this result implies, phenomenology for proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is constructed. Two noteworthy features are that, at high energies, both the total cross section and the ratio of the integrated elastic cross section to the total cross section to the total cross section are increasing functions of the center-of-mass energy. Detailed predictions are given for the elastic differential cross sections, Coulomb interference and the ratios of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes. These predictions have been extensively and accurately confirmed by experiments, and have also been given both for future experiments on existing accelerators and for experiments on future accelerators. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Wen C; Moyers, Michael F; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E; Farr, Jonathan B; Mascia, Anthony E; Schreuder, Andries N

    2009-06-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to +/-21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than +/-3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies. PMID:19610318

  12. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-06-15

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to {+-}21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than {+-}3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  13. Evaluation of energy deposition and secondary particle production in proton therapy of brain using a slab head phantom

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Sayyed Bijan; Hadizadeh, Mohammad Hadi; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Loushab, Mahdy Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Aim Evaluation of energy deposition of protons in human brain and calculation of the secondary neutrons and photons produced by protons in proton therapy. Background Radiation therapy is one of the main methods of treating localized cancer tumors. The use of high energy proton beam in radiotherapy was proposed almost 60 years ago. In recent years, there has been a revival of interest in this subject in the context of radiation therapy. High energy protons suffer little angular deflection and have a well-defined penetration range, with a sharp increase in the energy loss at the end of their trajectories, namely the Bragg peak. Materials and methods A slab head phantom was used for the purpose of simulating proton therapy in brain tissue. In this study simulation was carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNPX code. Results By using mono energetic proton pencil beams, energy depositions in tissues, especially inside the brain, as well as estimating the neutron and photon production as a result of proton interactions in the body, together with their energy spectra, were calculated or obtained. The amount of energy escaped from the head by secondary neutrons and photons was determined. Conclusions It was found that for high energy proton beams the amount of escaped energy by neutrons is almost 10 times larger than that by photons. We estimated that at 110 MeV beam energy, the overall proton energy “leaked” from the head by secondary photons and neutrons to be around 1%. PMID:25337410

  14. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-01

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has supported much of Proton's technology development through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Awards and other non-SBIR funding.

  15. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To 'scan' the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient's body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s(-1), changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed. PMID:25295881

  16. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To “scan” the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient’s body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10–20 m/s, changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%–18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases, and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed. PMID:25295881

  17. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To ‘scan’ the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient’s body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s-1, changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed.

  18. On the anisotropies of interplanetary low-energy proton intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Sarris, E. T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 35 proton anisotropic flux data (proton energies between 0.3 and 6.3 MeV) and simultaneous magnetic field measurements were used to supply more information on the propagation characteristics of low-energy protons in the interplanetary medium. During the rising portions of the proton events, large field-aligned anisotropies were observed. During the decaying part of the proton events, either radial anisotropy or near-isotropy was noticed. In addition, certain observations made during the decaying part of the proton events revealed anisotropies deviating significantly from the radial direction.

  19. Radiation stability of SiO2 micro- and nanopowders under electron and proton exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chundong; Mikhailov, M. M.; Neshchimenko, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of proton and electron (E = 100 keV, F = 5 × 1015 сm-2) exposure on the reflective spectra of SiO2 micro- and nanopowders in wavelength range from 250 to 2500 nm have been investigated. It has been established that the reflectance and radiation stability of nanopowders is less than that of micropowders. This effect is caused by the high concentration of radiation defects, which act as surface absorption centers (Es‧ centers) near the energies 5.47 and 4.45 eV, and peroxide silicon defects (tbnd Sisbnd Osbnd Osbnd Sitbnd) near the energy 3.84 eV.

  20. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT. PMID:26352616

  1. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-09-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described. The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods. It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan. When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  2. Systematics of proton and diproton separation energies for light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    A simple method to estimate proton and two-proton separation energies of proton-rich nuclei is presented that is sufficiently accurate to allow the prediction of suitable candidates for observable diproton decay. The method is based on the systematics of measured particle separation energies. Predictions for proton-rich nuclei with Z=18{minus}24 are compared with the results of previous calculations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Intercomparison of luminescence detectors for space radiation dosimetry within Proton-ICCHIBAN experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihori, Yukio; Ploc, Ondrej; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Kodaira, Satoshi; Benton, Eric; Ambrozova, Iva; Kitamura, Hisashi

    2012-07-01

    Luminescence detectors for space radiation dosimetry are frequently used to estimate personal and environmental doses in the International Space Station and other space vehicles. Detector responses for cosmic rays and their secondaries were investigated for a long time and it is well-known that luminescence detectors have dependencies of response on LET (Linear Energy Transfer). Some of luminescence detectors show over-response to gamma rays (used for routine calibration) and others have similar responses to gamma rays. But, because of lack of sufficient and reliable calibration data in the low LET region (about 1 keV/μm), it is the responses of these detectors at LET is poorly known. Protons make up the dominant portion of the fluence from space radiation, so the LET region corresponding to energetic protons must be characterized very well. For that purpose, calibration and intercomparison experiments were performed using relatively low energy (30 to 80 MeV) proton beams at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan. In this paper, the results of these intercomparison experiments, including high energy protons and light ions, are reported and illustrate the response of luminescence detectors in the low LET region. This research will help improve our understanding of space dosimeters and reliable dose measurement for astronauts and cosmonauts in low earth orbit.

  4. Detailed parametrization of neutrino and gamma-ray energy spectra from high energy proton-proton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supanitsky, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma rays and neutrinos are produced as a result of proton-proton interactions that occur in different astrophysical contexts. The detection of these two types of messengers is of great importance for the study of different physical phenomena, related to nonthermal processes, taking place in different astrophysical scenarios. Therefore, the knowledge of the energy spectrum of these two types of particles, as a function of the incident proton energy, is essential for the interpretation of the observational data. In this paper, parametrizations of the energy spectra of gamma rays and neutrinos, originated in proton-proton collisions, are presented. The energy range of the incident protons considered extends from 102 to 108 GeV . The parametrizations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of proton-proton interactions performed with the hadronic interaction models QGSJET-II-04 and EPOS-LHC, which have recently been updated with the data taken by the Large Hadron Collider.

  5. The energy dependence of refractory metals and alloys radiation damageability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukashev, K. M.; Umarov, F. F.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the systematical investigation of the radiation defects distribution profile energy dependence in three different materials - tantalum, molybdenum and 10X18H10T-VD stainless steel irradiated by high energy protons has been performed. It has been shown that in stainless steel and tantalum, independently of proton energy, the vacancy complexes related by configuration appear which are described by the slightly expressed elastic channel. The defects are recovered in one annealing stage with different migration activation energy. At the same time the molybdenum radiation damageability is composed of two components in each of which its specified defects formation mechanism takes action. For high energy protons the inelastic channel of interaction is the basic and subcascades appearance is created by primary knocked-on atoms of considerable energies. For low energy protons the processes of elastic interaction with lattice atoms and atomic hydrogen in the end of run creation are major.

  6. Application of Monte Carlo to Proton Beam Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, J. V.

    As with photon and electron radiotherapy, the future of dose calculation for hadron beams will be based upon Monte Carlo algorithms. Benchmark calculations of the LAHET Monte Carlo code with respect to measured in-phantom dose distributions show that the proton physics modules in LAHET accurately reproduce measured results. Since MCNP-X incorporates the proton and high energy neutron physics modules from LAHET, similar agreement with MCNP-X is expected. In addition to beam-line simulations, MCNP-X has the ability to input the lattice geometry required for simulating patient treatments based on CT data sets. The ability of MCNP-X to perform patient dose calculation simulations for proton radiotherapy was demonstrated by simulating a two-beam prostate treatment plan. While MCNP-X is fully capable to perform patient-planning calculations, currently, it is too time consuming to be used for routine patient planning.

  7. PRaVDA: High Energy Physics towards proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.

    2016-07-01

    Proton radiotherapy is an increasingly popular modality for treating cancers of the head and neck, and in paediatrics. To maximise the potential of proton radiotherapy it is essential to know the distribution, and more importantly the proton stopping powers, of the body tissues between the proton beam and the tumour. A stopping power map could be measured directly, and uncertainties in the treatment vastly reduce, if the patient was imaged with protons instead of conventional x-rays. Here we outline the application of technologies developed for High Energy Physics to provide clinical-quality proton Computed Tomography, in so reducing range uncertainties and enhancing the treatment of cancer.

  8. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  9. Energy spectra and LET spectra of protons behind shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Sari; Barak, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    With the advent of devices sensitive to SEU due to direct ionization by protons, it became important to know the flux and energies of protons behind aluminum shielding or within satellites. We present new analytically derived expressions for the energy distribution of incident protons, after passing the shielding, and of secondary protons emitted within the shielding. The results are compared with those of the MULASSIS code. In some cases, like a satellite in a GCR orbit, the contribution of the secondary protons to SEU might be the dominant one. Proton energy-distributions behind shielding are proportional, at low energy values, to inverse proton-LET in aluminum. Their calculated LET-spectra in silicon can be used for evaluating SEU-rate in space. The analytic expressions presented here can be useful in calculating the influence of shielding on other incident ions and secondary ions.

  10. Comparative Study of Radiation Dosage Distribution and Medical Implication of Quasi-monoenergetic Proton Generated from Laser Acceleration of Ultra-thin Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batpurev, Temuge; Cao, Jennifer; Xie, Wang; Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Recently the search for mono-energetic protons has gained great interest, particularly in applications such as proton therapy for cancer treatment. The advantage of proton therapy is that unlike photon radiation, proton beams deposit most of the energy at the tumor, sparing surrounding tissue and vital organs. A compact laser-driven proton accelerator is attractive for proton cancer therapy since the electric fields for particle acceleration can reach the order of tens of GV per cm which allows large reduction of the system size. Recent work by Liu et al. [2012] shows that laser acceleration of an ultra-thin multi-ion foil can generate high quality quasi-monoenergetic proton beams. The proton acceleration is due to the combination of radiation pressure and heavy-ion Coulomb repulsion. To assess the feasibility of laser-proton cancer therapy with such a proton accelerator, we simulated the interaction of protons with water and determine the radiation dosage deposition for particle beams produced from the PIC simulation of laser acceleration of multi-ion targets. We used the SRIM code to calculate the depth and lateral dose distribution of protons. We also compared the dosage map produced from protons generated from laser acceleration of single ion and multi-ion targets.

  11. Protracted low-dose radiation priming and response of liver to acute gamma and proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Mao, X W; Cao, J D; Bayeta, E J M; Pecaut, M J

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated liver from C57BL/6 mice irradiated with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays (0.01 Gy, 0.03 cGy/h), with and without subsequent exposure to acute 2 Gy gamma or proton radiation. Analyses were performed on day 56 post-exposure. Expression patterns of apoptosis-related genes were strikingly different among irradiated groups compared with 0 Gy (p < 0.05). Two genes were affected in the Gamma group, whereas 10 were modified in the LDR + Gamma group. In Proton and LDR + Proton groups, there were six and 12 affected genes, respectively. Expression of genes in the Gamma (Traf3) and Proton (Bak1, Birc2, Birc3, Mcl1) groups was no longer different from 0 Gy control group when mice were pre-exposed to LDR γ-rays. When each combined regimen was compared with the corresponding group that received acute radiation alone, two genes in the LDR + Gamma group and 17 genes in the LDR + Proton group were modified; greatest effect was on Birc2 and Nol3 (> 5-fold up-regulated by LDR + Protons). Oxygen radical production in livers from the LDR + Proton group was higher in LDR, Gamma, and LDR + Gamma groups (p < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy), but there were no differences in phagocytosis of E. coli. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) suggested more inflammation, with and without necrosis, in some irradiated groups. The data demonstrate that response to acute radiation is dependent on radiation quality and regimen and that some LDR γ-ray-induced modifications in liver response were still evident nearly 2 months after exposure. PMID:23869974

  12. Effect of Low Frequency Waves on the Lifetime of Protons in the Earth's Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Demekhov, A.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial electronics on LEO satellites are affected by protons in the 30-100 MeV range trapped in the inner radiation belt mainly when transiting the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). As the feature size of commercial electronic components shrinks to 65 nm, the probability of single event upsets increases by two to three orders of magnitude, reducing the utility of LEO orbiting satellites and making micro-satellites obsolete. Reduction of the flux of energetic protons in the inner belts,in the range of 1.5-1.8 becomes national priority. The paper examines the physics requirements for reducing the lifetime of the energetic protons in the inner belts from 10-20 years to 1-2 years. In reviewing the current understanding of the proton lifetimes we note that the lifetime of the outer belt protons is by more than four orders of magnitude shorter than in the inner belts. The reason for this sharp lifetime gradient is that the lifetime in the outer belts is controlled by fast pitch angle scattering of the protons into the loss cone by resonant interaction with naturally generated Alfven waves. Since these waves are constrained to regions with L>2, the inner belt lifetimes are controlled by slowing down of the protons exciting and ionizing oxygen atoms in the thermosphere. Results, obtained using a global plasma code indicate that injection of Alfven waves, from the ground or satellites, in the frequency range of 1-5 Hz with average amplitude 20-30 pT can reduce the energetic proton lifetime in the inner belts to 1- 2 years. The paper concludes by presenting the energy and power requirements for achieving such lifetime reduction as well as brief discussion.

  13. Hydration energies of protonated and sodiated thiouracils.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    Hydration reactions of protonated and sodiated thiouracils (2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil, and 4-thiouracil) generated by electrospray ionization have been studied in a gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH(o)n, ΔS(o)n, and ΔG(o)n, for the hydrated systems were obtained by equilibrium measurements. The water binding energies of protonated thiouracils, [2SU]H(+) and [6Me2SU]H(+), were found to be of the order of 51 kJ/mol for the first, and 46 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. For [4SU]H(+), these values are 3-4 kJ/mol lower. For sodiated complexes, these energies are similar for all studied systems, and varied between 62 and 68 kJ/mol for the first and between 48 and 51 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. The structural aspects of the precursors for hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. PMID:25270881

  14. Hydration Energies of Protonated and Sodiated Thiouracils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    Hydration reactions of protonated and sodiated thiouracils (2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil, and 4-thiouracil) generated by electrospray ionization have been studied in a gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH o n, ΔS o n, and ΔG o n, for the hydrated systems were obtained by equilibrium measurements. The water binding energies of protonated thiouracils, [2SU]H+ and [6Me2SU]H+, were found to be of the order of 51 kJ/mol for the first, and 46 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. For [4SU]H+, these values are 3-4 kJ/mol lower. For sodiated complexes, these energies are similar for all studied systems, and varied between 62 and 68 kJ/mol for the first and between 48 and 51 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. The structural aspects of the precursors for hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data.

  15. The radiation dosimetry of a quartz viewer irradiated with a 4.5 MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyasathian, Kalong

    The present dissertation describes a procedure to measure the radiation dose received by an accelerator operator who uses a quartz viewer to locate an ion beam. This procedure consists of the following steps: (i) A solid-state gamma radiation detector was calibrated to determine its efficiency and its energy scale. (ii) The calibrated detector was used to measure the gamma energy spectrum obtained when bombarding the viewer with the ion beam. This measurement was normalized, that is, beam current and measurement duration were determined. (iii) Individual gamma energy lines were extracted from the gamma spectrum and the respective energies and emission rates were obtained. Energies were checked with known transitions in silicon and oxygen, to ensure correct identification. (iv) The Compton gamma energy spectrum generated by the primary gamma rays was determined using a Compton code. (v) Finally the charged-ion bremsstrahlung spectrum was obtained using the formalism of Alder et. al. In this dissertation several prospective contributors to the radiation dose have been checked and were found to be insignificant. They were: the radiation dose due to x-rays generated by Compton electrons and the radiation dose generated by electrons produced by collisions with the incident ions. With a proton energy of 4.5 MeV the eye dose equivalent was determined at 0 and 90 degrees to the proton beam. At 0 degree with a proton fluence rate of 8.9 x 1011 protons/s the dose was 8.7 x 10-3 rem/hr. At 90 degrees with a proton fluence rate of 1.1 x 1012 protons/s the dose was 8.1 x 10-3 rem/hr.

  16. SU-E-T-200: IBA ProteusOne Compact Proton Therapy System Radiation Survey Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Syh, J; Syh, J; White, M; Patel, B; Song, X; Wu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study summarizes the results of an initial radiation survey of the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center in Shreveport, Louisiana. The facility houses an IBA ProteusOne compact single room proton therapy unit coupled with a C230 cyclotron that operates at a maximum energy of 230 MeV. Methods: A calibrated survey meter was used for the photon measurements to obtain reliable results. A neutron detector was used as the measuring instrument for neutrons. The locations of the survey and measurements were planned carefully in order to get a proper evaluation of the facility shielding configuration. The walls, ceiling, vault entrance, and the adjacent environment were each surveyed with suitable measurement instruments. A total of 22 locations were chosen for radiation survey. Dose equivalent values were calculated for both the photon and the neutron radiation using measured data. Results: All measured dose values are presented in millisievert per year. The highest dose measured at the vault entrance is 0.34 mSv/year. A dedicated shielding door was not present at the time of the measurement. The vault entrance area is considered as a controlled area. The shielding design goals are not to exceed 5 mSv/year for the controlled area and 1 mSv/year the uncontrolled area. The total combined neutron and photon dose equivalent values were found to be compliant with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality radiation protection regulatory codes. Conclusion: In our efforts to evaluate the radiation levels at the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center proton treatment facility, we have found that all the measured values of the radiation shielding are below the critical radiation limits per year. Since the total dose measured at the vault entrance is below the shielding design goal, a shielding door is not required at this proton treatment vault.

  17. [MODIFICATION OF THE PROTON BEAM PHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS BY ELEMENTS OF SPACECRAFT RADIATION PROTECTION].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Molokanov, A G; Shurshakov, V A; Bulynina, T M; Liakhova, K N; Severiukhin, Yu S; Abrosimova, A N; Ushakov, I B

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was performed with outbred ICR (CD-1). female mice (SPF). The animals were irradiated by 171 MeV protons at a dose of 20 cGy. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a "protective blind", and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Physical obstacles on the path of 171 MeV protons increase their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, two types of obstacles together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. Rationalization of physical methods of spacecrew protection should be based as on knowledge in physical dosimetry (ionizing chambers, thermoluminescent, track detectors etc.), so the radiobiological criteria established in experiments with animals. PMID:26738306

  18. Non-radiative processes in protonated diazines, pyrimidine bases and an aromatic azine.

    PubMed

    Pino, Gustavo A; Feraud, Géraldine; Broquier, Michel; Grégoire, Gilles; Soorkia, Satchin; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2016-07-27

    The excited state lifetimes of DNA bases are often very short due to very efficient non-radiative processes assigned to the ππ*-nπ* coupling. A set of protonated aromatic diazine molecules (pyridazine, pyrimidine and pyrazine C4H5N2(+)) and protonated pyrimidine DNA bases (cytosine, uracil and thymine), as well as the protonated pyridine (C5H6N(+)), have been investigated. For all these molecules except one tautomer of protonated uracil (enol-keto), electronic spectroscopy exhibits vibrational line broadening. Excited state geometry optimization at the CC2 level has been conducted to find out whether the excited state lifetimes measured from line broadening can be correlated to the calculated ordering of the ππ* and nπ* states and the ππ*-nπ* energy gap. The short lifetimes, observed when one nitrogen atom of the ring is not protonated, can be rationalized by relaxation of the ππ* state to the nπ* state or directly to the electronic ground state through ring puckering. PMID:27110833

  19. Study of proton radiation effects on analog IC designed for high energy physics in a BICMOS-JFET radhard SOI technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blanquart, L.; Delpierre, P.; Habrard, M.C.

    1994-12-01

    The authors present experimental results from a fast charge amplifier and a wideband analog buffer processed in the DMILL BiCMOS-JFET radhard SOI technology and irradiated up to 4.5 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}. In parallel, they have irradiated elementary transistors. These components were biased and electrical measurements were done 30 min after beam stop. By evaluating variations of main SPICE parameters, i.e., threshold voltage shift for CMOS and current gain variation for bipolar transistors, they have simulated the wideband analog buffer at different doses. These SPICE simulations are in good agreement with measured circuit degradations. The behavior of the charge amplifier is consistent with extraction of transconductance and pinch-off voltage shift of the PJFET.

  20. Simulation of proton-induced energy deposition in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernald, Kenneth W.; Kerns, Sherra E.

    1988-01-01

    A time-efficient simulation technique was developed for modeling the energy deposition by incident protons in modern integrated circuits. To avoid the excessive computer time required by many proton-effects simulators, a stochastic method was chosen to model the various physical effects responsible for energy deposition by incident protons. Using probability density functions to describe the nuclear reactions responsible for most proton-induced memory upsets, the simulator determines the probability of a proton hit depositing the energy necessary for circuit destabilization. This factor is combined with various circuit parameters to determine the expected error-rate in a given proton environment. An analysis of transient or dose-rate effects is also performed. A comparison to experimental energy-disposition data proves the simulator to be quite accurate for predicting the expected number of events in certain integrated circuits.

  1. The central engine of quasars and AGNs: A relativistic proton radiative shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Ellison, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars (QSOs) appear to emit roughly equal energy per decade from radio to gamma-ray energies (e.g. Ramaty and Ligenfelter 1982). This argues strongly for a nonthermal radiation mechanism (see Rees 1984). In addition, statistical studies have indicated that the spectra of these objects in the IR-UV and 2 to 50 keV X-ray band, can be fitted very well with power laws of specific indices. These spectral indices do not seem to depend on the luminosity or morphology of the objects (Rothschild et al. 1983; Malkan 1984), and any theory should account for them in a basic and model independent way. If shocks accelerate relativistic protons via the first-order Fermi mechanism (e.g. Axfor 1981), the radiating electrons can be produced as secondaries throughout the source by proton-proton (p-p) collisions and pion decay, thus eliminating Compton losses (Protheroe and Kazanas 1983). As shown by Kazanas (1984), if relativistic electrons are injected at high energies, e+-e- pair production results in a steady state electron distribution that is very similar to that observed in AGNs, independent of the details of injection and the dynamics of the source. The conditions required by this mechanism are met in the shock model of Eichler (1984) and Ellison and Eichler (1984) which allows the self-consistent calculation of the shock acceleration efficiency.

  2. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions. PMID:27500804

  3. Proton tissue dose for the blood forming organ in human geometry: Isotropic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is described which calculates doses averaged within five major segments of the blood forming organ in the human body taking into account selfshielding of the detailed body geometry and nuclear star effects for proton radiation of arbitrary energy spectrum (energy less than 1 GeV) and isotropic angular distribution. The dose calculation includes the first term of an asymptotic series expansion of transport theory which is known to converge rapidly for most points in the human body. The result is always a conservative estimate of dose and is given as physical dose (rad) and dose equivalent (rem).

  4. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  5. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jack

    2003-06-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space. PMID:12959128

  6. Photoluminescence of radiation-induced color centers in lithium fluoride thin films for advanced diagnostics of proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piccinini, M. Ampollini, A.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.; Ambrosini, F.; Nichelatti, E.

    2015-06-29

    Systematic irradiation of thermally evaporated 0.8 μm thick polycrystalline lithium fluoride films on glass was performed by proton beams of 3 and 7 MeV energies, produced by a linear accelerator, in a fluence range from 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. The visible photoluminescence spectra of radiation-induced F{sub 2} and F{sub 3}{sup +} laser active color centers, which possess almost overlapping absorption bands at about 450 nm, were measured under laser pumping at 458 nm. On the basis of simulations of the linear energy transfer with proton penetration depth in LiF, it was possible to obtain the behavior of the measured integrated photoluminescence intensity of proton irradiated LiF films as a function of the deposited dose. The photoluminescence signal is linearly dependent on the deposited dose in the interval from 10{sup 3} to about 10{sup 6 }Gy, independently from the used proton energies. This behavior is very encouraging for the development of advanced solid state radiation detectors based on optically transparent LiF thin films for proton beam diagnostics and two-dimensional dose mapping.

  7. Analysis of approximations used in calculations of radiative corrections to electron-proton scattering cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, R. E. Fadin, V. S.

    2015-01-15

    An analysis of approximations used in calculations of radiative corrections to electron-proton scattering cross section is presented. We investigate the difference between the relatively recent Maximon and Tjon result and the Mo and Tsai result, which was used in the analysis of experimental data. We also discuss the proton form factors ratio dependence on the way we take into account radiative corrections.

  8. RBE estimation of proton radiation fields using a {Delta}E-E telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Wroe, Andrew; Schulte, Reinhard; Fazzi, Alberto; Pola, Andrea; Agosteo, Stefano; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2009-10-15

    A new monolithic silicon {Delta}E-E telescope was evaluated in unmodulated and modulated 100 MeV proton beams used for hadron therapy. Compared to a classical microdosimetry detector, which provides one-dimensional information on lineal energy of charged particles, this detector system provides two-dimensional information on lineal energy and particle energy based on energy depositions, collected in coincidence, within the {Delta}E and E stages of the detector. The authors investigated the possibility to use the information obtained with the {Delta}E-E telescope to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at defined locations within the proton Bragg peak and spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). An RBE matrix based on the established in vitro V79 cell survival data was developed to link the output of the device directly to RBE({alpha}), the RBE in the low-dose limit, at various depths in a homogeneous polystyrene phantom. In the SOBP of a 100 MeV proton beam, the RBE({alpha}) increased from 4.04 proximal to the SOBP to a maximum value of 5.4 at the distal edge. The {Delta}E-E telescope, with its high spatial resolution, has potential applications to biologically weighted hadron treatment planning as it provides a compact and portable means for estimating the RBE in rapidly changing hadron radiation fields within phantoms.

  9. Assessment of radiation-induced second cancer risks in proton therapy and IMRT for organs inside the primary radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganetti, Harald; Athar, Basit S.; Moteabbed, Maryam; Adams, Judith A.; Schneider, Uwe; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-10-01

    There is clinical evidence that second malignancies in radiation therapy occur mainly within the beam path, i.e. in the medium or high-dose region. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk for developing a radiation-induced tumor within the treated volume and to compare this risk for proton therapy and intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Instead of using data for specific patients we have created a representative scenario. Fully contoured age- and gender-specific whole body phantoms (4 year and 14 year old) were uploaded into a treatment planning system and tumor volumes were contoured based on patients treated for optic glioma and vertebral body Ewing's sarcoma. Treatment plans for IMRT and proton therapy treatments were generated. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for developing a second malignancy were calculated using a risk model considering cell kill, mutation, repopulation, as well as inhomogeneous organ doses. For standard fractionation schemes, the LAR for developing a second malignancy from radiation therapy alone was found to be up to 2.7% for a 4 year old optic glioma patient treated with IMRT considering a soft-tissue carcinoma risk model only. Sarcoma risks were found to be below 1% in all cases. For a 14 year old, risks were found to be about a factor of 2 lower. For Ewing's sarcoma cases the risks based on a sarcoma model were typically higher than the carcinoma risks, i.e. LAR up to 1.3% for soft-tissue sarcoma. In all cases, the risk from proton therapy turned out to be lower by at least a factor of 2 and up to a factor of 10. This is mainly due to lower total energy deposited in the patient when using proton beams. However, the comparison of a three-field and four-field proton plan also shows that the distribution of the dose, i.e. the particular treatment plan, plays a role. When using different fractionation schemes, the estimated risks roughly scale with the total dose difference in%. In conclusion, proton therapy can

  10. Criticality of Low-Energy Protons in Single-Event Effects Testing of Highly-Scaled Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Gordon, Michael S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Schwank, James R.; Dodds, Nathaniel A.; Castaneda, Carlos M.; Berg, Melanie D.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; Seidleck, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    We report low-energy proton and low-energy alpha particle single-event effects (SEE) data on a 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) latches and static random access memory (SRAM) that demonstrates the criticality of using low-energy protons for SEE testing of highly-scaled technologies. Low-energy protons produced a significantly higher fraction of multi-bit upsets relative to single-bit upsets when compared to similar alpha particle data. This difference highlights the importance of performing hardness assurance testing with protons that include energy distribution components below 2 megaelectron-volt. The importance of low-energy protons to system-level single-event performance is based on the technology under investigation as well as the target radiation environment.

  11. Quantifying Low Energy Proton Damage in Multijunction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Warner, Jeffrey H.; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Lorentzen, Justin R.; Morton, Thomas L.; Taylor, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of low energy proton irradiation on the electrical performance of triple junction (3J) InGaP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells is presented. The Monte Carlo ion transport code (SRIM) is used to simulate the damage profile induced in a 3J solar cell under the conditions of typical ground testing and that of the space environment. The results are used to present a quantitative analysis of the defect, and hence damage, distribution induced in the cell active region by the different radiation conditions. The modelling results show that, in the space environment, the solar cell will experience a uniform damage distribution through the active region of the cell. Through an application of the displacement damage dose analysis methodology, the implications of this result on mission performance predictions are investigated.

  12. A Nuclear Interaction Model for Understanding Results of Single Event Testing with High Energy Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, William X.; ONeill, Pat; Nicholson, Leonard L.

    2000-01-01

    An internuclear cascade and evaporation model has been adapted to estimate the LET spectrum generated during testing with 200 MeV protons. The model-generated heavy ion LET spectrum is compared to the heavy ion LET spectrum seen on orbit. This comparison is the basis for predicting single event failure rates from heavy ions using results from a single proton test. Of equal importance, this spectra comparison also establishes an estimate of the risk of encountering a failure mode on orbit that was not detected during proton testing. Verification of the general results of the model is presented based on experiments, individual part test results, and flight data. Acceptance of this model and its estimate of remaining risk opens the hardware verification philosophy to the consideration of radiation testing with high energy protons at the board and box level instead of the more standard method of individual part testing with low energy heavy ions.

  13. A detection system for very low-energy protons from {beta}-delayed proton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Spiridon, A.; Pollacco, E.; Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E.; Pascovici, G.; Riallot, M.; Mols, J. P.; Kebbiri, M.

    2012-11-20

    We have recently developed a gas based detection system called AstroBox, motivated by nuclear astrophysics studies. The goal was to detect very low-energy protons from {beta}-delayed p-decay with reduced beta background and improved energy resolution. The detector was tested using the {beta}-delayed proton-emitter 23Al previously studied with a set-up based on thin double-sided Si strip detectors. The proton spectrum obtained with AstroBox showed no beta background down to {approx}80 keV. The low energy (206 keV, 267 keV) proton peaks were positively identified, well separated, and the resolution was improved.

  14. Investigation of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization mechanisms using a free radical scavenger and protons of different energies.

    PubMed

    Jeynes, J C G; Merchant, M J; Spindler, A; Wera, A-C; Kirkby, K J

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to x-ray radiation, particularly at kV energies where photoelectric interactions dominate and the high atomic number of gold makes a large difference to x-ray absorption. Protons have a high cross-section for gold at a large range of relevant clinical energies, and so potentially could be used with GNPs for increased therapeutic effect.Here, we investigate the contribution of secondary electron emission to cancer cell radiosensitization and investigate how this parameter is affected by proton energy and a free radical scavenger. We simulate the emission from a realistic cell phantom containing GNPs after traversal by protons and x-rays with different energies. We find that with a range of proton energies (1-250 MeV) there is a small increase in secondaries compared to a much larger increase with x-rays. Secondary electrons are known to produce toxic free radicals. Using a cancer cell line in vitro we find that a free radical scavenger has no protective effect on cells containing GNPs irradiated with 3 MeV protons, while it does protect against cells irradiated with x-rays. We conclude that GNP generated free radicals are a major cause of radiosensitization and that there is likely to be much less dose enhancement effect with clinical proton beams compared to x-rays. PMID:25296027

  15. Investigation of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization mechanisms using a free radical scavenger and protons of different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Spindler, A.; Wera, A.-C.; Kirkby, K. J.

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to x-ray radiation, particularly at kV energies where photoelectric interactions dominate and the high atomic number of gold makes a large difference to x-ray absorption. Protons have a high cross-section for gold at a large range of relevant clinical energies, and so potentially could be used with GNPs for increased therapeutic effect. Here, we investigate the contribution of secondary electron emission to cancer cell radiosensitization and investigate how this parameter is affected by proton energy and a free radical scavenger. We simulate the emission from a realistic cell phantom containing GNPs after traversal by protons and x-rays with different energies. We find that with a range of proton energies (1-250 MeV) there is a small increase in secondaries compared to a much larger increase with x-rays. Secondary electrons are known to produce toxic free radicals. Using a cancer cell line in vitro we find that a free radical scavenger has no protective effect on cells containing GNPs irradiated with 3 MeV protons, while it does protect against cells irradiated with x-rays. We conclude that GNP generated free radicals are a major cause of radiosensitization and that there is likely to be much less dose enhancement effect with clinical proton beams compared to x-rays.

  16. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  17. Development of the Midwest Proton Radiation Institute for the treatment of cancer and other diseases using proton radiation therapy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, John M.

    2003-02-10

    The Indiana University Cyclotron Facility houses three research accelerators (a 205-MeV cyclotron, a 240-MeV synchrotron, and a 500-MeV synchrotron) with space to carry out a program of fundamental and applied research including nuclear and accelerator physics, materials science, radiation biology, and proton therapy. Twelve thousand square feet associated with the 205-MeV machine is being converted into a regional proton therapy center. This center is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of treatments, and research in the development of new treatments. There will be three patient treatment rooms and an outpatient clinic. During the funding period the following activities were undertaken: construction and commissioning of the T0 Achromat; design, construction, and commissioning of the Trunk Line; design of the Energy Selection Line for all three treatment rooms; construction of the Energy Selection Line to the first treatment room; and design of the Dose Delivery System for the Large Field Line. A detailed description of each of these activities is given.

  18. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Christine S.; Yock, Torunn I.; Nelson, Kerrie; Xu, Yang; Keating, Nancy L.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  19. Ab Initio Investigation of Cation Proton Affinity and Proton Transfer Energy for Energetic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Caleb M; Gordon, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    Protonation of the anion in an ionic liquid plays a key role in the hypergolic reaction between ionic liquids and oxidizers such as white fuming nitric acid. To investigate the influence of the cation on the protonation reaction, the deprotonation energy of a set of cations has been calculated at the MP2 level of theory. Specifically, guanidinium, dimethyltriazanium, triethylamine, N-ethyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium, N-ethyl-pyridinium, 1,4-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazolium, 1-ethyl-4-methyl-1,2,4-triazolium, and 1-butyl-4-methyl-1,2,4-triazolium were studied. In addition, the net proton transfer energies from the cations to a set of previously studied anions was calculated, demonstrating an inverse correlation between the net proton transfer energy and the likelihood that the cation/anion combination will react hypergolically with white fuming nitric acid. It is suggested that this correlation occurs due to a balance between the energy released by the proton transfer and the rate of proton transfer as determined by the ionicity of the ionic liquid. PMID:27397644

  20. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; LaBel, K. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Swanson, Scot E.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Van Deusen, Stuart B.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Gordon, M. S.

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data from 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.

  1. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; et al

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data frommore » 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.« less

  2. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  3. Radiation damage of heavy crystalline detector materials by 24 GeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barysevich, A.; Dormenev, V.; Fedorov, A.; Glaser, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Korjik, M.; Maas, F.; Mechinski, V.; Rusack, R.; Singovski, A.; Zoueyski, R.

    2013-02-01

    Samples of three heavy crystalline materials: PbWO4, Bi4Si3O12, and PbF2 were irradiated in a high-intensity 24 GeV proton beam at the CERN PS to fluencies of 3.8×1013 protons/cm2. The optical transmission radiation damage was measured and all crystals show a shift of the cutoff in the transmission spectrum that is not observed when the crystals are irradiated with γ radiation. This shift of the cutoff under proton irradiation seems to be a general property of the heavy crystalline materials. A mechanism for this proton-induced transmission damage is discussed.

  4. Propensity and Risk Assessment for Solar Particle Events: Consideration of Integral Fluence at High Proton Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The expected SPE propensity for large proton fluence was estimated from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, Phi(sub 30). The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made including the 95% confidence level. In addition to total particle intensity of SPE, the detailed energy spectra of protons especially at high energy levels were recognized as extremely important parameter for the risk assessment, since there remains a significant cancer risks from those energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Phi(sub 60) and Phi(sub 100), respectively, the expected propensities of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  5. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  6. Radiation dose to critical body organs for October 1989 proton event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Atwell, William; Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1992-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-7) provides high-quality environmental data about the temporal development and energy characteristics of the protons emitted during a solar particle event. The GOES-7 time history of the hourly averaged integral proton flux for various particle kinetic energies are analyzed for the solar proton event occurring October 19-29, 1989. This event is similar to the August 1972 event that has been widely studied to estimate free-space and planetary radiation-protection requirements. By analyzing the time-history data, the dose rates, which can vary over many orders of magnitude in the early phases of the flare, can be estimated as well as the cumulative dose as a function of time. When basic transport results are coupled with detailed body organ thickness distributions calculated with the Computerized Anatomical Man and Computerized Anatomical Female models, the dose rates and cumulative doses to specific organs can be predicted. With these results, the risks of cancer incidence and mortality are estimated for astronauts in free space protected by various water shield thicknesses.

  7. Terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin reveals correlated primary electron and proton transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Groma, G. I.; Hebling, J.; Kozma, I. Z.; Váró, G.; Hauer, J.; Kuhl, J.; Riedle, E.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of electrogenic events associated with the different steps of the light-induced proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin is well studied in a wide range of time scales by direct electric methods. However, the investigation of the fundamental primary charge translocation phenomena taking place in the functional energy conversion process of this protein, and in other biomolecular assemblies using light energy, has remained experimentally unfeasible because of the lack of proper detection technique operating in the 0.1- to 20-THz region. Here, we show that extending the concept of the familiar Hertzian dipole emission into the extreme spatial and temporal range of intramolecular polarization processes provides an alternative way to study ultrafast electrogenic events on naturally ordered biological systems. Applying a relatively simple experimental arrangement based on this idea, we were able to observe light-induced coherent terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin with femtosecond time resolution. The detected terahertz signal was analyzed by numerical simulation in the framework of different models for the elementary polarization processes. It was found that the principal component of the terahertz emission can be well described by excited-state intramolecular electron transfer within the retinal chromophore. An additional slower process is attributed to the earliest phase of the proton pump, probably occurring by the redistribution of a H bond near the retinal. The correlated electron and proton translocation supports the concept, assigning a functional role to the light-induced sudden polarization in retinal proteins. PMID:18456840

  8. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  9. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons. PMID:27435446

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and ambient dose equivalent for a passively scattered proton therapy unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Fontenot, Jonas; Taddei, Phil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Stray neutron exposures pose a potential risk for the development of secondary cancer in patients receiving proton therapy. However, the behavior of the ambient dose equivalent is not fully understood, including dependences on neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and proton treatment beam characteristics. The objective of this work, therefore, was to estimate neutron exposures resulting from the use of a passively scattered proton treatment unit. In particular, we studied the characteristics of the neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and ambient dose equivalent with Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron spectral fluence contained two pronounced peaks, one a low-energy peak with a mode around 1 MeV and one a high-energy peak that ranged from about 10 MeV up to the proton energy. The mean radiation weighting factors varied only slightly, from 8.8 to 10.3, with proton energy and location for a closed-aperture configuration. For unmodulated proton beams stopped in a closed aperture, the ambient dose equivalent from neutrons per therapeutic absorbed dose (H*(10)/D) calculated free-in-air ranged from about 0.3 mSv/Gy for a small scattered field of 100 MeV proton energy to 19 mSv/Gy for a large scattered field of 250 MeV proton energy, revealing strong dependences on proton energy and field size. Comparisons of in-air calculations with in-phantom calculations indicated that the in-air method yielded a conservative estimation of stray neutron radiation exposure for a prostate cancer patient.

  11. Results on damage induced by high-energy protons in LYSO calorimeter crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissertori, G.; Luckey, D.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pauss, F.; Quittnat, M.; Wallny, R.; Glaser, M.

    2014-05-01

    Lutetium-Yttrium Orthosilicate doped with Cerium (LYSO), as a bright scintillating crystal, is a candidate for calorimetry applications in strong ionising-radiation fields and large high-energy hadron fluences are expected at the CERN Large Hadron Collider after the planned High-Luminosity upgrade. There, proton-proton collisions will produce fast hadron fluences up to ~ 5 ×1014cm-2 in the large-rapidity regions of the calorimeters. The performance of LYSO has been investigated, after exposure to different fluences of 24 GeV c-1 protons. Measured changes in optical transmission as a function of proton fluence are presented, and the evolution over time due to spontaneous recovery at room temperature is studied. The activation of materials will also be an issue in the described environment. Studies of the ambient dose induced by LYSO and its evolution with time, in comparison with other scintillating crystals, have also been performed through measurements and FLUKA simulations.

  12. Proton Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mouw, Kent W.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Yeap, Beow Y.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Munzenrider, John E.; Adams, Judith; Grabowski, Eric; Mukai, Shizuo; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term disease and toxicity outcomes for pediatric retinoblastoma patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 49 retinoblastoma patients (60 eyes) treated with PRT between 1986 and 2012. Results: The majority (84%) of patients had bilateral disease, and nearly half (45%) had received prior chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 8 years (range, 1-24 years), no patients died of retinoblastoma or developed metastatic disease. The post-PRT enucleation rate was low (18%), especially in patients with early-stage disease (11% for patients with International Classification for Intraocular Retinoblastoma [ICIR] stage A-B disease vs 23% for patients with ICIR stage C-D disease). Post-PRT ophthalmologic follow-up was available for 61% of the preserved eyes (30 of 49): 14 of 30 eyes (47%) had 20/40 visual acuity or better, 7 of 30 (23%) had moderate visual acuity (20/40-20/600), and 9 of 30 (30%) had little or no useful vision (worse than 20/600). Twelve of 60 treated eyes (20%) experienced a post-PRT event requiring intervention, with cataracts the most common (4 eyes). No patients developed an in-field second malignancy. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up of retinoblastoma patients treated with PRT demonstrates that PRT can achieve high local control rates, even in advanced cases, and many patients retain useful vision in the treated eye. Treatment-related ocular side effects were uncommon, and no radiation-associated malignancies were observed.

  13. Proton radiation alters intrinsic and synaptic properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Irina V; Schneider, Calvin J; Bezaire, Marianne; Soltesz, Ivan; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Nelson, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    High-energy protons constitute at least 85% of the fluence of energetic ions in interplanetary space. Although protons are only sparsely ionizing compared to higher atomic mass ions, they nevertheless significantly contribute to the delivered dose received by astronauts that can potentially affect central nervous system function at high fluence, especially during prolonged deep space missions such as to Mars. Here we report on the long-term effects of 1 Gy proton irradiation on electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the mouse hippocampus. The hippocampus is a key structure for the formation of long-term episodic memory, for spatial orientation and for information processing in a number of other cognitive tasks. CA1 pyramidal neurons form the last and critical relay point in the trisynaptic circuit of the hippocampal principal neurons through which information is processed before being transferred to other brain areas. Proper functioning of CA1 pyramidal neurons is crucial for hippocampus-dependent tasks. Using the patch-clamp technique to evaluate chronic effects of 1 Gy proton irradiation on CA1 pyramidal neurons, we found that the intrinsic membrane properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons were chronically altered at 3 months postirradiation, resulting in a hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (VRMP) and a decrease in input resistance (Rin). These small but significant alterations in intrinsic properties decreased the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and had a dramatic impact on network function in a computational model of the CA1 microcircuit. We also found that proton-radiation exposure upregulated the persistent Na(+) current (INaP) and increased the rate of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Both the INaP and the heightened rate of mEPSCs contribute to neuronal depolarization and excitation, and at least in part, could compensate for the reduced excitability resulting from the radiation effects on the

  14. Enhancement of proton acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulse in radiation pressure mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosoughian, H.; Riazi, Z.; Afarideh, H.; Yazdani, E.

    2015-07-01

    The transition from hole-boring to light-sail regime of radiation pressure acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulses is studied using particle-in-cell simulation. The penetration depth of laser into the plasma with ramped density profile increases when a negatively chirped laser pulse is applied. Because of this induced transparency, the laser reflection layer moves deeper into the target and the hole-boring stage would smoothly transit into the light-sail stage. An optimum chirp parameter which satisfies the laser transparency condition, a 0 ≈ π n e l / n c λ , is obtained for each ramp scale length. Moreover, the efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the kinetic energy of particles is maximized at the obtained optimum condition. A relatively narrow proton energy spectrum with peak enhancement by a factor of 2 is achieved using a negatively chirped pulse compared with the un-chirped pulse.

  15. Proton-Proton On Shell Optical Potential at High Energies and the Hollowness Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriola, Enrique Ruiz; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the usefulness of the optical potential as suggested by the double spectral Mandelstam representation at very high energies, such as in the proton-proton scattering at ISR and the LHC. Its particular meaning regarding the interpretation of the scattering data up to the maximum available measured energies is discussed. Our analysis reconstructs 3D dynamics from the effective transverse 2D impact parameter representation and suggests that besides the onset of gray nucleons at the LHC there appears an inelasticity depletion (hollowness) which precludes convolution models at the attometer scale.

  16. Proton-Proton On Shell Optical Potential at High Energies and the Hollowness Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriola, Enrique Ruiz; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the usefulness of the optical potential as suggested by the double spectral Mandelstam representation at very high energies, such as in the proton-proton scattering at ISR and the LHC. Its particular meaning regarding the interpretation of the scattering data up to the maximum available measured energies is discussed. Our analysis reconstructs 3D dynamics from the effective transverse 2D impact parameter representation and suggests that besides the onset of gray nucleons at the LHC there appears an inelasticity depletion (hollowness) which precludes convolution models at the attometer scale.

  17. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced deep-level defects (both electron and hole traps) in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells are investigated along with the correlation between the measured defect parameters and the solar cell performance parameters. The range of proton energies studied was from 50 KeV to 10 MeV and the proton fluence was varied from 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 13th power P/sq cm. Experimental tools employed include deep-level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, current voltage, and SEM-EBIC methods. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, capture cross section, carrier lifetimes and effective hole diffusion lengths in n-GaAs LPE layers were determined from these measurements.

  18. Cognitive effects of proton irradiation at differing energy levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During exploratory class missions to space outside of the magnetic field of the Earth, astronauts will be exposed to various forms of radiation including solar particle events (SPE) which are predominantly composed of protons. As such it is important to characterize the cognitive effects of exposure...

  19. The Effects of Gamma and Proton Radiation Exposure on Hematopoietic Cell Counts in the Ferret Model

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wan, X. Steven; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Wroe, Andrew J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to total-body radiation induces hematological changes, which can detriment one's immune response to wounds and infection. Here, the decreases in blood cell counts after acute radiation doses of γ-ray or proton radiation exposure, at the doses and dose-rates expected during a solar particle event (SPE), are reported in the ferret model system. Following the exposure to γ-ray or proton radiation, the ferret peripheral total white blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte counts decreased whereas neutrophil count increased within 3 hours. At 48 hours after irradiation, the WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts decreased in a dose-dependent manner but were not significantly affected by the radiation type (γ-rays verses protons) or dose rate (0.5 Gy/minute verses 0.5 Gy/hour). The loss of these blood cells could accompany and contribute to the physiological symptoms of the acute radiation syndrome (ARS). PMID:25356435

  20. Study of mass loss of spacecraft polymeric thermal control coatings under electron and proton radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanshin, Rashid; Novikov, Lev; Galygin, Alexander

    Polymeric composites have a number of properties that give a possibility to apply them as spacecraft external coatings. In space environment, however, such materials become one of the main sources of volatile products that form the outer spacecraft atmosphere and are able to con-dense on contamination-sensitive surfaces of onboard equipment. Thermal control coatings oc-cupy a considerable part of a satellite surface and are mostly subjected to ionizing radiations ac-companying by outgassing. The main stages of the process are the following: formation of vola-tile radiolysis products, diffusion of the products to free material surface, and desorption. Radia-tion-induced destruction and outgassing of material increase its permeability and accelerate mi-gration processes in it. Experimental data of effect of radiation on mass loss of polymeric composites used as thermal control coatings was analyzed and interpreted in the work. As a particular case, it was shown that mass loss of a polymeric composite irradiated by protons is greater than by electrons if energies and flux densities of the particles are the same. It can be explained that volatile products, in the first case, generate within a thin near-surface layer of material which permeability increases together with the absorbed dose, and quickly escape in vacuum. In the second case, a bulk of volatile products emerges far enough from the free surface of material which permeability increases slower as compared with proton radiation. Therefore, migration time of volatile products to the free surface grows and quantity of chemical reactions which they are involved in increases. To analyze and interpret experimental data, a mathematical model describing mass loss of polymeric composites subject to its growth of permeability under radiation is proposed. Based upon analysis of experiments and numerical simulation results, thresholds of fluen-cies and flux densities of electron and proton were determined. Exceeding these

  1. Response of BC418 Plastic Scintillator to Low Energy Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daub, B. H.; Henzl, V.; Kovash, M. A.; Matthews, J. L.; Miller, Z. W.; Shoniyozov, K.; Yang, H.

    2012-10-01

    The response of fast plastic scintillators is unknown for proton energies below approximately 300 keV. The response of BC418 plastic scintillator to protons from 100 keV to 3.6 MeV was measured using elastic scattering of neutrons at the University of Kentucky and at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. At Kentucky, protons of precise energies from a Van de Graaff accelerator impinged on a thin LiF target to produce neutrons in narrow energy bands. At Los Alamos, neutrons were produced from a tungsten spallation source and their energies determined by time of flight. In both experiments a coincidence was detected between the recoiling proton in the plastic scintillator and the elastically scattered neutron in a liquid scintillator. The energy of the recoil proton is determined by the elastic scattering kinematics, with the scattered neutron energy precisely determined by time of flight. The results are compared with previous measurements of the response of similar plastic scintillators in the energy region where they overlap.

  2. A Mechanism-Based Approach to Predict the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons and Carbon Ions in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frese, Malte C.; Yu, Victor K.; Stewart, Robert D.; Carlson, David J.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The physical and potential biological advantages of proton and carbon ions have not been fully exploited in radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. In this work, an approach to predict proton and carbon ion relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in a representative spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) is derived using the repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model. Methods and Materials: Formulas linking dose-averaged linear-quadratic parameters to DSB induction and processing are derived from the RMF model. The Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) software is used to quantify the effects of radiation quality on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Trends in parameters {alpha} and {beta} for clinically relevant proton and carbon ion kinetic energies are determined. Results: Proton and carbon ion RBE are shown to increase as particle energy, dose, and tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios decrease. Entrance RBE is {approx}1.0 and {approx}1.3 for protons and carbon ions, respectively. For doses in the range of 0.5 to 10 Gy, proton RBE ranges from 1.02 (proximal edge) to 1.4 (distal edge). Over the same dose range, the RBE for carbon ions ranges from 1.5 on the proximal edge to 6.7 on the distal edge. Conclusions: The proposed approach is advantageous because the RBE for clinically relevant particle distributions is guided by well-established physical and biological (track structure) considerations. The use of an independently tested Monte Carlo model to predict the effects of radiation quality on DSB induction also minimizes the number of ad hoc biological parameters that must be determined to predict RBE. Large variations in predicted RBE across an SOBP may produce undesirable biological hot and cold spots. These results highlight the potential for the optimization of physical dose for a uniform biological effect.

  3. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-05-15

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10{sup -11} achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions/light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 {mu}m (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150-500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100-220 MeV energies.

  4. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10−11 achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W∕cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions∕light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 μm (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150–500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100–220 MeV energies. PMID:18561651

  5. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  6. Heavy quark energy loss in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sascha; Gossiaux, Pol Bernard; Werner, Klaus; Aichelin, Jörg

    2011-07-15

    One of the most promising probes to study deconfined matter created in high energy nuclear collisions is the energy loss of (heavy) quarks. It has been shown in experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider that even charm and bottom quarks, despite their high mass, experience a remarkable medium suppression in the quark gluon plasma. In this exploratory investigation we study the energy loss of heavy quarks in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions at LHC energies. Although the colliding systems are smaller than compared to those at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (p+p vs Au+Au), the higher energy might lead to multiplicities comparable to Cu+Cu collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The interaction of charm quarks with this environment gives rise to a non-negligible suppression of high momentum heavy quarks in elementary collisions. PMID:21838351

  7. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Yepes, Pablo; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2009-03-01

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  8. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Yepes, Pablo

    2009-03-10

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  9. Astrophysical S factors for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2011-03-15

    Within the potential cluster model where orbital states are classified according to Young diagrams and isospin, astrophysical S factors are considered for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei at energies of up to 1 and 10 keV, respectively. It is shown that the approach used, which takes into account only the E1 transition for the p{sup 3}H capture process, makes it possible to describe well the most recent experimental data at c.m. energies in the range from 50 keV to 5MeV. In the case of proton capture by {sup 7}Li nuclei, an M1 processwas taken into account in addition to the E1 transition, and a general behavior and the magnitude of the experimental S factor could be correctly reproduced owing to this at astrophysical energies, including the region around the resonance at 0.441 MeV (in the laboratory frame).

  10. Late radiation toxicity in Hodgkin lymphoma patients: proton therapy's potential.

    PubMed

    Toltz, Allison; Shin, Naomi; Mitrou, Ellis; Laude, Cecile; Freeman, Carolyn R; Seuntjens, Jan; Parker, William; Roberge, David

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, all young patients treated for intrathoracic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) at one of 10 radiotherapy centers in the province of Quebec received 3D conformal photon therapy. These patients may now be at risk for late effects of their treatment, notably secondary malignancies and cardiac toxicity. We hypothesized that more complex radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and possibly IMRT (in the form of helical tomotherapy (HT)), could benefit these patients. With institutional review board approval at 10 institutions, all treatment plans for patients under the age of 30 treated for HL during a six-month consecutive period of 2010 were retrieved. Twenty-six patients were identified, and after excluding patients with extrathoracic radiation or treatment of recurrence, 20 patients were replanned for HT and IMPT. Neutron dose for IMPT plans was estimated from published measurements. The relative seriality model was used to predict excess risk of cardiac mortality. A modified linear quadratic model was used to predict the excess absolute risk for induction of lung cancer and, in female patients, breast cancer. Model parameters were derived from published data. Predicted risk for cardiac mortality was similar among the three treatment techniques (absolute excess risk of cardiac mortality was not reduced for HT or IMPT (p > 0.05, p > 0.05) as compared to 3D CRT). Predicted risks were increased for HT and reduced for IMPT for secondary lung cancer (p < 0.001, p < 0.001) and breast cancers (p< 0.001, p< 0.001) as compared to 3D CRT. PMID:26699298

  11. Maximum kinetic energy considerations in proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, Evan R.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum proton kinetic energy required to treat a given percentage of patients eligible for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with coplanar arc-based proton therapy, contingent upon the number and location of gantry angles used. Treatment plans from 100 consecutive patients treated with SRS at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center between June of 2007 and March of 2010 were analyzed. For each target volume within each patient, in-house software was used to place proton pencil beam spots over the distal surface of the target volume from 51 equally-spaced gantry angles of up to 360°. For each beam spot, the radiological path length from the surface of the patient to the distal boundary of the target was then calculated along a ray from the gantry location to the location of the beam spot. This data was used to generate a maximum proton energy requirement for each patient as a function of the arc length that would be spanned by the gantry angles used in a given treatment. If only a single treatment angle is required, 100% of the patients included in the study could be treated by a proton beam with a maximum kinetic energy of 118 MeV. As the length of the treatment arc is increased to 90°, 180°, 270°, and 360°, the maximum energy requirement increases to 127, 145, 156, and 179 MeV, respectively. A very high percentage of SRS patients could be treated at relatively low proton energies if the gantry angles used in the treatment plan do not span a large treatment arc. Maximum proton kinetic energy requirements increase linearly with size of the treatment arc. PMID:21844866

  12. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H (*)(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H (*)(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy(-1) was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H (*)(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy(-1) at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to

  13. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy‑1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy‑1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  14. Simulation of proton radiation belt formation during the March 24, 1991 SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kotelnikov, A. D.; Li, X.; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J.; Blake, J. B.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid formation of a new proton radiation belt at L approximately = 2.5 following the March 24, 1991 Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) observed at the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite is modeled using a relativistic guiding center test particle code. The SSC is modeled by a bipolar electric field and associated compression and relaxation in the magnetic field, superimposed on a dipole magnetic field. The source population consists of both solar and trapped inner zone protons. The simulations show that while both populations contribute to drift echoes in the 20-80 MeV range, primary conditions is from the solar protons. Proton acceleration by the SSC differs from relativistic electron acceleration in that different source populations contribute and nonrelativistic conservation of the first adiabatic invariation leads to greater energization of protons for a given decrease in L. Model drift echoes and flux distribution in L at the time of injection compare well with CRRES observations.

  15. Stochastic spatial energy deposition profiles for MeV protons and keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalagama, C.; Bettiol, A. A.; Watt, F.

    2009-12-01

    With the rapid advances being made in novel high-energy ion-beam techniques such as proton beam writing, single-ion-event effects, ion-beam-radiation therapy, ion-induced fluorescence imaging, proton/ion microscopy, and ion-induced electron imaging, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the spatial energy-deposition profiles of energetic ions as they penetrate matter. In this work we present the results of comprehensive yet straightforward event-by-event Monte Carlo calculations that simulate ion/electron propagation and secondary electron ( δ ray) generation to yield spatial energy-deposition data. These calculations combine SRIM/TRIM features, EEDL97 data and volume-plasmon-localization models with a modified version of one of the newer δ ray generation models, namely, the Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht. The development of the computer code DEEP (deposition of energy due to electrons and protons) offers a unique means of studying the energy-deposition/redistribution problem while still retaining the important stochastic nature inherent in these processes which cannot be achieved with analytical modeling. As an example of an application of DEEP we present results that compare the energy-deposition profiles of primary MeV protons and primary keV electrons in polymethymethacrylate. Such data are important when comparing proximity effects in the direct write lithography processes of proton-beam writing and electron-beam writing. Our calculations demonstrate that protons are able to maintain highly compact spatial energy-deposition profiles compared with electrons.

  16. Comprehensive description of J/ψ production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-04

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate + Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/ψ production at low p⊥ in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p⊥ distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for ψ' production. We observe an overlap region in p⊥ where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  17. Radiation protection studies for a high-power 160 MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, Egidio; Silari, Marco

    2009-07-01

    CERN is presently designing a new chain of accelerators to replace the present Proton Synchrotron (PS) complex: a 160 MeV room-temperature H - linac (Linac4) to replace the present 50 MeV proton linac injector, a 3.5 GeV Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) to replace the 1.4 GeV PS Booster (PSB) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (named PS2) to replace the 26 GeV PS. Linac4 has been funded and the civil engineering work started in October 2008, whilst the SPL is in an advanced stage of design. Beyond injecting into the future 50 GeV PS, the ultimate goal of the SPL is to generate a 4 MW beam for the production of intense neutrino beams. The radiation protection design is driven by the latter requirement. This work summarizes the radiation protection studies conducted for Linac4. FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, complemented by analytical estimates, were performed to evaluate the propagation of neutrons through the waveguide, ventilation and cable ducts placed along the accelerator, to estimate the radiological impact of the accelerator in its low-energy section, where the access area is located, and to calculate the induced radioactivity in the air and in the components of the accelerator. The latter study is particularly important for maintenance interventions and final disposal of radioactive waste. Two possible layouts for the CCDTL section of the machine were considered in order to evaluate the feasibility, from the radiological standpoint, of replacing electromagnetic quadrupoles with permanent magnet quadrupoles with a high content of cobalt.

  18. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-02: Exploring Radiation Acoustics CT Dosimeter Design Aspects for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alsanea, F; Moskvin, V; Stantz, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Investigate the design aspects and imaging dose capabilities of the Radiation Acoustics Computed Tomography (RA CT) dosimeter for Proton induced acoustics, with the objective to characterize a pulsed pencil proton beam. The focus includes scanner geometry, transducer array, and transducer bandwidth on image quality. Methods: The geometry of the dosimeter is a cylindrical water phantom (length 40cm, radius 15cm) with 71 ultrasound transducers placed along the length and end of the cylinder to achieve a weighted set of projections with spherical sampling. A 3D filtered backprojection algorithm was used to reconstruct the dosimetric images and compared to MC dose distribution. First, 3D Monte Carlo (MC) Dose distributions for proton beam energies (range of 12cm, 16cm, 20cm, and 27cm) were used to simulate the acoustic pressure signal within this scanner for a pulsed proton beam of 1.8x107 protons, with a pulse width of 1 microsecond and a rise time of 0.1 microseconds. Dose comparison within the Bragg peak and distal edge were compared to MC analysis, where the integrated Gaussian was used to locate the 50% dose of the distal edge. To evaluate spatial fidelity, a set of point sources within the scanner field of view (15×15×15cm3) were simulated implementing a low-pass bandwidth response function (0 to 1MHz) equivalent to a multiple frequency transducer array, and the FWHM of the point-spread-function determined. Results: From the reconstructed images, RACT and MC range values are within 0.5mm, and the average variation of the dose within the Bragg peak are within 2%. The spatial resolution tracked with transducer bandwidth and projection angle sampling, and can be kept at 1.5mm. Conclusion: This design is ready for fabrication to start acquiring measurements. The 15 cm FOV is an optimum size for imaging dosimetry. Currently, simulations comparing transducer sensitivity, bandwidth, and proton beam parameters are being evaluated to assess signal-to-noise.

  19. Relative Proton Affinities from Kinetic Energy Release Distributions for Dissociation of Proton-Bound Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Hache, John J.; Laskin, Julia ); Futrell, Jean H.)

    2002-12-19

    Kinetic energy release distributions (KERDs) upon dissociation of proton-bound dimers are utilized along with Finite Heat Bath theory analysis to obtain relative proton affinities of monomeric species composing the dimer. The proposed approach allows accurate measurement of relative proton affinities based on KERD measurements for the compound with unknown thermochemical properties versus a single reference base. It also allows distinguishing the cases when dissociation of proton-bound dimers is associated with reverse activation barrier, for which both our approach and the kinetic method become inapplicable. Results are reported for the n-butanol-n-propanol dimer, for which there is no significant difference in entropy effects for two reactions and for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine dimer, which is characterized by a significant difference in entropy effects for the two competing reactions. Relative protonation affinities of -1.0?0.3 kcal/mol for the n-butanol-n-propanol pair and 0.27?0.10 kcal/mol for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine pair are in good agreement with literature values. Relative reaction entropies were extracted from the branching ratio and KERD measurements. Good correspondence was found between the relative reaction entropies for the n-butanol-n-propanol dimer (D(DS?)=-0.3?1.5 cal/mol K) and the relative protonation entropy for the two monomers (D(DSp)=0). However, the relative reaction entropy for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine dimer is higher than the difference in protonation entropies (D(DS?)=8.2?0.5 cal/mol K vs. D(DSp)=5 cal/mol K).

  20. Transition of proton energy scaling using an ultrathin target irradiated by linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, I Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Nam, Kee Hwan; Nickles, Peter V; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Particle acceleration using ultraintense, ultrashort laser pulses is one of the most attractive topics in relativistic laser-plasma research. We report proton and/or ion acceleration in the intensity range of 5×10(19) to 3.3×10(20) W/cm2 by irradiating linearly polarized, 30-fs laser pulses on 10-to 100-nm-thick polymer targets. The proton energy scaling with respect to the intensity and target thickness is examined, and a maximum proton energy of 45 MeV is obtained when a 10-nm-thick target is irradiated by a laser intensity of 3.3×10(20) W/cm2. The proton acceleration is explained by a hybrid acceleration mechanism including target normal sheath acceleration, radiation pressure acceleration, and Coulomb explosion assisted-free expansion. The transition of proton energy scaling from I(1/2) to I is observed as a consequence of the hybrid acceleration mechanism. The experimental results are supported by two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:24182274

  1. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  2. Proton irradiation energy dependence of defect formation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Hong, Juree; Park, Seul Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Min, Byung-Wook; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-07-01

    Graphene transistors on SiO2/Si were irradiated with 5, 10, and 15 MeV protons at a dose rate of 2 × 1014 cm-2. The effect of proton irradiation on the structural defects and electrical characteristics of graphene was measured using Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements. Raman spectra exhibited high intensity peaks induced by defects after 5 and 10 MeV proton irradiation, whereas no significant defect-induced peaks were observed after 15 MeV proton irradiation. The drain current of graphene transistors decreased and the Dirac point shifted after proton irradiation; however, a flattening in the Dirac point occurred after 15 MeV proton irradiation. The variations in characteristics were attributed to different types of graphene defects, which were closely related to the irradiation energy dependency of the transferred energy. Our observation results were in good agreement with the Bethe formula as well as the stopping and range of ions in matter simulation results.

  3. Measurements of proton energy spectra using a radiochromic film stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ellison, D. M.; Steidle, Jeffrey; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Fiksel, G.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The energy spectrum of protons accelerated from the rear-side of a thin foil illuminated with ultra-intense laser light from the OMEGA EP laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) was measured using a stack of radiochromic film (RCF). The film stack consisted of four layers of Gafchromic HD-V2 film and four layers of Gafchromic MD-V2-55 film. Aluminum foils of various thicknesses were placed between each piece of RCF in the stack. This arrangement allowed protons with energies of 30 MeV to reach the back layer of RCF in the stack. The stack was placed in the detector plane of a Thomson parabola ion energy (TPIE) spectrometer. Each piece of film in the stack was scanned using a commercially available flat-bed scanner (Epson 10000XL). The resulting optical density was converted into proton fluence using an absolute calibration of the RCF obtained at the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator laboratory. In these calibration measurements, the sensitivity of the radiochromic film was measured using monoenergetic protons produced by the accelerator. Details of the analysis procedure and the resulting proton energy spectra will be presented. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  4. A statistical study of proton pitch angle distributions measured by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run; Summers, Danny; Ni, Binbin; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Mitchell, Donald G.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2016-06-01

    A statistical study of ring current-energy proton pitch angle distributions (PADs) in Earth's inner magnetosphere is reported here. The data are from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on board the Van Allen Probe B spacecraft from 1 January 2013 to 15 April 2015. By fitting the data to the functional form sinnα, where α is the proton pitch angle, we examine proton PADs at the energies 50, 100, 180, 328, and 488 keV in the L shell range from L = 2.5 to L = 6. Three PAD types are classified: trapped (90° peaked), butterfly, and isotropic. The proton PAD dependence on the particle energy, magnetic local time (MLT), L shell, and geomagnetic activity are analyzed in detail. The results show a strong dependence of the proton PADs on MLT. On the nightside, the n values outside the plasmapause are clearly lower than those inside the plasmapause. At higher energies and during intense magnetic activity, nightside butterfly PADs can be observed at L shells down to the vicinity of the plasmapause. The averaged n values on the dayside are larger than on the nightside. A maximum of the averaged n values occurs around L = 4.5 in the postnoon sector (12-16 MLT). The averaged n values show a dawn-dusk asymmetry with lower values on the dawnside at high L shells, which is consistent with previous studies of butterfly PADs. The MLT dependence of the proton PADs becomes more distinct with increasing particle energy. These features suggest that drift shell splitting coupled with a radial flux gradient play an important role in the formation of PADs, particularly at L > ~ 4.5.

  5. Investigation of high-energy-proton effects in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Todosow, M.

    1997-12-01

    Specimens of 1100 aluminum were exposed to several fluences of 23.5-GeV protons at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Although this energy is above those currently being proposed for spallation-neutron applications, the results can be viewed as indicative of trends and other microstructural evolution with fluence that take place with high-energy proton exposures such as those associated with an increasing ratio of gas generation to dpa. TEM investigation showed significantly larger bubble size and lower density of bubbles compared with lower-energy proton results. Additional testing showed that the tensile strength increased with fluence as expected, but the microhardness decreased, a result for which an intepretation is still under investigation.

  6. Team Update on North American Proton Facilities for Radiation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Turflinger, Thomas; Haas, Thurman; George, Jeffrey; Moss, Steven; Davis, Scott; Kostic, Andrew; Wie, Brian; Reed, Robert; Guertin, Steven; Wert, Jerry; Foster, Charles

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the closure of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF), this presentation provides an overview of the options for North American proton facilities. This includes those in use by the aerospace community as well as new additions from the cancer therapy regime. In addition, proton single event testing background is provided for understanding the criteria needed for these facilities for electronics testing.

  7. Analysis of white blood cell counts in mice after gamma- or proton-radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Maks, Casey J; Wan, X Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H; Romero-Weaver, Ana L; Sanzari, Jenine K; Wilson, Jolaine M; Rightnar, Steve; Wroe, Andrew J; Koss, Peter; Gridley, Daila S; Slater, James M; Kennedy, Ann R

    2011-08-01

    In the coming decades human space exploration is expected to move beyond low-Earth orbit. This transition involves increasing mission time and therefore an increased risk of radiation exposure from solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Acute radiation effects after exposure to SPE radiation are of prime importance due to potential mission-threatening consequences. The major objective of this study was to characterize the dose-response relationship for proton and γ radiation delivered at doses up to 2 Gy at high (0.5 Gy/min) and low (0.5 Gy/h) dose rates using white blood cell (WBC) counts as a biological end point. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent decrease in WBC counts in mice exposed to high- and low-dose-rate proton and γ radiation, suggesting that astronauts exposed to SPE-like radiation may experience a significant decrease in circulating leukocytes. PMID:21476859

  8. Analysis of White Blood Cell Counts in Mice after Gamma- or Proton-Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Maks, Casey J.; Wan, X. Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Romero-Weaver, Ana L.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Rightnar, Steve; Wroe, Andrew J.; Koss, Peter; Gridley, Daila S.; Slater, James M.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2013-01-01

    In the coming decades human space exploration is expected to move beyond low-Earth orbit. This transition involves increasing mission time and therefore an increased risk of radiation exposure from solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Acute radiation effects after exposure to SPE radiation are of prime importance due to potential mission-threatening consequences. The major objective of this study was to characterize the dose–response relationship for proton and γ radiation delivered at doses up to 2 Gy at high (0.5 Gy/min) and low (0.5 Gy/h) dose rates using white blood cell (WBC) counts as a biological end point. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent decrease in WBC counts in mice exposed to high- and low-dose-rate proton and γ radiation, suggesting that astronauts exposed to SPE-like radiation may experience a significant decrease in circulating leukocytes. PMID:21476859

  9. Study of the effects of high-energy proton beams on escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is one of the most serious risks to public health care today. However, discouragingly, the development of new antibiotics has progressed little over the last decade. There is an urgent need for alternative approaches to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Novel methods, which include photothermal therapy based on gold nano-materials and ionizing radiation such as X-rays and gamma rays, have been reported. Studies of the effects of high-energy proton radiation on bacteria have mainly focused on Bacillus species and its spores. The effect of proton beams on Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been limitedly reported. Escherichia coli is an important biological tool to obtain metabolic and genetic information and is a common model microorganism for studying toxicity and antimicrobial activity. In addition, E. coli is a common bacterium in the intestinal tract of mammals. In this research, the morphological and the physiological changes of E. coli after proton irradiation were investigated. Diluted solutions of cells were used for proton beam radiation. LB agar plates were used to count the number of colonies formed. The growth profile of the cells was monitored by using the optical density at 600 nm. The morphology of the irradiated cells was observed with an optical microscope. A microarray analysis was performed to examine the gene expression changes between irradiated samples and control samples without irradiation. E coli cells have observed to be elongated after proton irradiation with doses ranging from 13 to 93 Gy. Twenty-two were up-regulated more than twofold in proton-irradiated samples (93 Gy) compared with unexposed one.

  10. Low energy inner zone protons{emdash}revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Vampola, A.L.

    1996-07-01

    Flux data from a two-element proton telescope flown on the S3-3 satellite in the 1976{endash}1979 time period were averaged to provide a low energy (80 keV to 3.2 MeV) proton model in the inner zone which is more realistic than the AP8 extrapolations. At {ital L}=1.35 and 1.85, S3-3 proton fluxes at 1.5 MeV and alpha particles at 4 MeV agree with published data. In the range {ital L}=1.35 to 1.85, the 1.5 to 3.2 MeV proton channel fluxes on S3-3 also agree with the AP8 model. But in this {ital L} range at 80 keV to 1.5 MeV, the S3-3 proton telescope measured higher fluxes than are present in the AP8 model. The discrepancy is maximum in the {ital L}=1.35 to 1.45 range and increases at lower energies, with the maximum discrepancy being three orders of magnitude in the 80 to 150 keV range at {ital L}=1.4. A model to supplement AP8 has been developed covering the energy range 80 keV to 3.2 MeV over the {ital L} range of 1.2 to 2.4. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Proton radiation damage in high-resistivity n-type silicon CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.J.; Groom, D.E.; Holland, S.E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.F.; Lee, J.; Levi, M.E.; Palaio, N.P.; Turko, B.T.; Uslenghi, M.C.; Wagner, M.T.; Wang, G.

    2001-12-20

    A new type of p-channel CCD constructed on high-resistivity n-type silicon was exposed to 12 MeV protons at doses up to 1x1011 protons/cm2. The charge transfer efficiency was measured as a function of radiation dose and temperature. We previously reported that these CCDs are significantly more tolerant to radiation damage than conventional n-channel devices. In the work reported here, we used pocket pumping techniques and charge transfer efficiency measurements to determine the identity and concentrations of radiation induced traps present in the damaged devices.

  12. Relative biological effectiveness and microdosimetry of a mixed energy field of protons up to 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. B.; Eaddy, J. M.; Archambeau, J. O.; Coutrakon, G. B.; Miller, D. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Siebers, J. V.; Slater, J. M.; Dicello, J. F.

    1994-10-01

    We have studied radiation effects utilizing the new 250 MeV Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. In this paper we present the data collected for the survival of Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells, that were irradiated with a beam of mixed energy protons up to 200 MeV. The RBE for protons, when compared to 60Co gamma rays, ranged from a low of 1.2 at the high energy portion of the field to 1.3+ at the low energy portion of the field. These results are consistent with the measured lineal energy (microdosimetric) spectra.

  13. Relative biological effectiveness and microdosimetry of a mixed energy field of protons up to 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J B; Eaddy, J M; Archambeau, J O; Coutrakon, G B; Miller, D W; Moyers, M F; Siebers, J V; Slater, J M; Dicello, J F

    1994-10-01

    We have studied radiation effects utilizing the new 250 MeV Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. In this paper we present the data collected for the survival of Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells, that were irradiated with a beam of mixed energy protons up to 200 MeV. The RBE for protons, when compared to 60Co gamma rays, ranged from a low of 1.2 at the high energy portion of the field to 1.3+ at the low energy portion of the field. These results are consistent with the measured lineal energy (microdosimetric) spectra. PMID:11539961

  14. Intermediate energy proton-deuteron elastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A fully symmetrized multiple scattering series is considered for the description of proton-deuteron elastic scattering. An off-shell continuation of the experimentally known twobody amplitudes that retains the exchange symmeteries required for the calculation is presented. The one boson exchange terms of the two body amplitudes are evaluated exactly in this off-shell prescription. The first two terms of the multiple scattering series are calculated explicitly whereas multiple scattering effects are obtained as minimum variance estimates from the 146-MeV data of Postma and Wilson. The multiple scattering corrections indeed consist of low order partial waves as suggested by Sloan based on model studies with separable interactions. The Hamada-Johnston wave function is shown consistent with the data for internucleon distances greater than about 0.84 fm.

  15. Energy distribution of proton microbeam transmitted through two flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, G. U. L.; Rajta, I.; Bereczky, R. J.; Tőkési, K.

    2015-07-01

    The transmission of 1 MeV proton microbeam passing between two parallel flat plates was investigated. Three different materials were used in our experiments. As insulators we used Polytetrafluoroethylene and borosilicate glass plates and glass with gold layer on the surface as conductor. The surface of the plates was parallel to the beam axis and one of the plates was moved towards the beam. The energy distribution and the deflection of the transmitted beam were measured as the function of the sample distance relative to the beam. We found systematic differences between the behaviour of the metallic and insulator samples. The proton microbeam suffered significant deflection towards the sample surface due to the image acceleration when using conductor material. In case of the glass and Polytetrafluoroethylene plates the beam was deflected into the opposite direction, and the incident protons did not suffer significant energy loss, which is the consequence of the guiding effect.

  16. Predicted Rates of Secondary Malignancies From Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy for Stage I Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B.; Kramer, Kevin; O'Meara, William P.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Belard, Arnaud; McDonough, James; O'Connell, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon radiotherapy has been the standard adjuvant treatment for stage I seminoma. Single-dose carboplatin therapy and observation have emerged as alternative options due to concerns for acute toxicities and secondary malignancies from radiation. In this institutional review board-approved study, we compared photon and proton radiotherapy for stage I seminoma and the predicted rates of excess secondary malignancies for both treatment modalities. Methods and Material: Computed tomography images from 10 consecutive patients with stage I seminoma were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapies. Structures reported to be at increased risk for secondary malignancies and in-field critical structures were contoured. Reported models of organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates based on organ equivalent dose were used to determine the excess absolute risk of secondary malignancies. Calculated values were compared with tumor registry reports of excess secondary malignancies among testicular cancer survivors. Results: Photon and proton plans provided comparable target volume coverage. Proton plans delivered significantly lower mean doses to all examined normal tissues, except for the kidneys. The greatest absolute reduction in mean dose was observed for the stomach (119 cGy for proton plans vs. 768 cGy for photon plans; p < 0.0001). Significantly more excess secondary cancers per 10,000 patients/year were predicted for photon radiation than for proton radiation to the stomach (4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.22-5.01), large bowel (0.81; 95% CI, 0.39-1.01), and bladder (0.03; 95% CI, 0.01-0.58), while no difference was demonstrated for radiation to the pancreas (0.02; 95% CI, -0.01-0.06). Conclusions: For patients with stage I seminoma, proton radiation therapy reduced the predicted secondary cancer risk compared with photon therapy. We predict a reduction of one additional secondary cancer for every 50 patients

  17. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma--case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Y; Tsunoda, T; Hyodo, A; Nose, T; Tsujii, H; Tsuji, H; Inada, T; Maruhashi, A; Hayakawa, Y

    1993-03-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. PMID:7683125

  18. CGC/saturation approach for high energy soft interactions: v2 in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsman, E.; Levin, E.; Maor, U.; Tapia, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we continue our program to construct a model for high energy soft interactions, based on the CGC/saturation approach. We demonstrate that in our model, which describes diffractive physics as well as multiparticle production at high energy, the density variation mechanism leads to the value of v2 , which is about 60%-70% of the measured v2 . Bearing in mind that in the CGC/saturation approach there are two other mechanisms present, Bose enhancement in the wave function and local anisotropy, we believe that the azimuthal long range rapidity correlations in proton-proton collisions stem from the CGC/saturation physics, and not from quark-gluon plasma production.

  19. Energy dependence of the ridge in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dusling, Kevin; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-01-27

    In this study, we demonstrate that the recent measurement of azimuthally collimated, long-range rapidity (“ridge”) correlations in √s=13 TeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC are in agreement with expectations from the color glass condensate effective theory of high-energy QCD. The observation that the integrated near-side yield as a function of multiplicity is independent of collision energy is a natural consequence of the fact that multiparticle production is driven by a single semihard saturation scale in the color glass condensate framework. We argue further that the azimuthal structure of these recent ATLAS ridge measurements strongly constrainsmore » hydrodynamic interpretations of such correlations in high-multiplicity p+p collisions.« less

  20. Proton radiography based on near-threshold Cerenkov radiation

    DOEpatents

    van Bibber, Karl A.; Dietrich, Frank S.

    2003-01-01

    A Cerenkov imaging system for charged particle radiography that determines the energy loss of the charged particle beam passing through an object. This energy loss information provides additional detail on target densities when used with traditional radiographic techniques like photon or x-ray radiography. In this invention a probe beam of 800 MeV to 50 GeV/c charged particles is passed through an object to be imaged, an imaging magnetic spectrometer, to a silicon aerogel Cerenkov radiator where the charged particles emitted Cerenkov light proportional to their velocity. At the same beam focal plane, a particle scintillator produces a light output proportional to the incident beam flux. Optical imaging systems relay the Cerenkov and scintillator information to CCD's or other measurement equipment. A ratio between the Cerenkov and scintillator is formed, which is directly proportional to the line density of the object for each pixel measured. By rotating the object, tomographic radiography may be performed. By applying pulses of beam, discrete time-step movies of dynamic objects may be made.

  1. Simulation of proton radiation belt formation during the March 24, 1991 SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.K.; Kotelnikov, A.D.; Li, X.; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J.; Blake, J.B.; Gussenhoven, M.S.

    1995-02-01

    The rapid formation of a new proton radiation belt at L {approx_equal} 2.5 following the March 24, 1991 Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) observed at the CRRES satellite is modelled using a relativistic guiding center test particle code. The SSC is modelled by a bipolar electric field and associated compression and relaxation in the magnetic field, superimposed on a dipole magnetic field. The source population consists of both solar and trapped inner zone protons. The simulations show that while both populations contribute to drift echoes in the 20-80 MeV range, primary contribution is from the solar protons. Proton acceleration by the SSC differs from relativistic electron acceleration in that different source populations contribute and nonrelativistic conservation of the first adiabatic invariant leads to greater energization of protons for a given decrease in L. Model drift echoes and flux distribution in L at the time of injection compare well with CRRES observations. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Regolith Biological Shield for a Lunar Outpost from High Energy Solar Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Tai T.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2008-01-21

    Beyond Earth atmosphere, natural space radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Protons (SEPs) represents a significant hazard to both manned and robotic missions. For lunar settlements, protecting astronauts from SEPs is a key safety issue that needs to be addressed by identifying appropriate shielding materials. This paper investigates the interaction of SEPs with the lunar regolith, and quantifies the effectiveness of the regolith as a biological shield for a human habitat, compared to aluminum, presently the standard shielding material. Also calculated is the shielding thickness to reduce the dose in the habitat to those recommended by International Radiation Protection Committee and by NASA for operation on the international space station. The present calculations are for the most energetic solar event of February 1956, which included high energy protons up to 1000 MeV. Results show that the lunar regolith is as effective as aluminum for shielding lunar outposts. A large thickness of the regolith ({approx}30 g/cm{sup 2}) would be needed to reduce the dose in the habitat from high energy protons below the 30 days flight crew limit of 25 Rem (or 250 mSv) and significantly more shielding would be needed ({approx}150 g/cm{sup 2}) to reduce the dose down to the limit for radiation workers of 5 Rem (or 50 mSv)

  3. Regolith Biological Shield for a Lunar Outpost from High Energy Solar Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tai T.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2008-01-01

    Beyond Earth atmosphere, natural space radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Protons (SEPs) represents a significant hazard to both manned and robotic missions. For lunar settlements, protecting astronauts from SEPs is a key safety issue that needs to be addressed by identifying appropriate shielding materials. This paper investigates the interaction of SEPs with the lunar regolith, and quantifies the effectiveness of the regolith as a biological shield for a human habitat, compared to aluminum, presently the standard shielding material. Also calculated is the shielding thickness to reduce the dose in the habitat to those recommended by International Radiation Protection Committee and by NASA for operation on the international space station. The present calculations are for the most energetic solar event of February 1956, which included high energy protons up to 1000 MeV. Results show that the lunar regolith is as effective as aluminum for shielding lunar outposts. A large thickness of the regolith (~30 g/cm2) would be needed to reduce the dose in the habitat from high energy protons below the 30 days flight crew limit of 25 Rem (or 250 mSv) and significantly more shielding would be needed (~150 g/cm2) to reduce the dose down to the limit for radiation workers of 5 Rem (or 50 mSv).

  4. Resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons and ring current protons by EMIC waves in a hot plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Ni, B.; Xiang, Z.; Zou, Z.; Gu, X.; Fu, S.; Zhou, C.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The full kinetic linear dispersion relation in a warm, multi-ion plasma with hot ring current protons is used to calculate the linear growth rate of parallel propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Significant wave growth at relatively small wave numbers occurs for both H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves at the magnetic equator. We find that the growth of H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves remains strong when they propagate to higher latitudes (< 30 degrees). The full hot plasma dispersion relation and cold plasma dispersion relation are used individually to quantify the quasi-linear bounce-averaged pitch angle diffusion rates for radiation belt electrons and ring current protons due to H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves. The results demonstrate considerable differences in the rates of pitch angle scattering caused by He+-band EMIC waves between the use of hot and cold plasma dispersion relation. He+-band EMIC waves can also resonate with lower energies particles (electrons and protons) when the impact of hot plasma is included. In contrast, much smaller differences are seen in the resonant scattering rates for H+-band EMIC waves. Our study strongly suggests that the effect of hot plasmas should be carefully taken into account to approach improved understanding of the exact role that EMIC waves plays in driving the dynamical evolution of radiation belt electrons and ring current protons.

  5. First measurement of proton-induced low-momentum dielectron radiation off cold nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HADES Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Mishra, D.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2012-09-01

    We present data on dielectron emission in proton induced reactions on a Nb target at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy measured with HADES installed at GSI. The data represent the first high statistics measurement of proton-induced dielectron radiation from cold nuclear matter in a kinematic regime, where strong medium effects are expected. Combined with the good mass resolution of 2%, it is the first measurement sensitive to changes of the spectral functions of vector mesons, as predicted by models for hadrons at rest or small relative momenta. Comparing the e+e- invariant mass spectra to elementary p + p data, we observe for e+e- momenta Pee<0.8 GeV/c a strong modification of the shape of the spectrum, which we attribute to an additional ρ-like contribution and a decrease of ω yield. These opposite trends are tentatively interpreted as a strong coupling of the ρ meson to baryonic resonances and an absorption of the ω meson, which are two aspects of in-medium modification of vector mesons.

  6. Radiation hardness test of the Philips Digital Photon Counter with proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Frach, T.; Kononov, S. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    The Philips Digital Photon Counter (DPC) is a silicon photomultiplier combining Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) and dedicated readout electronics in the same chip. The DPC is a promising photon sensor for future RICH detectors. A known issue of G-APD is its sensitivity to radiation damage. Two DPC sensors were tested using 800 MeV/c protons. An increase of dark counting rate with proton fluence up to 4 ·1011cm-2 has been measured.

  7. Proton Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: A Review of the Clinical Experience to Date

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Emma B.; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-06-01

    Proton beam radiation has been used for cancer treatment since the 1950s, but recent increasing interest in this form of therapy and the construction of hospital-based and clinic-based facilities for its delivery have greatly increased both the number of patients and the variety of tumors being treated with proton therapy. The mass of proton particles and their unique physical properties (ie, the Bragg peak) allow proton therapy to spare normal tissues distal to the tumor target from incidental irradiation. Initial observations show that proton therapy is particularly useful for treating tumors in challenging locations close to nontarget critical structures. Specifically, improvements in local control outcomes for patients with chordoma, chonodrosarcoma, and tumors in the sinonasal regions have been reported in series using proton. Improved local control and survival outcomes for patients with cancer of the head and neck region have also been seen with the advent of improvements in better imaging and multimodality therapy comprising surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. However, aggressive local therapy in the proximity of critical normal structures to tumors in the head and neck region may produce debilitating early and late toxic effects. Great interest has been expressed in evaluating whether proton therapy can improve outcomes, especially early and late toxicity, when used in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. This review summarizes the progress made to date in addressing this question.

  8. The proton and electron radiation belts at geosynchronous orbit: Statistics and behavior during high-speed stream-driven storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.; Cayton, Thomas E.; Denton, Michael H.; Belian, Richard D.; Christensen, Roderick A.; Ingraham, J. Charles

    2016-06-01

    The outer proton radiation belt (OPRB) and outer electron radiation belt (OERB) at geosynchronous orbit are investigated using a reanalysis of the LANL CPA (Charged Particle Analyzer) 8-satellite 2-solar cycle energetic particle data set from 1976 to 1995. Statistics of the OPRB and the OERB are calculated, including local time and solar cycle trends. The number density of the OPRB is about 10 times higher than the OERB, but the 1 MeV proton flux is about 1000 times less than the 1 MeV electron flux because the proton energy spectrum is softer than the electron spectrum. Using a collection of 94 high-speed stream-driven storms in 1976-1995, the storm time evolutions of the OPRB and OERB are studied via superposed epoch analysis. The evolution of the OERB shows the familiar sequence (1) prestorm decay of density and flux, (2) early-storm dropout of density and flux, (3) sudden recovery of density, and (4) steady storm time heating to high fluxes. The evolution of the OPRB shows a sudden enhancement of density and flux early in the storm. The absence of a proton dropout when there is an electron dropout is noted. The sudden recovery of the density of the OERB and the sudden density enhancement of the OPRB are both associated with the occurrence of a substorm during the early stage of the storm when the superdense plasma sheet produces a "strong stretching phase" of the storm. These storm time substorms are seen to inject electrons to 1 MeV and protons to beyond 1 MeV into geosynchronous orbit, directly producing a suddenly enhanced radiation belt population.

  9. Paths and ionization losses of proton energy in different substances

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilovskiy, I.M.; Karpov, I.I.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Prokoshkin, Yu.D.

    1986-02-14

    Ionization energy losses of charged particles in a substance are described by the well-known Bethe-Bloch formula. However, the magnitudes of the ionization potentials in region of low proton energies (E < 100 MeV) for heavy elements prove to be considerably larger than those at high energies. Thus, studies of ionization losses in the region of high energies are the main source of the experimental information necessary for the correction of the Bethe-Bloch formula and determination of magnitudes of ionization potentials I. The purpose of this work was to measure the magnitudes of ionization losses dE/ds, paths R and ionization potentials I at a proton energy of E 670 MeV. The measurements were taken by the relative method for different substances of x, and the magnitudes of q sub x=(dE/ds) sub x/(dE/ds) sub Al and px=R sub x/R sub Al were found. Quantities qx and px weakly depend on the energy E where at E=200-600 MeV, a=(2-4).10-2 for different substances. The proton energy was determined with an accuracy of 2 MeV.

  10. Water calorimetry-based radiation dosimetry in iridium-192 brachytherapy and proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfehnia, Arman

    The aim of this work is to develop and evaluate a primary standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources as well as for active spot scanning proton radiotherapy beams based on stagnant 4 °C water calorimetry. The measurements were performed using an in-house built water calorimeter and a parallel-plate calorimeter vessel. The dose measurement results of the McGill calorimeter were validated in high energy photon beams against Canada's national established primary standard at the NRC. The measurements in brachytherapy were performed with a spring-loaded catheter holder which allowed for the 192Ir source to come directly inside the water calorimeter. The COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS(TM) software was used to solve the heat transport equation numerically for a detailed geometrical model of our experimental setup. In brachytherapy, reference dosimetry protocols were also developed and used to measure the dose to water directly using thimble type ionization chambers and Gafchromic films with traceable 60Co (or higher energy photons) calibration factor. Based on water calorimetry standard, we measured an absolute dose rate to water of 361+/-7 microGy/(h·U) at 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The 1.9 % uncertainty on water calorimetry results is in contrast with the current recommended AAPM TG-43 protocol that achieves at best an uncertainty (k=1) of 2.5 % based on an indirect dose to water measurement technique. All measurement results from water calorimetry, ion chamber, film, and TG-43 agreed to within 0.83 %. We achieved an overall dose uncertainty of 0.4 % and 0.6 % for scattered and scanned proton radiation water calorimetry, respectively. The water calorimetry absorbed dose to water results agreed with those obtained through the currently recommended IAEA TRS-398 protocol (measurements made using an ionization chamber with a 60Co calibration factor) to better than 0.14 % and 0.32 % in scattered and scanned proton beams, respectively. In conclusion, this work forms the

  11. Reducing stray radiation dose to patients receiving passively scattered proton radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Phillip J; Fontenot, Jonas D; Zheng, Yuanshui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Lee, Andrew K; Titt, Uwe; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy exposes healthy tissue to stray radiation emanating from the treatment unit and secondary radiation produced within the patient. These exposures provide no known benefit and may increase a patient's risk of developing a radiogenic second cancer. The aim of this study was to explore strategies to reduce stray radiation dose to a patient receiving a 76 Gy proton beam treatment for cancer of the prostate. The whole-body effective dose from stray radiation, E, was estimated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a passively scattered proton treatment unit and an anthropomorphic phantom. The predicted value of E was 567 mSv, of which 320 mSv was attributed to leakage from the treatment unit; the remainder arose from scattered radiation that originated within the patient. Modest modifications of the treatment unit reduced E by 212 mSv. Surprisingly, E from a modified passive-scattering device was only slightly higher (109 mSv) than from a nozzle with no leakage, e.g., that which may be approached with a spot-scanning technique. These results add to the body of evidence supporting the suitability of passively scattered proton beams for the treatment of prostate cancer, confirm that the effective dose from stray radiation was not excessive, and, importantly, show that it can be substantially reduced by modest enhancements to the treatment unit. PMID:18369278

  12. Reducing stray radiation dose to patients receiving passively scattered proton radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Zheng, Yuanshui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Lee, Andrew K.; Titt, Uwe; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2008-04-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy exposes healthy tissue to stray radiation emanating from the treatment unit and secondary radiation produced within the patient. These exposures provide no known benefit and may increase a patient's risk of developing a radiogenic second cancer. The aim of this study was to explore strategies to reduce stray radiation dose to a patient receiving a 76 Gy proton beam treatment for cancer of the prostate. The whole-body effective dose from stray radiation, E, was estimated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a passively scattered proton treatment unit and an anthropomorphic phantom. The predicted value of E was 567 mSv, of which 320 mSv was attributed to leakage from the treatment unit; the remainder arose from scattered radiation that originated within the patient. Modest modifications of the treatment unit reduced E by 212 mSv. Surprisingly, E from a modified passive-scattering device was only slightly higher (109 mSv) than from a nozzle with no leakage, e.g., that which may be approached with a spot-scanning technique. These results add to the body of evidence supporting the suitability of passively scattered proton beams for the treatment of prostate cancer, confirm that the effective dose from stray radiation was not excessive, and, importantly, show that it can be substantially reduced by modest enhancements to the treatment unit.

  13. Effects of Solar Particle Event Proton Radiation on Parameters Related to Ferret Emesis

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, J. K.; Wan, X. S.; Krigsfeld, G. S.; King, G. L.; Miller, A.; Mick, R.; Gridley, D. S.; Wroe, A. J.; Rightnar, S.; Dolney, D.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of simulated solar particle event (SPE) proton radiation to induce retching and vomiting was evaluated in the ferret experimental animal model. The endpoints measured in the study included: (1) the fraction of animals that retched or vomited, (2) the number of retches or vomits observed, (3) the latency period before the first retch or vomit and (4) the duration between the first and last retching or vomiting events. The results demonstrated that γ ray and proton irradiation delivered at a high dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min induced dose-dependent changes in the endpoints related to retching and vomiting. The minimum radiation doses required to induce statistically significant changes in retching- and vomiting-related endpoints were 0.75 and 1.0 Gy, respectively, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton radiation at the high dose rate did not significantly differ from 1. Similar but less consistent and smaller changes in the retching- and vomiting-related endpoints were observed for groups irradiated with γ rays and protons delivered at a low dose rate of 0.5 Gy/h. Since this low dose rate is similar to a radiation dose rate expected during a SPE, these results suggest that the risk of SPE radiation-induced vomiting is low and may reach statistical significance only when the radiation dose reaches 1 Gy or higher. PMID:23883319

  14. Time Variations of Proton Flux in Earth Inner Radiation Belt for 2006-2015 Years based on the PAMELA and the ARINA Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, V. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mayorova, M. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Aleksandrin, S. Yu.

    The PAMELA and the ARINA experiments are carried out aboard satellite RESURS-DK1 since 2006 up to now. Both these instruments have possibility to measure charged particles in the inner radiation belt. Combination of these two devices covers proton energy range from 30 MeV up to trapping limit (E ∽2 GeV). Continuous measurements with PAMELA and ARINA include minimum between 23rd and 24th solar cycles falling and rising phases of 23/24 solar cycles and maximum of 24th one. It is important because existing empirical radiation belt models does not intend to calculate fluxes taking into account solar activity varying, e.g. widely used AP-8 model allows to evaluate proton fluxes just in two cases: for minimum or maximum of a solar activity. In this report we present temporal profiles of proton flux in the lower edge of the inner proton radiation belt (1.12 < L < 1.20, 0.18 < B < 0.22 G) and ratio between solar minimum and maximum fluxes. Dependence of proton fluxes on degree of solar activity were studied for various phases of 23/24 solar cycle. At that it was shown that proton fluxes of energy >80MeV at the solar minimum several times greater than at the solar maximum. Maximum difference is seen on the L-shell 1.15.

  15. Discussion of the reliability of electron densities and energies interpreted from data and limits on the proton energy and density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of radio observations of Jupiter were changed to take into account the antenna resolution. A dipole magnetic field with a surface equatorial value of 7 gauss is assumed. The electron temperature is found to increase for r 2.5 Jupiter radii with decreasing r as 1/r cubed, reaching a peak of about 100 MeV at r = 2.5 Jupiter radii. For r 2.5 Jupiter radii, the electron temperature goes as r to the 6th power because of energy lost to radiation. The consequences of making an upper estimate on the proton flux by assuming the magnetic field is loaded with all the energetic protons it can hold are described. The upper limits of proton energy, density, flux, and energy flux are calculated for 1, 2, 2.5, 3, and 6 Jupiter radii. The proton energy and velocity estimates are considered to be fairly reliable; the upper limit to the number density is probably much higher than actuality.

  16. High-energy trapped radiation penetrating the rings of Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Chenette, D.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Eraker, J.H.; Pyle, K.R.; Simpson, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    Electrons and protons in the energy ranges 2--25 MeV and >67 MeV, respectively, have been discovered throughout the entire equatorial region inward from the outer edge of the A ring at L=2.3 to the periapsis of the Pioneer trajectory at Lapprox.1.3. The trapped radiation which populates Saturn's magnetosphere byond L=2.3 is totally absent in this region. The electron measurements include (1) a differential energy spectrum proportionalE/sup -0.6/, (2) an L dependence consistent with L/sup 2.8/, and (3) an intensity of approx.0.05 el/cm/sup 2/ s sr near L=2 for the energy range 7--17 MeV (a factor of 5 times the interplanetary quiettime flux in this energy range.) The proton measurements display an L dependence of L/sup 2/ with a flux level of approx.6 x 10/sup -2/ protons/cm/sup 2/ s sr above 67 MeV, just inside the edge of the A ring. The pitch angle distributions of both the electrons and protons are consistent with isotropy in the dipole magnetic field. It is argued from these results that the electrons and protons are trapped and thus penetrate the A-B-C rings. However, from the above experimental evidence it is concluded that this trapped radiation is not remnant radiation from the trapped radiation region beyond L=2.3. We find that these measurements are consistent with a model for spalsh albedo production of electrons and protons resulting from the bombardment of the atmosphere and/or rings of Saturn by cosmic ray protons with energies above the Stoermer cut-off at the magnetic latitudes of production. These secondary particles are then observed as trapped radiation propagating along the appropriate field lines crossing the ring plane. We also show that electron production may occur through ..pi../sup + -/..--> mu../sup + -/ ..-->..e/sup + -/ decay chain which yields an L dependence of L/sup 2.8/ for pions.

  17. About multiple scattering of high energy protons in crystal deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taratin, A. M.; Scandale, W.

    2015-07-01

    The process of multiple scattering of high energy protons in a silicon crystal at its amorphous orientation was studied by simulation of proton trajectories in the model of binary collisions and by a straight simulation of the sequences of proton collisions with atoms when their impact parameters are randomly and uniformly distributed on the symmetry cell for a given crystallography direction. The value of the RMS deflection of multiple scattering obtained by the simulation is in a good agreement with the experiment and more than 15% larger than it follows from the Moliere theory. The obtained RMS deflection used in the Gaussian approach of multiple scattering well describes dechanneling of protons in the frame of the planar potential model. Different number of proton collisions with atoms occurs along the same crystal length for different crystal orientations. However, the change of the collision number is compensated by the corresponding change of the mean square deflection in a single collision. Therefore, multiple scattering is the same for different crystal orientations. The generator of multiple scattering for amorphous crystal orientations was proposed.

  18. Survival of bacterial isolates exposed to simulated Jovian trapped radiation belt electrons and solar wind protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.; Hagen, C. A.; Renninger, G. M.; Simko, G. J.; Smith, C. D.; Yelinek, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    With missions to Jupiter, the spacecraft will be exposed for extended durations to solar wind radiation and the Jovian trapped radiation belt. This study is designed to determine the effect of these radiation environments on spacecraft bacterial isolates. The information can be used in the probability of contamination analysis for these missions. A bacterial subpopulation from Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft (nine spore-forming and three non-spore-forming isolates) plus two comparative organisms, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 17917 and a strain of Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were exposed to 2, 12, and 25 MeV electrons at different doses with simultaneous exposure to a vacuum of 1.3 x 10(-4) N m-2 at 20 and -20 degrees C. The radioresistance of the subpopulation was dependent on the isolate, dose and energy of electrons. Temperature affected the radioresistance of only the spore-forming isolates. Survival data indicated that spores were reduced approximately 1 log/1500 J kg-1 (10 J kg-1=1 krad), while non-spore-forming isolates (micrococci) were reduced 1.5-2 logs/1500 J kg-1 with the exception of an apparent radioresistant isolate whose resistance approached that of the spores. The subpopulation was found to be less resistant to lower energy than to higher energy electrons. The bacterial isolates were exposed to 3 keV protons under the same conditions as the electrons with a total fluence of 1.5 x 10(13) p cm-2 and a dose rate of 8.6 x 10(9) p cm-2 s-1. The results showed that only 20% of S. epidermidis and 45% of B. subtilis populations survived exposure to the 3 keV protons, while the mean survival of the spacecraft subpopulation was 45% with a range from 31.8% (non-spore-former) to 64.8% (non-spore-former). No significant difference existed between spore-forming and non-spore-forming isolates.

  19. Survival of bacterial isolates exposed to simulated Jovian trapped radiation belt electrons and solar wind protons.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D M; Hagen, C A; Renninger, G M; Simko, G J; Smith, C D; Yelinek, J A

    1973-01-01

    With missions to Jupiter, the spacecraft will be exposed for extended durations to solar wind radiation and the Jovian trapped radiation belt. This study is designed to determine the effect of these radiation environments on spacecraft bacterial isolates. The information can be used in the probability of contamination analysis for these missions. A bacterial subpopulation from Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft (nine spore-forming and three non-spore-forming isolates) plus two comparative organisms, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 17917 and a strain of Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were exposed to 2, 12, and 25 MeV electrons at different doses with simultaneous exposure to a vacuum of 1.3 x 10(-4) N m-2 at 20 and -20 degrees C. The radioresistance of the subpopulation was dependent on the isolate, dose and energy of electrons. Temperature affected the radioresistance of only the spore-forming isolates. Survival data indicated that spores were reduced approximately 1 log/1500 J kg-1 (10 J kg-1=1 krad), while non-spore-forming isolates (micrococci) were reduced 1.5-2 logs/1500 J kg-1 with the exception of an apparent radioresistant isolate whose resistance approached that of the spores. The subpopulation was found to be less resistant to lower energy than to higher energy electrons. The bacterial isolates were exposed to 3 keV protons under the same conditions as the electrons with a total fluence of 1.5 x 10(13) p cm-2 and a dose rate of 8.6 x 10(9) p cm-2 s-1. The results showed that only 20% of S. epidermidis and 45% of B. subtilis populations survived exposure to the 3 keV protons, while the mean survival of the spacecraft subpopulation was 45% with a range from 31.8% (non-spore-former) to 64.8% (non-spore-former). No significant difference existed between spore-forming and non-spore-forming isolates. PMID:12523379

  20. A simulation study investigating a radiation detector utilizing the prompt gamma range verification technique for proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Andrew David

    Proton therapy has shown to be a viable therapy for radiation oncology applications. The advantages of using protons as compared to photons in the treatments of diseases with radiation are numerous including the ability to deliver overall lower amounts of lethal radiation doses to the patient. This advantage is due to the fundamental interaction mechanism of the incident therapeutic protons with the patient, which produces a characteristic dose-distribution unique only to protons. Unlike photons, the entire proton beam is absorbed within the patent and the dose-distribution's maximum occurs near the end of the proton's path. Protons deliver less dose on the skin and intervening tissues, tighter dose conformality to the disease site, as well as no dose past the target volume, sparring healthy tissue distally in the patient. Current research in proton therapy is geared towards minimizing proton range uncertainty and monitoring in-vivo the location of the proton's path. Monitoring the beam's path serves also to verify which healthy structures/tissues were irradiated and whether the target volume has met the prescription dose. Among the many techniques used for in-vivo proton monitoring, the technique based on the emitted secondary particles, specifically the Prompt Gamma (PG) method, can be used for clinical implementation. This work focuses on developing a radiation detector system for using the PG method by investigating the characterizing the secondary particle field emitted from plastic and water phantoms as well as a radiation detector based on glass materials that exploits the Cherenkov phenomenon.

  1. Comprehensive description of J/ψ production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-01

    We employ a small x color glass condensate (CGC)+ nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/ψ production at low p(⊥) in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross sections, rapidity distributions, and low momentum p(⊥) distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for ψ' production. We observe an overlap region in p(⊥) where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross section. PMID:25415899

  2. Metabolomic profiling of urine samples from mice exposed to protons reveals radiation quality and dose specific differences.

    PubMed

    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Trani, Daniela; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steven J; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-04-01

    As space travel is expanding to include private tourism and travel beyond low-Earth orbit, so is the risk of exposure to space radiation. Galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events have the potential to expose space travelers to significant doses of radiation that can lead to increased cancer risk and other adverse health consequences. Metabolomics has the potential to assess an individual's risk by exploring the metabolic perturbations in a biofluid or tissue. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0.5 and 2 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon of protons and the levels of metabolites were evaluated in urine at 4 h after radiation exposure through liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Significant differences were identified in metabolites that map to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting that energy metabolism is severely impacted after exposure to protons. Additionally, various pathways of amino acid metabolism (tryptophan, tyrosine, arginine and proline and phenylalanine) were affected with potential implications for DNA damage repair and cognitive impairment. Finally, presence of products of purine and pyrimidine metabolism points to direct DNA damage or increased apoptosis. Comparison of these metabolomic data to previously published data from our laboratory with gamma radiation strongly suggests a more pronounced effect on metabolism with protons. This is the first metabolomics study with space radiation in an easily accessible biofluid such as urine that further investigates and exemplifies the biological differences at early time points after exposure to different radiation qualities. PMID:25768838

  3. Modeling the Action of Protons and Heavier Ions in Biological Targets: Nuclear Interactions in Hadrontherapy and Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gadioli, E.; Garzelli, M. V.; Ottolenghi, A.; Parini, V.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinsky, L.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.

    2005-05-01

    Tumor treatment with protons and Carbon ions can allow for a better optimization of Tumor Control Probability and Normal Tissue Complication Probability, especially for radio-resistant tumors. Exposure to protons and heavier ions is also of concern for manned space missions such as future travels to the Moon and Mars. Nuclear reactions with the human body constituents, the beam line components (for hadrontherapy), and the spacecraft walls and shielding (for space radiation protection) can significantly modify the characteristics of the primary radiation field and thus the dose distributions in the various target tissues. In this context the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code, integrated with radiobiological data and coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms, was applied to the characterization of therapeutic proton beams and the calculation of space radiation organ doses, with focus on the role of nuclear interactions. Besides absorbed and equivalent doses, distributions of ``biological'' dose (modeled as the average number of DNA clustered lesions per cell induced in a given organ or tissue) were calculated as well. Concerning space radiation protection, exposure to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) under different shielding conditions was simulated. Both for hadrontherapy and for space radiation exposure, nuclear reaction products were found to play a more important role for the equivalent and ``biological'' dose than for the absorbed dose. Furthermore, while for SPEs the doses (both absorbed and equivalent/``biological'') decreased dramatically by increasing the shield thickness, the GCR doses showed a slight shielding dependence. Overall, these examples of application of FLUKA to radiotherapy and radiation protection problems emphasized the need of further models and data, typically double-differential cross sections for nucleus-nucleus interactions at energies below a few hundred MeV/n.

  4. Metabolomic Profiling of Urine Samples from Mice Exposed to Protons Reveals Radiation Quality and Dose Specific Differences

    PubMed Central

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Trani, Daniela; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steven J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    As space travel is expanding to include private tourism and travel beyond low-Earth orbit, so is the risk of exposure to space radiation. Galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events have the potential to expose space travelers to significant doses of radiation that can lead to increased cancer risk and other adverse health consequences. Metabolomics has the potential to assess an individual’s risk by exploring the metabolic perturbations in a biofluid or tissue. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0.5 and 2 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon of protons and the levels of metabolites were evaluated in urine at 4 h after radiation exposure through liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Significant differences were identified in metabolites that map to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting that energy metabolism is severely impacted after exposure to protons. Additionally, various pathways of amino acid metabolism (tryptophan, tyrosine, arginine and proline and phenylalanine) were affected with potential implications for DNA damage repair and cognitive impairment. Finally, presence of products of purine and pyrimidine metabolism points to direct DNA damage or increased apoptosis. Comparison of these metabolomic data to previously published data from our laboratory with gamma radiation strongly suggests a more pronounced effect on metabolism with protons. This is the first metabolomics study with space radiation in an easily accessible biofluid such as urine that further investigates and exemplifies the biological differences at early time points after exposure to different radiation qualities. PMID:25768838

  5. Modeling the Action of Protons and Heavier Ions in Biological Targets: Nuclear Interactions in Hadrontherapy and Space Radiation Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Ballarini, F.; Ottolenghi, A.; Scannicchio, D.; Battistoni, G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Cerutti, F.; Gadioli, E.; Ferrari, A.; Garzelli, M. V.; Parini, V.; Pinsky, L.

    2005-05-24

    Tumor treatment with protons and Carbon ions can allow for a better optimization of Tumor Control Probability and Normal Tissue Complication Probability, especially for radio-resistant tumors. Exposure to protons and heavier ions is also of concern for manned space missions such as future travels to the Moon and Mars. Nuclear reactions with the human body constituents, the beam line components (for hadrontherapy), and the spacecraft walls and shielding (for space radiation protection) can significantly modify the characteristics of the primary radiation field and thus the dose distributions in the various target tissues. In this context the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code, integrated with radiobiological data and coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms, was applied to the characterization of therapeutic proton beams and the calculation of space radiation organ doses, with focus on the role of nuclear interactions. Besides absorbed and equivalent doses, distributions of 'biological' dose (modeled as the average number of DNA clustered lesions per cell induced in a given organ or tissue) were calculated as well. Concerning space radiation protection, exposure to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) under different shielding conditions was simulated. Both for hadrontherapy and for space radiation exposure, nuclear reaction products were found to play a more important role for the equivalent and 'biological' dose than for the absorbed dose. Furthermore, while for SPEs the doses (both absorbed and equivalent/'biological') decreased dramatically by increasing the shield thickness, the GCR doses showed a slight shielding dependence. Overall, these examples of application of FLUKA to radiotherapy and radiation protection problems emphasized the need of further models and data, typically double-differential cross sections for nucleus-nucleus interactions at energies below a few hundred MeV/n.

  6. Development of a remote proton radiation therapy solution over internet2.

    PubMed

    Belard, Arnaud; Tinnel, Brent; Wilson, Steve; Ferro, Ralph; O'Connell, John

    2009-12-01

    Through our existing partnership, our research program has leveraged the benefits of proton radiation therapy through the development a robust telemedicine solution for remote proton therapy planning. Our proof-of-concept system provides a cost-effective and functional videoconferencing desktop platform for both ad-hoc and scheduled communication, as well as a robust interface for data collaboration (application-sharing of a commercial radiation treatment planning package). Over a 2-year period, our evaluation of this model has highlighted the inherent benefits of this affordable remote treatment planning solution, i.e., (1) giving physicians the ability to remotely participate in refining and generating proton therapy plans via a secure and robust Internet2 VPN tunnel to the University of Pennsylvania's commercial proton treatment planning package; (2) allowing cancer-care providers sending patients to a proton treatment facility to participate in treatment planning decisions by enabling referring or accepting providers to initiate ad-hoc, point-to-point communication with their counterparts to clarify and resolve issues arising before or during patient treatment; and thus (3) allowing stewards of an otherwise highly centralized resource the ability to encourage wider participation with and referrals to sparsely located proton treatment centers by adapting telemedicine techniques that allow sharing of proton therapy planning services. We believe that our elegant and very affordable approach to remote proton treatment planning opens the door to greater worldwide referrals to the scarce resource of proton treatment units and wide-ranging scientific collaboration, both nationally and internationally. PMID:19929221

  7. Proton-proton, pion-proton and pion-pion diffractive collisions at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Nikonov, K. V.; Nikonov, V. A.; Nyiri, J.

    2014-05-01

    The LHC energies are those at which the asymptotic regime in hadron-hadron diffractive collisions (pp, πp, ππ) might be switched on. Based on results of the Dakhno-Nikonov eikonal model which is a generalization of the Good-Walker eikonal approach for a continuous set of channels, we present a picture for transformation of the constituent quark mode to the black disk one. In the black disk mode (√ {s} >= 10 TeV), we have a growth of the logarithm squared type for total and elastic cross-sections, σtot ln2 s and σel ln2 s and (τ = q⊥2&sigma_; tot)-scaling for diffractive scattering and diffractive dissociation of hadrons. The diffractive dissociation cross-section grows as σD ln s, σDD ln s, and their relative contribution tends to zero: σD/σtot → 0, σDD/σtot → 0. Asymptotic characteristics of diffractive and total cross-sections are universal, and this results in the asymptotical equality of cross-sections for all types of hadrons (the Gribov universality). The energy scale for switching on the asymptotic mode is estimated for different processes.

  8. Radiation Tests of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Space Suit for the International Space Station Using Energetic Protons. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Shavers, M.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements using silicon detectors to characterize the radiation transmitted through the EMU space suit and a human phantom have been performed using 155 and 250 MeV proton beams at LLUMC. The beams simulate radiation encountered in space, where trapped protons having kinetic energies on the order of 100 MeV are copious. Protons with 100 MeV kinetic energy and above can penetrate many centimeters of water or other light materials, so that astronauts exposed to such energetic particles will receive doses to their internal organs. This dose can be enhanced or reduced by shielding - either from the space suit or the self-shielding of the body - but minimization of the risk depends on details of the incident particle flux (in particular the energy spectrum) and on the dose responses of the various critical organs. Data were taken to characterize the beams and to calibrate the detectors using the beam in a treatment room at LLUPTF, in preparation for an experiment with the same beams incident on detectors placed in a human phantom within the EMU suit. Nuclear interactions of high-energy protons in various materials produce a small flux of highly ionizing, low-energy secondary radiation. Secondaries are of interest for their biological effects, since they cause doses and especially dose-equivalents to increase relative to the values expected simply from ionization energy loss along the Bragg curve. Because many secondaries have very short ranges, they are best measured in passive track detectors such as CR-39. The silicon detector data presented here are intended to supplement the CR-39 data in regions where silicon has greater sensitivity, in particular the portion of the LET spectrum below 5 keV/micron. The results obtained in this study suggest that optimizing the radiation shielding properties of space suits is a formidable task. The naive assumption that adding mass can reduce risk is not supported by the data, which show that reducing the dose delivered at or

  9. Fragmentation of the CH2Cl2 molecule by attosecond proton beams and synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcantara, K. F.; Gomes, A. H. A.; Soriano, S.; Oliveira, V.; Sigaud, L.; Wolf, W.; Rocha, A. B.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2012-11-01

    A comparative study for the fragmentation of the CH2Cl2 molecule has been performed for collisions with 0.2-2.0 MeV H+ beam and 12.0-90.0 eV photons using the time-of-flight coincidence technique. As opposed to the photoionization case, the abundances in the mass spectra are not strongly dependent on the proton collision energy. The main observed fragment, in the proton impact case, was associated to the detachment of a chlorine atom. Combing the information from the molecular orbital energies, one estimates their relative contributions to the total ionization of CH2Cl2 by proton impact.

  10. Proton Irradiation Facility and space radiation monitoring at the Paul Scherrer Institute.

    PubMed

    Hajdas, W; Zehnder, A; Adams, L; Buehler, P; Harboe-Sorensen, R; Daum, M; Nickson, R; Daly, E; Nieminen, P

    2001-01-01

    The Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF) has been designed and constructed, in cooperation between Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and European Space Agency (ESA), for terrestrial proton testing of components and materials for spacecraft. Emphasis has been given to generating realistic proton spectra encountered by space-flights at any potential orbit. The facility, designed in a user-friendly manner, can be readily adapted to the individual requirements of experimenters. It is available for general use serving also in testing of radiation monitors and for proton experiments in different scientific disciplines. The Radiation Environment Monitor REM has been developed for measurements of the spacecraft radiation conditions. Two instruments were launched into space, one into a Geo-stationary Transfer Orbit on board of the STRV-1b satellite and one into a Low Earth Orbit on the Russian MIR station. The next generation of monitors (SREMs--Standard REMs) is currently under development in partnership of ESA, PSI and Contraves-Space. They will operate both as minimum intrusive monitors, which provide radiation housekeeping data and alert the spacecraft when the radiation level crosses allowed limits and as small scientific devices measuring particle spectra and fluxes. Future missions as e.g. INTEGRAL, STRV-1c and PROBA will be equipped with new SREMs. PMID:11770526

  11. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the 'NETSCAN' method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  12. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons, and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron Michael; Pompos, Arnold; Timmerman, Robert; Jiang, Steve; Story, Michael D.; Pistenmaa, David; Choy, Hak

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation-induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal, and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently, there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and, in addition, there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward. PMID:26793619

  13. Study on the bias-dependent effects of proton-induced damage in CdZnTe radiation detectors using ion beam induced charge microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Na; Guo, Rongrong; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xi, Shouzhi

    2016-09-01

    The influence of damage induced by 2MeV protons on CdZnTe radiation detectors is investigated using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy. Charge collection efficiency (CCE) in irradiated region is found to be degraded above a fluence of 3.3×10(11)p/cm(2) and the energy spectrum is severely deteriorated with increasing fluence. Moreover, CCE maps obtained under the applied biases from 50V to 400V suggests that local radiation damage results in significant degradation of CCE uniformity, especially under low bias, i. e., 50V and 100V. The CCE nonuniformity induced by local radiation damage, however, can be greatly improved by increasing the detector applied bias. This bias-dependent effect of 2MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe detectors is attributed to the interaction of electron cloud and radiation-induced displacement defects. PMID:27399802

  14. The Mini-SPT (Space Particle Telescope) for dual use: Precision flux measurement of low energy proton electron and heavy ion with tracking capability and A compact, low-cost realtime local radiation hazard/alarm detector to be used on board a satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpat, Behcet; Ergin, Tulun; Kalemci, Emrah

    2016-07-01

    The Mini-SPT project is the first, and most important, step towards the ambitious goal of creating a low-cost, compact, radiation hardened and high performance space particle telescope that can be mounted, in the near future, as standard particle detector on any satellite. Mini-SPT will be capable of providing high quality physics data on local space environment. In particular high precision flux measurement and tracking of low energy protons and electrons on different orbits with same instrumentation is of paramount importance for studies as geomagnetically trapped fluxes and space weather dynamics, dark matter search, low energy proton anisotropy and its effects on ICs as well as the solar protons studies. In addition, it will provide real-time "differentiable warnings" about the local space radiation hazard to other electronics systems on board the hosting satellite, including different criticality levels and alarm signals to activate mitigation techniques whenever this is strictly necessary to protect them from temporary/permanent failures. A real-time warning system will help satellite subsystems to save significant amount of power and memory with respect to other conventional techniques where the "mitigation" solutions are required to be active during entire mission life. The Mini-SPT will combine the use of technologies developed in cutting-edge high energy physics experiments (including technology from CMS experiments at CERN) and the development of new charged particle detecting systems for their use for the first time in space. The Mini-SPT essential objective is, by using for the first time in space SIPMs (Silicon Photomultipliers) technology for TOF and energy measurements, the production of high quality data with a good time, position and energy resolutions. The mini-SPT will consists of three main sub-units: a- A tracking and dE/dX measuring sub-detector which will be based on silicon pixel detectors (SPD) coupled to the rad-hard chip ROC-DIG (Read

  15. Equivalent dose and effective dose from stray radiation during passively scattered proton radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenot, Jonas; Taddei, Phillip; Zheng, Yuanshui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Jordan, Thomas; Newhauser, Wayne

    2008-03-01

    Proton therapy reduces the integral therapeutic dose required for local control in prostate patients compared to intensity-modulated radiotherapy. One proposed benefit of this reduction is an associated decrease in the incidence of radiogenic secondary cancers. However, patients are also exposed to stray radiation during the course of treatment. The purpose of this study was to quantify the stray radiation dose received by patients during proton therapy for prostate cancer. Using a Monte Carlo model of a proton therapy nozzle and a computerized anthropomorphic phantom, we determined that the effective dose from stray radiation per therapeutic dose (E/D) for a typical prostate patient was approximately 5.5 mSv Gy-1. Sensitivity analysis revealed that E/D varied by ±30% over the interval of treatment parameter values used for proton therapy of the prostate. Equivalent doses per therapeutic dose (HT/D) in specific organs at risk were found to decrease with distance from the isocenter, with a maximum of 12 mSv Gy-1 in the organ closest to the treatment volume (bladder) and 1.9 mSv Gy-1 in the furthest (esophagus). Neutrons created in the nozzle predominated effective dose, though neutrons created in the patient contributed substantially to the equivalent dose in organs near the proton field. Photons contributed less than 15% to equivalent doses.

  16. Analytical calculation of proton linear energy transfer in voxelized geometries including secondary protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Dolney, D.; Kondrla, M.; Fager, M.; Carabe, A.

    2016-02-01

    In order to integrate radiobiological modelling with clinical treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, we extended our in-house treatment planning system FoCa with a 3D analytical algorithm to calculate linear energy transfer (LET) in voxelized patient geometries. Both active scanning and passive scattering delivery modalities are supported. The analytical calculation is much faster than the Monte-Carlo (MC) method and it can be implemented in the inverse treatment planning optimization suite, allowing us to create LET-based objectives in inverse planning. The LET was calculated by combining a 1D analytical approach including a novel correction for secondary protons with pencil-beam type LET-kernels. Then, these LET kernels were inserted into the proton-convolution-superposition algorithm in FoCa. The analytical LET distributions were benchmarked against MC simulations carried out in Geant4. A cohort of simple phantom and patient plans representing a wide variety of sites (prostate, lung, brain, head and neck) was selected. The calculation algorithm was able to reproduce the MC LET to within 6% (1 standard deviation) for low-LET areas (under 1.7 keV μm-1) and within 22% for the high-LET areas above that threshold. The dose and LET distributions can be further extended, using radiobiological models, to include radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) calculations in the treatment planning system. This implementation also allows for radiobiological optimization of treatments by including RBE-weighted dose constraints in the inverse treatment planning process.

  17. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; España, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Ouyang, Jinsong; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R; El Fakhri, Georges

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We used a mobile PET scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Methods and materials Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 minutes during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. Results The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 min to <5 min. Features in deep-site, soft-tissue regions were better retained with in-room short PET acquisitions because of the collection of 15O component and lower biological washout. For soft tissue-equivalent material, the distal fall-off edge of an in-room short acquisition is deeper compared to an off-line equivalent scan, indicating a better coverage of the high-dose end of the beam. Conclusions In-room PET is a promising low cost, high sensitivity modality for the in vivo verification of proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary. PMID:21677366

  18. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  19. Microdosimetric comparison of scanned and conventional proton beams used in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Dicello, John F; Gersey, Bradford B; Gridley, Daila S; Coutrakon, George B; Lesyna, David; Pisacane, Vincent L; Robertson, James B; Schulte, Reinhard W; Slater, Jerry D; Wroe, Andrew J; Slater, James M

    2011-02-01

    Multiple groups have hypothesised that the use of scanning beams in proton therapy will reduce the neutron component of secondary radiation in comparison with conventional methods with a corresponding reduction in risks of radiation-induced cancers. Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) has had FDA marketing clearance for scanning beams since 1988 and an experimental scanning beam has been available at the LLUMC proton facility since 2001. The facility has a dedicated research room with a scanning beam and fast switching that allows its use during patient treatments. Dosimetric measurements and microdosimetric distributions for a scanned beam are presented and compared with beams produced with the conventional methods presently used in proton therapy. PMID:21362697

  20. Proton radiation damage in P-channel CCDs fabricated on high-resistivity silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Groom, D.; Holland, S.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lee, J.; Levi, M.; Palaio, N.; Turko, B.; Uslenghi, M.; Wagner, M.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-28

    P-channel, backside illuminated silicon CCDs were developed and fabricated on high-resistivity n-type silicon. Devices have been exposed up to 1x1011 protons/cm2 at 12 MeV. The charge transfer efficiency and dark current were measured as a function of radiation dose. These CCDs were found to be significantly more radiation tolerant than conventional n-channel devices. This could prove to be a major benefit for long duration space missions.

  1. Storm- Time Dynamics of Ring Current Protons: Implications for the Long-Term Energy Budget in the Inner Magnetosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    The ring current energy budget plays a key role in the global electrodynamics of Earth's space environment. Pressure gradients developed in the inner magnetosphere can shield the near-Earth region from solar wind-induced electric fields. The distortion of Earth's magnetic field due to the ring current affects the dynamics of particles contributing both to the ring current and radiation belts. Therefore, understanding the long-term evolution of the inner magnetosphere energy content is essential. We have investigated the evolution of ring current proton pressure (7 - 600 keV) in the inner magnetosphere based on data from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard Van Allen Probe B throughout the year 2013. We find that although the low-energy component of the protons (< 80 keV) is governed by convective timescales and is very well correlated with the Dst index, the high-energy component (>100 keV) varies on much longer timescales and shows either no or anti-correlation with the Dst index. Interestingly, the contributions of the high- and low-energy protons to the total energy content are comparable. Our results indicate that the proton dynamics, and as a consequence the total energy budget in the inner magnetosphere (inside geosynchronous orbit), is not strictly controlled by storm-time timescales as those are defined by the Dst index.

  2. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole; Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Held, Kathryn D.; Willers, Henning

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  3. ELRADGEN: Monte Carlo generator for radiative events in elastic electron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Afanasev; I. Akushevich; A. Ilyichev; B. Niczyporuk

    2003-08-01

    We discuss the theoretical approach and practical algorithms for simulation of radiative events in elastic ep-scattering. A new Monte Carlo generator for real photon emission events in the process of elastic electron-proton scattering is presented. We perform a few consistency checks and present numerical results.

  4. Neutrino diagnostics of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Markus; Sarkar, Subir; Anchordoqui, Luis A.

    2009-04-15

    The energy at which cosmic rays from extra-galactic sources begin to dominate over those from galactic sources is an important open question in astroparticle physics. A natural candidate is the energy at the 'ankle' in the approximately power-law energy spectrum which is indicative of a crossover from a falling galactic component to a flatter extra-galactic component. The transition can occur without such flattening but this requires some degree of conspiracy of the spectral shapes and normalizations of the two components. Nevertheless, it has been argued that extra-galactic sources of cosmic ray protons that undergo interactions on the CMB can reproduce the energy spectrum below the ankle if the crossover energy is as low as the 'second knee' in the spectrum. This low crossover model is constrained by direct measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory, which indicate a heavier composition at these energies. We demonstrate that upper limits on the cosmic diffuse neutrino flux provide a complementary constraint on the proton fraction in ultra-high energy extra-galactic cosmic rays and forthcoming data from IceCube will provide a definitive test of this model.

  5. Proposed linear energy transfer areal detector for protons using radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Rulon; Lin, Liyong; Fager, Marcus; Douglas, Dan; McDonough, James; Carabe, Alejandro

    2015-04-15

    Radiation therapy depends on predictably and reliably delivering dose to tumors and sparing normal tissues. Protons with kinetic energy of a few hundred MeV can selectively deposit dose to deep seated tumors without an exit dose, unlike x-rays. The better dose distribution is attributed to a phenomenon known as the Bragg peak. The Bragg peak is due to relatively high energy deposition within a given distance or high Linear Energy Transfer (LET). In addition, biological response to radiation depends on the dose, dose rate, and localized energy deposition patterns or LET. At present, the LET can only be measured at a given fixed point and the LET spatial distribution can only be inferred from calculations. The goal of this study is to develop and test a method to measure LET over extended areas. Traditionally, radiochromic films are used to measure dose distribution but not for LET distribution. We report the first use of these films for measuring the spatial distribution of the LET deposited by protons. The radiochromic film sensitivity diminishes for large LET. A mathematical model correlating the film sensitivity and LET is presented to justify relating LET and radiochromic film relative sensitivity. Protons were directed parallel to radiochromic film sandwiched between solid water slabs. This study proposes the scaled-normalized difference (SND) between the Treatment Planning system (TPS) and measured dose as the metric describing the LET. The SND is correlated with a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation of the LET spatial distribution for a large range of SNDs. A polynomial fit between the SND and MC LET is generated for protons having a single range of 20 cm with narrow Bragg peak. Coefficients from these fitted polynomial fits were applied to measured proton dose distributions with a variety of ranges. An identical procedure was applied to the protons deposited from Spread Out Bragg Peak and modulated by 5 cm. Gamma analysis is a method for comparing the calculated

  6. Proposed linear energy transfer areal detector for protons using radiochromic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon; Lin, Liyong; Fager, Marcus; Douglas, Dan; McDonough, James; Carabe, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    Radiation therapy depends on predictably and reliably delivering dose to tumors and sparing normal tissues. Protons with kinetic energy of a few hundred MeV can selectively deposit dose to deep seated tumors without an exit dose, unlike x-rays. The better dose distribution is attributed to a phenomenon known as the Bragg peak. The Bragg peak is due to relatively high energy deposition within a given distance or high Linear Energy Transfer (LET). In addition, biological response to radiation depends on the dose, dose rate, and localized energy deposition patterns or LET. At present, the LET can only be measured at a given fixed point and the LET spatial distribution can only be inferred from calculations. The goal of this study is to develop and test a method to measure LET over extended areas. Traditionally, radiochromic films are used to measure dose distribution but not for LET distribution. We report the first use of these films for measuring the spatial distribution of the LET deposited by protons. The radiochromic film sensitivity diminishes for large LET. A mathematical model correlating the film sensitivity and LET is presented to justify relating LET and radiochromic film relative sensitivity. Protons were directed parallel to radiochromic film sandwiched between solid water slabs. This study proposes the scaled-normalized difference (SND) between the Treatment Planning system (TPS) and measured dose as the metric describing the LET. The SND is correlated with a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation of the LET spatial distribution for a large range of SNDs. A polynomial fit between the SND and MC LET is generated for protons having a single range of 20 cm with narrow Bragg peak. Coefficients from these fitted polynomial fits were applied to measured proton dose distributions with a variety of ranges. An identical procedure was applied to the protons deposited from Spread Out Bragg Peak and modulated by 5 cm. Gamma analysis is a method for comparing the calculated

  7. Microstructural origins of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of 316 L and 304 L austenitic stainless steels irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    A number of candidate alloys were exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) that closely match the mixed high-energy proton/neutron spectra expected in accelerator production of tritium (APT) window and blanket applications. Austenitic stainless steels 316 L and 304 L are two of these candidate alloys possessing attractive strength and corrosion resistance for APT applications. This paper describes the dose dependence of the irradiation-induced microstructural evolution of SS 316 L and 304 L in the temperature range 30-60°C and consequent changes in mechanical properties. It was observed that the microstructural evolution during irradiation was essentially identical in the two alloys, a behavior mirrored in their changes in mechanical properties. With one expection, it was possible to correlate all changes in mechanical properties with visible microstructural features. A late-term second abrupt decrease in uniform elongation was not associated with visible microstructure, but is postulated to be a consequence of large levels of retained hydrogen measured in the specimens. In spite of large amounts of both helium and hydrogen retained, approaching 1 at.% at the highest exposures, no visible cavities were formed, indicating that the gas atoms were either in solution or in subresolvable clusters.

  8. Radiation energy detector and analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, T.G.

    1981-09-15

    A radiation detector array and a method for measuring the spectral content of radiation. The radiation sensor or detector is an array or stack of thin solid-electrolyte batteries. The batteries, arranged in a stack, may be composed of independent battery cells or may be arranged so that adjacent cells share a common terminal surface. This common surface is possible since the polarity of the batteries with respect to an adjacent battery is unrestricted, allowing a reduction in component parts of the assembly and reducing the overall stack length. Additionally, a test jig or chamber for allowing rapid measurement of the voltage across each battery is disclosed. A multichannel recorder and display may be used to indicate the voltage gradient change across the cells, or a small computer may be used for rapidly converting these voltage readings to a graph of radiation intensity versus wavelength or energy. The behavior of the batteries when used as a radiation detector and analyzer are such that the voltage measurements can be made at leisure after the detector array has been exposed to the radiation, and it is not necessary to make rapid measurements as is now done.

  9. Advanced proton-exchange materials for energy efficient fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Hickner, Michael A.; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2005-12-01

    The ''Advanced Proton-Exchange Materials for Energy Efficient Fuel Cells'' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project began in October 2002 and ended in September 2005. This LDRD was funded by the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy strategic business unit. The purpose of this LDRD was to initiate the fundamental research necessary for the development of a novel proton-exchange membranes (PEM) to overcome the material and performance limitations of the ''state of the art'' Nafion that is used in both hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. An atomistic modeling effort was added to this LDRD in order to establish a frame work between predicted morphology and observed PEM morphology in order to relate it to fuel cell performance. Significant progress was made in the area of PEM material design, development, and demonstration during this LDRD. A fundamental understanding involving the role of the structure of the PEM material as a function of sulfonic acid content, polymer topology, chemical composition, molecular weight, and electrode electrolyte ink development was demonstrated during this LDRD. PEM materials based upon random and block polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes were created and evaluated for improvements in proton conductivity, reduced swelling, reduced O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} permeability, and increased thermal stability. Results from this work reveal that the family of polyphenylenes potentially solves several technical challenges associated with obtaining a high temperature PEM membrane. Fuel cell relevant properties such as high proton conductivity (>120 mS/cm), good thermal stability, and mechanical robustness were demonstrated during this LDRD. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and results of this LDRD.

  10. Proton beam radiation induces DNA damage and cell apoptosis in glioma stem cells through reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Alan Mitteer, R.; Wang, Yanling; Shah, Jennifer; Gordon, Sherika; Fager, Marcus; Butter, Param-Puneet; Jun Kim, Hyun; Guardiola-Salmeron, Consuelo; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Fan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most lethal of human malignancies. Most GBM tumors are refractory to cytotoxic therapies. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) significantly contribute to GBM progression and post-treatment tumor relapse, therefore serving as a key therapeutic target; however, GSCs are resistant to conventional radiation therapy. Proton therapy is one of the newer cancer treatment modalities and its effects on GSCs function remain unclear. Here, by utilizing patient-derived GSCs, we show that proton radiation generates greater cytotoxicity in GSCs than x-ray photon radiation. Compared with photon radiation, proton beam irradiation induces more single and double strand DNA breaks, less H2AX phosphorylation, increased Chk2 phosphorylation, and reduced cell cycle recovery from G2 arrest, leading to caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and cell apoptosis. Furthermore, proton radiation generates a large quantity of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is required for DNA damage, cell cycle redistribution, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. Together, these findings indicate that proton radiation has a higher efficacy in treating GSCs than photon radiation. Our data reveal a ROS-dependent mechanism by which proton radiation induces DNA damage and cell apoptosis in GSCs. Thus, proton therapy may be more efficient than conventional x-ray photon therapy for eliminating GSCs in GBM patients. PMID:26354413