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Sample records for energy spectrum emitted

  1. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-07-15

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  2. Work function, field emitted electron energy spectrum and surface composition of silicon covered molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamu Nishikawa; Haruhiko Koyama; Masahiko Tomitori

    1991-04-01

    The variation of work functions and electronic structures of Mo surfaces with Si coverages was studied using the atom-probe with a field emission electron spectrometer (AP/FEES). The field emission microscope images of a Si/Mo surface indicate that the deposited Si atoms form micro-clusters, the work function of which is found to be more than 10% larger than the Mo substrate. The FEES spectrum of the clusters implies that the Si/Mo surface is semiconductive even if the Si coverage is reduced to a fraction of a monolayer. The work functions of the Mo silicides formed by heating the Si/Mo tips are about 10% smaller than that of a clean Mo surface and the FEES analysis indicates that the silicide surface is metallic. At the Si-Mo and silicide-Mo interfaces, energy spectra, work functions and compositions vary abruptly in the range of one to a few atomic layers.

  3. Photon energy spectrum emitted by a novel polymer-encapsulated {sup 103}Pd source and its effect on the dose rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Sabrina; Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2008-04-15

    Two independent groups have published intrinsic dosimetry parameters for the recently introduced OptiSeed{sup 103} interstitial brachytherapy source which contains {sup 103}Pd encapsulated by a novel polymer shell. The dose rate constant ({lambda}) reported by the two groups, however, differed by more than 6% and there is currently no AAPM recommended consensus value for this source in clinical dosimetry. The aim of this work was to perform an independent determination of {lambda} for the OptiSeed{sup 103} source using a recently developed photon spectrometry technique. Three OptiSeed{sup 103} sources (model 1032P) with known air-kerma strength were used in this study. The photon energy spectrum emitted along the radial direction on the source's bisector was measured in air using a high-resolution intrinsic germanium spectrometer designed and established for low-energy brachytherapy source spectrometry. The dose rate constant of each source was determined from its emitted energy spectrum and the spatial distribution of radioactivity in the source. Unlike other sources made with traditional titanium encapsulation, the photons emitted by the OptiSeed{sup 103} sources exhibited only slight spectral hardening, yielding a relative energy spectrum closer to that emitted by bare {sup 103}Pd. The dose rate constant determined by the photon spectrometry technique for water was 0.664{+-}0.025 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. This value agreed, within experimental uncertainties, with the Monte Carlo-calculated value ({sub MC}{lambda}) of 0.665{+-}0.014 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} and the TLD-measured value (with a Monte Carlo-calculated solid-phantom-to-water conversion factor) of 0.675{+-}0.051 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} reported by Wang and Hertel [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 63, 311-321 (2005)]. However, it differed by -6.7% from the {sub MC}{lambda} of 0.712{+-}0.043 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} reported by Bernard and Vynckier [Phys. Med. Biol. 50, 1493-1504 (2005)]. The results obtained in this

  4. Recipient luminophoric mediums having narrow spectrum luminescent materials and related semiconductor light emitting devices and methods

    SciTech Connect

    LeToquin, Ronan P; Tong, Tao; Glass, Robert C

    2014-12-30

    Light emitting devices include a light emitting diode ("LED") and a recipient luminophoric medium that is configured to down-convert at least some of the light emitted by the LED. In some embodiments, the recipient luminophoric medium includes a first broad-spectrum luminescent material and a narrow-spectrum luminescent material. The broad-spectrum luminescent material may down-convert radiation emitted by the LED to radiation having a peak wavelength in the red color range. The narrow-spectrum luminescent material may also down-convert radiation emitted by the LED into the cyan, green or red color range.

  5. Estimation of muon spectrum from CRAB emitted photon induced air showers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battacharyya, D. P.

    1996-12-01

    Discusses the derivation of the integral spectrum of muons produced from the interactions of energetic Crab emitted gamma ray induced EAS. The conventional analytical procedure of Drees et al. (1988) has been adopted for muon number calculation. The FNAL data on πp→π+-X inclusive reactions and HERA ep collider results have been used for the evaluation of the hadronic energy moments and the photonuclear cross sections. The derived integral number of muons as a function of muon energy for Zππ = 0.1967, αγN = 0.332 mb and απA = 293 mb has been found comparable with the expected results of Drees et al. for Zππ = 0.3, αγN = 0.1 mb and απA = 198 mb. The present photo induced muon spectrum is found much lower than that obtained from the proton producing EAS muon spectrum obtained by Gaisser (1990).

  6. Spectrum-luminosity dependence of radiation from the polar emitting regions in accreting magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    The recent progress in observational techniques allowed one to probe the evolution of the X-ray spectrum in accreting pulsars (especially, of the cyclotron absorption line - the key spectral feature of accreting magnetized neutron stars) in great detail on various timescales, from pulse-to-pulse variability to secular trends. Particularly interesting are the discovered spectrum-luminosity correlations which are being used to infer the structure and physical characteristics of the pulsar's polar emitting region. I will present the latest developments in the modeling of the emitting structure (accretion column/mound/spot) aimed at explaining the observed spectrum-luminosity dependences.

  7. Universal energy spectrum from point sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomozawa, Yukio

    1992-01-01

    The suggestion is made that the energy spectrum from point sources such as galactic black hole candidates (GBHC) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) is universal on the average, irrespective of the species of the emitted particles, photons, nucleons, or others. The similarity between the observed energy spectra of cosmic rays, gamma-rays, and X-rays is discussed. In other words, the existing data for gamma-rays and X-rays seem to support the prediction. The expected data from the Gamma Ray Observatory are to provide a further test.

  8. Energy distribution in the quantum spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen

    2015-11-01

    At first this paper summarizes the current situation and historical development of the spectrum research, the difficulties and demand background. Then it introduces the research status of quantum spectrum and research ideas of energy distribution in quantum spectrum. We explain the concept of quantum spectrum, the difference between quantum spectrum and spectrum. We elaborate energy distribution in quantum spectrum from three aspects, which are representation, feature and mechanism of quantum spectrum energy distribution. Finally we describe the application of monochrome quantum spectrum about imaging and detection aspects and give an overview of the quantum spectrum. Based on above research results we continue to study and achieve the detection of multi-spectral imaging, which provide the technical basis for the application. We try access to an advanced stage of quantum spectrum study as soon as possible.

  9. Energy spectrum of sputtered uranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, R. A.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fission track technique for detecting uranium 235 was used in conjunction with a mechanical time-of-flight spectrometer to measure the energy spectrum in the region 1 eV to 1 keV of material sputtered from a 93% enriched U-235 foil by 80 keV Ar-40(+) ions. The spectrum was found to exhibit a peak in the region 2-4 eV and to decrease approximately as E to the -1.77 power for E is approximately greater than 100 eV. The design, construction and resolution of the mechanical spectrometer are discussed and comparisons are made between the data and the predictions of the ramdom collision cascade model of sputtering.

  10. Energy spectra of single neutrons and charged particles emitted following the absorption of stopped negative pions in 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernigoi, C.; Gabrielli, I.; Grion, N.; Pauli, G.; Saitta, B.; Ricci, R. A.; Boccaccio, P.; Viesti, G.

    1981-02-01

    Energy spectra have been measured of single neutrons, protons and deuterons emitted following the capture at rest of negative pions in 4He. The neutron energy spectrum has been measured with an energy resolution of 4% at 90 MeV. The absolute number of stopped pions has been measured.

  11. X-Ray Emitting GHz-Peaked Spectrum Galaxies: Testing a Dynamical-Radiative Model with Broad-Band Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ostorero, L.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Diaferio, A.; Kowalska, I.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Begelman, M.C.; Wagner, S.J.; /Heidelberg Observ.

    2010-06-07

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the GPS spectral energy distribution (SED) with the source expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broad-band SEDs of a sample of eleven X-ray emitting GPS galaxies with Compact-Symmetric-Object (CSO) morphology, and show that: (i) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism; (ii) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N{sub H}) and radio (N{sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  12. X-RAY-EMITTING GHz-PEAKED-SPECTRUM GALAXIES: TESTING A DYNAMICAL-RADIATIVE MODEL WITH BROADBAND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ostorero, L.; Diaferio, A.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Kowalska, I.; Cheung, C. C.; Kataoka, J.; Begelman, M. C.; Wagner, S. J.

    2010-06-01

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of GPS sources with their expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broadband SEDs of a sample of 11 X-ray-emitting GPS galaxies with compact-symmetric-object morphology, and show that (1) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism and (2) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk-dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N {sub H}) and radio (N {sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  13. Locally Optimally Emitting Clouds and the Variable Broad Emission Line Spectrum of NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korista, Kirk T.; Goad, Michael R.

    2000-06-01

    In recent work Baldwin et al. proposed that in the geometrically extended broad-line regions (BLRs) of quasars and active galactic nuclei, a range in line-emitting gas properties (e.g., density, column density) might exist at each radius and showed that under these conditions the broad emission line spectra of these objects may be dominated by selection effects introduced by the atomic physics and general radiative transfer within the large pool of line-emitting entities. In this picture, the light we see originates in a vast amalgam of emitters but is dominated by those emitters best able to reprocess the incident continuum into a particular emission line. We test this ``locally optimally emitting clouds'' (LOC) model against the extensive spectroscopic database of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. The time-averaged, integrated-light UV broad emission line spectrum from the 1993 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) monitoring campaign is reproduced via the optimization of three global geometric parameters: the outer radius, the index controlling the radial cloud covering fraction of the continuum source, and the integrated cloud covering fraction. We make an ad hoc selection from the range of successful models, and for a simple spherical BLR geometry we simulate the emission-line light curves for the 1989 IUE and 1993 HST campaigns, using the respective observed UV continuum light curves as drivers. We find good agreement between the predicted and observed light curves and lags-a demonstration of the LOC picture's viability as a means to understanding the BLR environment. Finally, we discuss the next step in developing the LOC picture, which involves the marriage of echo-mapping techniques with spectral simulation grids such as those presented here, using the constraints provided by a high-quality, temporally well-sampled spectroscopic data set.

  14. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    This brochure describes the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, which includes analysis and decision support, fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. Through deep technical expertise and an unmatched breadth of capabilities, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leads an integrated approach across the spectrum of renewable energy innovation. From scientific discovery to accelerating market deployment, NREL works in partnership with private industry to drive the transformation of our nation's energy systems. NREL integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization, and deployment. Our world-class analysis and decision support informs every point on the spectrum. The innovation process at NREL is inter-dependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies may come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  15. Angular measurement of the cobalt-60 emitted radiation spectrum from a radiosurgery irradiator.

    PubMed

    Drzymala, R E; Sohn, J W; Guo, C; Sobotka, L G; Purdy, J A

    2001-04-01

    The photon energy spectrum emanating from a Leksell Gamma Knife, Model 23004B, was measured between 0.250 and 3.5 MeV with the sources exposed. Measurements were made using a 2x2 inch NaI detector enclosed in a lead-shielded apparatus having a 1/4 inch diameter measurement aperture, which reduced the amount of radiation received by the crystal. All measurements were made one meter above the floor within a quadrant toward one side of the Gamma Knife couch. The measured spectra displayed the expected 60Co doublet of photon peaks at energies of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. These peaks appeared in spectra beginning at approximately 50 degrees, as one proceeds from a point directly lateral to the source enclosure (0 degrees) toward the foot of the couch (90 degrees). The average photon energy of the spectrum shifts to lower values as the doublet decreases in magnitude with increasing angle until almost vanishing at an angle equal to 90 degrees. Inserting a 16 cm diameter plastic sphere phantom, provided with the Gamma Knife, into the radiation beams increases the low energy photon emissions appearing in the spectrum, especially for measurements at the foot of the couch. Implications for the design of shielding a treatment room containing the Gamma Knife, Model B, and estimation of the radiation exposure to personnel during an emergency procedure in the treatment room with the sources exposed are discussed. PMID:11339760

  16. Energy spectrum of C60 fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, G. I.; Murzashev, A. I.

    2011-11-01

    The energy spectrum of the C60 fullerene has been calculated in terms of the Shubin-Vonsovskii-Hubbard model using an approximation of static fluctuations. Based on the spectrum, the optical absorption bands at 4.84, 5.88, and 6.30 eV observed experimentally have been successfully explained. It has been concluded that the model used is applicable for the calculation of the energy spectrum and the energy properties of other nanosystems, such as fullerenes of higher orders, carbon nanotubes, and grafen planes.

  17. Tuning the white light spectrum of light emitting diode lamps to reduce attraction of nocturnal arthropods.

    PubMed

    Longcore, Travis; Aldern, Hannah L; Eggers, John F; Flores, Steve; Franco, Lesly; Hirshfield-Yamanishi, Eric; Petrinec, Laina N; Yan, Wilson A; Barroso, André M

    2015-05-01

    Artificial lighting allows humans to be active at night, but has many unintended consequences, including interference with ecological processes, disruption of circadian rhythms and increased exposure to insect vectors of diseases. Although ultraviolet and blue light are usually most attractive to arthropods, degree of attraction varies among orders. With a focus on future indoor lighting applications, we manipulated the spectrum of white lamps to investigate the influence of spectral composition on number of arthropods attracted. We compared numbers of arthropods captured at three customizable light-emitting diode (LED) lamps (3510, 2704 and 2728 K), two commercial LED lamps (2700 K), two commercial compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs; 2700 K) and a control. We configured the three custom LEDs to minimize invertebrate attraction based on published attraction curves for honeybees and moths. Lamps were placed with pan traps at an urban and two rural study sites in Los Angeles, California. For all invertebrate orders combined, our custom LED configurations were less attractive than the commercial LED lamps or CFLs of similar colour temperatures. Thus, adjusting spectral composition of white light to minimize attracting nocturnal arthropods is feasible; not all lights with the same colour temperature are equally attractive to arthropods. PMID:25780237

  18. Design of a surface-emitting, subwavelength metal-clad disk laser in the visible spectrum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingqing; Kim, Se-Heon; Scherer, Axel

    2010-09-13

    We analyze metal-clad disk cavities designed for nanolasers in the visible red spectrum with subwavelength device size and mode volume. Metal cladding suppresses radiation loss and supports low order modes with room temperature Q of 200 to 300. Non-degenerate single-mode operation with enhanced spontaneous emission coupling factor β is expected with the TE(011) mode that has a 0.46(λ(0)/n)(3) mode volume and Q = 210 in a device of size 0.12λ(0)(3). Threshold gain calculations show that room temperature lasing is possible using multiple GaInP/AlGaInP quantum wells as the gain medium. Placing a planar metal reflector under the cavity can enhance radiation and extraction efficiencies or increase the Q, without incurring additional metallic absorption loss. We show that the far-field radiation characteristics are strongly affected by the devices' immediate surroundings, such as changes in metal cladding thickness, even as the resonant mode profile, frequency, and Q remain the same. When the metal cladding is 1 mm thick, light radiates upward with a distinct intensity maximum at 45° when the cladding is 100 nm thick, the emitted light spreads in a near-horizontal direction. PMID:20940854

  19. Tuning the white light spectrum of light emitting diode lamps to reduce attraction of nocturnal arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Longcore, Travis; Aldern, Hannah L.; Eggers, John F.; Flores, Steve; Franco, Lesly; Hirshfield-Yamanishi, Eric; Petrinec, Laina N.; Yan, Wilson A.; Barroso, André M.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial lighting allows humans to be active at night, but has many unintended consequences, including interference with ecological processes, disruption of circadian rhythms and increased exposure to insect vectors of diseases. Although ultraviolet and blue light are usually most attractive to arthropods, degree of attraction varies among orders. With a focus on future indoor lighting applications, we manipulated the spectrum of white lamps to investigate the influence of spectral composition on number of arthropods attracted. We compared numbers of arthropods captured at three customizable light-emitting diode (LED) lamps (3510, 2704 and 2728 K), two commercial LED lamps (2700 K), two commercial compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs; 2700 K) and a control. We configured the three custom LEDs to minimize invertebrate attraction based on published attraction curves for honeybees and moths. Lamps were placed with pan traps at an urban and two rural study sites in Los Angeles, California. For all invertebrate orders combined, our custom LED configurations were less attractive than the commercial LED lamps or CFLs of similar colour temperatures. Thus, adjusting spectral composition of white light to minimize attracting nocturnal arthropods is feasible; not all lights with the same colour temperature are equally attractive to arthropods. PMID:25780237

  20. The energy spectrum in a barotropic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2008-03-01

    In a forced-dissipative barotropic model of the atmosphere on a spherical planet, by following mathematical techniques in (Thompson, P. D.: The equilibrium energy spectrum of randomly forced two-dimensional turbulence, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 30, 1593-1598, 1973) but applying them in a novel context of the discrete spectrum on a rotating sphere, the "minus 2" energy spectrum for wavenumbers much greater than a characteristic wavenumber of the baroclinic forcing has been obtained if the forcing is taken in the simplest and most fundamental form. Some observation-based atmospheric kinetic energy spectra, with their slopes lying between "minus 2" and "minus 3" laws, are discussed from the perspective of the deduced "minus 2" energy spectrum.

  1. Light collection optics for measuring flux and spectrum from light-emitting devices

    DOEpatents

    McCord, Mark A.; DiRegolo, Joseph A.; Gluszczak, Michael R.

    2016-05-24

    Systems and methods for accurately measuring the luminous flux and color (spectra) from light-emitting devices are disclosed. An integrating sphere may be utilized to directly receive a first portion of light emitted by a light-emitting device through an opening defined on the integrating sphere. A light collector may be utilized to collect a second portion of light emitted by the light-emitting device and direct the second portion of light into the integrating sphere through the opening defined on the integrating sphere. A spectrometer may be utilized to measure at least one property of the first portion and the second portion of light received by the integrating sphere.

  2. Wavelength-stable rare earth-free green light-emitting diodes for energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Christian; Detchprohm, Theeradetch

    2011-07-01

    Solid state lighting seeks to replace both, incandescent and fluorescent lighting by energy efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Just like compact fluorescent tubes, current white LEDs employ costly rare earth-based phosphors, a drawback we propose to overcome with direct emitting LEDs of all colors. We show the benefits of homoepitaxial LEDs on bulk GaN substrate for wavelength-stable green spectrum LEDs. By use of non-polar growth orientation we avoid big color shifts with drive current and demonstrate polarized light emitters that prove ideal for pairing with liquid crystal display modulators in back light units of television monitors. We further offer a comparison of the prospects of non-polar a- and m-plane growth over conventional c-plane growth. PMID:21747568

  3. X-ray spectrum in the range (6-12) A emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Louzon, Einat; Henis, Zohar; Levi, Izhak; Hurvitz, Gilad; Ehrlich, Yosi; Fraenkel, Moshe; Maman, Shlomo; Mandelbaum, Pinchas

    2009-05-15

    A detailed analysis of the x-ray spectrum emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium (6-12 A) is presented, using ab initio calculations with the HULLAC relativistic code and isoelectronic considerations. Resonance 3d-nf (n=4 to 7), 3p-4d, 3d-4p, and 3p-4s transitions in Ni samarium ions and in neighboring ionization states (from Mn to Zn ions) were identified. The experiment results show changes in the fine details of the plasma spectrum for different laser intensities.

  4. New calorimetric all-particle energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Both the maximum size N sub m and the sea level muon size N sub mu have been used separately to find the all-particle energy spectrum in the air shower domain. However the conversion required, whether from N sub m to E or from N sub mu to E, has customarily been carried out by means of calculations based on an assumed cascase model. It is shown here that by combining present data on N sub m and N sub mu spectra with data on: (1); the energy spectrum of air shower muons and (2) the average width of the electron profile, one can obtain empirical values of the N sub m to E and N sub mu to E conversion factors, and an empirical calorimetric all-particle spectrum, in the energy range 2 x 10 to the 6th power E 2 x 10 to the 9th power GeV.

  5. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Wen C; Moyers, Michael F; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E; Farr, Jonathan B; Mascia, Anthony E; Schreuder, Andries N

    2009-06-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to +/-21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than +/-3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies. PMID:19610318

  6. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-06-15

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to {+-}21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than {+-}3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  7. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Anando G; Verma, Mahendra K

    2014-08-01

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Π(u), we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum E(u)(k)∼k(-11/5), the potential energy spectrum E(θ)(k)∼k(-7/5), and Π(u)(k)∼k(-4/5) are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence E(u)(k) follows Kolmogorov's spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Π(u)(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Π(u)(k) and E(u)(k)∼k(-5/3) for a narrow band of wave numbers. PMID:25215829

  8. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Anando G.; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-08-01

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)˜k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)˜k-7/5, and Πu(k)˜k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov's spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)˜k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers.

  9. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  10. Simple Experimental Verification of the Relation between the Band-Gap Energy and the Energy of Photons Emitted by LEDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Precker, Jurgen W.

    2007-01-01

    The wavelength of the light emitted by a light-emitting diode (LED) is intimately related to the band-gap energy of the semiconductor from which the LED is made. We experimentally estimate the band-gap energies of several types of LEDs, and compare them with the energies of the emitted light, which ranges from infrared to white. In spite of…

  11. RESIDUAL ENERGY SPECTRUM OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H. K.; Bale, S. D.; Salem, C. S.; Maruca, B. A.

    2013-06-20

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 yr of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of {sigma}{sub r} = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r{sub A} = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cross helicity were also investigated, showing that globally balanced intervals with small residual energy contain local patches of larger imbalance and larger residual energy at all scales, as expected for nonlinear turbulent interactions.

  12. Discovery of a Fanaroff-Riley type 0 radio galaxy emitting at γ-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandi, Paola; Capetti, Alessandro; Baldi, Ranieri D.

    2016-03-01

    We present supporting evidence for the first association of a Fermi source, 3FGLJ1330.0-3818, Acero et al. (2015) with the Fanaroff-Riley type 0 (FR 0) radio galaxy Tol1326-379. FR 0s represent the majority of the local population of radio-loud active galactic nuclei but their nature is still unclear. They share the same nuclear and host properties as FR Is, but they show a large deficit of extended radio emission. Here we show that FR 0s can emit photons at very high energies. Tol1326-379 has a GeV luminosity of L>1 GeV ˜ 2 × 1042 erg s-1, typical of FR Is, but with a steeper γ-ray spectrum (Γ = 2.78 ± 0.14). This could be related to the intrinsic jet properties but also to a different viewing angle.

  13. On the energy spectra of secondary ions emitted from silicon and graphite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostov, V. V.; Khrustachev, I. K.; Minnebaev, K. F.; Zykova, E. Yu.; Ivanenko, I. P.; Yurasova, V. E.

    2014-03-01

    Secondary ion emission from silicon and graphite single crystals bombarded by argon ions with energies E 0 varied from 1 to 10 keV at various angles of incidence α has been studied. The evolution of the energy spectra of C+ and Si+ secondary ions has been traced in which the positions of maxima ( E max) shift toward higher secondary-ion energies E 1 with increasing polar emission angle θ (measured from the normal to the sample surface). The opposite trend has been observed for ions emitted from single crystals heated to several hundred degrees Centigrade; the E max values initially remain unchanged and then shift toward lower energies E 1 with increasing angle θ. It is established that the magnitude and position of a peak in the energy spectrum of secondary C+ ions is virtually independent of E 0, angle α, and the surface relief of the sample (in the E 0 and α intervals studied). Unusual oscillating energy distributions are discussed, which have been observed for secondary ions emitted from silicon (111) and layered graphite (0001) faces. Numerical simulations of secondary ion sputtering and charge exchange have been performed. A comparison of the measured and calculated data for graphite crystals has shown that C+ ions are formed as a result of charge exchange between secondary ions and bombarding Ar+ ions, which takes place both outside and inside the target. This substantially differs from the ion sputtering process in metals and must be taken into account when analyzing secondary ion emission mechanisms and in practical applications of secondary-ion mass spectrometry.

  14. Study Of Radiation Spectrum Emitted From Local Regions In PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krcal, Ondrej; Koktavy, Pavel; Trcka, Tomas

    2009-04-01

    The microplasma discharges in PN junction local defect micro-regions are as a rule accompanied by the emission of light, as it has been reported by Chynoweth and McKay [1]. The emission of visible light can be observed on small regions on the surface of solar cells. This study deals with investigating the spectrum of emission and determines the wavelength with maximum intensity.

  15. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  16. The fractal energy measurement and the singularity energy spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gang; Zhang, Shuning; Yang, Xiaoniu

    2012-12-01

    The singularity exponent (SE) is the characteristic parameter of fractal and multifractal signals. Based on SE, the fractal dimension reflecting the global self-similar character, the instantaneous SE reflecting the local self-similar character, the multifractal spectrum (MFS) reflecting the distribution of SE, and the time-varying MFS reflecting pointwise multifractal spectrum were proposed. However, all the studies were based on the depiction of spatial or differentiability characters of fractal signals. Taking the SE as the independent dimension, this paper investigates the fractal energy measurement (FEM) and the singularity energy spectrum (SES) theory. Firstly, we study the energy measurement and the energy spectrum of a fractal signal in the singularity domain, propose the conception of FEM and SES of multifractal signals, and investigate the Hausdorff measure and the local direction angle of the fractal energy element. Then, we prove the compatibility between FEM and traditional energy, and point out that SES can be measured in the fractal space. Finally, we study the algorithm of SES under the condition of a continuous signal and a discrete signal, and give the approximation algorithm of the latter, and the estimations of FEM and SES of the Gaussian white noise, Fractal Brownian motion and the multifractal Brownian motion show the theoretical significance and application value of FEM and SES.

  17. Light-spectrum modification of warm white-light-emitting diodes with 3D colloidal photonic crystals to approximate candlelight.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Feng; Hsieh, Cheng-Liang; Wu, Chia-Jung

    2013-09-15

    This study presents the light-spectrum modification of warm white-light-emitting diodes (w-WLEDs) with 3D colloidal photonic crystals (3D CPhCs) to approximate candlelight. The study measures the angular-resolved transmission properties of the w-WLEDs with CPhCs, which exhibit photonic stop bands based on the CPhC photonic band structures. The w-WLEDs with 3D CPhCs produce a low correlated color temperature of 1963 K, a high color-rendering index of 85, and a luminous flux of 22.8 lm (four times that of a candle). This study presents the successful development of a novel low-cost technique to produce candlelight w-WLEDs for use as an indoor light source. PMID:24104827

  18. Measurement of the thermal characteristics of packaged double-heterostructure light emitting diodes for space applications using spontaneous optical spectrum properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechou, L.; Rehioui, O.; Deshayes, Y.; Gilard, O.; Quadri, G.; Ousten, Y.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, the thermal characteristics of packaged infrared double-heterostructure light emitting diode (DH-LED), used in space applications, are measured under conditions that reproduce space environments. The characterisation uses spontaneous optical spectrum characteristics, current-voltage curves and optical power measured under a primary vacuum (<10 -2 Torr) at temperatures between -30 and 100 °C. The investigations have been specifically oriented toward the extraction of junction temperature in the steady-state regime and junction-to-case thermal resistance. A specific model based on semiconductor theory for electrical transport has been used to calculate the shape of the spontaneous emission spectrum between the band-gap energy and higher energies and its change versus temperature. A linear relation between the junction temperature and the dissipated power has been found for various case temperatures appropriately controlled in a LN 2 cryostat. These results confirm that thermal behavior of DH-LEDs depends on both environment temperature and dissipated power level in the active zone and that the junction-to-case thermal resistance is not constant over a large range of temperatures, diminishing at higher currents as already reported by recent papers on high brightness DH-LED. Finally, this study could represent a practical non-destructive method providing qualitative information about variations of junction temperature and junction-to-case thermal resistance taking into account an industrial qualification framework approach based on electroluminescence analysis, frequently measured by manufacturers or end-users.

  19. SLC energy spectrum monitor using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.; Brunk, W.; Early, R.; Ross, M.; Tillmann, E.; Walz, D.

    1986-04-01

    The SLAC Linac is being upgraded for the use in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The improved Linac must accelerate electron and positron bunches from 1.2 GeV to 50 GeV while producing output energy spectra of about 0.2%. The energy spectra must be maintained during operation to provide for good beam transmission and to minimize chromatic effects in the SLC ARCs and Final Focus. the energy spectra of these beams are determined by the bunch length and intensity, the RF phase and waveform and the intra-bunch longitudinal wakefields. A non-destructive energy spectrum monitor has been designed using a vertical wiggler magnet located downstream of the horizontal beam splitter at the end of the SLC Linac. It produces synchrotron radiation which is viewed in an off-axis x-ray position sensitive detector. The expected resolution is 0.08%. The design considerations of this monitor are presented in this paper. A pair of these monitors is under construction with an installation date set for late summer 1986. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  20. A radio view of high-energy emitting AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Robert Frank

    2016-07-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are among the most energetic objects in the Universe. These galaxies that are dominated in part or even throughout the electromagnetic spectrum by emission from their central, compact region. AGNs are extensively studied by multi-wavelength observations. In the standard picture, the main driver of an AGN is a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in its centre that is surrounded by an accretion disk. Perpendicular to the disk, in the vicinity of highly magnetized SMBH relativistic outflows of plasma, so-called jets, can form on either side that can reach far beyond the host galaxy. Only about 10% of all AGNs are dominated by emission from these jets due to relativistic beaming effects and these so-called blazars dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray sky. It is commonly accepted that the low-energy emission (radio to UV/X-ray) is due to synchrotron emission from the jet. The high-energy emission is considered to stem from inverse-Compton scattering of photons on the jet particles, but different sources for these photons are discussed (internal or external to the AGN) and other models for the high-energy emission have also been proposed. The nature of the high-energy emission is strongly linked to the location of the emission region in the jet which requires a detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of jets. Radio observations especially using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) provide the best way to gain direct information on the intrinsic properties of jets down to sub-pc scales, close to their formation region. In this thesis, I focus on the properties of three different AGNs, IC 310, PKS2004-447, and 3C 111 that belong to the small non-blazar population of gamma-ray-loud AGNs. I study them in detail with a variety of radio astronomical instruments with respect to their high-energy emission and in the context of the large monitoring programmes MOJAVE (Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments) and

  1. Enhanced performances for top-emitting white organic light-emitting diodes by utilizing green phosphor as energy transfer medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lingling; Bao, Yiyang; Zhang, Yanan; Peng, Ling; Zhu, Wenjing; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Yewen; Chen, Shufen

    2016-06-01

    In top-emitting white organic light-emitting diodes (TWOLEDs), the device performances attribute to the several important factors, such as exciton profile, energy transfer, and microcavity effect. In this paper, a TWOLED containing a heterojunction blue emission layer (EML) and a red EML is reported. A host material with high triplet energy level is employed for the adjacent blue and red EML, while the inefficient red emission reduces the emission efficiency of the TWOLED. In order to enhance the red emission efficiency, mixed-host and co-doping technologies are used in the red EML. By mixing the hole transporting and electron transporting host materials, the exciton recombination zone extends to the red EML to increase the red emission intensity and reduce the efficiency roll-off. And by co-doping a green phosphor into the red EML as the energy transfer medium, the energy transfer rate is enhanced, and then the current efficiency increases. Besides, both the mixed-host and co-doping change the carrier transport and the exciton recombination zone, which further affects the microcavity resonance in the devices. Due to the enhancement on the red emission intensity and the shift of resonant wavelength, the chromaticity of the TWOLED is improved.

  2. The design of a source to simulate the gamma-ray spectrum emitted by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reier, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simulated source was designed to duplicate the gamma spectrum of a uniform cylindrical 2200-watt Pu02 radioisotope thermoelectric generator containing 81% Pu-238 and 1.2 ppm Pu-236. Gamma rays from the decay of Pu-238, Am-241, Pu-239, and the 0-18(alpha,n)Ne-21 reaction were catalogued in broad energy groups. Two 46- and one 22-mc Th-228 sources provided simulation at various times in the life of the fuel capsule up to 18 years, which covers the time span of an outer planet mission. Emission from Th-228 represents the overwhelming contribution of the gamma spectrum after the first few years. The sources, in the form of 13-inch rods, were placed in a concentric hole in a cylinder of depleted uranium, which provided shielding equivalent to the self-shielding of the fuel capsule. The thickness of the U-238 cylinder (0.55cm) was determined by Monte Carlo calculations to insure that the spectrum emerging from the simulated source matched that of the fuel capsule.

  3. Measurement of the Spectral Distribution of Low Energy Electrons emitted as a result of MVV Auger Transition in Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyal, Suman; Joglekar, P. V.; Shastry, K.; Weiss, A. H.; Hulbert, S. L.

    2011-10-01

    Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) was used to investigate the physics of the Low Energy tail (LET) region of the Auger spectrum of a Cu (100) sample. A beam of 200eV photons was incident on the sample and two Cylindrical Mirror Analyzers (CMA's) were used to select the energy of electrons emitted from the sample. An APECS spectra was obtained with one of the CMA's fixed at the energy 136.25eV, which corresponds to the core photoemission peak. The APECS spectra contains the contributions from electrons excited by the MVV Auger transition plus a background due to true coincidences between photo-emitted valence band electrons that undergo inelastic scattering and transfer part of their energy with other valence electrons. Coincidence measurements were made with the fixed analyzer set at various energies between the core and the valence band. These measurements were used to obtain an estimate of the background due to the inelastically scattered valence band electrons.

  4. On muon energy spectrum in muon groups underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which was used to measure muon energy spectrum characteristics in muon groups underground using mu-e decays recording. The Baksan Telescope's experimental data on mu-e decays intensity in muon groups of various multiplicities are analyzed. The experimental data indicating very flat spectrum does not however represent the total spectrum in muon groups. Obviously the muon energy spectrum depends strongly on a distance from the group axis. The core attraction effect makes a significant distortion, making the spectrum flatter. After taking this into account and making corrections for this effect the integral total spectrum index in groups has a very small depencence on muon multiplicity and agrees well with expected one: beta=beta (sub expected) = 1.75.

  5. Novel red-emitting Ba2Tb(BO3)2Cl:Eu phosphor with efficient energy transfer for potential application in white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhiguo; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Liao, Libing

    2012-07-01

    A novel red-emitting Ba(2)Tb(BO(3))(2)Cl:Eu phosphor possessing a broad excitation band in the near-ultraviolet (n-UV) region was synthesized by the solid-state reaction. Versatile Ba(2)Tb(BO(3))(2)Cl compound has a rigid open framework, which can offer two types of sites for various valence's cations to occupy, and the coexistence of Eu(2+)/Eu(3+) and the red-emitting luminescence from Eu(3+) with the aid of efficient energy transfer of Eu(2+)-Eu(3+)(Tb(3+)) and Tb(3+)-Eu(3+) have been investigated. Ba(2)Tb(BO(3))(2)Cl emits green emission with the main peak around 543 nm, which originates from (5)D(4) → (7)F(5) transition of Tb(3+). Ba(2)Tb(BO(3))(2)Cl:Eu shows bright red emission from Eu(3+) with peaks around 594, 612, and 624 nm under n-UV excitation (350-420 nm). The existence of Eu(2+) can be testified by the broad-band excitation spectrum, UV-vis reflectance spectrum, X-ray photoelectron spectrum, and Eu L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectrum. Decay time and time-resolved luminescence measurements indicated that the interesting luminescence behavior should be ascribed to efficient energy transfer of Eu(2+)-Eu(3+)(Tb(3+)) and Tb(3+)-Eu(3+) in Ba(2)Tb(BO(3))(2)Cl:Eu phosphors. PMID:22686374

  6. Energy spectrum of stably-stratified and convective turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra; Kumar, Abhishek

    2015-11-01

    In the inertial range of fluid turbulence, the energy flux is constant, while the energy spectrum scales as k - 5 / 3 (k=wavenumber). The buoyancy however could change the phenomenology dramatically. Bolgiano and Obukhov (1959) had conjectured that stably stratified flows (as in atmosphere) exhibits a decrease in the energy flux as k - 4 / 5 due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy, consequently, the energy spectrum scales as k - 11 / 5. We show using detailed numerical analysis that the stably stratified flows indeed exhibit k - 11 / 5 energy spectrum for Froude numbers Fr near unity. The flow becomes anisotropic for small Froude numbers. For weaker buoyancy (large Fr), the kinetic energy follows Kolmogorov's spectrum with a constant energy flux. However, in convective turbulence, the energy flux is a nondecreasing function of wavenumber since the buoyancy feeds positively into the kinetic energy. Hence, the kinetic energy spectrum is Kolmogorov-like (k - 5 / 3) or shallower. We also demonstrate the above scaling using a shell model of buoyancy-driven turbulence.

  7. Turbulent diffusion phase transition is due to singular energy spectrum.

    PubMed Central

    Wallstrom, T C

    1995-01-01

    The phase transition for turbulent diffusion, reported by Avellaneda and Majda [Avellaneda, M. & Majda, A. J. (1994) Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London A 346, 205-233, and several earlier papers], is traced to a modeling assumption in which the energy spectrum of the turbulent fluid is singularly dependent on the viscosity in the inertial range. Phenomenological models of turbulence and intermittency, by contrast, require that the energy spectrum be independent of the viscosity in the inertial range. When the energy spectrum is assumed to be consistent with the phenomenological models, there is no phase transition for turbulent diffusion. Images Fig. 2 PMID:11607590

  8. One particularity of energy-angular secondary electrons spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. S.; Zaitsev, S. I.

    2006-05-01

    In this work we discuss the problems of the energy-angular spectrum of backscattered and true secondary electrons simulation using the discrete (DLA) and the continuous (CLA) loss approximations. The presence of an angular spectrum artefact - the deviation from the sinusoidal distribution over the range of 177-18O° from the beam direction is shown.

  9. Spectrum and energy transfer in steady Burgers turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The spectrum, energy transfer, and spectral interactions in steady Burgers turbulence are studied using numerically generated data. The velocity field is initially random and the turbulence is maintained steady by forcing the amplitude of a band of low wavenumbers to be invariant in time, while permitting the phase to change as dictated by the equation. The spectrum, as expected, is very different from that of Navier-Stokes turbulence. It is demonstrated that the far range of the spectrum scales as predicted by Burgers. Despite the difference in their spectra, in matters of the spectral energy transfer and triadic interactions Burgers turbulence is similar to Navier-Stokes turbulence.

  10. Mass Spectrum Analysis of Gas Emitted during Organic Contaminant Removal from a Metal Surface with an Arc in Low Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Masaya; Takeda, Koichi

    2006-05-05

    The gas emitted during organic contaminant removal from a metal surface with an arc in low vacuum is investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The experimental results show that fragment molecules of the contaminant material, which are created by the decomposition of the contaminant material, exist in the emitted gas. The decomposition rate of the contaminant increased with the treatment current, which indicates that the decomposition occurs not in the cathode spot, but in the arc column.

  11. The High Energy Spectrum of NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Gehrels, N.; Shrader, C.; Soldi, S.; Lubinski, P.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Malzac, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present first INTEGRAL observations of the type 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. Combining several INTEGRAL observations performed during 2003, totaling approximately 400 ksec of exposure time, allow us to study the spectrum in the 3 - 300 keV range. The measurements presented here reveal an overall spectrum from X-rays up to the soft gamma-rays that can be described by an absorbed (N(sub H) approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter) and non-variable thermal component, plus a Fe Kalpha line, and an exponential cutoff occurs at 110 keV, consistent with earlier claims. The Galactic hydrogen column density in the line of sight is N(sub H), Gal approximately equal to 2.1 x 10 (exp 20) per square centimeter. The time resolved analysis shows little variation of the spectral parameters. The comparison with CGRO/OSSE data shows that the same spectral model can be applied over a time span of 15 years, while the flux varied by a factor of 2. Applying a Compton reflection component improves the model fit to the INTEGRAL data. Nonetheless the data available to date cannot significantly confirm or exclude the existence of reflection, nor is a high iron overabundance in the absorber, as had been previously suggested, clearly detectable.

  12. On the Linearly-Balanced Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Huei,-Iin; Robertson, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the earth's atmospheric motion can generally be characterized by the two dimensional quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which the constraints on global integrals of kinetic energy, entrophy and potential vorticity play very important roles in redistributing the wave energy among different scales of motion. Assuming the hypothesis of Kolmogrov's local isotropy, derived a -3 power law of the equilibrium two-dimensional kinetic energy spectrum that entails constant vorticity and zero energy flows from the energy-containing wave number up to the viscous cutoff. In his three dimensional quasi-geostrophic theory, showed that the spectrum function of the vertical scale turbulence - expressible in terms of the available potential energy - possesses the same power law as the two dimensional kinetic energy spectrum. As the slope of kinetic energy spectrum in the inertial range is theoretically related to the predictability of the synoptic scales (Lorenz, 1969), many general circulation models includes a horizontal diffusion to provide reasonable kinetic energy spectra, although the actual power law exhibited in the atmospheric general circulation is controversial. Note that in either the atmospheric modeling or the observational analyses, the proper choice of wave number Index to represent the turbulence scale Is the degree of the Legendre polynomial.

  13. Energy-based dosimetry of low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, Martha J.

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) for low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources have advanced to the point where the algorithms may be used in clinical practice. Before these algorithms can be used, a methodology must be established to verify the accuracy of the source models used by the algorithms. Additionally, the source strength metric for these algorithms must be established. This work explored the feasibility of verifying the source models used by MBDCAs by measuring the differential photon fluence emitted from the encapsulation of the source. The measured fluence could be compared to that modeled by the algorithm to validate the source model. This work examined how the differential photon fluence varied with position and angle of emission from the source, and the resolution that these measurements would require for dose computations to be accurate to within 1.5%. Both the spatial and angular resolution requirements were determined. The techniques used to determine the resolution required for measurements of the differential photon fluence were applied to determine why dose-rate constants determined using a spectroscopic technique disagreed with those computed using Monte Carlo techniques. The discrepancy between the two techniques had been previously published, but the cause of the discrepancy was not known. This work determined the impact that some of the assumptions used by the spectroscopic technique had on the accuracy of the calculation. The assumption of isotropic emission was found to cause the largest discrepancy in the spectroscopic dose-rate constant. Finally, this work improved the instrumentation used to measure the rate at which energy leaves the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. This quantity is called emitted power (EP), and is presented as a possible source strength metric for MBDCAs. A calorimeter that measured EP was designed and built. The theoretical framework that the calorimeter relied upon to measure EP

  14. Ion beam energy spectrum calculation via dosimetry data deconvolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Sharp, Andrew Clinton

    2010-10-01

    The energy spectrum of a H{sup +} beam generated within the HERMES III accelerator is calculated from dosimetry data to refine future experiments. Multiple layers of radiochromic film are exposed to the beam. A graphic user interface was written in MATLAB to align the film images and calculate the beam's dose depth profile. Singular value regularization is used to stabilize the unfolding and provide the H{sup +} beam's energy spectrum. The beam was found to have major contributions from 1 MeV and 8.5 MeV protons. The HERMES III accelerator is typically used as a pulsed photon source to experimentally obtain photon impulse response of systems due to high energy photons. A series of experiments were performed to explore the use of Hermes III to generate an intense pulsed proton beam. Knowing the beam energy spectrum allows for greater precision in experiment predictions and beam model verification.

  15. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

  16. Hadron intensity and energy spectrum at 4380 m above level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cananov, S. D.; Chadranyan, E. K.; Khizanishvili, L. A.; Ladaria, N. K.; Roinishvili, N. N.

    1985-01-01

    The flux value of hadrons with E (sup gamma) h or = 5 TeV, where E (sup gamma) h or = is the energy transferred into electromagnetic component is presented. It is shown that the energy spectrum slope beta of hadrons with E h or = 20 TeV is equal to 1.9.

  17. High-energy terahertz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Tang, Longhuang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-15

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning in a wide frequency range. Through the special optical design with a galvano-optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, the maximum THz wave output energy of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump energy of 172.8 mJ. The fast THz frequency tuning in the range of 0.7-2.8 THz can be accessed with the step response of 600 μs. Moreover, the maximum THz wave output energy from this configuration is 3.29 times as large as that obtained from the conventional surface-emitted THz wave parametric oscillator with the same experimental conditions. PMID:27176978

  18. Spectrum tailoring of the neutron energy spectrum in the context of delayed neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, William E; Tobin, Steve J; Sandoval, Nathan P; Fensin, Mike L

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of measuring plutonium mass in spent fuel, a delayed neutron instrument is of particular interest since, if properly designed, the delayed neutron signal from {sup 235}U is significantly stronger than the signature from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Pu. A key factor in properly designing a delayed neutron instrument is to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U. This minimization is achieved by keeping the interrogating neutron spectrum below {approx} 1 MeV. In the context of spent fuel measurements it is desirable to use a 14 MeV (deuterium and tritium) neutron generator for economic reasons. Spectrum tailoring is the term used to describe the inclusion of material between the 14 MeV neutrons and the interrogated object that lower the neutron energy through nuclear reactions and moderation. This report quantifies the utility of different material combination for spectrum tailoring.

  19. Parameterizations of Pion Energy Spectrum in Nucleon-Nucleon Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Franics A.; Wilson, John W.; Norbury, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of pion (PI) production are expected to play an important role in radiation exposures in the upper atmosphere or on the Martian surface. Nuclear databases for describing pion production are developed for radiation transport codes to support these studies. We analyze the secondary energy spectrum of pions produced in nucleon-nucleon (NN) collisions in the relativistic one-pion exchange model. Parametric formulas of the isospin cross sections for one-pion production channels are discussed and are used to renormalize the model spectrum. Energy spectra for the deuteron related channels (NN yields dPi) are also described.

  20. Energy Spectrum in the Dissipation Range of Fluid Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, D. O.; Chen, S.; Doolen, G. D.; Kraichnan, R. H.; Wang, L.-P.; Zhou, Y.

    1996-01-01

    High resolution, direct numerical simulations of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are carried out to study the energy spectrum in the dissipation range. An energy spectrum of the form A(k/k( sub d))(sup alpha) exp[- betak/k(sub d) is confirmed. The possible values of the parameters alpha and beta, as well as their dependence on Revnolds numbers and length scales, are investigated, showing good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. A "bottleneck'-type effect is reported at k/k(sub d) approximately 4, exhibiting a possible transition from near-dissipation to far- dissipation.

  1. High Energy Terahertz Parametric Oscillator Based on Surface-Emitted Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, De-Gang; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Yu-Ye; Liu, Chang-Ming; Yu, Hong; Li, Zhong-Yang; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jian-Quan

    2013-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high power nanosecond pulsed terahertz (THz)-wave parametric oscillator (TPO) by using a wide pump beam. A surface emitted cavity configuration is employed to reduce the THz absorption in MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The THz wave can be tuned from 1 THz to 3 THz. A maximum THz output energy of 438 nJ/pulse is achieved at 1.56 Hz using a 4.5-mm-diameter pump beam with a pulse energy of 226 mJ pump energy with the repetition of 10 Hz, corresponding to the energy conversion efficiency of 1.94 × 10-6.

  2. Expected spectrum of high-energy photons from ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatov, M. L.

    2006-04-01

    Two methods for identifying the flux of high-energy photons as emitted by ball lightning are proposed. It is assumed that ball lightning has a core consisting of oscillating clouds of electrons and totally ionized ions. A search for tooth enamel changes due to the influence of high-energy photons from ball lightning to reveal the influence of such photons on human beings is also proposed. This diagnostic measure should be taken if after observation of ball lightning symptoms similar to those of radiation sickness arise or ball lightning causes heavy burns.

  3. High Energy Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes From a Realistic Primary Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos Penha, Felipe; Dembinski, Hans; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric neutrino fluxes depend on the energy spectrum of primary nucleons entering the top of the atmosphere. Before the advent of AMANDA and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, measurements of the neutrino fluxes were generally below ~ 1TeV , a regime in which a simple energy power law sufficed to describe the primary spectrum. Now, IceCube's muon neutrino data extends beyond 1PeV , including a combination of neutrinos from astrophysical sources with background from atmospheric neutrinos. At such high energies, the steepening at the knee of the primary spectrum must be accounted for. Here, we describe a semi-analytical approach for calculating the atmospheric differential neutrino fluxes at high energies. The input is a realistic primary spectrum consisting of 4 populations with distinct energy cutoffs, each with up to 7 representative nuclei, where the parameters were extracted from a global fit. We show the effect of each component on the atmospheric neutrino spectra, above 10TeV . The resulting features follow directly from recent air shower measurements included in the fit. Felipe Campos Penha gratefully acknowledges financial support from CAPES (Processo BEX 5348/14-5), CNPq (Processo 142180/2012-2), and the Bartol Research Institute.

  4. Energy Correlation among Three Photoelectrons Emitted in Core-Valence-Valence Triple Photoionization of Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Hikosaka, Y.; Soejima, K.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Palaudoux, J.; Andric, L.; Shigemasa, E.; Suzuki, I. H.; Nakano, M.; Ito, K.

    2011-09-09

    The direct observation of triple photoionization involving one inner shell and two valence electrons is reported. The energy distribution of the three photoelectrons emitted from Ne is obtained using a very efficient multielectron coincidence method using the magnetic bottle electron spectroscopic technique. A predominance of the direct path to triple photoionization for the formation of Ne{sup 3+} in the 1s2s{sup 2}2p{sup 4} configuration is observed. It is demonstrated that the energy distribution evolves with photon energy and indicates a significant difference with triple photoionization involving only valence electrons.

  5. Energy Correlation among Three Photoelectrons Emitted in Core-Valence-Valence Triple Photoionization of Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikosaka, Y.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Palaudoux, J.; Andric, L.; Soejima, K.; Shigemasa, E.; Suzuki, I. H.; Nakano, M.; Ito, K.

    2011-09-01

    The direct observation of triple photoionization involving one inner shell and two valence electrons is reported. The energy distribution of the three photoelectrons emitted from Ne is obtained using a very efficient multielectron coincidence method using the magnetic bottle electron spectroscopic technique. A predominance of the direct path to triple photoionization for the formation of Ne3+ in the 1s2s22p4 configuration is observed. It is demonstrated that the energy distribution evolves with photon energy and indicates a significant difference with triple photoionization involving only valence electrons.

  6. Energy correlation among three photoelectrons emitted in core-valence-valence triple photoionization of Ne.

    PubMed

    Hikosaka, Y; Lablanquie, P; Penent, F; Palaudoux, J; Andric, L; Soejima, K; Shigemasa, E; Suzuki, I H; Nakano, M; Ito, K

    2011-09-01

    The direct observation of triple photoionization involving one inner shell and two valence electrons is reported. The energy distribution of the three photoelectrons emitted from Ne is obtained using a very efficient multielectron coincidence method using the magnetic bottle electron spectroscopic technique. A predominance of the direct path to triple photoionization for the formation of Ne3+ in the 1s 2s2 2p4 configuration is observed. It is demonstrated that the energy distribution evolves with photon energy and indicates a significant difference with triple photoionization involving only valence electrons. PMID:22026663

  7. High energy primary electron spectrum observed by the emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Aizu, H.; Hiraiwa, N.; Taira, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Niu, K.; Koss, T. A.; Lord, J. J.; Golden, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector of the emulsion chamber type is used to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons. Two large emulsion chambers, each having an area of 40 by 50 sq cm, are exposed for about 25.5 hr at an average pressure altitude of 3.9 mbar. About 500 high-energy cascades (no less than about 600 GeV) are detected by searching for dark spots on the X-ray films. A power-law energy dependence formula is derived for the spectrum of primary cosmic-ray electrons in the energy region over 100 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the transition curves obtained previously by theoretical and Monte Carlo calculations.

  8. Limiting energy spectrum of a saturated radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Michael; Davidson, Gerald T.

    1988-01-01

    The condition for magnetospheric wave growth in the presence of anisotropic charged particle distributions is used to extend the Kennel-Petschek theory that traditionally imposes an upper bound on the integral flux of charged particles at energies above a certain threshold to provide a limit on the differential flux at any energy above this threshold. A closed-form expression is derived for the limiting energy spectrum consistent with marginal occurrence of a magnetospheric maser at all wave frequencies below a certain fraction of the electron or proton gyrofrequency. The bounded integral can be recast in such a way that repeated differentiations with respect to v(parallel) actually generate a closed expression for the limiting form of the velocity space distribution, and thus for the limiting energy spectrum of the corresponding particles, whenever the anisotropy parameter is an integer.

  9. Investigation of energy transfer and charge trapping in dye-doped organic light-emitting diodes by magneto-electroluminescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qiming; Gao, Na; Li, Weijun; Chen, Ping; Li, Feng; Ma, Yuguang

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the energy transfer and charge trapping (CT) in dye-doped organic light-emitting devices by using the magneto-electroluminescence as a tool. An intra-molecular charge-transfer fluorescent material N,N-diphenyl-4-(9-phenylnaphtho-[2,3-c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl)aniline was selected as the guest emitter. The tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum and 1,3-bis(9-carbazolyl)benzene were selected as the hosts. Our results demonstrate that as the energy difference between the HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital)/LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) of the host and the guest (ΔEHOMO/ΔELUMO) increases, the CT becomes more dominant, and the CT cannot be ignored even when the ΔEHOMO/ΔELUMO is small and the emission spectrum of the host overlaps the absorption spectrum of the guest well.

  10. Linear energy transfer spectrum measurement experiment (P0006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Parnell, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The linear energy transfer (LET) is the energy deposited per unit path length of charged particle traversing matter. For estimating the rate of damage from single-hit phenomena, the quantity that best combines the radiation environment, orbital situation, and spacecraft shielding is the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum at the device location. This experiment will measure the LET spectrum behind different shielding configurations for approximately 1 year. The shielding will be increased in increments of approximately 1 G/sq cm up to a maximum shieldng of 16 G/sq cm. In addition to providing critical information to future spacecraft designers, these measurements will also provide data that will be extremely valuable to other experiments on LDEF.

  11. Linear energy transfer spectrum measurement experiment (P0006)

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Parnell, T.A.

    1984-02-01

    The linear energy transfer (LET) is the energy deposited per unit path length of charged particle traversing matter. For estimating the rate of damage from single-hit phenomena, the quantity that best combines the radiation environment, orbital situation, and spacecraft shielding is the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum at the device location. This experiment will measure the LET spectrum behind different shielding configurations for approxmately 1 year. The shielding will be increased in increments of approximately 1 G/sq cm up to a maximum shieldng of 16 G/sq cm. In addition to providing critical information to future spacecraft designers, these measurements will also provide data that will be extremely valuable to other experiments on LDEF.

  12. ENERGY SPECTRUM AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS FROM SEMI-RELATIVISTIC HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu

    2012-02-10

    It has been suggested that hypernova remnants, with a substantial amount of energy in semi-relativistic ejecta, can accelerate intermediate mass or heavy nuclei to ultrahigh energies and provide a sufficient amount of energy in cosmic rays to account for the observed flux. We here calculate the expected energy spectrum and chemical composition of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from such semi-relativistic hypernovae. With a chemical composition equal to that of the hypernova ejecta and a flat or hard spectrum for cosmic rays at the sources, the spectrum and composition of the propagated cosmic rays observed at the Earth can be compatible with the measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  13. Measurements of the absolute neutron fluence spectrum emitted at 0/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/ from the Little-Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear research emulsions (NRE) have been used to characterize the neutron spectrum emitted by the Little-Boy replica. NRE were irradiated at the Little-Boy surface as well as approximately 2m from the center of the Little-Boy replica using polar angles of 0/sup 0/, 30/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/. For the NRE exposed at 2m, neutron background was determined using shadow shields of borated polyethylene. Emulsion scanning to date has concentrated exclusively on the 2m, 0/sup 0/ and 2m, 90/sup 0/ locations. Approximately 5000 proton-recoil tracks have been measured in NRE irradiated at each of these locations. At the 2m, 90/sup 0/ location the NRE neutron spectrum extends from 0.37 up to 8.2 MeV, whereas the NRE neutron spectrum at the 2m, 0/sup 0/ location is much softer and extends only up to 2.7 MeV. NRE neutron spectrometry results at these two locations are compared with both liquid scintillator neutron spectrometry and Monte Carlo calculations. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  14. A new absolute method for the standardization of radionuclides emitting low-energy radiation.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, E; de, Marcillac P; Coron, N; Leblanc, J; Loidl, M; Metge, J F; Bouchard, J

    2002-01-01

    Microcalorimeters (or bolometers) operated at temperatures below 100 mK allow individual counting of photons and electrons with a very low energy detection threshold. The physics is based on the pulse temperature increase of the target (or absorber) of the detector due to the complete absorption of both electrons and photons. Since this target can be constructed with a perfect 4-pi geometry, a bolometer offers potentially a new method for absolute activity measurements of radionuclides emitting low-energy radiation. In this paper we present our first results of a feasibility study of activity standardization of a 55Fe solution with a prototype 4-pi bolometer. PMID:11839023

  15. Anisotropy and the knee of the energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clay, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The measured cosmic ray energy spectrum exhibits clear structure (the knee) at approx 3 x 10 to the 15th power eV (sea level shower size approx 3 x 10 to the 5th power particles). Additionally, at energies in this general region, there occur apparent changes in shower development such that the observed characteristics of showers at this energy appear different to those characteristics observed at somewhat higher energies. At energies just below this region, the cosmic ray anisotropy amplitude apparently begins a progressive increase with energy. The latter effect does not clearly fit with the first two since there appears to be no significant change exactly at the knee. However, the phase of the first harmonic of the anisotropy appears to show a substantial change just where the energy spectrum shows structure and in the middle of the shower development changes. The first harmonic phase appears to change from approx. 18 hours R.A. to approx. 5 hours R.A. as the energy of observation moves through the knee. In this paper the latter change is examined in some detail by taking into account information contained in the second harmonic of the anisotropy.

  16. White organic light-emitting diodes based on incomplete energy transfer from perylene to rubrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Bangdong; Zhu, Wenqing; Jiang, Xueyin; Zhang, Zhilin

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents organic light-emitting diodes which generate white emission based on both perylene and rubrene doped in 9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (ADN). In this doping system, the blue dopant perylene not only emitted but also assisted the energy transfer from ADN to rubrene, which contributes to a lower doping concentration of rubrene. The optimal configuration of the device is ITO/TPD(50 nm)/ADN:0.5 wt% perylene:0.006 wt% rubrene(40 nm)/Bphen(25 nm)/LiF(1 nm)/Al. The maximum luminance of 11 665 cd/m 2 at 14 V according to a luminance efficiency of 2.9 cd/A was obtained. A CIE color coordinate of (0.30, 0.37) at 4 mA/cm 2 was also achieved.

  17. Electrical and optical measurements of the bandgap energy of a light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Matthieu; Michez, Lisa; Raimundo, Jean-Manuel; Dumas, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Semiconductor materials are at the core of electronics. Most electronic devices are made of semiconductors. The operation of these components is well described by quantum physics which is often a difficult concept for students to understand. One of the intrinsic parameters of semiconductors is their bandgap energy {{E}\\text{g}} . In the case of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) {{E}\\text{g}} fixes the colour of the light emitted by the diodes. In this article we propose an experiment to compare {{E}\\text{g}} of a green LED obtained by both electrical and optical measurements. The two slightly different results can be explained by the theoretical knowledge of students on solid physics and the internal structure of electronic devices.

  18. The energy spectrum of Jovian electrons in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Webber, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectrum of electrons with energies approximately 10 to approximately 180 MeV measured with the electron telescope on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in interplanetary space from 1978 to 1983 is reported. The kinetic energy of electrons is determined by double dE/dx measurements from the first two detectors (D1,D2) of a stack of eight solid state detectors and by the range of particle penetration into the remaining six detectors (D3 to D8) which are interleaved with tungsten absorbers.

  19. A spectrum-adjusted white organic light-emitting diode for the optimization of luminous efficiency and color rendering index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Shu-ming

    2015-01-01

    High luminous efficiency and high color rendering index (CRI) are both the foremost factors for white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) to serve as next generation solid-state lighting sources. In this paper, we show that both luminous efficiency and CRI can be improved by adjusting the green/red spectra of WOLEDs. With green emission spectra matching with the human photopic curve, the WOLEDs exhibit higher luminous efficiency and higher CRI. Theoretical calculation shows that by tuning the white emission spectra to maximally match with the human photopic curve, the luminous efficiency can be improved by 41.8% without altering the color coordinates, the color correlated temperature (CCT) and the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the WOLEDs.

  20. The energy spectrum of Jovian electrons in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christon, S. P.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Webber, W. R.

    1985-08-01

    The energy spectrum of electrons with energies approx 10 to approx 180 MeV measured with the electron telescope on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in interplanetary space from 1978 to 1983 is studied. The kinetic energy of electrons is determined by double dE/dx measurements from the first two detectors (D1, D2) of a stack of eight solid state detectors and by the range of particle penetration into the remaining six detectors (D3 to D8) which are interleaved with tungsten absorbers. From 1978 to 1983 (radial range approx 2 to approx 12 AU) electrons of Jovian origin were clearly observable for electrons stopping in D3(e or MeV) and in D4 (E or = 8 MeV). . For electrons stopping in D5 (E or = 12 MeV), the jovian flux dominated the galactic electron flux for a period of approximately one year near the encounter with Jupiter. Jovian electrons were also observed in D6(E or = 21 Mev) 1 MeV but not in D7(E 28 MeV). A detailed interpretation of the electron variations in all energy channels depends on an accurate subtraction of background induced by energetic protons of a few 100 MeV. This substraction is facilitated by laboratory calibration results at several energies. Further results on the differential energy spectrum of Jovian electrons and limits on the maximum detected energies will be reported.

  1. Energy Spectrum of Cosmic-Ray Electrons at TeV Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Sahakian, V.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Chadwick, P. M.; Cheesebrough, A.; Dickinson, H. J.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Keogh, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Nolan, S. J.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Rayner, S. M.; Rulten, C. B.; Spangler, D.; Ward, M.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Borrel, V.; Olive, J-F.

    2008-12-31

    The very large collection area of ground-based {gamma}-ray telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon or satellite based instruments in the detection of very-high-energy (>600 GeV) cosmic-ray electrons. Here we present the electron spectrum derived from data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. In this measurement, the first of this type, we are able to extend the measurement of the electron spectrum beyond the range accessible to direct measurements. We find evidence for a substantial steepening in the energy spectrum above 600 GeV compared to lower energies.

  2. The energy spectrum and the optical absorption spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene within the Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Silant’ev, A. V.

    2015-10-15

    Anticommutator Green’s functions and the energy spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene are calculated in the approximation of static fluctuations within the Hubbard model. On the basis of this spectrum, an interpretation is proposed for the experimentally observed optical absorption bands of C{sub 60} fullerene. The parameters of C{sub 60} fullerene that characterize it within the Hubbard model are calculated by the optical absorption spectrum.

  3. Fast energy and energy spectrum feedback in the SLC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, G.S.; Soderstrom, E.; Seeman, J.T.; Campisi, I.E.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.; Lee, M.; Petersen, A.; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.; Thompson, K.

    1987-01-01

    The energies and energy spectra of the positron and electron beams emerging from the SLC Linac must be carefully maintained so that the beams can be transported through the Arcs to the Final Focus without phase space dilution and also to specify the collision energy. A fastback system has been designed and constructed to control these parameters. The energies and energy spectra are measured nondestructively using position monitors and synchrotron radiation width monitors. The controls consist of rf phases in the Damping Rings, SLED timing, and rf amplitude. Theoretical aspects of the feedback process, algorithms, and operational experience are discussed.

  4. Exact energy spectrum for models with equally spaced point potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudrelier, V.; Crampé, N.

    2006-03-01

    We describe a non-perturbative method for computing the energy band structures of one-dimensional models with general point potentials sitting at equally spaced sites. This is done thanks to a Bethe ansatz approach and the method is applicable even when periodicity is broken, that is when Bloch's theorem is not valid any more. We derive the general equation governing the energy spectrum and illustrate its use in various situations. In particular, we get exact results for boundary effects. We also study non-perturbatively the effects of impurities in such systems. Finally, we discuss the possibility of including interactions between the particles of these systems.

  5. XTE Proposal #20102--"SS 433's High Energy Spectrum"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Blanco, P.; Rothschild, R.; Kawai, N.; Kotani, T.; Oka, T.; Wagner, R. M.; Hjellming, R.; Rupen, M.; Brinkmann, W.

    1999-01-01

    We observed the jet-producing compact binary system SS 433 with RXTE during three multiwavelength campaigns, the first in conjunction with ASCA observations, the second simultaneous with a VLA-VLBA-MERLIN campaign, and the third associated with a Nobeyama millimeter-band campaign. All these campaigns included optical observations. Occurring at different jet precession and binary phases, the observations also monitored the system during a radio flare. The data provide SS 433's X-ray spectrum over more than an energy decade, and track the spectral variations as the X-ray source was partially eclipsed. The continuum can be modeled as a power law with an exponential cutoff, which can be detected to approximately 50 keV. Strong line emission is evident in the 5-10 keV range which can be modeled as a broad line whose energy is precession independent and a narrow line whose energy does vary with jet precession phase; this line model is clearly an over simplification since the PCA does not have sufficient energy resolution to detect the lines ASCA observed. The eclipses are deeper at high energy and at jet precession phases when the jets are more inclined towards and away from us. A large radio flare occurred between two sets of X-ray monitoring observations; an X-ray observation at the peak of the flare found a softer spectrum with a flux approximately 1/3 that of the quiescent level.

  6. Red organic light-emitting diodes based on wide band gap emitting material as the host utilizing two-step energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Khizar-ul; Shan-peng, Liu; Khan, M. A.; Jiang, X. Y.; Zhang, Z. L.; Zhu, W. Q.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrated efficient red organic light-emitting diodes based on a host emitting system of 9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (ADN) co-doped with 4-(dicyano-methylene)-2-t-butyle-6- (1,1,7,7-tetramethyl-julolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) as a red dopant and 2,3,6,7- tetrahydro-1,1,7,7-tetramethyl-1H,5H,1 1H-10(2-benzothiazolyl)-quinolizine-[9,9a,1gh] coumarin (C545T) as an assistant dopant. The typical device structure was glass substrate/ITO/4,4',4''-tris(N-3-methylphenyl-N-phenylamino) triphenylamine(m-MTDATA)/N,N'-bis-(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine(NPB)/[ADN: DCJTB: C545T/Alq3/LiF/Al]. It was found that C545T dopant did not emit by itself but did assist the energy transfer from the host (ADN) to the red emitting dopant. The red OLEDs realized by this approach not only enhanced the emission color, but also significantly improved the EL efficiency. The EL efficiency reached 3.5 cd A-1 at a current density of 20 mA cm-2, which is enhanced by three times compared with devices where the emissive layer is composed of the DCJTB doped ADN. The saturated red emission was obtained with CIE coordinates (x = 0.618, y = 0.373) at 621 nm, and the device driving voltage is decreased as much as 38%. We attribute these improvements to the assistant dopant (C545T), which leads to the more efficient energy transfer from ADN to DCJTB. These results indicate that the co-doped system is a promising method for obtaining high-efficiency red OLEDs.

  7. Energy level alignment at the interfaces in a multilayer organic light-emitting diode structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olthof, S.; Meerheim, R.; Schober, M.; Leo, K.

    2009-06-01

    We use photoelectron spectroscopy to study the electronic structure and energy level alignment throughout an organic light-emitting diode. The structure under investigation is a state-of-the-art long-living red phosphorescent device composed of doped charge-injection layers, charge-blocking layers, and an emission layer. By consecutively building up the whole device, the key parameters of every interface are measured. Our results show that the doped layers have a significant influence on the device energetics, especially in controlling the built-in potential, and that there are mostly only small dipoles present at the interfaces of the intrinsic organic layers.

  8. The energy spectrum of X-rays from rocket-triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Cramer, E. S.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Lucia, R. J.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Uman, M. A.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-10-01

    Although the production of X-rays from natural and rocket-triggered lightning leaders have been studied in detail over the last 10 years, the energy spectrum of the X-rays has never been well measured because the X-rays are emitted in very short but intense bursts that result in pulse pileup in the detectors. The energy spectrum is important because it provides information about the source mechanism for producing the energetic runaway electrons and about the electric fields that they traverse. We have recently developed and operated the first spectrometer for the energetic radiation from lightning. The instrument is part of the Atmospheric Radiation Imagery and Spectroscopy (ARIS) project and will be referred to as ARIS-S (ARIS Spectrometer). It consists of seven 3'' NaI(Tl)/photomultiplier tube scintillation detectors with different thicknesses of attenuators, ranging from no attenuator to more than 1'' of lead placed over the detector (all the detectors are in a 1/8'' thick aluminum box). Using X-ray pulses preceding 48 return strokes in 8 rocket-triggered lightnings, we found that the spectrum of X-rays from leaders is too soft to be consistent with Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche. It has a power law dependence on the energies of the photons, and the power index, λ, is between 2.5 and 3.5. We present the details of the design of the instrument and the results of the analysis of the lightning data acquired during the summer of 2012.

  9. Effects of atmosphere, temperature and emittance on reflected and emitted energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature and emittance on the relative magnitude of reflected energy and emitter energy from a target including atmospheric effects was studied. From the calculations of energy reflected and emitted from a target including atmospheric effects using LOWTRAN 3 programs for midlatitude summer model, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) At 3.5 micrometers q is considerably less than 1 except at high temperatures and for high emittance; (2) at 4 micrometers q is of the order of magnitude equal to 1 for most targets; and (3) at 4.6 micrometers, q is considerably greater than 1 at high temperatures and high emittance. In addition, incident atmospheric emission reflected from the target was found to be negligible except for targets having low temperature and low emittance.

  10. Energy spectrum of sputtered uranium - A new technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, R. A.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    The fission track technique for detecting U-235 has been used in conjunction with a mechanical time-of-flight spectrometer in order to measure the energy spectrum in the region 1 eV to 1 keV of material sputtered from a 93% enriched U-235 foil by 80 keV Ar-40(+) ions. The spectrum was found to exhibit a peak in the region 2-4 eV and to decrease approximately as E exp -1.77 for E not less than 100 eV. The design, construction and resolution of the mechanical spectrometer are discussed and comparisons are made between the data and the predictions of the random collision cascade model of sputtering.

  11. Sharp knee phenomenon of primary cosmic ray energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Antonyan, Samvel

    2014-06-01

    Primary energy spectral models are tested in the energy range of 1-200 PeV using standardized extensive air shower responses from BASJE-MAS, Tibet, GAMMA and KASCADE scintillation shower arrays. Results point toward the two-component origin of observed cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region consisting of a pulsar component superimposed upon rigidity-dependent power law diffuse Galactic flux. The two-component energy spectral model accounts for both the sharp knee shower spectral phenomenon and observed irregularity of all-particle energy spectrum in the region of 50-100 PeV. Alternatively, tested multipopulation primary energy spectra predicted by nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration models describe observed shower spectra in the knee region provided that the cutoff magnetic rigidities of accelerating particles are 6±0.3 and 45±2 PV for the first two populations, respectively. Both tested spectral models confirm the predominant H-He primary nuclei origin of observed shower spectral knee. The parameters of tested energy spectra are evaluated using solutions of the inverse problem on the basis of the corresponding parameterizations of energy spectra for primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei, standardized shower size spectral responses in the 550-1085 g/cm2 atmospheric slant depth range and near vertical muon truncated size spectra detected by the GAMMA array.

  12. Backward emitted high-energy neutrons in hard reactions of p and π+ on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, A.; Piasetzky, E.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Heppelmann, S.; Kawabata, T.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Yoshida, H.; Zhalov, D.

    2000-12-01

    Beams of protons and pions of 5.9 GeV/c were incident on a C target. Neutrons emitted into the back hemisphere, in the laboratory system, were detected in (triple) coincidence with two emerging pt>0.6 GeV/c particles. We present the momentum spectra of the backward going neutrons. We also integrated the spectra and determined the fraction of the hard scattering events which are in coincidence with at least one neutron emitted into the back hemisphere, with momenta above 0.32 GeV/c. Contrary to the earlier measurements which found that only a small fraction (of the order of 10%) of the total inelastic cross section for light nuclei was associated with backward going nucleons, we find that about half of the events are of this nature. We speculate that the reason for the large difference is due to the strong dependence of the hard-scattering reaction upon the total center of mass energy(s) and short range nucleon correlations in nuclei.

  13. Luminescence and energy transfer of white emitting phosphor YAl3(BO3)4:Ce3+, Dy3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fen; Wang, Di; Cao, He-ying; Li, Jing; Song, Hui-ling; Li, Pan-lai; Wang, Zhi-jun; Zhang, Kun; Pang, Li-bin

    2015-03-01

    A white emitting phosphor of YAl3(BO3)4:Ce3+, Dy3+ is synthesized by a solid state reaction, and its luminescent properties are investigated. Its phase formation is carried out with X-ray powder diffraction analysis, and there is no crystalline phase other than YAl3(BO3)4. YAl3(BO3)4:Ce3+ can produce 422 nm blue emission under 367 nm excitation. The emission spectrum of YAl3(BO3)4:Dy3+ shows several emission peaks under 350 nm excitation, and the peaks locate at 485 nm, 575 nm and 668 nm, respectively. Emission intensities of Ce3+ and Dy3+ in YAl3(BO3)4 are influenced by their concentrations, and the concentration quenching effect is observed. Energy transfer from Ce3+ to Dy3+ in YAl3(BO3)4 is validated and proved to be a resonant type via a quadrupole-quadrupole interaction, and the emission color can be tuned from blue to white by tuning the ratio of Ce3+/Dy3+. Moreover, the critical distance ( R c) of Ce3+ to Dy3+ in YAl3(BO3)4 is calculated to be 1.904 nm.

  14. Scaling Laws of the Two-Electron Sum-Energy Spectrum in Strong-Field Double Ionization.

    PubMed

    Ye, Difa; Li, Min; Fu, Libin; Liu, Jie; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan; Ullrich, J

    2015-09-18

    The sum-energy spectrum of two correlated electrons emitted in nonsequential strong-field double ionization (SFDI) of Ar was studied for intensities of 0.3 to 2×10^{14} W/cm^{2}. We find the mean sum energy, the maximum of the distributions as well as the high-energy tail of the scaled (to the ponderomotive energy) spectra increase with decreasing intensity below the recollision threshold (BRT). At higher intensities the spectra collapse into a single distribution. This behavior can be well explained within a semiclassical model providing clear evidence of the importance of multiple recollisions in the BRT regime. Here, ultrafast thermalization between both electrons is found occurring within three optical cycles only and leaving its clear footprint in the sum-energy spectra. PMID:26430991

  15. Universal Raising and Lowering Operators for a Discrete Energy Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Vega, Gabino

    2016-06-01

    We consider the first-order finite-difference expression of the commutator between d / dx and x. This is the appropriate setting in which to propose commutators and time operators for a quantum system with an arbitrary potential function and a discrete energy spectrum. The resulting commutators are identified as universal lowering and raising operators. We also find time operators which are finite-difference derivations with respect to the energy. The matrix elements of the commutator in the energy representation are analyzed, and we find consistency with the equality [hat{T},hat{H}]=ihbar . We apply the theory to the particle in an infinite well and for the Harmonic oscillator as examples.

  16. Universal Raising and Lowering Operators for a Discrete Energy Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Vega, Gabino

    2016-03-01

    We consider the first-order finite-difference expression of the commutator between d / dx and x. This is the appropriate setting in which to propose commutators and time operators for a quantum system with an arbitrary potential function and a discrete energy spectrum. The resulting commutators are identified as universal lowering and raising operators. We also find time operators which are finite-difference derivations with respect to the energy. The matrix elements of the commutator in the energy representation are analyzed, and we find consistency with the equality [hat{T},hat{H}]=ihbar . We apply the theory to the particle in an infinite well and for the Harmonic oscillator as examples.

  17. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125I and 103Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S(K)) standard for 125I seeds and has also established an S(K) standard for 103Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (inverted V) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of dose rate constant and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of dose rate constant. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that dose rate constant may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S(K) and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for dose rate constant was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of dose rate constant as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated dose rate constant for 125I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within +/-1%. For the 103Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the +/-7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for dose rate constant proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known. PMID:11213926

  18. Spectrum and energy levels of kryptonlike ion Nb VI

    SciTech Connect

    Reader, J.; Ekberg, J.O.

    1993-05-01

    The spectrum of five-times ionized niobium, Nb, VI, was observed from 238 to 2700 {angstrom} with sliding spark discharges on 10.7-m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs. Experimental energies were determined for all levels of the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 6}, 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 6}, 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 5}4d, 4f, 5s, 5p, 5g, 6s, and 4s4p{sup 6}4d configurations as well as some levels of 4p{sup 5}6g. A total of 291 lines were classified as transitions between 88 observed levels. A previous analysis of this spectrum was found to be totally erroneous. Large hyperfine splittings were found for several levels of the 4p{sup 5}5s and 5p configurations. The observed configurations were theoretically interpreted by means of Hartree-Fock calculations and least squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels. A revised value of the ionization energy was obtained from the 4p{sup 5}5g and 6g configurations.

  19. Data on energy end-use patterns and energy efficiencies in major CO sub 2 emitting countries

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hsing C.

    1990-08-01

    This is a report of the basic data regarding energy end-uses and efficiencies in major CO{sub 2} emitting countries. The task is part of the multi-lab carbon dioxide energy system research program. Fossil energy production and use are the largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions. To gain an insight into the relationship between CO{sub 2} emission and energy use, the global energy consumption patterns and the changing energy efficiencies must be better analyzed and understood. This work attempts to collect and organize the data on energy use and energy efficiency for the ten major CO{sub 2} emitting countries: USA, USSR, the People's Republic of China, Japan, the Federal Republic of Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Italy, and Australia. A wide variety of information sources have been examined. The data base is presented in tabular format. It is documented by three main parts, the first shows the total final energy consumption by fuel type and end-use sector for each nation. The second shows the detailed energy use by fuel type and function for each end-use sector: residential, commercial, transportation and industrial. The third part shows the country-specific energy balances for electricity generation and use. The data base is a living document and will be updated as additional information becomes available. The data base is to be used to accomplish the ultimate objective of improving the reliability of future CO{sub 2}-emissions estimates. 7 refs., 12 tabs.

  20. Search for the end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Linsley, John

    1998-06-15

    The title I was asked to speak about expresses an idea that occurred rather recently in the history of cosmic ray studies. I argue that the idea of a possible end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum came into being after a sequence of three rapid advances in knowledge which I describe, calling them 'breakthroughs'. I suggest that the present workshop be regarded as a step toward a fourth breakthrough. I argue that this may occur through application of the Space Airwatch concept--the earth atmosphere as target and signal generator--as embodied in the NASA OWL project.

  1. Infrared emitting device and method

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Dawson, L. Ralph; Howard, Arnold J.; Baucom, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    An infrared emitting device and method. The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns.

  2. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-11-25

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the {sup 252}Cf(sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 10{sup 7} fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  3. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-11-01

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the 252Cf (sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 107 fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  4. Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrum of SS Cygni in Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.

    2004-07-01

    We have fitted the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) spectrum of SS Cygni in outburst with a single-temperature blackbody suffering the photoelectric opacity of a neutral column density and the scattering opacity of an outflowing wind. We find that this simple model is capable of reproducing the essential features of the observed spectrum with the blackbody temperature Tbl~250+/-50 kK, hydrogen column density NH~5.0+2.9-1.5×1019cm-2, fractional emitting area f~5.6+60-4.5×10-3, boundary layer luminosity Lbl~5+18-3×1033ergss-1, wind velocity v~2500kms-1, wind mass-loss rate Mw~1.1×1016gs-1, and arbitrary values of the wind ionization fractions of 20 ions of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe. Given that in outburst the accretion disk luminosity Ldisk~1×1035ergss-1, Lbl/Ldisk~0.05+0.18-0.03, which can be explained if the white dwarf (or an equatorial belt thereon) is rotating with an angular velocity Ωwd~0.7+0.1-0.2 Hz, hence Vrotsini~2300kms-1. This paper is dedicated to the memory and accomplishments of my colleague and friend Janet Akyüz Mattei, who died on 2004 March 22 after a long battle with acute myelogenous leukemia. Her passing is a great loss to the astronomical community, both amateur and professional.

  5. Energy-efficiency of optical network units with vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Elaine; Mueller, Michael; Dias, Maluge P I; Chan, Chien Aun; Amann, Markus C

    2012-07-01

    The energy savings of 10 Gbps vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) for use in energy-efficient optical network units (ONUs) is critically examined in this work. We experimentally characterize and analytically show that the fast settling time and low power consumption during active and power-saving modes allow the VCSEL-ONU to achieve significant energy savings over the distributed feedback laser (DFB) based ONU. The power consumption per customer using VCSEL-ONUs and DFB-ONUs, is compared through an illustrative example of 10G-EPON for Video-on-Demand delivery. Using energy consumption models and numerical analyses in sleep and doze mode operations, we present an impact study of network and protocol parameters, e.g. polling cycle time, network load, and upstream access scheme used, on the achievable energy savings of VCSEL-ONUs over DFB-ONUs. Guidance on the specific power-saving mode to maximum energy savings throughout the day, is also presented. PMID:22772191

  6. Backward emitted high-energy neutrons in hard reactions of p and π+ on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, A.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Heppelmann, S.; Kawabata, T.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Piasetzky, E.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Yoshida, H.; Zhalov, D.

    2002-01-01

    Beams of protons and pions of 5.9 GeV/c were incident on a C target. Neutrons emitted into the backward hemisphere, in the laboratory system, were detected in (triple) coincidence with two emerging particles of tranverse momenta pt>0.6 GeV/c. We determined that for (46.5+/-3.7)% of the proton-induced events and for (40.8+/-4.5)% of the pion-induced events with the two high-pt particles, there is also at least one backward emitted neutron with momentum greater than 0.32 GeV/c. This observation is in sharp contrast to a well- established universal pattern from a large variety of earlier inclusive measurements with hadrons, electrons, photons, neutrinos, and antineutrinos where the probability for backward nucleon emission was in the 5 to 10 % range. We present also a measurement of the momentum spectra for the backward going neutrons. The spectra have the same universal shape observed in the inclusive reactions. We speculate that the enhanced backward neutron emission in this semi-inclusive region could be an indication for a strong dependence of the cross section on the squared total center-of-mass energy (s) and for the importance of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations.

  7. Understanding the Energy Spectrum from the Second Run of CDMSlite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Mark; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The first run of the CDMSlite experiment demonstrated the use of Neganov-Luke phonon amplification in a single SuperCDMS detector to achieve lower energy thresholds for the direct detection of dark matter. A longer physics run with improved noise rejection has been recorded with a larger voltage bias of -70 V applied across the same detector, yielding an amplification factor of 15 (for electron recoils) and reducing the statistical uncertainty of the measured background rate. In order to extract optimal dark-matter sensitivity with these data it is important to understand the shape and composition of the background spectrum at the lowest energies. The dominant backgrounds in this high-voltage mode are from Compton scatters, internal activation lines (primarily from 71 Ge decays), and microphonic noise. This presentation will consider the contributions from these sources and how the electric field geometry in the detector can distort the spectra. Prospects for new results will also be discussed.

  8. Energy spectrum of the optical polaron at finite total momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, B.; Kalina, F.

    1999-10-01

    In the following discussion we are concerned with the standard Fröhlich model for an optical polaron. We clarify the qualitative properties of the energy spectrum for arbitrary total momentum Q. Concerning the ground-state energy, we establish an effective lower bound. Until now, we have to assume that the electron-phonon coupling parameter α does not exceed a specified positive value. Using this bound, we demonstrate that the ground-state energy coincides with the continuum edge for \\|Q\\|>=\\|QC\\|, QC being finite. Consequently, it is only for \\|Q\\|<\\|QC\\| that an isolated ground state exists at all. This behavior is strikingly different from that of the corresponding system in lower dimensions, which has been analyzed previously by other authors, the discussion of the three-dimensional case remaining incomplete. Concerning the overall behavior of the ground-state energy as a function of Q and α, we find an increase (strict decrease) with increasing \\|Q\\|(α). In addition, we present an approach to the excited states. Interestingly enough, this can be based entirely on the knowledge of the ground-state energy and ground-state wave function.

  9. Organic light-emitting devices integrated with solar cells: High contrast and energy recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chih-Jen; Cho, Ting-Yi; Lin, Chun-Liang; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2007-04-01

    In this letter, the authors report that by integrating organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with solar cells, luminous ambient-light reflection as low as 1.4% (even superior to that achieved with polarizers) can be achieved without compromising the electroluminescence efficiency for high-contrast display applications. Furthermore, in such a configuration, the photon energies of the incident ambient light and the portion of OLED emission not getting outside of the device can be recycled into useful electrical power via the photovoltaic action, instead of being totally wasted as in other reported contrast-enhancement techniques. These features, the authors believe, shall make this technique attractive for high-contrast display applications and portable/mobile electronics that are highly power aware.

  10. Low energy photon mimic of the tritium beta decay energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malabre-O'Sullivan, Neville

    Tritium is a radioactive hydrogen isotope that is typically produced via neutron interaction with heavy water (D2O), producing tritiated water (DTO). As a result of this, tritium accounts for roughly a third of all occupational exposures at a CANDU type nuclear power plant. This identifies a need to study the biological effects associated with tritium (and low energy electrons in general). However, there are complications regarding the dosimetry of tritium, as well as difficulties in handling and using tritium for the purposes of biophysics experiments. To avoid these difficulties, an experiment has been proposed using photons to mimic the beta decay energy spectrum of tritium. This would allow simulation of the radiation properties of tritium, so that a surrogate photon source can be used for biophysics experiments. Through experimental and computational means, this work has explored the use of characteristic x-rays of various materials to modify the output spectrum of an x-ray source, such that it mimics the tritium beta decay spectrum. Additionally, the resultant primary electron spectrum generated in water from an x-ray source was simulated. The results from this research have indicated that the use of characteristic x-rays is not a viable method for simulating a tritium source. Also, the primary electron spectrum generated in water shows some promise for simulating tritium exposure, however further work must be done to investigate the slowing down electron spectrum. Keywords: Tritium, MCNP, low energy electrons, biophysics, characteristic x-rays.

  11. Spectrum of Quantized Energy for a Lengthening Pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Song, Ji Nny; Hong, Seong Ju

    2010-09-30

    We considered a quantum system of simple pendulum whose length of string is increasing at a steady rate. Since the string length is represented as a time function, this system is described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The invariant operator method is very useful in solving the quantum solutions of time-dependent Hamiltonian systems like this. The invariant operator of the system is represented in terms of the lowering operator a(t) and the raising operator a{sup {dagger}}(t). The Schroedinger solutions {psi}{sub n}({theta}, t) whose spectrum is discrete are obtained by means of the invariant operator. The expectation value of the Hamiltonian in the {psi}{sub n}({theta}, t) state is the same as the quantum energy. At first, we considered only {theta}{sup 2} term in the Hamiltonian in order to evaluate the quantized energy. The numerical study for quantum energy correction is also made by considering the angle variable not only up to {theta}{sup 4} term but also up to {theta}{sup 6} term in the Hamiltonian, using the perturbation theory.

  12. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Melhus, Christopher S.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Methods: Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source {beta}{sup -}, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Results: Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., >0.5%) within 3.3 mm of {sup 60}Co and 1.7 mm of {sup 192}Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 169}Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Conclusions: Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  13. Infrared emitting device and method

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Baucom, K.C.

    1997-04-29

    The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns. 8 figs.

  14. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at KAMINI shielding experiment location.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sujoy; Bagchi, Subhrojit; Prasad, R R; Venkatasubramanian, D; Mohanakrishnan, P; Keshavamurty, R S; Haridas, Adish; Arul, A John; Puthiyavinayagam, P

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spectrum at KAMINI reactor south beam tube end has been determined using multifoil activation method. This beam tube is being used for characterizing neutron attenuation of novel shield materials. Starting from a computed guess spectrum, the spectrum adjustment/unfolding procedure makes use of minimization of a modified constraint function representing (a) least squared deviations between the measured and calculated reaction rates, (b) a measure of sharp fluctuations in the adjusted spectrum and (c) the square of the deviation of adjusted spectrum from the guess spectrum. The adjusted/unfolded spectrum predicts the reaction rates accurately. The results of this new procedure are compared with those of widely used SAND-II code. PMID:27389881

  15. Quantitative Mapping of Reflected and Emitted Energy Patterns Over a City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, J.; Rickman, D.; Quattrochi, D.; Estes, M.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There are major variations in energy flux within and across the region of a large city. These variations have impacts in disparate areas, such as human health, environmental monitoring and mitigation, and energy consumption. Knowledge of the variations also has utility to urban and regional planners, and climate modelers. The authors have developed a system which permits robust measurement of both the magnitude of the energy flux variation and the absolute value of energy flux over regions of the size of large cites. The technique uses properly acquired and processed multispectral imagery with bands in the visible, near-IR and thermal portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. With proper knowledge of the atmosphere and geometries of acquisition it is possible to compute the energy budget for individual pixels. The reality of this technique is demonstrated using data acquired over Salt Lake City, Utah. The deficiencies in the results emphasize the critical nature of various design and engineering features usually ignored in airborne and satellite imaging systems.

  16. 77 FR 24192 - Energy Spectrum, Inc. and Riverbay Corporation v. New York Independent System Operator; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Spectrum, Inc. and Riverbay Corporation v. New York Independent... Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, Energy Spectrum, Inc. and Riverbay Corporation...

  17. Highly efficient greenish-blue platinum-based phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes on a high triplet energy platform

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. L. Gong, S. White, R.; Lu, Z. H.; Wang, X.; Wang, S.; Yang, C.

    2014-04-28

    We have demonstrated high-efficiency greenish-blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) based on a dimesitylboryl-functionalized C^N chelate Pt(II) phosphor, Pt(m-Bptrz)(t-Bu-pytrz-Me). Using a high triplet energy platform and optimized double emissive zone device architecture results in greenish-blue PHOLEDs that exhibit an external quantum efficiency of 24.0% and a power efficiency of 55.8 lm/W. This record high performance is comparable with that of the state-of-the-art Ir-based sky-blue organic light-emitting diodes.

  18. Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies at 2 < z < 3: Towards a Calibrated Probe of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Caryl Gronwall

    2012-12-03

    The goal of this project was to establish the physical properties of Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies from redshifts of 2 to 3 in order to better calibrate the use of LAEs as probes of the large scale structure of the universe for upcoming dark energy experiments, such as the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). We have obtained narrow-band imaging of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S) in two different narrow-band filters centered at Ly{alpha} at z=2.1 and 3.1. The resulting of samples of LAEs were used to determine the LAE luminosity function, equivalent width distribution and clustering properties (bias) of LAEs at these redshifts. While the results from the ECDF-S appear robust, they are based on a single field. To explore the effects of cosmic variance and galaxy environment on the physical properties of LAEs, we have also obtained narrow-band data at both redshifts (z = 2:1 and 3:1) in three additional fields (SDSS 1030+-05, the Extended Hubble Deep Field South, and CW 1255+01). The narrow-band imaging data has been reduced and LAE catalogs are being generated. We have calculated preliminary luminosity functions, equivalent width distributions, and clustering properties. We have also obtained follow-up spectroscopy in the optical (using VLT/FORS) and in the near-infrared (using Magellan/MMIRS). Since individual LAEs have too little S/N to enable meaningful fits for stellar population parameters, our previous work has analyzed stacked Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). SED fitting was performed on several subsets of LAEs selected by their rest-UV luminosity, UV spectral slope, Ly alpha luminosity, Equivalent Width, or rest-optical (IRAC) luminosity.

  19. Multibunch energy and spectrum control in the SLC High Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Decker, F.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Hsu, I.

    1991-05-01

    Three intense bunches (two electron and one positron) are accelerated on each rf pulse in the SLC Linac. Careful control of the energy and energy spectrum of each bunch is needed to provide acceptable beams at the collision point and the positron productive target. The required rf amplitude, timing, and phase adjustments can be calculated and adjusted in real time to correct for changing conditions. BNS damping and energy feedback systems reduce the available reserve energy, which is limited. Observations and stability of actual beams are reviewed. Implications for a future collider are discussed. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Ultra high energy events in ECHOS series and primary energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Iwai, J.; Ogata, T.

    1985-01-01

    The compilation of ultra high energy jets suggests at present the existence of a bump in primary energy spectrum (with the standard concept of high energy collisions). The pseudo-rapidity distribution exhibits some typical anomalies, more than the (P sub t) behavior, which are (may be) the fingerprints of quark gluon plasma transition. The next results of Emulsion Chamber on Supersonic (ECHOS) will be in both cases determinant to confirm those tendancies, as well as an important effort of the cosmic ray community to develop in that sense a flying emulsion chamber experiment.

  1. Low-Energy Electrons Emitted in Ion Collisions with Thin Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Michael; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Durante, Marco; Hagmann, Siegbert; Kraft, Gerhard; Lineva, Natallia

    The realistic description of radiation damage after charged particle passage is an ongoing issue for both radiotherapy as well as space applications. In both areas of applied radiological science, living as well as nonliving matter is exposed to ionizing radiation, and it is of vital interest to predict the responses of structures like cells, detectors or electronic devices. In ion beam radiotherapy, for example, the Local Effect Model (LEM) is being used to calculate radiobiological effects with so far unprecedented versatility. This has been shown in the GSI radiotherapy pilot project and consequently this model has become the "industry standard" for treatment planning in subsequent commercial ion radiotherapy sites. The model has also been extended to nonliving matter, i.e. to describe the response of solid state detectors such as TLDs and films. A prerequisite for this model (and possibly similar ones) is the proper description of microscopic track structure and energy deposition. In particular, the area at a very low distance (¡20 nm) from the ion path needs special attention due to the locally very high dose and the rather limited experimental evidence for the shape of the dose distribution. The dose distribution at low distances is inevitably associated with the creation and transport of low-energy (sub-keV) electrons. While some data, elementary cross sections as well as dose distributions, exist for gaseous media, i.e. under single collision conditions, experimental data for the condensed phase are scarce. We have, therefore, launched a project aimed at systematic research of the energy and angular distributions of low-energy (sub-keV) electrons emitted from solids. These investigations com-prise creation as well as transport of low-energy electrons under multiple collision conditions and hence require accounting for the properties of the target, both bulk and surface, i.e. for the inherent inhomogeneity of the thickness and for the surface roughness. To

  2. Energy Migration Engineering of Bright Rare-Earth Upconversion Nanoparticles for Excitation by Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yeteng; Rostami, Iman; Wang, Zihua; Dai, Hongjie; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2015-11-01

    A novel Nd(3+) -sensitized upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP) that can be excited by near-infrared 740 nm light-emitting diode (LED) lamps with bright upconversion luminescence is designed. Yb(3+) ion distribution is engineered to increase the energy migration efficiency. The benefit of the novel LED-excited UCNPs is demonstrated by imaging of breast cancer cells and enabling an economic handheld semiquantitative visual measurement device. PMID:26393770

  3. Nearly 100% triplet harvesting in conventional fluorescent dopant-based organic light-emitting devices through energy transfer from exciplex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ke; Chen, Zhan; Zheng, Cai-Jun; Chen, Miao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-03-25

    Nearly 100% triplet harvesting in conventional fluorophor-based organic light-emitting devices is realized through energy transfer from exciplex. The best C545T-doped device using the exciplex host exhibits a maximum current efficiency of 44.0 cd A(-1) , a maximum power efficiency of 46.1 lm W(-1) , and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 14.5%. PMID:25676085

  4. ENERGY-DEPENDENT GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSE WIDTH DUE TO THE CURVATURE EFFECT AND INTRINSIC BAND SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Z. Y.; Ma, L.; Zhao, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Bao, Y. Y.

    2012-06-20

    Previous studies have found that the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulse is energy dependent and that it decreases as a power-law function with increasing photon energy. In this work we have investigated the relation between the energy dependence of the pulse and the so-called Band spectrum by using a sample including 51 well-separated fast rise and exponential decay long-duration GRB pulses observed by BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory). We first decompose these pulses into rise and decay phases and find that the rise widths and the decay widths also behave as a power-law function with photon energy. Then we investigate statistically the relations between the three power-law indices of the rise, decay, and total width of the pulse (denoted as {delta}{sub r}, {delta}{sub d}, and {delta}{sub w}, respectively) and the three Band spectral parameters, high-energy index ({alpha}), low-energy index ({beta}), and peak energy (E{sub p} ). It is found that (1) {alpha} is strongly correlated with {delta}{sub w} and {delta}{sub d} but seems uncorrelated with {delta}{sub r}; (2) {beta} is weakly correlated with the three power-law indices, and (3) E{sub p} does not show evident correlations with the three power-law indices. We further investigate the origin of {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha}. We show that the curvature effect and the intrinsic Band spectrum could naturally lead to the energy dependence of the GRB pulse width and also the {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha} correlations. Our results hold so long as the shell emitting gamma rays has a curved surface and the intrinsic spectrum is a Band spectrum or broken power law. The strong {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} correlation and inapparent correlations between {delta}{sub r} and the three Band spectral parameters also suggest that the rise and decay phases of the GRB pulses have different origins.

  5. Method to extract the primary cosmic ray spectrum from very high energy {gamma}-ray data and its application to SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Villante, F. L.; Vissani, F.

    2007-12-15

    Supernova remnants are likely to be the accelerators of the galactic cosmic rays. Assuming the correctness of this hypothesis, we develop a method to extract the parent cosmic ray spectrum from the very high energy gamma-ray flux emitted by supernova remnants (and other gamma transparent sources). Namely, we calculate semianalytically the (inverse) operator which relates an arbitrary gamma-ray flux to the parent cosmic ray spectrum, without relying on any theoretical assumption about the shape of the cosmic ray and/or photon spectrum. We illustrate the use of this technique by applying it to the young SNR RX J1713.7-3946 which has been observed by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) experiment during the last three years. Specific implementations of the method permit using as an input either the parametrized very high energy gamma-ray flux or directly the raw data. The possibility to detect features in the cosmic rays spectrum and the error in the determination of the parent cosmic ray spectrum are also discussed.

  6. Energy spectrum of cascades generated by muons in Baksan underground scintillation telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Achkasov, V. M.; Semenov, A. M.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    Spectrum of cascades generated by cosmic ray muons underground is presented. The mean zenith angle of the muon arrival is theta=35 deg the depth approx. 1000 hg/sq cm. In cascades energy range 700 GeV the measured spectrum is in agreement with the sea-level integral muon spectrum index gamma=3.0. Some decrease of this exponent has been found in the range 4000 Gev.

  7. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    The spectrum of gamma energy absorption in the NaI crystal (scintillation detector) is the interaction result of gamma photon with NaI crystal, and it’s associated with the photon gamma energy incoming to the detector. Through a simulation approach, we can perform an early observation of gamma energy absorption spectrum in a scintillator crystal detector (NaI) before the experiment conducted. In this paper, we present a simulation model result of gamma energy absorption spectrum for energy 100-700 keV (i.e. 297 keV, 400 keV and 662 keV). This simulation developed based on the concept of photon beam point source distribution and photon cross section interaction with the Monte Carlo method. Our computational code has been successfully predicting the multiple energy peaks absorption spectrum, which derived from multiple photon energy sources.

  8. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  9. Long-Range Energy Transfer and Singlet-Exciton Migration in Working Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Grayson L.; Nguyen, Carmen; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Rapid industrialization of organic light-emitting devices for flat-panel displays and solid-state lighting makes a deep understanding of device physics more desirable than ever. Developing reliable experimental techniques to measure fundamental physical properties such as exciton diffusion lengths is a vital part of developing device physics. In this paper, we present a study of exciton diffusion and long-range energy transfer in working organic light-emitting devices, and a study of the interplay between these two tangled processes through both experimental probes and simulations. With the inclusion of multiple factors including long-range energy transfer, exciton boundary conditions, and the finite width of the exciton generation zone, we quantify exciton migration based on emission characteristics from rubrene sensing layers placed in working organic light-emitting devices. This comprehensive analysis is found to be essential to accurately measuring exciton diffusion length, and in the present case the measured singlet-exciton diffusion length in the archetype material 4' -bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl is 4.3 ±0.3 nm with a corresponding diffusivity of (2.6 ±0.3 )×10-4 cm2/s .

  10. The high energy X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula observed from OSO 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, L. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Maurer, G. S.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula was measured with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite. The total emission of the X-ray source shows no long term variability. The spectrum itself can be described by a single power law out to energies of at least 500 keV.

  11. White light-emitting organic electroluminescent devices

    DOEpatents

    Shiang, Joseph John; Duggal, Anil Raj; Parthasarathy, Gautam

    2006-06-20

    A light-emitting device comprises a light-emitting member, which comprises two electrodes, at least two organic electroluminescent ("EL") materials disposed between the electrodes, a charge blocking material disposed between the electrodes, and at least one photoluminescent ("PL") material. The light-emitting member emits electromagnetic ("EM") radiation having a first spectrum in response to a voltage applied across the two electrodes. The PL material absorbs a portion of the EM radiation emitted by the light-emitting member and emits EM radiation having second spectrum different than the first spectrum. Each of the organic EL materials emits EM radiation having a wavelength range selected from the group consisting of blue and red wavelength ranges.

  12. Energy spectrum of the recurrent cosmic rays variation during the solar minimum 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Agnieszka; Alania, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We study temporal changes of the power-law energy/ rigidity spectrum of the first three harmonics of the recurrent variation of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) intensity during the unusual solar minimum 23/24 and compare with four previous minima. We show that the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the recurrent variation is soft in the minimum 23/24. Moreover, while the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the first harmonic of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity practically behaves as during earlier four minima, the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the second and the third harmonics demonstrate a valuable softening. We attribute this phenomenon to the decrease of an extension of heliosphere caused by the drop of the solar wind dynamic pressure during the solar minimum 23/24.

  13. Energy spectrum analysis of blast waves based on an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, F.; Shang, F.; Jia, Y.; Zhao, C.; Kong, D.

    2016-07-01

    Using the improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), this paper investigates the problems of analysis and interpretation of the energy spectrum of a blast wave. It has been previously established that the energy spectrum is an effective feature by which to characterize a blast wave. In fact, the higher the energy spectra in a frequency band of a blast wave, the greater the damage to a target in the same frequency band. However, most current research focuses on analyzing wave signals in the time domain or frequency domain rather than considering the energy spectrum. We propose here an improved HHT method combined with a wavelet packet to extract the energy spectrum feature of a blast wave. When applying the HHT, the signal is first roughly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition. The wavelet packet method is then performed on each IMF to eliminate noise on the energy spectrum. Second, a coefficient is introduced to remove unrelated IMFs. The energy of each instantaneous frequency can be derived through the Hilbert transform. The energy spectrum can then be obtained by adding up all the components after the wavelet packet filters and screens them through a coefficient to obtain the effective IMFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by 12 groups of experimental data, and an energy attenuation model is established based on the experimental data. The improved HHT is a precise method for blast wave signal analysis. For other shock wave signals from blasting experiments, an energy frequency time distribution and energy spectrum can also be obtained through this method, allowing for more practical applications.

  14. Energy spectrum and transport in narrow HgTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Germanenko, A. V.; Minkov, G. M.; Rut, O. E.; Sherstobitov, A. A.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.

    2015-01-15

    The results of an experimental study of the transport phenomena and the hole energy spectrum of two-dimensional systems in the quantum well of HgTe zero-gap semiconductor with normal arrangement of quantum-confinement subbands are presented. An analysis of the experimental data allows us to reconstruct the carrier energy spectrum near the hole subband extrema. The results are interpreted using the standard kP model.

  15. Extragalactic radiation and the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of extragalactic microwave and submillimeter-radiation fields on the ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray spectrum is reexamined. It is found that the general characteristics of the spectrum can be derived from fairly simple analytical arguments. It is shown that the various spectral features obtained by numerical calculations can be explored by simpler and more general means. This approach is illustrated using a newly derived lifetime-energy relation based on the new submillimeter observations.

  16. Enhancement of high-energy cosmic-ray spectrum by type-II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Miyaji, S.; Parnell, T. A.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    The cosmic-ray spectrum has an intensity enhancement in the energy range 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 16th eV per nucleus. Recent observations of heavy cosmic rays in this energy range indicate that the Ca/Fe ratio may be as large as 10 times the solar value. It is suggested that pulsars in type-II supernova remnants are the origin of this component of the cosmic-ray spectrum.

  17. Evolution of the ultra high energy cosmic ray spectrum by transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.T.; Schramm, D.N.

    1983-04-01

    Ultra-high energy proton primaries interacting with the 3/sup 0/K photon background are treated as a transport phenomenon. Baryon number is explicitly conserved and the evolved spectrum develops a bump at a scale of order 5x10/sup 19/ eV, below the cutoff, due to the pile-up of energy degraded protons. This may correspond in part to the observed ankle structure in the CR spectrum.

  18. Phenomenological Rashba model for calculating the electron energy spectrum on a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savinskiĭ, S. S.; Belosludtsev, A. V.

    2007-05-01

    The energy spectrum of an electron on the surface of a cylinder is calculated using the Pauli equation with an additional term that takes into account the spin-orbit interaction. This term is taken in the approximation of a phenomenological Rashba model, which provides exact expressions for the wave functions and the electron energy spectrum on the cylinder surface in a static magnetic field.

  19. Revisiting the hardening of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at TeV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoudam, Satyendra; Hörandel, Jörg R.

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of cosmic rays by experiments such as ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA indicate a hardening of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at TeV energies. In our recent work, we showed that the hardening can be due to the effect of nearby supernova remnants. We showed it for the case of protons and helium nuclei. In this paper, we present an improved and more detailed version of our previous work, and extend our study to heavier cosmic ray species such as boron, carbon, oxygen and iron nuclei. Unlike our previous study, the present work involves a detailed calculation of the background cosmic rays and follows a consistent treatment of cosmic ray source parameters between the background and the nearby components. Moreover, we also present a detailed comparison of our results on the secondary-to-primary ratios, secondary spectra and the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum with the results expected from other existing models, which can be checked by future measurements at high energies.

  20. PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-10-20

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates {mu}- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k {approx}< 10{sup 4} Mpc{sup -1}. Here, we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of {mu} and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  1. Energy spectrum transfer equations of solar wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The recent studies of transfer equations for solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are reviewed with emphasis on the comparison with the statistical observational results. Helios and Voyager missions provide an opportunity to study the the radial evolution of the power spectrum. the cross-helicity the Alfven ratio and the minimum variance direction. Spectrum transfer equations are considered as a tool to explore the nature of this radial evolution of the fluctuations. The transfer equations are derived from incompressible MHD equations. Generally one needs to make assumptions about the nature of the fluctuations and the nature of the turbulent non-linear interactions to obtain numerical results which can be compared with the observations. Some special model results for several simple cases SUCH as for structures or strong mixing. for Alfven waves with weak turbulent interactions. and for a superposition of structures and Alfven waves. are discussed. The difference between the various approaches to derive and handle the transfer equations are also addressed. Finally some theoretical description of the compressible fluctuations are also briefly reviewed.

  2. Segmentation-free x-ray energy spectrum estimation for computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Qiude; Niu, Tianye

    2016-03-01

    X-ray energy spectrum plays an essential role in imaging and related tasks. Due to the high photon flux of clinical CT scanners, most of the spectrum estimation methods are indirect and are usually suffered from various limitations. The recently proposed indirect transmission measurement-based method requires at least the segmentation of one material, which is insufficient for CT images of highly noisy and with artifacts. To combat for the bottleneck of spectrum estimation using segmented CT images, in this study, we develop a segmentation-free indirect transmission measurement based energy spectrum estimation method using dual-energy material decomposition. The general principle of the method is to compare polychromatic forward projection with raw projection to calibrate a set of unknown weights which are used to express the unknown spectrum together with a set of model spectra. After applying dual-energy material decomposition using high-and low-energy raw projection data, polychromatic forward projection is conducted on material-specific images. The unknown weights are then iteratively updated to minimize the difference between the raw projection and estimated projection. Both numerical simulations and experimental head phantom are used to evaluate the proposed method. The results indicate that the method provides accurate estimate of the spectrum and it may be attractive for dose calculations, artifacts correction and other clinical applications.

  3. Even-odd effects in Z and N distributions of fragments emitted at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, I.; Lanzalone, G.; Agodi, C.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Han, J.; Maiolino, C.; Auditore, L.; Loria, D.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Cavallaro, S.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.

    2011-08-15

    Even-odd effects in Z and N distributions of light fragments emitted at forward angles in nuclear collisions {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca, {sup 40}Ca + {sup 48}Ca, and {sup 48}Ca + {sup 48}Ca at 25 MeV/nucleon and identified in charge and mass with the Chimera multidetector have been analyzed. The amplitude of even-odd staggering effects seems to be related to the neutron to proton ratio N/Z of the entrance channels. A qualitative explanation of this effect, taking into account the deexcitation phase of primary excited fragments, is discussed.

  4. Detecting special nuclear materials in containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.

    2007-10-02

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a container. The system and its method include irradiating the container with an energetic beam, so as to induce a fission in the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  5. EFTEM spectrum imaging at high-energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Bernhard; Kothleitner, Gerald; Grogger, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of high-energy resolution EFTEM image series and the corrections needed for reliable data interpretation. The detail of spectral information gained from an image series is largely determined by the intrinsic energy resolution. In this work we show that energy resolution values of as low as 0.8 eV in spectra extracted from EFTEM image series can be obtained with a small energy-selecting slit. At this resolution level aberrations of the energy filter, in particular the non-isochromaticity, can no longer be neglected. We show that the four most prominent factors for EFTEM image series data correction--spatial drift, non-isochromaticity, energy drift and image distortion--must not be treated independently but have to be corrected in unison. We present an efficient algorithm for this correction, and demonstrate the applied correction for the case of a GaN/AlN multilayer sample. PMID:16872748

  6. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Christopher R.

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  7. A range-based method to calibrate a magnetic spectrometer measuring the energy spectrum of the backward electron beam of a plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccolini, E.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M.; Rocchi, F.; Tartari, A.

    2011-08-15

    The electron beam emitted from the back of plasma focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for intraoperative radiation therapy applications. A plasma focus device is being developed for this purpose, and there is a need for characterizing its electron beam, particularly, insofar as the energy spectrum is concerned. The instrument used is a magnetic spectrometer. To calibrate this spectrometer, a procedure relying on the energy-range relation in Mylar has been devised and applied. By measuring the transmission through increasing thicknesses of the material, electron energies could be assessed and compared to the spectrometer readings. Thus, the original calibration of the instrument has been extended to higher energies and also to better accuracy. Methods and results are presented.

  8. A range-based method to calibrate a magnetic spectrometer measuring the energy spectrum of the backward electron beam of a plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccolini, E.; Rocchi, F.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M.; Tartari, A.

    2011-08-01

    The electron beam emitted from the back of plasma focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for intraoperative radiation therapy applications. A plasma focus device is being developed for this purpose, and there is a need for characterizing its electron beam, particularly, insofar as the energy spectrum is concerned. The instrument used is a magnetic spectrometer. To calibrate this spectrometer, a procedure relying on the energy-range relation in Mylar® has been devised and applied. By measuring the transmission through increasing thicknesses of the material, electron energies could be assessed and compared to the spectrometer readings. Thus, the original calibration of the instrument has been extended to higher energies and also to better accuracy. Methods and results are presented.

  9. Is the Smagorinsky coefficient sensitive to uncertainty in the form of the energy spectrum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldi, M.; Lucor, D.; Sagaut, P.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the influence of uncertainties in the shape of the energy spectrum over the Smagorinsky ["General circulation experiments with the primitive equations. I: The basic experiment," Mon. Weather Rev. 91(3), 99 (1963)] subgrid scale model constant CS: the analysis is carried out by a stochastic approach based on generalized polynomial chaos. The free parameters in the considered energy spectrum functional forms are modeled as random variables over bounded supports: two models of the energy spectrum are investigated, namely, the functional form proposed by Pope [Turbulent Flows (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000)] and by Meyers and Meneveau ["A functional form for the energy spectrum parametrizing bottleneck and intermittency effects," Phys. Fluids 20(6), 065109 (2008)]. The Smagorinsky model coefficient, computed from the algebraic relation presented in a recent work by Meyers and Sagaut ["On the model coefficients for the standard and the variational multi-scale Smagorinsky model," J. Fluid Mech. 569, 287 (2006)], is considered as a stochastic process and is described by numerical tools streaming from the probability theory. The uncertainties are introduced in the free parameters shaping the energy spectrum in correspondence to the large and the small scales, respectively. The predicted model constant is weakly sensitive to the shape of the energy spectrum when large scales uncertainty is considered: if the large-eddy simulation (LES) filter cut is performed in the inertial range, a significant probability to recover values lower in magnitude than the asymptotic Lilly-Smagorinsky model constant is recovered. Furthermore, the predicted model constant occurrences cluster in a compact range of values: the correspondent probability density function rapidly drops to zero approaching the extremes values of the range, which show a significant sensitivity to the LES filter width. The sensitivity of the model constant to uncertainties propagated in the

  10. Dual-Energy CT: Spectrum of Thoracic Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Otrakji, Alexi; Digumarthy, Subba R; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Flores, Efren J; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dual-energy computed tomography (CT) can provide useful information in several chest-related clinical indications. Compared with single-energy CT, dual-energy CT of the chest is feasible with the use of a radiation-dose-neutral scanning protocol. This article highlights the different types of images that can be generated by using dual-energy CT protocols such as virtual monochromatic, virtual unenhanced (ie, water), and pulmonary blood volume (ie, iodine) images. The physical basis of dual-energy CT and material decomposition are explained. The advantages of the use of virtual low-monochromatic images include reduced volume of intravenous contrast material and improved contrast resolution of images. The use of virtual high-monochromatic images can reduce beam hardening and contrast streak artifacts. The pulmonary blood volume images can help differentiate various parenchymal abnormalities, such as infarcts, atelectasis, and pneumonias, as well as airway abnormalities. The pulmonary blood volume images allow quantitative and qualitative assessment of iodine distribution. The estimation of iodine concentration (quantitative assessment) provides objective analysis of enhancement. The advantages of virtual unenhanced images include differentiation of calcifications, talc, and enhanced thoracic structures. Dual-energy CT has applications in oncologic imaging, including diagnosis of thoracic masses, treatment planning, and assessment of response to treatment. Understanding the concept of dual-energy CT and its clinical application in the chest are the goals of this article. PMID:26761530

  11. Particle Energy Spectrum, Revisited from a Counting Statistics Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-28

    In nuclear science, gamma and neutron spectra are counted energy by energy, and then particle by particle. Until recently, few studies have been performed on how exactly those energy spectra are counted, or how those counts are correlated. Because of lack of investigation, cross section covariance and correlation matrices are usually estimated using perturbation method. We will discuss a statistical counting scheme that shall mimic the gamma and neutron counting process used in nuclear science. From this counting scheme, the cross section covariance and correlation can be statistically derived.

  12. Very High Brightness Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Devices via Enhanced Energy Transfer from a Phosphorescent Sensitizer.

    PubMed

    Zamani Siboni, Hossein; Sadeghimakki, Bahareh; Sivoththaman, Siva; Aziz, Hany

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate very efficient and bright quantum dot light-emitting devices (QDLEDs) with the use of a phosphorescent sensitizer and a thermal annealing step. Utilizing CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots with 560 nm emission peak, bis(4,6-difluorophenylpyridinatoN,C2) picolinatoiridium as a sensitizer, and thermal annealing at 50 °C for 30 min, green-emitting QDLEDs with a maximum current efficiency of 23.9 cd/A, a power efficiency of 31 lm/W, and a brightness of 65,000 cd/m(2) are demonstrated. The high efficiency and brightness are attributed to annealing-induced enhancements in both the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process from the phosphorescent energy donor to the QD acceptor and hole transport across the device. The FRET enhancement is attributed to annealing-induced diffusion of the phosphorescent material molecules from the sensitizer layer into the QD layer, which results in a shorter donor-acceptor distance. We also find, quite interestingly, that FRET to a QD acceptor is strongly influenced by the QD size, and is generally less efficient to QDs with larger sizes despite their narrower bandgaps. PMID:26556102

  13. Excitation energy dependent Raman spectrum of MoSe2

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dahyun; Lee, Jae-Ung; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2015-01-01

    Raman investigation of MoSe2 was carried out with eight different excitation energies. Seven peaks, including E1g, A1g, E2g1, and A2u2 peaks are observed in the range of 100–400 cm−1. The phonon modes are assigned by comparing the peak positions with theoretical calculations. The intensities of the peaks are enhanced at different excitation energies through resonance with different optical transitions. The A1g mode is enhanced at 1.58 and 3.82 eV, which are near the A exciton energy and the band-to-band transition between higher energy bands, respectively. The E2g1 mode is strongly enhanced with respect to the A1g mode for the 2.71- and 2.81-eV excitations, which are close to the C exciton energy. The different enhancements of the A1g and E2g1 modes are explained in terms of the symmetries of the exciton states and the exciton-phonon coupling. Other smaller peaks including E1g and A2u2 are forbidden but appear due to the resonance effect near optical transition energies. PMID:26601614

  14. Observation of energy spectrum of electron albedo in low latitude region at Hyderabad, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. D.; Bhatnagar, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The preliminary results are presented of the measurement of the energy spectrum of low energy (5-24 MeV) albedo electrons, moving upward as well as downwards, at about 37 km (-4 mb) altitude, over Hyderabad, India, in low latitude region. The flux and energy spectrum was observed by a bi-directional, multidetector charged particle telescope which was flown in a high altitude balloon on 8th December 1984. Results based on a quick look data acquisition and analysis system are presented here.

  15. Material grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Tong; Song, Yanan

    2016-07-01

    A grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed. First, the spectra of the first and second back-wall echoes are cut into several frequency bands to calculate the energy attenuation coefficient spectrum. Second, the frequency band that is sensitive to grain size variation is determined. Finally, a statistical model between the energy attenuation coefficient in the sensitive frequency band and average grain size is established through SVR. Experimental verification is conducted on austenitic stainless steel. The average relative error of the predicted grain size is 5.65%, which is better than that of conventional methods. PMID:26995732

  16. Primary CR energy spectrum and mass composition by the data of Tunka-133 array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosin, V. V.; Berezhnev, S. F.; Budnev, N. M.; Chiavassa, A.; Chvalaev, O. A.; Dyachok, A. V.; Epimakhov, S. N.; Gress, O. A.; Gress, T. I.; Kalmykov, N. N.; Karpov, N. I.; Konstantinov, E. N.; Korobchenko, A. V.; Korosteleva, E. E.; Kozhin, V. A.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, N. B.; Mirgazov, R. R.; Monkhoev, R. D.; Osipova, E. A.; Pakhorukov, A. L.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Pankov, L. V.; Popova, E. G.; Ptuskin, V. S.; Semeney, Y. A.; Silaev, A. A.; Silaev, A. A., Jr.; Skurikhin, A. V.; Spiering, C.; Sveshnikova, L. G.; Zagorodnikov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    The Cherenkov light array for the registration of extensive air showers (EAS) Tunka-133 collected data during 5 winter seasons from 2009 to 2014.-The differential energy spectrum of all particles and the dependence of the average maximum depth on the energy in the range of 6 ṡ 1015-1018 eV measured for 1540 hours of observation are presented.

  17. Energy spectrum, dissipation, and spatial structures in reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Gomez, D. O.

    2012-05-15

    We analyze the effect of the Hall term in the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence under a strong externally supported magnetic field, seeing how this changes the energy cascade, the characteristic scales of the flow, and the dynamics of global magnitudes, with particular interest in the dissipation. Numerical simulations of freely evolving three-dimensional reduced magnetohydrodynamics are performed, for different values of the Hall parameter (the ratio of the ion skin depth to the macroscopic scale of the turbulence) controlling the impact of the Hall term. The Hall effect modifies the transfer of energy across scales, slowing down the transfer of energy from the large scales up to the Hall scale (ion skin depth) and carrying faster the energy from the Hall scale to smaller scales. The final outcome is an effective shift of the dissipation scale to larger scales but also a development of smaller scales. Current sheets (fundamental structures for energy dissipation) are affected in two ways by increasing the Hall effect, with a widening but at the same time generating an internal structure within them. In the case where the Hall term is sufficiently intense, the current sheet is fully delocalized. The effect appears to reduce impulsive effects in the flow, making it less intermittent.

  18. Nano-light-emitting-diodes based on InGaN mesoscopic structures for energy saving optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulics, M.; Winden, A.; Marso, M.; Moonshiram, A.; Lüth, H.; Grützmacher, D.; Hardtdegen, H.

    2016-07-01

    Vertically integrated III-nitride based nano-LEDs (light emitting diodes) were designed and fabricated for operation in the telecommunication wavelength range in the (p-GaN/InGaN/n-GaN/sapphire) material system. The band edge luminescence energy of the nano-LEDs could be engineered by tuning the composition and size of the InGaN mesoscopic structures. Narrow band edge photoluminescence and electroluminescence were observed. Our mesoscopic InGaN structures (depending on diameter) feature a very low power consumption in the range between 2 nW and 30 nW. The suitability of the technological process for the long-term operation of LEDs is demonstrated by reliability measurements. The optical and electrical characterization presented show strong potential for future low energy consumption optoelectronics.

  19. Mn-doped nanocrystals in light-emitting diodes: Energy-transfer to obtain electroluminescence from quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Arup K.; Bhaumik, Saikat; Pal, Amlan J.

    2010-09-01

    We fabricate light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on Mn-doped ZnS nanocrystals along with hole-transporting N ,N' bis(3-methylphenyl)-N ,N'-diphenyl-benzidine (TPD). With Mn-doping, ZnS nanostructures exhibit a strong photoluminescence. The LEDs exhibit electroluminescence (EL) from Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots and TPD. In order to open up channels for energy-transfer from TPD to quantum dots and to achieve EL from only the nanoparticles, we grow core-shell nanoparticles with Mn-doped ZnS in the core and CdS as the shell layer. Excitons formed in TPD can now transfer their energy directly to the shell-layer to yield EL from only the nanoparticles.

  20. Electron energy spectrum in circularly polarized laser irradiated overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Shao, Xi; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-10-15

    A circularly polarized laser normally impinged on an overdense plasma thin foil target is shown to accelerate the electrons in the skin layer towards the rear, converting the quiver energy into streaming energy exactly if one ignores the space charge field. The energy distribution of electrons is close to Maxwellian with an upper cutoff ε{sub max}=mc{sup 2}[(1+a{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 1/2}−1], where a{sub 0}{sup 2}=(1+(2ω{sup 2}/ω{sub p}{sup 2})|a{sub in}|{sup 2}){sup 2}−1, |a{sub in}| is the normalized amplitude of the incident laser of frequency ω, and ω{sub p} is the plasma frequency. The energetic electrons create an electrostatic sheath at the rear and cause target normal sheath acceleration of protons. The energy gain by the accelerated ions is of the order of ε{sub max}.

  1. Energy spectrum of neutrals formed in an ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.

    1982-03-15

    This work presents an estimate of the energy distribution of the neutrals formed in the ion beam accelerator. However it does not determine the fraction of those neutrals which leave the neutral beam injector and go on into the reactor. To do that, more details of the beam line performance are needed.

  2. Energy spectrum and wavefunction of electrons in hybrid superconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruchinin, S. P.

    2016-03-01

    Recent experiments have fabricated structured arrays. We study hybrid nanowires, in which normal and superconducting regions are in close proximity, by using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for superconductivity in a cylindrical nanowire. We succeed to obtain the quantum energy levels and wavefunctions of a superconducting nanowire. The obtained spectra of electrons remind Hofstadter’s butterfly.

  3. ON THE VERY HIGH ENERGY SPECTRUM OF THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Chkheidze, N.; Machabeli, G.; Osmanov, Z.

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, we construct a self-consistent theory interpreting the observations from the MAGIC Cherenkov Telescope of the very high energy (VHE) pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar. In particular, on the basis of Vlasov's kinetic equation, we study the process of quasi-linear diffusion (QLD) developed by means of the cyclotron instability. This mechanism provides simultaneous generation of low (radio) and VHE (0.01-25 GeV) emission on light cylinder scales in one location of the pulsar magnetosphere. A different approach to the synchrotron emission is considered, giving the spectral index of the VHE emission ({beta} = 2) and the exponential cutoff energy (23 GeV) in good agreement with the observational data.

  4. On the groundstate energy spectrum of magnetic knots and links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricca, Renzo L.; Maggioni, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    By using analytical results for the constrained minimum energy of magnetic knots we determine the influence of internal twist on the minimum magnetic energy levels of knots and links, and by using ropelength data from the RIDGERUNNER tightening algorithm (Ashton et al 2011 Exp. Math. 20 57-90) we obtain the groundstate energy spectra of the first 250 prime knots and 130 prime links. The two spectra are found to follow an almost identical logarithmic law. By assuming that the number of knot types grows exponentially with the topological crossing number, we show that this generic behavior can be justified by a general relationship between ropelength and crossing number, which is in good agreement with former analytical estimates (Buck and Simon 1999 Topol. Appl. 91 245-57, Diao 2003 J. Knot Theory Ramifications 12 1-16). Moreover, by considering the ropelength averaged over a given knot family, we establish a new connection between the averaged ropelength and the topological crossing number of magnetic knots.

  5. Photoluminescence Properties and Energy Transfer in a Novel Yellow Emitting Phosphor GdTaO4: Dy3+.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hijuan; Tan, Xinyu; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-04-01

    The phosphor Dy3+ doped M type gadolinium orthotantalate GdTaO4 was prepared successfully by traditional solid state reaction and the photoluminescence of GdTaO4: xDy3+ (0.01 ≤ x ≤ 0.10) has been investigated under ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet excitation. In the excitation spectra of GdTaO4: Dy3+, the overlap appears between the host lattice excitation, the excitation lines of Gd3+ and the f-f transitions of Dy3+, which indicates that the energy transfer could occur from the host to the Dy3+ ions. In the emission spectra of the samples, the intense emissions of Dy3+ have been expectably revealed both upon excitation at 365 nm and 147 nm. And the chromaticity coordinates of GdTaO4: xDy3+ have been correspondingly calculated. The results indicate that GdTaO4: Dy3+ would be a novel yellow emitting phosphor applied in light emitting diodes (LEDs), plasma display panels (PDPs) and mercury-free fluorescent tubes. PMID:27451754

  6. Neutron energy spectrum adjustment using deposited metal films on Teflon in the miniature neutron source reactor.

    PubMed

    Nassan, L; Abdallah, B; Omar, H; Sarheel, A; Alsomel, N; Ghazi, N

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this article was on the experimental estimation of the neutron energy spectrum in the inner irradiation site of the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR), using, for the first time, a selected set of deposited metal films on Teflon (DMFTs) neutron detectors. Gold, copper, zinc, titanium, aluminum, nickel, silver, and chromium were selected because of the dependence of their neutron cross-sections on neutron energy. Emphasis was placed on the usability of this new type of neutron detectors in the total neutron energy spectrum adjustment. The measured saturation activities per target nucleus values of the DMFTs, and the calculated neutron spectrum in the inner irradiation site using the MCNP-4C code were used as an input for the STAY'SL computer code during the adjustment procedure. The agreement between the numerically calculated and experimentally adjusted spectra results was discussed. PMID:26562448

  7. The matter power spectrum of dark energy models and the Harrison-Zel'dovich prescription

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, Ivan; Pavón, Diego; Atrio-Barandela, Fernando E-mail: atrio@usal.es

    2012-04-01

    According to the Harrison-Zel'dovich prescription, the amplitude of matter density perturbations at horizon crossing is the same at all scales. Based on this prescription, we show how to construct the matter power spectrum of generic dark energy models from the power spectrum of a ΛCDM model without the need of solving in full the dynamical equations describing the evolution of all energy density perturbations. Our approach allows to make model predictions of observables that can be expressed in terms of the matter power spectrum alone, such as the amplitude of matter fluctuations, peculiar velocities, cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies on large angular scales or the weak lensing convergence spectrum. Then, models that have been tested only at the background level using the rate of the expansion of the Universe can now be tested using data on gravitational clustering and on large scale structure. This method can save a lot of effort in checking the validity of dark energy models. As an example of the accurateness of the approximation used, we compute the power spectrum of different dark energy models with constant equation of state parameter (w{sub DE} = −0.1, -0.5 and -0.8, ruled out by observations but easy to compare to numerical solutions) using our methodology and discuss the constraints imposed by the low multipoles of the cosmic microwave background.

  8. The spectrum of flare protons in the low-energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Stolpovskii, V. G.

    1981-09-01

    An analysis is presented of the spectra of flare protons in the 0.08-150 MeV energy range, measured at about 1 AE on the Prognoz-6 satellite. The spectral data are compared with the energy dependence of the observation time of the maximum flux of flare protons. It is shown that changes in the slope in the spectrum and in the energy dependence of maximum times occur at approximately the same energy. Energy losses of protons in the interplanetary medium due to adiabatic cooling are determined. This effect is significant for protons with energies less than 1 MeV, and, in the case of flares of low importance, plays a decisive role in the formation of the spectrum of the observed flare protons.

  9. Energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays observed with the Telescope Array using a hybrid technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Aida, R.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, E. J.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Fukuda, T.; Fukushima, M.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Hiyama, K.; Honda, K.; Iguchi, T.; Ikeda, D.; Ikuta, K.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Iwamoto, S.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kanbe, T.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, H. K.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamoto, K.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Kuramoto, K.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, S.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuura, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Miyata, K.; Murano, Y.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nam, S. W.; Nonaka, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Oku, D.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Roh, S. Y.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, J. I.; Shirahama, T.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Takeda, M.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Tsuyuguchi, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Ukai, H.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wada, Y.; Wong, T.; Yamakawa, Y.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zhou, X.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-02-01

    We measure the spectrum of cosmic rays with energies greater than 1018.2 eV with the fluorescence detectors (FDs) and the surface detectors (SDs) of the Telescope Array Experiment using the data taken in our first 2.3-year observation from May 27, 2008 to September 7, 2010. A hybrid air shower reconstruction technique is employed to improve accuracies in determination of arrival directions and primary energies of cosmic rays using both FD and SD data. The energy spectrum presented here is in agreement with our previously published spectra and the HiRes results.

  10. Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray iron nucleus observed with emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohta, I.; Tasaka, S.; Sato, Y.; Shimada, E.; Tanaka, S.; Sugimoto, H.; Taira, K.; Tateyama, N.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray Fe-nucleus has been measured from 4 GeV per nucleon to beyond 100 GeV per nucleon. The data were obtained using emulsion chambers on a balloon from Sanriku, Japan. The energies were estimated by the opening angle method after calibrated using 1.88 GeV per nucleon Fe collisions. The spectrum of Fe is approximately E-2.5 in the range from 10 to 200 GeV per nucleon. This result is in good agreement with those of other experiments.

  11. Holographic lens spectrum splitting photovoltaic system for increased diffuse collection and annual energy yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorndran, Shelby D.; Wu, Yuechen; Ayala, Silvana; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2015-09-01

    Concentrating and spectrum splitting photovoltaic (PV) modules have a limited acceptance angle and thus suffer from optical loss under off-axis illumination. This loss manifests itself as a substantial reduction in energy yield in locations where a significant portion of insulation is diffuse. In this work, a spectrum splitting PV system is designed to efficiently collect and convert light in a range of illumination conditions. The system uses a holographic lens to concentrate shortwavelength light onto a smaller, more expensive indium gallium phosphide (InGaP) PV cell. The high efficiency PV cell near the axis is surrounded with silicon (Si), a less expensive material that collects a broader portion of the solar spectrum. Under direct illumination, the device achieves increased conversion efficiency from spectrum splitting. Under diffuse illumination, the device collects light with efficiency comparable to a flat-panel Si module. Design of the holographic lens is discussed. Optical efficiency and power output of the module under a range of illumination conditions from direct to diffuse are simulated with non-sequential raytracing software. Using direct and diffuse Typical Metrological Year (TMY3) irradiance measurements, annual energy yield of the module is calculated for several installation sites. Energy yield of the spectrum splitting module is compared to that of a full flat-panel Si reference module.

  12. Characterization of Low-Energy Photon-Emitting Brachytherapy Sources with Modified Strengths for Applications in Focal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Joshua L.

    Permanent implants of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are used to treat a variety of cancers. Individual source models must be separately characterized due to their unique geometry, materials, and radionuclides, which all influence their dose distributions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are often used for dose measurements around low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. TLDs are typically calibrated with higher energy sources such as 60Co, which requires a correction for the change in the response of the TLDs as a function of photon energy. These corrections have historically been based on TLD response to x ray bremsstrahlung spectra instead of to brachytherapy sources themselves. This work determined the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for 125I and 103Pd sources relative to 60Co, which allows for correction of TLD measurements of brachytherapy sources with factors specific to their energy spectra. Traditional brachytherapy sources contain mobile internal components and large amounts of high-Z material such as radio-opaque markers and titanium encapsulations. These all contribute to perturbations and uncertainties in the dose distribution around the source. The CivaString is a new elongated 103Pd brachytherapy source with a fixed internal geometry, polymer encapsulation, and lengths ranging from 1 to 6 cm, which offers advantages over traditional source designs. This work characterized the CivaString source and the results facilitated the formal approval of this source for use in clinical treatments. Additionally, the accuracy of a superposition technique for dose calculation around the sources with lengths >1 cm was verified. Advances in diagnostic techniques are paving the way for focal brachytherapy in which the dose is intentionally modulated throughout the target volume to focus on subvolumes that contain cancer cells. Brachytherapy sources with variable longitudinal strength (VLS) are a promising candidate for use in focal

  13. Application of light-emitting diodes in bioreactors: flashing light effects and energy economy in algal culture (Chlorella pyrenoidosa).

    PubMed

    Matthijs, H C; Balke, H; van Hes, U M; Kroon, B M; Mur, L R; Binot, R A

    1996-04-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were used as the sole light source in continuous culture of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The LEDs applied show a peak emission at 659 nm with a half-power bandwidth of 30 nm. Selection of this wavelength range, which is optimal for excitation of chlorophylls a and b in their "red" absorption bands makes all photons emitted potentially suitable for photosynthesis. No need for additional supply of blue light was found. A standardized panel with 2 LEDs cm(-2) fully covered one side of the culture vessel. At standard voltage in continuous operation the light output of the diode panel appeared more than sufficient to reach maximal growth. Flash operation (5-mus pulse duration) enables potential use of higher operating voltages which may render up to three times more light output. Flat airlift fermentor-type continuous culture devices were used to estimate steady state growth rates of Chlorella pyrenoidosa as a function of the light flux (micromol photons x m(-2) x s(-1)) and the flashing frequency of the light-emitting diodes (which determines the duration of the dark "off" time between the 5-micros "on" pulses). At the fixed voltage and turbidostat setting applied a 20-kHz frequency, which equals dark periods of 45 mus, still permitted the maximum growth rate to become nearly reached. Lower frequencies fell short of sustaining the maximal growth rate. However, the light flux decrease resulting from lowering of the flash frequency appeared to reduce the observed growth rates less than in the case of a similar flux decrease with light originating from LEDs in continuous operation. Flash application also showed reduction of the quantum requirement for oxygen evolution at defined frequencies. The frequency domain of interest was between 2 and 14 kHz. LEDs may open interesting new perspectives for studies on optimization of mixing in mass algal culture via the possibility of separation of interests in the role of modulation on light

  14. Three-dimensional spectrum mapping of bright emission centers: Investigating the brightness-limiting process in Eu-doped GaN red light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Masashi; Koizumi, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2015-08-24

    A pulse-driven emission-spectroscopy mapping technique is used to investigate the bright emission centers in Eu-doped GaN (GaN:Eu) red light emitting diodes (LED). The LEDs are operated in pulse-driven mode, and the emission spectra are acquired for a range of pulse frequencies. This ensemble of emission spectral data yields a three-dimensional mapping that allows the origin of emission lines to be identified by visual inspection. The identification was achieved even for a weak {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 3} transition in conventional photoluminescence measurements. A peculiar split is observed in the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 3} transition for the bright emission center referred to as OMVPE 8. Despite the unique transition at this emission center, the emission efficiencies for the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 3} and {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions were identical. This finding indicates that the excitation of the emission centers, rather than the radiative transitions, is the limiting process that determines the GaN:Eu red LED brightness.

  15. All-Particle Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum Measured with 26 Icetop Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H; Bell, M.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Stamatikos, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array, thesurface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The data used in this analysiswere taken between June and October, 2007, with 26 surface stations operational at that time, corresponding to about one third of the final array. The fiducial area used in this analysis was 0.122 square kilometers.The analysis investigated the energy spectrum from 1 to 100 PeV measured for three different zenithangle ranges between 0 and 46. Because of the isotropy of cosmic rays in this energy range the spectrafrom all zenith angle intervals have to agree. The cosmic-ray energy spectrum was determined under differentassumptions on the primary mass composition. Good agreement of spectra in the three zenithangle ranges was found for the assumption of pure proton and a simple two-component model. Forzenith angles theta less than 30 deg., where the mass dependence is smallest, the knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrumwas observed at about 4 PeV, with a spectral index above the knee of about -3.1. Moreover, an indicationof a flattening of the spectrum above 22 PeV was observed.

  16. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  17. An Energy-Efficient Game-Theory-Based Spectrum Decision Scheme for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman

    2016-01-01

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network in which sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio. In this paper, we propose an energy-efficient game-theory-based spectrum decision (EGSD) scheme for CRSNs to prolong the network lifetime. Note that energy efficiency is the most important design consideration in CRSNs because it determines the network lifetime. The central part of the EGSD scheme consists of two spectrum selection algorithms: random selection and game-theory-based selection. The EGSD scheme also includes a clustering algorithm, spectrum characterization with a Markov chain, and cluster member coordination. Our performance study shows that EGSD outperforms the existing popular framework in terms of network lifetime and coordination overhead. PMID:27376290

  18. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Hosseini, S. A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  19. An Energy-Efficient Game-Theory-Based Spectrum Decision Scheme for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman

    2016-01-01

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network in which sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio. In this paper, we propose an energy-efficient game-theory-based spectrum decision (EGSD) scheme for CRSNs to prolong the network lifetime. Note that energy efficiency is the most important design consideration in CRSNs because it determines the network lifetime. The central part of the EGSD scheme consists of two spectrum selection algorithms: random selection and game-theory-based selection. The EGSD scheme also includes a clustering algorithm, spectrum characterization with a Markov chain, and cluster member coordination. Our performance study shows that EGSD outperforms the existing popular framework in terms of network lifetime and coordination overhead. PMID:27376290

  20. Long-term differential energy spectrum for solar-flare iron-group particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E.; Fruland, R. M.; Morrison, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A long-term solar-flare differential energy spectrum for iron-group nuclei from approximately 0.1 to approximately 600 MeV/amu is derived from track density profile measurements in sample 64455 and sample 68815. Measurements from uneroded surfaces were obtained from quench crystals of plagioclase in 64455, and a Kr-81/Kr method indicates that the exposure age of this sample is 2,010,000 yrs. The power laws which best fit the normalized track density data are reported; the energy spectrum consists of two power law curves smoothly joined together which in turn are smoothly connected to a modulated galactic cosmic-ray spectrum. Standard track production versus depth profiles can be used to determine solar-flare track exposure ages and erosion rates for lunar samples.

  1. Neutron energy spectrum characterization on TMR-1 at the Indiana University neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, Matthew R.; Lee, Sangjin; Petrosky, James; Bickley, Abigail; Sokol, Paul

    The energy spectrum of the Neutron Radiation Effects Program (NREP) beam line, Target-Moderator-Reflector-1 (TMR-1), at Indiana University has not been previously characterized. The facility has a unique proton source with variable pulse length (15-600 ms) and energy (13 MeV). Thus, it can produce a unique and tailored neutron beam when incident on a beryllium target. Through a combination of MCNP-X particle simulations, neutron activation experiments, and application of a spectrum unfolding code (SAND-II), the neutron source is characterized. Eight activation foils and wires were irradiated in the target area and the gamma activity measured. This information was used in an unfolding code, SAND-II, to deconvolve the spectrum, using the MCNP simulations as a basis for the spectral fitting.

  2. DISENTANGLING HADRONIC AND LEPTONIC CASCADE SCENARIOS FROM THE VERY-HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF DISTANT HARD-SPECTRUM BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Murase, Kohta; Dermer, Charles D. E-mail: murase@ias.edu

    2013-07-10

    Recent data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope have revealed about a dozen distant hard-spectrum blazars that have very-high-energy (VHE; {approx}> 100 GeV) photons associated with them, but most of them have not yet been detected by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. Most of these high-energy gamma-ray spectra, like those of other extreme high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects, can be well explained either by gamma rays emitted at the source or by cascades induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, as we show specifically for KUV 00311-1938. We consider the prospects for detection of the VHE sources by the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and show how it can distinguish the two scenarios by measuring the integrated flux above {approx}500 GeV (depending on source redshift) for several luminous sources with z {approx}< 1 in the sample. Strong evidence for the origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays could be obtained from VHE observations with CTA. Depending on redshift, if the often quoted redshift of KUV 00311-1938 (z = 0.61) is believed, then preliminary H.E.S.S. data favor cascades induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. Accurate redshift measurements of hard-spectrum blazars are essential for this study.

  3. A two-stage spectrum sensing scheme based on energy detection and a novel multitaper method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Pei-Han; Li, Zan; Si, Jiang-Bo; Xiong, Tian-Yi

    2015-04-01

    Wideband spectrum sensing has drawn much attention in recent years since it provides more opportunities to the secondary users. However, wideband spectrum sensing requires a long time and a complex mechanism at the sensing terminal. A two-stage wideband spectrum sensing scheme is considered to proceed spectrum sensing with low time consumption and high performance to tackle this predicament. In this scheme, a novel multitaper spectrum sensing (MSS) method is proposed to mitigate the poor performance of energy detection (ED) in the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) region. The closed-form expression of the decision threshold is derived based on the Neyman-Pearson criterion and the probability of detection in the Rayleigh fading channel is analyzed. An optimization problem is formulated to maximize the probability of detection of the proposed two-stage scheme and the average sensing time of the two-stage scheme is analyzed. Numerical results validate the efficiency of MSS and show that the two-stage spectrum sensing scheme enjoys higher performance in the low SNR region and lower time cost in the high SNR region than the single-stage scheme. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61301179), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M550479), and the Doctorial Programs Foundation of the Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. 20110203110011).

  4. Modeling bistatic spectral measurements of temporally evolving reflected and emitted energy from a distant and receding target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, Salvatore J.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Bartell, Richard J.; Krizo, Matthew J.; Bailey, William F.; Beauchamp, Rebecca L.; Marciniak, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The Air Force Institute of Technology's Center for Directed Energy developed the High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS) model in part to quantify the performance variability in laser propagation created by the natural environment during dynamic engagements. As such, HELEEOS includes a fast-calculating, first principles, worldwide surface-to-100 km, atmospheric propagation, and characterization package. This package enables the creation of profiles of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, optical turbulence, atmospheric particulates, and hydrometeors as they relate to line-by-line layer transmission, path, and background radiance at wavelengths from the ultraviolet to radio frequencies. In the current paper an example of a unique high fidelity simulation of a bistatic, time-varying five band multispectral remote observation of energy delivered on a distant and receding test object is presented for noncloudy conditions with aerosols. The multispectral example emphasizes atmospheric effects using HELEEOS, the interaction of the energy and the test object, the observed reflectance, and subsequent hot spot generated. A model of a sensor suite located on the surface is included to collect the diffuse reflected in-band laser radiation and the emitted radiance of the hot spot in four separate and spatially offset midwave infrared and longwave infrared bands. Particular care is taken in modeling the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the delivered energy/target interaction to account for both the coupling of energy into the test object and the changes in reflectance as a function of temperature. The architecture supports any platform-target-observer geometry, geographic location, season, and time of day, and it provides for correct contributions of the sky-earth background. The simulation accurately models the thermal response, kinetics, turbulence, base disturbance, diffraction, and signal-to-noise ratios.

  5. Measuring the internal energies of species emitted from hypervelocity nanoprojectile impacts on surfaces using recalibrated benzylpyridinium probe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBord, J. Daniel; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Perez, Lisa M.; North, Simon W.; Hall, Michael B.; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2013-06-01

    We present herein a framework for measuring the internal energy distributions of vibrationally excited molecular ions emitted from hypervelocity nanoprojectile impacts on organic surfaces. The experimental portion of this framework is based on the measurement of lifetime distributions of "thermometer" benzylpyridinium ions dissociated within a time of flight mass spectrometer. The theoretical component comprises re-evaluation of the fragmentation energetics of benzylpyridinium ions at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples level. Vibrational frequencies for the ground and transition states of select molecules are reported, allowing for a full description of vibrational excitations of these molecules via Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus unimolecular fragmentation theory. Ultimately, this approach is used to evaluate the internal energy distributions from the measured lifetime distributions. The average internal energies of benzylpyridinium ions measured from 440 keV Au400+4 impacts are found to be relatively low (˜0.24 eV/atom) when compared with keV atomic bombardment of surfaces (1-2 eV/atom).

  6. The energy spectrum of electrons and cosmic-ray confinement A new measurement and its interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, K.-K.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmic ray flux and electron energy spectrum from 5 GeV to 300 GeV, with an absolute uncertainty in the flux level of + or - 10 percent at low energies and + or - 30 percent at 100 GeV, are described. The measured spectrum appears to represent the competing processes of radiative energy loss in the interstellar medium and leakage out of the Galaxy. In the framework of the leaky box model and diffusion models, the result is most consistent with the picture of cosmic ray electrons spending an average of 10 million years in the Galaxy independent of electron energy, probably propagating in a halo as well as in the galactic disk.

  7. Study of La-binding energies by analysis of its photodetachment spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lin; Beck, Donald

    2016-05-01

    In this study, relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) is employed to investigate the electron affinity and binding energies of the negative ion of lanthanum, by reinterpreting an earlier experimental photoelectron kinetic energy spectrum of La-. For the electron affinity of lanthanum, our study revises the original experimental interpretation of 0.47 +/- 0.02 eV and agrees well with the earlier RCI value of 0.545 eV. The calculation yields also the binding energies for thirteen excited states of La-. These energies are compared to results of recent experimental studies on La-. The details of the calculation, identities of main features in the experimental spectrum will be presented in our poster. National Science Foundation, Grant No. PHY-0968205

  8. Semiclassical analysis of the Efimov energy spectrum in the unitary limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaduri, Rajat K.; Brack, Matthias; Murthy, M. V. N.

    2011-06-15

    We demonstrate that the (s-wave) geometric spectrum of the Efimov energy levels in the unitary limit is generated by the radial motion of a primitive periodic orbit (and its harmonics) of the corresponding classical system. The action of the primitive orbit depends logarithmically on the energy. It is shown to be consistent with an inverse-squared radial potential with a lower cutoff radius. The lowest-order WKB quantization, including the Langer correction, is shown to reproduce the geometric scaling of the energy spectrum. The (WKB) mean-squared radii of the Efimov states scale geometrically like the inverse of their energies. The WKB wave functions, regularized near the classical turning point by Langer's generalized connection formula, are practically indistinguishable from the exact wave functions even for the lowest (n=0) state, apart from a tiny shift of its zeros that remains constant for large n.

  9. Semiclassical analysis of the Efimov energy spectrum in the unitary limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaduri, Rajat K.; Brack, Matthias; Murthy, M. V. N.

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate that the (s-wave) geometric spectrum of the Efimov energy levels in the unitary limit is generated by the radial motion of a primitive periodic orbit (and its harmonics) of the corresponding classical system. The action of the primitive orbit depends logarithmically on the energy. It is shown to be consistent with an inverse-squared radial potential with a lower cutoff radius. The lowest-order WKB quantization, including the Langer correction, is shown to reproduce the geometric scaling of the energy spectrum. The (WKB) mean-squared radii of the Efimov states scale geometrically like the inverse of their energies. The WKB wave functions, regularized near the classical turning point by Langer’s generalized connection formula, are practically indistinguishable from the exact wave functions even for the lowest (n=0) state, apart from a tiny shift of its zeros that remains constant for large n.

  10. Balloon measurements of the energy spectrum of cosmic electrons between 1 and 25 GeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.; Neely, D. E.; Rygg, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    During three balloon flights made in 1966 and 1967, cosmic electrons were investigated with the aid of a hodoscope detector that provided extensive and detailed information on each cosmic-ray event triggering the apparatus. Similar information obtained during calibration exposures to protons and pions as well as to electrons was used to provide identification of cosmic electrons and to determine their energies. Differential primary electron intensities measured in the range from 1 to 25 GeV were substantially larger than some earlier measurements. In conjunction with existing measurements at energies above 100 GeV, this finding indicates that the energy spectrum of cosmic electrons is steeper than that of cosmic-ray nuclei and consequently suggests that Compton/synchrotron energy loss plays a significant role in shaping the electron spectrum.

  11. Power Versus Spectrum 2-D Sensing in Energy Harvesting Cognitive Radio Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Han, Weijia; Li, Di; Zhang, Ping; Cui, Shuguang

    2015-12-01

    Energy harvester based cognitive radio is a promising solution to address the shortage of both spectrum and energy. Since the spectrum access and power consumption patterns are interdependent, and the power value harvested from certain environmental sources are spatially correlated, the new power dimension could provide additional information to enhance the spectrum sensing accuracy. In this paper, the Markovian behavior of the primary users is considered, based on which we adopt a hidden input Markov model to specify the primary vs. secondary dynamics in the system. Accordingly, we propose a 2-D spectrum and power (harvested) sensing scheme to improve the primary user detection performance, which is also capable of estimating the primary transmit power level. Theoretical and simulated results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, in term of the performance gain achieved by considering the new power dimension. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to jointly consider the spectrum and power dimensions for the cognitive primary user detection problem.

  12. Distribution of RF energy emitted by mobile phones in anatomical structures of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardis, E.; Deltour, I.; Mann, S.; Moissonnier, M.; Taki, M.; Varsier, N.; Wake, K.; Wiart, J.

    2008-06-01

    The rapid worldwide increase in mobile phone use in the last decade has generated considerable interest in possible carcinogenic effects of radio frequency (RF). Because exposure to RF from phones is localized, if a risk exists it is likely to be greatest for tumours in regions with greatest energy absorption. The objective of the current paper was to characterize the spatial distribution of RF energy in the brain, using results of measurements made in two laboratories on 110 phones used in Europe or Japan. Most (97-99% depending on frequency) appears to be absorbed in the brain hemisphere on the side where the phone is used, mainly (50-60%) in the temporal lobe. The average relative SARSAR is the specific energy absorption rate i.e. energy absorption rate per unit mass (measured in W kg-1). is highest in the temporal lobe (6-15%, depending on frequency, of the spatial peak SAR in the most exposed region of the brain) and the cerebellum (2-10%) and decreases very rapidly with increasing depth, particularly at higher frequencies. The SAR distribution appears to be fairly similar across phone models, between older and newer phones and between phones with different antenna types and positions. Analyses of risk by location of tumour are therefore important for the interpretation of results of studies of brain tumours in relation to mobile phone use.

  13. Electrical and Optical Measurements of the Bandgap Energy of a Light-Emitting Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petit, Matthieu; Michez, Lisa; Raimundo, Jean-Manuel; Dumas, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor materials are at the core of electronics. Most electronic devices are made of semiconductors. The operation of these components is well described by quantum physics which is often a difficult concept for students to understand. One of the intrinsic parameters of semiconductors is their bandgap energy E[subscript g]. In the case of…

  14. Multiplicity and entropy scaling of medium-energy protons emitted in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, A.; Kamel, S.; Hafiz, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    The behavior and the properties of medium-energy protons with kinetic energies in the range 26 - 400 MeV is derived from measurements of the particle yields and spectra in the final state of relativistic heavy-ion collisions (16O-AgBr interactions at 60 A and 200 A GeV and 32S-AgBr interactions at 3.7 A and 200 A GeV) and their interpretation in terms of the higher order moments. The multiplicity distributions have been fitted well with the Gaussian distribution function. The data are also compared with the predictions of the modified FRITIOF model, showing that the FRITIOF model does not reproduce the trend and the magnitude of the data. Measurements of the ratio of the variance to the mean show that the production of target fragments at high energies cannot be considered as a statistically independent process. However, the deviation of each multiplicity distribution from a Poisson law provides evidence for correlations. The KNO scaling behavior of two types of scaling (Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling and Hegyi scaling) functions in terms of the multiplicity distribution is investigated. A simplified universal function has been used in each scaling to display the experimental data. An examination of the relationship between the entropy, the average multiplicity, and the KNO function is performed. Entropy production and subsequent scaling in nucleus-nucleus collisions are carried out by analyzing the experimental data over a wide energy range (Dubna and SPS). Interestingly, the data points corresponding to various energies overlap and fall on a single curve, indicating the presence of a kind of entropy scaling.

  15. The effect of stochastic re-acceleration on the energy spectrum of shock-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami; Kocharov, Leon

    2014-07-20

    The energy spectra of particles in gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events do not always have a power-law form attributed to the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In particular, the observed spectra in major SEP events can take the form of a broken (double) power law. In this paper, we study the effect of a process that can modify the power-law spectral form produced by the diffusive shock acceleration: the stochastic re-acceleration of energetic protons by enhanced Alfvénic turbulence in the downstream region of a shock wave. There are arguments suggesting that this process can be important when the shock propagates in the corona. We consider a coronal magnetic loop traversed by a shock and perform Monte Carlo simulations of interactions of shock-accelerated protons with Alfvén waves in the loop. The wave-particle interactions are treated self-consistently, so the finiteness of the available turbulent energy is taken into account. The initial energy spectrum of particles is taken to be a power law. The simulations reveal that the stochastic re-acceleration leads either to the formation of a spectrum that is described in a wide energy range by a power law (although the resulting power-law index is different from the initial one) or to a broken power-law spectrum. The resulting spectral form is determined by the ratio of the energy density of shock-accelerated protons to the wave energy density in the shock's downstream region.

  16. Cascade energy transfer versus charge separation in ladder-type oligo(p-phenylene)/ZnO hybrid structures for light-emitting applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, F.; Sadofev, S.; Schlesinger, R.; Koch, N.; Henneberger, F.; Blumstengel, S.; Kobin, B.; Hecht, S.

    2014-12-08

    Usability of inorganic/organic semiconductor hybrid structures for light-emitting applications can be intrinsically limited by an unfavorable interfacial energy level alignment causing charge separation and nonradiative deactivation. Introducing cascaded energy transfer funneling away the excitation energy from the interface by transfer to a secondary acceptor molecule enables us to overcome this issue. We demonstrate a substantial recovery of the light output along with high inorganic-to-organic exciton conversion rates up to room temperature.

  17. Measurement of Underwater Operational Noise Emitted by Wave and Tidal Stream Energy Devices.

    PubMed

    Lepper, Paul A; Robinson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    The increasing international growth in the development of marine and freshwater wave and tidal energy harvesting systems has been followed by a growing requirement to understand any associated underwater impact. Radiated noise generated during operation is dependent on the device's physical properties, the sound-propagation environment, and the device's operational state. Physical properties may include size, distribution in the water column, and mechanics/hydrodynamics. The sound-propagation environment may be influenced by water depth, bathymetry, sediment type, and water column acoustic properties, and operational state may be influenced by tidal cycle and wave height among others This paper discusses some of the challenges for measurement of noise characteristics from these devices as well as a case study of the measurement of radiated noise from a full-scale wave energy converter. PMID:26611011

  18. LIMITS TO THE FRACTION OF HIGH-ENERGY PHOTON EMITTING GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Akerlof, Carl W.; Zheng, WeiKang

    2013-02-20

    After almost four years of operation, the two instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have shown that the number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV cannot exceed roughly 9% of the total number of all such events, at least at the present detection limits. In a recent paper, we found that GRBs with photons detected in the Large Area Telescope have a surprisingly broad distribution with respect to the observed event photon number. Extrapolation of our empirical fit to numbers of photons below our previous detection limit suggests that the overall rate of such low flux events could be estimated by standard image co-adding techniques. In this case, we have taken advantage of the excellent angular resolution of the Swift mission to provide accurate reference points for 79 GRB events which have eluded any previous correlations with high-energy photons. We find a small but significant signal in the co-added field. Guided by the extrapolated power-law fit previously obtained for the number distribution of GRBs with higher fluxes, the data suggest that only a small fraction of GRBs are sources of high-energy photons.

  19. Testing oscillating primordial spectrum and oscillating dark energy with astronomical observations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Li, Hong; Zhang, Xinmin; Xia, Jun-Qing E-mail: hongli@ihep.ac.cn E-mail: xmzhang@ihep.ac.cn

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we revisit the issue of determining the oscillating primordial scalar power spectrum and oscillating equation of state of dark energy from the astronomical observations. By performing a global analysis with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we find that the current observations from five-year WMAP and SDSS-LRG matter power spectrum, as well as the ''union'' supernovae sample, constrain the oscillating index of primordial spectrum and oscillating equation of state of dark energy with the amplitude less than |n{sub amp}| < 0.116 and |w{sub amp}| < 0.232 at 95% confidence level, respectively. This result shows that the oscillatory structures on the primordial scalar spectrum and the equation of state of dark energy are still allowed by the current data. Furthermore, we point out that these kinds of modulation effects will be detectable (or gotten a stronger constraint) in the near future astronomical observations, such as the PLANCK satellite, LAMOST telescope and the currently ongoing supernovae projects SNLS.

  20. Lorentz Invariance Violation and the Observed Spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, S. T.; Stecker, F. W.

    2009-01-01

    There has been much interest in possible violations of Lorentz invariance, particularly motivated by quantum gravity theories. It has been suggested that a small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) could turn of photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with photons of the cosmic background radiation and thereby eliminate the resulting sharp steepening in the spectrum of the highest energy CRs predicted by Greisen Zatsepin and Kuzmin (GZK). Recent measurements of the UHECR spectrum reported by the HiRes and Auger collaborations, however, indicate the presence of the GZK effect. We present the results of a detailed calculation of the modification of the UHECR spectrum caused by LIV using the formalism of Coleman and Glashow. We then compare these results with the experimental UHECR data from Auger and HiRes. Based on these data, we find a best fit amount of LIV of 4.5+1:5 ..4:5 x 10(exp -23),consistent with an upper limit of 6 x 10(exp -23). This possible amount of LIV can lead to a recovery of the cosmic ray spectrum at higher energies than presently observed. Such an LIV recovery effect can be tested observationally using future detectors.

  1. Study of Sequential Dexter Energy Transfer in High Efficient Phosphorescent White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Single Emissive Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Wook; You, Seung Il; Kim, Nam Ho; Yoon, Ju-An; Cheah, Kok Wai; Zhu, Fu Rong; Kim, Woo Young

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we report our effort to realize high performance single emissive layer three color white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) through sequential Dexter energy transfer of blue, green and red dopants. The PHOLEDs had a structure of; ITO(1500 Å)/NPB(700 Å)/mCP:Firpic-x%:Ir(ppy)3-0.5%:Ir(piq)3-y%(300 Å)/TPBi(300 Å)/Liq(20 Å)/Al(1200 Å). The dopant concentrations of FIrpic, Ir(ppy)3 and Ir(piq)3 were adjusted and optimized to facilitate the preferred energy transfer processes attaining both the best luminous efficiency and CIE color coordinates. The presence of a deep trapping center for charge carriers in the emissive layer was confirmed by the observed red shift in electroluminescent spectra. White PHOLEDs, with phosphorescent dopant concentrations of FIrpic-8.0%:Ir(ppy)3-0.5%:Ir(piq)3-0.5% in the mCP host of the single emissive layer, had a maximum luminescence of 37,810 cd/m2 at 11 V and a luminous efficiency of 48.10 cd/A at 5 V with CIE color coordinates of (0.35, 0.41).

  2. Integration of Semiconducting Sulfides for Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-23

    The full harvest of solar energy by semiconductors requires a material that simultaneously absorbs across the whole solar spectrum and collects photogenerated electrons and holes separately. The stepwise integration of three semiconducting sulfides, namely ZnS, CdS, and Cu2-x S, into a single nanocrystal, led to a unique ternary multi-node sheath ZnS-CdS-Cu2-x S heteronanorod for full-spectrum solar energy absorption. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nonstoichiometric copper sulfide nanostructures enables effective NIR absorption. More significantly, the construction of pn heterojunctions between Cu2-x S and CdS leads to staggered gaps, as confirmed by first-principles simulations. This band alignment causes effective electron-hole separation in the ternary system and hence enables efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:27062543

  3. Measurements of the spectrum and energy dependence of X-ray transition radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the theory of X-ray transition radiation and to verify the predicted dependence of the characteristic features of the radiation on the radiator dimensions are presented. The X-ray frequency spectrum produced by 5- to 9-GeV electrons over the range 4 to 30 keV was measured with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer, and at frequencies up to 100 keV with an NaI scintillator. The interference pattern in the spectrum and the hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The energy dependence of the total transition-radiation intensity was studied using a radiator with large dimensions designed to yield energy-dependent signals at very high particle energies, up to E/mc-squared approximately equal to 100,000. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  4. Mars Energy Spectrum studies from Assimilated MCS data using the UK MGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeanu, Alexandru; Read, Peter; Wang, Yixiong; Lewis, Stephen; Montabone, Luca; Tabataba-Vakili, Fachreddin

    2015-04-01

    Introduction The energy spectrum (ES) analysis is a renowned tool for understanding the driving mechanisms behind atmospheric turbulence (Lindborg, 1998). We aim to investigate whether energy and enstrophy inertial ranges exist in the kinetic energy spectrum (KES), and to quantify the corresponding cascades (with their ranges), and relationship with the atmospheric forcing and energy dissipation scales. The calculation of the ES from observational data is known to be highly non-trivial due to the lack of global coverage in space and time. Gage and Nastrom (1984) were the first to overcome this problem for Earth but this has not so far been attempted for Mars. Our approach is to take the sparse observational data and assimilate it using a global numerical model. We present preliminary results using the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) retrievals and the LMD-UK Mars GCM (MGCM). This was pioneered by Lewis and Read (1999). Methodology The equations we used to calculate the Eddy and Zonal Mean kinetic energies are derived from total KES formula presented in Lindborg and Augier (2013). Hence, adding the two spectra together, we obtain the full KES spectrum as presented in their paper. For the Available Potential Energy Spectrum (APES), we have used a preliminary simplified version of the approach presented in Lindborg and Augier (2013). The Energy Spectra To date we have assimilated the MCS data at the resolution of T31 (triangular truncation), hence the ES only spans up to total wavenumber 31. This encompasses a portion of the energy inertial range, which might be expected to manifest the -3 exponential law by analogy with the Earth (Gage & Nastrom, 1984). Features: - velocities and corresponding KEs are higher with increasing height compared to Earth, - "-3" slope is restricted to ~30 km altitude, suggesting an early departure from the enstrophy inertial range, - boundary layer velocities are similar to Earth References 1. Gage and Nastrom, A Climatology of Atmospheric

  5. Measuring the neutron energy spectrum of laser-fusion targets with CR-39

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, S.M.

    1983-09-01

    We are developing a detector capable of measuring the neutron energy spectrum from a laser fusion target containing DT fuel. From such a spectrum the compressed areal density of the DT can be inferred by observing the fraction of 14.1 MeV neutrons down-shifted in energy by elastic scattering. The detector consists of a 0.1 cm thick Ta x-ray and debris shield backed by a 50 to 200 ..mu..m polyethylene radiator followed by layers of CR-39. The energy of each neutron producing a knock-on proton in the radiatior, that in turn creates a damage track in the CR-39, can be derived from the resultant track diameter, location, and orientation. We have analyzed the proton sensitivity and sample readability of 5 types of CR-39 in the energy range 3 to 11 MeV and have found a type fabricated by American Acrylics from a monomer made by a French company, Allymer, to be the most acceptable. Calibration curves were obtained for this plastic at energies of 3 to 15 MeV and dip angles ranging from 75 to 90/sup 0/. These curves were subsequently used to unfold a 14.7 MeV spectrum generated at the Livermore Rotating Target Neutron Source.

  6. Spectrum and energy levels of five-times ionized zirconium (Zr VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph; Lindsay, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    We carried out a new analysis of the spectrum of five-times-ionized zirconium Zr VI. For this we used sliding-spark discharges together with normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs to observe the spectrum from 160 to 2000 Å. These observations showed that the analysis of this spectrum by Khan et al (1985 Phys. Scr. 31 837) contained a significant number of incorrect energy levels. We have now classified ˜420 lines as transitions between 23 even-parity levels 73 odd-parity levels. The 4s24p5, 4s4p6, 4s24p44d, 5s, 5d, 6s configurations are now complete, although a few levels of 4s24p45d are tentative. We determined Ritz-type wavelengths for ˜135 lines from the optimized energy levels. The uncertainties range from 0.0003 to 0.0020 Å. Hartree-Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels were used to interpret the observed configurations. Oscillator strengths for all classified lines were calculated with the fitted parameters. The results are compared with values for the level energies, percentage compositions, and transition probabilities from recent ab initio theoretical calculations. The ionization energy was revised to 777 380 ± 300 cm-1 (96.38 ± 0.04 eV).

  7. Wavelet Spatial Energy Spectrums Studies on Drag Reduction by Micro-bubble Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zhen; Yassin Hassan

    2006-07-01

    In this study, continuous wavelet transforms and spatial correlation techniques are employed to determine the space-localized wavenumber energy spectrum of the velocity signals in turbulent channel flow. The flow conditions correspond to single phase flow and micro-bubbles injected two phase flow. The wavelet energy spectrums demonstrate that the wavenumber (eddy size) content of the velocity signals is not only space-dependent but also micro-bubbles can impact the eddy size content. Visual observations of the wavelet energy spectrum spatial distribution was realized by using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurement technique. The two phase flow condition corresponds to a drag reduction of 38.4% with void fraction of 4.9%. The present results provide evidence that micro-bubbles in the boundary layer of a turbulent channel flow can help adjust the eddy size distributions near the wall. This can assist in explaining that micro-bubbles are performing as buffers to keep the energy of fluid particles going in stream-wise direction and reducing the energy of fluid particles going in normal direction. (authors)

  8. The puzzle of the ankle in the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum, and composition indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Glennys

    2015-08-01

    The sharp change in slope of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray spectrum around 10^18.6 eV (the ankle), combined with evidence of a light but extragalactic component near and below the ankle and intermediate composition above, has proved exceedingly challenging to understand theoretically. In this talk I discuss two possible solutions to the puzzle and how they can be (in)validated.First, I present a new mechanism whereby photo-disintegration of ultra-high energy nuclei in the region surrounding a UHECR accelerator naturally accounts for the observed spectrum and inferred composition (using LHC-tuned models extrapolated to UHE) at Earth. We discuss the conditions required to reproduce the spectrum above 10^17.5 eV and the composition, which -- in our model -- consists below the ankle of extragalactic protons and the high energy tail of Galactic Cosmic Rays, and above the ankle of surviving nuclei from the extended source. Predictions for the spectrum and flavors of neutrinos resulting from this process will be presented, and also implications for candidate sources.The other possible explanation is that in actuality UHECRs are entirely or almost entirely protons, and the cross-section for p-Air scattering increases more rapidly above center-of-mass energy of 70 TeV (10 times the current LHC cm energy) than predicted in conventional models. This gives an equally good fit to the depth-of-shower maximum behavior obverved by Auger, while being an intriguing sign of new state in QCD at extremely high energy density.

  9. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijay, Biplab; Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-09-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  10. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  11. Dimmable sunlight-like organic light emitting diodes with ultra-high color rendering index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin-Han; Chi, Chien-An; Chiang, Chang-Lin; Chen, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yi-Ping; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Ho, Shu-Yi; Chen, Shih-Pu; Li, Jung-Yu

    2016-05-01

    We propose novel dimmable sunlight-like white organic light-emitting diodes that were fabricated using three luminophores to form an emitting spectrum similar to black body radiation at 2250 K with ultra-high color rendering index (CRI) value of 91, which nearly remained the constant at various luminance values ranging from 100 to more than 2500 cd/m2 at Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.51, 0.41). Introducing charge modification layers suppressed the energy transfer between the emitting material layers and increased the probability of carrier recombination. Moreover, we reveal that covering long-wavelength ranges played a vital role in achieving high CRI values; the CRI values of a spectrum artificially shifted toward a long-wavelength direction (from 610 to 620 nm) remained constant, whereas those of a spectrum shifted toward a short-wavelength direction (from 610 to 600 nm) dropped to 79.

  12. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-07-02

    We performed a neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In order to investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ~90–~800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the hardness and microstructure changes exhibitedmore » a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Finally, irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.« less

  13. Diffuse gamma radiation. [intensity, energy spectrum and spatial distribution from SAS 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma radiation detected by SAS 2 away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV. The gamma-ray data are compared with relevant data obtained at other wavelengths, including 21-cm emission, radio continuum radiation, and the limited UV and radio information on local molecular hydrogen. It is found that there are two quite distinct components to the diffuse radiation, one of which shows a good correlation with the galactic matter distribution and continuum radiation, while the other has a much steeper energy spectrum and appears to be isotropic at least on a coarse scale. The galactic component is interpreted in terms of its implications for both local and more distant regions of the Galaxy. The apparently isotropic radiation is discussed partly with regard to the constraints placed on possible models by the steep energy spectrum, the observed intensity, and an upper limit on the anisotropy.

  14. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrati, R.; Attallah, R.

    2014-04-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥ 10 GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data.

  15. Energy transfer from Sm3+ to Eu3+ in red-emitting phosphor LaMgAl11O19:Sm3+, Eu3+ for solar cells and near-ultraviolet white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Min, Xin; Huang, Zhaohui; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan-Gai; Tang, Chao; Wu, Xiaowen

    2014-06-16

    The red-emitting phosphor LaMgAl11O19:Sm(3+), Eu(3+) was prepared by solid-state reaction at 1600 °C for 4 h. The phase formation, luminescence properties, and energy transfer from Sm(3+) to Eu(3+) were studied. With the addition of 5 mol % Sm(3+) as the sensitizer, the excitation wavelength of LaMgAl11O19:Eu(3+) phosphor was extended from 464 to 403 nm, and the emission intensity under the excitation at 403 nm was also enhanced. The host material LaMgAl11O19 could contain the high doping content of Eu(3+) (20 mol %) without concentration quenching. This energy transfer from Sm(3+) to Eu(3+) was confirmed by the decay times of energy donor Sm(3+). The mechanism of energy transfer (Sm(3+) → Eu(3+)) was proved to be quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. Under the 403 nm excitation at 150 °C, the emission intensities of the characteristic peaks of Sm(3+) and Eu(3+) in LaMgAl11O19:0.05Sm(3+), 0.2Eu(3+) phosphor were decreased to 65% and 56% of the initial intensities at room temperature, and the relatively high activation energy proved that this phosphor had a good thermal stability. The CIE coordinate was calculated to be (x = 0.601, y = 0.390). The LaMgAl11O19:0.05Sm(3+), 0.2Eu(3+) phosphor is a candidate for copper phthalocyanine-based solar cells and white light-emitting diodes. PMID:24884208

  16. Cosmic ray energy spectrum around the knee obtained by the Tibet Experiment and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayose, Yusaku

    The measurement of the energy spectrum and the chemical composition of cosmic rays at the 'Knee' energy region have been made in the Tibet-AS experiment since 1990. The 1st phase of the Tibet hybrid experiment(1996-1999) consisted of Tibet II air-shower array(AS), Emulsion Chamber(EC) and burst detector(BD). The EC was used to detect high energy-gamma-families of the energy greater than 20 TeV at the core of ASs of which more than 80% are induced by light nuclei like protons or helium. Due to the high spatial resolution of the EC, proton and helium events were separated from others and we obtained the energy spectrum of each of them using 177 family events. We also obtained all-particle energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays in a wide range from 1014 eV to 1017 eV by the Tibet-III air-shower array. The size spectrum exhibits a sharp knee at a corresponding primary energy around 4 PeV. These results strongly indicated that the fraction of the light component to the all particle spectrum is decreasing around the knee.The observation of the AS core has been continued with upgraded Tibet III array and burst detectors without using X-ray films, which still works as the selector for the air showers induced by light component (pHe). This second phase experiment shows that the dominance of the heavy elements at the knee reported by the first phase experiment is confirmed with higher statistics by one order.Our results suggest that the main component at the knee is heavy elements (heavier than helium) because of the low intensities of observed proton and helium fluxes, whose summed flux are less than 30% of all particles. A new air-shower-core detector(YAC) will be added to the Tibet AS array to explicitly measure the heavy elements around the knee and beyond. In this paper, the results of composition study with the Tibet experiment are summarized and the prospects for the next phase experiment are described.

  17. NEW OPTICAL/ULTRAVIOLET COUNTERPARTS AND THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF NEARBY, THERMALLY EMITTING, ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D. L.; Kamble, A.; Van Kerkwijk, M. H.; Ho, W. C. G. E-mail: kamble@uwm.edu E-mail: wynnho@slac.stanford.edu

    2011-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope optical and ultraviolet photometry for five nearby, thermally emitting neutron stars. With these measurements, all seven such objects have confirmed optical and ultraviolet counterparts. Combining our data with archival space-based photometry, we present spectral energy distributions for all sources and measure the 'optical excess': the factor by which the measured photometry exceeds that extrapolated from X-ray spectra. We find that the majority have optical and ultraviolet fluxes that are inconsistent with that expected from thermal (Rayleigh-Jeans) emission, exhibiting more flux at longer wavelengths. We also find that most objects have optical excesses between 5 and 12, but that one object (RX J2143.0+0654) exceeds the X-ray extrapolation by a factor of more than 50 at 5000 A, and that this is robust to uncertainties in the X-ray spectra and absorption. We consider explanations for this ranging from atmospheric effects, magnetospheric emission, and resonant scattering, but find that none is satisfactory.

  18. Electron energy spectrum in cylindrical quantum dots and rods: approximation of separation of variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedzinskas, R.; Karpus, V.; Čechavičius, B.; Kavaliauskas, J.; Valušis, G.

    2015-06-01

    A simple analytical method for electron energy spectrum calculations of cylindrical quantum dots (QDs) and quantum rods (QRs) is presented. The method is based on a replacement of an actual QD or QR hamiltonian with an approximate one, which allows for a separation of variables. Though this approach is known in the literature, it is essentially expanded in the present paper by taking into account a discontinuity of the effective mass, which is of importance in actual semiconductor heterostructures, e.g., InGaAs QDs or QRs embedded in GaAs matrix. Several examples of InGaAs QDs and QRs are considered—their energy spectrum calculations show that the suggested method yields reliable results both for the ground and excited states. The proposed analytical model is verified by numerical calculations, results of which coincide with an accuracy of ∼1 meV.

  19. The energy spectrum and geometrical structure of Galactic turbulent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Gaensler, Bryan; Mcclure-Griffiths, Naomi; Purcell, Cormac; Hill, Alex; Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, Alex

    2012-04-01

    The energy spectrum and geometrical structure of the turbulent magnetic field can offer a solid test of different theoretical models on the generation and evolution of Galactic magnetic fields. They are also pivotal to understanding the propagation of cosmic-ray particles. However, the energy spectrum has been difficult to determine and the geometrical structure has never been obtained so far, due to lack of proper methods and observations. We aim to infer these quantities by applying our newly developed techniques to polarisation images. These images are required to be observed with high angular resolution and broadband multi-channel polarimetry, which is possible only recently using the ATCA. As a pilot study, we plan to map the 2X2 degree high-latitude field centred at l=255.5 degree and b=-38 degree at 1.1-3.1 GHz in total intensity and polarisation.

  20. The energy spectrum and geometrical structure of Galactic turbulent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Gaensler, Bryan; Mcclure-Griffiths, Naomi; Purcell, Cormac; Hill, Alex; Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, Alex

    2012-10-01

    The energy spectrum and geometrical structure of the turbulent magnetic field can offer a solid test of different theoretical models on the generation and evolution of Galactic magnetic fields. They are also pivotal to understanding the propagation of cosmic-ray particles. However, the energy spectrum has been difficult to determine and the geometrical structure has never been obtained so far, due to lack of proper methods and observations. We aim to infer these quantities by applying our newly developed techniques to polarisation images. These images are required to be observed with high angular resolution and broadband multi-channel polarimetry, which is possible only recently using the ATCA. As a pilot study, we plan to map the 2X2 degree high-latitude field centred at l=255.5 degree and b=-38 degree at 1.1-3.1 GHz in total intensity and polarisation.

  1. Measurements of the spectrum of galactic electrons at very high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, D.

    1974-01-01

    A counter telescope has been exposed in three balloon flights in 1970 to measure the flux and energy spectrum of cosmic ray electrons between 10 and 1000 GeV. This instrument has been modified by incorporating a large area CsI crystal as well as highly efficient time of flight circuitry, and was flown again twice during 1972. The methods of data analysis are based on extensive accelerator calibrations at SLAC. The resulting electron spectrum fits well to a single power law with an index (gamma) equal to 2.66 over the whole energy region. No obvious steepening can be observed, although statistical uncertainties prohibit definite claims beyond 250 GeV.

  2. The hybrid energy spectrum of Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and surface array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M. G.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-08-01

    The Telescope Array experiment studies ultra high energy cosmic rays using a hybrid detector. Fluorescence telescopes measure the longitudinal development of the extensive air shower generated when a primary cosmic ray particle interacts with the atmosphere. Meanwhile, scintillator detectors measure the lateral distribution of secondary shower particles that hit the ground. The Middle Drum (MD) fluorescence telescope station consists of 14 telescopes from the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiment, providing a direct link back to the HiRes measurements. Using the scintillator detector data in conjunction with the telescope data improves the geometrical reconstruction of the showers significantly, and hence, provides a more accurate reconstruction of the energy of the primary particle. The Middle Drum hybrid spectrum is presented and compared to that measured by the Middle Drum station in monocular mode. Further, the hybrid data establishes a link between the Middle Drum data and the surface array. A comparison between the Middle Drum hybrid energy spectrum and scintillator Surface Detector (SD) spectrum is also shown.

  3. The Spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Constraints on Lorentz Invariance Violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2008-01-01

    There has been much interest in possible violations of Lorentz invariance, particularly motivated by quantum gravity theories. It has been suggested that a small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) could turn off photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with photons of the cosmic background radiation and thereby eliminate the resulting sharp steepening in the spectrum of the highest energy CRs predicted by Greisen Zatsepin and Kuzmin (GZK). Recent measurements of the UHECR spectrum reported by the HiRes and Auger collaborations, however, indicate the presence of the GZK effect. We present the results of a detailed calculation of the modification of the UHECR spectrum caused by LIV using the formalism of Coleman and Glashow. We then use a chi-squared analysis to compare our results with the experimental UHECR data and thereby place limits on the amount of LIV. We also discuss how a small amount of LIV that is consistent with the experimental data can still lead to a recovery of the cosmic ray flux at higher energies than presently observed.

  4. Peculiarities of the electron energy spectrum in the Coulomb field of a superheavy nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, B. L.; Gitman, D. M.; Levin, A. D.; Ferreira, R.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the peculiarities of the electron energy spectrum in the Coulomb field of a superheavy nucleus and discuss the long history of an incorrect interpretation of this problem in the case of a pointlike nucleus and its current correct solution. We consider the spectral problem in the case of a regularized Coulomb potential. For some special regularizations, we derive an exact equation for the point spectrum in the energy interval (-m,m) and find some of its solutions numerically. We also derive an exact equation for charges yielding bound states with the energy E = -m; some call them supercritical charges. We show the existence of an infinite number of such charges. Their existence does not mean that the oneparticle relativistic quantum mechanics based on the Dirac Hamiltonian with the Coulomb field of such charges is mathematically inconsistent, although it is physically unacceptable because the spectrum of the Hamiltonian is unbounded from below. The question of constructing a consistent nonperturbative second-quantized theory remains open, and the consequences of the existence of supercritical charges from the standpoint of the possibility of constructing such a theory also remain unclear.

  5. The spectrum of cosmic electron with energies between 6 and 100 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Earl, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    This experiment was carried out during three balloon flights which provided a total exposure of 3500 + or - 60 sq m sec sterad at an average depth of 4.8 g/sq cm The detector, in which the development of cascade showers in a 33.7 rl absorber was sampled by 10 scintillation counters and 216 Geiger-Muller tubes, was calibrated at the Cornell Electron Synchrotron, the separation of cosmic electrons from the nuclear background was confirmed by extensive analysis of data from the flights, from the calibration and from ground level exposure. The spectral intensity of primary cosmic ray electrons were found in particles/sq m sec sterad GeV. Similarly, the ground level spectrum of secondary cosmic ray electrons was also found. The steepness of the spectrum of cosmic electrons relative to that of nuclei implies one of the following conclusions: either the injection spectrum of electrons is steeper than that of nuclei, or the electron spectrum has been steepened by Compton/synchrotron losses in the energy range covered by the experiment.

  6. Study of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays: EAS size fluctuations at a fixed primary energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashpulatov, R.; Khristiansen, G. B.; Allev, N.; Alimov, T.; Kakhharov, N.; Khakimov, K.; Rakhimova, N.

    1985-01-01

    During the initial period of the Samarkand EAS array operations the showers were selected on the basis of charged-particle flux density, and during the subsequent periods the showers were selected on the basis of Cerenkov light flux density. This procedure made it possible to measure the shower energy, to estimate the EAS size fluctuations at a fixed primary energy, and to experimentally obtain the scaling factor K(Ne, Eo) from the EAS size spectrum to the primary energy spectrum. Six scintillators of area S = 2 sq m each were added to the array. The fluctuations of EAS sizes in the showers of fixed primary energies and the scaling factors K(Ne, Eo) were inferred from the data obtained. The showers with zenith angles 30 deg were selected. The EAS axis positions were inferred from the amplitude data of the scintillators. The primary energy Eo was determined by the method of least squares for the known EAS axis position using the data of the Cerenkov detector located at 80 to 150 m EAS axis. It is shown that the Cerenkov light flux fluctuations at 100 m from EAS axis, q sub 100, do not exceed 10% at a fixed EAS energy, so the parameter q sub 100 may be used to estimate the EAS-generating primary particle-energy.

  7. THE COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRUM OBSERVED WITH THE SURFACE DETECTOR OF THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W.; Aida, R.; Azuma, R.; Fukuda, T.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, E. J.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; and others

    2013-05-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with primary energies above 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV. This measurement is based upon four years of observation by the surface detector component of TA. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV and a steepening at 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. We present the results of a technique, new to the analysis of UHECR surface detector data, that involves generating a complete simulation of UHECRs striking the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the ''thinning'' approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

  8. Energy spectrum and Landau levels in bilayer graphene with spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireles, Francisco; Schliemann, John

    2012-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of the band structure and Landau levels in bilayer graphene at low energies in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and Rashba spin-orbit interaction in the regime of negligible trigonal distortion. Within an effective low-energy approach the (Löwdin partitioning theory), we derive an effective Hamiltonian for bilayer graphene that incorporates the influence of the Zeeman effect, the Rashba spin-orbit interaction and, inclusively, the role of the intrinsic spin-orbit interaction on the same footing. Particular attention is paid to the energy spectrum and Landau levels. Our modeling unveils the strong influence of the Rashba coupling λR in the spin splitting of the electron and hole bands. Graphene bilayers with weak Rashba spin-orbit interaction show a spin splitting linear in momentum and proportional to λR, but scaling inversely proportional to the interlayer hopping energy γ1. However, at robust spin-orbit coupling λR, the energy spectrum shows a strong warping behavior near the Dirac points. We find that the bias-induced gap in bilayer graphene decreases with increasing Rashba coupling, a behavior resembling a topological insulator transition. We further predict an unexpected asymmetric spin splitting and crossings of the Landau levels due to the interplay between the Rashba interaction and the external bias voltage. Our results are of relevance for interpreting magnetotransport and infrared cyclotron resonance measurements, including situations of comparatively weak spin-orbit coupling.

  9. Measurements of the energy spectrum of electrons emanating from solid materials irradiated by a picosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, C. A. Kuranz, C. C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Rasmus, A. M.; Wan, W. C.; Joglekar, A. S.; McKelvey, A.; Zhao, Z.; Klein, S. R.; Seely, J. F.; Williams, G. J.; Park, J.; Chen, H.; Kemp, G. E.; MacDonald, M. J.; Pereira, N. R.; Jarrott, L. C.; Peebles, J.; and others

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we present the results of experiments observing the properties of the electron stream generated laterally when a laser irradiates a metal. We find that the directionality of the electrons is dependent upon their energies, with the higher-energy tail of the spectrum (∼1 MeV and higher) being more narrowly focused. This behavior is likely due to the coupling of the electrons to the electric field of the laser. The experiments are performed by using the Titan laser to irradiate a metal wire, creating the electron stream of interest. These electrons propagate to nearby spectator wires of differing metals, causing them to fluoresce at their characteristic K-shell energies. This fluorescence is recorded by a crystal spectrometer. By varying the distances between the wires, we are able to probe the divergence of the electron stream, while by varying the medium through which the electrons propagate (and hence the energy-dependence of electron attenuation), we are able to probe the energy spectrum of the stream.

  10. A Monte Carlo study of reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum of a carbon contaminated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Da, B.; Li, Z. Y.; Chang, H. C.; Ding, Z. J.; Mao, S. F.

    2014-09-28

    It has been experimentally found that the carbon surface contamination influences strongly the spectrum signals in reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) especially at low primary electron energy. However, there is still little theoretical work dealing with the carbon contamination effect in REELS. Such a work is required to predict REELS spectrum for layered structural sample, providing an understanding of the experimental phenomena observed. In this study, we present a numerical calculation result on the spatially varying differential inelastic mean free path for a sample made of a carbon contamination layer of varied thickness on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. A Monte Carlo simulation model for electron interaction with a layered structural sample is built by combining this inelastic scattering cross-section with the Mott's cross-section for electron elastic scattering. The simulation results have clearly shown that the contribution of the electron energy loss from carbon surface contamination increases with decreasing primary energy due to increased individual scattering processes along trajectory parts carbon contamination layer. Comparison of the simulated spectra for different thicknesses of the carbon contamination layer and for different primary electron energies with experimental spectra clearly identifies that the carbon contamination in the measured sample was in the form of discontinuous islands other than the uniform film.

  11. Advantages of Real-Time Spectrum Analyzers in High-Energy Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Louis

    2004-11-10

    Typically, particles are injected into the ring at low energy levels and then 'ramped up' to higher levels. During ramping, it is important that the horizontal and vertical tune frequencies do not shift, lest they hit upon a resonant combination that causes beam instability or sudden total loss of ring beam current (beam blow up). Beam instabilities can be caused by a number of factors. Non-linearities and/or different response times of independent controls such as beam position monitor (BPM) cables and circuits, magnets for guidance and focusing of the beam, Klystrons or Tetrodes (which provide power to RF cavities that transmit energy to the beam), and vacuum pumps and monitors can all cause beam instabilities. Vibrations and lack of proper shielding are other factors. The challenge for operators and researchers is to correctly identify the factors causing beam instabilities and blow up so that costly accelerator time is not interrupted and experimental results are not compromised. The instrument often used to identify problems in particle accelerator applications is the spectrum analyzer. This paper will discuss the advantages of real time spectrum analyzers (RSA) versus swept frequency spectrum analyzers in HEP applications. The main focus will be on monitoring beam position and stability, especially during ramp-up. Also covered will be use of RSA for chromaticity measurements, Phase Locked Loop (PLL) diagnostics, and vibration analysis.

  12. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1987-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  13. Advantages of Real-Time Spectrum Analyzers in High-Energy Physics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Louis

    2004-11-01

    Typically, particles are injected into the ring at low energy levels and then "ramped up" to higher levels. During ramping, it is important that the horizontal and vertical tune frequencies do not shift, lest they hit upon a resonant combination that causes beam instability or sudden total loss of ring beam current (beam blow up). Beam instabilities can be caused by a number of factors. Non-linearities and/or different response times of independent controls such as beam position monitor (BPM) cables and circuits, magnets for guidance and focusing of the beam, Klystrons or Tetrodes (which provide power to RF cavities that transmit energy to the beam), and vacuum pumps and monitors can all cause beam instabilities. Vibrations and lack of proper shielding are other factors. The challenge for operators and researchers is to correctly identify the factors causing beam instabilities and blow up so that costly accelerator time is not interrupted and experimental results are not compromised. The instrument often used to identify problems in particle accelerator applications is the spectrum analyzer. This paper will discuss the advantages of real time spectrum analyzers (RSA) versus swept frequency spectrum analyzers in HEP applications. The main focus will be on monitoring beam position and stability, especially during ramp-up. Also covered will be use of RSA for chromaticity measurements, Phase Locked Loop (PLL) diagnostics, and vibration analysis.

  14. Measurement of the UHECR Energy Spectrum by the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, Thomas; Bergman, Douglas

    2013-04-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), subatomic charged particles of extraterrestrial origin and with kinetic energies near or exceeding 10^18 eV, are very rare. The Telescope Array (TA) experiment in western Utah is the northern hemisphere's largest UHECR detector, and consists of three atmospheric fluorescence detectors (FDs) and a ground array of 507 scintillator detectors. In stand-alone ``monocular'' operation, the FDs can observe the widest range in primary UHECR energies. One FD employs refurbished hardware from the High-Resolution Fly's Eye experiment; the remaining two FDs were designed for TA and employ new hardware and analysis. We will present the UHECR energy spectrum measured by the FDs in monocular mode using data collected during the first four years of operation.

  15. Primary Energy Spectrum as Reconstructed from S(500) Measurements by KASCADE-Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, G.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2010-01-01

    In cosmic ray investigations by observations of extensive air showers (EAS) the general question arises how to relate the registered EAS observables to the energy of the primary particle from the cosmos entering into the atmosphere. We present results on the reconstruction of the primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays from the experimentally recorded S(500) observable using the KASCADE-Grande detector array. The KASCADE-Grande experiment is installed in Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, and driven by an international collaboration. Previous EAS investigations have shown that for a fixed energy the charged particle density becomes independent of the primary mass at certain distances from the shower core. This feature can be used as an estimator for the primary energy. The particular radial distance from the shower core where this effect shows up is a characteristic of the detector. For the KASCADE-Grande experiment it was shown to be around 500 m, hence a notation S(500). Extensive simulation studies have shown that S(500) is mapping the primary energy. The constant intensity cut (CIC) method is applied to evaluate the attenuation of the S(500) observable with the zenith angle. An attenuation correction is applied and all recorded S(500) values are corrected for attenuation. A calibration of S(500) values with the primary energy has been worked out by simulations and was used for conversion providing the possibility to obtain the primary energy spectrum (in the energy range accessible to KASCADE-Grande 1010-1018 eV). The systematic uncertainties induced by different factors are considered.

  16. SPECTRUM AND ENERGY LEVELS OF Pr{sup 3+} IN ThBr{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J. G.; Krupa, J. C.; Delamoye, P.; Genet, M.

    1980-06-01

    The strong features in the absorption spectrum and the laser excited fluorescence spectrum have been interpreted as arising from levels of Pr{sup 3+} in the D{sub 2d} symmetry site of ThBr{sub 4} . 43 energy levels have been fitted to the parameters with an RMS deviation of 61 cm{sup -1}. The values of the crystal field parameters are. B{sub 0}{sup 2} = 260.0 cm {sup -1}, B{sub 0}{sup 4} = - 644.2 cm{sup -1}, B{sub 4}{sup 4} = 929.2 cm{sup -1}, B{sub 0}{sup 6} = 1089.0 cm{sup -1} and B{sub 4}{sup 6} = 240.6 cm{sup -1}. The presence of other crystal symmetry sites is observed.

  17. Using light emitted clusters as a probe of the symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngs, Michael David

    The symmetry energy, and more specifically its density dependence, has been studied for quite some time from both a theoretical and experimental approach. In order to sufficiently constrain the symmetry energy, we need to experimentally measure observables sensitive to the symmetry energy within a reasonable uncertainty and compare those results to those of simulations of the same nuclear reactions. This dissertation aims to achieve both experimental measurements and compare them to the results of studies using the pBUU transport code. These studies using pBUU aim to find the sensitivity of different observables to different transport variables as well as the symmetry energy itself. Some of the predominant variables that have been investigated in this dissertation are the in-medium cross section between nucleons as well as the effect of cluster production. The specific observables upon which we report are the center of mass spectra of protons, neutrons, deuterons, tritons and finally 3He. In addition we investigate the n/p and t/3He single and double ratios which have been suggested as being sensitive to the symmetry energy. As an added check we also study the coalescence invariant n/p spectra and ratios. We also include a study of spectra for all charged particles up through mass A=4 emitted from reactions of 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn at both 50 and 120 MeV/A. The experiment to measure these reactions used the Large Area Silicon Strip Array to detect the charged particles and the MSU Miniball to detect charge particle multiplicity in order to select central collisions. Neutrons were also measured in this experiment using the Large Area Neutron Array along with two thin scintillators used as a start timer for the neutron walls and a charge particle veto to discern contamination in the neutron walls. The neutron analyses are not extensively reported in this dissertation as they were the focus of the dissertation of Daniel Coupland [1]. Finally, another

  18. Light-emitting device with organic electroluminescent material and photoluminescent materials

    DOEpatents

    McNulty, Thomas Francis; Duggal, Anil Raj; Turner, Larry Gene; Shiang, Joseph John

    2005-06-07

    A light-emitting device comprises a light-emitting member, which comprises two electrodes and an organic electroluminescent material disposed between the electrodes, and at least one organic photoluminescent ("PL") material. The light-emitting member emits light having a first spectrum in response to a voltage applied across the two electrodes. The organic PL material absorbs a portion of the light emitted by the light-emitting member and emits light having second spectrum different than the first spectrum. The light-emitting device can include an inorganic PL material that absorbs another portion of the light emitted from the light-emitting member and emits light having a third spectrum different than both the first and the second spectra.

  19. Monocular measurement of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Priti Dhanesh

    The Telescope Array Project was designed to observe cosmic rays with energies greater than 1018 eV. Its goals are to study the physics of cosmic rays by measuring their anisotropy, composition, and energy spectrum. This work makes a monocular measurement of the ultra high energy cosmic ray spectrum and analyzes the physics produced from that spectrum. The flux of cosmic rays observed on Earth follows a power law over 12 decades in energy and 32 decades in flux. At the highest energies, the spectrum has detailed structure. Studying these features can tell us about the astrophysics of the production and propagation of cosmic rays. First, it can tell us about the sources of cosmic rays such as they capable of producing a power law spectrum and the maximum energy of cosmic rays that they can produce. Second, the acceleration mechanisms that can boost cosmic rays to ultra high energies can be studied. Third, the spectral features themselves can tell us about their possible cause for formation. For example, the ankle feature in the ultra high energy regime can tell us if it is the galactic-extragalactic transition or if it is due to e+e- pair production. Fourth, the energy losses that cosmic rays incur can tell us about their physical interactions during propagation. Studying the physics of the cosmic ray spectrum in the ultra high energy regime with data from the Telescope Array Project is the goal of this analysis. The Telescope Array Project consists of three fluorescence detectors overlooking an array of 507 scintillation surface detectors. Due to their extremely low flux at these energies, cosmic rays can only be observed indirectly via an extensive air shower produced when they collide with the nucleus of an atom in the Earth's atmosphere. These charged secondary particles produce fluorescence light. The array of surface detectors observes the lateral footprint of the extensive air shower when it reaches the ground. The fluorescence detectors observe the

  20. Single-phased white-light-emitting Ca₄(PO₄)₂O:Ce³⁺,Eu²⁺ phosphors based on energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yonglei; Pang, Ran; Li, Haifeng; Sun, Wenzhi; Fu, Jipeng; Jiang, Lihong; Zhang, Su; Su, Qiang; Li, Chengyu; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2015-07-01

    A novel single-composition Ca4(PO4)2O:Ce(3+),Eu(2+) phosphor emitting white light was synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction for light-emitting diode applications. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence spectra, and luminescence decay spectra were used to characterize the samples. Energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Eu(2+) ions was observed in the co-doped samples, and the transfer mechanism in the Ca4(PO4)2O:Ce(3+),Eu(2+) phosphors was dipole-dipole interaction. The emission hue of Ca4(PO4)2O:Ce(3+),Eu(2+) was found to vary from blue (0.165, 0.188) to white (0.332, 0.300) and eventually to orange (0.519, 0.366) by precisely controlling the ratio of Ce(3+) to Eu(2+). The combination of a 380 nm near-ultraviolet chip with a Ca4(PO4)2O:0.02Ce(3+),0.012Eu(2+) phosphor produced a diode emitting white light with ultra-wideband emission and a correlated color temperature of 4124 K. Overall, results indicated that the prepared samples may be potentially applied in white-light-emitting diodes. PMID:26017804

  1. Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Das, Rupak K.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Ouhib, Zoubir; Rivard, Mark J.; Sloboda, Ron S.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) on dose calculations for high-energy (average energy higher than 50 keV) photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are presented, including the physical characteristics of specific {sup 192}Ir, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 60}Co source models. Methods: This report has been prepared by the High Energy Brachytherapy Source Dosimetry (HEBD) Working Group. This report includes considerations in the application of the TG-43U1 formalism to high-energy photon-emitting sources with particular attention to phantom size effects, interpolation accuracy dependence on dose calculation grid size, and dosimetry parameter dependence on source active length. Results: Consensus datasets for commercially available high-energy photon sources are provided, along with recommended methods for evaluating these datasets. Recommendations on dosimetry characterization methods, mainly using experimental procedures and Monte Carlo, are established and discussed. Also included are methodological recommendations on detector choice, detector energy response characterization and phantom materials, and measurement specification methodology. Uncertainty analyses are discussed and recommendations for high-energy sources without consensus datasets are given. Conclusions: Recommended consensus datasets for high-energy sources have been derived for sources that were commercially available as of January 2010. Data are presented according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism, with modified interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the AAPM TG-43U1S1 report for the 2D anisotropy function and radial dose function.

  2. Accelerator measurement of the energy spectra of neutrons emitted in the interaction of 3-GeV protons with several elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalesnik, W. J.; Devlin, T. J.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The application of time of flight techniques for determining the shapes of the energy spectra of neutrons between 20 and 400 MeV is discussed. The neutrons are emitted at 20, 34, and 90 degrees in the bombardment of targets by 3 GeV protons. The targets used are carbon, aluminum, cobalt, and platinum with cylindrical cross section. Targets being bombarded are located in the internal circulating beam of a particle accelerator.

  3. Inclusive spectra of protons emitted in interactions between /sup 3/He nuclei of energy 4. 9 GeV per nucleon and C, Cu, and Pb nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ad'yasevich, B.P.; Antonenko, V.G.; Vinogradov, A.A.; Grigor'yan, Y.I.; Ippolitov, M.S.; Karadzhev, K.V.; Lebedev, A.L.; Man'ko, V.I.; Nikolaev, S.A.; Polunin, Y.P.; and others

    1987-02-01

    We have measured inclusive spectra of protons emitted in interactions between /sup 3/He nuclei of energy 4.9 GeV per nucleon and C, Cu, and Pb nuclei. Data are presented on the invariant cross sections for proton yield in the range of emission angles from 20/sup 0/ to 150/sup 0/ for the momentum interval 350--850 MeV/c. The data obtained are analyzed.

  4. Reconstruction of the Primary Energy Spectrum from Fluorescence Telescope Data of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, H.

    2007-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is the largest extensive air-shower (EAS) experiment in operation. It is still being constructed, and the final configuration will have detectors at the two sites Argentina and USA observing both celestial hemispheres. The aim of the experiment is to determine the energy, composition and origin of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) using two complementary detection techniques. The detector at the southern site presently contains more than 1400 (Jul. 2007) water-Cherenkov detectors at ground level (870 gcm^-2). Completion of the 3000 km^2 large detector array is expected by the end of 2007 with finally more than 1600 tanks. The atmosphere above the site is observed by 24 fluorescence telescopes located in four buildings at the boundary of the array. During clear moon-less nights, this configuration permits hybrid measurement of both longitudinal development of an EAS and lateral particle density at ground. All fluorescence telescopes are fully operational since February 2007. The aim of this work is to reconstruct the cosmic ray energy spectrum between a few 10^17 eV up to 10^20 eV. This would provide an overlap to spectral results from other experiments at lower energies. The hybrid detection provides an accurate geometry determination and thereby a good energy resolution. However, the energy threshold is limited to the threshold of the surface array: larger than a few 10^18 eV. The advantage of FD-monocular events (FD-mono) is a lower energy threshold in the aimed 10^17 eV regime. In addition, the present FD-mono exposure is about 1.5 times larger than the hybrid one. However, the energy resolution of FD-mono events is worse compared to hybrid, and the detector acceptance is strongly energy dependent. Therefore, the determination of the energy spectrum requires an unfolding procedure, which considers both the limited acceptance and the limited resolution. In this analysis the FD-mono data are reconstructed. The reconstruction

  5. Highly Emitting Near-Infrared Lanthanide “Encapsulated Sandwich” Metallacrown Complexes with Excitation Shifted Toward Lower Energy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent lanthanide complexes hold great promise for practical applications, as their optical properties have several complementary advantages over organic fluorophores and semiconductor nanoparticles. The fundamental challenge for lanthanide luminescence is their sensitization through suitable chromophores. The use of the metallacrown (MC) motif is an innovative strategy to arrange several organic sensitizers at a well-controlled distance from a lanthanide cation. Herein we report a series of lanthanide “encapsulated sandwich” MC complexes of the form Ln3+[12-MCZn(II),quinHA-4]2[24-MCZn(II),quinHA-8] (Ln3+[Zn(II)MCquinHA]) in which the MC framework is formed by the self-assembly of Zn2+ ions and tetradentate chromophoric ligands based on quinaldichydroxamic acid (quinHA). A first-generation of luminescent MCs was presented previously but was limited due to excitation wavelengths in the UV. We report here that through the design of the chromophore of the MC assembly, we have significantly shifted the absorption wavelength toward lower energy (450 nm). In addition to this near-visible inter- and/or intraligand charge transfer absorption, Ln3+[Zn(II)MCquinHA] exhibits remarkably high quantum yields, long luminescence lifetimes (CD3OD; Yb3+, QLnL = 2.88(2)%, τobs = 150.7(2) μs; Nd3+, QLnL = 1.35(1)%, τobs = 4.11(3) μs; Er3+, QLnL = 3.60(6)·10–2%, τobs = 11.40(3) μs), and excellent photostability. Quantum yields of Nd3+ and Er3+ MCs in the solid state and in deuterated solvents, upon excitation at low energy, are the highest values among NIR-emitting lanthanide complexes containing C–H bonds. The versatility of the MC strategy allows modifications in the excitation wavelength and absorptivity through the appropriate design of the ligand sensitizer, providing a highly efficient platform with tunable properties. PMID:24432702

  6. LDEF (Postflight), M0002-01 : Trapped-Proton Energy Spectrum Determination, Tray G12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The postflight photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC after the experiment tray was removed from the LDEF. The Trapped Proton Energy Spectrum Determination Experiment is one of four experiments located in a three (3) inch deep LDEF end center tray. Additional Trapped Proton Energy Experiments are located in periph eral LDEF integrated experiment trays in the D03 and D09 tray locations. The Trapped Proton Energy experiment, located in the upper left quadrant of the integrated tray, appears to be intact with no apparent physical damage. The brown discoloration appears to be much lighter in this photograph than in the flight photograph, however, the postflight photograph of the individual experiment verifies the darker discoloration in the flight photograph. The light ing angle and intensity appear to have washed out the colors in the upper half of the integrated tray. The sub experiments appear to be intact and secure.

  7. Classification of vibrational resonances in the energy spectrum of the formaldehyde molecule and Katz's branch points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. D.; Duchko, A. N.

    2016-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory of high orders and the algebraic Padé-Hermite approximants are used to determine the singular points of a vibrational energy function of the formaldehyde molecule dependent on a complex perturbation parameter as on the argument. It is shown that the Fermi, Darling-Dennison, and other higher-order vibrational resonances are related to Katz's points—common branch points on the complex plane of the energy of two vibrational states. Analysis of Katz's points that connect different vibrational states allows one to reveal essential resonance perturbations, to introduce an additional classification for them, and to determine the polyad structure of an energy spectrum.

  8. Energy spectrum of iron nuclei measured inside the MIR space craft using CR-39 track detectors.

    PubMed

    Gunther, W; Leugner, D; Becker, E; Flesch, F; Heinrich, W; Huntrup, G; Reitz, G; Rocher, H; Streibel, T

    1999-06-01

    We have exposed stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors inside the MIR space craft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for almost 6 months. Over this long period a large number of tracks of high LET events was accumulated in the detector foils. The etching and measuring conditions for this experiment were optimized to detect tracks of stopping iron nuclei. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei inside the stack and identified their trajectories through the material of the experiment. Based on the energy-range relation the energy at the surface of the stack was determined. These particles allow the determination of the low energy part of the spectrum of iron nuclei behind shielding material inside the MIR station. PMID:12025843

  9. Spectrum splitting using multi-layer dielectric meta-surfaces for efficient solar energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuhan; Liu, He; Wu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    We designed a high-efficiency dispersive mirror based on multi-layer dielectric meta-surfaces. By replacing the secondary mirror of a dome solar concentrator with this dispersive mirror, the solar concentrator can be converted into a spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system with higher energy harvesting efficiency and potentially lower cost. The meta-surfaces are consisted of high-index contrast gratings (HCG). The structures and parameters of the dispersive mirror (i.e. stacked HCG) are optimized based on finite-difference time-domain and rigorous coupled-wave analysis method. Our numerical study shows that the dispersive mirror can direct light with different wavelengths into different angles in the entire solar spectrum, maintaining very low energy loss. Our approach will not only improve the energy harvesting efficiency, but also lower the cost by using single junction cells instead of multi-layer tandem solar cells. Moreover, this approach has the minimal disruption to the existing solar concentrator infrastructures.

  10. Calculation of quasiparticle energy spectrum of silicon using the correlated Hartree-Fock method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takamitsu; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Matsuzawa, Kazuya; Yasuhara, Hiroshi

    1999-06-01

    We present quasiparticle energy spectrum calculations of silicon using the correlated Hartree-Fock method proposed by Yasuhara and Takada [Phys. Rev. B 43, 7200 (1991)], in which the information on the effective mass of an electron liquid is included in the form of a nonlocal spin-parallel potential in addition to a local potential. The calculated band gaps of silicon are much improved, compared with the local density approximation values. The minimum indirect band gap is evaluated to be 1.37 eV.