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Sample records for energy range procesy

  1. A conjecture of Procesi and the straightening algorithm of Rota.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, E E

    1992-01-01

    Let R = Q[x1, x2,..., xn] and R* denote the quotient of R by the ideal generated by the elementary symmetric functions. R*, under the action of Sn, yields a graded version of the left regular representation. Procesi asked for a basis of R* consisting of homogeneous polynomials Gamma[S, C] indexed by pairs of tableaux, with S standard and C cocharge, that exhibits the decomposition of R* into its irreducible components. Procesi also suggested a way to construct the Gamma[S, C]. Using Rota's straightening algorithm, I show that certain polynomials [S, C] closely related to the Gamma[S, C] terms yield the desired basis. Parallel to the ring R* there is a family of Sn-modules R that have recently been studied by Garsia and Procesi. These modules have a graded character that is closely related to the q-Kostka-Foulkes polynomials Klambdamu(q). The [S, C] can be shown to yield also a basis when restricted to a given R. Through this connection the work reported here leads to an additional way of proving the charge interpretation for the polynomials Klambdamu(q). PMID:11607289

  2. Energy Expenditure Ranges and Muscular Work Grades

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. R.; Crowden, G. P.

    1963-01-01

    This paper is based on the findings of a field study which was planned to ascertain by metabolic measurement the rates of energy expenditure of men and women on productive effort at work in modern factories. The investigation which is described was carried out during a period of peace-time full employment, mainly in factories associated with the Slough Industrial Health Service in which a nutritional survey of the calorie intake of male operatives had been made by the Ministry of Health and the Medical Research Council in 1952. The rates of energy expenditure of 70 men and 54 women in 27 occupational groups were measured by indirect calorimetric methods. On the basis of the criteria for the classification of work according grades to its heaviness, adopted by the Factory Department of the Ministry of Labour, muscular work grades have been ascribed to the occupations studied. From the distribution of 390 metabolic measurements, ranges of energy expenditure have been computed for occupations classed as sedentary, light, moderate, heavy, or very heavy, Observation of recurrent phase variations in types of productive effort in the work-cycle indicated that wider work grades, such as light-to-moderate or moderate-to-heavy, are needed to cover the energy expenditure rates of men and women in many occupations. The data obtained in this study have enabled a table termed the “Slough Scales” to be compiled giving ranges of energy expenditure and pulmonary ventilation rates for the various work grades ascribed to occupations. The mean rates of energy expenditure of 257 workers (in industries in different parts of England and Scotland) which have been calculated from data published by other investigators have been found to fall within the ranges specified in these scales for the work grades of their occupations. It is felt, therefore, that the Slough Scales represent a reasonably true appraisal of the relation between the Ministry of Labour occupational work grades and the

  3. A Riemann-Hilbert approach for the Degasperis-Procesi equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutet de Monvel, Anne; Shepelsky, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    We present an inverse scattering transform approach to the Cauchy problem on the line for the Degasperis-Procesi equation \\begin{equation*}u_t-u_{txx}+3\\omega u_x+4uu_x=3u_xu_{xx}+uu_{xxx} \\end{equation*} in the form of an associated Riemann-Hilbert problem. This approach allows us to give a representation of the solution to the Cauchy problem, which can be efficiently used in studying its long-time behaviour.

  4. Range and Energy Straggling in Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tai, Hsiang

    2000-01-01

    A first-order approximation to the range and energy straggling of ion beams is given as a normal distribution for which the standard deviation is estimated from the fluctuations in energy loss events. The standard deviation is calculated by assuming scattering from free electrons with a long range cutoff parameter that depends on the mean excitation energy of the medium. The present formalism is derived by extrapolating Payne's formalism to low energy by systematic energy scaling and to greater depths of penetration by a second-order perturbation. Limited comparisons are made with experimental data.

  5. Energy-range relations for hadrons in nuclear matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Range-energy relations for hadrons in nuclear matter exist similarly to the range-energy relations for charged particles in materials. When hadrons of GeV kinetic energies collide with atomic nuclei massive enough, events occur in which incident hadron is stopped completely inside the target nucleus without causing particle production - without pion production in particular. The stoppings are always accompanied by intensive emission of nucleons with kinetic energy from about 20 up to about 400 MeV. It was shown experimentally that the mean number of the emitted nucleons is a measure of the mean path in nuclear matter in nucleons on which the incident hadrons are stopped.

  6. Range fluctuations of high energy muons passing through matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minorikawa, Y.; Mitsui, K.

    1985-01-01

    The information about energy spectrum of sea level muons at high energies beyond magnetic spectrographs can be obtained from the underground intensity measurements if the fluctuations problems are solved. The correction factor R for the range fluctuations of high energy muons were calculated by analytical method of Zatsepin, where most probable energy loss parameter are used. It is shown that by using the R at great depth together with the slope, lambda, of the vertical depth-intensity (D-I) curve in the form of exp(-t/lambda), the spectral index, gamma, in the power law energy spectrum of muons at sea level can be obtained.

  7. The low-energy ion range in DNA.

    PubMed

    Yu, L D; Kamwanna, T; Brown, I G

    2009-08-21

    In fundamental studies of low-energy ion irradiation effects on DNA, calculation of the low-energy ion range, an important basic physical parameter, is often necessary. However, up to now a unified model and approach for range calculation is still lacking, and reported data are quite divergent and thus unreliable. Here we describe an approach for calculation of the ion range, using a simplified mean-pseudoatom model of the DNA target. Based on ion stopping theory, for the case of low-energy (< or = a few keV) ion implantation into DNA, the stopping falls in the low reduced energy regime, which gives a cube-root energy dependence of the stopping (E(1/3)). Calculation formulas of the ion range in DNA are obtained and presented to unify the relevant calculations. The upper limits of the ion energy as a function of the atomic number of the bombarding ion species are proposed for the low-energy case to hold. Comparison of the results of this approach with the results of some widely used computer simulation codes and with results reported by other groups indicates that the approach described here provides convincing and dependable results. PMID:19652287

  8. Periodic discrete energy for long-range potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, D. P.; Saff, E. B.; Simanek, B.

    2014-12-01

    We consider periodic energy problems in Euclidean space with a special emphasis on long-range potentials that cannot be defined through the usual infinite sum. One of our main results builds on more recent developments of Ewald summation to define the periodic energy corresponding to a large class of long-range potentials. Two particularly interesting examples are the logarithmic potential and the Riesz potential when the Riesz parameter is smaller than the dimension of the space. For these examples, we use analytic continuation methods to provide concise formulas for the periodic kernel in terms of the Epstein Hurwitz Zeta function. We apply our energy definition to deduce several properties of the minimal energy including the asymptotic order of growth and the distribution of points in energy minimizing configurations as the number of points becomes large. We conclude with some detailed calculations in the case of one dimension, which shows the utility of this approach.

  9. Long-ranged contributions to solvation free energies from theory and short-ranged models.

    PubMed

    Remsing, Richard C; Liu, Shule; Weeks, John D

    2016-03-15

    Long-standing problems associated with long-ranged electrostatic interactions have plagued theory and simulation alike. Traditional lattice sum (Ewald-like) treatments of Coulomb interactions add significant overhead to computer simulations and can produce artifacts from spurious interactions between simulation cell images. These subtle issues become particularly apparent when estimating thermodynamic quantities, such as free energies of solvation in charged and polar systems, to which long-ranged Coulomb interactions typically make a large contribution. In this paper, we develop a framework for determining very accurate solvation free energies of systems with long-ranged interactions from models that interact with purely short-ranged potentials. Our approach is generally applicable and can be combined with existing computational and theoretical techniques for estimating solvation thermodynamics. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by examining the hydration thermodynamics of hydrophobic and ionic solutes and the solvation of a large, highly charged colloid that exhibits overcharging, a complex nonlinear electrostatic phenomenon whereby counterions from the solvent effectively overscreen and locally invert the integrated charge of the solvated object. PMID:26929375

  10. Long-ranged contributions to solvation free energies from theory and short-ranged models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsing, Richard C.; Liu, Shule; Weeks, John D.

    2016-03-01

    Long-standing problems associated with long-ranged electrostatic interactions have plagued theory and simulation alike. Traditional lattice sum (Ewald-like) treatments of Coulomb interactions add significant overhead to computer simulations and can produce artifacts from spurious interactions between simulation cell images. These subtle issues become particularly apparent when estimating thermodynamic quantities, such as free energies of solvation in charged and polar systems, to which long-ranged Coulomb interactions typically make a large contribution. In this paper, we develop a framework for determining very accurate solvation free energies of systems with long-ranged interactions from models that interact with purely short-ranged potentials. Our approach is generally applicable and can be combined with existing computational and theoretical techniques for estimating solvation thermodynamics. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by examining the hydration thermodynamics of hydrophobic and ionic solutes and the solvation of a large, highly charged colloid that exhibits overcharging, a complex nonlinear electrostatic phenomenon whereby counterions from the solvent effectively overscreen and locally invert the integrated charge of the solvated object.

  11. Long-range energy transport in photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Jan J. J.; Bennett, Doran I. G.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    We simulate the long-range inter-complex electronic energy transfer in photosystem II - from the antenna complex, via a core complex, to the reaction center - using a non-Markovian (ZOFE) quantum master equation description that allows the electronic coherence involved in the energy transfer to be explicitly included at all length scales. This allows us to identify all locations where coherence is manifested and to further identify the pathways of the energy transfer in the full network of coupled chromophores using a description based on excitation probability currents. We investigate how the energy transfer depends on the initial excitation - localized, coherent initial excitation versus delocalized, incoherent initial excitation - and find that the overall energy transfer is remarkably robust with respect to such strong variations of the initial condition. To explore the importance of vibrationally enhanced transfer and to address the question of optimization in the system parameters, we systematically vary the strength of the coupling between the electronic and the vibrational degrees of freedom. We find that the natural parameters lie in a (broad) region that enables optimal transfer efficiency and that the overall long-range energy transfer on a ns time scale appears to be very robust with respect to variations in the vibronic coupling of up to an order of magnitude. Nevertheless, vibrationally enhanced transfer appears to be crucial to obtain a high transfer efficiency, with the latter falling sharply for couplings outside the optimal range. Comparison of our full quantum simulations to results obtained with a "classical" rate equation based on a modified-Redfield/generalized-Förster description previously used to simulate energy transfer dynamics in the entire photosystem II complex shows good agreement for the overall time scales of excitation energy transport.

  12. Long range energy transfer in graphene hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Hugo; Bernardo, César; Moura, Cacilda; Ferreira, R. A. S.; André, P. S.; Stauber, Tobias; Belsley, Michael; Schellenberg, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this work we quantify the distance dependence for the extraction of energy from excited chromophores by a single layer graphene flake over a large separation range. To this end hybrid structures were prepared, consisting of a thin (2 nm) layer of a polymer matrix doped with a well chosen strongly fluorescent organic molecule, followed by an un-doped spacer layer of well-defined thicknesses made of the same polymer material and an underlying single layer of pristine, undoped graphene. The coupling strength is assessed through the variation of the fluorescence decay kinetics as a function of distance between the graphene and the excited chromophore molecules. Non-radiative energy transfer to the graphene was observed at distances of up to 60 nm a range much greater than typical energy transfer distances observed in molecular systems.

  13. Phantom energy mediates a long-range repulsive force.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Luca

    2004-10-29

    Scalar field models with nonstandard kinetic terms have been proposed in the context of k inflation, of Born-Infeld Lagrangians, of phantom energy and, more in general, of low-energy string theory. In general, scalar fields are expected to couple to matter inducing a new interaction. In this Letter I derive the cosmological perturbation equations and the Yukawa correction to gravity for such general models. I find three interesting results: first, when the field behaves as phantom energy (equation of state less than -1), then the coupling strength is negative, inducing a long-range repulsive force; second, the dark-energy field might cluster on astrophysical scales; third, applying the formalism to a Brans-Dicke theory with a general kinetic term it is shown that its Newtonian effects depend on a single parameter that generalizes the Brans-Dicke constant. PMID:15525149

  14. Energy Spectrum in the Dissipation Range of Fluid Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, D. O.; Chen, S.; Doolen, G. D.; Kraichnan, R. H.; Wang, L.-P.; Zhou, Y.

    1996-01-01

    High resolution, direct numerical simulations of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are carried out to study the energy spectrum in the dissipation range. An energy spectrum of the form A(k/k( sub d))(sup alpha) exp[- betak/k(sub d) is confirmed. The possible values of the parameters alpha and beta, as well as their dependence on Revnolds numbers and length scales, are investigated, showing good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. A "bottleneck'-type effect is reported at k/k(sub d) approximately 4, exhibiting a possible transition from near-dissipation to far- dissipation.

  15. Renewable Energy Opportunities at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Warwick, William M.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2008-09-01

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewable Energy Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  16. Power wheelchair range testing and energy consumption during fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A; VanSickle, D P; Albright, S J; Stewart, K J; Flannery, M; Robertson, R N

    1995-10-01

    The range of a power wheelchair depends on many factors including: battery type, battery state, wheelchair/rider weight, terrain, the efficiency of the drive train, and driving behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of three methods of estimating power wheelchair range. Another significant purpose was to compare the current draw on pavement to current draw on an International Standards Organization (ISO) Double Drum tester at one m/sec. Tests were performed on seven different power wheelchairs unloaded, and loaded with an ISO 100 kg test dummy. Each chair was configured according to the manufacturer's specifications, and tires were properly inflated. Experienced test technicians were used for the tennis court tests, and treadmill tests. An ISO 100 kg test dummy was used for the ISO Double Drum test. Energy consumption was measured over a distance of 1500 m for each of the three test conditions. The rolling surface was level in all cases. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant difference (p = 0.0001) between the predicted range at maximum speed for the three tests. Post hoc analysis demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.01) in estimated range at maximum speed between the Double Drum test and the treadmill test, as well as between the Double Drum test and the tennis court test. Our results indicate no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the predicted range at maximal speed between the treadmill and tennis court tests. A simple relationship does not exist between the results of range testing with the Double Drum tester and the tennis court. An alternative would be to permit the use of a treadmill for range testing as simple relationships between all pertinent treadmill and tennis court range data were found. For the Double Drum tester used, the current demand is higher than under normal usage. This presents a problem as current is related to load torque in a power wheelchair. Hence, the Double

  17. Sampling the low-energy range of EEDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Dominik A.; Franck, Christian M.

    2011-10-01

    Electron swarms are investigated by the classical Pulsed Townsend Method in mixtures of N2/CO2 with controlled traces of SF6. The electron swarms are released from a back- illuminated photocathode by 1.5 ns FWHM laser pulses and drift in the homogeneous field of Rogowski electrodes. From an analysis of displacement currents the coefficient of electron attachment to gas molecules η is obtained. The pronounced s-wave attachment of SF6 acts on the electron swarm energy distribution (EEDF) by reducing the number of electrons in the energy range below 0.2 eV. It will be investigated if, vice versa, the observed η can be used as a measure for the EEDF in the range below 0.2 eV. The effect of the N2/CO2 mixing ratio on η will be measured and put in relation to the difference between N2 and CO2 concerning their elastic and inelastic cross sections. The goal is to provide data about that range of the EEDF which are not accessible by optical emission spectroscopy or by Langmuir probes.

  18. An Experiment to Measure Range, Range Straggling, Stopping Power, and Energy Straggling of Alpha Particles in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.; Mostovych, Andrew

    1978-01-01

    Experiments to measure range, range straggling, stopping power, and energy straggling of alpha particles are discussed in this article. Commercially available equipment with simple modifications is used for these measurements. (Author/GA)

  19. Extending the energy range of materials activation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, R. A.

    2004-08-01

    Activation calculations are an essential contribution to understanding the interactions of fusion materials with neutrons. The existing state-of-the-art tools such as EASY-2003 enable calculations to be carried out with neutrons up to 20 MeV. Plans to expose fusion components to high neutron fluxes include the IFMIF materials testing facility. This accelerator-based device will produce neutrons with a high-energy tail up to about 55 MeV. In order to carry out activation calculations on materials exposed to such neutrons it is necessary to extend the energy range of the data libraries. An extension of the European Activation System (EASY) to a new version, EASY-2004, for testing has been completed. The existing reactions have been extended up to 60 MeV and new classes of reactions added using calculated cross sections. Results of preliminary calculations in an IFMIF relevant neutron field are given.

  20. Characteristics of an OSLD in the diagnostic energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Senan, Rani M.; Hatab, Mustapha R.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry has been recently introduced in radiation therapy as a potential alternative to the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) system. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using OSL point dosimeters in the energy range used in diagnostic imaging. Methods: NanoDot OSL dosimeters (OSLDs) were used in this study, which started with testing the homogeneity of a new packet of nanoDots. Reproducibility and the effect of optical treatment (bleaching) were then examined, followed by an investigation of the effect of accumulated dose on the OSLD indicated doses. OSLD linearity, angular dependence, and energy dependence were also studied. Furthermore, comparison with LiF:Mg,Ti TLD chips using standard CT dose phantoms at 80 and 120 kVp settings was performed. Results: Batch homogeneity showed a coefficient of variation of <5%. Single-irradiation measurements with bleaching after each OSL readout was found to be associated with a 3.3% reproducibility (one standard deviation measured with a 8 mGy test dose), and no systematic change in OSLDs sensitivity could be noted from measurement to measurement. In contrast, the multiple-irradiation readout without bleaching in between measurements was found to be associated with an uncertainty (using a 6 mGy test dose) that systematically increased with accumulated dose, reaching 42% at 82 mGy. Good linearity was shown by nanoDots under general x-ray, CT, and mammography units with an R{sup 2} > 0.99. The angular dependence test showed a drop of approximately 70% in the OSLD response at 90 deg. in mammography (25 kVp). With the general radiography unit, the maximum drop was 40% at 80 kVp and 20% at 120 kVp, and it was only 10% with CT at both 80 and 120 kVp. The energy dependence study showed a range of ion chamber-to-OSLDs ratios between 0.81 and 1.56, at the energies investigated (29-62 keV). A paired t-test for comparing the OSLDs and TLDs showed no significant

  1. Advanced Range Safety System for High Energy Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claxton, Jeffrey S.; Linton, Donald F.

    2002-01-01

    The advanced range safety system project is a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the United States Air Force to develop systems that would reduce costs and schedule for safety approval for new classes of unmanned high-energy vehicles. The mission-planning feature for this system would yield flight profiles that satisfy the mission requirements for the user while providing an increased quality of risk assessment, enhancing public safety. By improving the speed and accuracy of predicting risks to the public, mission planners would be able to expand flight envelopes significantly. Once in place, this system is expected to offer the flexibility of handling real-time risk management for the high-energy capabilities of hypersonic vehicles including autonomous return-from-orbit vehicles and extended flight profiles over land. Users of this system would include mission planners of Space Launch Initiative vehicles, space planes, and other high-energy vehicles. The real-time features of the system could make extended flight of a malfunctioning vehicle possible, in lieu of an immediate terminate decision. With this improved capability, the user would have more time for anomaly resolution and potential recovery of a malfunctioning vehicle.

  2. A Global and Long-Range Picture of Energy Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafele, Wolf

    1980-01-01

    A discussion is presented of future global energy supply and demand problems and two benchmark scenarios showing that time will be the limiting constraint in adapting the energy supply infrastructure to changing resource availability. (Author/SA).

  3. Autonomous Vehicles Have a Wide Range of Possible Energy Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Austin Brown, Brittany Repac, Jeff Gonder

    2013-07-15

    Self-driving or “autonomous” vehicles (AVs) have leapt from science fiction into the forefront of transportation technology news. The technology is likely still years away from widespread commercial adoption, but the recent progress makes it worth considering the potential national impacts of widespread implementation. This poster makes an initial assessment of the energy impacts of AV adoptionon a per-vehicle basis and on total personal vehicle fuel use. While AVs offer numerous potential advantages in energy use, there are significant factors that could decrease or even eliminate the energy benefits under some circumstances. This analysis attempts to describe, quantify, and combine many of the possible effects. The nature and magnitude of these effects remain highly uncertain. This set of effects is very unlikely to be exhaustive, but this analysis approach can serve as a base for future estimates.

  4. GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY IN THE CASCADE RANGE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Quaternary volcanoes of the Cascade Range form a 1200-km-long belt from northern California to southwest British Columbia and lie above the subduction zone formed as the Juan de Fuca plate is consumed beneath North America. Volcanoes throughout this belt may have been active during Quaternary time, and many have erupted within Holocene time. Thermal springs are few and inconspicuous. Surface expression of hydrothermal systems possibly is masked by infiltration of abundant rainwater and snowmelt. Several geologic and geophysical features suggest that the Oregon and California parts of the Cascades are characterized by moderate east-west crustal extension, tectonic regime conducive to relatively widespread volcanism and to the formation of normal fault zones of potentially high permeability. Refs.

  5. Kilovoltage energy imaging with a radiotherapy linac with a continuously variable energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D. A.; Hansen, V. N.; Thompson, M. G.; Poludniowski, G.; Niven, A.; Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the effect on image quality of significantly reducing the primary electron energy of a radiotherapy accelerator is investigated using a novel waveguide test piece. The waveguide contains a novel variable coupling device (rotovane), allowing for a wide continuously variable energy range of between 1.4 and 9 MeV suitable for both imaging and therapy.Method: Imaging at linac accelerating potentials close to 1 MV was investigated experimentally and via Monte Carlo simulations. An imaging beam line was designed, and planar and cone beam computed tomography images were obtained to enable qualitative and quantitative comparisons with kilovoltage and megavoltage imaging systems. The imaging beam had an electron energy of 1.4 MeV, which was incident on a water cooled electron window consisting of stainless steel, a 5 mm carbon electron absorber and 2.5 mm aluminium filtration. Images were acquired with an amorphous silicon detector sensitive to diagnostic x-ray energies. Results: The x-ray beam had an average energy of 220 keV and half value layer of 5.9 mm of copper. Cone beam CT images with the same contrast to noise ratio as a gantry mounted kilovoltage imaging system were obtained with doses as low as 2 cGy. This dose is equivalent to a single 6 MV portal image. While 12 times higher than a 100 kVp CBCT system (Elekta XVI), this dose is 140 times lower than a 6 MV cone beam imaging system and 6 times lower than previously published LowZ imaging beams operating at higher (4-5 MeV) energies. Conclusions: The novel coupling device provides for a wide range of electron energies that are suitable for kilovoltage quality imaging and therapy. The imaging system provides high contrast images from the therapy portal at low dose, approaching that of gantry mounted kilovoltage x-ray systems. Additionally, the system provides low dose imaging directly from the therapy portal, potentially allowing for target tracking during radiotherapy treatment. There is

  6. Transcript of the proceedings of the first Albuquerque informal range/energy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, D.K.

    1981-04-01

    An informal workshop was held to discuss aspects of the calculation of range and energy deposition distributions which are of interest in ion implantation experiments. Topics covered include: problems encountered in using published range and energy deposition tabulations; some limitations in the solutions of range/energy transport equations; the effect of the scattering cross section on straggle; Monte Carlo calculations of ranges and straggling; damage studies in aluminum; simulation of heavy-ion irradiation of gold using MARLOWE; and MARLOWE calculations of range distribution parameters - dependence on input data and calculational model. (GHT)

  7. Theoretical aspects of energy range relations, stopping power and energy straggling of protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, W.

    2007-07-01

    The Bragg-Kleeman rule RCSDA=AE0p provides a connection between the initial energy E0 of a proton and the range RCSDA in a medium, if the continuous-slowing-down approximation (CSDA) is assumed. The rule results from a generalized (nonrelativistic) Langevin equation; its integration also yields information on the residual energy E(z) or dE(z)/dz of a proton at position z. A relativistic extension of the generalized Langevin equation leads to the formula RCSDA=A(E0+E02/2Mc2)p. Since the initial energy E0 of therapeutic protons satisfies E0≪2Mc2, relativistic contributions can be treated as correction terms. Besides this phenomenological aspect, a complete integration of Bethe-Bloch equation (BBE) is presented, which provides the determination of RCSDA, E(z), dE(z)/dz and works without any empirical parameters. The results of these different methods are compared with Monte Carlo calculations (GEANT4). Since the energy transfer from proton to the environmental atomic electrons regarded in the CSDA-framework has to account for local fluctuations, an analysis of the Gaussian convolution and the Landau-Vavilov distribution function is performed on the basis of quantum-statistical mechanics. The Landau tail can be described as a Hermite polynomial correction of a Gaussian convolution.

  8. Thermodynamic Processes Involving Liquefied Natural Gas at the LNG Receiving Terminals / Procesy termodynamiczne z wykorzystaniem skroplonego gazu ziemnego w terminalach odbiorczych LNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łaciak, Mariusz

    2013-06-01

    The increase in demand for natural gas in the world, cause that the production of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and in consequences its regasification becoming more common process related to its transportation. Liquefied gas is transported in the tanks at a temperature of about 111K at atmospheric pressure. The process required to convert LNG from a liquid to a gas phase for further pipeline transport, allows the use of exergy of LNG to various applications, including for electricity generation. Exergy analysis is a well known technique for analyzing irreversible losses in a separate process. It allows to specify the distribution, the source and size of the irreversible losses in energy systems, and thus provide guidelines for energy efficiency. Because both the LNG regasification and liquefaction of natural gas are energy intensive, exergy analysis process is essential for designing highly efficient cryogenic installations. Wzrost zapotrzebowania na gaz ziemny na świecie powoduje, że produkcja skroplonego gazu ziemnego (LNG), a w konsekwencji jego regazyfikacja, staje się coraz bardziej powszechnym procesem związanym z jego transportem. Skroplony gaz transportowany jest w zbiornikach w temperaturze około 111K pod ciśnieniem atmosferycznym. Przebieg procesu regazyfikacji niezbędny do zamiany LNG z fazy ciekłej w gazową dla dalszego transportu w sieci, umożliwia wykorzystanie egzergii LNG do różnych zastosowań, między innymi do produkcji energii elektrycznej. Analiza egzergii jest znaną techniką analizowania nieodwracalnych strat w wydzielonym procesie. Pozwala na określenie dystrybucji, źródła i wielkości nieodwracalnych strat w systemach energetycznych, a więc ustalić wytyczne dotyczące efektywnego zużycia energii. Ponieważ zarówno regazyfikacja LNG jak i skraplanie gazu ziemnego są energochłonne, proces analizy egzergii jest niezbędny do projektowania wysoce wydajnych instalacji kriogenicznych.

  9. High energy factorization in nucleus-nucleus collisions III. Long range rapidity correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, R.; Gelis, F., Lappi, T.

    2009-10-27

    We obtain a novel result in QCD for long range rapidity correlations between gluons produced in the collision of saturated high energy hadrons or nuclei. This result, obtained in a high energy factorization framework, provides strong justification for the Glasma flux tube picture of coherent strong color fields. Our formalism can be applied to 'near side ridge' events at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and in future studies of long range rapidity correlations at the LHC.

  10. High energy factorization in nucleus-nucleus collisions. III. Long range rapidity correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Francois

    2009-05-01

    We obtain a novel result in QCD for long range rapidity correlations between gluons produced in the collision of saturated high energy hadrons or nuclei. This result, obtained in a high energy factorization framework, provides strong justification for the Glasma flux tube picture of coherent strong color fields. Our formalism can be applied to 'near side ridge' events at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and in future studies of long range rapidity correlations at the LHC.

  11. Future directions for probing two and three nucleon short-range correlations at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Sargsian, Misak; Strikman, Mark

    2008-10-13

    We summarize recent progress in the studies of the short-rang correlations (SRC) in nuclei in high energy electron and hadron nucleus scattering and suggest directions for the future high energy studies aimed at establishing detailed structure of two-nucleon SRCs, revealing structure of three nucleon SRC correlations and discovering non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  12. The Crab nebula and pulsar in the MeV energy range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Much, R.; Bennett, K.; Buccheri, R.; Busetta, M.; Diehl, R.; Forrest, D.; Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Lichti, G. G.; Mcconnell, M.

    1995-01-01

    The imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) is sensitive in the energy range of 0.75 to 30 MeV. COMPTEL observed the Crab several times during the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) sky survey and CGRO Phase II. Both the Crab pulsar and nebula are detected over the entire COMPTEL energy range. The phase-averaged energy spectra of the Crab Pulsar and Nebula are presented. The combined observations provide sufficient statistics for a phase-resolved analysis of the Crab pulsar spectrum.

  13. Mechanism of Long-Range Penetration of Low-Energy Ions in Botanic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yu-Gang; Xue, Jian-Ming; Wang, Si-Xue; Du, Guang-Hua; Yan, Sha; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2002-03-01

    We present experimental evidence to reveal the mechanism of long-range penetration of low-energy ions in botanic samples. In the 100 keV Ar+ ion transmission measurement, the result confirmed that low-energy ions could penetrate at least 60 µm thick kidney bean slices with the probability of about 1.0×10-5. The energy spectrum of 1 MeV He+ ions penetrating botanic samples has shown that there is a peak of the count of ions with little energy loss. The probability of the low-energy ions penetrating the botanic sample is almost the same as that of the high-energy ions penetrating the same samples with little energy loss. The results indicate that there are some micro-regions with mass thickness less than the projectile range of low-energy ions in the botanic samples and they result in the long-range penetration of low-energy ions in botanic samples.

  14. Long-range correlation energy calculated from coupled atomic response functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Reilly, Anthony M.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; DiStasio, Robert A.

    2014-05-14

    An accurate determination of the electron correlation energy is an essential prerequisite for describing the structure, stability, and function in a wide variety of systems. Therefore, the development of efficient approaches for the calculation of the correlation energy (and hence the dispersion energy as well) is essential and such methods can be coupled with many density-functional approximations, local methods for the electron correlation energy, and even interatomic force fields. In this work, we build upon the previously developed many-body dispersion (MBD) framework, which is intimately linked to the random-phase approximation for the correlation energy. We separate the correlation energy into short-range contributions that are modeled by semi-local functionals and long-range contributions that are calculated by mapping the complex all-electron problem onto a set of atomic response functions coupled in the dipole approximation. We propose an effective range-separation of the coupling between the atomic response functions that extends the already broad applicability of the MBD method to non-metallic materials with highly anisotropic responses, such as layered nanostructures. Application to a variety of high-quality benchmark datasets illustrates the accuracy and applicability of the improved MBD approach, which offers the prospect of first-principles modeling of large structurally complex systems with an accurate description of the long-range correlation energy.

  15. Energy-Efficient Algorithm for Sensor Networks with Non-Uniform Maximum Transmission Range

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yimin; Song, Chao; Liu, Ming; Gong, Haigang

    2011-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks (WSNs), the energy hole problem is a key factor affecting the network lifetime. In a circular multi-hop sensor network (modeled as concentric coronas), the optimal transmission ranges of all coronas can effectively improve network lifetime. In this paper, we investigate WSNs with non-uniform maximum transmission ranges, where sensor nodes deployed in different regions may differ in their maximum transmission range. Then, we propose an Energy-efficient algorithm for Non-uniform Maximum Transmission range (ENMT), which can search approximate optimal transmission ranges of all coronas in order to prolong network lifetime. Furthermore, the simulation results indicate that ENMT performs better than other algorithms. PMID:22163950

  16. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F.

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  17. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-02-01

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution ΔE/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration. PMID:23464194

  18. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F.

    2013-02-01

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution ΔE/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  19. Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M; Singer, Brett

    2014-06-01

    Range hood use during residential cooking is essential to maintaining good indoor air quality. However, widespread use will impact the energy demand of the U.S. housing stock. This paper describes a modeling study to determine site energy, source energy, and consumer costs for comprehensive range hood use. To estimate the energy impacts for all 113 million homes in the U.S., we extrapolated from the simulation of a representative weighted sample of 50,000 virtual homes developed from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey database. A physics-based simulation model that considered fan energy, energy to condition additional incoming air, and the effect on home heating and cooling due to exhausting the heat from cooking was applied to each home. Hoods performing at a level common to hoods currently in U.S. homes would require 19?33 TWh [69?120 PJ] of site energy, 31?53 TWh [110-190 PJ] of source energy; and would cost consumers $1.2?2.1 billion (U.S.$2010) annually in the U.S. housing stock. The average household would spend less than $15 annually. Reducing required airflow, e.g. with designs that promote better pollutant capture has more energy saving potential, on average, than improving fan efficiency.

  20. Geographical and temporal differences in electric vehicle range due to cabin conditioning energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambly, Kiran; Bradley, Thomas H.

    2015-02-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) are vehicles that are propelled by electric motors powered by rechargeable battery. They are generally asserted to have GHG emissions, driveability and life cycle cost benefits over conventional vehicles. Despite this, EVs face significant challenges due to their limited on-board energy storage capacity. In addition to providing energy for traction, the energy storage device operates HVAC systems for cabin conditioning. This results in reduced driving range. The factors such as local ambient temperature, local solar radiation, local humidity, duration and thermal soak have been identified to affect the cabin conditions. In this paper, the development of a detailed system-level approach to HVAC energy consumption in EVs as a function of transient environmental parameters is described. The resulting vehicle thermal comfort model is used to address several questions such as 1) How does day to day environmental conditions affect EV range? 2) How does frequency of EV range change geographically? 3) How does trip start time affect EV range? 4) Under what conditions does cabin preconditioning assist in increasing the EV range? 5) What percentage increase in EV range can be expected due to cabin preconditioning at a given location?

  1. Neutron-proton effective range parameters and zero-energy shape dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackenburg, R. W.

    2006-04-01

    The low-energy np elastic-scattering parameters, including the zero-energy free-proton cross section σ0, are determined with a substantially improved precision over previous values, using available np-scattering data below 3 MeV. The method includes a careful handling of a correlation between the singlet and triplet effective ranges which does not seem to have been previously treated. This correlation is responsible for a large systematic error in the singlet effective range and spoils a model-independent determination of the zero-energy triplet effective range. It is shown that improved cross section measurements between 20 and 600 keV (laboratory neutron energy) are needed to overcome the degrading effect of this correlation. The values obtained for the zero-energy cross section and the scattering lengths and effective ranges for the singlet and triplet are: σ0=20.4278(78) b, at=5.4112(15) fm, as=-23.7148(43) fm, rt=1.7436(19) fm, rs=2.750(18) fm (systematic error: -0.059 fm). The widely used measurement of the zero-energy free-proton elastic cross section from W. Dilg, Phys. Rev. C 11, 103 (1975), appears to be in error.

  2. Prediction of the metabolizable energy requirements of free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Brainer, M M A; Rabello, C B V; Santos, M J B; Lopes, C C; Ludke, J V; Silva, J H V; Lima, R A

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted with the aim of estimating the ME requirements of free-range laying hens for maintenance, weight gain, and egg production. These experiments were performed to develop an energy requirement prediction equation by using the comparative slaughter technique and the total excreta collection method. Regression equations were used to relate the energy intake, the energy retained in the body and eggs, and the heat production of the hens. These relationships were used to determine the daily ME requirement for maintenance, the efficiency energy utilization above the requirements for maintenance, and the NE requirement for maintenance. The requirement for weight gain was estimated from the energy content of the carcass, and the diet's efficiency energy utilization was determined from the weight gain, which was measured during weekly slaughter. The requirement for egg production was estimated by considering the energy content of the eggs and the efficiency of energy deposition in the eggs. The requirement and efficiency energy utilization for maintenance were 121.8 kcal ME/(kg∙d)and 0.68, respectively. Similarly, the NE requirement for maintenance was 82.4 kcal ME/(kg∙d), and the efficiency energy utilization above maintenance was 0.61. Because the carcass body weight and energy did not increase during the trial, the weight gain could not be estimated. The requirements for egg production requirement and efficiency energy utilization for egg production were 2.48 kcal/g and 0.61, respectively. The following energy prediction equation for free-range laying hens (without weight gain) was developed: ME /(hen ∙ d) = 121.8 × W + 2.48 × EM, in which W = body weight (kg) and EM = egg mass (g/[hen ∙ d]). PMID:26812318

  3. Theoretical modeling for neutron elastic scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2010-12-07

    One of the major issues of neutron scattering modeling in the fast energy range is the contribution of compound elastic and inelastic scattering to the total scattering process. The compound component may become large at very low energies where the angular distribution becomes 90-degree symmetric in the center-of-mass system. Together with the shape elastic component, the elastic scattering gives slightly forward-peaked angular distributions in the fast energy range. This anisotropic angular distribution gives high sensitivities to many important nuclear reactor characteristics, such as criticality and neutron shielding. In this talk we describe how the anisotropic angular distributions are calculated within the statistical model framework, including the case where strongly coupled channels exist, by combining the coupled-channels theory with the Hauser-Feshbach model. This unique capability extension will have significant advantages in understanding the neutron scattering process for deformed nuclei, like uranium or plutonium, on which advanced nuclear energy applications center.

  4. The spectrum of flare protons in the low-energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Stolpovskii, V. G.

    1981-09-01

    An analysis is presented of the spectra of flare protons in the 0.08-150 MeV energy range, measured at about 1 AE on the Prognoz-6 satellite. The spectral data are compared with the energy dependence of the observation time of the maximum flux of flare protons. It is shown that changes in the slope in the spectrum and in the energy dependence of maximum times occur at approximately the same energy. Energy losses of protons in the interplanetary medium due to adiabatic cooling are determined. This effect is significant for protons with energies less than 1 MeV, and, in the case of flares of low importance, plays a decisive role in the formation of the spectrum of the observed flare protons.

  5. N(+)-N long-range interaction energies and resonance charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.; Partridge, H.

    1985-01-01

    The aerothermodynamic studies of proposed space missions require atmospheric charge-transfer data. N2(+) eigenstate energies are calculated with use of the complete-active-space self-consistent-field method with an extended Gaussian basis set. The N(+)-N charge-exchange cross section, determined from these energies, agrees with merged-beam measurements. This contradicts the previous theoretical conclusion. A simple physical description of the long-range interaction is presented and should expedite future charge-transfer studies.

  6. Mid-range adiabatic wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A. Vitanov, N.V.

    2012-09-15

    A technique for efficient mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils via a mediator coil is proposed. By varying the coil frequencies, three resonances are created: emitter-mediator (EM), mediator-receiver (MR) and emitter-receiver (ER). If the frequency sweeps are adiabatic and such that the EM resonance precedes the MR resonance, the energy flows sequentially along the chain emitter-mediator-receiver. If the MR resonance precedes the EM resonance, then the energy flows directly from the emitter to the receiver via the ER resonance; then the losses from the mediator are suppressed. This technique is robust against noise, resonant constraints and external interferences. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils.

  7. Investigation of pulsed X-ray radiation of a plasma focus in a broad energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Savelov, A. S. Salakhutdinov, G. Kh.; Koltunov, M. V.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Yurkov, D. I.; Sidorov, P. P.

    2011-12-15

    The results of the experimental investigations of the spectral composition of plasma focus X-ray radiation in the photon energy range of 1.5 keV-400 keV are presented. Three regions in the radiation spectrum where the latter is of a quasi-thermal nature with a corresponding effective temperature are distinguished.

  8. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  9. Long-range plasmon-assisted energy transfer over doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velizhanin, Kirill; Shahbazyan, Tigran

    2013-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between spatially separated donor and acceptor fluorophores, such as dye molecules or semiconductors quantum dots, underpins diverse phenomena in physics, chemistry and biology. However, the range of present and potential applications of FRET is limited by its intrinsically short-range nature (~ 1 /R6). We demonstrate that longitudinal plasmons in doped monolayer graphene can mediate highly efficient long-range (~ 1 / R) energy transfer between nearby fluorophores, e.g., semiconductor quantum dots. We derive a simple analytical expression for the energy transfer efficiency that incorporates all the essential processes involved. We perform numerical calculations of the transfer efficiency for a pair of PbSe quantum dots near graphene for inter-fluorophore distances of up to 1 μm and find that the plasmon-assisted long-range energy transfer can be enhanced by up to a factor of ~104 relative to FRET in vacuum. Work at LANL was performed under the NNSA of the U.S. DOE at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52- 06NA25396. Work at JSU was supported by the NSF under Grants No. DMR-1206975 and No. HRD-0833178 and under EPSCOR program.

  10. Charge-exchange neutral particle measurement in MeV energy range on JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusama, Y.; Nemoto, M.; Satoh, M.; Tsukahara, Y.; Tobita, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Petrov, S.; Afanassiev, V.; Kozlovskij, S.; Kislyakov, A.; Petrov, M.

    1995-01-01

    A charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer for the measurement of the MeV energy range ions produced by nuclear fusion or radio frequency heating has been developed and installed in JT-60U. Neutral particles entering the analyzer are ionized with a carbon foil of thickness 400 Å. The energy and mass of the stripped ions are resolved by magnetic and electrostatic fields (E∥B type). The analyzer has eight CsI(Tl) scintillator detectors. The energy range is 0.5-4 MeV for 4He0, the dynamic range is 4.08 and the energy resolution is 6%-11%. The detection efficiency for 4He0 with energy above 1 MeV is 30%-40%. A pulse height analysis (PHA) with 16 channels was adopted to distinguish particle signals from noise arising from neutrons, γ rays and optical lights emitted by JT-60U plasmas. The validity of the PHA was confirmed in a calibration experiment using a neutron source and in a high power heating experiment in JT-60U.

  11. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P. M.; Green, S.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.; Parker, D. J.; Poludniowski, G.; Price, T.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  12. Elastic electron scattering in krypton in the energy range from 5 to 10 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Linert, Ireneusz; Mielewska, Brygida; Zubek, Mariusz; King, George C.

    2010-01-15

    Differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering in krypton have been measured at the energies of 5,7.5, and 10 eV over the scattering angle range from 30 deg. to 180 deg. The measurements for backward scattering employed the magnetic angle-changing technique. These differential cross sections have been integrated to yield the elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections at the above energies. These new results are compared with the most recent measurements and calculations of the respective cross sections in krypton. The dependence of the differential cross sections on atomic polarizability of the heavier rare gas atoms argon, krypton, and xenon has also been investigated over the electron energy range 5-30 eV and for forward, backward, and intermediate scattering angles.

  13. High-energy Laser-accelerated Electron Beams for Long-range Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Banerjee, Sudeep; Ramanathan, Vidya; Powers, Nathan; Chandler-Smith, Nate; Umstadter, Donald; Vane, Randy; Schultz, David; Beene, James; Pozzi, Sara; Clarke, Shaun

    2009-03-10

    We are studying the use of 0.1-1.0 GeV laser-accelerated electron beams as active interrogation probes for long-standoff radiography or nuclear activation of concealed special nuclear material. Use of beams in this energy range is largely unexplored, but such beams could provide notable advantages over lower-energy beams and x-rays. High-energy laser-accelerated electrons exhibit large penetration range through air and solids, and low beam divergence for both direct beams and secondary Bremsstrahlung x-rays. We present laboratory measurements of radiography and activation, using the high-power Diodes laser system at the University of Nebraska, as well as MCNP and GEANT Monte Carlo simulation results used to aid experiment design and interpretation.

  14. Autonomous Vehicles Have a Wide Range of Possible Energy Impacts (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.; Repac, B.; Gonder, J.

    2013-07-01

    This poster presents initial estimates of the net energy impacts of automated vehicles (AVs). Automated vehicle technologies are increasingly recognized as having potential to decrease carbon dioxide emissions and petroleum consumption through mechanisms such as improved efficiency, better routing, lower traffic congestion, and by enabling advanced technologies. However, some effects of AVs could conceivably increase fuel consumption through possible effects such as longer distances traveled, increased use of transportation by underserved groups, and increased travel speeds. The net effect on petroleum use and climate change is still uncertain. To make an aggregate system estimate, we first collect best estimates for the energy impacts of approximately ten effects of AVs. We then use a modified Kaya Identity approach to estimate the range of aggregate effects and avoid double counting. We find that depending on numerous factors, there is a wide range of potential energy impacts. Adoption of automated personal or shared vehicles can lead to significant fuel savings but has potential for backfire.

  15. Elastic and total cross sections for simple biomolecules in the intermediate energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2015-09-01

    The elastic and total cross sections for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone and formamide are calculated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism in the intermediate energy range from 50 eV to 10 keV. These cross sections find application to various fields like radiation damage and biological sciences. The present results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and are found to give excellent agreement. The elastic cross sections reported for most of the targets in the present energy range are done for the first time. The energy dependence of the contribution of ionization and elastic cross section with respect to the total cross section and the correlation of total cross section with polarizability of the molecules are also studied.

  16. Elastic and total cross sections for simple biomolecules in the intermediate energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2015-09-15

    The elastic and total cross sections for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone and formamide are calculated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism in the intermediate energy range from 50 eV to 10 keV. These cross sections find application to various fields like radiation damage and biological sciences. The present results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and are found to give excellent agreement. The elastic cross sections reported for most of the targets in the present energy range are done for the first time. The energy dependence of the contribution of ionization and elastic cross section with respect to the total cross section and the correlation of total cross section with polarizability of the molecules are also studied.

  17. High-Energy Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams for Long-Range Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Cummingham, N. J.; Banerjee, Sudeep; Ramanathan, Vidya; Powell, Nathan; Chandler-Smith, Nate; Vane, C Randy; Schultz, David Robert; Pozzi, Sara; Clarke, Shaun; Beene, James R; Umstadter, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We are studying the use of 0.1 1.0 GeV laser-accelerated electron beams as active interrogation probes for long-standoff radiography or nuclear activation of concealed special nuclear material. Use of beams in this energy range is largely unexplored, but such beams could provide notable advantages over lower-energy beams and x-rays. High-energy laser-accelerated electrons exhibit large penetration range through air and solids, and low beam divergence for both direct beams and secondary Bremsstrahlung x-rays. We present laboratory measurements of radiography and activation, using the high-power Diodes laser system at the University of Nebraska, as well as MCNP and GEANT Monte Carlo simulation results used to aid experiment design and interpretation.

  18. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, François; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu; Després, Philippe; Therriault-Proulx, François; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  19. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu; and others

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  20. Increasing the energy dynamic range of solid-state nuclear track detectors using multiple surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zylstra, A B; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Manuel, M; Séguin, F H; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2011-08-01

    Solid-state nuclear track detectors, such as CR-39, are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. In the ICF experiments, the particles of interest, such as D(3)He-protons, have ranges of order of the detector thickness. In this case, the dynamic range of the detector can be extended by recording data on both the front and back sides of the detector. Higher energy particles which are undetectable on the front surface can then be measured on the back of the detector. Studies of track formation under the conditions on the front and back of the detector reveal significant differences. Distinct front and back energy calibrations of CR-39 are therefore necessary and are presented for protons. Utilizing multiple surfaces with additional calibrations can extend the range of detectable energies on a single piece of CR-39 by up to 7-8 MeV. The track formation process is explored with a Monte Carlo code, which shows that the track formation difference between front and back is due to the non-uniform ion energy deposition in matter. PMID:21895237

  1. A high energy resolution experiment in the hard X-ray range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, W.; Baker, R.; Cline, T.; Ehrmann, C.; Gehrels, N.; Teegarden, B.; Boclet, D.; Durouchoux, PH.; Hameury, J. M.; Haymes, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Low Energy Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (LEGS), a joint project among NASA/GSFC, CEN-SACLAY, and Rice University, is designed to perform fine energy resolution measurements of astrophysical sources. In its low energy configuration (20-800 keV energy range) the instrument uses three planar detectors (effective area of 53 sq cm) surrounded by a combination of passive Fe and active NaI for shielding and collimation (FOW of about 5 x 10 deg FWHM). In a typical one-day balloon flight, LEGS sensitivity limit (3 sigma) for narrow line features is not greater than about 0.0003 ph/sq cm s (at 100 kev).

  2. An advanced energy management system for controlling the ultracapacitor discharge and improving the electric vehicle range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenta, Jesús; Núñez, Ciro; Visairo, Nancy; Lázaro, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    Over the last years issues regarding both the use and the improvement of energy management in electric vehicles have been highlighted by industry and academic fields. Some of the research has been focused on exploiting the ultracapacitor characteristics and on protecting the battery life. From this standpoint, this paper proposes an advanced energy management system based on the adequate discharge of the ultracapacitor bank in order to utilize all the energy available from the regenerative breaking. In this way, the energy consumption is reduced and the electric vehicle range is increased. This strategy, based on simple rules, takes advantage of the high power density of the ultracapacitor and prevents an overstress of the battery. The benefits are featured using three standard drive cycles for a 1550 kg electric vehicle via simulations.

  3. Enhancing the dynamic range of targeted energy transfer in acoustics using several nonlinear membrane absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellet, R.; Cochelin, B.; Côte, R.; Mattei, P.-O.

    2012-12-01

    In order to enhance the robustness and the energy range of efficiency of targeted energy transfer (TET) phenomena in acoustics, we discuss in this paper about the use of multiple nonlinear membrane absorbers (called nonlinear energy sinks or NES) placed in parallel. We show this way, mainly thanks to an experimental set-up with two membranes, that the different absorbers have additional effects that extend the efficiency and the possibilities of observation of TET. More precisely, we present the different behavior of the system under sinusoidal forcing and free oscillations, characterizing the phenomena for all input energies. The frequency responses are also presented, showing successive clipping of the original resonance peak of the system, and strongly modulated regimes (SMR). A model is finally used to generalize these results to more than two NES and to simulate the case of several very similar membranes in parallel which shows how to extend the existence zone of TET.

  4. Therelationship between professional operatic soprano voice and high range spectral energy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jennifer J; Davis, Pamela; Oates, Jennifer; Chapman, Janice

    2004-07-01

    Operatic sopranos need to be audible over an orchestra yet they are not considered to possess a singer's formant. As in other voice types, some singers are more successful than others at being heard and so this work investigated the frequency range of the singer's formant between 2000 and 4000 Hz to consider the question of extra energy in this range. Such energy would give an advantage over an orchestra, so the aims were to ascertain what levels of excess energy there might be and look at any relationship between extra energy levels and performance level. The voices of six operatic sopranos (national and international standard) were recorded performing vowel and song tasks and subsequently analyzed acoustically. Measures taken from vowel data were compared with song task data to assess the consistency of the approaches. Comparisons were also made with regard to two conditions of intended projection (maximal and comfortable), two song tasks (anthem and aria), two recording environments (studio and anechoic room), and between subjects. Ranking the singers from highest energy result to lowest showed the consistency of the results from both vowel and song methods and correlated reasonably well with the performance level of the subjects. The use of formant tuning is considered and examined. PMID:15296012

  5. The relationship between professional operatic soprano voice and high range spectral energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jennifer J.; Davis, Pamela; Oates, Jennifer; Chapman, Janice

    2004-07-01

    Operatic sopranos need to be audible over an orchestra yet they are not considered to possess a singer's formant. As in other voice types, some singers are more successful than others at being heard and so this work investigated the frequency range of the singer's formant between 2000 and 4000 Hz to consider the question of extra energy in this range. Such energy would give an advantage over an orchestra, so the aims were to ascertain what levels of excess energy there might be and look at any relationship between extra energy levels and performance level. The voices of six operatic sopranos (national and international standard) were recorded performing vowel and song tasks and subsequently analyzed acoustically. Measures taken from vowel data were compared with song task data to assess the consistency of the approaches. Comparisons were also made with regard to two conditions of intended projection (maximal and comfortable), two song tasks (anthem and aria), two recording environments (studio and anechoic room), and between subjects. Ranking the singers from highest energy result to lowest showed the consistency of the results from both vowel and song methods and correlated reasonably well with the performance level of the subjects. The use of formant tuning is considered and examined.

  6. The energy range of drift effects in the solar modulation of cosmic ray electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nndanganeni, Rendani R.; Potgieter, Marius S.

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive three-dimensional modulation model is used to study the energy range of drift effects in the solar modulation of cosmic ray (galactic) electrons. Drift effects are defined as the difference between modulated spectra at a given position in the heliosphere computed for the two solar magnetic polarity cycles. The process of curvature, gradient and current sheet drifts in the heliosphere, together with convection, adiabatic energy losses and diffusion have profound effects on electron modulation. However, several reports indicated that the so-called weak-scattering drifts caused an overestimation of drift effects. It is illustrated that drift effects can be reduced in two ways, explicitly and implicitly; both influence the energy range where these effects are present but the implicit approach is more subtle to recognize and understand. A new very local interstellar spectrum for electrons is used. Electrons are most suitable for this type of study because they experience far less adiabatic energy losses than protons so that they respond directly with changes of the diffusion coefficients down to very low kinetic energy, E ∼ 1 MeV. In general, taking several modulation considerations into account, drift effects for electrons at the Earth are getting increasingly larger from above ∼10 MeV, with a maximum effect around 100 MeV, then gradually subsides to become less significant above ∼10 GeV.

  7. Energy saving mechanisms, collective behavior and the variation range hypothesis in biological systems: A review.

    PubMed

    Trenchard, Hugh; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-09-01

    Energy saving mechanisms are ubiquitous in nature. Aerodynamic and hydrodynamic drafting, vortice uplift, Bernoulli suction, thermoregulatory coupling, path following, physical hooks, synchronization, and cooperation are only some of the better-known examples. While drafting mechanisms also appear in non-biological systems such as sedimentation and particle vortices, the broad spectrum of these mechanisms appears more diversely in biological systems that include bacteria, spermatozoa, various aquatic species, birds, land animals, semi-fluid dwellers like turtle hatchlings, as well as human systems. We present the thermodynamic framework for energy saving mechanisms, and we review evidence in favor of the variation range hypothesis. This hypothesis posits that, as an evolutionary process, the variation range between strongest and weakest group members converges on the equivalent energy saving quantity that is generated by the energy saving mechanism. We also review self-organized structures that emerge due to energy saving mechanisms, including convective processes that can be observed in many systems over both short and long time scales, as well as high collective output processes in which a form of collective position locking occurs. PMID:27288936

  8. Degrees of locality of energy transfer in the inertial range. [Kolmogoroff notion in turbulence theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    Measured raw transfer interactions from which local energy transfer is argued to result are summed in a way that directly indicates the scale disparity (s) of contributions to the net energy flux across the spectrum. It is found that the dependence upon s closely follows the s exp -4/3 form predicted by classical arguments. As a result, it is concluded that direct numerical simulation measurements lend support to the classical Kolmogorov phenomenology of local interactions and local transfer in an inertial range.

  9. Low-energy parameters of neutron-neutron interaction in the effective-range approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2013-06-15

    The effect of the mass difference between the charged and neutral pions on the low-energy parameters of nucleon-nucleon interaction in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state is studied in the effective-range approximation. On the basis of experimental values of the singlet parameters of neutron-proton scattering and the experimental value of the virtual-state energy for the neutron-neutron systemin the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state, the following values were obtained for the neutron-neutron scattering length and effective range: a{sub nn} = -16.59(117) fm and r{sub nn} = 2.83(11) fm. The calculated values agree well with present-day experimental results.

  10. Energy- and time-resolved detection of prompt gamma-rays for proton range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verburg, Joost M.; Riley, Kent; Bortfeld, Thomas; Seco, Joao

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we present experimental results of a novel prompt gamma-ray detector for proton beam range verification. The detection system features an actively shielded cerium-doped lanthanum(III) bromide scintillator, coupled to a digital data acquisition system. The acquisition was synchronized to the cyclotron radio frequency to separate the prompt gamma-ray signals from the later-arriving neutron-induced background. We designed the detector to provide a high energy resolution and an effective reduction of background events, enabling discrete proton-induced prompt gamma lines to be resolved. Measuring discrete prompt gamma lines has several benefits for range verification. As the discrete energies correspond to specific nuclear transitions, the magnitudes of the different gamma lines have unique correlations with the proton energy and can be directly related to nuclear reaction cross sections. The quantification of discrete gamma lines also enables elemental analysis of tissue in the beam path, providing a better prediction of prompt gamma-ray yields. We present the results of experiments in which a water phantom was irradiated with proton pencil-beams in a clinical proton therapy gantry. A slit collimator was used to collimate the prompt gamma-rays, and measurements were performed at 27 positions along the path of proton beams with ranges of 9, 16 and 23 g cm-2 in water. The magnitudes of discrete gamma lines at 4.44, 5.2 and 6.13 MeV were quantified. The prompt gamma lines were found to be clearly resolved in dimensions of energy and time, and had a reproducible correlation with the proton depth-dose curve. We conclude that the measurement of discrete prompt gamma-rays for in vivo range verification of clinical proton beams is feasible, and plan to further study methods and detector designs for clinical use.

  11. Daily energy expenditure in free-ranging Gopher Tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, P.G.R.; Epperson, D.M.; Visser, G.H.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of ecological energetics in chelonians are rare. Here, we report the first measurements of daily energy expenditure (DEE) and water influx rates (WIRs) in free-ranging adult Gopher Tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus). We used the doubly labeled water (DLW) method to measure DEE in six adult tortoises during the non-breeding season in south-central Mississippi, USA. Tortoise DEE ranged from 76.7-187.5 kj/day and WIR ranged from 30.6-93.1 ml H2O/day. Daily energy expenditure did not differ between the sexes, but DEE was positively related to body mass. Water influx rates varied with the interaction of sex and body mass. We used a log/log regression model to assess the allometric relationship between DEE and body mass for Gopher Tortoises, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), and Box Turtles (Terrapene carolina), the only chelonians for which DEE has been measured. The slope of this allometric model (0.626) was less than that previously calculated for herbivorous reptiles (0.813), suggesting that chelonians may expend energy at a slower rate per unit of body mass compared to other herbivorous reptiles. We used retrospective power analyses and data from the DLW isotope analyses to develop guidelines for sample sizes and duration of measurement intervals, respectively, for larger-scale energetic studies in this species. ?? 2006 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  12. Coupling Emitters and Silver Nanowires to Achieve Long-Range Plasmon-Mediated Fluorescence Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    de Torres, Juan; Ferrand, Patrick; Colas des Francs, Gérard; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-04-26

    The development of quantum plasmonic circuitry requires efficient coupling between quantum emitters and plasmonic waveguides. A major experimental challenge is to simultaneously maximize the surface plasmon propagation length, the coupling efficiency into the plasmonic mode, and the Purcell factor. Addressing this challenge is also the key to enabling long-range energy transfer between quantum nanoemitters. Here, we use a dual-beam scanning confocal microscope to carefully investigate the interactions between fluorescent nanoparticles and surface plasmons on single-crystalline silver nanowires. By exciting the fluorescent nanoparticles via nanowire surface plasmons, we maximize the light-matter interactions and reach coupling efficiencies up to 44% together with 24× lifetime reduction and 4.1 μm propagation lengths. This improved optical performance enables the demonstration of long-range plasmon-mediated fluorescence energy transfer between two nanoparticles separated by micrometer distance. Our results provide guidelines toward practical realizations of efficient long-range fluorescence energy transfer for integrated plasmonics and quantum nano-optics. PMID:27019008

  13. A space bourne crystal diffraction telescope for the energy range of nuclear transitions

    SciTech Connect

    von Ballmoos, P.; Naya, J.E.; Albernhe, F.; Vedrenne, G.; Smither, R.K.; Faiz, M.; Fernandez, P.; Graber, T.

    1995-10-01

    Recent experimental work of the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration has opened for perspective of a focusing gamma-ray telescope operating in the energy range of nuclear transitions, featuring unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution. The instrument consists of a tunable crystal diffraction lens situated on a stabilized spacecraft, focusing gamma-rays onto a small array of Germanium detectors perched on an extendible boom. While the weight of such an instrument is less than 500 kg, it features an angular resolution of 15 in., an energy resolution of 2 keV and a 3 {sigma} narrow line sensitivity of a few times 10{sup {minus}7} photons s{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}2} (10{sup 6} sec observation). This instrumental concept permits observation of any identified source at any selected line-energy in a range of typically 200 keV to 1300 keV. The resulting ``sequential`` operation mode makes sites of explosive nucleosynthesis natural scientific objectives for such a telescope: the nuclear lines of extragalactic supernovae ({sup 56}Ni, {sup 44}Ti, {sup 60}Fe) and galactic novae (p{sup {minus}}p{sup +} line, {sup 7}Be) are accessible to observation, one at a time, due to the erratic appearance and the sequence of half-lifes of these events. Other scientific objectives, include the narrow 511 keV line from galactic broad class annihilators (such as 1E1740-29, nova musca) and possible redshifted annihilation lines from AGN`s.

  14. Photodissociation of HCN and HNC isomers in the 7-10 eV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenel, Aurelie; Roncero, Octavio; Aguado, Alfredo; Agúndez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, José

    2016-04-01

    The ultraviolet photoabsorption spectra of the HCN and HNC isomers have been simulated in the 7-10 eV photon energy range. For this purpose, the three-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surfaces of the 7 lowest electronic states, and the corresponding transition dipole moments, have been calculated, at multireference configuration interaction level. The spectra are calculated with a quantum wave packet method on these adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The spectra for the 3 lower excited states, the dissociative electronic states, correspond essentially to predissociation peaks, most of them through tunneling on the same adiabatic state. The 3 higher electronic states are bound, hereafter electronic bound states, and their spectra consist of delta lines, in the adiabatic approximation. The radiative lifetime towards the ground electronic states of these bound states has been calculated, being longer than 10 ns in all cases, much longer that the characteristic predissociation lifetimes. The spectra of HCN is compared with the available experimental and previous theoretical simulations, while in the case of HNC there are no previous studies to our knowledge. The spectrum for HNC is considerably more intense than that of HCN in the 7-10 eV photon energy range, which points to a higher photodissociation rate for HNC, compared to HCN, in astrophysical environments illuminated by ultraviolet radiation.

  15. Photodissociation of HCN and HNC isomers in the 7-10 eV energy range.

    PubMed

    Chenel, Aurelie; Roncero, Octavio; Aguado, Alfredo; Agúndez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, José

    2016-04-14

    The ultraviolet photoabsorption spectra of the HCN and HNC isomers have been simulated in the 7-10 eV photon energy range. For this purpose, the three-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surfaces of the 7 lowest electronic states, and the corresponding transition dipole moments, have been calculated, at multireference configuration interaction level. The spectra are calculated with a quantum wave packet method on these adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The spectra for the 3 lower excited states, the dissociative electronic states, correspond essentially to predissociation peaks, most of them through tunneling on the same adiabatic state. The 3 higher electronic states are bound, hereafter electronic bound states, and their spectra consist of delta lines, in the adiabatic approximation. The radiative lifetime towards the ground electronic states of these bound states has been calculated, being longer than 10 ns in all cases, much longer that the characteristic predissociation lifetimes. The spectra of HCN is compared with the available experimental and previous theoretical simulations, while in the case of HNC there are no previous studies to our knowledge. The spectrum for HNC is considerably more intense than that of HCN in the 7-10 eV photon energy range, which points to a higher photodissociation rate for HNC, compared to HCN, in astrophysical environments illuminated by ultraviolet radiation. PMID:27083720

  16. The photofragmentation of naphthalene and azulene monocations in the energy range 7 22 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochims, H. W.; Rasekh, H.; Rühl, E.; Baumgärtel, H.; Leach, S.

    1992-12-01

    Photoion mass spectrometry was used to study the fragmentation of naphthalene and azulene monocations over the excitation energy range 7-22 eV. Fifteen fragmentation processes in naphthalene and twelve in azulene have been examined in detail. The photoionization mass spectra at 20.58 eV are quasi-identical for the two isomers. This, and the constant value of the difference between the fragment appearance energies (AE) for naphthalene and azulene, equal to the difference in the heats of formations of the neutral parents, suggest that identical products are formed. The unimolecular dissociations fall mainly into (i) a "low energy" group, (AE<16 eV) and (ii) a "high energy" group (AE > 18 eV). The reactions in (i) have in common the bicyclic precursor C 10H +8 ion 18 which decays via rupture of one ring. The group (ii) reactions involve rupture of both rings to give an open chain precursor, the 1,6-bis-ethinyl-hexatriene radical cation 20. Thermodynamic and mechanistic arguments are given to propose specific reaction pathways and product structures. Two general schemes rationalize the low-energy and high-energy ionic decompositions.

  17. Research on simulation system with the wide range and high-precision laser energy characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ke-yan; Lou, Yan; He, Jing-yi; Tong, Shou-feng; Jiang, Hui-lin

    2012-10-01

    The Hardware-in-the-loop(HWIL) simulation test is one of the important parts for the development and performance testing of semi-active laser-guided weapons. In order to obtain accurate results, the confidence level of the target environment should be provided for a high-seeker during the HWIL simulation test of semi-active laser-guided weapons, and one of the important simulation parameters is the laser energy characteristic. In this paper, based on the semi-active laser-guided weapon guidance principles, an important parameter of simulation of confidence which affects energy characteristics in performance test of HWIL simulation was analyzed. According to the principle of receiving the same energy by using HWIL simulation and in practical application, HWIL energy characteristics simulation systems with the crystal absorption structure was designed. And on this basis, the problems of optimal design of the optical system were also analyzed. The measured results show that the dynamic attenuation range of the system energy is greater than 50dB, the dynamic attenuation stability is less than 5%, and the maximum energy changing rate driven by the servo motor is greater than 20dB/s.

  18. Long-range energy transfer in self-assembled quantum dot-DNA cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Samuel M.; Siu, Albert; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-11-01

    The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient transport of energy across QD-DNA thin films.The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient

  19. Energy study (EEAP) at MELSTF, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.; Howard, D.; Pieper, C.A.

    1996-08-23

    This energy conservation study was performed by Huitt-Zollars Inc., for the U.S. Army Engineer District (USAED), Fort Worth, under contract number DECAC63-94-D-0015. The study was conducted at MELSTF on the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, between September 21, 1995 and April 28, 1996. The site survey, data collection and technical analysis were performed by John Carter, E.I.T, Denney Howard, P.E. and C.A. Pieper, P.E.. The purpose of the study was to perform a limited site survey of specific buildings at the facility, identify specific Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) that exist, and then evaluate these ECOs for technical and economic feasibility. These ECOs were open to all methods of energy conservation which were reasonable and practical.

  20. Measurements and Calculations of Neutron Scattering Angular Distributions over a Wide Mass and Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. F.

    Neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for targets between (9)Be and (239)Pu at energies, E 14 MeV have been measured using the Livermore and Ohio University neutron time-of-flight facilities. We review here the data and the analyses based on two local microscopic optical potentials: that of Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux, and that of Brieva and Rook. The results are also compared with calculations using global potentials. Coupled channel formalism has been used in the analysis of targets with strong deformations, such as Be, C, Ta, and actinides. The value of the microscopic optical potentials as a tool to predict elastic and inelastic neutron cross sections over a wide mass and energy range is discussed. The need for neutron measurements up to higher energies and their analysis in conjunction with (p,p) and charge exchange (p,n) data is addressed.

  1. Measurements and calculations of neutron scattering angular distributions over a wide mass and energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-05-01

    Neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for targets between /sup 9/Be and /sup 239/Pu at energies, E > 14 MeV have been measured using the Livermore and Ohio University neutron time-of-flight facilities. We review here the data and the analyses based on two local microscopic optical potentials: that of Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux, and that of Brieva and Rook. The results are also compared with calculations using global potentials. Coupled channel formalism has been used in the analysis of targets with strong deformations, such as Be, C, Ta, and actinides. The value of the microscopic optical potentials as a tool to predict elastic and inelastic neutron cross sections over a wide mass and energy range is discussed. The need for neutron measurements up to higher energies and their analysis in conjunction with (p,p) and charge exchange (p,n) data is addressed. 17 refs.

  2. NEUTRON-PROTON EFFECTIVE RANGE PARAMETERS AND ZERO-ENERGY SHAPE DEPENDENCE.

    SciTech Connect

    HACKENBURG, R.W.

    2005-06-01

    A completely model-independent effective range theory fit to available, unpolarized, np scattering data below 3 MeV determines the zero-energy free proton cross section {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.4287 {+-} 0.0078 b, the singlet apparent effective range r{sub s} = 2.754 {+-} 0.018{sub stat} {+-} 0.056{sub syst} fm, and improves the error slightly on the parahydrogen coherent scattering length, a{sub c} = -3.7406 {+-} 0.0010 fm. The triplet and singlet scattering lengths and the triplet mixed effective range are calculated to be a{sub t} = 5.4114 {+-} 0.0015 fm, a{sub s} = -23.7153 {+-} 0.0043 fm, and {rho}{sub t}(0,-{epsilon}{sub t}) = 1.7468 {+-} 0.0019 fm. The model-independent analysis also determines the zero-energy effective ranges by treating them as separate fit parameters without the constraint from the deuteron binding energy {epsilon}{sub t}. These are determined to be {rho}{sub t}(0,0) = 1.705 {+-} 0.023 fm and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) = 2.665 {+-} 0.056 fm. This determination of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is most sensitive to the sparse data between about 20 and 600 keV, where the correlation between the determined values of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is at a minimum. This correlation is responsible for the large systematic error in r{sub s}. More precise data in this range are needed. The present data do not event determine (with confidence) that {rho}{sub t}(0,0) {ne} {rho}{sub t}(0, -{epsilon}{sub t}), referred to here as ''zero-energy shape dependence''. The widely used measurement of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.491 {+-} 0.014 b from W. Dilg, Phys. Rev. C 11, 103 (1975), is argued to be in error.

  3. Long-range energy transfer in self-assembled quantum dot-DNA cascades.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Samuel M; Siu, Albert; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-11-28

    The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient transport of energy across QD-DNA thin films. PMID:26498166

  4. The energy range of drift effects in the solar modulation of cosmic ray electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejoyce Nndanganeni, Rendani; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive modulation model is used to study the energy dependence of drift effects in the solar modulation of cosmic ray electrons. The fundamental process of curvature, gradient and current sheet drifts in the heliosphere has profound effects on electron modulation but it is still not fully understood, especially since there is general consensus that the so-called weak scattering drift is giving too large modulation effects as follows from the application of numerical drift models to observations from the Earth to the outer heliosphere. A straight forward approach is followed to illustrate how reducing drifts can affect the modulation of electrons on a global scale and to find the energy range over which drifts can affect the modulation of these electrons. It is established that reducing drifts explicitly and implicitly does influence the energy range where drift effects are present. It is found that reducing drifts implicitly through changing the two perpendicular diffusion coefficients is far more subtle a process than decreasing the drift coefficient directly. Enlarging the rigidity dependence of the drift coefficient at lower energies reduces very effectively the extent to which drifts dominate the modulation process. In general, these effects for electrons at the Earth become progressively larger with increasing kinetic energy for both HMF polarities, from above ~10 MeV, with a maximal effect around 100 MeV, then gradually subsides to become less significant above ~10 GeV. However, the issue pertaining to how drift reduction occurs from a fundamental theoretical point of view is a work in progress.

  5. Long-range energy transport in single supramolecular nanofibres at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haedler, Andreas T.; Kreger, Klaus; Issac, Abey; Wittmann, Bernd; Kivala, Milan; Hammer, Natalie; Köhler, Jürgen; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Hildner, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Efficient transport of excitation energy over long distances is a key process in light-harvesting systems, as well as in molecular electronics. However, in synthetic disordered organic materials, the exciton diffusion length is typically only around 10 nanometres (refs 4, 5), or about 50 nanometres in exceptional cases, a distance that is largely determined by the probability laws of incoherent exciton hopping. Only for highly ordered organic systems has the transport of excitation energy over macroscopic distances been reported--for example, for triplet excitons in anthracene single crystals at room temperature, as well as along single polydiacetylene chains embedded in their monomer crystalline matrix at cryogenic temperatures (at 10 kelvin, or -263 degrees Celsius). For supramolecular nanostructures, uniaxial long-range transport has not been demonstrated at room temperature. Here we show that individual self-assembled nanofibres with molecular-scale diameter efficiently transport singlet excitons at ambient conditions over more than four micrometres, a distance that is limited only by the fibre length. Our data suggest that this remarkable long-range transport is predominantly coherent. Such coherent long-range transport is achieved by one-dimensional self-assembly of supramolecular building blocks, based on carbonyl-bridged triarylamines, into well defined H-type aggregates (in which individual monomers are aligned cofacially) with substantial electronic interactions. These findings may facilitate the development of organic nanophotonic devices and quantum information technology.

  6. Improving the range of UHF RFID transponders using solar energy harvesting under low light conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascher, A.; Lehner, M.; Eberhardt, M.; Biebl, E.

    2015-11-01

    The sensitivity of passive UHF RFID transponders (Radio Frequency Identification) is the key issue, which determines the maximum read range of an UHF RFID system. During this work the ability of improving the sensitivity using solar energy harvesting, especially for low light conditions, is shown. To use the additional energy harvested from the examined silicon and organic solar cells, the passive RFID system is changed into a semi-active one. This needs no changes on the reader hardware itself, only the used RFIC (Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit) of the transponder has to possess an additional input pin for an external supply voltage. The silicon and organic cells are evaluated and compared to each other regarding their low light performance. The different cells are examined in a shielded box, which is protected from the environmental lighting. Additionally, a demonstrator is shown, which makes the measurement of the extended read range with respect to the lighting conditions possible. If the cells are completely darkened, the sensitivity gain is ascertained using high capacity super caps. Due to the measurements an enhancement in range up to 70 % could be guaranteed even under low light conditions.

  7. A closed-loop wide-range tunable mechanical resonator for energy harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Christian; Maurath, Dominic; Schock, Wolfram; Mezger, Florian; Manoli, Yiannos

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents a novel electrically tunable structure which can be used as a resonator for vibration-based energy harvesters. The adjustment of the resonance frequency is provided by mechanical stiffening of the structure using piezoelectric actuators. This concept can easily be stand-alone integrated to realize an autonomous, tunable harvester. The resonator was simulated using ANSYS to find the optimum operation point concerning tuning range. The scalability of this tuning concept is also investigated in this work. A phase shift control circuit was developed for very efficient autonomous closed-loop control of the resonance frequency. Prototypes of the resonators were fabricated and measured with and without the control circuit. The tuning voltage can be kept as low as ±5 V leading to a measured resonance shift of ±15% for the larger resonator (40 mm) and around ±8% for the smaller resonator (27 mm). This tuning range can be simply enhanced by increasing the tuning voltage.

  8. Elastic scattering of electrons from CO2 in the intermediate energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iga, I.; Nogueira, J. C.; Mu-Tao, L.

    1984-03-01

    Ratios of elastic differential cross sections of CO2 to those of N2 have been measured at electron impact energies of 500, 800 and 1000 eV in the angular range of 5 deg to 120 deg, using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry and the relative flow technique. These ratios have been multiplied by previously known N2 elastic differential cross sections to obtain elastic differential cross sections for CO2. At 500 eV, experimental results agree quite well with the absolute values of Bromberg (1974). Comparison has also been made with the theoretical results obtained in the renormalized multicenter potential model approach of Botelho et al. (1983) and shows an agreement within 20 percent in the entire angular range. The elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections have also been determined from the differential cross sections.

  9. Implants of aluminum in the 50-120 MeV energy range into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Ferla, A.; Torrisi, L.; Galvagno, G.; Rimini, E.; Ciavola, G.; Carnera, A.; Gasparotto, A.

    1993-01-01

    Al ions in the 50-120 MeV energy range were implanted in Si substrates for fluences varying between 1 × 10 14 and 3.5 × 10 15/cm 2. The electrical and chemical Al distributions were obtained by spreading resistance profilometry and secondary ion mass spectroscopy and the two principal moments, Rp and ΔRp, were measured. On low resistivity samples, τ = 0.01 Ω cm, the disorder profile induced by the 100 MeV Al implant was determined from the electrical measurement of the inactivated bulk dopant (boron) distribution. The diffusion coefficient of Al implanted into floating-zone silicon was extracted from the electrical profiles after thermal treatments in the 1000-1290°C temperature range with the result D = 7.4 exp[ {-3.42( eV) }/{kT}] {( cm2}/{s) }.

  10. Effect of the short-range interaction on low-energy collisions of ultracold dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Jie, Jianwen

    2014-12-01

    We consider the low-energy scattering of two ultracold polarized dipoles with both a short-range interaction (SRI) and a weak dipole-dipole interaction (DDI), which is far away from shape resonances. In previous analytical studies, the scattering amplitude in this system was often calculated via the first-order Born approximation (FBA). Our results show that significant derivations from this approximation can arise in some cases. In these cases, the SRI can significantly modify the interdipole scattering amplitudes even if the scattering amplitudes for the SRI alone are much smaller than the dipolar length of the DDI. We further obtain approximate analytical expressions for these interdipole scattering amplitudes.

  11. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives of this work are: (1) Develop advanced Li -ion electrolytes that enable cell operation over a wide temperature range (i.e., -30 to +60C). (2) Improve the high temperature stability and lifetime characteristics of wide operating temperature electrolytes. (3) Improve the high voltage stability of these candidate electrolytes systems to enable operation up to 5V with high specific energy cathode materials. (4) Define the performance limitations at low and high temperature extremes, as well as, life limiting processes. (5) Demonstrate the performance of advanced electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells.

  12. Photon interference effect in x-ray absorption spectra over a wide energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Suzuki, M.; Kawamura, N.; Kappen, P.; Korecki, P.; Haack, N.; Materlik, G.

    2002-09-01

    We consider fundamental structures in x-ray absorption spectra over a wide energy range. We formulate the elastic scattering in addition to the photoelectric absorption in recently reported photon interference x-ray absorption fine structure (πXAFS). The simulations show excellent agreement with experimental x-ray absorption spectra for platinum and tungsten powders far above and below the L absorption edges. πXAFS can be as big as in the order of 10% of XAFS, and cannot be easily neglected in detailed analysis of XAFS and related phenomena.

  13. True coincidence summing corrections for an extended energy range HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Venegas-Argumedo, Y.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-23

    True coincidence summing (TCS) effect for natural radioactive families of U-238 and Th-232 represents a problem when an environmental sample with a close source-detector geometry measurement is performed. By using a certified multi-nuclide standard source to calibrate an energy extended range (XtRa) HPGe detector, it is possible to obtain an intensity spectrum slightly affected by the TCS effect with energies from 46 to 1836 keV. In this work, the equations and some other considerations required to calculate the TCS correction factor for isotopes of natural radioactive chains are described. It is projected a validation of the calibration, performed with the IAEA-CU-2006-03 samples (soil and water)

  14. Cross sections for elastic electron scattering by tetramethylsilane in the intermediate-energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Sugohara, R. T.; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Souza, G. L. C. de; Homem, M. G. P.

    2011-12-15

    Organosilicon compounds are of current interest due to the numerous applications of these species in industries. Some of these applications require the knowledge of electron collision cross sections, which are scarce for such compounds. In this work, we report absolute values of differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic electron scattering by tetramethylsilane (TMS) measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range. The relative-flow technique is used to normalize our data. In addition, the independent-atom-model (IAM) and the additivity rule (AR), widely used to model electron collisions with light hydrocarbons, are also applied for e{sup -}-TMS interaction. The comparison of our measured results of cross sections and the calculated data shows good agreement, particularly near the higher-end of incident energies.

  15. Long range correlations in stochastic transport with energy and momentum conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Anupam; Hirschberg, Ori; Mukamel, David

    2016-03-01

    We consider a simple one-dimensional stochastic model of heat transport which locally conserves both energy and momentum and which is coupled to heat reservoirs with different temperatures at its two ends. The steady state is analyzed and the model is found to obey the Fourier law with finite heat conductivity. In the infinite length limit, the steady state is described locally by an equilibrium Gibbs state. However finite size corrections to this local equilibrium state are present. We analyze these finite size corrections by calculating the on-site fluctuations of the momentum and the two point correlation of the momentum and energy. These correlations are long ranged and have scaling forms which are computed explicitly. We also introduce a multi-lane variant of the model in which correlations vanish in the steady state. The deviation from local equilibrium in this model as expressed in terms of the on-site momentum fluctuations is calculated in the large length limit.

  16. Excited-state dynamics in rigid media: evidence for long-range energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akitaka; Stewart, David J; Knight, Troy E; Fang, Zhen; Brennaman, M Kyle; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-03-28

    In semirigid PEG-DMA550 films with the added anthracene derivatives PEG-An and Acr-An, energy transfer quenching of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state Ru(bpy)3(2+)* to give -(3)An occurs by both rapid, static, and slow, diffusional quenching processes. The appearance of -(3)An was verified by transient absorption measurements. The kinetics of the two quenching processes have been analyzed by a Stern-Volmer kinetic analysis. The data for static quenching are consistent with energy transfer quenching with a distance dependence consistent with Dexter (exchange) energy transfer. On the basis of this analysis Bohr radii were found to be 26 and 11 Å for PEG-An and Acr-An, respectively. Evidence for triplet-triplet annihilation between triplet anthracene excited states in the films was obtained from the concentration dependences of excited-state decay. These results provide evidence for long-range energy migration between derivatized anthracenes in rigid, cross-linked PEG-DMA550 films. PMID:23458318

  17. Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect

    Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

  18. Calibrating image plate sensitivity in the 700 to 5000 eV spectral energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, Michael J.; Lee, Joshua; Romano, Edward; Schneider, Marilyn

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a method to calibrate image plate sensitivity for use in the low energy spectral range. Image plates, also known as photostimulable luminescence (PSL) detectors, have often proved to be a valuable tool as a detector for plasma physics studies. Their advantages of large dynamic range, high stopping power, and resistance to neutron damage sometimes outweigh the problems of limited resolution and the remote processing required. The neutron damage resistance is required when the X-ray source is producing a high neutron flux. The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a key diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber at LLNL for use in determining the symmetry of the laser beams. The SXI is essential to proper interpretation of the data from the Dante diagnostic to determine the X-ray radiation temperature. It is comprised of two diagnostics located at the top and the bottom of the target chamber. The usual detector is a large array CCD camera. For shots giving high yields of neutrons, the camera would not only be blinded by the neutrons, it would be damaged. To get around this problem, an image plate (IP) is used as the detector. The NIF application covers the energy range from 700 to 5000 eV. The type of image plates typically used for plasma physics are the Fuji BAS-MS, BAS-SR, and BAS-TR models. All models consist of an X-ray sensitive material made of BaF(Br,I):Eu2+ embedded in a plastic binder. X-rays incident on the phosphor ionize the Eu 2+ producing Eu3+ and free electrons that are trapped in lattice defects (F-centers) produced by the absence of halogen ions in the BaF2 crystal. An image plate readout scanner irradiates the IP with a red laser causing reduction of the Eu3+ and emission of a blue photon. The photon is collected using a photomultiplier and digitized to make an electronic image. Image plates are cleared of all F-centers by putting them under a bright light for about 10 minutes. They are then ready for producing a

  19. Range prediction for tissue mixtures based on dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Möhler, Christian; Wohlfahrt, Patrick; Richter, Christian; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    The use of dual-energy CT (DECT) potentially decreases range uncertainties in proton and ion therapy treatment planning via determination of the involved physical target quantities. For eventual clinical application, the correct treatment of tissue mixtures and heterogeneities is an essential feature, as they naturally occur within a patient's CT. Here, we present how existing methods for DECT-based ion-range prediction can be modified in order to incorporate proper mixing behavior on several structural levels. Our approach is based on the factorization of the stopping-power ratio into the relative electron density and the relative stopping number. The latter is confined for tissue between about 0.95 and 1.02 at a therapeutic beam energy of 200 MeV u(-1) and depends on the I-value. We show that convenient mixing and averaging properties arise by relating the relative stopping number to the relative cross section obtained by DECT. From this, a maximum uncertainty of the stopping-power ratio prediction below [Formula: see text] is suggested for arbitrary mixtures of human body tissues. PMID:27182757

  20. An Energy-Harvesting Wireless-Interface SoC for Short-Range Data Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Shinji; Matsuno, Tetsuro; Miyama, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Masahiko; Ono, Hiroaki

    This paper describes design and verification of a wireless-interface SoC (system-on-a-chip) for a wireless battery-less mouse with short-range data-communication capability. The SoC comprises an RF transmitter and microcontroller. The SoC, which is powered by an electric generator that exploits gyration energy by dragging the mouse, was fabricated using a TSMC 0.18-um CMOS process. The features of the SoC are the adoption of a simple FSK modulation scheme, single-end configuration on the RF transmitter, and specific microcontroller design for mouse operation. We verified that the RF transmitter can make data communication within a 1-m range at 2.17 mW, and the microcontroller consumes 0.03 mW at 1 MHz, which exhibits that the total power consumption is 2.2 mW. This is sufficiently low for the SoC to operate with energy harvesting.

  1. Electron range-energy relationships for calculating backscattering coefficients in elemental and compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouabah, Z.; Bouzid, A.; Champion, C.; Bouarissa, N.

    2011-06-01

    Backscattering coefficients for electrons normally impinging on Si, Ge, GaN, GaAs and InSb targets have been calculated by using the Vicanek and Urbassek theory [M. Vicanek, H.M. Urbassek, Phys. Rev. B 44 (1991) 7234] for incident energies ≤5 keV. Electron range has been calculated from various semi-empirical analytical expressions. The cross-sections used to describe the electron transport are determined via the appropriate analytical expression given by Jablonski [A. Jablonski, Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 16470] whose new improved version has been recently reported by Rouabah et al. [Z. Rouabah, N. Bouarissa, C. Champion, N. Bouaouadja, Appl. Surf. Sci. 255 (2009) 6217]. The results may be seen as the first predictions for low-energy electron backscattering coefficients impinging on GaN, GaAs and InSb semiconductors. The models used in the calculation of the electron range affect both the accuracy and behaviour of the electron backscattering coefficients.

  2. Range prediction for tissue mixtures based on dual-energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, Christian; Wohlfahrt, Patrick; Richter, Christian; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    The use of dual-energy CT (DECT) potentially decreases range uncertainties in proton and ion therapy treatment planning via determination of the involved physical target quantities. For eventual clinical application, the correct treatment of tissue mixtures and heterogeneities is an essential feature, as they naturally occur within a patient’s CT. Here, we present how existing methods for DECT-based ion-range prediction can be modified in order to incorporate proper mixing behavior on several structural levels. Our approach is based on the factorization of the stopping-power ratio into the relative electron density and the relative stopping number. The latter is confined for tissue between about 0.95 and 1.02 at a therapeutic beam energy of 200 MeV u‑1 and depends on the I-value. We show that convenient mixing and averaging properties arise by relating the relative stopping number to the relative cross section obtained by DECT. From this, a maximum uncertainty of the stopping-power ratio prediction below 1% is suggested for arbitrary mixtures of human body tissues.

  3. Photodissociation of HCN and HNC isomers in the 7-10 eV energy range

    PubMed Central

    Chenel, Aurelie; Roncero, Octavio; Aguado, Alfredo; Agúndez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, José

    2016-01-01

    The ultraviolet photoabsorption spectra of the HCN and HNC isomers have been simulated in the 7-10 eV photon energy range. For this purpose the three-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surfaces of the 7 lowest electronic states, and the corresponding transition dipole moments, have been calculated, at multi reference configuration interaction level. The spectra are calculated with a quantum wave packet method on these adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The spectra for the 3 lower excited states, the dissociative electronic states, correspond essentially to predissociation peaks, most of them through tunneling on the same adiabatic state. The 3 higher electronic states are bound, hereafter electronic bound states, and their spectra consist of delta lines, in the adiabatic approximation. The radiative lifetime towards the ground electronic states of these bound states have been calculated, being longer than 10 ns in all cases, much longer that the characteristic predissociation lifetimes. The spectra of HCN is compared with the available experimental and previous theoretical simulations while in the case of HNC there are no previous studies to our knowledge. The spectrum for HNC is considerably more intense than that of HCN, which implies a much faster destruction of HNC than HCN in astrophysical environments illuminated by ultraviolet radiation. PMID:27083720

  4. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-06-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  5. Energy dissipation of nanoconfined hydration layer: Long-range hydration on the hydrophilic solid surface

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bongsu; Kwon, Soyoung; Mun, Hyosik; An, Sangmin; Jhe, Wonho

    2014-01-01

    The hydration water layer (HWL), a ubiquitous form of water on the hydrophilic surfaces, exhibits anomalous characteristics different from bulk water and plays an important role in interfacial interactions. Despite extensive studies on the mechanical properties of HWL, one still lacks holistic understanding of its energy dissipation, which is critical to characterization of viscoelastic materials as well as identification of nanoscale dissipation processes. Here we address energy dissipation of nanoconfined HWL between two atomically flat hydrophilic solid surfaces (area of ~120 nm2) by small amplitude-modulation, noncontact atomic force microscopy. Based on the viscoelastic hydration-force model, the average dissipation energy is ~1 eV at the tapping amplitude (~0.1 nm) of the tip. In particular, we determine the accurate HWL thickness of ~6 layers of water molecules, as similarly observed on biological surfaces. Such a long-range interaction of HWL should be considered in the nanoscale phenomena such as friction, collision and self-assembly. PMID:25267426

  6. Short-range stabilizing potential for computing energies and lifetimes of temporary anions with extrapolation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerfeld, Thomas; Ehara, Masahiro

    2015-01-21

    The energy of a temporary anion can be computed by adding a stabilizing potential to the molecular Hamiltonian, increasing the stabilization until the temporary state is turned into a bound state, and then further increasing the stabilization until enough bound state energies have been collected so that these can be extrapolated back to vanishing stabilization. The lifetime can be obtained from the same data, but only if the extrapolation is done through analytic continuation of the momentum as a function of the square root of a shifted stabilizing parameter. This method is known as analytic continuation of the coupling constant, and it requires—at least in principle—that the bound-state input data are computed with a short-range stabilizing potential. In the context of molecules and ab initio packages, long-range Coulomb stabilizing potentials are, however, far more convenient and have been used in the past with some success, although the error introduced by the long-rang nature of the stabilizing potential remains unknown. Here, we introduce a soft-Voronoi box potential that can serve as a short-range stabilizing potential. The difference between a Coulomb and the new stabilization is analyzed in detail for a one-dimensional model system as well as for the {sup 2}Π{sub u} resonance of CO{sub 2}{sup −}, and in both cases, the extrapolation results are compared to independently computed resonance parameters, from complex scaling for the model, and from complex absorbing potential calculations for CO{sub 2}{sup −}. It is important to emphasize that for both the model and for CO{sub 2}{sup −}, all three sets of results have, respectively, been obtained with the same electronic structure method and basis set so that the theoretical description of the continuum can be directly compared. The new soft-Voronoi-box-based extrapolation is then used to study the influence of the size of diffuse and the valence basis sets on the computed resonance parameters.

  7. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  8. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  9. Hadronization scheme dependence of long-range azimuthal harmonics in high energy p + A reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2015-07-01

    We compare the distortion effects of three popular final-state hadronization schemes. We show how hadronization modifies the initial-state gluon correlations in high energy p + A collisions. The three models considered are (1) LPH: local parton-hadron duality, (2) CPR: collinear parton-hadron resonance independent fragmentation, and (3) LUND: color string hadronization. The strong initial-state azimuthal asymmetries are generated using the GLVB model for non-abelian gluon bremsstrahlung, assuming a saturation scale Qsat = 2 GeV. Long-range elliptic and triangular harmonics for the final hadron pairs are compared based on the three hadronization schemes. Our analysis shows that the process of hadronization causes major distortions of the partonic azimuthal harmonics for transverse momenta at least up to pT = 3 GeV. In particular, they appear to be greatly reduced for pT < 1 ÷ 2 GeV.

  10. Energy Analysis of Aluminosilicate Zeolites with Comprehensive Ranges of Framework Topologies, Chemical Compositions, and Aluminum Distributions.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Koki; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2016-05-18

    The contents and locations of Al in the zeolite frameworks are one of the key factors determining the physicochemical properties of zeolites. Systematic evaluation of the characteristics of zeolites with a wide variety of framework topologies, a wide range of Si/Al ratios, and various locations of Al is of great significance, but very challenging due to the limitation of the realizable ranges of Al contents in zeolites as well as the limited information on the Al locations obtained from the current analytical techniques. Here, we report the systematic analysis of the energetics of aluminosilicate zeolites with 209 existing framework topologies at different Si/Al ratios using molecular mechanics. More than 43 000 initial structures were generated to give comprehensive views of the energetics of zeolites. The results coincide well with the structural knowledge obtained experimentally. It was revealed that the relation between the relative framework energies versus the Al contents varies in accordance with the topologies, suggesting that the relative stability of zeolites depends not only on the topologies, but also on the substituting contents of Al. For particular topologies with the same Al contents, in addition, comparisons between random and specific distributions of Al showed that zeolite with Al at a particular T site is energetically more stable than those with random distributions, suggesting the inherent influences of the Al locations. The contents and locations of Al in zeolites likely have a certain preference that may reflect the range of chemical compositions, the Al distributions, and consequently the physicochemical properties of realizable aluminosilicate zeolites. PMID:27097121

  11. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation. PMID:16381717

  12. A portable and wide energy range semiconductor-based neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshor, C. B.; Oakes, T. M.; Myers, E. R.; Rogers, B. J.; Currie, J. E.; Young, S. M.; Crow, J. A.; Scott, P. R.; Miller, W. H.; Bellinger, S. L.; Sobering, T. J.; Fronk, R. G.; Shultis, J. K.; McGregor, D. S.; Caruso, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Hand-held instruments that can be used to passively detect and identify sources of neutron radiation-either bare or obscured by neutron moderating and/or absorbing material(s)-in real time are of interest in a variety of nuclear non-proliferation and health physics applications. Such an instrument must provide a means to high intrinsic detection efficiency and energy-sensitive measurements of free neutron fields, for neutrons ranging from thermal energies to the top end of the evaporation spectrum. To address and overcome the challenges inherent to the aforementioned applications, four solid-state moderating-type neutron spectrometers of varying cost, weight, and complexity have been designed, fabricated, and tested. The motivation of this work is to introduce these novel human-portable instruments by discussing the fundamental theory of their operation, investigating and analyzing the principal considerations for optimal instrument design, and evaluating the capability of each of the four fabricated spectrometers to meet the application needs.

  13. Characterization of a fiber-optic-coupled radioluminescent detector for application in the mammography energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Benevides, Luis A.; Huston, Alan L.; Justus, Brian L.; Falkenstein, Paul; Brateman, Libby F.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2007-06-15

    Fiber-optic-coupled radioluminescent (FOC) dosimeters are members of a new family of dosimeters that are finding increased clinical applications. This study provides the first characterization of a Cu doped quartz FOC dosimeter at diagnostic energies, specifically across the range of x-ray energies and intensities used in mammographies. We characterize the calibration factors, linearity, angular dependence, and reproducibility of the FOC dosimeters. The sensitive element of each dosimeter was coupled to a photon counting photomultiplier module via 1 m long optical fibers. A computer controlled interface permitted real-time monitoring of the dosimeter output and rapid data acquisition. The axial-angular responses for all dosimeter models show nearly uniform response without any marked decrease in sensitivity. However, the normal-to-axial angular response showed a marked decrease in sensitivity of about 0 deg. C and 180 deg. C. In most clinical applications, appropriate dosimeter positioning can minimize the contributions of the varying normal-to-axial response. The FOC dosimeters having the greatest sensitive length provided the greatest sensitivity, with greatest to lowest sensitivity observed for 4.0, 1.9, 1.6, and 1.1 mm length sensitive elements. The average sensitivity of the dosimeters varies linearly with sensitive volume (R{sup 2}=95%) and as a function of tube potential and target/filter combinations, generally exhibiting an increased sensitivity for higher energies. The dosimeter sensitivity as a function of tube potential had an average increase of 4.72{+-}2.04% for dosimeter models and three target-filter combinations tested (Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, and Rh/Rh) over a range of 25-31 kVp. All dosimeter models exhibited a linear response (R{sup 2}{>=}0.997) to exposure for all target-filter combinations, tube potentials, and tube current-time product stations evaluated and demonstrated reproducibility within 2%. All of the dosimeters examined in this study provided a

  14. Characterization of a fiber-optic-coupled radioluminescent detector for application in the mammography energy range.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Luis A; Huston, Alan L; Justus, Brian L; Falkenstein, Paul; Brateman, Libby F; Hintenlang, David E

    2007-06-01

    Fiber-optic-coupled radioluminescent (FOC) dosimeters are members of a new family of dosimeters that are finding increased clinical applications. This study provides the first characterization of a Cu doped quartz FOC dosimeter at diagnostic energies, specifically across the range of x-ray energies and intensities used in mammographies. We characterize the calibration factors, linearity, angular dependence, and reproducibility of the FOC dosimeters. The sensitive element of each dosimeter was coupled to a photon counting photomultiplier module via 1 m long optical fibers. A computer controlled interface permitted real-time monitoring of the dosimeter output and rapid data acquisition. The axial-angular responses for all dosimeter models show nearly uniform response without any marked decrease in sensitivity. However, the normal-to-axial angular response showed a marked decrease in sensitivity of about 0 degrees C and 180 degrees C. In most clinical applications, appropriate dosimeter positioning can minimize the contributions of the varying normal-to-axial response. The FOC dosimeters having the greatest sensitive length provided the greatest sensitivity, with greatest to lowest sensitivity observed for 4.0, 1.9, 1.6, and 1.1 mm length sensitive elements. The average sensitivity of the dosimeters varies linearly with sensitive volume (R2=95%) and as a function of tube potential and target/filter combinations, generally exhibiting an increased sensitivity for higher energies. The dosimeter sensitivity as a function of tube potential had an average increase of 4.72 +/- 2.04% for dosimeter models and three target-filter combinations tested (Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, and Rh/Rh) over a range of 25-31 kVp. All dosimeter models exhibited a linear response (R2 > or = 0.997) to exposure for all target-filter combinations, tube potentials, and tube current-time product stations evaluated and demonstrated reproducibility within 2%. All of the dosimeters examined in this study provided a

  15. Home in the heat: dramatic seasonal variation in home range of desert golden eagles informs management for renewable energy development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braham, Melissa; Miller, Tricia A.; Duerr, Adam E.; Lanzone, Michael; Fesnock, Amy; LaPre, Larry; Driscoll, Daniel; Katzner, Todd Eli

    2015-01-01

    Renewable energy is expanding quickly with sometimes dramatic impacts to species and ecosystems. To understand the degree to which sensitive species may be impacted by renewable energy projects, it is informative to know how much space individuals use and how that space may overlap with planned development. We used global positioning system–global system for mobile communications (GPS-GSM) telemetry to measure year-round movements of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from the Mojave Desert of California, USA. We estimated monthly space use with adaptive local convex hulls to identify the temporal and spatial scales at which eagles may encounter renewable energy projects in the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan area. Mean size of home ranges was lowest and least variable from November through January and greatest in February–March and May–August. These monthly home range patterns coincided with seasonal variation in breeding ecology, habitat associations, and temperature. The expanded home ranges in hot summer months included movements to cooler, prey-dense, mountainous areas characterized by forest, grasslands, and scrublands. Breeding-season home ranges (October–May) included more lowland semi-desert and rock vegetation. Overlap of eagle home ranges and focus areas for renewable energy development was greatest when eagle home ranges were smallest, during the breeding season. Golden eagles in the Mojave Desert used more space and a wider range of habitat types than expected and renewable energy projects could affect a larger section of the regional population than was previously thought.

  16. Energies, Polarizabilities, and Forces of Interacting Molecules at Long or Intermediate Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying Q.

    Collision-induced molecular phenomena are widely researched subjects. In complement with other research, deriving new results to understand the nature and effects of the interaction between molecules at long or intermediate range is the main goal of this thesis. By applying Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory, we have obtained the molecular interaction energy to second order in terms of nonlocal polarizability densities. The derivation also includes the effects of an applied field. The nonlocal polarizability density alpha (r; r^', omega) plays a central role in this research. The polarizability density is a linear-response tensor that determines the electronic polarization induced at point r in a molecule, by an external electric field of frequency omega, acting at r^ '. When a nuclear position in the molecule shifts infinitesimally, we find that the change in alpha(r; r^', omega) is connected to the same hyperpolarizability beta_{alphabetagamma }(r; r^', omega, r^{' '}, 0) that describes the electronic charge distribution's response to external fields, i.e.: partialalpha_{ betagamma}(omega)/partial R ^{I}_alpha=int dr dr^' dr^ {''} beta _{betagammadelta}(r; r^', omega, r^{''}, 0) Z^{rm I} T_{deltaalpha}(r ^{''}, R^{rm I}). This is a generalization of the relationship between partialalpha_{beta gamma}(0)/partial R^{I} _alpha and beta_ {betagammadelta}(r; r^', r^ {''}).. Due to establishment of the relationships between partialalpha_{ betagamma}/partial R^{I }_alpha and beta _{betagammadelta}, we have obtained new analytical results for the forces acting on nuclei in a molecule. For the first time, we have proven the equivalence of forces from interaction energy calculations and those obtained via the Hellmann -Feynman theorem, order by order. We are also able to separate forces on nuclei in one of the interacting molecules (A) into those due to its "own" electrons vs. forces due to the charge distribution of the collision partner, B. By taking the long range

  17. Photofragmentation spectra of halogenated methanes in the VUV photon energy range.

    PubMed

    Cartoni, Antonella; Bolognesi, Paola; Fainelli, Ettore; Avaldi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-14

    In this paper an investigation of the photofragmentation of dihalomethanes CH2X2 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and chlorinated methanes (CH(n)Cl(4-n) with n = 0-3) with VUV helium, neon, and argon discharge lamps is reported and the role played by the different halogen atoms is discussed. Halogenated methanes are a class of molecules used in several fields of chemistry and the study of their physical and chemical proprieties is of fundamental interest. In particular their photodissociation and photoionization are of great importance since the decomposition of these compounds in the atmosphere strongly affects the environment. The results of the present work show that the halogen-loss is the predominant fragmentation channel for these molecules in the VUV photon energy range and confirm their role as reservoir of chlorine, bromine, and iodine atoms in the atmosphere. Moreover, the results highlight the peculiar feature of CH2F2 as a source of both fluorine and hydrogen atoms and the characteristic formation of I2(+) and CH2(+) ions from the photofragmentation of the CH2I2 molecule. PMID:24832270

  18. Passively-Switched, Non-Contact Energy Harvester for Broad Operational Range and Enhanced Durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, William Z.; Livermore, Carol

    2015-12-01

    Impact-based vibrational energy harvesters that switch passively among dynamical modes to best match the ambient conditions and perform frequency up-conversion to maximize power output can increase the operational range over which harvesters output useful power. The disadvantage of impact-based harvesting is that it can lead to premature system failure. This paper presents modelling and experimental validation of a harvester with passively- switched dynamics in which a magnetic non-contact interaction replaces the impact-based interaction of previous systems for greater robustness. A low-frequency driving beam couples to a higher-frequency generating beam via tip magnets. Simulations predict that the noncontact interaction drives a diversity of dynamical modes in which the tip of the driving beam variously is repelled from and passes the tip of generating beam. Experiments validate the predicted dynamical behaviour of the system. Output power levels are similar to predictions, with a power of 903 μW on the primary resonance at 1 g acceleration.

  19. Photofragmentation spectra of halogenated methanes in the VUV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Cartoni, Antonella; Bolognesi, Paola; Fainelli, Ettore; Avaldi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-14

    In this paper an investigation of the photofragmentation of dihalomethanes CH{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and chlorinated methanes (CH{sub n}Cl{sub 4−n} with n = 0–3) with VUV helium, neon, and argon discharge lamps is reported and the role played by the different halogen atoms is discussed. Halogenated methanes are a class of molecules used in several fields of chemistry and the study of their physical and chemical proprieties is of fundamental interest. In particular their photodissociation and photoionization are of great importance since the decomposition of these compounds in the atmosphere strongly affects the environment. The results of the present work show that the halogen-loss is the predominant fragmentation channel for these molecules in the VUV photon energy range and confirm their role as reservoir of chlorine, bromine, and iodine atoms in the atmosphere. Moreover, the results highlight the peculiar feature of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} as a source of both fluorine and hydrogen atoms and the characteristic formation of I{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}{sup +} ions from the photofragmentation of the CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} molecule.

  20. Range, energy, heat of motion in the modified NBC, anti-g, tank suit

    SciTech Connect

    Mastropaolo, J.A.; Gaston, A.N. de; Durck, C.H.; Van Santen, A.R. McDonnell Douglas Corp., Long Beach, CA )

    1992-08-01

    The modified nuclear, biologic pathogen, chemical (NBC), anti-g, anthropomorphic tank suit (ATS 2), was designed and modified. The ATS 2 provided a protective liner of water around, but not in contact with, the subject to the neck. For three subjects in the ATS 2, range of motion was lost in 30 of 32 tests by an average of 39 percent dry and 40 percent wet, p less than 0.001. For work rates from 49 to 151 W, all blood pressures were significantly elevated, p less than 0.05, but no other significant differences were found. The factors dry and wet, for heart rate were 1.2, 1.3; for systolic blood pressure 1.2, 1.4; for diastolic blood pressure 1.1, 1.3; for estimated mean blood pressure 1.1, 1.3; for ventilation 1.7, 2.0 and for energy of motion 1.40, 1.53. The factor 1.53 was an underestimation because of a suppressed maximal oxygen consumption. Special joints, pressure breathing and water cooling seemed desirable for future suits. 24 refs.

  1. Alternative separation of exchange and correlation energies in multi-configuration range-separated density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanova, Alexandrina; Teale, Andrew M.; Toulouse, Julien; Helgaker, Trygve; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2013-10-01

    The alternative separation of exchange and correlation energies proposed by Toulouse et al. [Theor. Chem. Acc. 114, 305 (2005)] is explored in the context of multi-configuration range-separated density-functional theory. The new decomposition of the short-range exchange-correlation energy relies on the auxiliary long-range interacting wavefunction rather than the Kohn-Sham (KS) determinant. The advantage, relative to the traditional KS decomposition, is that the wavefunction part of the energy is now computed with the regular (fully interacting) Hamiltonian. One potential drawback is that, because of double counting, the wavefunction used to compute the energy cannot be obtained by minimizing the energy expression with respect to the wavefunction parameters. The problem is overcome by using short-range optimized effective potentials (OEPs). The resulting combination of OEP techniques with wavefunction theory has been investigated in this work, at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and multi-configuration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) levels. In the HF case, an analytical expression for the energy gradient has been derived and implemented. Calculations have been performed within the short-range local density approximation on H2, N2, Li2, and H2O. Significant improvements in binding energies are obtained with the new decomposition of the short-range energy. The importance of optimizing the short-range OEP at the MCSCF level when static correlation becomes significant has also been demonstrated for H2, using a finite-difference gradient. The implementation of the analytical gradient for MCSCF wavefunctions is currently in progress.

  2. Alternative separation of exchange and correlation energies in multi-configuration range-separated density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Alexandrina; Teale, Andrew M; Toulouse, Julien; Helgaker, Trygve; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2013-10-01

    The alternative separation of exchange and correlation energies proposed by Toulouse et al. [Theor. Chem. Acc. 114, 305 (2005)] is explored in the context of multi-configuration range-separated density-functional theory. The new decomposition of the short-range exchange-correlation energy relies on the auxiliary long-range interacting wavefunction rather than the Kohn-Sham (KS) determinant. The advantage, relative to the traditional KS decomposition, is that the wavefunction part of the energy is now computed with the regular (fully interacting) Hamiltonian. One potential drawback is that, because of double counting, the wavefunction used to compute the energy cannot be obtained by minimizing the energy expression with respect to the wavefunction parameters. The problem is overcome by using short-range optimized effective potentials (OEPs). The resulting combination of OEP techniques with wavefunction theory has been investigated in this work, at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and multi-configuration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) levels. In the HF case, an analytical expression for the energy gradient has been derived and implemented. Calculations have been performed within the short-range local density approximation on H2, N2, Li2, and H2O. Significant improvements in binding energies are obtained with the new decomposition of the short-range energy. The importance of optimizing the short-range OEP at the MCSCF level when static correlation becomes significant has also been demonstrated for H2, using a finite-difference gradient. The implementation of the analytical gradient for MCSCF wavefunctions is currently in progress. PMID:24116558

  3. WATER SPOTTERS: Water, energy, isotopes and experiential learning in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noone, D. C.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Raudzens Bailey, A.; Buhr, S. M.; Smith, L. K.

    2011-12-01

    Providing students with tangible examples of the two-way interaction between human society and the climate system is a pressing challenge. Water is at the core of many issues in environmental change from local to global scales. In climate research, there are significant uncertainties in the role water plays in the climate system. "Water" can also act as a central theme that provides opportunities for science education at all levels. WATER SPOTTERS takes advantage of the prominent agricultural landscape of the region, which is a poignant example of how society influences the climate through irrigation, evaporation/transpiration and run-off and whose productivity is influenced by the climate system. Both natural grasslands and alpine ecosystems in the surrounding regions serve as examples of the native landscape. The centerpiece of this project is a 300m tower that is fully implemented with gas sampling lines and micrometeorological equipment to study the energy and water budgets of the region. Middle Schools that surround this site, many of which exist in visual contact with the tall tower, are provided with meteorological stations, which provide rainfall rates, temperature, humidity and radiation data. In coordination with the St Vrain Valley School District MESA (Math Engineering Science Achievement) program, students collect rain water samples that are analyzed and used as a core component of the research goals. The students use the weather stations as a way to directly explore their local climatology and provide data that is needed in research. We present an overview of the curriculum goals and associated physical infrastructure designed for middle school students in the Colorado Front Range to explore their local water cycle using water isotopes. The fixed infrastructure at the schools and tall tower are supplemented by mobile instruments such as an automated precipitation collector and snowflake photography system, which both fulfill science needs and provide

  4. Ranges and profiles of distribution of low-energy ions channeling in metal and semiconductor single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umarov, F. F.; Rasulov, A. M.; Khaidarov, A. K.

    2003-07-01

    In the present work peculiarities of trajectories and energy losses, ranges and profiles of distribution of low-energy different-mass ions channeling in thin single crystals of metals and semiconductors have been thoroughly studied by computer simulation in binary collision approximation. The character of oscillations of channeled-ion trajectories depending on their energies, aiming points from the axis of a channel, kind of interaction potential, crystal lattice type and temperature has been determined. It has been found that, in the case of light ions even at low energy, the main contribution to energy loss is made by inelastic energy losses, whereas for heavy ions, already at E < 10 keV elastic energy losses exceed inelastic ones. Profiles of the distribution of channeled ions have been calculated depending on crystal lattice type, kind of ions and their energy.

  5. Ionization By Impact Electrons in Solids: Electron Mean Free Path Fitted Over A Wide Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Ziaja, B; London, R A; Hajdu, J

    2005-06-09

    We propose a simple formula for fitting the electron mean free paths in solids both at high and at low electron energies. The free-electron-gas approximation used for predicting electron mean free paths is no longer valid at low energies (E < 50 eV), as the band structure effects become significant at those energies. Therefore we include the results of the band structure calculations in our fit. Finally, we apply the fit to 9 elements and 2 compounds.

  6. Analysis of Long-range Clean Energy Investment Scenarios forEritrea, East Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buskirk, Robert D.

    2004-05-07

    We discuss energy efficiency and renewable energy investments in Eritrea from the strategic long-term economic perspective of meeting Eritrea's sustainable development goals and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Energy efficiency and renewable energy are potentially important contributors to national productive capital accumulation, enhancement of the environment, expansion of energy services, increases in household standard of living, and improvements in health. In this study we develop a spreadsheet model for calculating some of the national benefits and costs of different levels of investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy. We then present the results of the model in terms of investment demand and investment scenario curves. These curves express the contribution that efficiency and renewable energy projects can make in terms of reduced energy sector operating expenses, and reduced carbon emissions. We provide demand and supply curves that show the rate of return, the cost of carbon emissions reductions vs. supply, and the evolution of the marginal carbon emissions per dollar of GDP for different investment levels and different fuel-type subsectors.

  7. Gamma-ray astronomy in the medium energy (10-50 MeV) range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Morris, D. J.; Palmeira, R. A. R.; Rao, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    To observe the medium energy component of the intense galactic center gamma-ray emission, two balloon flights of a medium energy gamma-ray spark chamber telescope were flown in Brazil in 1975. The results indicate the emission is higher than previously thought and above the predictions of a theoretical model proposed.

  8. Energy dependence of exotic nuclei production cross sections by photofission reaction in GDR range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Debasis; Khan, F. A.; Atta, Debasis; Basu, D. N.; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2016-02-01

    Photofission of actinides is studied in the region of nuclear excitation energies that covers the entire giant dipole resonance (GDR) region. The mass distributions of $^{238}$U photofission fragments have been explored theoretically for eight different endpoint bremsstrahlung energies from 11.5 MeV to 67.7 MeV which correspond to average photon energy of 9.09 MeV to 15.90 MeV. Among these energies, the 29.1 MeV corresponds to the average photon energy of 13.7$\\pm$0.3 MeV which coincides with GDR peak for $^{238}$U photofission. The integrated yield of $^{238}$U photofission as well as charge distribution of photofission products are calculated and its role in producing nuclei and their neutron-richness is investigated.

  9. Long-Range Energy Transport via Plasmonic Propagation in a Supramolecular Organic Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Armao, Joseph J; Rabu, Pierre; Moulin, Emilie; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2016-04-13

    Energy transport in organic materials is dependent on the coherent migration of optically induced excited states. For instance, in active organic waveguides, the tight packing of dye molecules allows delocalization of excitons over a distance generally limited to at most several hundred nanometers. Here, we demonstrate an alternative mechanism of energy transport in a triarylamine-based supramolecular organic waveguide that is plasmonic in nature and results in coherent energy propagation superior to 10 μm. The optical, electric, and magnetic properties of the doped material support the presence of metallic electrons that couple with and transport incident light. These results show that organic metals constitute a novel class of materials with efficient energy transport and are of potential interest for optoelectronics, plasmonics, and artificial light-energy harvesting systems. PMID:26985699

  10. The energy spectra of solar energetic protons in the large energy range: their functional form and parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho; Pervaia, Taisia

    2016-07-01

    Experimental data on the fluxes of protons of solar energetic particles (SEP) are analyzed. It is known that above energies of 2-45 MeV (averaging 27-30 MeV), the proton spectra are a power-law function of the energy (at relativistic energies - from the momentum) of the particles. At lower energies, the spectra become harder, with the high-energy part of the spectra forming the "knee". This report is devoted to the determination of the parameters of the SEP spectra, having the form of a "double power-law shape", to ascertain the reliability of the parameters of the approximations of the experimental data.

  11. Spin-unrestricted random-phase approximation with range separation: Benchmark on atomization energies and reaction barrier heights

    SciTech Connect

    Mussard, Bastien; Reinhardt, Peter; Toulouse, Julien; Ángyán, János G.

    2015-04-21

    We consider several spin-unrestricted random-phase approximation (RPA) variants for calculating correlation energies, with and without range separation, and test them on datasets of atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. We show that range separation greatly improves the accuracy of all RPA variants for these properties. Moreover, we show that a RPA variant with exchange, hereafter referred to as RPAx-SO2, first proposed by Szabo and Ostlund [J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4351 (1977)] in a spin-restricted closed-shell formalism, and extended here to a spin-unrestricted formalism, provides on average the most accurate range-separated RPA variant for atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. Since this range-separated RPAx-SO2 method had already been shown to be among the most accurate range-separated RPA variants for weak intermolecular interactions [J. Toulouse et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 084119 (2011)], this works confirms range-separated RPAx-SO2 as a promising method for general chemical applications.

  12. Dependence of cluster ranges on target cohesive energy: Molecular-dynamics study of energetic Au 402 cluster impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    It has long been known that the stopping and ranges of atoms and clusters depends on the projectile-target atom mass ratio. Recently, Carroll et al. [S.J. Carroll, P.D. Nellist, R.E. Palmer, S. Hobday, R. Smith, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 2654] proposed that the stopping of clusters also depends on the cohesive energy of the target. We investigate this dependence using a series of molecular-dynamics simulations, in which we systematically change the target cohesive energy, while keeping all other parameters fixed. We focus on the specific case of Au 402 cluster impact on van-der-Waals bonded targets. As target, we employ Lennard-Jones materials based on the parameters of Ar, but for which we vary the cohesive energy artificially up to a factor of 20. We show that for small impact energies, E0 ≲ 100 eV/atom, the range D depends on the target cohesive energy U, D ∝ U- β. The exponent β increases with decreasing projectile energy and assumes values up to β = 0.25 for E0 = 10 eV/atom. For higher impact energies, the cluster range becomes independent of the target cohesive energy. These results have their origin in the so-called 'clearing-the way' effect of the heavy Au 402 cluster; this effect is strongly reduced for E0 ≳ 100 eV/atom when projectile fragmentation sets in, and the fragments are stopped independently of each other. These results are relevant for studies of cluster stopping and ranges in soft matter.

  13. Monochromated, spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopic measurements of gold nanoparticles in the plasmon range.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, B; Riegler, K; Kothleitner, G; Grogger, W; Hofer, F

    2009-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles show optical properties different from bulk material due to resonance phenomena which depend on local structure and geometry. Electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows the spatially resolved measurement of these properties at a resolution of few nanometers. In this work, the first monochromated measurements of gold nanoparticles (spheres, rods and triangles) are presented. Due to the improved energy resolution of about 0.2 eV, surface plasmon excitations at energies below 1 eV could be accurately measured from raw experimental data. PMID:18722779

  14. Electron inelastic interactions in bioorganic compounds in the energy range of 20 10000 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Xia, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhao, M.; Ji, Y.; Li, F.; Huang, B.

    2005-09-01

    Systematic calculations of stopping powers (SPs) and mean free paths (MFPs) for 10 bioorganic compounds have been performed for electrons with energies lower than 10 keV, based on dielectric response theory and Penn’s statistical approximation. The exchange effect is also taken into account in the calculations. An empirical approach to obtain an optical energy loss function is presented for those organic compounds without available optical data. Using this method, the calculated values of the optical energy loss function are in good agreement with experimental data. Comparisons of SP and MFP values derived in this study with other published values are presented. Using the described model, the calculated mean ionization potentials agree well with the predictions from Bragg’s rule and the calculated SPs have also been compared with the Bethe Bloch results at an energy of 10 keV.

  15. Equation of state for tungsten over a wide range of densities and internal energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishchenko, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    A caloric model, which describes the pressure-density-internal-energy relationship in a broad region of condensed-phase states, is applied for tungsten. As distinct from previously known caloric equations of state for this material, a new form of the cold-compression curve at T = 0 K is used. Thermodynamic characteristics along the cold curve and shock Hugoniots are calculated for the metal and compared with some theoretical results and experimental data available at high energy densities.

  16. The impact of short-range forces on high-energy atom collisions in displacement cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyuk, German; Stoller, Roger; Tamm, Artur; Beland, Laurent; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Caro, Alfredo; Slipchenko4, Lyudmila; Osetskiy, Yury; Aabloo, Alvo; Klintenberg, Mattias; Wang, Yang

    Simulation of primary radiation damage formation in solid materials involves collisions between atoms with a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. As a result, during these collisions, the distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm. For such small atomic separations, interatomic potentials significantly underestimate the potential energy. The common practice involves using a screened Coulomb pair potential to describe the high-energy interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium potential. However, there is no standard method for choosing the joining parameters and defect production during cascade evolution has been shown to be sensitive to how the joining is done. We developed a new procedure, which includes the use of ab initio, calculations to determine the pair interactions at intermediate distances, together with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel. Research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, ``Center for Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution''.

  17. Daily energy expenditures of free-ranging Common Loon (Gavia immer) chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, F.; Karasov, W.H.; Meyer, M.W.; Kenow, K.P.

    2002-01-01

    We measured the daily energy expenditure of free-living Common Loon (Gavia immer) chicks using doubly labeled water (DLW). Average body mass of chicks during the DLW measures were 425, 1,052, and 1,963 g for 10 day-old (n = 5), 21 day-old (n = 6), and 35 day-old (n = 6) chicks, respectively, and their mean daily energy expenditures (DEE) were 686 kJ day-1, 768 kJ day-1, and 1,935 kJ day-1, respectively. Variation in DEE was not due solely to variation in body mass, but age was also a significant factor independent of body mass. Energy deposited in new tissue was calculated from age-dependent tissue energy contents and measured gains in body mass, which were 51, 54, and 33 g day-1 from the youngest to oldest chicks. Metabolizable energy (the sum of DEE and tissue energy) was used to estimate feeding rates of loon chicks and their exposure to mercury in the fish they consume. We calculated that loon chicks in Wisconsin consumed between 162 and 383 g wet mass of fish per day (depending on age), corresponding to intakes of mercury of 16-192 ??g day-1.

  18. The impact of CT scan energy on range calculation in proton therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Kevin K; Li, Hua; Zhao, Tianyu; Klein, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of tube potential (kVp) on the CT number (HU) to proton stopping power ratio (PSPR) conversion. The range and dosimetric change introduced by a mismatch in kVp used for the CT scan and the HU to PSPR table, based on a specific kVp, used to calculate dose are analyzed. Three HU to PSPR curves, corresponding to three kVp settings on the CT scanner, were created. A treatment plan was created for a single beam in a water phantom passing through a wedge-shaped bone heterogeneity. The dose was recalculated by changing only the HU to PSPR table used in the dose calculation. The change in the position of the distal 90% isodose line was recorded as a function of heterogeneity thickness along the beam path. The dosimetric impact of a mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table was investigated by repeating this procedure for five clinical plans comparing DVH data and dose difference distributions. The HU to PSPR tables diverge for CT numbers greater than 200 HU. In the phantom plan, the divergence of the tables resulted in a difference in range of 1.6 mm per cm of bone in the beam path, for the HU used. For the clinical plans, the dosimetric effect of a kVp mismatch depends on the amount of bone in the beam path and the proximity of OARs to the distal range of the planned beams. A mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table can introduce inaccuracy in the proton beam range. For dense bone, the measured range difference was approximately 1.6 mm per cm of bone along the beam path. However, the clinical cases analyzed showed a range change of 1 mm or less. Caution is merited when such a mismatch may occur. PMID:26699561

  19. Balancing the energy budget in free-ranging male Myotis daubentonii bats.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nina I; Tschapka, Marco; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Encarnação, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Mammals use five main, mutually nonexclusive mechanisms to balance energy budgets: torpor, metabolic compensation, change in activity patterns, change in ingested energy, and/or variability in digestive efficiency. Bats, as small and actively flying mammals, have a high mass-specific energy demand; therefore, balancing mechanisms should be pronounced in this group. We found that male Myotis daubentonii exhibited marked variation in the relative importance of these different mechanisms during their period of seasonal activity in response to extrinsic (ambient temperature, insect abundance) and intrinsic (reproduction, body condition) factors. Cold ambient temperatures in spring facilitated long and frequent daily torpor bouts, whereas in early summer, increased energy intake was the dominant factor in energy balancing. Intake was further increased in late summer, when insect abundance was highest, and daily torpor bouts were shorter and less frequent than in early summer. In autumn, males used metabolic compensation to reduce their resting metabolic rate in addition to daily torpor. Metabolic compensation might be one of the mechanisms that allow males to maintain high body temperature during the day while decreasing the need for foraging time at night, thus maximizing their opportunities to mate. PMID:23629886

  20. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom. PMID:19887515

  1. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Thomas D; Justus, Alan L; Gadd, S Milan; Olsher, Richard H; Devine, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  2. Gross range of motion in the cervical spine: the effects of osteopathic muscle energy technique in asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Burns, Denise K; Wells, Michael R

    2006-03-01

    Muscle energy technique is an established osteopathic manipulative intervention often used to treat somatic dysfunctions of the spine. There are little objective data to demonstrate its efficacy, however. To determine the efficacy of this osteopathic manipulative technique, the authors compared active cervical range of motion among asymptomatic young and middle-aged adults (n=18) before and after this treatment protocol, comparing those results against matched control subjects (n=14) who received sham manipulative treatment. Range of motion was measured in three planes (flexion/extension, lateral bending, rotation) on all subjects (N=32) using a motion-analysis system. Multiplanar gross cervical motion restrictions were diagnosed in this asymptomatic population. In the treatment group, cervical long restrictor muscles were treated with the muscle energy technique in the sagittal, frontal, and horizontal planes. The control group had relative restrictions addressed by means of a sham manipulative treatment protocol in which the barriers to motion were not challenged therapeutically. The muscle energy technique produced a significant increase in overall regional cervical range of motion in the treatment group (approximately 4 degrees) when compared with control subjects (P<.001). Significant differences were also observed in the magnitude of change in the three planes of movement (rotation, P<.002; lateral bending, P<.01), with flexion/extension being the least affected (P=.2). These data demonstrate that the application of the muscle energy technique can produce acute increases in the active cervical range of motion in asymptomatic subjects. PMID:16585381

  3. Tunable and long-range energy transfer efficiency through a graphene nanodisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanikolas, Vasilios D.; Marocico, Cristian A.; Bradley, A. Louise

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical investigation of the energy transfer efficiency between a pair of quantum emitters placed in proximity to a conducting graphene nanodisk. The energy transfer efficiency quantifies the contribution of the energy transfer process to the relaxation of the donor quantum system, as compared to the spontaneous emission rate of the donor in the absence of the acceptor. We use in our calculations the Green's tensor formalism in the electrostatic limit. This approximation works very well for the nanodisks considered here, for which the radius is much smaller than the emission wavelength of the donor. The approximate analytical solutions obtained are used to investigate the decay rate of a single quantum emitter and the energy transfer rate between quantum emitters in the vicinity of the graphene nanodisk. We find that these rates are enhanced several orders of magnitude compared with their free-space values. We determine the resonance frequencies of the spontaneous emission rate of a single quantum emitter to a graphene nanodisk, and the energy transfer rate between a pair of quantum emitters in proximity to a graphene nanodisk. We identify the surface modes which give the largest contributions to the energy transfer function. We connect the resonance frequency values and their surface plasmon wave numbers, which depend on the radius of the graphene nanodisk, with the dispersion relation of an infinite graphene monolayer at the same chemical potential. Analyzing the distance dependence of these rates, we are able to fit the full numerical results with a simple analytical expression which depends only on the geometrical characteristics of the graphene nanodisk, i.e., its radius. We show that the interaction distance depends on the transition dipole moment orientation and the different order resonance frequencies. The interaction distance between a pair of quantum emitters increases from a free-space value of 20 nm to reach values of

  4. Mesoscopic order and the dimensionality of long-range resonance energy transfer in supramolecular semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Clément; Makereel, François; Herz, Laura M.; Hoeben, Freek J. M.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.; Meijer, E. W.; Silva, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    We present time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on two series of oligo-p-phenylenevinylene materials that self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with thermotropic reversibility in dodecane. One set of derivatives form chiral helical stacks, while the second set form less organized "frustrated" stacks. Here we study the effects of supramolecular organization on the resonance energy transfer rates. We measure these rates in nanoassemblies formed with mixed blends of oligomers and compare them with the rates predicted by Förster theory. Our results and analysis show that control of supramolecular order in the nanometer length scale has a dominant effect on the efficiency and dimensionality of resonance energy transfer.

  5. Analysis of experimental data on neutron-proton scattering in the energy range between 0 and 150 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A. Petrov, N. M.

    2009-04-15

    Experimental data on neutron-proton scattering in the energy range between 0 and 150 keV are analyzed by using various sets of effective-range parameters. It is shown that, in contrast to the parameters corresponding to the phase shifts of a Nijmegen group, the parameters corresponding to the experimental phase shifts reported by a group from George Washington University (GWU group) lead to very good agreement between the calculated cross sections and their experimental counterparts in the energy region under consideration. On the basis of the experimental value of the cross section for neutron-proton scattering at an energy of 2 keV, the total cross section for neutron-proton scattering at zero energy was found to be {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.428(16) b, which is in very good agreement with a value of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.423(9) b, which was obtained as the weighted mean of the cross sections presented by Houke and Hurst. It is shown that, in the energy region around several tens of keV units, the effective-range parameters matched with Dilg's cross-section value of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.491(14) b lead to calculated cross sections whose values are in excess of their experimental counterparts.

  6. Analysis of experimental data on neutron-proton scattering in the energy range between 0 and 150 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental data on neutron-proton scattering in the energy range between 0 and 150 keV are analyzed by using various sets of effective-range parameters. It is shown that, in contrast to the parameters corresponding to the phase shifts of a Nijmegen group, the parameters corresponding to the experimental phase shifts reported by a group from George Washington University (GWU group) lead to very good agreement between the calculated cross sections and their experimental counterparts in the energy region under consideration. On the basis of the experimental value of the cross section for neutron—proton scattering at an energy of 2 keV, the total cross section for neutron-proton scattering at zero energy was found to be σ 0 = 20.428(16) b, which is in very good agreement with a value of σ 0 = 20.423(9) b, which was obtained as the weighted mean of the cross sections presented by Houke and Hurst. It is shown that, in the energy region around several tens of keV units, the effective-range parameters matched with Dilg’s cross-section value of σ 0 = 20.491(14) b lead to calculated cross sections whose values are in excess of their experimental counterparts.

  7. Rotationally elastic total cross sections for NH3 on electron impact over a wide energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Limbachiya, Chetan; Antony, Bobby

    2011-10-01

    Electron molecule collisions are important over incident energy from very low (0.01 eV) to intermediate and high energies (10 keV). We present rotationally elastic total cross sections for electron scattering for NH3 from 0.01 eV to 2 keV using two different theoretical formalisms. We use Quantemol-N formalism for calculating total cross sections up to threshold of the target and the Spherical Optical Complex Potential (SCOP) method for calculating total cross sections beyond threshold up to 2 keV. Electron molecule collisions are important over incident energy from very low (0.01 eV) to intermediate and high energies (10 keV). We present rotationally elastic total cross sections for electron scattering for NH3 from 0.01 eV to 2 keV using two different theoretical formalisms. We use Quantemol-N formalism for calculating total cross sections up to threshold of the target and the Spherical Optical Complex Potential (SCOP) method for calculating total cross sections beyond threshold up to 2 keV. MVK and BA thank DST, CGL thanks UGC new Delhi.

  8. Energy Expenditure of Free-Ranging Chicks of the Cape Gannet Morus capensis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, René A; Mullers, Ralf H E; Meijer, Haro A J; Underhill, Les G

    2015-01-01

    The Cape gannet Morus capensis, a large fish-eating seabird, is endemic to southern Africa. To study the energetics of nestling growth, we used the doubly labeled water technique to measure field metabolic rate (FMR) of nestlings, from hatchings to large partly feathered chicks (n = 17) at Malgas Island, Saldanha Bay, South Africa. At the same time, the growth rate of a large sample of chicks was measured (n = 338). These data, together with literature values on resting metabolic rate and body composition, were used to construct and partition the nestling energy budget. Nestling FMR (kJ d(-1)) increased with body mass according to FMR = 1.23m(0.923), r(2) = 0.944. Mass-specific FMR (FMRratio; kJ d(-1) g(-3/4)) was independent of chick age (r(2) = 0.20, P > 0.05); mean mass-specific FMR was 4.11 ± 1.28, n = 17. Peak daily-metabolized energy (DME), which represents the maximum rate at which parents must supply their nestlings, occurred at age 71 d and was 2,141 kJ d(-1). Between the ages 51 and 92 d (43% of the fledging period), the DME of Cape gannet chicks was equal to or surpassed 90% of adult FMR at the nest. Energy demand during this period of peak DME represented 58% of the total metabolized energy, which was estimated at 150.1 MJ for an average chick during a 97-d period, from hatching to fledging. Sensitivity analysis of the energy budget indicated that the model was robust; the biggest source of error (±15%) was for the mass-FMR equation used in the model. PMID:26052637

  9. Effective bridge spectral density for long-range biological energy and charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Oliver; Rupasov, Valery; Mukamel, Shaul

    1996-04-01

    The role of medium-induced relaxation of intermediate (bridge) sites in energy and charge transfer processes in molecular aggregates of arbitrary size and geometry is explored by means of Green's function techniques. The coupling of electronic and (solvent and intramolecular) nuclear degrees of freedom is incorporated using the Brownian oscillator model, which allows an exact calculation of the necessary two-point and four-point correlation functions of exciton operators. The signatures of energy transfer and spectral diffusion in time- and frequency-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy are studied. A unified expression for the frequency-dependent transfer rate is derived, which interpolates between the sequential and superexchange limits. Numerical results and a Liouville space pathway analysis for a donor-acceptor system coupled through a single bridge molecule are presented.

  10. Communication: Accurate hydration free energies at a wide range of temperatures from 3D-RISM.

    PubMed

    Misin, Maksim; Fedorov, Maxim V; Palmer, David S

    2015-03-01

    We present a new model for computing hydration free energies by 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) that uses an appropriate initial state of the system (as suggested by Sergiievskyi et al.). The new adjustment to 3D-RISM theory significantly improves hydration free energy predictions for various classes of organic molecules at both ambient and non-ambient temperatures. An extensive benchmarking against experimental data shows that the accuracy of the model is comparable to (much more computationally expensive) molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations can be readily performed with a standard 3D-RISM algorithm. In our work, we used an open source package AmberTools; a script to automate the whole procedure is available on the web (https://github.com/MTS-Strathclyde/ISc). PMID:25747054

  11. Long-Range Electric Vehicle Batteries: High Energy Density Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: In a battery, metal ions move between the electrodes through the electrolyte in order to store energy. Envia Systems is developing new silicon-based negative electrode materials for Li-Ion batteries. Using this technology, Envia will be able to produce commercial EV batteries that outperform today’s technology by 2-3 times. Many other programs have attempted to make anode materials based on silicon, but have not been able to produce materials that can withstand charge/discharge cycles multiple times. Envia has been able to make this material which can successfully cycle hundreds of times, on a scale that is economically viable. Today, Envia’s batteries exhibit world-record energy densities.

  12. Photofission and total photoabsorption cross sections in the energy range of shadowing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Deppman, A.; Silva, G.; Anefalos, S.; Hisamoto, F.H.; Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.

    2006-06-15

    The energy dependence of photofission cross section for heavy nuclei has recently been well described in terms of a Monte Carlo calculation at energies from the pion photoproduction threshold up to 1 GeV [see, for instance, A. Deppman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 182701]. Recent experimental data from CLAS (CEBAF Large Angle Spectrometer) collaboration have extended the measured photofission cross section up to 3.5 GeV for actinide and preactinide nuclei. In this work we address the calculation of photoabsorption and photofission cross sections for actinide and preactinide nuclei above 1 GeV, a region where the shadowing effect plays an important role in the nuclear photoabsorption process.

  13. Correlation of Resonance Charge Exchange Cross-Section Data in the Low-Energy Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1962-01-01

    During the course of a literature survey concerning resonance charge exchange, an unusual degree of agreement was noted between an extrapolation of the data reported by Kushnir, Palyukh, and Sena and the data reported by Ziegler. The data of Kushnir et al. are for ion-atom relative energies from 10 to 1000 ev, while the data of Ziegler are for a relative energy of about 1 ev. Extrapolation of the data of Kushnir et al. was made in accordance with Holstein's theory, 3 which is a combination of time-dependent perturbation methods and classical orbit theory. The results of this theory may be discussed in terms of a critical impact parameter b(sub c).

  14. Parameter estimation of magnetospheric particle distributions in the energy range 20 to 500 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K. M.

    1982-04-01

    A computer program which analyzes the energy spectra of energetic magnetospheric particles is described. The instrument characteristics and experimental design of the geostationary satellite GEOS-2 which provided the raw data are indicated. The program is designed to run on a UNIVAC 1100/81 computer and requires a plotter and a terminal with basic display enhancement features. Three dimensional charts showing the spectral distribution of energetic electrons are included.

  15. Conjugated Polymer Blend Microspheres for Efficient, Long-Range Light Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Soh; Braam, Daniel; Dao, Thang Duy; Saito, Hitoshi; Shibasaki, Kosuke; Ishii, Satoshi; Nagao, Tadaaki; Saeki, Akinori; Kuwabara, Junpei; Kanbara, Takaki; Kijima, Masashi; Lorke, Axel; Yamamoto, Yohei

    2016-05-24

    Highly luminescent π-conjugated polymeric microspheres were fabricated through self-assembly of energy-donating and energy-accepting polymers and their blends. To avoid macroscopic phase separation, the nucleation time and growth rate of each polymer in the solution were properly adjusted. Photoluminescence (PL) studies showed that efficient donor-to-acceptor energy transfer takes place inside the microspheres, revealing that two polymers are well-blended in the microspheres. Focused laser irradiation of a single microsphere excites whispering gallery modes (WGMs), where PL generated inside the sphere is confined and resonates. The wavelengths of the PL lines are finely tuned by changing the blending ratio, accompanying the systematic yellow-to-red color change. Furthermore, when several microspheres are coupled linearly, the confined PL propagates the microspheres through the contact point, and a cascade-like process converts the PL color while maintaining the WGM characteristics. The self-assembly strategy for the formation of polymeric nano- to microstructures with highly miscible polymer blends will be advantageous for optoelectronic and photonic device applications. PMID:27135760

  16. Experimental Testing of Rockfall Barriers Designed for the Low Range of Impact Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzi, O.; Spadari, M.; Giacomini, A.; Fityus, S.; Sloan, S. W.

    2013-07-01

    Most of the recent research on rockfall and the development of protective systems, such as flexible rockfall barriers, have been focused on medium to high levels of impacting energy. However, in many regions of the world, the rockfall hazard involves low levels of energy. This is particularly the case in New South Wales, Australia, because of the nature of the geological environments. The state Road and Traffic Authority (RTA) has designed various types of rockfall barriers, including some of low capacity, i.e. 35 kJ. The latter were tested indoors using a pendulum equipped with an automatic block release mechanism triggered by an optical beam. Another three systems were also tested, including two products designed by rockfall specialised companies and one modification of the initial design of the RTA. The research focused on the influence of the system's stiffness on the transmission of load to components of the barrier such as posts and cables. Not surprisingly, the more compliant the system, the less loaded the cables and posts. It was also found that removing the intermediate cables and placing the mesh downslope could reduce the stiffness of the system designed by the RTA. The paper concludes with some multi-scale considerations on the capacity of a barrier to absorb the energy based on experimental evidence.

  17. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoller, R. E.; Tamm, A.; Béland, L. K.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stocks, G. M.; Caro, A.; Slipchenko, L. V.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Aabloo, A.; Klintenberg, M.; et al

    2016-04-25

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. The distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm during these collisions. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. But, there is nomore » accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure.« less

  18. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R E; Tamm, A; Béland, L K; Samolyuk, G D; Stocks, G M; Caro, A; Slipchenko, L V; Osetsky, Yu N; Aabloo, A; Klintenberg, M; Wang, Y

    2016-06-14

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. During these collisions, the distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. However, there is no accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure. PMID:27110927

  19. Effects of long-range interactions on curvature energies of viral shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, Hamid R.; Božič, Anže Lošdorfer; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-05-01

    We formulate a theory of the effects of long-range interactions on the surface tension and spontaneous curvature of proteinaceous shells based on the general Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek mesoscale approach to colloid stability. We derive the full renormalization formulas for the elastic properties of the shell and consider in detail the renormalization of the spontaneous curvature as a function of the corresponding Hamaker coefficient, inner and outer capsid charges, and bathing solution properties. The renormalized spontaneous curvature is found to be a nonmonotonic function of several parameters describing the system.

  20. Damage growth in Si during self-ion irradiation: A study of ion effects over an extended energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, O.W.; El-Ghor, M.K.; White, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Damage nucleation/growth in single-crystal Si during ion irradiation is discussed. For MeV ions, the rate of growth as well as the damage morphology are shown to vary widely along the track of the ion. This is attributed to a change in the dominant, defect-related reactions as the ion penetrates the crystal. The nature of these reactions were elucidated by studying the interaction of MeV ions with different types of defects. The defects were introduced into the Si crystal prior to high-energy irradiation by self-ion implantation at a medium energy (100 keV). Varied damage morphologies were produced by implanting different ion fluences. Electron microscopy and ion-channeling measurements, in conjunction with annealing studies, were used to characterize the damage. Subtle changes in the predamage morphology are shown to result in markedly different responses to the high-energy irradiation, ranging from complete annealing of the damage to rapid growth. These divergent responses occur over a narrow range of dose (2--3 /times/ 10/sup 14/ cm/sup /minus/2/) of the medium-energy ions; this range also marks a transition in the growth behavior of the damage during the predamage implantation. A model is proposed which accounts for these observations and provides insight into ion-induced growth of amorphous layers in Si and the role of the amorphous/crystalline interface in this process. 15 refs, 9 figs.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Strategies for increasing the operating frequency range of vibration energy harvesters: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dibin; Tudor, Michael J.; Beeby, Stephen P.

    2010-02-01

    This review presents possible strategies to increase the operational frequency range of vibration-based micro-generators. Most vibration-based micro-generators are spring-mass-damper systems which generate maximum power when the resonant frequency of the generator matches the frequency of the ambient vibration. Any difference between these two frequencies can result in a significant decrease in generated power. This is a fundamental limitation of resonant vibration generators which restricts their capability in real applications. Possible solutions include the periodic tuning of the resonant frequency of the generator so that it matches the frequency of the ambient vibration at all times or widening the bandwidth of the generator. Periodic tuning can be achieved using mechanical or electrical methods. Bandwidth widening can be achieved using a generator array, a mechanical stopper, nonlinear (e.g. magnetic) springs or bi-stable structures. Tuning methods can be classified into intermittent tuning (power is consumed periodically to tune the device) and continuous tuning (the tuning mechanism is continuously powered). This review presents a comprehensive review of the principles and operating strategies for increasing the operating frequency range of vibration-based micro-generators presented in the literature to date. The advantages and disadvantages of each strategy are evaluated and conclusions are drawn regarding the relevant merits of each approach.

  2. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    Met programmatic milestones for program. Demonstrated improved performance with wide operating temperature electrolytes containing ester co-solvents (i.e., methyl butyrate) containing electrolyte additives in A123 prototype cells: Previously demonstrated excellent low temperature performance, including 11C rates at -30 C and the ability to perform well down to -60 C. Excellent cycle life at room temperature has been displayed, with over 5,000 cycles being demonstrated. Good high temperature cycle life performance has also been achieved. Demonstrated improved performance with methyl propionate-containing electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells: Demonstrated the wide operating temperature range capability in large cells (12 Ah), successfully scaling up technology from 0.25 Ah size cells. Demonstrated improved performance at low temperature and good cycle life at 40 C with methyl propionate-based electrolyte containing increasing FEC content and the use of LiBOB as an additive. Utilized three-electrode cells to investigate the electrochemical characteristics of high voltage systems coupled with wide operating temperature range electrolytes: From Tafel polarization measurements on each electrode, it is evident the NMC-based cathode displays poor lithium kinetics (being the limiting electrode). The MB-based formulations containing LiBOB delivered the best rate capability at low temperature, which is attributed to improved cathode kinetics. Whereas, the use of lithium oxalate as an additive lead to the highest reversible capacity and lower irreversible losses.

  3. Energy dependence and dose response of Gafchromic EBT2 film over a wide range of photon, electron, and proton beam energies

    SciTech Connect

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Tailor, Ramesh; Anand, Aman; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Prado, Karl; Vicic, Milos

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Since the Gafchromic film EBT has been recently replaced by the newer model EBT2, its characterization, especially energy dependence, has become critically important. The energy dependence of the dose response of Gafchromic EBT2 film is evaluated for a broad range of energies from different radiation sources used in radiation therapy. Methods: The beams used for this study comprised of kilovoltage x rays (75, 125, and 250 kVp), {sup 137}Cs gamma (662 KeV), {sup 60}Co gamma (1.17-1.33 MeV), megavoltage x rays (6 and 18 MV), electron beams (6 and 20 MeV), and proton beams (100 and 250 MeV). The film's response to each of the above energies was measured over the dose range of 0.4-10 Gy, which corresponds to optical densities ranging from 0.05 to 0.74 for the film reader used. Results: The energy dependence of EBT2 was found to be relatively small within measurement uncertainties (1{sigma}={+-}4.5%) for all energies and modalities. Conclusion: For relative and absolute dosimetry of radiation therapy beams, the weak energy dependence of the EBT2 makes it most suitable for clinical use compared to other films.

  4. Neutron Scattering Cross Sections for Natural Carbon in the Energy Range 2-133 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzay, O; Gnidak, M; Kolotyi, V; Korol, O; Razbudey, V; Venedyktov, V; Richardson, J H; Sale, K

    2006-06-14

    Natural carbon is well known as reactor structure material and at the same time as one of the most important neutron scattering standards, especially at energies less than 2 MeV, where the neutron total and neutron scattering cross sections are essentially identical. The best neutron total cross section experimental data for natural carbon in the range 1-500 keV have uncertainties of 1-4%. However, the difference between these data and those based on R-matrix analysis and used in the ENDF libraries is evident, especially in the energy range 1-60 keV. Experimental data for total scattering neutron cross sections for this element in the energy range 1-200 keV are scanty. The use of the technique of neutron filtered beams developed at the Kyiv Research Reactor makes it possible to reduce the uncertainty of the experimental data and to measure the neutron scattering cross sections on natural carbon in the energy range 2-149 keV with accuracies of 3-6%. Investigations of the neutron scattering cross section on carbon were carried out using 5 filters with energies 2, 3.5, 24, 54 and 133 keV. The neutron scattering cross sections were measured using a detector system covering nearly 2{pi}. The detector consisting of {sup 3}He counters (58 units), was located just above the carbon samples. The {sup 3}He counters (CHM-37, 7 atm, diameter =18 mm, L=50 cm) are placed in five layers (12 or 11 in each layer). To determine the neutron scattering cross section on carbon the relative method of measurement was used. The isotope {sup 208}Pb was used as the standard. The normalization factor, which is a function of detector efficiency, thickness of the carbon samples, thickness of the {sup 208}Pb sample, geometry, etc., for each sample and for each filter energy has been obtained through Monte Carlo calculations by means of the MCNP4C code. The results of measurements of the neutron scattering cross sections at reactor neutron filtered beams with energies in the range 2-133 keV on

  5. Energy expenditure of the spotted snow skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus, at two climatic extremes of its distribution range.

    PubMed

    Yuni, Luh P E K; Jones, Susan M; Wapstra, Erik

    2015-08-01

    The study of energy expenditure between populations of a wide ranging ectothermic species may provide an insight into how organisms respond to variation in environmental conditions. In this study, the energy expenditure of male spotted snow skinks, Niveoscincus ocellatus, living at the two extremes of the species' distribution range (warm lowland versus cold alpine site) was measured using the doubly labelled water method. Males at the cold alpine site expended more energy per gram per hour compared to their counterparts living at the warm lowland site. Lizards living at high altitude were active at lower temperatures compared with those at the low altitude site, which resulted in a longer activity time for the highland population. However, the differences in energy expenditure cannot be explained only by these differences in activity time. We further suggest that at the cold alpine site, lizards compensated for the low temperatures by elevating their metabolism which subsequently increased their energy expenditure. An elevated metabolic rate combined with modified thermoregulatory behaviour is likely an important mechanism allowing N. ocellatus to cope with the cold environments at high altitude sites. PMID:26267516

  6. Compton scattering for spectroscopic detection of ultra-fast, high flux, broad energy range X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Brunetti, E.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Montgomery, R.; Smith, G.; Hoek, M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Shea, V. O.; Issac, R. C.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Dias, J. M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Compton side-scattering has been used to simultaneously downshift the energy of keV to MeV energy range photons while attenuating their flux to enable single-shot, spectrally resolved, measurements of high flux X-ray sources to be undertaken. To demonstrate the technique a 1 mm thick pixelated cadmium telluride detector has been used to measure spectra of Compton side-scattered radiation from a Cobalt-60 laboratory source and a high flux, high peak brilliance X-ray source of betatron radiation from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

  7. Vibrational excitation in CO by electron impact in the energy range 10-90 eV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Truhlar, D. G.; Williams, W.; Trajmar, S.

    1972-01-01

    The ratio of the scattering intensity for the v double prime = 1 excitation to the elastic scattering intensity at 40- and 80-deg scattering angles has been determined for 10- to 90-eV impact energies for electron scattering by CO. These ratio curves exhibit broad peaks near 20-eV impact energy which cannot be accounted for by plane-wave calculations based on potential scattering models. The peaks are indicative of a resonant excitation process (or processes) in the v double prime = 1 channel in the range from 15 to 25 eV.

  8. Long Range Nanoparticle Surface Energy Transfer Ruler for Monitoring Photothermal Therapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anant K.; Lu, Wentong; Senapati, Dulal; Khan, Sadia Afrin; Fan, Zhen; Senapati, Tapas; Demeritte, Teresa; Beqa, Lule; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanotechnology driven recent approach opens up a new possibility for the destruction of cancer cells through photothermal therapy. Ultimately, photothermal therapy may enter into clinical therapy and as a result, there is an urgent need for techniques to monitor on time tumor response to therapy. Driven by the need, in this article we report nanoparticle surface energy transfer (NSET) approach to monitor photothermal therapy process by measuring the simple fluorescence intensity change. Florescence intensity change is due to the light-controlled photothermal release of ssDNA/RNA via dehybridization during therapy process. Our time dependent results show that just by monitoring fluorescence intensity change, one can monitor photothermal therapy response during therapy process. Possible mechanism and operating principle of our NSET assay have been discussed. Ultimately, this NSET assay could have enormous potential applications in rapid, on-site monitoring of photothermal therapy process, which is critical to providing effective treatment of cancer and MDRB infections. PMID:21744496

  9. Optical constants for hard x-ray multilayers over the energy range E = 35 - 180 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, David L.; Donguy, Soizik; Hailey, Charles J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2004-02-01

    We have determined experimentally optical constants for eight thin film materials that can be used in hard X-ray multilayer coatings. Thin film samples of Ni.97V.03, Mo, W, Pt, C, B4C, Si and SiC were deposited by magnetron sputtering onto superpolished optical flats. Optical constants were determined from fits to reflectance-vs-incidence angle measurements made using synchrotron radiation over the energy range E=35 180 keV. We have also measured the X-ray reflectance of a prototype W/SiC multilayer coating over the energy range E=35 100 keV, and we compare the measured reflectance with a calculation using the newly derived optical constants.

  10. A phenomenological model to study the energy discrimination potential of GEM detectors in the X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, F.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Claps, G.; Gabellieri, L.

    2015-11-01

    An empirical model is presented to study the operational characteristics of GEM detectors in the X-ray range and, in particular, its energy discrimination potential. Physical processes are modelled from a macroscopic point of view, to provide a simple but effective simulation tool. Experimental data from monochromatic and combined, two-line fluorescence sources, are used to validate the model and provide realistic estimates of the empirical parameters used in the description. The model is instrumental in understanding the role of threshold, gain and operational conditions to achieve energy-discriminating response. Appropriate choices of gas mixtures, threshold and gain will permit to best utilise this new functionality of the GEM to improve the efficiency of image detectors in applications ranging from in-situ imaging in harsh environments, such as tokamaks, to composite materials analysis and medical imaging of tissues.

  11. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions.

    PubMed

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D; Ziegler, James F

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u(-1) to 450 MeV u(-1) or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity. PMID:27530803

  12. Collision Cross Sections for O + Ar(+) Collisions in the Energy Range 0.03-500 eV.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A A; Balint-Kurti, G G; Palov, A P

    2016-07-14

    The interatomic potentials of the a(2)Π and b(2)Π states of the OAr(+) molecule are calculated using the relativistic complete-active space Hartree-Fock method followed by a multireference configuration interaction calculation with an aug-cc-pwCVNZ-DK basis sets where N is 4 and 5. The calculations were followed by an extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. An avoided crossing between the two potential energy curves is found at an internuclear separation of 5.75 bohr (3.04 Å). As the transition probability between the curves is negligible in the relative collision energy range 0.03-500 eV of interest here, collisions on the lower adiabatic a(2)Π potential may be treated without reference to the upper state. For low energies and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers, the one-dimensional radial Schrödinger equation is solved numerically using a Numerov algorithm method to determine the phase shift. The semiclassical JWKB approximation was employed for relative energies greater than 5 eV and orbital angular quantum numbers higher than 500. Differential, integral, transport (diffusion), and viscosity cross sections for elastic collisions of oxygen atoms with argon ions are calculated for the first time for the range of relative collision energies studied. The calculated cross sections are expected to be of utility in the fields of nanotechnology and arc welding. The combination of an Ar(+)((2)P) ion and a O((3)P) atom gives rise to a total of 12 different molecular electronic states that are all coupled by spin-orbit interactions. Potential energy curves for all 12 states are computed at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level and scattering calculations performed. The results are compared with those obtained using just the lowest potential energy curve. PMID:26741565

  13. Compton scattering from C12 using tagged photons in the energy range 65-115 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, L. S.; Shoniyozov, K.; Preston, M. F.; Anderson, M. D.; Annand, J. R. M.; Boselli, M.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brudvik, J.; Capone, J. I.; Feldman, G.; Fissum, K. G.; Hansen, K.; Henshaw, S. S.; Isaksson, L.; Jebali, R.; Kovash, M. A.; Lewis, K.; Lundin, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Middleton, D. G.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Murray, M.; Nathan, A. M.; Nutbeam, S.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Schröder, B.; Seitz, B.; Stave, S. C.; Weller, H. R.; Compton@Max-Lab Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Elastic scattering of photons from C12 has been investigated using quasimonoenergetic tagged photons with energies in the range 65-115 MeV at laboratory angles of 60∘, 120∘, and 150∘ at the Tagged-Photon Facility at the MAX IV Laboratory in Lund, Sweden. A phenomenological model was employed to provide an estimate of the sensitivity of the 12C(γ ,γ)12C cross section to the bound-nucleon polarizabilities.

  14. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC presents a systematic study of high transverse momentum charged di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation {Delta}{phi}, in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation {Delta}{eta} is observed in central Au+Au, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in {Delta}{eta} x {delta}{phi} can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component which is narrow in {Delta}{phi} and depends only weakly on {Delta}{eta}, the 'ridge'. Using two systematically independent analyses, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger p{sub t} > 6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2 < p{sub t} < 4 GeV/c).

  15. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider presents a systematic study of high-transverse-momentum charged-di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation Δϕ in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation Δη is observed in central Au+Au collisions, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in Δη×Δϕ can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component that is narrow in Δϕ and depends only weakly on Δη, the “ridge.” Using two systematically independent determinations of the background normalization and shape, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger pt>6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse-momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2

  16. Organizational, Design and Technology Issues in the Process of Protection of Underground Historic Monuments/ Probelmy Organizacyjne, Projektowe I Technologiczne W Procesie Zabezpieczania Zabytkowych Podziemi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, Maciej; Chmura, Janusz; Wieja, Tomasz

    2015-06-01

    Underground historic monuments constitute the immanent part of the cultural and natural heritage. Protecting and opening underground historic objects, as the investment aim, is a process of renewed actions taken in objects that are degraded or out of order, contributing to improvement of quality of life of residents, restoring new functions, reconstruction of social bonds. Underground historic buildings should be subjected to processes of protecting and revitalization. Determining the state of a given building and the adjustability of its spatial structure to introducing a new function or making it available to tourist purposes are the basis for these actions. Zabytkowe podziemia stanowią immanentną część dziedzictwa kulturowego i przyrodniczego. Zabezpieczenie i udostępnienie podziemnych obiektów zabytkowych, jako zamierzenia inwestycyjnego, jest procesem ponownych działań podejmowanych w zdegradowanych lub nieczynnych obiektach, przyczyniając się do poprawy jakości życia mieszkańców, przywrócenia nowych funkcji, odbudowy więzi społecznych. Podziemne obiekty zabytkowe powinny być poddane procesom zabezpieczenia i rewitalizacji. Podstawą tych działań jest określenie stanu zachowania danego obiektu oraz możliwości dostosowania jego struktury przestrzennej do wprowadzenia nowej funkcji lub udostępnienia w celach turystycznych. Zasadniczym problemem jest, na etapie organizacyjnym, brak jednolitego ustawodawstwa prawnego dotyczącego procesu zabezpieczania podziemnych obiektów. W artykule przedstawiamy zasadnicze problemy organizacyjne, projektowe i technologiczne występujące w procesie inwestycyjnym zabezpieczania podziemnych obiektów zabytkowych. Efektem tych prac jest transformacja podziemnego obiektu w strukturę przestrzenną o nowej funkcji użytkowej.

  17. A Constant Energy-Per-Cycle Ring Oscillator Over a Wide Frequency Range for Wireless Sensor Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Inhee; Sylvester, Dennis; Blaauw, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an energy-efficient oscillator for wireless sensor nodes (WSNs). It avoids short-circuit current by minimizing the time spent in the input voltage range from Vthn to [Vdd − |Vthp|]. A current-feeding scheme with gate voltage control enables the oscillator to operate over a wide frequency range. A test chip is fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show that the proposed oscillator achieves a constant energy-per-cycle (EpC) of 0.8 pJ/cycle over the 21–60 MHz frequency range and is more efficient than a conventional current-starved ring oscillator (CSRO) below 300 kHz at 1.8 V supply voltage. As an application example, the proposed oscillator is implemented in a switched-capacitor DC–DC converter. The converter is 11%–56% more efficient for load power values ranging from 583 pW to 2.9 nW than a converter using a conventional CSRO. PMID:27546899

  18. A space crystal diffraction telescope for the energy range of nuclear transitions

    SciTech Connect

    von Ballmoos, P.; Naya, J.E.; Albernhe, F.; Vedrenne, G.; Smither, R.K.; Faiz, M.; Fernandez, P.; Graber, T.

    1995-04-01

    This paper contains literature from American Power Conference Air Toxics Being Measured Accurately, Controlled Effectively NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} Emissions Reduced; Surface Condensers Improve Heat Rate; Usable Fuel from Municipal Solid Waste; Cofiring Technology Reduces Gas Turbine Emissions; Trainable, Rugged Microsensor Identifies of Gases; High-Tc Superconductors Fabricated; High-Temperature Superconducting Current Leads; Vitrification of Low-Level Radioactive and Mixed Wastes; Characterization, Demolition, and Disposal of Contaminated Structures; On-Line Plant Diagnostics and Management; Sulfide Ceramic Materials for Improved Batteries; Flywheel Provides Efficient Energy Storage; Battery Systems for Electric Vehicles; Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells for Transportation; Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells for Transportation; Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Monitors Emissions in Real-Time; Advance Alternative-Fueled Automotive Technologies; Thermal & Mechanical Process; Flow-Induced Vibration & Flow Distribution in Shell-and-Tube Heat Exchangers; Ice Slurries for District Cooling; Advanced Fluids; Compact Evaporator and Condenser Technology; and Analysis of Failed Nuclear Power Station Components.

  19. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of drugs in the thermal and hyperthermal energy range -- a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Amirav, Aviv; Fujü, Toshihiro

    1995-12-01

    Thermal and hyperthermal surface ionization (SI) mass spectra of nicotine, caffeine and lidocaine were obtained using a rhenium oxide surface. Thermal surface ionization was studied on an oxidized surface positioned inside an electron impact ion source, while hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) was obtained upon seeding the compounds into a hydrogen or helium supersonic molecular beam that scattered from the rhenium oxide surface. Both HSI and SI provide rich, informative and complementary mass spectral information. The results indicate that SI follows thermal dissociation processes on the surface prior to the desorption of the ion, while in HSI no thermal equilibrium is established and the ionization process is impulsive, followed by mostly unimolecular ion dissociation. HSI mass spectra are similar to electron impact mass spectra in the fragment ion masses, but the observed relative intensities are different. HSI is a softer ionization method compared to SI, and enables the degree of ion fragmentation to be tuned so that it can be minimized to a low level at low molecular kinetic energy. In SI, limited control over the degree of fragmentation is possible through the surface temperature. The analytical mass spectrometric applications of SI and HSI are briefly mentioned.

  20. Bismuth Sulfide Nanoflowers for Detection of X-rays in the Mammographic Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-03-01

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale ``flower-like'' structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials - 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber.

  1. Bismuth Sulfide Nanoflowers for Detection of X-rays in the Mammographic Energy Range

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale “flower-like” structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials – 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber. PMID:25801531

  2. Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes for High Voltage and High Specific Energy Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Hwang, C.; Krause, F. C.; Soler, J.; West, W. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Amine, K.

    2012-01-01

    A number of electrolyte formulations that have been designed to operate over a wide temperature range have been investigated in conjunction with layered-layered metal oxide cathode materials developed at Argonne. In this study, we have evaluated a number of electrolytes in Li-ion cells consisting of Conoco Phillips A12 graphite anodes and Toda HE5050 Li(1.2)Ni(0.15)Co(0.10)Mn(0.55)O2 cathodes. The electrolytes studied consisted of LiPF6 in carbonate-based electrolytes that contain ester co-solvents with various solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) promoting additives, many of which have been demonstrated to perform well in 4V systems. More specifically, we have investigated the performance of a number of methyl butyrate (MB) containing electrolytes (i.e., LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + MB (20:20:60 v/v %) that contain various additives, including vinylene carbonate, lithium oxalate, and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB). When these systems were evaluated at various rates at low temperatures, the methyl butyrate-based electrolytes resulted in improved rate capability compared to cells with all carbonate-based formulations. It was also ascertained that the slow cathode kinetics govern the generally poor rate capability at low temperature in contrast to traditionally used LiNi(0.80)Co(0.15)Al(0.05)O2-based systems, rather than being influenced strongly by the electrolyte type.

  3. Characterisation of a counting imaging detector for electron detection in the energy range 10-20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, G.; Sikharulidze, I.; Matheson, J.; Derbyshire, G.; Kirkland, A. I.; Abrahams, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    As part of a feasibility study into the use of novel electron detector for X-ray photoelectron emission microscopes (XPEEM) and related methods, we have characterised the imaging performance of a counting Medipix 2 readout chip bump bonded to a Silicon diode array sensor and directly exposed to electrons in the energy range 10-20 keV. Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and Noise Power Spectra (NPS) are presented, demonstrating very good performance for the case of electrons with an energy of 20 keV. Significant reductions in DQE are observed for electrons with energy of 15 keV and less, down to levels of 20% for electrons of 10 keV.

  4. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy 800 MeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sjue, Sky K. L.; Morris, Christopher L.; Merrill, Frank Edward; Mariam, Fesseha Gebre; Saunders, Alexander

    2016-01-14

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the protonimaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane.more » Furthermore, comparison with a series of static calibrationimages demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.« less

  5. DEIMOS: A beamline dedicated to dichroism measurements in the 350–2500 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ohresser, P. Otero, E.; Choueikani, F.; Chen, K.; Stanescu, S.; Deschamps, F.; Moreno, T.; Polack, F.; Lagarde, B.; Daguerre, J.-P.; Marteau, F.; Scheurer, F.; Joly, L.; Muller, B.; Kappler, J.-P.; Bunau, O.; Sainctavit, Ph.

    2014-01-15

    The DEIMOS (Dichroism Experimental Installation for Magneto-Optical Spectroscopy) beamline was part of the second phase of the beamline development at French Synchrotron SOLEIL (Source Optimisée de Lumière à Energie Intermédiaire du LURE) and opened to users in March 2011. It delivers polarized soft x-rays to perform x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and x-ray linear dichroism in the energy range 350–2500 eV. The beamline has been optimized for stability and reproducibility in terms of photon flux and photon energy. The main end-station consists in a cryo-magnet with 2 split coils providing a 7 T magnetic field along the beam or 2 T perpendicular to the beam with a controllable temperature on the sample from 370 K down to 1.5 K.

  6. Photofission of sup 238 U with monochromatic gamma rays in the energy range 11--16 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, W.; Kneissl, U.; Weber, T. ); Stroeher, H. ); Cardman, L.S.; Debevec, P.T.; Hoblit, S.D.; Jones, R.T.; Nathan, A.M. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL )

    1990-11-01

    We have measured the angular and mass distributions of the fragments from photofission of {sup 238}U using tagged photons with energies between 11 and 16 MeV. The fission fragments were detected by a 4{pi} arrangement of position-sensitive parallel-plate avalanche counters. Anisotropic angular distributions have been observed for the first time in the energy range where second-chance fission becomes energetically possible. A consistent assignment of {ital J}{sup {pi}} and {ital K} for the fission channels in {sup 237}U has been deduced from a combined analysis of ({gamma},{ital nf}) and ({ital e},{ital e}{prime}{ital f}) data. A clear relationship between the anisotropies and the fragment mass asymmetry has also been established. This correlation, together with the energy dependence of the angular distribution parameters, points to a possible interpretation of the results in terms of a recent theoretical model incorporating multiple exit channels in fission.

  7. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV.

    PubMed

    Sjue, S K L; Mariam, F G; Merrill, F E; Morris, C L; Saunders, A

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets. PMID:26827356

  8. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  9. On the analytical representation of free energy profiles with a Morse/long-range model: Application to the water dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritzant-Martinez, Yalina; Zeng, Tao; Broom, Aron; Meiering, Elizabeth; Le Roy, Robert J.; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the analytical representation of potentials of mean force (pmf) using the Morse/long-range (MLR) potential approach. The MLR method had previously been used to represent potential energy surfaces, and we assess its validity for representing free-energies. The advantage of the approach is that the potential of mean force data only needs to be calculated in the short to medium range region of the reaction coordinate while the long range can be handled analytically. This can result in significant savings in terms of computational effort since one does not need to cover the whole range of the reaction coordinate during simulations. The water dimer with rigid monomers whose interactions are described by the commonly used TIP4P model [W. Jorgensen and J. Madura, Mol. Phys. 56, 1381 (1985)], 10.1080/00268978500103111 is used as a test case. We first calculate an "exact" pmf using direct Monte Carlo (MC) integration and term such a calculation as our gold standard (GS). Second, we compare this GS with several MLR fits to the GS to test the validity of the fitting procedure. We then obtain the water dimer pmf using metadynamics simulations in a limited range of the reaction coordinate and show how the MLR treatment allows the accurate generation of the full pmf. We finally calculate the transition state theory rate constant for the water dimer dissociation process using the GS, the GS MLR fits, and the metadynamics MLR fits. Our approach can yield a compact, smooth, and accurate analytical representation of pmf data with reduced computational cost.

  10. Performance of Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As cells over a range of proton energies

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, I.; Jain, R.K.; Vargasaburto, C.; Wilt, D.M.; Scheiman, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As solar cells were processed by OMVPE and their characteristics determined at proton energies of 0.2, 0.5, and 3 MeV. Emphasis was on characteristics applicable to use of this cell as the low bandgap member of a monolithic, two terminal high efficiency InP/GaInAs cell. It was found that the radiation induced degradation in efficiency, I(sub SC), V(sub OC) and diffusion length increased with decreasing proton energy. When efficiency degradations were compared with InP it was observed that the present cells showed considerably more degradation over the entire energy range. Similar to InP, R(sub C), the carrier removal rate, decreased with increasing proton energy. However, numerical values for R(sub C) differed from those observed with InP. The difference is attributed to differing defect behavior between the two cell types. It was concluded that particular attention should be paid to the effects of low energy protons especially when the particle`s track ends in one cell of the multibandgap device.

  11. Performance of Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As cells over a range of proton energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Jain, R. K.; Vargasaburto, C.; Wilt, D. M.; Scheiman, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As solar cells were processed by OMVPE and their characteristics determined at proton energies of 0.2, 0.5, and 3 MeV. Emphasis was on characteristics applicable to use of this cell as the low bandgap member of a monolithic, two terminal high efficiency InP/GaInAs cell. It was found that the radiation induced degradation in efficiency, I(sub SC), V(sub OC) and diffusion length increased with decreasing proton energy. When efficiency degradations were compared with InP it was observed that the present cells showed considerably more degradation over the entire energy range. Similar to InP, R(sub C), the carrier removal rate, decreased with increasing proton energy. However, numerical values for R(sub C) differed from those observed with InP. The difference is attributed to differing defect behavior between the two cell types. It was concluded that particular attention should be paid to the effects of low energy protons especially when the particle's track ends in one cell of the multibandgap device.

  12. Ionization at the Noble Gases Ion-Atom Collisions in the 1-7 KeV Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikiani, Boris; Chitaladze, Marika; Japaridze, Josif; Kavlashvili, Nana

    2002-10-01

    The absolute total cross sections for production of free electrons, all positive show target gas ions and partial cross sections for production of double charged slow target gas ions at these collisions have been measured. The measurements were carried out by improved transfers electric field ("condenser") and magnetic mass-analyzer methods[1]. It was shown that in the investigated energy range practically there are now slow ions with charged state more than two. Control experiments have been shown that process of electron's liberation from fast particles ("stripping" process) is unlikely in the investigated energy range. Therefore, one can to suppose that total cross sections for productions of free electrons are equal to the total cross sections of ionization of the target gas atoms. For symmetrical pairs of colliding particles (He+ _ He, Ne+ _ Ne , etc) and for pairs He+ _ Ne, Ar+ _ Kr and Kr+ _ Xe values of partial cross-sections are negligible. In the cases of He+ _ Kr and He+ _ Xe pairs value of these partial cross sections increases with colliding energy and reaches about three percent at the energy 4kev. However, in the cases of He+ _ Ar, Na+ _ Ar, Kr, Xe the values of relative portion of the double charged ions in the total amount of slow positive ions are significant (for example in He+ _ Ar collision at the energy of 4kev this portion is about 20-25 percent). Analyzes of the correlation diagrams of the diabetics terms of colliding particles system (MS) [2] show that the electron capture processes are accompanying by simultaneous excitation of auto- ionization states of target gas ions. The decay of these states are responsible for realize of double ionization process of the target gas atoms. 1. B. Kikiani, R.Lomsadze, N. Mosulishvili, Proceedings of Tbilisi State University, Physics, 34, 114, 1999; 2 M. Barat, W.Lichten, Phys. Rev, A6, 211, 1972.

  13. Short- and long-range energy strategies for Japan and the world after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, K.; Wagner, F.; Yamagata, Y.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in 2011 has caused profound effects on energy policies in Japan and worldwide. This is particularly because it occurred at the time of the growing awareness of global warming forcing measures towards decarbonised energy production, namely the use of fossil fuels has to be drastically reduced from the present level of more than 80% by 2050. A dilemma has now emerged because nuclear power, a CO2-free technology with proven large-scale energy production capability, lost confidence in many societies, especially in Japan and Germany. As a consequence, there is a world-wide effort now to expand renewable energies (REs), specifically photo-voltaic (PV) and wind power. However, the authors conjecture that PV and wind power can provide only up to a 40% share of the electricity production as long as sufficient storage is not available. Beyond this level, the technological (high grid power) and economic problems (large surplus production) grow. This is the result of the analysis of the growing use of REs in the electricity systems for Germany and Japan. The key element to overcome this situation is to develop suitable energy storage technologies. This is particularly necessary when electricity will become the main energy source because also transportation, process heat and heating, will be supplied by it. Facing the difficulty in replacing all fossil fuels in all countries with different technology standards, a rapid development of carbon capture and storage (CCS) might also be necessary. Therefore, for the short-range strategy up to 2050, all meaningful options have to be developed. For the long-range strategy beyond 2050, new energy sources (such as thermonuclear fusion, solar fuels and nuclear power—if inherently safe concepts will gain credibility of societies again), and large-scale energy storage systems based on novel concepts (such as large-capacity batteries and hydrogen) is required. It is acknowledged

  14. Conformers of Kojic Acid and Their Near-IR-Induced Conversions: Long-Range Intramolecular Vibrational Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Halasa, Anna; Reva, Igor; Lapinski, Leszek; Rostkowska, Hanna; Fausto, Rui; Nowak, Maciej J

    2016-05-01

    Conformational transformations were investigated for molecules of kojic acid trapped in low-temperature argon and nitrogen matrixes. Two conformers, differing from each other by 120° rotation of the hydroxymethyl (-CH2OH) moiety, were found to be populated in freshly deposited matrixes, prior to any irradiation. Matrixes containing isolated monomers of kojic acid were irradiated with narrowband, tunable near-infrared (near-IR) laser light. Excitations at wavenumbers corresponding to the overtone of the stretching vibration of the OH bond of the hydroxymethyl group led to conversion of one of the observed conformers into another. The direction of this conformational transformation depended on the wavenumber (within the 7126-7115 cm(-1) range) used for irradiation. The same conformational photoconversion was also observed to occur upon narrowband irradiation at much lower wavenumbers (from the 6468-6447 cm(-1) range). Near-IR light from this range selectively excites overtone vibrations of the OH group directly attached to the heterocyclic ring. Such an observation provides a convincing evidence of a long-range vibrational energy transfer from the initially excited OH group (directly attached to the ring) to the remote hydroxymethyl fragment which changes its orientation. Structural changes, occurring in matrix-isolated molecules of kojic acid upon near-IR excitation, were monitored by FTIR spectroscopy. PMID:27070389

  15. SINGLE- AND TWO-COMPONENT GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRA IN THE FERMI GBM-LAT ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, P.; Meszaros, P. E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu

    2012-08-10

    Most Fermi gamma-ray burst spectra appear as either a broken power law extending to GeV energies or as a broken power with a separate GeV power-law component. Here we show that such spectra can be understood in terms of magnetically dominated relativistic jets where a dissipative photosphere produces the prompt MeV emission, which is extended into the GeV range by inverse Compton scattering in the external shock, with possible contributions from a reverse shock as well. The bulk Lorentz factors required in these models are in the range of 300-600, and the MeV-GeV time delays arise naturally. In some cases an optical flash and a sub-dominant thermal component are also present.

  16. Experimental search for solar hidden photons in the eV energy range using kinetic mixing with photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mizumoto, T.; Ohta, R.; Horie, T.; Suzuki, J.; Minowa, M.; Inoue, Y. E-mail: comic@icepp.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: jsuzuki@icepp.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: minowa@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-07-01

    We have searched for solar hidden photons in the eV energy range using a dedicated hidden photon detector. The detector consisted of a parabolic mirror with a diameter of 500 mm and a focal length of 1007 mm installed in a vacuum chamber, and a photomultiplier tube at its focal point. The detector was attached to the Tokyo axion helioscope, Sumico which has a mechanism to track the sun. From the result of the measurement, we found no evidence for the existence of hidden photons and set a limit on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameter χ depending on the hidden photon mass m{sub γ'}.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy NESHAP Annual Report for CY 2014 Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range

    SciTech Connect

    Evelo, Stacie; Miller, Mark L.

    2015-05-01

    This National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Annual Report has been prepared in a format to comply with the reporting requirements of 40 CFR 61.94 and the April 5, 1995 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to the EPA approved NESHAP Monitoring Plan for the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), 40 CFR 61, subpart H, and the MOA, no additional monitoring or measurements are required at TTR in order to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP regulation.

  18. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  19. Emulsion chamber observations of primary cosmic-ray electrons in the energy range 30-1000 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Taira, T.; Aizu, E.; Hiraiwa, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Niu, K.; Ohta, I.; Golden, R. L.; Koss, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a series of emulsion exposures, beginning in Japan in 1968 and continued in the U.S. since 1975, which have yielded a total balloon-altitude exposure of 98,700 sq m sr s, are presented. The data are discussed in terms of several models of cosmic-ray propagation. Interpreted in terms of the energy-dependent leaky-box model, the spectrum results suggest a galactic electron residence time of 1.0(+2.0, -0.5) x 10 to the 7th yr, which is consistent with results from Be-10 observations. Finally, the possibility that departures from smooth power law behavior in the spectrum due to individual nearby sources will be observable in the energy range above 1 TeV is discussed.

  20. Test of hadron interaction models in the most important energy range of secondary particles in spectra of atmospheric muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedenko, L. G.; Roganova, T. M.; Fedorova, G. F.

    2014-10-01

    A simple method has been proposed for testing hadron interaction models, which are used to simulate extensive air showers, in observed spectra of atmospheric muons. It has been shown that muon flux intensities in the energy range of 102-104 GeV that are calculated within the SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJETII-04, and QGSJET01 models exceed the data of the classical experiments L3 + Cosmic, MACRO, and LVD on the spectra of atmospheric muons by a factor of 1.5-2. It has been concluded that these tested models overestimate the generation of secondary particles with the highest energies in elementary events of interaction between hadrons in agreement with the LHCf and TOTEM accelerator experiments.

  1. Critical coupling and coherent perfect absorption for ranges of energies due to a complex gain and loss symmetric system

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Mohammad; Ghatak, Ananya; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2014-05-15

    We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system. -- Highlights: •Energy ranges for CC and CPA are obtained explicitly for complex WS potential. •Analytical conditions for CC and CPA for PT symmetric WS potential are obtained. •Conditions for left and right CC are shown to be different. •Conditions for CC and CPA are shown to be that of SS for the time reversed system. •Our model shows the great flexibility of frequencies for CC and CPA.

  2. SU-E-CAMPUS-J-06: The Impact of CT-Scan Energy On Range Uncertainty in Proton Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Grantham, K; Li, H; Zhao, T; Klein, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of tube potential (kVp) on the CTnumber (HU) to proton stopping power ratio (PSPR) conversion table; the range uncertainty and the dosimetric change introduced by a mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table used to calculate dose are analyzed. Methods: A CIRS CT-ED phantom was scanned with a Philips Brilliance 64-slice scanner under 90kVp and 120kVp tube potentials. Two HU to PSPR curves were then created. Using Eclipse (Varian) a treatment plan was created for a single beam in a water phantom (HU=0) passing through a wedge-shaped heterogeneity (HU=1488). The dose was recalculated by changing only the HU to PSPR table used in the dose calculation. The change in range (the distal 90% isodose line) relative to a distal structure was recorded as a function of heterogeneity thickness in the beam. To show the dosimetric impact of a mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table, we repeated this procedure using a clinical plan comparing DVH data. Results: The HU to PSPR tables diverge for low-density bone and higher density structures. In the phantom plan, the divergence of the tables results in a change in range of ~1mm per cm of bone in the beam path for the HU used. For the clinical plan, a mismatch in kVp showed a 28% increase in mean dose to the brainstem along with a 10% increase in maximum dose to the brainstem center. Conclusion: A mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table can introduce significant uncertainty in the proton beam range. For dense bone, the measured range uncertainty is about 1mm per cm of bone in the beam. CT-scan energy verification should be employed, particularly when high-density media is in the proton beam path.

  3. The Cosmic Ray p+He energy spectrum in the 3-3000 TeV energy range measured by ARGO-YBJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, S. M.; Montini, P.

    2016-07-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment is a full coverage air shower detector operated at the Yangbajing International Cosmic Ray Observatory. The detector has been in stable data taking in its full configuration since November 2007 to February 2013. The high altitude and the high segmentation and spacetime resolution offer the possibility to explore the cosmic ray energy spectrum in a very wide range, from a few TeV up to the PeV region. The high segmentation allows a detailed measurement of the lateral distribution, which can be used in order to discriminate showers produced by light and heavy elements. In this work we present the measurement of the cosmic ray light component spectrum in the energy range 3-3000 TeV. The analysis has been carried out by using a two-dimensional unfolding method based on the Bayes' theorem.

  4. Long-Range Energy Transfer and Singlet-Exciton Migration in Working Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Grayson L.; Nguyen, Carmen; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Rapid industrialization of organic light-emitting devices for flat-panel displays and solid-state lighting makes a deep understanding of device physics more desirable than ever. Developing reliable experimental techniques to measure fundamental physical properties such as exciton diffusion lengths is a vital part of developing device physics. In this paper, we present a study of exciton diffusion and long-range energy transfer in working organic light-emitting devices, and a study of the interplay between these two tangled processes through both experimental probes and simulations. With the inclusion of multiple factors including long-range energy transfer, exciton boundary conditions, and the finite width of the exciton generation zone, we quantify exciton migration based on emission characteristics from rubrene sensing layers placed in working organic light-emitting devices. This comprehensive analysis is found to be essential to accurately measuring exciton diffusion length, and in the present case the measured singlet-exciton diffusion length in the archetype material 4' -bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl is 4.3 ±0.3 nm with a corresponding diffusivity of (2.6 ±0.3 )×10-4 cm2/s .

  5. Search for critical point indications in long-range correlations by energy and system size scanning in string fusion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, V. N.; Vechernin, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The ultrarelativistic collisions of heavy and light ions in the center-of-mass energy range from a few up to a hundred GeV per nucleon have been considered in string fusion approach. A Monte Carlo model of proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions has been developed, which takes into account both the string fusion and the finite rapidity length of strings, implementing the hadronic scattering through the interaction of color dipoles. It well describes the proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the partonic level without using Glauber model of nuclear collisions. All parameters are fixed using experimental data on inelastic cross section and multiplicity. In the framework of the model, we performed a beam energy and system size scan and studied the behaviour of n-n, pt-n and pt-pt long-range correlation coefficients. The detailed modeling of the event by event charged particles production allowed to provide predictions in the conditions close to the experimental ones allowing a direct comparison to the data.

  6. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xinguo; Newville, Matthew; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within ±3° relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO2 recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO2 glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO2 glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures. PMID:19655966

  7. Measurements of galactic plane gamma ray emission in the energy range from 10 - 80 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A spark chamber gamma ray telescope was developed and flown to observe diffuse gamma ray emission from the central region of the galaxy. The extension of observations down to 10 MeV provides important new data indicating that the galactic diffuse gamma ray spectrum continues as a power law down to about 10 MeV, an observation in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Data from other experiments in the range from 100 keV to 10 MeV show a significant departure from the extension of the power-law fit to the medium energy observations reported here, possibly indicating that a different mechanism may be responsible for the emissions below and above a few MeV. The intensity of the spectrum above 10 MeV implies a galactic electron spectrum which is also very intense down to about 10 MeV. Electrons in this energy range cannot be observed in the solar cavity because of solar modulation effects. The galactic gamma ray data are compared with recent theoretical predictions.

  8. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Newville, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    2009-07-31

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within {+-}3{sup o} relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO{sub 2} recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO{sub 2} glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO{sub 2} glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures.

  9. THE FERMI BUBBLE AS A SOURCE OF COSMIC RAYS IN THE ENERGY RANGE >10{sup 15} eV

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.; Wang, Y.; Ip, W.-H.

    2012-02-20

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope has recently discovered two giant gamma-ray bubbles that extend north and south of the Galactic center with diameters and heights of the order of H {approx} 10 kpc. We suggest that the periodic star capture processes by the Galactic supermassive black hole Sgr A*, with a capture rate of {tau}{sup -1}{sub cap} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1} and an energy release of W {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 52} erg per capture, can result in hot plasma injecting into the Galactic halo at a wind velocity of u {approx} 10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1}. The periodic injection of hot plasma can produce a series of shocks. Energetic protons in the bubble are re-accelerated when they interact with these shocks. We show that for energy larger than E > 10{sup 15} eV, the acceleration process can be better described by the stochastic second-order Fermi acceleration. We propose that hadronic cosmic rays (CRs) within the 'knee' of the observed CR spectrum are produced by Galactic supernova remnants distributed in the Galactic disk. Re-acceleration of these particles in the Fermi Bubble produces CRs beyond the knee. With a mean CR diffusion coefficient in this energy range in the bubble D{sub B} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, we can reproduce the spectral index of the spectrum beyond the knee and within it. The conversion efficiency from shock energy of the bubble into CR energy is about 10%. This model provides a natural explanation of the observed CR flux, spectral indices, and matching of spectra at the knee.

  10. Effect of noise, order and range in fitting the photopeak region of local, Anger-camera energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Koral, K. F.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Rogers, W. L.; Floyd, C. E.; Jaszczak, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    In order to estimate and correct Compton scattering in nuclear-medicine Anger-camera imaging, we have previously required the least-mean-square error between the locally measured energy spectrum and one dependent on a model. The model assumes a fixed-order polynomial for the spectrum of scatter and fits the data over a specified energy range. In this study, a Monte Carlo simulation program produces spectra at specified locations in a projection image of a 99mTc "hot" sphere in a "cold" cylinder. Poisson noise is subsequently added to each spectral channel, modelling a given count level within the acceptance window. Tests were done at two pixel locations, one at the center of the sphere and the other near the edge. Without noise, we find that the calculated-to-true ratio for unscattered counts is reasonably close to 1.0 (average 1.03, range 0.85 to 1.16) for all of the 16 order-range combinations that were tested. Tests on experimental data yield comparable results. For comparison, without any Compton-scatter correction the average ratio is 1.39. Optimizing the fitting parameters is difficult because, for example, the best set for location 1 is the worst for location 2. With noisy data, the relative standard deviation, and sometimes the bias for the estimate of direct (i.e. unscattered) counts, increases as the statistical noise increases. The average relative error for the estimate is 10% for the 3 cases measured with about 5000 unscattered counts but increases to 20% if that number decreases to 700.

  11. Range and Annealing Behaviour of Pb+ Ions Implanted into LiNbO3 Crystals at Moderate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Hu, Hui; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiang-Dong; Xia, Hui-Hao; Shi, Bo-Rong; Wang, Ke-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Pb+ ions have been implanted into LiNbO3 crystals in the energy range of 100-350 keV at doses of 5×1015, 1×1016 and 2×1016 ions/cm2. The profile of the implanted ions was measured by Rutherford backscattering. The mean projected range and the range straggling obtained from the experiment were compared with the TRIM'98 and SRIM 2000 code. In the present case, the TRIM'98 code predicts experimental values better than those of the SRIM 2000 code. The depth distribution is also found to be independent of dose for 350 keV Pb+ implanted into LiNbO3 crystals. After 800°C annealing for 60 min in ambient air, obvious diffusion occurs to the implanted Pb+ ions at 150 keV with a dose of 5×1015 ions/cm2. After a low-temperature treatment at 77 K in liquid nitrogen, no obvious diffusion phenomenon occurs for the implanted Pb+ ions in LiNbO3.

  12. Two-electron R-matrix approach to calculations of potential-energy curves of long-range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Čurík, Roman

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a computational method developed for study of long-range molecular Rydberg states of such systems that can be approximated by two electrons in a model potential of the atomic cores. The method is based on a two-electron R-matrix approach inside a sphere centered on one of the atoms. The wave function is then connected to a Coulomb region outside the sphere via a multichannel version of the Coulomb Green's function. This approach is applied to a study of Rydberg states of Rb2 for internuclear separations R from 40 to 320 bohrs and energies corresponding to n from 7 to 30. We report bound states associated with the low-lying 3Po resonance and with the virtual state of the rubidium atom that turn into ion-pair-like bound states in the Coulomb potential of the atomic Rydberg core. The results are compared with previous calculations based on single-electron models employing a zero-range contact-potential and short-range modele potential. Czech Science Foundation (Project No. P208/14-15989P).

  13. Energy transport in the three coupled α-polypeptide chains of collagen molecule with long-range interactions effect.

    PubMed

    Mvogo, Alain; Ben-Bolie, G H; Kofané, T C

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of three coupled α-polypeptide chains of a collagen molecule is investigated with the influence of power-law long-range exciton-exciton interactions. The continuum limit of the discrete equations reveal that the collagen dynamics is governed by a set of three coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, whose dispersive coefficient depends on the LRI parameter r. We construct the analytic symmetric and asymmetric (antisymmetric) soliton solutions, which match with the structural features of collagen related with the acupuncture channels. These solutions are used as initial conditions for the numerical simulations of the discrete equations, which reveal a coherent transport of energy in the molecule for r > 3. The results also indicate that the width of the solitons is a decreasing function of r, which help to stabilize the solitons propagating in the molecule. To confirm further the efficiency of energy transport in the molecule, the modulational instability of the system is performed and the numerical simulations show that the energy can flow from one polypeptide chain to another in the form of nonlinear waves. PMID:26117109

  14. Long-range energy transfer and ionization in extended quantum systems driven by ultrashort spatially shaped laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Paramonov, Guennaddi K; Bandrauk, André D; Kühn, Oliver

    2011-05-21

    The processes of ionization and energy transfer in a quantum system composed of two distant H atoms with an initial internuclear separation of 100 atomic units (5.29 nm) have been studied by the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Thereby it has been assumed that only one of the two H atoms was excited by temporally and spatially shaped laser pulses at various laser carrier frequencies. The quantum dynamics of the extended H-H system, which was taken to be initially either in an unentangled or an entangled ground state, has been explored within a linear three-dimensional model, including the two z coordinates of the electrons and the internuclear distance R. An efficient energy transfer from the laser-excited H atom (atom A) to the other H atom (atom B) and the ionization of the latter have been found. It has been shown that the physical mechanisms of the energy transfer as well as of the ionization of atom B are the Coulomb attraction of the laser driven electron of atom A by the proton of atom B and a short-range Coulomb repulsion of the two electrons when their wave functions strongly overlap in the domain of atom B. PMID:21487637

  15. Upgrades of DARWIN, a dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to various types of radiation over wide energy ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Fusao; Sakurai, Hiroki; Arai, Yoichi

    2011-05-01

    A dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to neutrons, photons and muons over wide ranges of energy, designated as DARWIN, has been developed for radiological protection in high-energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN consists of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, a data-acquisition (DAQ) module for digital waveform analysis, and a personal computer equipped with a graphical-user-interface (GUI) program for controlling the system. The system was recently upgraded by introducing an original DAQ module based on a field programmable gate array, FPGA, and also by adding a function for estimating neutron and photon spectra based on an unfolding technique without requiring any specific scientific background of the user. The performance of the upgraded DARWIN was examined in various radiation fields, including an operational field in J-PARC. The experiments revealed that the dose rates and spectra measured by the upgraded DARWIN are quite reasonable, even in radiation fields with peak structures in terms of both spectrum and time variation. These results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of DARWIN for improving radiation safety in high-energy accelerator facilities.

  16. Energy transport in the three coupled α-polypeptide chains of collagen molecule with long-range interactions effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mvogo, Alain; Ben-Bolie, G. H.; Kofané, T. C.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of three coupled α-polypeptide chains of a collagen molecule is investigated with the influence of power-law long-range exciton-exciton interactions. The continuum limit of the discrete equations reveal that the collagen dynamics is governed by a set of three coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, whose dispersive coefficient depends on the LRI parameter r. We construct the analytic symmetric and asymmetric (antisymmetric) soliton solutions, which match with the structural features of collagen related with the acupuncture channels. These solutions are used as initial conditions for the numerical simulations of the discrete equations, which reveal a coherent transport of energy in the molecule for r > 3. The results also indicate that the width of the solitons is a decreasing function of r, which help to stabilize the solitons propagating in the molecule. To confirm further the efficiency of energy transport in the molecule, the modulational instability of the system is performed and the numerical simulations show that the energy can flow from one polypeptide chain to another in the form of nonlinear waves.

  17. Energy response of GR-200A thermoluminescence dosemeters to 60Co and to monoenergetic synchrotron radiation in the energy range 28-40 keV.

    PubMed

    Emiro, F; Di Lillo, F; Mettivier, G; Fedon, C; Longo, R; Tromba, G; Russo, P

    2016-01-01

    The response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence dosemeters (type GR-200A) to monoenergetic radiation of energy 28, 35, 38 and 40 keV was evaluated with respect to irradiation with a calibrated (60)Co gamma-ray source. High-precision measurements of the relative air kerma response performed at the SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy) showed a significant deviation of the average response to low-energy X-rays from that to (60)Co, with an over-response from 6 % (at 28 keV) to 22 % (at 40 keV). These data are not consistent with literature data for these dosemeters, where model predictions gave deviation from unity of the relative air kerma response of about 10 %. The authors conclude for the need of additional determinations of the low-energy relative response of GR-200A dosemeters, covering a wider range of monoenergetic energies sampled at a fine energy step, as planned in future experiments by their group at the ELETTRA facility. PMID:25737582

  18. Adiabatic potential-energy curves of long-range Rydberg molecules: Two-electron R -matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Čurík, Roman

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a computational method developed for study of long-range molecular Rydberg states of such systems that can be approximated by two electrons in a model potential of the atomic cores. Only diatomic molecules are considered. The method is based on a two-electron R -matrix approach inside a sphere centered on one of the atoms. The wave function is then connected to a Coulomb region outside the sphere via a multichannel version of the Coulomb Green's function. This approach is put into a test by its application to a study of Rydberg states of the hydrogen molecule for internuclear distances R from 20 to 400 bohrs and energies corresponding to n from 3 to 22. The results are compared with previous quantum chemical calculations (lower quantum numbers n ) and computations based on contact-potential models (higher quantum numbers n ).

  19. Excitation cross sections for krypton by electrons in the 15-100-eV impact-energy range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Srivastava, S. K.; Tanaka, H.; Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections have been determined for the excitation of the 24 lowest electronic states of Kr (some of the transitions are unresolved). The inelastic-scattering cross sections were normalized to the absolute scale with the help of the elastic-scattering differential cross sections (DCS's) which in turn were normalized with respect to absolute He DCS's. The impact energies were 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV and the DCS's were obtained over the range of 5-135 deg scattering angles. The error limits associated with the differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections have been estimated at 25%, 38%, and 46%, respectively.

  20. Modeling of exclusive parton distributions and long-range rapidity correlations in proton-proton collisions at the LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, V. N.

    2013-10-15

    The soft part of proton-proton interaction is considered within a phenomenological model that involves the formation of color strings. Under the assumption that an elementary collision is associated with the interaction of two color dipoles, the total inelastic cross section and the multiplicity of charged particles are estimated in order to fix model parameters. Particular attention is given to modeling of exclusive parton distributions with allowance for the energy-conservation law and for fixing the center of mass, which are necessary for describing correlations. An algorithm that describes the fusion of strings in the transverse plane and which takes into account their finite rapidity width is developed. The influence of string-fusion effects on long-range correlations is found within this mechanism.

  1. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  2. Stopping power of palladium for protons in the energy range 0.300-3.100 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. A.; Sepúlveda, A.; Morales, J. R.; Rodriguez, T.; Burgos, E.; Fernández, H.

    2014-01-01

    The stopping power of palladium for protons has been measured using the transmission method with an overall uncertainty of around 5% over the energy range Ep=(0.300-3.100) MeV. These stopping power data are then compared to stopping power values calculated by the SRIM-2010 code and to those derived from a model based on the dielectric formalism. Subsequently, and within the framework of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory, this stopping power data were used for extracting Pd target mean excitation and ionization potential, (I = 468 ± 5 eV), and Barkas effect parameter, (b = 1.51 ± 0.06). A good agreement is found between the obtained results and values reported in literature.

  3. A theoretical model describing the light emission efficiency of single-crystal scintillators in the diagnostic energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, A.; Kalyvas, N.; Kandarakis, I.; Valais, I.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a theoretical model to examine emission features of single-crystal scintillators, used in medical imaging detectors, under X-ray excitation. For this purpose, the number of optical photons that were produced inside the crystal and escaped to the output was modeled for variant X-ray tube voltages in the energy range of Computed Tomography and for different thicknesses of the crystalline material. The theoretical model that was used to estimate the optimum dimensions and the radiation conditions of the crystal, was validated against experimental data obtained by a single-crystal scintillator irradiated by X-rays. For implementation a Gd2SiO5:Ce crystal was used. Theoretical and experimental results will be useful in designing Hybrid Tomographic imaging systems based on a common gamma-ray and X-ray detector (PET/CT or SPECT/CT).

  4. Surface hopping outperforms secular Redfield theory when reorganization energies range from small to moderate (and nuclei are classical)

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Brian R. Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2015-03-14

    We evaluate the accuracy of Tully’s surface hopping algorithm for the spin-boson model in the limit of small to moderate reorganization energy. We calculate transition rates between diabatic surfaces in the exciton basis and compare against exact results from the hierarchical equations of motion; we also compare against approximate rates from the secular Redfield equation and Ehrenfest dynamics. We show that decoherence-corrected surface hopping performs very well in this regime, agreeing with secular Redfield theory for very weak system-bath coupling and outperforming secular Redfield theory for moderate system-bath coupling. Surface hopping can also be extended beyond the Markovian limits of standard Redfield theory. Given previous work [B. R. Landry and J. E. Subotnik, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A513 (2012)] that establishes the accuracy of decoherence-corrected surface-hopping in the Marcus regime, this work suggests that surface hopping may well have a very wide range of applicability.

  5. Activation cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on niobium in the 30-50 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Activation cross-sections of deuterons induced reactions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of different applications and comparison with theoretical models. We present the experimental excitation functions of 93Nb(d,x)93m,90Mo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 89,88Zr and 88,87m,87gY in the energy range of 30-50 MeV. The results were compared with earlier measurements and with the cross-sections calculated by means of the theoretical model codes ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS (on-line TENDL-2014 and TENDL-2015 libraries). Possible applications of the radioisotopes are discussed in detail.

  6. Fast, long-range, reversible conformational fluctuations in nucleosomes revealed by single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tomschik, Miroslav; Zheng, Haocheng; van Holde, Ken; Zlatanova, Jordanka; Leuba, Sanford H.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleosome core particle, the basic repeated structure in chromatin fibers, consists of an octamer of eight core histone molecules, organized as dimers (H2A/H2B) and tetramers [(H3/H4)2] around which DNA wraps tightly in almost two left-handed turns. The nucleosome has to undergo certain conformational changes to allow processes that need access to the DNA template to occur. By single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrate fast, long-range, reversible conformational fluctuations in nucleosomes between two states: fully folded (closed), with the DNA wrapped around the histone core, or open, with the DNA significantly unraveled from the histone octamer. The brief excursions into an extended open state may create windows of opportunity for protein factors involved in DNA transactions to bind to or translocate along the DNA. PMID:15728351

  7. Biofouling community composition across a range of environmental conditions and geographical locations suitable for floating marine renewable energy generation.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Adrian K; Stanley, Michele S; Day, John G; Cook, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of biofouling typical of marine structures is essential for engineers to define appropriate loading criteria in addition to informing other stakeholders about the ecological implications of creating novel artificial environments. There is a lack of information regarding biofouling community composition (including weight and density characteristics) on floating structures associated with future marine renewable energy generation technologies. A network of navigation buoys were identified across a range of geographical areas, environmental conditions (tidal flow speed, temperature and salinity), and deployment durations suitable for future developments. Despite the perceived importance of environmental and temporal factors, geographical location explained the greatest proportion of the observed variation in community composition, emphasising the importance of considering geography when assessing the impact of biofouling on device functioning and associated ecology. The principal taxa associated with variation in biofouling community composition were mussels (Mytilus edulis), which were also important when determining loading criteria. PMID:26900732

  8. GRBs Radiative Processes: Synchrotron and Synchrotron Self-Absorption From a Power Law Electrons Distribution with Finite Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2010-10-31

    Synchrotron emission behind relativistic magnetic internal-external shocks in gamma-ray bursts cosmological explosions is assumed to be the basic emission mechanism for prompt and afterglow emissions. Inverse Compton from relativistic electrons can also have appreciable effects by upscattering initial synchrotron or blackbody photons or other photons fields up to GeV-TeV energies. For extreme physical conditions such as high magnetic fields (e.g., B>10{sup 5} Gauss) self-absorption is not negligible and can hardly affect spectra at least for the low energy range. In this paper we present calculations of the synchrotron power, P{sub {nu}}, and their asymptotic forms, generated by a power law relativistic electron distribution of type N{sub e}({gamma}) = C{gamma}{sup -p} with {gamma}{sub 1}<{gamma}<{gamma}{sub 2}, especially for finite values of the higher limit {gamma}{sub 2}. For this aim we defined the dimensionless parametric function Z{sub p}(x,{eta}) with x = {nu}/{nu}{sub 1} and {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1} so that P{sub {nu}{proportional_to}Zp}({nu}/{nu}{sub 1},{eta}), with {nu}{sub 1} = (3/4{pi}){gamma}{sub 1}{sup 2}qBsin{theta}/mc({theta} being the pitch angle). Asymptotic forms of this later are derived for three different frequency ranges, i.e., x<<1, 1<>{eta}{sup 2}. These results are then used to calculate the absorption coefficient, {alpha}{sub {nu}}, and the source function, S{sub {nu}}, together with their asymptotic forms through the dimensionless parametric functions H{sub p}(x,{eta}) and Y{sub p}(x,{eta}), respectively. Further calculation details are also presented and discussed.

  9. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced α-particle optical potential at low energies, for the mass range A∼45-209

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, V.; Avrigeanu, M.; Mănăilescu, C.

    2015-02-24

    An updated optical potential is thus provided for α-particles on nuclei within the mass number range 45≤A≤209, below the Coulomb barrier (B), on the basis of recent high-precision measurements of α-particle induced reaction data below B that made possible the understanding of actual limits and possible improvement of the α-particle optical-model potentials. The main revision concerns actually only the surface imaginary potential depth at the lowest α-particle energies well below B, and in fact only for the mass range above A∼130. A further regional point is the underestimation of reaction cross sections for the rare-earth nuclei by using the spherical optical potential unless a 7% larger value of the surface imaginary potential radius is taken into account. Involvement of this potential for further description of both the scattering and α-particles induced reactions is moreover discussed in the present work, of equal interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear technology for fusion devices.

  11. Comparison of Physical Therapy with Energy Healing for Improving Range of Motion in Subjects with Restricted Shoulder Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Linda Baldwin, Ann; Schwartz, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Two forms of energy healing, Reconnective Healing (RH) and Reiki, which involve light or no touch, were tested for efficacy against physical therapy (PT) for increasing limited range of motion (ROM) of arm elevation in the scapular plane. Participants were assigned to one of 5 groups: PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, or no treatment. Except for no treatment, participants were blinded as to grouping. Range of Motion, self-reported pain, and heart rate variability (HRV) were assessed before and after a 10-minute session. On average, for PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, and no treatment, respectively, ROM increased by 12°, 20°, 26°, 0.6°, and 3° and pain score decreased by 11.5%, 10.1%, 23.9%, 15.4%, and 0%. Physical therapy, Reiki, and RH were more effective than Sham Healing for increasing ROM (PT: F = 8.05, P = 0.008; Reiki: F = 10.48, P = 0.003; RH: F = 30.19, P < 0.001). It is possible that this improvement was not mediated by myofascial release because the subjects' HRV did not change, suggesting no significant increase in vagal activity. Sham treatment significantly reduced pain compared to no treatment (F = 8.4, P = 0.007) and was just as effective as PT, Reiki, and RH. It is the authors' opinion that the accompanying pain relief is a placebo effect. PMID:24327820

  12. Comparison of physical therapy with energy healing for improving range of motion in subjects with restricted shoulder mobility.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Fullmer, Kirstin; Schwartz, Gary E

    2013-01-01

    Two forms of energy healing, Reconnective Healing (RH) and Reiki, which involve light or no touch, were tested for efficacy against physical therapy (PT) for increasing limited range of motion (ROM) of arm elevation in the scapular plane. Participants were assigned to one of 5 groups: PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, or no treatment. Except for no treatment, participants were blinded as to grouping. Range of Motion, self-reported pain, and heart rate variability (HRV) were assessed before and after a 10-minute session. On average, for PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, and no treatment, respectively, ROM increased by 12°, 20°, 26°, 0.6°, and 3° and pain score decreased by 11.5%, 10.1%, 23.9%, 15.4%, and 0%. Physical therapy, Reiki, and RH were more effective than Sham Healing for increasing ROM (PT: F = 8.05, P = 0.008; Reiki: F = 10.48, P = 0.003; RH: F = 30.19, P < 0.001). It is possible that this improvement was not mediated by myofascial release because the subjects' HRV did not change, suggesting no significant increase in vagal activity. Sham treatment significantly reduced pain compared to no treatment (F = 8.4, P = 0.007) and was just as effective as PT, Reiki, and RH. It is the authors' opinion that the accompanying pain relief is a placebo effect. PMID:24327820

  13. SYNCHROTRON POLARIZATION AND SYNCHROTRON SELF-ABSORPTION SPECTRA FOR A POWER-LAW PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION WITH FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S. E-mail: souichaoui@usthb.dz

    2011-12-10

    We have derived asymptotic forms for the degree of polarization of the optically thin synchrotron and for synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) spectra assuming a power-law particle distribution of the form N({gamma}) {approx} {gamma}{sup -p} with {gamma}{sub 1} < {gamma} < {gamma}{sub 2}, especially for a finite high-energy limit, {gamma}{sub 2}, in the case of an arbitrary pitch angle. The new results inferred concern more especially the high-frequency range x >> {eta}{sup 2} with parameter {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1}. The calculated SSA spectra concern instantaneous photon emission where cooling effects are not considered. They have been obtained by also ignoring likely effects such as Comptonization, pair creation and annihilation, as well as magnetic photon splitting. To that aim, in addition to the two usual absorption frequencies, a third possible one has been derived and expressed in terms of the Lambert W function based on the analytical asymptotic form of the absorption coefficient, {alpha}{sub {nu}}, for the high-frequency range {nu} >> {nu}{sub 2} (with {nu}{sub 2} the synchrotron frequency corresponding to {gamma}{sub 2}). We have shown that the latter frequency may not have realistic applications in astrophysics, except in the case of an adequate set of parameters allowing one to neglect Comptonization effects. More detailed calculations and discussions are presented.

  14. Nuclear physics in the 10--300 MeV energy range using a pulsed white neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.; Wender, S.A.; Auchampaugh, G.F.

    1985-01-20

    A new pulsed white neutron source is under construction at the Los Alamos WNR facility. The neutrons are produced by LAMPF proton micropulses striking thick targets of various materials. Beam parameters include energy of 800 MeV, pulse rate of approximately 50,000 Hz, 0.4 nsec pulse width, average current as high as 6..mu..a, and a useful neutron energy range from 3 to 300 MeV. The facility will receive beam approximately 80% of the time LAMPF is operational; it increases by a factor of 1000 the experimental capability over the present system at the WNR when beam intensity, angular distribution, and availability are taken into account. In addition to established white source techniques, the facility is also highly competitive with monoenergetic sources for a wide class of experiments such as neutron capture ..gamma.. ray spectroscopy and neutron-induced charged particle reactions. The facility should be operational in about nine months. Arrangements are underway to make the facility readily accessible to visiting experiments.

  15. Nuclear physics in the 10 to 300 MeV energy range using a pulsed white neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.; Wender, S.A.; Auchampaugh, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A new pulsed white neutron source is under construction at the Los Alamos WNR facility. The neutrons are produced by LAMPF proton micropulses striking thick targets of various materials. Beam parameters include energy of 800 MeV, pulse rate of approximately 50,000 Hz, 0.4 nsec pulse width, average current as high as 6..mu..a, and a useful neutron energy range from 3 to 300 MeV. The facility will receive beam approximately 80% of the time LAMPF is operational; it increased by a factor of 1000 the experimental capability over the present system at the WNR when beam intensity, angular distribution, and availability are taken into account. In addition to established white source techniques, the facility is also highly competitive with monoenergetic sources for a wide class of experiments such as neutron capture ..gamma.. ray spectroscopy and neutron-induced charged particle reactions. The facility should be operational in about nine months. Arrangements are underway to make the facility readily accessible to visiting experimenters.

  16. Nuclear physics in the 10-300 MeV energy range using a pulsed white neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, C. D.; Wender, S. A.; Auchampaugh, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    A new pulsed white neutron source is under construction at the Los Alamos WNR facility. The neutrons are produced by LAMPF proton micropulses striking thick targets of various materials. Beam parameters include energy of 800 MeV, pulse rate of approximately 50,000 Hz, 0.4 nsec pulse width, average current as high as 6μa, and a useful neutron energy range from 3 to 300 MeV. The facility will receive beam approximately 80% of the time LAMPF is operational; it increases by a factor of 1000 the experimental capability over the present system at the WNR when beam intensity, angular distribution, and availability are taken into account. In addition to established white source techniques, the facility is also highly competitive with monoenergetic sources for a wide class of experiments such as neutron capture γ ray spectroscopy and neutron-induced charged particle reactions. The facility should be operational in about nine months. Arrangements are underway to make the facility readily accessible to visiting experiments.

  17. Nuclear physics in the 10 to 300 MeV energy range using a pulsed white neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, C. D.; Wender, S. A.; Auchampaugh, G. F.

    A new pulsed white neutron source is under construction at the Los Alamos WNR facility. The neutrons are produced by LAMPF proton micropulses striking thick targets of various materials. Beam parameters include energy of 800 MeV, pulse rate of approximately 50,000 Hz, 0.4 nsec pulse width, average current as high as 6(MU)a, and a useful neutron energy range from 3 to 300 MeV. The facility will receive beam approximately 80% of the time LAMPF is operational; it increased by a factor of 1000 the experimental capability over the present system at the WNR when beam intensity, angular distribution, and availability are taken into account. In addition to established white source techniques, the facility is also highly competitive with monoenergetic sources for a wide class of experiments such as neutron capture (GAMMA) ray spectroscopy and neutron-induced charged particle reactions. The facility should be operational in about nine months. Arrangements are underway to make the facility readily accessible to visiting experimenters.

  18. Polycrystalline lead iodide films produced by solution evaporation and tested in the mammography X-ray energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condeles, J. F.; Mulato, M.

    2016-02-01

    Lead iodide polycrystalline films have been deposited on corning glass substrates using solution evaporation in oven. Films 6 μm-thick were obtained with full coverage of the substrates as verified by scanning electron microscopy. Some pin-holes were observable. X-ray diffraction revealed a crystalline structure corresponding to the 4 H-PbI2 polytype formation. Polarized Raman scattering experiments indicated a lamellar structure. Anisotropy was also investigated using depolarization ratio calculations. The optical and electrical properties of the samples were investigated using photoluminescence and dark conductivity as a function of temperature, respectively. Activation energies of 0.10 up to 0.89 eV were related to two main electrical transport mechanisms. Films were also exposed to X-ray irradiation in the mammography X-ray energy range. The detector produced was also exposed to X-ray from 5 mR up to 1450 mR. A linear response was observed as a function of dose with a slope of 0.52 nA/mm2 per mR.

  19. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  20. The Role of Heat in the Development of Energy and Mineral Resources in the Northern Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Richard L.

    It is now just over a decade since OPEC escalated the price of oil and triggered a flurry of alternate energy research and changing energy consumption practices. One scientific impact of that historical economic turning point was the launching of geothermal exploration programs of unprecedented intensity that focused on Cenozoic volcanic rocks and active, as well as fossil, geothermal systems. The good science that was already being done on such rocks and systems was both accelerated and diluted by government-funded research and energy industry exploration efforts. After the initial flood of detailed reports, gray literature, and documents interred in company files, we are observing the appearance of syntheses of just what happened and what progress was achieved during the geothermal boom (which has now wilted to the quiet development of a few most promising sites). Recent examples of geothermal synthesis literature include the book Geothermal Systems by L. Rybach and L.J. Muffler (John Wiley, New York, 1981), publications like Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Paper 15 by G.R. Priest et al. (1983) entitled “Geology and geothermal resources of central Oregon Cascade range,” and informative maps like the U.S. Geological Survey series summarizing late Cenozoic volcanic rock distribution and age (R.G. Luedke and R.L. Smith, maps 1-1091 A to D, 1979 to 1982), and state and regional geothermal resources maps (NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, 1977-1982). The book under review here is part of this second literature wave, a useful primary reference, collection of syntheses, and literature guide but certainly not unique.

  1. Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities, and Polarization Energies of Organic Molecular Crystals: Quantitative Estimations from a Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM)-Tuned Range-Separated Density Functional Approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haitao; Ryno, Sean; Zhong, Cheng; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Sun, Zhenrong; Körzdörfer, Thomas; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-14

    We propose a new methodology for the first-principles description of the electronic properties relevant for charge transport in organic molecular crystals. This methodology, which is based on the combination of a nonempirical, optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functional with the polarizable continuum model, is applied to a series of eight representative molecular semiconductor crystals. We show that it provides ionization energies, electron affinities, and transport gaps in very good agreement with experimental values, as well as with the results of many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation at a fraction of the computational costs. Hence, this approach represents an easily applicable and computationally efficient tool to estimate the gas-to-crystal phase shifts of the frontier-orbital quasiparticle energies in organic electronic materials. PMID:27183355

  2. Energy spectrum of cascade showers induced by cosmic ray muons in the range from 50 GeV to 5 TeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashitkov, V. D.; Kirina, T. M.; Klimakov, A. P.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Yumatov, V. I.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cascade showers induced by electromagnetic interactions of high energy muons of horizontal cosmic ray flux in iron absorber was measured. The total observation time exceeded 22,000 hours. Both the energy spectrum and angular distributions of cascade showers are fairly described in terms of the usual muon generation processes, with a single power index of the parent meson spectrum over the muon energy range from 150 GeV to 5 TeV.

  3. Energy responses of the LiF series TL pellets to high-energy photons in the energy range from 1.25 to 21 MV.

    PubMed

    Kim, J L; Lee, J I; Ji, Y H; Kim, B H; Kim, J S; Chang, S Y

    2006-01-01

    The energy responses for the KLT-300(LiF:Mg,Cu,Na,Si, Korea), GR-200(LiF:Mg,Cu,P, China) and MCP-N(LiF:Mg,Cu,P, Poland) thermoluminescence(TL) pellets were studied for a photon radiation with energies from 1.25 MeV(60Co) to 21 MV (Microtron) to verify the usefulness of the calibration for the radiotherapy beams. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have performed thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) audits to verify the calibration of the beams by TL powder, but TL pellets were used in this study because the element correction factor (ECF), defined as the factor to correct the variations that all TL dosemeters cannot be manufactured to have exactly the same TL efficiency, for each TL pellet could be accurately derived and be handled conveniently when compared with the powder. Also several works for the energy response of the TLDs were done for the low-energy photon beams up to 60Co, but they will be extended in this experiment to the high photon energies (up to 20 MV), which are widely used in the therapy level of a radiation. The PTW 30006 ionisation chamber was calibrated by the Korea primary standards to establish the air-kerma rates and the TL pellets were irradiated in a specially designed waterproof pellet holder in a water phantom (30 x 30 x 30 cm3) just like the IAEA postal audits programme. This result was compared with that of another type of phantom [10 (W) x 10 (L) x 10 (H) cm3 PMMA Perspex phantom for the 60Co and 6 MV photon, and 10 x 10 x 20 (H) cm3 for the 10 and 21 MV photon] for its convenient use and easy handling and installation in a hospital. The results show that the differences of the responses for the water phantom and PMMA Perspex phantom were negligible, which is contrary to the general conception that a big difference would be expected. For an application of these results to verify the therapy beams, an appropriate energy correction factor should be applied to the energies and phantom types

  4. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  5. A low-noise wide-dynamic-range event-driven detector using SOI pixel technology for high-energy particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sumeet; Kamehama, Hiroki; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Takeda, Ayaki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Arai, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a low-noise wide-dynamic-range pixel design for a high-energy particle detector in astronomical applications. A silicon on insulator (SOI) based detector is used for the detection of wide energy range of high energy particles (mainly for X-ray). The sensor has a thin layer of SOI CMOS readout circuitry and a thick layer of high-resistivity detector vertically stacked in a single chip. Pixel circuits are divided into two parts; signal sensing circuit and event detection circuit. The event detection circuit consisting of a comparator and logic circuits which detect the incidence of high energy particle categorizes the incident photon it into two energy groups using an appropriate energy threshold and generate a two-bit code for an event and energy level. The code for energy level is then used for selection of the gain of the in-pixel amplifier for the detected signal, providing a function of high-dynamic-range signal measurement. The two-bit code for the event and energy level is scanned in the event scanning block and the signals from the hit pixels only are read out. The variable-gain in-pixel amplifier uses a continuous integrator and integration-time control for the variable gain. The proposed design allows the small signal detection and wide dynamic range due to the adaptive gain technique and capability of correlated double sampling (CDS) technique of kTC noise canceling of the charge detector.

  6. Fluoride salts as phase change materials for thermal energy storage in the temperature range 1000-1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermediate compounds in binary and ternary fluoride salt systems were characterized for potential use as latent heat of fusion phase change materials to store thermal energy in the temperature range 1000-1400 K. The melting points and eutectic compositions for many systems with published phase diagrams were experimentally verified and new eutectic compositions having melting points between 1000 and 1400 K were identified. Heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting compounds were experimentally measured by differential scanning calorimetry. For a few systems in which heats of mixing in the melts have been measured, heats of fusion of the eutectics were calculated from thermodynamic considerations and good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated values. Several combinations of salts with high heats of fusion per unit mass (greater than 0.7 kJ/g) have been identified for possible use as phase change materials in advanced solar dynamic space power applications.

  7. An overview on incomplete fusion reaction dynamics at energy range ∼ 3-8 MeV/A

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Rahbar; Singh, D.; Ansari, M. Afzal; Kumar, Rakesh; Muralithar, S.; Golda, K. S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Rashid, M. H.; Guin, R.; Das, S. K.

    2014-08-14

    The information of ICF reaction has been obtained from the measurement of excitation function (EF) of ERs populated in the interaction of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 16}O on {sup 55}Mn, {sup 159}Tb and {sup 156}Gd targets. Sizable enhancement in the measured cross-sections has been observed in α-emitting channels over theoretical predictions, which has been attributed to ICF of the projectile. In order to confirm the findings of the measurements and analysis of EFs, the forward recoil range distributions of ERs populated in {sup 20}Ne+{sup 159}Tb (E ∼165MeV) and {sup 16}O+{sup 156}Gd (E ∼ 72, 82 and 93MeV) systems, have been measured. It has been observed that peaks appearing at different cumulative thicknesses in the stopping medium are related with different degree of linear momentum transfer from projectile to target nucleus by adopting the break-up fusion model consideration. In order to deduce the angular momentum involved in various CF and / or ICF reaction products, spin distribution and side-feeding intensity profiles of radio-nuclides populated via CF and ICF channels in {sup 16}O+{sup 160}Gd system at energy, E ∼ 5.6 MeV/A, have been studied. Spin distribution of ICF products are found to be distinctly different than that observed from CF products.

  8. SiO_2-aerogel dense plasma properties in the energy range up to 65 kJ/g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Dmitry; Fortov, Vladimir; Filimonov, Aleksandr; Kvitov, Sergei; Ternovoi, Vladimir

    1999-06-01

    Aerogels is a new class of porous matherials, characterized by wide range of initial densities (up to 1mg/cc), high gomogenity and optical transparency. One of the widely-used is SiO_2-aerogel. The results of experiments on shock compression of SiO_2-aerogel are presented. Porosity of samples was 7.5, 10 and 330. Shock wave in evacuated sample was initiated by impact of flat stainless steel striker. For increasing of particle velosity striker was impacted with sample through the layer of plexiglas. Optical emission from shock front was registered by fast six-channel pyrometer Using of step-shaped samples and streak camera allowed to measure impactor.velosity. Hugoniot data in Us-Up coordinates for all initial densities can be fitted by single linear dependence. Data from VNIIEF for shock compression of aerosil (another form of porous SiO2) samples is also close to this dependence. In coordinates T-U^2/2 (U^2/2 is a total energy of shock compression per gramm, density-independent coordinate) temperatures, measured on Hugoniots for all initial densities also can be fitted by single linear dependence, but at temperature about 1 eV there is a flat region. It can be explained by dissociation of SiO2 molecules.

  9. Ionisation potential theorem in the presence of the electric field: Assessment of range-separated functional in the reproduction of orbital and excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borpuzari, Manash Protim; Boruah, Abhijit; Kar, Rahul

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the range-separated density functionals have been reported to reproduce gas phase orbital and excitation energies with good accuracy. In this article, we have revisited the ionisation potential theorem in the presence of external electric field. Numerical results on six linear molecules are presented and the performance of the range-separated density functionals in reproducing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies, LUMO energies, HOMO-LUMO gaps in the presence of the external electric field is assessed. In addition, valence and Rydberg excitation energies in the presence of the external electric field are presented. It is found that the range-separated density functionals reproduce orbital and excitation energies accurately in the presence of the electric field. Moreover, we have performed fractional occupation calculation using cubic spline equation and tried to explain the performance of the functional.

  10. A measurement of the energy spectra and relative abundance of the cosmic-ray H and He isotopes over a broad energy range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Yushak, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    The measurements reported of these isotopes were made using two sets of detectors during the same minimum modulation period in 1977. One measurement was made with a balloon-borne telescope, the other with telescopes on the Voyager spacecraft. It is noted that together they provide the widest energy range yet available for studying these isotopes: 14-150 MeV per nucleon for H2 and 10-290 MeV per nucleon for He-3. The simultaneous helium isotope observations are used to give a mutually consistent picture of galactic propagation and solar modulation. The data define the form of the interstellar H-1 and He-4 spectra, an interstellar matter path length for both H-1 and He-4, and a total residual modulation for He-4. The H-2 observations suggest a picture that is very similar for the galactic propagation of H-1 and He-4.