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Sample records for energy transfer-based genetically

  1. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, X.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  2. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  3. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based stoichiometry in living cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Adam; Christensen, Kenneth; Swanson, Joel A

    2002-01-01

    Imaging of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescently labeled molecules can measure the timing and location of intermolecular interactions inside living cells. Present microscopic methods measure FRET in arbitrary units, and cannot discriminate FRET efficiency and the fractions of donor and acceptor in complex. Here we describe a stoichiometric method that uses three microscopic fluorescence images to measure FRET efficiency, the relative concentrations of donor and acceptor, and the fractions of donor and acceptor in complex in living cells. FRET stoichiometry derives from the concept that specific donor-acceptor complexes will give rise to a characteristic FRET efficiency, which, if measured, can allow stoichiometric discrimination of interacting components. A first equation determines FRET efficiency and the fraction of acceptor molecules in complex with donor. A second equation determines the fraction of donor molecules in complex by estimating the donor fluorescence lost due to energy transfer. This eliminates the need for acceptor photobleaching to determine total donor concentrations and allows for repeated measurements from the same cell. A third equation obtains the ratio of total acceptor to total donor molecules. The theory and method were confirmed by microscopic measurements of fluorescence from cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), citrine, and linked CFP-Citrine fusion protein, in solutions and inside cells. Together, the methods derived from these equations allow sensitive, rapid, and repeatable detection of donor-, acceptor-, and donor-acceptor complex stoichiometry at each pixel in an image. By accurately imaging molecular interactions, FRET stoichiometry opens new areas for quantitative study of intracellular molecular networks. PMID:12496132

  4. Chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer-based detection for microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shulin; Huang, Yong; Shi, Ming; Liu, Rongjun; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2010-03-01

    Since the channels in micro- and nanofluidic devices are extremely small, a sensitive detection is required following microchip electrophoresis (MCE). This work describes a highly sensitive and yet universal detection scheme based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) for MCE. It was found that an efficient CRET occurred between a luminol donor and a CdTe quantum dot (QD) acceptor in the luminol-NaBrO-QD system and that it was sensitively suppressed by the presence of certain organic compounds of biological interest including biogenic amines and thiols, amino acids, organic acids, and steroids. These findings allowed developing sensitive MCE-CL assays for the tested compounds. The proposed MCE-CL methods showed desired analytical figures of merit such as a wide concentration range of linear response. Detection limits obtained were approximately 10(-9) M for biogenic amines including dopamine and epinephrine and approximately 10(-8) M for biogenic thiols (e.g., glutathione and acetylcysteine), organic acids (i.e., ascorbic acid and uric acid), estrogens, and native amino acids. These were 10-1000 times more sensitive than those of previously reported MCE-based methods with chemiluminescence, electrochemical, or laser-induced fluorescence detection for quantifying corresponding compounds. To evaluate the applicability of the present MCE-CL method for analyzing real biological samples, it was used to determine amino acids in individual human red blood cells. Nine amino acids, including Lys, Ser, Ala, Glu, Trp, etc., were detected. The contents ranged from 3 to 31 amol/cell. The assay proved to be simple, quick, reproducible, and very sensitive. PMID:20121202

  5. Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based reporter reveals differential calcineurin activation in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Bazzazi, Hojjat; Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yang, Wanjun; Yue, David T

    2015-09-01

    Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based genetically encoded reporters of calcineurin are constructed by fusing the two subunits of calcineurin with P2A-based linkers retaining the expected native conformation of calcineurin. Calcineurin reporters display robust responses to calcium transients in HEK293 cells. The sensor responses are correlated with NFATc1 translocation dynamics in HEK293 cells. The sensors are uniformly distributed in neonatal myocytes and respond efficiently to single electrically evoked calcium transients and show cumulative activation at frequencies of 0.5 and 1 Hz. In adult myocytes, the calcineurin sensors appear to be localized to the cardiac z-lines, and respond to cumulative calcium transients at frequencies of 0.5 and 1 Hz. The phosphatase calcineurin is a central component of many calcium signalling pathways, relaying calcium signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. It has critical functions in a multitude of systems, including immune, cardiac and neuronal. Given the widespread importance of calcineurin in both normal and pathological conditions, new tools that elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcineurin activity would be invaluable. Here we develop two separate genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors of calcineurin activation, DuoCaN and UniCaN. Both sensors showcase a large dynamic range and rapid response kinetics, differing primarily in the linker structure between the FRET pairs. Both sensors were calibrated in HEK293 cells and their responses correlated well with NFAT translocation to the nucleus, validating the biological relevance of the sensor readout. The sensors were subsequently expressed in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and acutely isolated adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Both sensors demonstrated robust responses in myocytes and revealed kinetic differences in calcineurin activation during changes in pacing rate for neonatal versus adult myocytes

  6. Upconversion luminescence resonance energy transfer-based aptasensor for the sensitive detection of oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Fang, Congcong; Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Wang, Zhouping

    2015-11-15

    In this work, a biosensor based on luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) from NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to SYBR Green I has been developed. The aptamers are covalently linked to UCNPs and hybridized with their complementary strands. The subsequent addition of SYBR Green allows SYBR Green I to insert into the formed double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) duplex and brings the energy donor and acceptor into close proximity, leading to the fluorescence of UCNPs transferred to SYBR Green I. When excited at 980 nm, the UCNPs emit luminescence at 477 nm, and this energy is transferred to SYBR Green I, which emits luminescence at 530 nm. In the presence of oxytetracycline (OTC), the aptamers prefer to bind to its corresponding analyte and dehybridize with the complementary DNA. This dehybridization leads to the liberation of SYBR Green I, which distances SYBR Green I from the UCNPs and recovers the UCNPs' luminescence. Under optimal conditions, a linear calibration is obtained between the ratio of I530 to I477 nm (I530/I477) and the OTC concentration, which ranges from 0.1 to 10 ng/ml with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.054 ng/ml. PMID:26302361

  7. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based molecular logic circuit using a DNA scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a method of information processing using biomolecular input signals and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signaling constructed on a DNA scaffold. Logic operations are achieved by encoding molecular inputs into an arrangement of fluorescence dyes using simple DNA reactions and by evaluating a logic expression using local photonic signaling that is much faster than DNA reactions. Experimental results verify the operation of a complete set of Boolean logic functions (AND, OR, NOT) and combinational logic operations using a FRET-signal cascade.

  8. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes.

    PubMed

    Junager, Nina P L; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  9. Detection of Citrus tristeza virus by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Taha Roodbar; Salleh, Mohamad Amran Mohd; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mohsenifar, Afshin; Safarnejad, Reza; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low titer or uneven distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in field samples, detection of CTV by using conventional detection techniques may be difficult. Therefore, in the present work, the cadmium-telluride quantum dots (QDs) was conjugated with a specific antibody against coat protein (CP) of CTV, and the CP were immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to develop a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanobiosensor for detecting CTV. The maximum FRET efficiency for the developed nano-biosensor was observed at 60% in AuNPs-CP/QDs-Ab ratio of 1:8.5. The designed system showed higher sensitivity and specificity over enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a limit of detection of 0.13μgmL(-1) and 93% and 94% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. As designed sensor is rapid, sensitive, specific and efficient in detecting CTV, this could be envisioned for diagnostic applications, surveillance and plant certification program. PMID:27380305

  10. A fluorescence energy transfer-based mechanical stress sensor for specific proteins in situ.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanjie; Suchyna, Thomas M; Sachs, Frederick

    2008-06-01

    To measure mechanical stress in real time, we designed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) cassette, denoted stFRET, which could be inserted into structural protein hosts. The probe was composed of a green fluorescence protein pair, Cerulean and Venus, linked with a stable alpha-helix. We measured the FRET efficiency of the free cassette protein as a function of the length of the linker, the angles of the fluorophores, temperature and urea denaturation, and protease treatment. The linking helix was stable to 80 degrees C, unfolded in 8 m urea, and rapidly digested by proteases, but in all cases the fluorophores were unaffected. We modified the alpha-helix linker by adding and subtracting residues to vary the angles and distance between the donor and acceptor, and assuming that the cassette was a rigid body, we calculated its geometry. We tested the strain sensitivity of stFRET by linking both ends to a rubber sheet subjected to equibiaxial stretch. FRET decreased proportionally to the substrate strain. The naked cassette expressed well in human embryonic kidney-293 cells and, surprisingly, was concentrated in the nucleus. However, when the cassette was located into host proteins such alpha-actinin, nonerythrocyte spectrin and filamin A, the labeled hosts expressed well and distributed normally in cell lines such as 3T3, where they were stressed at the leading edge of migrating cells and relaxed at the trailing edge. When collagen-19 was labeled near its middle with stFRET, it expressed well in Caenorhabditis elegans, distributing similarly to hosts labeled with a terminal green fluorescent protein, and the worms behaved normally. PMID:18479457

  11. Upconversion fluorescence resonance energy transfer based biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in blood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhui; Shen, Pei; Li, Chunya; Wang, Yanying; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is a very important biomarker in blood. Presently, sensitive and selective determination of MMP-2 directly in blood samples is still a challenging job because of the high complexity of the sample matrix. In this work, we reported a new homogeneous biosensor for MMP-2 based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from upconversion phosphors (UCPs) to carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). A polypeptide chain (NH(2)-GHHYYGPLGVRGC-COOH) comprising both the specific MMP-2 substrate domain (PLGVR) and a π-rich motif (HHYY) was designed and linked to the surface of UCPs at the C terminus. The FRET process was initiated by the π-π interaction between the peptide and CNPs, which thus quenched the fluorescence of the donor. Upon the cleavage of the substrate by the protease at the amide bond between Gly and Val, the donor was separated from the acceptor while the π-rich motif stayed on the acceptor. As a result, the fluorescence of the donor was restored. The fluorescence recovery was found to be proportional to the concentration of MMP-2 within the range from 10-500 pg/mL in an aqueous solution. The quantification limit of this sensor was at least 1 order of magnitude lower than that of other reported assays for MMP-2. The sensor was used to determine the MMP-2 level directly in human plasma and whole blood samples with satisfactory results obtained. Owing to the hypersensitivity of the method, clinical samples of only less than 1 μL were needed for accurate quantification, which can be meaningful in MMP-2-related clinical and bioanalytical applications. PMID:22242647

  12. Assessing Gonadotropin Receptor Function by Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Landomiel, Flavie; Gallay, Nathalie; Jégot, Gwenhael; Poupon, Anne; Crépieux, Pascale; Reiter, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin receptors belong to the super family of G protein-coupled receptors and mediate the physiological effects of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone (LHR). Their central role in the control of reproductive function has made them the focus of intensive studies. Upon binding to their cognate hormone, they trigger complex signaling and trafficking mechanisms that are tightly regulated in concentration, time, and space. Classical cellular assays often fail to capture all these dynamics. Here, we describe the use of various bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BRET and FRET) assays to investigate the activation and regulation of FSHR and LHR in real-time, in living cells (i.e., transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells). Indeed, the dynamics of hormone-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation, cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) production, calcium release, β-arrestin 2 recruitment, and receptor internalization/recycling was assessed. Kinetics and dose–response analyses confirmed the expected pharmacological and signaling properties of hFSHR and hLHR but revealed interesting characteristics when considering the two major pathways (cAMP and β-arrestin 2) of the two receptors assessed by BRET. Indeed, the EC50 values were in picomolar range for cAMP production while nanomolar range was observed for β-arrestin 2 recruitment as well as receptor internalization. Interestingly, the predicted receptor occupancy indicates that the maximal G protein activation and cAMP response occur at <10% of receptor occupancy whereas >90% of activated receptors is required to achieve full β-arrestin 2 recruitment and subsequent receptor internalization. The rapid receptor internalization was also followed by a recycling phase. Collectively, our data reveal that β-arrestin-mediated desensitization, internalization, and the subsequent fast recycling of receptors at the plasma membrane may provide a mechanistic

  13. Assessing Gonadotropin Receptor Function by Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Assays.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Landomiel, Flavie; Gallay, Nathalie; Jégot, Gwenhael; Poupon, Anne; Crépieux, Pascale; Reiter, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin receptors belong to the super family of G protein-coupled receptors and mediate the physiological effects of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone (LHR). Their central role in the control of reproductive function has made them the focus of intensive studies. Upon binding to their cognate hormone, they trigger complex signaling and trafficking mechanisms that are tightly regulated in concentration, time, and space. Classical cellular assays often fail to capture all these dynamics. Here, we describe the use of various bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BRET and FRET) assays to investigate the activation and regulation of FSHR and LHR in real-time, in living cells (i.e., transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells). Indeed, the dynamics of hormone-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation, cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) production, calcium release, β-arrestin 2 recruitment, and receptor internalization/recycling was assessed. Kinetics and dose-response analyses confirmed the expected pharmacological and signaling properties of hFSHR and hLHR but revealed interesting characteristics when considering the two major pathways (cAMP and β-arrestin 2) of the two receptors assessed by BRET. Indeed, the EC50 values were in picomolar range for cAMP production while nanomolar range was observed for β-arrestin 2 recruitment as well as receptor internalization. Interestingly, the predicted receptor occupancy indicates that the maximal G protein activation and cAMP response occur at <10% of receptor occupancy whereas >90% of activated receptors is required to achieve full β-arrestin 2 recruitment and subsequent receptor internalization. The rapid receptor internalization was also followed by a recycling phase. Collectively, our data reveal that β-arrestin-mediated desensitization, internalization, and the subsequent fast recycling of receptors at the plasma membrane may provide a mechanistic

  14. A novel alignment-free method for detection of lateral genetic transfer based on TF-IDF

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yingnan; Chan, Yao-ban; Ragan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral genetic transfer (LGT) plays an important role in the evolution of microbes. Existing computational methods for detecting genomic regions of putative lateral origin scale poorly to large data. Here, we propose a novel method based on TF-IDF (Term Frequency-Inverse Document Frequency) statistics to detect not only regions of lateral origin, but also their origin and direction of transfer, in sets of hierarchically structured nucleotide or protein sequences. This approach is based on the frequency distributions of k-mers in the sequences. If a set of contiguous k-mers appears sufficiently more frequently in another phyletic group than in its own, we infer that they have been transferred from the first group to the second. We performed rigorous tests of TF-IDF using simulated and empirical datasets. With the simulated data, we tested our method under different parameter settings for sequence length, substitution rate between and within groups and post-LGT, deletion rate, length of transferred region and k size, and found that we can detect LGT events with high precision and recall. Our method performs better than an established method, ALFY, which has high recall but low precision. Our method is efficient, with runtime increasing approximately linearly with sequence length. PMID:27453035

  15. Energy transfer based emission analysis of (Tb³⁺, Sm³⁺): lithium zinc phosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C Parthasaradhi; Naresh, V; Ramaraghavulu, R; Rudramadevi, B H; Reddy, K T Ramakrishna; Buddhudu, S

    2015-06-01

    The present paper reports on the results pertaining to photoluminescence properties of Tb(3+), Sm(3+) and energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Sm(3+) ions in lithium zinc phosphate (LZP) glass matrix prepared by melt quenching method. Besides photoluminescence studies thermal stability for the LZP glass is also evaluated from TG-DTA measurement. Tb(3+) doped glasses have exhibited a prominent green emission at 547 nm assigned to (5)D4→(7)F5 transitions on exciting at λ(exci)=377 nm. The quenching phenomenon in Tb(3+) emission on varying its concentration has been discussed from cross-relaxations. Sm(3+) incorporated glasses have shown strong orange emission at 603 nm assigned to (4)G5/2→(6)H7/2 transition upon exciting with λ(exci)=404 nm. The possibility of energy transfer process taking place between these two ions is understood from the significant spectral overlap of Sm(3+) absorption and Tb(3+) emission. Migration of excitation energy from Tb(3+) ions to Sm(3+) ions at λ(exci)=375 nm is evaluated from the emission spectra of (0.5 mol.% Tb(3+)+(0.5-2.0 mol.%) Sm(3+)) co-doped glasses. The emission intensity of Sm(3+) has enhanced while Tb(3+) emission intensity decreased with an increase in Sm(3+) concentration suggesting the occurrence of energy transfer through cross-relaxations from Tb(3+) ((5)D4) to Sm(3+) ((4)G5/2). The mechanism behind energy transfer process has been further explained from energy level diagram, decay profiles and confirmed by calculating energy transfer parameters (energy transfer efficiency (η) and energy transfer probability (P)) of co-doped glasses. The dipole-dipole interaction is found to be more responsible for energy transfer Tb(3+) ((5)D4) to Sm(3+) ((4)G5/2) ions in LZP glass matrix. PMID:25756686

  16. Engineering interfacial photo-induced charge transfer based on nanobamboo array architecture for efficient solar-to-chemical energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaotian; Liow, Chihao; Bisht, Ankit; Liu, Xinfeng; Sum, Tze Chien; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Shuzhou

    2015-04-01

    Engineering interfacial photo-induced charge transfer for highly synergistic photocatalysis is successfully realized based on nanobamboo array architecture. Programmable assemblies of various components and heterogeneous interfaces, and, in turn, engineering of the energy band structure along the charge transport pathways, play a critical role in generating excellent synergistic effects of multiple components for promoting photocatalytic efficiency. PMID:25704499

  17. Synthesis of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based probe containing a tricyclic nucleoside analog for single nucleotide polymorphism typing.

    PubMed

    Hayai, Aya; Maeda, Yusuke; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2016-08-01

    Here, we report the synthesis of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based probe for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. The probe contains a fluorescent tricyclic base, 8-amino-3-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)imidazo[4',5':5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine, as a donor molecule and 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carboxylic acid as an acceptor molecule. FRET was observed between the donor and acceptor molecules on the probe. The identity of the target bases on DNA and RNA strands could be determined using the probe. PMID:27329795

  18. Resonance energy transfer based on shallow and deep energy levels of biotin-polyethylene glycol/polyamine stabilized CdS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, W.; Tokuhiro, Y.; Umezu, I.; Sugimura, A.; Nagasaki, Y.

    2006-10-01

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2-(N ,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) stabilized CdS quantum dots (QDs) and texas-red streptavidin was observed. We propose a four-state model to explain photoluminescence (PL) process of CdS QDs and suggest that there are two emission processes originated from shallow and deep trap energy levels corresponding to fast and slow components of PL decay, respectively. Energy transfer mechanism was discussed based on Dexter theory [J. Chem. Phys. 21, 863 (1953)] and the proposed four-state model. It is found that the energy transfer efficiency of deep energy level is higher than that of shallow energy level. The calculated distance between QD and texas red with the parameters of shallow energy level is the same with that of deep level, which indicates that the proposed model is reasonable for explaining the PL dynamics of CdS QDs.

  19. Through-bond energy transfer-based ratiometric two-photon probe for fluorescent imaging of Pd(2+) ions in living cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liyi; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-04-21

    Palladium can cause severe skin and eye irritation once it enters the human body. Ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probes can both eliminate interference from environmental factors and realize deep-tissue imaging with improved spatial localization. To quantitatively track Pd(2+) in biosystems, we report here a colorimetric and two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe, termed Np-Rh-Pd, which consists of a two-photon fluorophore (naphthalene derivative with a D-π-A structure) and a rhodamine B dye. The two fluorophores are directly linked to form a two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe for Pd(2+) based on a through-bond energy transfer (TBET) strategy. It exhibits highly efficient energy transfer (90%) with two well-resolved emission peaks (wavelength difference of 100 nm), which could efficiently diminish the cross talk between channels and is especially favorable for ratiometric bioimaging applications. A signal-to-background ratio of 31.2 was observed for the probe, which affords a high sensitivity for Pd(2+) with a detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-7) M. It was also found that acidity does not affect the fluorescent response of the probe to Pd(2+), which is favorable for its applications in practical samples. The probe was further used for fluorescence imaging of Pd(2+) ions in live cells and tissue slices under two-photon excitation, which showed significant tissue-imaging depths (90-270 μm) and a high resolution for ratiometric imaging. PMID:25809980

  20. Energy transfer based photoluminescence properties of co-doped (Er3+ + Pr3+): PEO + PVP blended polymer composites for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen Kumar, K.; Kang, Misook; Bhaskar Kumar, G.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2016-04-01

    Er3+, Pr3+ singly doped and co-doped PEO + PVP polymer composites have been synthesized by conventional solution casting method. The structural analysis has been carried out for all these polymer composites from XRD analysis. Raman spectral studies confirm the ion-polymer interactions and polymer complex formation. Thermal properties of pure polymer film has also been clearly elucidated by TG/DTA profiles. Well defined optical absorption bands pertaining to Er3+ and Pr3+ are observed in the absorption spectral profile and these bands are assigned with corresponding electronic transitions. The polymer films containing singly doped Er3+ and Pr3+ ions have displayed green and red emissions at 510 nm (2H11/2 → 4I15/2) and 688 nm (3P0 → 3F3) respectively under UV excitation source. Comparing the emission spectra of singly Er3+ and co-doped Er3+ + Pr3+: PEO + PVP polymer films, a significant red emission pertaining to Pr3+ions is remarkably enhanced in co-doped polymer system. This could be ascribed to possible energy transfer from Er3+ to Pr3+ in co-doped polymer system. The energy transfer mechanism is clearly demonstrated using their emission performances, overlapped spectral profiles and also life time decay dynamics. Thus, it could be suggested that Er3+: PEO + PVP, Pr3+: PEO + PVP and (Er3+ + Pr3+): PEO + PVP blended polymer films are potential materials for several photonic applications.

  1. Detection of enzyme activity in orthotopic murine breast cancer by fluorescence lifetime imaging using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Metasebya; Guo, Kevin; Sudlow, Gail P.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Edwards, W. Barry; Achilefu, Samuel; Akers, Walter J.

    2011-06-01

    Cancer-related enzyme activity can be detected noninvasively using activatable fluorescent molecular probes. In contrast to ``always-on'' fluorescent molecular probes, activatable probes are relatively nonfluorescent at the time of administration due to intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Enzyme-mediated hydrolysis of peptide linkers results in reduced FRET and increase of fluorescence yield. Separation of signal from active and inactive probe can be difficult with conventional intensity-based fluorescence imaging. Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) measurement is an alternative method to detect changes in FRET. Thus, we investigate FLT imaging for in vivo detection of FRET-based molecular probe activation in an orthotopic breast cancer model. Indeed, the measured FLT of the enzyme-activatable molecular probe increases from 0.62 ns just after injection to 0.78 ns in tumor tissue after 4 h. A significant increase in FLT is not observed for an always-on targeted molecular probe with the same fluorescent reporter. These results show that FLT contrast is a powerful addition to preclinical imaging because it can report molecular activity in vivo due to changes in FRET. Fluorescence lifetime imaging exploits unique characteristics of fluorescent molecular probes that can be further translated into clinical applications, including noninvasive detection of cancer-related enzyme activity.

  2. Continuous Monitoring of Specific mRNA Expression Responses with a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Nano-tweezer Technique That Does Not Require Gene Recombination.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Hajime; Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Ikeda, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2016-08-16

    This letter discusses the feasibility of continuously monitoring specific mRNA expression responses in a living cell with a probe structured as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based DNA nano-tweezer (DNA-NT). The FRET-based DNA-NT, self-assembled from three single-stranded DNAs, alters its structure from an open state to a closed state in recognition of a target mRNA, resulting in the closing of the distal relation of previously modified FRET-paired fluorescent dyes and generating a FRET signal. The expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 4 in a mouse hepato-carcinoma (Hepa 1-6 cells) were selected as the target model. Live-cell imaging analysis of Hepa 1-6 cells with both FRET-based DNA-NTs indicated that the behaviors of the FRET signals integrated in each individual cell were similar to those measured with the conventional mass analysis technique of semiquantitative real-time (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From these results, it is concluded that continuous monitoring of gene expression response without gene recombination is feasible with a FRET-based DNA-NT, even in a single cell manner. PMID:27458920

  3. Noninvasive Evaluation of Heavy Metal Uptake and Storage in Micoralgae Using a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Heavy Metal Biosensor1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Sathish; Torres, Moacir; Falcao, Vanessa; Ewalt Gray, Jaime; Coury, Daniel A.; Colepicolo, Pio; Sayre, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based heavy metal biosensor for the quantification of bioavailable free heavy metals in the cytoplasm of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The biosensor is composed of an end-to-end fusion of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), chicken metallothionein II (MT-II), and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). In vitro measurements of YFP/CFP fluorescence emission ratios indicated that the addition of metals to the purified biosensor enhanced FRET between CFP and YFP, consistent with heavy metal-induced folding of MT-II. A maximum YFP/CFP FRET ratio of 2.8 was observed in the presence of saturating concentrations of heavy metals. The sensitivity of the biosensor was greatest for Hg2+ followed by Cd2+ ≈ Pb2+ > Zn2+ > Cu2+. The heavy metal biosensor was unresponsive to metals that do not bind to MT-II (Na+ and Mg2+). When expressed in C. reinhardtii, we observed a differential metal-dependent response to saturating external concentrations (1.6 mm) of heavy metals (Pb2+ > Cd2+) that was unlike that observed for the isolated biosensor (in vitro). Significantly, analysis of metal uptake kinetics indicated that equilibration of the cytoplasm with externally applied heavy metals occurred within seconds. Our results also indicated that algae have substantial buffering capacity for free heavy metals in their cytosol, even at high external metal concentrations. PMID:24368336

  4. Influence of Donor on the Sensing Performance of a Series of Through-Bond Energy Transfer-Based Two-photon Fluorescent Cu(2+) Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jin; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2016-07-01

    Optical properties of a series of molecular two-photon fluorescent Cu(2+) probes containing the same acceptor (rhodamine group) are analyzed using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with analytical response theory. Special emphasis is placed on evolution of the probes' optical properties in the presence of Cu(2+) . In this study, the compound with naphthalene as the donor is shown to be excellent ratiometric fluorescent chemosensor, whereas the compound with quinoline derivative as the donor shows off/on-typed colorimetric fluorescent response. For the compound with naphthalimide derivative as the donor, changing the connection between the donor and acceptor can efficiently prevent the fluorescent quenching of the probe both in the absence and presence of Cu(2+) . The donor moiety and the connection between donor and acceptor are thus found to play dominant roles on sensing performance of these probes. Moreover, distributions of molecular orbitals involved in the excitation and emission of the probes are analyzed to explore responsive mechanism of the probes. The through-bond energy transfer process is theoretically demonstrated. Our results are used to elucidate the available experimental measurements. This work is helpful to understand the relationships of structure with optical properties for the studied probes. PMID:27144496

  5. Selective ligand activity at Nur/retinoid X receptor complexes revealed by dimer-specific bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Giner, Xavier C; Cotnoir-White, David; Mader, Sylvie; Lévesque, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) play a role as master regulators because of their capacity to form heterodimers with other nuclear receptors (NRs). Accordingly, retinoid signaling is involved in multiple biologic processes, including development, cell differentiation, metabolism, and cell death. However, the role and function of RXRs in different heterodimer complexes remain unidentified, mainly because most RXR drugs (called rexinoids) are not selective of specific heterodimer complexes. The lack of selectivity strongly limits the use of rexinoids for specific therapeutic approaches. To better characterize rexinoids at specific NR complexes, we have developed and optimized luciferase (Luc) protein complementation(PCA)-based bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays that can directly measure recruitment of a coactivator (CoA) motif fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by specific NR dimers. To validate the assays, we compared rexinoid modulation of CoA recruitment by the RXR homodimer and by the heterodimers Nur77/RXR and Nurr1/RXR. Results revealed that some rexinoids display selective CoA recruitment activities with homo- or heterodimer complexes. In particular, SR11237 (BMS649) has stronger potency for recruitment of CoA motif and transcriptional activity with the heterodimer Nur77/RXR than other complexes. This technology should be useful in identifying new compounds with specificity for individual dimeric species formed by NRs. PMID:26148973

  6. Ag nanoclusters could efficiently quench the photoresponse of CdS quantum dots for novel energy transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yue; Liang, Yan-Yu; He, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-11-15

    Herein the influence of ultrasmall Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) against CdS quantum dots (QDs) in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) nanosystem was exploited for the first time, based on which a novel PEC bioanalysis was successfully developed via the efficient quenching effect of Ag NCs against the CdS QDs. In a model system, DNA assay was achieved by using molecular beacon (MB) probes anchored on a CdS QDs modified electrode, and the MB probes contain two segments that can hybridize with both target DNA sequence and the label of DNA encapsulated Ag NCs. After the MB probe was unfolded by the target DNA sequence, the labels of oligonucleotide encapsulated Ag NCs would be brought in close proximity to the CdS QDs electrode surface, and efficient photocurrent quenching of QDs could be resulted from an energy transfer process that originated from NCs. Thus, by monitoring the attenuation in the photocurrent signal, an elegant and sensitive PEC DNA bioanalysis could be accomplished. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0pM to 10nM and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3pM. This work presents a feasible signaling principle that could act as a common basis for general PEC bioanalysis development. PMID:27315518

  7. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer based immunosensing of human IgG by using quantum dot/GIgG-gold nanoparticles/IgG conjugation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lin; Liu, Zhao; Li, Jianjun; Zhu, Jian

    2014-06-01

    A novel immunosensor of human immune globulin (IgG) was fabricated based on the fluorescence transfer between luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). AuNPs and CdSe/ZnS QDs were respectively labeled with immune reaction pair:IgG and goat anti-human immunoglobulin (GIgG), by optimizing the conditions including pH value and protein amount. In the assembled QD-GIgG-IgG-AuNP fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) immunocomplex system, the presence of AuNP-IgG directly reduced the fluorescence intensity of the GIgG conjugated QDs. As a result, the concentration of AuNP-IgG had a linear relationship with the fluorescence decrease in a range of 0-1.57 microg/mL. Furthermore, the mechanism of the QDs' fluorescence decay has also been discussed and attributed to the light-induced photobleaching. This novel sensing method achieves quantitative detection of trace proteins, suggesting the potential of biomolecule-AuNPs conjugation based analytical methods in further application. PMID:24738348

  8. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of Zn(2+) using a dual-emission silica-coated quantum dots mixture.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Guo, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Qian; Sun, Qing-Jiang

    2015-05-19

    In this work, we report the design and application of a new ratiometric fluorescent probe, which contains different-colored quantum dots (QDs) as dual fluorophores, ultrathin silica shell as spacer, and meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphine dihydrochloride (TSPP) as receptor, for Zn(2+) detection in aqueous solution and living cells. In the architecture of our designed probe, the silica shell plays the key roles in controlling the locations of QDs, TSPP, and Zn(2+), preventing the direct contact between QDs and Zn(2+) but affording fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from dual-color QDs to TSPP. In the presence of Zn(2+), the analyte-receptor reaction changes the absorption in the range of the Q-band of TSPP and accordingly the efficiencies of two independent FRET processes from the dual-colored QDs to the acceptor, respectively, leading to fluorescence enhancement of green-emission QDs whereas fluorescence quenching of yellow-emission QDs. Benefiting from the well-resolved dual emissions from different-colored QDs and the large range of emission ratios, the probe solution displays continuous color changes from yellow to green, which can be clearly observed by the naked eye. Under physiological conditions, the probe exhibits a stable response for Zn(2+) from 0.3 to 6 μM, with a detection limit of 60 nM in aqueous solutions. With respect to single-emission probes, this ratiometric probe has demonstrated to feature excellent selectivity for Zn(2+) over other physiologically important cations such as Fe(3+) and Cu(2+). It has been preliminarily used for ratiometric imaging of Zn(2+) in living cells with satisfying resolution. PMID:25932651

  9. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Self-Assembled Nanoprobe for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Nobuhito; Murata, Masaharu; Kawano, Takahito; Piao, Jing Shu; Narahara, Sayoko; Nakata, Ryosuke; Akahoshi, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Hashizume, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) is the most serious and challenging complication following gastroenterological surgery. Activated pancreatic juice leaking from the organ remnant contains proteases that attack the surrounding tissue, potentially leading to severe inflammation, tissue necrosis, and fistula formation. However, it is difficult to observe pancreatic leakage during surgery and to evaluate the protease activity of leaked fluid at the patient's bedside. This report describes a protein nanocage-based protease ratiometric sensor comprising a pancreatic protease-sensitive small heat-shock protein (HSP) 16.5, which is a naturally occurring protein in Methanococcus jannaschii that forms a spherical structure by self-assembly of 24 subunits, and a chemically conjugated donor-acceptor dye pair for Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The HSP-FRET probe was constructed by subunit exchange of each dye-labeled engineered HSP, resulting in a spherical nanocage of approximately 10 nm in diameter, which exhibited very high stability against degradation in blood plasma and no remarkable toxicity in mice. The efficiency of FRET was found to depend on both the dye orientation and the acceptor/donor ratio. Pancreatic proteases, including trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, and elastase, were quantitatively analyzed by fluorescence recovery with high specificity using the HSP-FRET nanoprobe. Furthermore, the HSP-FRET nanoprobe was sufficiently sensitive to detect POPF in the pancreatic juice of patients using only the naked eye within 10 min. Thus, this novel nanoprobe is proposed as an effective and convenient tool for the detection of POPF and the visualization of activated pancreatic juice during gastroenterological surgery. PMID:26845508

  10. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-based Structural Analysis of the Dihydropyridine Receptor α1S Subunit Reveals Conformational Differences Induced by Binding of the β1a Subunit.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Mohana; Perez, Claudio F; Fessenden, James D

    2016-06-24

    The skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor α1S subunit plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling by sensing membrane voltage changes and then triggering intracellular calcium release. The cytoplasmic loops connecting four homologous α1S structural domains have diverse functions, but their structural arrangement is poorly understood. Here, we used a novel FRET-based method to characterize the relative proximity of these intracellular loops in α1S subunits expressed in intact cells. In dysgenic myotubes, energy transfer was observed from an N-terminal-fused YFP to a FRET acceptor, ReAsH (resorufin arsenical hairpin binder), targeted to each α1S intracellular loop, with the highest FRET efficiencies measured to the α1S II-III loop and C-terminal tail. However, in HEK-293T cells, FRET efficiencies from the α1S N terminus to the II-III and III-IV loops and the C-terminal tail were significantly lower, thus suggesting that these loop structures are influenced by the cellular microenvironment. The addition of the β1a dihydropyridine receptor subunit enhanced FRET to the II-III loop, thus indicating that β1a binding directly affects II-III loop conformation. This specific structural change required the C-terminal 36 amino acids of β1a, which are essential to support EC coupling. Direct FRET measurements between α1S and β1a confirmed that both wild type and truncated β1a bind similarly to α1S These results provide new insights into the role of muscle-specific proteins on the structural arrangement of α1S intracellular loops and point to a new conformational effect of the β1a subunit in supporting skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:27129199

  11. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based real-time polymerase chain reaction method without DNA extraction for the genotyping of F5, F2, F12, MTHFR, and HFE.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Robles, Juan; Nicolàs, Antoni; Gutierrez, Antonio; Ros, Teresa; Amat, Juan Carlos; Alemany, Regina; Vögler, Oliver; Abelló, Aina; Noguera, Aina; Besalduch, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Blood samples are extensively used for the molecular diagnosis of many hematological diseases. The daily practice in a clinical laboratory of molecular diagnosis in hematology involves using a variety of techniques, based on the amplification of nucleic acids. Current methods for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) use purified genomic DNA, mostly isolated from total peripheral blood cells or white blood cells (WBC). In this paper we describe a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based method for genotyping directly from blood cells. Our strategy is based on an initial isolation of the WBCs, allowing the removal of PCR inhibitors, such as the heme group, present in the erythrocytes. Once the erythrocytes have been lysed, in the LightCycler(®) 2.0 Instrument, we perform a real-time PCR followed by a melting curve analysis for different genes (Factors 2, 5, 12, MTHFR, and HFE). After testing 34 samples comparing the real-time crossing point (CP) values between WBC (5×10(6) WBC/mL) and purified DNA (20 ng/μL), the results for F5 Leiden were as follows: CP mean value for WBC was 29.26±0.566 versus purified DNA 24.79±0.56. Thus, when PCR was performed from WBC (5×10(6) WBC/mL) instead of DNA (20 ng/μL), we observed a delay of about 4 cycles. These small differences in CP values were similar for all genes tested and did not significantly affect the subsequent analysis by melting curves. In both cases the fluorescence values were high enough, allowing a robust genotyping of all these genes without a previous DNA purification/extraction. PMID:25028568

  12. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime. PMID:26461447

  13. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C.; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F.; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime.

  14. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  15. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  16. Optimal Design of RF Energy Harvesting Device Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Sato, Y.; Adriano, R.; Igarashi, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents optimal design of an RF energy harvesting device using genetic algorithm (GA). In the present RF harvester, a planar spiral antenna (PSA) is loaded with matching and rectifying circuits. On the first stage of the optimal design, the shape parameters of PSA are optimized using . Then, the equivalent circuit of the optimized PSA is derived for optimization of the circuits. Finally, the parameters of RF energy harvesting circuit are optimized to maximize the output power using GA. It is shown that the present optimization increases the output power by a factor of five. The manufactured energy harvester starts working when the input electric field is greater than 0.5 V/m.

  17. Energy transfer based photoluminescence spectra of co-doped (Dy3+ + Sm3+): Li2O-LiF-B2O3-ZnO glasses for orange emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, L.; Naveen Kumar, K.; Vijayalakshmi, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The present paper brings out the results concerning the preparation and optical properties of Sm3+ and Dy3+ each ion separately in different concentrations (0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol.%) and also together doped (x mol.% Dy3+ + 1.5 mol.% Sm3+): Li2O-LiF-B2O3-ZnO (where x = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol.%) glasses by a melt quenching method. Structural and thermal properties have been extensively studied for those glasses by XRD and TG/DTA. The compositional analysis has been carried out from FTIR spectral profile. Optical absorption spectral studies were also carried out. Sm3+: LBZ glasses have displayed an intense orange emission at 603 nm (4G5/2 → 6H7/2) with an excitation wavelength at 403 nm and Dy3+: LBZ glasses have shown two emissions located at 485 nm (4F9/2 → 6H15/2; blue) and 574 nm (4F9/2 → 6H13/2; yellow) with an excitation wavelength at 385 nm. Remarkably, it has been identified that the significant increase in the reddish orange emission of Sm3+ ions and diminished yellow emission pertaining to Dy3+ ions in the co-doped LBZ glass system under the excitation of 385 nm which relates to Dy3+ ions. This could be due energy transfer from Dy3+ to Sm3+. The non-radiative energy transfer from Dy3+ to Sm3+ is explained in terms of their emission spectra, donor lifetime, energy level diagram and energy transfer characteristic factors. These significantly enhanced orange emission exhibited glasses could be suggested as potential optical glasses for orange luminescence photonic devices.

  18. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Based on Interaction of PII and PipX Proteins Provides a Robust and Specific Biosensor for 2-Oxoglutarate, a Central Metabolite and a Signaling Molecule.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Lin; Bernard, Christophe S; Hubert, Pierre; My, Laetitia; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-12-26

    2-Oxoglutarate is a central metabolite and a signalling molecule in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The cellular levels of 2-oxoglutarate vary rapidly in response to environmental changes, but an easy and reliable approach is lacking for the measurement of 2-oxoglutarate. Here we report a biosensor of 2-oxoglutarate based on the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dissociation of the PII-PipX protein complex from cyanobacteria. Fusions of PII and PipX to either CFP or YFP could form a complex and their interaction could be detected by FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer). Mutations in PII or PipX that affect their interaction strongly decrease the FRET signal. Furthermore, the FRET signal is negatively affected, in a specific and concentration-dependent manner, by the presence of 2-oxoglutarate. This 2-oxoglutarate biosensor responds specifically and rapidly to a large range of 2-oxoglutarate levels, and is highly robust under different conditions, including in bacterial cell extracts. We further used this biosensor to study the interaction between PII and its effectors, and our data indicate that excess in Mg(2+) ions is a key factor for PII to respond efficiently to an increase in 2-oxoglutarate levels. This study paves the way for probing the dynamics of 2-oxoglutarate in various organisms and provides a valuable tool for the understanding of the molecular mechanism in metabolic regulation. PMID:24373496

  19. Development and comparison of a Primer-Probe Energy Transfer based assay and a 5' conjugated Minor Groove Binder assay for sensitive real-time PCR detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    McMenamy, M J; McKillen, J; Hjertner, B; Kiss, I; Yacoub, A; Leijon, M; Duffy, C; Belák, S; Welsh, M; Allan, G

    2011-08-01

    In this study the design and development of two real-time PCR assays for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) DNA is described. A Primer-Probe Energy Transfer (PriProET) assay and 5' conjugated Minor Groove Binder (MGB) method are compared and contrasted. Both have been designed to target the thymidine kinase gene of the ILTV genome. Both PriProET and MGB assays are capable of detecting 20 copies of a DNA standard per reaction and are linear from 2×10(8) to 2×10(2)copies/μl. Neither PriProET, nor MGB reacted with heterologous herpesviruses, indicating a high specificity of the two methods as novel tools for virus detection and identification. This study demonstrates the suitability of PriProET and 5' conjugated MGB probes as real-time PCR chemistries for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases caused by ILTV. PMID:21539859

  20. A new perspective on dark energy modeling via genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Nesseris, Savvas; García-Bellido, Juan E-mail: juan.garciabellido@uam.es

    2012-11-01

    We use Genetic Algorithms to extract information from several cosmological probes, such as the type Ia supernovae (SnIa), the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and the growth rate of matter perturbations. This is done by implementing a model independent and bias-free reconstruction of the various scales and distances that characterize the data, like the luminosity d{sub L}(z) and the angular diameter distance d{sub A}(z) in the SnIa and BAO data, respectively, or the dependence with redshift of the matter density Ω{sub m}(a) in the growth rate data, fσ{sub 8}(z). These quantities can then be used to reconstruct the expansion history of the Universe, and the resulting Dark Energy (DE) equation of state w(z) in the context of FRW models, or the mass radial function Ω{sub M}(r) in LTB models. In this way, the reconstruction is completely independent of our prior bias. Furthermore, we use this method to test the Etherington relation, ie the well-known relation between the luminosity and the angular diameter distance, η≡d{sub L}(z)/(1+z){sup 2}d{sub A}(z), which is equal to 1 in metric theories of gravity. We find that the present data seem to suggest a 3-σ deviation from one at redshifts z ∼ 0.5. Finally, we present a novel way, within the Genetic Algorithm paradigm, to analytically estimate the errors on the reconstructed quantities by calculating a Path Integral over all possible functions that may contribute to the likelihood. We show that this can be done regardless of the data being correlated or uncorrelated with each other and we also explicitly demonstrate that our approach is in good agreement with other error estimation techniques like the Fisher Matrix approach and the Bootstrap Monte Carlo.

  1. English to Sanskrit Machine Translation Using Transfer Based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ganesh R.; Godse, Sachin P.

    2010-11-01

    Translation is one of the needs of global society for communicating thoughts and ideas of one country with other country. Translation is the process of interpretation of text meaning and subsequent production of equivalent text, also called as communicating same meaning (message) in another language. In this paper we gave detail information on how to convert source language text in to target language text using Transfer Based Approach for machine translation. Here we implemented English to Sanskrit machine translator using transfer based approach. English is global language used for business and communication but large amount of population in India is not using and understand the English. Sanskrit is ancient language of India most of the languages in India are derived from Sanskrit. Sanskrit can be act as an intermediate language for multilingual translation.

  2. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  3. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  4. Genome-wide scan revealed genetic loci for energy metabolism in Hispanic children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide scans were conducted in a search for genetic locations linked to energy expenditure and substrate oxidation in children. Pedigreed data of 1030 Hispanic children and adolescents were from the Viva La Familia Study, which was designed to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors ...

  5. Empirical valence bond models for reactive potential energy surfaces: a parallel multilevel genetic program approach.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Michael A; Coker, David F

    2011-07-28

    We describe a new method for constructing empirical valence bond potential energy surfaces using a parallel multilevel genetic program (PMLGP). Genetic programs can be used to perform an efficient search through function space and parameter space to find the best functions and sets of parameters that fit energies obtained by ab initio electronic structure calculations. Building on the traditional genetic program approach, the PMLGP utilizes a hierarchy of genetic programming on two different levels. The lower level genetic programs are used to optimize coevolving populations in parallel while the higher level genetic program (HLGP) is used to optimize the genetic operator probabilities of the lower level genetic programs. The HLGP allows the algorithm to dynamically learn the mutation or combination of mutations that most effectively increase the fitness of the populations, causing a significant increase in the algorithm's accuracy and efficiency. The algorithm's accuracy and efficiency is tested against a standard parallel genetic program with a variety of one-dimensional test cases. Subsequently, the PMLGP is utilized to obtain an accurate empirical valence bond model for proton transfer in 3-hydroxy-gamma-pyrone in gas phase and protic solvent. PMID:21806098

  6. Advancements in gene transfer-based therapy for hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Christopher B; Spencer, H Trent

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy has promised clinical benefit to those suffering with hemophilia A, but this benefit has not yet been realized. However, during the past two decades, basic and applied gene therapy research has progressed and the goal of gene therapy for hemophilia A is once again in our sights. The hemophilia A patient population suffers from a disease that requires invasive, lifelong management, is exorbitantly expensive to treat, has geographically limited treatment access and can become untreatable due to immune reactions to the treatment product. Subsequent to the cloning of the factor VIII gene and cDNA in the early 1980s, academic and commercial research laboratories began to pursue gene transfer-based therapies to supplement or supplant the available protein replacement therapy. However, to date, clinical trials for gene therapy of hemophilia A have been unsuccessful. Three trials have been conducted with each having tested a different gene-transfer strategy and each demonstrating that there is a considerable barrier to achieving sustained expression of therapeutic amounts of factor VIII. Recent progress has been made in gene-transfer technology and, relevant to hemophilia A, towards increasing the biosynthetic efficiency of factor VIII. These advances are now being combined to develop novel strategies to treat and possibly cure hemophilia A. PMID:20577574

  7. Breed and parity effects on energy balance profiles through lactation: evidence of genetically driven body energy change.

    PubMed

    Friggens, N C; Berg, P; Theilgaard, P; Korsgaard, I R; Ingvartsen, K L; Løvendahl, P; Jensen, J

    2007-11-01

    14) there was no significant relationship between live weight and intake, suggesting that, within diet type, the systematic patterns of body energy change through lactation in cows that were kept under stable and sufficient nutritional conditions cannot be accounted for by environmental factors such as constrained intake or condition score at calving. Thus, these patterns appear to have a genetic basis. The proportion of the phenotypic variation (remaining after accounting for fixed effects) accounted for by additive genetic effects varied through lactation from 4.2 to 13.0%. Genetic correlations between early and late lactation energy balances were low and close to zero, suggesting that body energy changes in early and late lactation are genetically independent traits. PMID:17954770

  8. GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF SWITCHGRASS AS A BIOMASS ENERGY CROP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass, Panicum virgatum, has been identified as a primary herbaceous biomass energy crop for use in temperate areas. To date, switchgrass has been primarily used as a warm-season pasture grass in the Great Plains and Midwest, USA. Previously developed cultivars or varieties have been release...

  9. Energy Consumption Forecasting Using Semantic-Based Genetic Programming with Local Search Optimizer.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Mauro; Trujillo, Leonardo; Vanneschi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Energy consumption forecasting (ECF) is an important policy issue in today's economies. An accurate ECF has great benefits for electric utilities and both negative and positive errors lead to increased operating costs. The paper proposes a semantic based genetic programming framework to address the ECF problem. In particular, we propose a system that finds (quasi-)perfect solutions with high probability and that generates models able to produce near optimal predictions also on unseen data. The framework blends a recently developed version of genetic programming that integrates semantic genetic operators with a local search method. The main idea in combining semantic genetic programming and a local searcher is to couple the exploration ability of the former with the exploitation ability of the latter. Experimental results confirm the suitability of the proposed method in predicting the energy consumption. In particular, the system produces a lower error with respect to the existing state-of-the art techniques used on the same dataset. More importantly, this case study has shown that including a local searcher in the geometric semantic genetic programming system can speed up the search process and can result in fitter models that are able to produce an accurate forecasting also on unseen data. PMID:26106410

  10. Energy Consumption Forecasting Using Semantic-Based Genetic Programming with Local Search Optimizer

    PubMed Central

    Vanneschi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Energy consumption forecasting (ECF) is an important policy issue in today's economies. An accurate ECF has great benefits for electric utilities and both negative and positive errors lead to increased operating costs. The paper proposes a semantic based genetic programming framework to address the ECF problem. In particular, we propose a system that finds (quasi-)perfect solutions with high probability and that generates models able to produce near optimal predictions also on unseen data. The framework blends a recently developed version of genetic programming that integrates semantic genetic operators with a local search method. The main idea in combining semantic genetic programming and a local searcher is to couple the exploration ability of the former with the exploitation ability of the latter. Experimental results confirm the suitability of the proposed method in predicting the energy consumption. In particular, the system produces a lower error with respect to the existing state-of-the art techniques used on the same dataset. More importantly, this case study has shown that including a local searcher in the geometric semantic genetic programming system can speed up the search process and can result in fitter models that are able to produce an accurate forecasting also on unseen data. PMID:26106410

  11. Heavy ion mutagenesis: linear energy transfer effects and genetic linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S.; Criddle, K.; Vannais, D.; Ueno, A.; Kraemer, S.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a series of 69 independent mutants at the endogenous hprt locus of human TK6 lymphoblasts and over 200 independent S1-deficient mutants of the human x hamster hybrid cell line AL arising spontaneously or following low-fluence exposures to densely ionizing Fe ions (600 MeV/amu, linear energy transfer = 190 keV/microns). We find that large deletions are common. The entire hprt gene (> 44 kb) was missing in 19/39 Fe-induced mutants, while only 2/30 spontaneous mutants lost the entire hprt coding sequence. When the gene of interest (S1 locus = M1C1 gene) is located on a nonessential human chromosome 11, multilocus deletions of several million base pairs are observed frequently. The S1 mutation frequency is more than 50-fold greater than the frequency of hprt mutants in the same cells. Taken together, these results suggest that low-fluence exposures to Fe ions are often cytotoxic due to their ability to create multilocus deletions that may often include the loss of essential genes. In addition, the tumorigenic potential of these HZE heavy ions may be due to the high potential for loss of tumor suppressor genes. The relative insensitivity of the hprt locus to mutation is likely due to tight linkage to a gene that is required for viability.

  12. Genetic Determinants of Atherosclerosis, Obesity and Energy Balance in Consomic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spiezio, Sabrina H.; Amon, Lynn M.; McMillen, Timothy S.; Vick, Cynthia M.; Houston, Barbara A.; Caldwell, Mark; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Morton, Gregory J.; Kirk, Elizabeth A.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Nadeau, Joseph H.; LeBoeuf, Renée C.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity and atherosclerosis result from complex interactions between environmental factors and genetic variants. A panel of chromosome substitution strains (CSSs) was developed to characterize genetic and dietary factors contributing to metabolic diseases and other biological traits and biomedical conditions. Our goal here was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to obesity, energy expenditure and atherosclerosis. Parental strains C57BL/6 and A/J together with a panel of 21 CSSs derived from these progenitors were subjected to chronic feeding of rodent chow and atherosclerotic (females) or diabetogenic (males) test diets, and evaluated for a variety of metabolic phenotypes including several traits unique to this report, namely fat pad weights, energy balance and atherosclerosis. A total of 297 QTLs across 35 traits were discovered, two of which provided significant protection from atherosclerosis, and several dozen QTLs modulated body weight, body composition and circulating lipid levels in females and males. While several QTLs confirmed previous reports, most QTLs were novel. Finally, we applied the CSS quantitative genetic approach to energy balance, and identified three novel QTLs controlling energy expenditure and one QTL modulating food intake. Overall, we identified many new QTLs and phenotyped several novel traits in this mouse model of diet-induced metabolic diseases. PMID:25001233

  13. Genetic determinants of atherosclerosis, obesity, and energy balance in consomic mice.

    PubMed

    Spiezio, Sabrina H; Amon, Lynn M; McMillen, Timothy S; Vick, Cynthia M; Houston, Barbara A; Caldwell, Mark; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Morton, Gregory J; Kirk, Elizabeth A; Schwartz, Michael W; Nadeau, Joseph H; LeBoeuf, Renée C

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity and atherosclerosis result from complex interactions between environmental factors and genetic variants. A panel of chromosome substitution strains (CSSs) was developed to characterize genetic and dietary factors contributing to metabolic diseases and other biological traits and biomedical conditions. Our goal here was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to obesity, energy expenditure, and atherosclerosis. Parental strains C57BL/6 and A/J together with a panel of 21 CSSs derived from these progenitors were subjected to chronic feeding of rodent chow and atherosclerotic (females) or diabetogenic (males) test diets, and evaluated for a variety of metabolic phenotypes including several traits unique to this report, namely fat pad weights, energy balance, and atherosclerosis. A total of 297 QTLs across 35 traits were discovered, two of which provided significant protection from atherosclerosis, and several dozen QTLs modulated body weight, body composition, and circulating lipid levels in females and males. While several QTLs confirmed previous reports, most QTLs were novel. Finally, we applied the CSS quantitative genetic approach to energy balance, and identified three novel QTLs controlling energy expenditure and one QTL modulating food intake. Overall, we identified many new QTLs and phenotyped several novel traits in this mouse model of diet-induced metabolic diseases. PMID:25001233

  14. Systems genetics analysis of body weight and energy metabolism traits in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity and phenotypic traits associated with this condition exhibit significant heritability in natural populations of most organisms. While a number of genes and genetic pathways have been implicated to play a role in obesity associated traits, the genetic architecture that underlies the natural variation in these traits is largely unknown. Here, we used 40 wild-derived inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster to quantify genetic variation in body weight, the content of three major metabolites (glycogen, triacylglycerol, and glycerol) associated with obesity, and metabolic rate in young flies. We chose these lines because they were previously screened for variation in whole-genome transcript abundance and in several adult life-history traits, including longevity, resistance to starvation stress, chill-coma recovery, mating behavior, and competitive fitness. This enabled us not only to identify candidate genes and transcriptional networks that might explain variation for energy metabolism traits, but also to investigate the genetic interrelationships among energy metabolism, behavioral, and life-history traits that have evolved in natural populations. Results We found significant genetically based variation in all traits. Using a genome-wide association screen for single feature polymorphisms and quantitative trait transcripts, we identified 337, 211, 237, 553, and 152 novel candidate genes associated with body weight, glycogen content, triacylglycerol storage, glycerol levels, and metabolic rate, respectively. Weighted gene co-expression analyses grouped transcripts associated with each trait in significant modules of co-expressed genes and we interpreted these modules in terms of their gene enrichment based on Gene Ontology analysis. Comparison of gene co-expression modules for traits in this study with previously determined modules for life-history traits identified significant modular pleiotropy between glycogen content, body weight, competitive

  15. Energy crops for biofuel feedstocks: facts and recent patents on genetic manipulation to improve biofuel crops.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh

    2013-12-01

    Burning fossil-fuels to meet the global energy requirements by human being has intensified the concerns of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Therefore, serious efforts are required to develop nonfossil-based renewable energy sources. Plants are more efficient in utilizing solar energy to convert it into biomass which can be used as feedstocks for biofuel production. Hence with the increasing demands of energy and the needs of cost-effective, sustainable production of fuels, it has become necessary to switch over to plant biomass as a renewable source of energy. Biofuels derived from more sustainable biological materials such as lignocellulosic plant residues, considered as second generation biofuels, are more dependable. However, there are technical challenges such as pretreatment and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to convert it into fermentable sugars. Plant genetic engineering has already proven its potential in modifying cell wall composition of plants for enhancing the efficiency of biofuel production. Interest and potential in the area are very much evident from the growing number of patents in the recent years on the subject. In this review, recent trends in genetic engineering of energy crops for biofuel production have been introduced, and strategies for the future developments have been discussed. PMID:24456235

  16. Mixing Energy Models in Genetic Algorithms for On-Lattice Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mahmood A.; Newton, M. A. Hakim; Hoque, Md. Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is computationally a very challenging problem. The challenge largely comes from the fact that the energy function that needs to be minimised in order to obtain the native structure of a given protein is not clearly known. A high resolution 20 × 20 energy model could better capture the behaviour of the actual energy function than a low resolution energy model such as hydrophobic polar. However, the fine grained details of the high resolution interaction energy matrix are often not very informative for guiding the search. In contrast, a low resolution energy model could effectively bias the search towards certain promising directions. In this paper, we develop a genetic algorithm that mainly uses a high resolution energy model for protein structure evaluation but uses a low resolution HP energy model in focussing the search towards exploring structures that have hydrophobic cores. We experimentally show that this mixing of energy models leads to significant lower energy structures compared to the state-of-the-art results. PMID:24224180

  17. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between residual energy intake and growth, feed intake, and carcass traits of young bulls.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J; Mao, I L; Andersen, B B; Madsen, P

    1992-02-01

    Residual energy intake, defined as actual minus predicted energy intake during a production period, was estimated for each of 650 bull calves of 31 Holstein Friesian or Brown Swiss sires. Residual energy intake, measured under ad libitum feeding, had heritabilities similar to those of growth rate and energy conversion ratio with an estimate of approximately .3. Residual energy intake was related to average daily energy intake both phenotypically and genetically such that selection for decreased residual energy intake would lead to a decrease in daily feed intake. Such selection would also tend to increase carcass fatness (i.e., genetically fat animals are the most efficient). Residual energy intake estimated with and without correction for carcass composition were closely correlated. Thus, residual energy intake may be estimated without the knowledge of carcass composition in growing bulls of dual-purpose breeds. PMID:1548200

  18. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Hosseini, S. A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  19. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly,more » during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.« less

  20. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  1. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy. PMID:25400629

  2. Challenges and Opportunities Associated with Simultaneous Energy Cane and Sugarcane Genetic Improvement -- Results of a Survey of International Sugarcane Breeders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following Brazil's dramatic success in utilizing sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) for large-scale ethanol production, and with a growing interest in energy crops worldwide, sugarcane breeders have been charged with genetically improving cane as an energy crop. We conducted a survey of sugarcane breeders i...

  3. Energy-efficient waveform shapes for neural stimulation revealed with a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2010-08-01

    The energy efficiency of stimulation is an important consideration for battery-powered implantable stimulators. We used a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the energy-optimal waveform shape for neural stimulation. The GA was coupled to a computational model of extracellular stimulation of a mammalian myelinated axon. As the GA progressed, waveforms became increasingly energy efficient and converged upon an energy-optimal shape. The results of the GA were consistent across several trials, and resulting waveforms resembled truncated Gaussian curves. When constrained to monophasic cathodic waveforms, the GA produced waveforms that were symmetric about the peak, which occurred approximately during the middle of the pulse. However, when the cathodic waveforms were coupled to rectangular charge-balancing anodic pulses, the location and sharpness of the peak varied with the duration and timing (i.e., before or after the cathodic phase) of the anodic phase. In a model of a population of mammalian axons and in vivo experiments on a cat sciatic nerve, the GA-optimized waveforms were more energy efficient and charge efficient than several conventional waveform shapes used in neural stimulation. If used in implantable neural stimulators, GA-optimized waveforms could prolong battery life, thereby reducing the frequency of recharge intervals, the volume of implanted pulse generators, and the costs and risks of battery-replacement surgeries.

  4. Energy-efficient waveform shapes for neural stimulation revealed with a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M

    2010-08-01

    The energy efficiency of stimulation is an important consideration for battery-powered implantable stimulators. We used a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the energy-optimal waveform shape for neural stimulation. The GA was coupled to a computational model of extracellular stimulation of a mammalian myelinated axon. As the GA progressed, waveforms became increasingly energy efficient and converged upon an energy-optimal shape. The results of the GA were consistent across several trials, and resulting waveforms resembled truncated Gaussian curves. When constrained to monophasic cathodic waveforms, the GA produced waveforms that were symmetric about the peak, which occurred approximately during the middle of the pulse. However, when the cathodic waveforms were coupled to rectangular charge-balancing anodic pulses, the location and sharpness of the peak varied with the duration and timing (i.e., before or after the cathodic phase) of the anodic phase. In a model of a population of mammalian axons and in vivo experiments on a cat sciatic nerve, the GA-optimized waveforms were more energy efficient and charge efficient than several conventional waveform shapes used in neural stimulation. If used in implantable neural stimulators, GA-optimized waveforms could prolong battery life, thereby reducing the frequency of recharge intervals, the volume of implanted pulse generators, and the costs and risks of battery-replacement surgeries. PMID:20571186

  5. Guided macro-mutation in a graded energy based genetic algorithm for protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahmood A; Iqbal, Sumaiya; Khatib, Firas; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    Protein structure prediction is considered as one of the most challenging and computationally intractable combinatorial problem. Thus, the efficient modeling of convoluted search space, the clever use of energy functions, and more importantly, the use of effective sampling algorithms become crucial to address this problem. For protein structure modeling, an off-lattice model provides limited scopes to exercise and evaluate the algorithmic developments due to its astronomically large set of data-points. In contrast, an on-lattice model widens the scopes and permits studying the relatively larger proteins because of its finite set of data-points. In this work, we took the full advantage of an on-lattice model by using a face-centered-cube lattice that has the highest packing density with the maximum degree of freedom. We proposed a graded energy-strategically mixes the Miyazawa-Jernigan (MJ) energy with the hydrophobic-polar (HP) energy-based genetic algorithm (GA) for conformational search. In our application, we introduced a 2×2 HP energy guided macro-mutation operator within the GA to explore the best possible local changes exhaustively. Conversely, the 20×20 MJ energy model-the ultimate objective function of our GA that needs to be minimized-considers the impacts amongst the 20 different amino acids and allow searching the globally acceptable conformations. On a set of benchmark proteins, our proposed approach outperformed state-of-the-art approaches in terms of the free energy levels and the root-mean-square deviations. PMID:26878130

  6. High-energy mode-locked fiber lasers using multiple transmission filters and a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xing; Kutz, J Nathan

    2013-03-11

    We theoretically demonstrate that in a laser cavity mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) using sets of waveplates and passive polarizer, the energy performance can be significantly increased by incorporating multiple NPR filters. The NPR filters are engineered so as to mitigate the multi-pulsing instability in the laser cavity which is responsible for limiting the single pulse per round trip energy in a myriad of mode-locked cavities. Engineering of the NPR filters for performance is accomplished by implementing a genetic algorithm that is capable of systematically identifying viable and optimal NPR settings in a vast parameter space. Our study shows that five NPR filters can increase the cavity energy by approximately a factor of five, with additional NPRs contributing little or no enhancements beyond this. With the advent and demonstration of electronic controls for waveplates and polarizers, the analysis suggests a general design and engineering principle that can potentially close the order of magnitude energy gap between fiber based mode-locked lasers and their solid state counterparts. PMID:23482223

  7. Calibration of mass transfer-based models to predict reference crop evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valipour, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to compare mass transfer-based models to determine the best model under different weather conditions. The results showed that the Penman model estimates reference crop evapotranspiration better than other models in most provinces of Iran (15 provinces). However, the values of R 2 were less than 0.90 for 24 provinces of Iran. Therefore, the models were calibrated, and precision of estimation was increased (the values of R 2 were less than 0.90 for only ten provinces in the modified models). The mass transfer-based models estimated reference crop evapotranspiration in the northern (near the Caspian Sea) and southern (near the Persian Gulf) Iran (annual relative humidity more than 65 %) better than other provinces. The best values of R 2 were 0.96 and 0.98 for the Trabert and Rohwer models in Ardabil (AR) and Mazandaran (MZ) provinces before and after calibration, respectively. Finally, a list of the best performances of each model was presented to use other regions and next studies according to values of mean, maximum, and minimum temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. The best weather conditions to use mass transfer-based equations are 8-18 °C (with the exception of Ivanov), <25.5 °C, <15 °C, >55 % for mean, maximum, and minimum temperature, and relative humidity, respectively.

  8. Energy Dense, Protein Restricted Diet Increases Adiposity and Perturbs Metabolism in Young, Genetically Lean Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kimberly D.; Scheffler, Tracy L.; Kasten, Steven C.; Reinholt, Brad M.; van Eyk, Gregory R.; Escobar, Jeffery; Scheffler, Jason M.; Gerrard, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of obesity and metabolic dysregulation during growth (or childhood) are lacking. Our objective was to increase adiposity and induce metabolic syndrome in young, genetically lean pigs. Pre-pubertal female pigs, age 35 d, were fed a high-energy diet (HED; n = 12), containing 15% tallow, 35% refined sugars and 9.1–12.9% crude protein, or a control corn-based diet (n = 11) with 12.2–19.2% crude protein for 16 wk. Initially, HED pigs self-regulated energy intake similar to controls, but by wk 5, consumed more (P<0.001) energy per kg body weight. At wk 15, pigs were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); blood glucose increased (P<0.05) in control pigs and returned to baseline levels within 60 min. HED pigs were hyperglycemic at time 0, and blood glucose did not return to baseline (P = 0.01), even 4 h post-challenge. During OGTT, glucose area under the curve (AUC) was higher and insulin AUC was lower in HED pigs compared to controls (P = 0.001). Chronic HED intake increased (P<0.05) subcutaneous, intramuscular, and perirenal fat deposition, and induced hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and low-density lipoprotein hypercholesterolemia. A subset of HED pigs (n = 7) was transitioned back to a control diet for an additional six weeks. These pigs were subjected to an additional OGTT at 22 wk. Glucose AUC and insulin AUC did not improve, supporting that dietary intervention was not sufficient to recover glucose tolerance or insulin production. These data suggest a HED may be used to increase adiposity and disrupt glucose homeostasis in young, growing pigs. PMID:23991090

  9. Optimizing energy yields in black locust through genetic selection: final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bongarten, B.C.; Merkle, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the magnitude of improvement in biomass yield of black locust possible through breeding, and to determine methods for efficiently capturing the yield improvement achievable from selective breeding. To meet this overall objective, six tasks were undertaken to determine: (1) the amount and geographic pattern of natural genetic variation, (2) the mating system of the species, (3) quantitative genetic parameters of relevant traits, (4) the relationship between nitrogen fixation and growth in black locust, (5) the viability of mass vegetative propagation, and (6) the feasibility of improvement through genetic transformation.

  10. Genetic variance and covariance patterns for body weight and energy balance characters in an advanced intercross population of mice

    PubMed Central

    Leamy, Larry J; Elo, Kari; Nielsen, Merlyn K; Van Vleck, L Dale; Pomp, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    We estimated heritabilities and genetic correlations for a suite of 15 characters in five functional groups in an advanced intercross population of over 2000 mice derived from a cross of inbred lines selected for high and low heat loss. Heritabilities averaged 0.56 for three body weights, 0.23 for two energy balance characters, 0.48 for three bone characters, 0.35 for four measures of adiposity, and 0.27 for three organ weights, all of which were generally consistent in magnitude with estimates derived in previous studies. Genetic correlations varied from -0.65 to +0.98, and were higher within these functional groups than between groups. These correlations generally conformed to a priori expectations, being positive in sign for energy expenditure and consumption (+0.24) and negative in sign for energy expenditure and adiposity (-0.17). The genetic correlations of adiposity with body weight at 3, 6, and 12 weeks of age (-0.29, -0.22, -0.26) all were negative in sign but not statistically significant. The independence of body weight and adiposity suggests that this advanced intercross population is ideal for a comprehensive discovery of genes controlling regulation of mammalian adiposity that are distinct from those for body weight. PMID:16194522

  11. Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Sam

    2013-03-01

    Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  12. Energy optimization of the fin/rudder roll stabilization system based on the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lijun; Liu, Shaoying; Liu, Fanming; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Energy optimization is one of the key problems for ship roll reduction systems in the last decade. According to the nonlinear characteristics of ship motion, the four degrees of freedom nonlinear model of Fin/Rudder roll stabilization can be established. This paper analyzes energy consumption caused by overcoming the resistance and the yaw, which is added to the fin/rudder roll stabilization system as new performance index. In order to achieve the purpose of the roll reduction, ship course keeping and energy optimization, the self-tuning PID controller based on the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) method is used to optimize performance index. In addition, random weight coefficient is adopted to build a multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization model. The objective function is improved so that the objective function can be normalized to a constant level. Simulation results showed that the control method based on MOGA, compared with the traditional control method, not only improves the efficiency of roll stabilization and yaw control precision, but also optimizes the energy of the system. The proposed methodology can get a better performance at different sea states.

  13. Toward a new radiative-transfer-based model for remote sensing of terrestrial surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shengcheng; Zhen, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Shizhi; Zhu, WenYue; Li, Xuebin; Huang, Honghua; Wei, Heli

    2015-08-15

    This Letter formulates a simple yet accurate radiative-transfer-based theoretical model to characterize the fraction of radiation reflected by terrestrial surfaces. Emphasis is placed on the concept of inhomogeneous distribution of the diffuse sky radiation function (DSRF) and multiple interaction effects (MIE). Neglecting DSRF and MIE produces a -1.55% mean relative bias in albedo estimates. The presented model can elucidate the impact of DSRF on the surface volume scattering and geometry-optical scattering components, respectively, especially for slant illuminations with solar zenith angles (SZA) larger than 50°. Particularly striking in the comparisons between our model and ground-based observations is the achievement of the agreement level, indicating that our model can effectively resolve the longstanding issue in accurately estimating albedo at extremely large SZAs and is promising for land-atmosphere interactions studies. PMID:26274674

  14. EFFECT OF DIETARY LYSINE AND GENETICS ON INDICES OF ENERGY AND PROTEIN METABOLISM IN RAINBOW TROUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since feed cost represents about 70% of production cost, inexpensive protein alternatives are desirable replacements for fish meal. One drawback to the replacement of fish meal with soybean meal is that the latter protein source is first limiting in lysine. To investigate if different genetic line...

  15. Genetic Resources of Energy Crops: Biological Systems to Combat Climate Change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological systems are expected to contribute to renewable energy production, help stabilize rising levels of green house gases (GHG), and mitigate the risk of global climate change (GCC). Bioenergy crop plants that function as solar energy collectors and thermo-chemical energy storage systems are t...

  16. Multiobjective genetic algorithm conjunctive use optimization for production, cost, and energy with dynamic return flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Richard C.; Forghani, Ali; Fayad, Hala

    2014-04-01

    Many real water resources optimization problems involve conflicting objectives for which the main goal is to find a set of optimal solutions on, or near to the Pareto front. E-constraint and weighting multiobjective optimization techniques have shortcomings, especially as the number of objectives increases. Multiobjective Genetic Algorithms (MGA) have been previously proposed to overcome these difficulties. Here, an MGA derives a set of optimal solutions for multiobjective multiuser conjunctive use of reservoir, stream, and (un)confined groundwater resources. The proposed methodology is applied to a hydraulically and economically nonlinear system in which all significant flows, including stream-aquifer-reservoir-diversion-return flow interactions, are simulated and optimized simultaneously for multiple periods. Neural networks represent constrained state variables. The addressed objectives that can be optimized simultaneously in the coupled simulation-optimization model are: (1) maximizing water provided from sources, (2) maximizing hydropower production, and (3) minimizing operation costs of transporting water from sources to destinations. Results show the efficiency of multiobjective genetic algorithms for generating Pareto optimal sets for complex nonlinear multiobjective optimization problems.

  17. cluster: Searching for Unique Low Energy Minima of Structures Using a Novel Implementation of a Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kanters, René P F; Donald, Kelling J

    2014-12-01

    A new flexible implementation of a genetic algorithm for locating unique low energy minima of isomers of clusters is described and tested. The strategy employed can be applied to molecular or atomic clusters and has a flexible input structure so that a system with several different elements can be built up from a set of individual atoms or from fragments made up of groups of atoms. This cluster program is tested on several systems, and the results are compared to computational and experimental data from previous studies. The quality of the algorithm for locating reliably the most competitive low energy structures of an assembly of atoms is examined for strongly bound Si-Li clusters, and ZnF2 clusters, and the more weakly interacting water trimers. The use of the nuclear repulsion energy as a duplication criterion, an increasing population size, and avoiding mutation steps without loss of efficacy are distinguishing features of the program. For the Si-Li clusters, a few new low energy minima are identified in the testing of the algorithm, and our results for the metal fluorides and water show very good agreement with the literature. PMID:26583254

  18. [Membrane transfer-based colorimetric DNA detection using enzyme modified gold nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Jing, Fengxiang; Gao, Qiuyue; Jia, Chunping; Chen, Jiwu; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2010-08-01

    We report here a novel membrane transfer-based DNA detection method, in which alkaline phosphatase labeled gold nanoparticle (AuNP) probes were used as a means to amplify the detection signal. In this method, the capture probe P1, complimentary to the 3' end of target DNA, was immobilized on the chip. The multi-component AuNP probes were prepared by co-coating AuNPs with the detecting probe P2, complimentary to the 5' end of target DNA, and two biotin-labeled signal probes (T10 and T40) with different lengths. In the presence of target DNA, DNA hybridization led to the attachment of AuNPs on the chip surface where specific DNA sequences were located in a "sandwich" format. Alkaline phosphatase was then introduced to the surface via biotine-streptavidin interaction. By using BCIP/NBT alkaline phosphatase color development kit, a colorimetric DNA detection was achieved through membrane transfer. The signal on the membrane was then detected by the naked eye or an ordinary optical scanner. The method provided a detection of limit of 1 pmol/L for synthesized target DNA and 0.23 pmol/L for PCR products of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 16S rDNA when the ratio of probes used was 9:1:1 (T10:T40:P2). The method described here has many desirable advantages including high sensitivity, simple operation, and no need of sophisticated equipment. The method can be potentially used for reliable biosensings. PMID:21090120

  19. Optimization of energy saving device combined with a propeller using real-coded genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Tomohiro; Kanemaru, Takashi; Kataoka, Shiro; Arihama, Kiyoshi; Yoshitake, Akira; Arakawa, Daijiro; Ando, Jun

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical optimization method to improve the performance of the propeller with Turbo-Ring using real-coded genetic algorithm. In the presented method, Unimodal Normal Distribution Crossover (UNDX) and Minimal Generation Gap (MGG) model are used as crossover operator and generation-alternation model, respectively. Propeller characteristics are evaluated by a simple surface panel method "SQCM" in the optimization process. Blade sections of the original Turbo-Ring and propeller are replaced by the NACA66 a = 0.8 section. However, original chord, skew, rake and maximum blade thickness distributions in the radial direction are unchanged. Pitch and maximum camber distributions in the radial direction are selected as the design variables. Optimization is conducted to maximize the efficiency of the propeller with Turbo-Ring. The experimental result shows that the efficiency of the optimized propeller with Turbo-Ring is higher than that of the original propeller with Turbo-Ring.

  20. [Genetic effects in mice exposed to the 10-km area around the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station].

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, M D; Chekhovich, A V; Ramaiĭa, L K; Shevchenko, V A; Shaks, A I; Lobaneva, N V

    1990-10-01

    Mice (CBAxC57BL) F of both sexes were exposed within the 10 km zone of Chernobyl nuclear power station. Genetic damage of phone chronic effect of increased radiation in exposed adult mice and in the course of embryogenesis was studied. The total absorbed radiation doses in testes varied from 1.85 to 0.42 Gy in embryos and from 3.4 to 2.7 Gy in adult males. Increase of dominant lethal mutations (DLM) and abnormal sperm heads (ASH) was only observed right after the end of exposure of adult males. The yield of reciprocal translocations (RT) in these males was relatively low. Among the males exposed at the stage of early embryogenesis, 4 heterozygotes for RT were revealed. In other males of this group the RT yield was low. PMID:2283055

  1. Energy management of a power-split plug-in hybrid electric vehicle based on genetic algorithm and quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zheng; Mi, Chris Chunting; Xiong, Rui; Xu, Jun; You, Chenwen

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces an online and intelligent energy management controller to improve the fuel economy of a power-split plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Based on analytic analysis between fuel-rate and battery current at different driveline power and vehicle speed, quadratic equations are applied to simulate the relationship between battery current and vehicle fuel-rate. The power threshold at which engine is turned on is optimized by genetic algorithm (GA) based on vehicle fuel-rate, battery state of charge (SOC) and driveline power demand. The optimal battery current when the engine is on is calculated using quadratic programming (QP) method. The proposed algorithm can control the battery current effectively, which makes the engine work more efficiently and thus reduce the fuel-consumption. Moreover, the controller is still applicable when the battery is unhealthy. Numerical simulations validated the feasibility of the proposed controller.

  2. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist. PMID:27067213

  3. Genetic approaches to understanding the population-level impact of wind energy development on migratory bats

    SciTech Connect

    Vonhof, Maarten J.; Russell, Amy L.

    2013-09-30

    Documented fatalities of bats at wind turbines have raised serious concerns about the future impacts of increased wind power development on populations of migratory bat species. Yet there is little data on bat population sizes and trends to provide context for understanding the consequences of mortality due to wind power development. Using a large dataset of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation for eastern red bats, we demonstrated that: 1) this species forms a single, panmictic population across their range with no evidence for the historical use of divergent migratory pathways by any portion of the population; 2) the effective size of this population is in the hundreds of thousands to millions; and 3) for large populations, genetic diversity measures and at least one coalescent method are insensitive to even very high rates of population decline over long time scales and until population size has become very small. Our data provide important context for understanding the population-level impacts of wind power development on affected bat species.

  4. Genetic variants in human CLOCK associate with total energy intake and cytokine sleep factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the importance of total energy intake in circadian system regulation, no study has related human CLOCK gene polymorphisms and food intake measures. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of five CLOCK single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) with food-intake and to explore the p...

  5. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  6. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  7. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  8. Mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). In addition, this review makes use of a growing number of publically available databases including MITOMAP, a human mitochondrial genome database (www.mitomap.org), the Human DNA polymerase Gamma Mutation Database (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/polg/) and PhyloTree.org (www.phylotree.org), a repository of global mtDNA variation. Areas of agreement The disruption in cellular energy, resulting from defects in mtDNA or defects in the nuclear-encoded genes responsible for mitochondrial maintenance, manifests in a growing number of human diseases. Areas of controversy The exact mechanisms which govern the inheritance of mtDNA are hotly debated. Growing points Although still in the early stages, the development of in vitro genetic manipulation could see an end to the inheritance of the most severe mtDNA disease. PMID:23704099

  9. Heterogeneity in genetic variation and energy sink relationships for residual feed intake across research stations and countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our long-term objective is to develop genomic prediction strategies for improving feed efficiency in dairy cattle. In this study, phenotypic data were pooled across multiple research stations to facilitate investigation of the genetic and non-genetic components of feed efficiency in Holstein cattle....

  10. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles Genetic Counseling Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetic Counseling Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... informed decisions about testing and treatment. Reasons for Genetic Counseling There are many reasons that people go ...

  11. New Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... human genome, behavioral genetics, pharmacogenetics, drug resistance, biofilms, computer modeling. » more Chapter 5: 21st-Century Genetics Covers systems biology, GFP, genetic testing, privacy concerns, DNA forensics, ...

  12. Charge-transfer-based Gas Sensing Using Atomic-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungjin; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Choi, Minseok; Yoon, Jongwon; Kim, Ah Ra; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Sung-Gyu; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Kim, Chang Su; Song, Myungkwan; Jeong, Yongsoo; Nam, Kee-Seok; Lee, Sangchul; Yoo, Tae Jin; Kang, Chang Goo; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) atomic layers have a strong potential to be used as 2D electronic sensor components. However, intrinsic synthesis challenges have made this task difficult. In addition, the detection mechanisms for gas molecules are not fully understood. Here, we report a high-performance gas sensor constructed using atomic-layered MoS2 synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). A highly sensitive and selective gas sensor based on the CVD-synthesised MoS2 was developed. In situ photoluminescence characterisation revealed the charge transfer mechanism between the gas molecules and MoS2, which was validated by theoretical calculations. First-principles density functional theory calculations indicated that NO2 and NH3 molecules have negative adsorption energies (i.e., the adsorption processes are exothermic). Thus, NO2 and NH3 molecules are likely to adsorb onto the surface of the MoS2. The in situ PL characterisation of the changes in the peaks corresponding to charged trions and neutral excitons via gas adsorption processes was used to elucidate the mechanisms of charge transfer between the MoS2 and the gas molecules.

  13. Charge-transfer-based Gas Sensing Using Atomic-layer MoS2

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byungjin; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Choi, Minseok; Yoon, Jongwon; Kim, Ah Ra; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Sung-Gyu; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Kim, Chang Su; Song, Myungkwan; Jeong, Yongsoo; Nam, Kee-Seok; Lee, Sangchul; Yoo, Tae Jin; Kang, Chang Goo; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) atomic layers have a strong potential to be used as 2D electronic sensor components. However, intrinsic synthesis challenges have made this task difficult. In addition, the detection mechanisms for gas molecules are not fully understood. Here, we report a high-performance gas sensor constructed using atomic-layered MoS2 synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). A highly sensitive and selective gas sensor based on the CVD-synthesised MoS2 was developed. In situ photoluminescence characterisation revealed the charge transfer mechanism between the gas molecules and MoS2, which was validated by theoretical calculations. First-principles density functional theory calculations indicated that NO2 and NH3 molecules have negative adsorption energies (i.e., the adsorption processes are exothermic). Thus, NO2 and NH3 molecules are likely to adsorb onto the surface of the MoS2. The in situ PL characterisation of the changes in the peaks corresponding to charged trions and neutral excitons via gas adsorption processes was used to elucidate the mechanisms of charge transfer between the MoS2 and the gas molecules. PMID:25623472

  14. Modeling Genetic and Environmental Factors in Biological Systems Using Structural Equation Modeling: An Application to Energy Balance.

    PubMed

    Nock, Nora L; Li, Li; Elston, Robert C

    2009-06-17

    To improve our understanding of the role(s) that genes and environmental factors play in a complex disease, we need statistical approaches that model multiple factors simultaneously in a hierarchical manner that aims to reflect the underlying biological system(s). We present an approach that models genes as latent constructs, defined by multiple variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) within each gene, using the multivariate statistical framework of structural equation modeling (SEM) to model multiple, putative genetic and environmental factors involved in energy imbalance ('obesity') using subjects from a colon polyp case-control study. We found that modeling constructs for the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene (defined by SNPs rs1137100, rs1137101, rs1805096, rs6588147) and the fat mass-and-obesity-associated (FTO) gene (defined by SNPs rs9939609, rs1421085, rs8044769) together with demographic (age, race, gender), physical activity, diet and sleep variables increased the strength of the association (β(std)=-0.13 ± 0.06; p=0.03) between the FTO and obesity constructs compared to that observed in a reduced model with only the FTO and LEPR constructs and demographic variables (β(std)=-0.05 ± 0.03; p=0.08). Several indirect paths, including an association between the LEPR and physical activity constructs (β(std)=-0.15 ± 0.04; p=0.01), were found. Interestingly, removing FTO revealed a marginal association between the LEPR and obesity constructs (β(std)=0.24 ± 0.14; p=0.09), which was not present when FTO was in the model. These results illustrate the importance of modeling multiple relevant genes and other factors in the same model, which is a major strength of this approach. Moreover, our latent gene construct approach exploits the correlation structure between SNPs while capturing overall effects of variation in that gene, which will enable better utilization of candidate gene and genome-wide SNP array data. PMID:21607009

  15. Modeling Genetic and Environmental Factors in Biological Systems Using Structural Equation Modeling: An Application to Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Nora L.; Li, Li; Elston, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the role(s) that genes and environmental factors play in a complex disease, we need statistical approaches that model multiple factors simultaneously in a hierarchical manner that aims to reflect the underlying biological system(s). We present an approach that models genes as latent constructs, defined by multiple variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) within each gene, using the multivariate statistical framework of structural equation modeling (SEM) to model multiple, putative genetic and environmental factors involved in energy imbalance (‘obesity’) using subjects from a colon polyp case-control study. We found that modeling constructs for the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene (defined by SNPs rs1137100, rs1137101, rs1805096, rs6588147) and the fat mass-and-obesity-associated (FTO) gene (defined by SNPs rs9939609, rs1421085, rs8044769) together with demographic (age, race, gender), physical activity, diet and sleep variables increased the strength of the association (βstd=−0.13 ± 0.06; p=0.03) between the FTO and obesity constructs compared to that observed in a reduced model with only the FTO and LEPR constructs and demographic variables (βstd=−0.05 ± 0.03; p=0.08). Several indirect paths, including an association between the LEPR and physical activity constructs (βstd=−0.15 ± 0.04; p=0.01), were found. Interestingly, removing FTO revealed a marginal association between the LEPR and obesity constructs (βstd=0.24 ± 0.14; p=0.09), which was not present when FTO was in the model. These results illustrate the importance of modeling multiple relevant genes and other factors in the same model, which is a major strength of this approach. Moreover, our latent gene construct approach exploits the correlation structure between SNPs while capturing overall effects of variation in that gene, which will enable better utilization of candidate gene and genome-wide SNP array data. PMID:21607009

  16. Genetic isolation and morphological divergence mediated by high-energy rapids in two cichlid genera from the lower Congo rapids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is hypothesized that one of the mechanisms promoting diversification in cichlid fishes in the African Great Lakes has been the well-documented pattern of philopatry along shoreline habitats leading to high levels of genetic isolation among populations. However lake habitats are not the only centers of cichlid biodiversity - certain African rivers also contain large numbers of narrowly endemic species. Patterns of isolation and divergence in these systems have tended to be overlooked and are not well understood. Results We examined genetic and morphological divergence among populations of two narrowly endemic cichlid species, Teleogramma depressum and Lamprologus tigripictilis, from a 100 km stretch of the lower Congo River using both nDNA microsatellites and mtDNA markers along with coordinate-based morphological techniques. In L. tigripictilis, the strongest genetic break was concordant with measurable phenotypic divergence but no morphological disjunction was detected for T. depressum despite significant differentiation at mtDNA and nDNA microsatellite markers. Conclusions The genetic markers revealed patterns of philopatry and estimates of genetic isolation that are among the highest reported for any African cichlid species over a comparable geographic scale. We hypothesize that the high levels of philopatry observed are generated and maintained by the extreme hydrology of the lower Congo River. PMID:20482864

  17. Theory of chemical kinetics and charge transfer based on nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Martin Z

    2013-05-21

    Advances in the fields of catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion often involve nanoparticles, which can have kinetics surprisingly different from the bulk material. Classical theories of chemical kinetics assume independent reactions in dilute solutions, whose rates are determined by mean concentrations. In condensed matter, strong interactions alter chemical activities and create variations that can dramatically affect the reaction rate. The extreme case is that of a reaction coupled to a phase transformation, whose kinetics must depend not only on the order parameter but also on its gradients at phase boundaries. Reaction-driven phase transformations are common in electrochemistry, when charge transfer is accompanied by ion intercalation or deposition in a solid phase. Examples abound in Li-ion, metal-air, and lead-acid batteries, as well as metal electrodeposition-dissolution. Despite complex thermodynamics, however, the standard kinetic model is the Butler-Volmer equation, based on a dilute solution approximation. The Marcus theory of charge transfer likewise considers isolated reactants and neglects elastic stress, configurational entropy, and other nonidealities in condensed phases. The limitations of existing theories recently became apparent for the Li-ion battery material LixFePO4 (LFP). It has a strong tendency to separate into Li-rich and Li-poor solid phases, which scientists believe limits its performance. Chemists first modeled phase separation in LFP as an isotropic "shrinking core" within each particle, but experiments later revealed striped phase boundaries on the active crystal facet. This raised the question: What is the reaction rate at a surface undergoing a phase transformation? Meanwhile, dramatic rate enhancement was attained with LFP nanoparticles, and classical battery models could not predict the roles of phase separation and surface modification. In this Account, I present a general theory of chemical kinetics, developed over

  18. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  19. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000510.htm Genetic counseling To use the sharing features on this ... cystic fibrosis or Down syndrome. Who May Want Genetic Counseling? It is up to you whether or ...

  20. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources ... prevalent. Using various laboratory techniques, the scientists isolate DNA from these samples and examine it for unique ...

  1. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    Genetics is the study of heredity, the process of a parent passing certain genes on to their ... certain diseases are also often determined by genes. Genetic counseling is the process where parents can learn ...

  2. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  3. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  4. Genetic barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  5. [Genetics of idiopathic epilepsies].

    PubMed

    Weber, Y G; Lerche, H

    2013-02-01

    Idiopathic epilepsies are genetically determined. They are characterized by the observed seizure types, an age-dependent onset, electroencephalographic criteria and concomitant symptoms, such as movement disorders or developmental delay. The main subtypes are the idiopathic (i) generalized, (ii) the focal epilepsies including the benign syndromes of early childhood and (iii) the epileptic encephalopathies as well as the fever-associated syndromes. In recent years, an increasing number of mutations have been identified in genes encoding ion channels, proteins associated to the vesical synaptic cycle or proteins involved in energy metabolism. These mechanisms are pathophysiologically plausible as they influence neuronal excitability. The large number of genetic defects in epilepsy complicates the genetic diagnostic analysis but novel genetic methods are available covering all known genes at a reasonable price. The proof of a genetic defect leads to a definitive diagnosis, is important for the prognostic and genetic counselling and may influence therapeutic decisions in some cases, so that genetic diagnostic testing is becoming increasingly more important and meaningful in many cases in daily clinical practice. PMID:23392265

  6. Flight Performance and Teneral Energy Reserves of Two Genetically-Modified and One Wild-Type Strain of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Christian; Alphey, Luke; Reiter, Paul; Koella, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The ability of sterile males to survive, disperse, find, and mate with wild females is key to the success of sterile insect technique (SIT). The Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal (RIDL) system is a genetics-based SIT strategy for Aedes aegypti. We examine two aspects of insect performance, flight potential (dispersal ability) and teneral energy reserves, by comparing wild-type (WT) males with genetically-modified lines carrying the tetracycline-repressible constructs OX513A and OX3604C. Our results show significant differences in the flight capacity of the modified lines. OX513A males bred with tetracycline covered 38% less distance, while OX3604C males reared without tetracycline spent 21% less time in flight than their WT counterparts. Such differences in flight performance should be considered when designing release programs (e.g., by placing release sites sufficiently close together to achieve adequate coverage). All mosquito lines had similar teneral carbohydrate contents, though males of the OX3604C line contained more lipids. The addition of tetracycline to the larval diet did not influence the flight potential of the males; however, it did change the teneral sugar reserves of the WT and the lipid reserves of both the WT and the OX3604C lines. PMID:22835152

  7. Genetic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  8. Genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Fraser, F C

    1974-09-01

    A workshop was sponsored by the National Genetics Foundation to evaluate and make recommendations about the status of genetic counseling, its goals, nature, achievements, and needs. The process of genetic workup and counseling is divided into 5 stages: validation of the diagnosis; obtaining family history; estimation of the risk of recurrence; helping the family make a decision and take appropriate action; and extending counseling to other members of the family. Counseling can be directed at individuals or at special groups with the potential of carrying such diseases as sickle cell amenia or Tay-Sachs. No consensus exists on an optimal counseling approach. Genetic counseling is regarded as a team effort, requiring, in addition to the counselor, laboratory facilities and a variety of specialists. The source of payment for genetic counseling services is regarded as a problem of increasing concern. Generally, the fee paid rarely covers the cost of the many procedures and it is suggested that the cost, like that of other public health services, should be subsidized by the state. Considerable argument exists over whether a genetic counselor must have a M.D. degree or whether a Ph. D. in medical genetics is suitable enough. The quality of much genetic counseling, which is often done in the office of doctors unskilled in the field, would be increased if better training in genetics were offered to medical students and if physicians were informed of the existence of counseling centers. Further, there is a growing feeling that some sort of accreditation of genetic counselors is desirable. PMID:4609197

  9. Finding the minimum-energy atomic configuration in large multi-atom structures: Genetic Algorithm versus the Virtual-Atom Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avezac, Mayeul; Zunger, Alex

    2007-03-01

    In many problems in molecular and solid state structures one needs to determine the energy-minimizing decoration of sites by different atom-types (i. e.configuration). The sheer size of this configurational space can be horrendous even if the underlying lattice-type is known. The ab-initio total-energy surface for different (relaxed) configurations can often be parameterized by a spin-like Hamiltonian (Cluster-Expansion) with discrete spin -variables denoting the type of atom occupying each site. We compare two search strategies for the energy-minimizing configuration: (i) A discrete-variable genetic-algorithm approach( S. V. Dudiy and A. Zunger, PRL 97, 046401 (2006) ) and (ii) a continuous-variable approach (M. Wang et al, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 3228 (2006) ) where the discrete-spin functional is mapped onto a continuous-spin functional (virtual atoms) and the search is guided by local gradients with respect to each spin. We compare their efficiency at locating the ground-state configurations of fcc Au-Pd Alloy in terms of number of calls to the functional. We show that a GA approach with diversity-enhancing constraints and reciprocal-space mating easily outperforms the VA approach.

  10. Genetic Variability in Energy Balance and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in a Population-Based Case-Control Study in Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Dhakal, Ishwori B.; Zhang, Xuemei; Prizment, Anna E.; Anderson, Kristin E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Accumulating evidence suggests that energy imbalance plays a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, it remains unclear whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes regulating energy homeostasis influence pancreatic cancer risk. We investigated this question in a case-control study conducted from 1994 to 1998. Methods Cases (n=173) were ascertained from hospitals in the Twin Cities and Mayo Clinic, Minnesota. Controls (n=476) were identified from the general population and frequency matched to cases by age and sex. Seven SNPs were evaluated in relation to pancreatic cancer using unconditional logistic regression. Results After adjustment for confounders, the leucine/proline or proline/proline genotype of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene rs16139 was associated with a lower risk than the leucine/leucine genotype [odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval) (95% CI): 0.40 (0.15, 0.91)]. Conversely, an increased risk was observed for the glycine/arginine or arginine/arginine genotype of the adrenoceptor beta 2, surface (ADRB2) gene rs1042713 as compared with the glycine/glycine genotype [OR (95% CI): 1.52 (1.01, 2.31)]. Conclusions This study first reveals that SNPs in genes modulating energy intake (NPY) and energy expenditure (ADRB2) altered pancreatic cancer risk. If confirmed by other studies, our findings may shed new light on the etiology and prevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24201779

  11. Sorghum Mutant Library as a Genetic Resource to Improve Biomass Yield and BioEnergy Conversion Efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the dwindling of mineral energy resources and soaring fuel price, agriculture sector is called to provide bioenergy in addition to the traditional role of providing humanity with food, fiber, and feed. Freshwater is likely a major challenge for developing biofuels because the trend of global ...

  12. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  13. Genetic Discrimination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Working Group New Horizons and Research Patient Management Policy and Ethics Issues Quick Links for Patient Care ... genetic discrimination. April 25, 2007, Statement of Administration Policy, Office of Management and Budget Official Statement from the Office of ...

  14. Arthropod Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumwalde, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on arthropod genetics that involves phenotype and genotype identification of the creature and the construction process. Includes a list of required materials and directions to build a model arthropod. (YDS)

  15. Development of a genetic algorithm optimisation tool for the early stage design of low and net-Zero Energy Solar Homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charron, Remi

    Homes that utilise solar thermal and solar photovoltaic (PV) technologies to generate as much energy as they consume in a year are referred to as net-Zero Energy Solar Homes (ZESH). This thesis presents the methodology used to develop a Genetic Algorithm (GA) Optimisation Tool that finds optimal configurations of low and net-zero energy solar homes taking into consideration effects from the use of different technologies, local climate, economics, and other factors. The tool links a low energy solar home model developed in TRNSYS with a GA optimisation program that automates the search for cost-effective building designs. The tool varies a predefined set of parameters including building width to length ratio, heating system type, solar thermal collector type and size, and more. The results from the TRNSYS model are compared with monitored data of an energy efficient house to verify that the model was correctly implemented. A total of 40 test cases were evaluated with the tool in order to verify the effects of climate, energy consumption target, control strategy, utility price structures, and other factors, to examine their impact on the resulting optimal design configurations. The GA program was capable of finding designs that were on average within 0.5% of the best known solution with the evaluation of only 0.00012% of the solution space. Results indicated that homes could be built with near equivalent monthly costs of conventional homes, while reducing the annual net-energy consumption by an order of magnitude. A reduction in PV system costs or the introduction of appropriate feed-in-tariffs had significant impacts on the overall cost-effectiveness of ZESH. The thesis clearly demonstrated the extent to which local climate, economic factors, and specific design constraints can have a major impact on the optimal design configuration, which limits the usefulness of generic design guidelines. The methodology developed was also a novel way of using TRNSYS for the

  16. Genetic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie; Tarini, Beth; Press, Nancy A.; Evans, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Current approaches to genetic screening include newborn screening to identify infants who would benefit from early treatment, reproductive genetic screening to assist reproductive decision making, and family history assessment to identify individuals who would benefit from additional prevention measures. Although the traditional goal of screening is to identify early disease or risk in order to implement preventive therapy, genetic screening has always included an atypical element—information relevant to reproductive decisions. New technologies offer increasingly comprehensive identification of genetic conditions and susceptibilities. Tests based on these technologies are generating a different approach to screening that seeks to inform individuals about all of their genetic traits and susceptibilities for purposes that incorporate rapid diagnosis, family planning, and expediting of research, as well as the traditional screening goal of improving prevention. Use of these tests in population screening will increase the challenges already encountered in genetic screening programs, including false-positive and ambiguous test results, overdiagnosis, and incidental findings. Whether this approach is desirable requires further empiric research, but it also requires careful deliberation on the part of all concerned, including genomic researchers, clinicians, public health officials, health care payers, and especially those who will be the recipients of this novel screening approach. PMID:21709145

  17. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to

  18. Specific Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Genetic Terms Definitions for genetic terms Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  19. The ability of genetically lean or fat slow-growing chickens to synthesize and store lipids is not altered by the dietary energy source.

    PubMed

    Baéza, E; Gondret, F; Chartrin, P; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Berri, C; Gabriel, I; Narcy, A; Lessire, M; Métayer-Coustard, S; Collin, A; Jégou, M; Lagarrigue, S; Duclos, M J

    2015-10-01

    The increasing use of unconventional feedstuffs in chicken's diets results in the substitution of starch by lipids as the main dietary energy source. To evaluate the responses of genetically fat or lean chickens to these diets, males of two experimental lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content were fed isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with either high lipid (80 g/kg), high fiber (64 g/kg) contents (HL), or low lipid (20 g/kg), low fiber (21 g/kg) contents (LL) from 22 to 63 days of age. The diet had no effect on growth performance and did not affect body composition evaluated at 63 days of age. Glycolytic and oxidative energy metabolisms in the liver and glycogen storage in liver and Sartorius muscle at 63 days of age were greater in chicken fed LL diet compared with chicken fed HL diet. In Pectoralis major (PM) muscle, energy metabolisms and glycogen content were not different between diets. There were no dietary-associated differences in lipid contents of the liver, muscles and abdominal fat. However, the percentages of saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in tissue lipids were generally higher, whereas percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were lower for diet LL than for diet HL. The fat line had a greater feed intake and average daily gain, but gain to feed ratio was lower in that line compared with the lean line. Fat chickens were heavier than lean chickens at 63 days of age. Their carcass fatness was higher and their muscle yield was lower than those of lean chickens. The oxidative enzyme activities in the liver were lower in the fat line than in the lean line, but line did not affect energy metabolism in muscles. The hepatic glycogen content was not different between lines, whereas glycogen content and glycolytic potential were higher in the PM muscle of fat chickens compared with lean chickens. Lipid contents in the liver, muscles and abdominal fat did not differ between lines, but fat chickens stored less MUFA and

  20. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  1. Geneletter: An Internet-based newsletter on the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics. Final report to the Department of Energy [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, Philip; Wertz, Dorothy C.

    2001-05-01

    The GeneLetter (http://www.geneletter.org) is an Internet newsletter on ethical, legal, and social issues in genetics, designed for a wide and varied audience, some of whom may not be familiar with genetic science. It appears every two months, with a variety of long and short feature articles on ethics and on genetic disorders, a section on new federal and state legislation, an international section, a student corner, book and video reviews, a summary of genetics in the news, and a list of upcoming conferences. Feature articles have ventured into an area of wide general concern, behavioral genetics. The newsletter also has an interactive chatbox and the opportunity of more private communications with the editors via email. The purpose of the GeneLetter is to help fill a communication and knowledge gap on ethical, legal and social issues surrounding genetics.

  2. Deep Sequencing Reveals Novel Genetic Variants in Children with Acute Liver Failure and Tissue Evidence of Impaired Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, C. Alexander; Wang, Xinjian; Wang, Jin; Peters, Anna; Simmons, Julia R.; Moran, Molly C.; Mathur, Abhinav; Husami, Ammar; Qian, Yaping; Sheridan, Rachel; Bove, Kevin E.; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Miethke, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The etiology of acute liver failure (ALF) remains elusive in almost half of affected children. We hypothesized that inherited mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation disorders were occult etiological factors in patients with idiopathic ALF and impaired energy metabolism. Methods Twelve patients with elevated blood molar lactate/pyruvate ratio and indeterminate etiology were selected from a retrospective cohort of 74 subjects with ALF because their fixed and frozen liver samples were available for histological, ultrastructural, molecular and biochemical analysis. Results A customized next-generation sequencing panel for 26 genes associated with mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation defects revealed mutations and sequence variants in five subjects. Variants involved the genes ACAD9, POLG, POLG2, DGUOK, and RRM2B; the latter not previously reported in subjects with ALF. The explanted livers of the patients with heterozygous, truncating insertion mutations in RRM2B showed patchy micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content <30% of controls, and reduced respiratory chain complex activity; both patients had good post-transplant outcome. One infant with severe lactic acidosis was found to carry two heterozygous variants in ACAD9, which was associated with isolated complex I deficiency and diffuse hypergranular hepatocytes. The two subjects with heterozygous variants of unknown clinical significance in POLG and DGUOK developed ALF following drug exposure. Their hepatocytes displayed abnormal mitochondria by electron microscopy. Conclusion Targeted next generation sequencing and correlation with histological, ultrastructural and functional studies on liver tissue in children with elevated lactate/pyruvate ratio expand the spectrum of genes associated with pediatric ALF. PMID:27483465

  3. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  4. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pregnancy loss. How do I know which tests to have? Your health care provider or a genetic counselor can discuss all of the testing options with you and help you decide based on your individual risk factors. Do I have to have these tests? Whether you want to be tested is a ...

  5. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic ...

  6. A Novel Wireless Power Transfer-Based Weighed Clustering Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Method for Cognitive Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    In a cognitive sensor network (CSN), the wastage of sensing time and energy is a challenge to cooperative spectrum sensing, when the number of cooperative cognitive nodes (CNs) becomes very large. In this paper, a novel wireless power transfer (WPT)-based weighed clustering cooperative spectrum sensing model is proposed, which divides all the CNs into several clusters, and then selects the most favorable CNs as the cluster heads and allows the common CNs to transfer the received radio frequency (RF) energy of the primary node (PN) to the cluster heads, in order to supply the electrical energy needed for sensing and cooperation. A joint resource optimization is formulated to maximize the spectrum access probability of the CSN, through jointly allocating sensing time and clustering number. According to the resource optimization results, a clustering algorithm is proposed. The simulation results have shown that compared to the traditional model, the cluster heads of the proposed model can achieve more transmission power and there exists optimal sensing time and clustering number to maximize the spectrum access probability. PMID:26528987

  7. A Novel Wireless Power Transfer-Based Weighed Clustering Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Method for Cognitive Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    In a cognitive sensor network (CSN), the wastage of sensing time and energy is a challenge to cooperative spectrum sensing, when the number of cooperative cognitive nodes (CNs) becomes very large. In this paper, a novel wireless power transfer (WPT)-based weighed clustering cooperative spectrum sensing model is proposed, which divides all the CNs into several clusters, and then selects the most favorable CNs as the cluster heads and allows the common CNs to transfer the received radio frequency (RF) energy of the primary node (PN) to the cluster heads, in order to supply the electrical energy needed for sensing and cooperation. A joint resource optimization is formulated to maximize the spectrum access probability of the CSN, through jointly allocating sensing time and clustering number. According to the resource optimization results, a clustering algorithm is proposed. The simulation results have shown that compared to the traditional model, the cluster heads of the proposed model can achieve more transmission power and there exists optimal sensing time and clustering number to maximize the spectrum access probability. PMID:26528987

  8. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  9. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Genetic Testing KidsHealth > For Parents > Genetic Testing Print A ... blood, skin, bone, or other tissue is needed. Genetic Testing During Pregnancy For genetic testing before birth, ...

  10. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  11. Genetically engineered foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants or animals) inserted into their genetic codes. Genetic engineering can be done with plants, animals, or bacteria ... have been genetically engineering plants since the 1990s. Genetic engineering allows scientists to speed this process up by ...

  12. Genetically encoded ratiometric biosensors to measure intracellular exchangeable zinc in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Hurst, Tamiika K.; Thompson, Richard B.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2011-08-01

    Zinc is an essential element for numerous cellular processes, therefore zinc homeostasis is regulated in living organisms. Fluorescent sensors have been developed as important tools to monitor the concentrations of readily exchangeable zinc in live cells. One type of biosensor uses carbonic anhydrase (CA) as the recognition element based on its tunable affinity, superior metal selectivity, and fluorescence signal from aryl sulfonamide ligands coupled to zinc binding. Here, we fuse carbonic anhydrase with a red fluorescent protein to create a series of genetically-encoded Förster resonance energy transfer-based excitation ratiometric zinc sensors that exhibit large signal increases in response to alterations in physiological-free zinc concentrations. These sensors were applied to the prokaryotic model organism Escherichia coli to quantify the readily exchangeable zinc concentration. In minimal media, E. coli BL21(DE3) cells expressing the CA sensor, exhibit a median intracellular readily exchangeable zinc concentration of 20 pM, much less than the total cellular zinc concentration of ~0.2 mM. Furthermore, the intracellular readily exchangeable zinc concentration varies with the concentration of environmental zinc.

  13. Measurement of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate in Living Cells Using an Improved Set of Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Dániel J.; Kurucz, István; Hunyady, László; Balla, Tamas; Várnai, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Improved versions of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) sensors were created to follow intracellular InsP3 changes in single living cells and in cell populations. Similar to previous InsP3 sensors the new sensors are based on the ligand binding domain of the human type-I InsP3 receptor (InsP3R-LBD), but contain a mutation of either R265K or R269K to lower their InsP3 binding affinity. Tagging the InsP3R-LBD with N-terminal Cerulean and C-terminal Venus allowed measurement of InsP3 in single-cell FRET experiments. Replacing Cerulean with a Luciferase enzyme allowed experiments in multi-cell format by measuring the change in the BRET signal upon stimulation. These sensors faithfully followed the agonist-induced increase in InsP3 concentration in HEK 293T cells expressing the Gq-coupled AT1 angiotensin receptor detecting a response to agonist concentration as low as 10 pmol/L. Compared to the wild type InsP3 sensor, the mutant sensors showed an improved off-rate, enabling a more rapid and complete return of the signal to the resting value of InsP3 after termination of M3 muscarinic receptor stimulation by atropine. For parallel measurements of intracellular InsP3 and Ca2+ levels in BRET experiments, the Cameleon D3 Ca2+ sensor was modified by replacing its CFP with luciferase. In these experiments depletion of plasma membrane PtdIns(4,5)P2 resulted in the fall of InsP3 level, followed by the decrease of the Ca2+-signal evoked by the stimulation of the AT1 receptor. In contrast, when type-III PI 4-kinases were inhibited with a high concentration of wortmannin or a more specific inhibitor, A1, the decrease of the Ca2+-signal preceded the fall of InsP3 level indicating an InsP3-, independent, direct regulation of capacitative Ca2+ influx by plasma membrane inositol lipids. Taken together, our results indicate that the improved InsP3 sensor can be used to monitor both the increase and decrease of InsP3 levels in live cells suitable for high-throughput BRET applications. PMID:25932648

  14. Genetic risks and genetic model specification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jinfeng; Yuan, Ao; Li, Qizhai; Gastwirth, Joseph L

    2016-08-21

    Genetic risks and genetic models are often used in design and analysis of genetic epidemiology studies. A genetic model is defined in terms of two genetic risk measures: genotype relative risk and odds ratio. The impacts of choosing a risk measure on the resulting genetic models are studied in the power to detect association and deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in cases using genetic relative risk. Extensive simulations demonstrate that the power of a study to detect associations using odds ratio is lower than that using relative risk with the same value when other parameters are fixed. When the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds in the general population, the genetic model can be inferred by the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in only cases. Furthermore, it is more efficient than that based on the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all cases and controls. PMID:27181372

  15. Medical genetics and genetic counseling in Chile.

    PubMed

    Margarit, Sonia B; Alvarado, Mónica; Alvarez, Karin; Lay-Son, Guillermo

    2013-12-01

    In the South American Republic of Chile genetic counseling is not currently recognized as an independent clinical discipline, and in general is provided by physicians with training in clinical genetics. At present only one genetic counselor and 28 clinical geneticists practice in this country of over 16 million inhabitants. Pediatric dysmorphology constitutes the primary area of practice in clinical genetics. Although the country has a universal health care system and an adequate level of health care, genetic conditions are not considered a health care priority and there is a lack of clinical and laboratory resources designated for clinical genetics services. Multiple educational, cultural and financial barriers exist to the growth and development of genetic counseling services in Chile. However, during the last 10 years increased awareness of the importance of identifying individuals at risk for inherited cancer syndromes led to growing interest in the practice of cancer genetics. PMID:23744184

  16. Genetic Differences in Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intellect, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Genetics Society of America has released a statement saying that the possibility of a "genetic difference in intelligence between races" is still an open question and warning against "the misuse of genetics for political purposes". (Editor)

  17. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  18. Applying the New Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, James

    1976-01-01

    New developments in the prediction and treatment of genetic diseases are presented. Genetic counseling and the role of the counselor, and rights of individuals to reproduce versus societal impact of genetic disorders, are discussed. (RW)

  19. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and natural…

  20. Genetic mapping and DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, T.; Waterman, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Human Genome Initiative has as its primary objective the characterization of the human genome. High-resolution linkage maps of genetic markers will play an important role in completing the human genome project. This is one of two volumes based on the proceedings of the 1994 IMA Summer Program on Molecular Biology and comprises Weeks 1 and 2 of the four-week program. This volume focuses on genetic mapping and DNA sequencing. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. The Genetics of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Brian P.; Schneider, David S.

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, Brian P. Lazzaro and David S. Schneider examine the topic of the Genetics of Immunity as explored in this month's issues of GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. These inaugural articles are part of a joint Genetics of Immunity collection (ongoing) in the GSA journals. PMID:24939182

  2. Interactive Genetics Tutorial Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The Interactive Genetics Tutorial (IGT) project and the Intelligent Tutoring System for the IGT project named MENDEL supplement genetics instruction in biology courses by providing students with experience in designing, conducting, and evaluating genetics experiments. The MENDEL software is designed to: (1) simulate genetics experiments that…

  3. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  4. Update: Biochemistry of Genetic Manipulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Various topics on the biochemistry of genetic manipulation are discussed. These include genetic transformation and DNA; genetic expression; DNA replication, repair, and mutation; technology of genetic manipulation; and applications of genetic manipulation. Other techniques employed are also considered. (JN)

  5. Genetics of obesity

    PubMed Central

    O'Rahilly, Stephen; Farooqi, I.Sadaf

    2006-01-01

    Considerable attention is currently being paid to the secular changes in food intake and physical activity that underlie the increase in the prevalence of obesity that is apparent in many societies. While this is laudable it would be unwise to view these environmental factors in isolation from the biological factors that normally control body weight and composition and the compelling evidence that inter-individual differences in susceptibility to obesity have strong genetic determinants. This is particularly important, as it is only in the past decade that we have begun to obtain substantive information regarding the molecular constituents of pathways controlling mammalian energy balance and therefore, for the first time, are in a position to achieve a better mechanistic understanding of this disease. Population-based association and linkage studies have highlighted a number of loci at which genetic variation is associated with obesity and related phenotypes and the identification and characterization of monogenic obesity syndromes has been particularly fruitful. While there is widespread acceptance that hereditary factors might predispose to human obesity, it is frequently assumed that such factors would influence metabolic rate or the selective partitioning of excess calories into fat. However, it is notable that, thus far, all monogenic defects causing human obesity actually disrupt hypothalamic pathways and have a profound effect on satiety and food intake. To conclude, the evidence we have to date suggests that the major impact of genes on human obesity is just as likely (or perhaps more likely) to directly impact on hunger, satiety and food intake rather than metabolic rate or nutrient partitioning. At the risk of oversimplification, it seems that from an aetiological/genetic standpoint, human obesity appears less a metabolic than a neuro-behavioural disease. PMID:16815794

  6. Global genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Kumm, Jochen; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2004-01-31

    The introduction of molecular markers in genetic analysis has revolutionized medicine. These molecular markers are genetic variations associated with a predisposition to common diseases and individual variations in drug responses. Identification and genotyping a vast number of genetic polymorphisms in large populations are increasingly important for disease gene identification, pharmacogenetics and population-based studies. Among variations being analyzed, single nucleotide polymorphisms seem to be most useful in large-scale genetic analysis. This review discusses approaches for genetic analysis, use of different markers, and emerging technologies for large-scale genetic analysis where millions of genotyping need to be performed. PMID:14761299

  7. Identification of genetic networks.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Momiao; Li, Jun; Fang, Xiangzhong

    2004-01-01

    In this report, we propose the use of structural equations as a tool for identifying and modeling genetic networks and genetic algorithms for searching the most likely genetic networks that best fit the data. After genetic networks are identified, it is fundamental to identify those networks influencing cell phenotypes. To accomplish this task we extend the concept of differential expression of the genes, widely used in gene expression data analysis, to genetic networks. We propose a definition for the differential expression of a genetic network and use the generalized T2 statistic to measure the ability of genetic networks to distinguish different phenotypes. However, describing the differential expression of genetic networks is not enough for understanding biological systems because differences in the expression of genetic networks do not directly reflect regulatory strength between gene activities. Therefore, in this report we also introduce the concept of differentially regulated genetic networks, which has the potential to assess changes of gene regulation in response to perturbation in the environment and may provide new insights into the mechanism of diseases and biological processes. We propose five novel statistics to measure the differences in regulation of genetic networks. To illustrate the concepts and methods for reconstruction of genetic networks and identification of association of genetic networks with function, we applied the proposed models and algorithms to three data sets. PMID:15020486

  8. Frontotemporal Dementia: Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calendar of Events Fundraising Events Conferences Press Releases Genetics of FTD After receiving a diagnosis of FTD ... that recent advances in science have brought the genetics of FTD into much better focus. In 2012, ...

  9. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  10. Genetic Brain Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: adermatoglyphia

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adermatoglyphia adermatoglyphia Enable Javascript to ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... of iron in the liver, alcohol consumption, smoking, hepatitis C or HIV infection, or certain hormones. Mutations in ... Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are genetic conditions ...

  13. Genetic Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newly Diagnosed Patients There are over 6,000 genetic disorders that can be passed down through the ... mission to help prevent, manage and treat inherited genetic diseases. View our latest News Brief here . You ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Genetics Home Reference Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Genetics Home Reference (GHR) Web site — ghr.nlm.nih. ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: retinoblastoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arias VE. Trilateral retinoblastoma. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2007 Mar;48(3):306-10. Review. Citation on PubMed ... for genetic counseling. Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Mar;62(3):610-9. Citation on PubMed or ...

  16. Latest Research: Genetic Links

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Latest Research: Genetic Links Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents ... laboratories is one way the NEI is expanding genetic testing of eye diseases. Photo courtesy of National ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: microphthalmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... including clouding of the lens of the eye ( cataract ) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed ... GeneReview: Microphthalmia/Anophthalmia/Coloboma Spectrum Genetic Testing Registry: Cataract, congenital, with microphthalmia Genetic Testing Registry: Cataract, microphthalmia ...

  18. Behavioral genetics and taste

    PubMed Central

    Boughter, John D; Bachmanov, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on behavioral genetic studies of sweet, umami, bitter and salt taste responses in mammals. Studies involving mouse inbred strain comparisons and genetic analyses, and their impact on elucidation of taste receptors and transduction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the effect of genetic variation in taste responsiveness on complex traits such as drug intake is considered. Recent advances in development of genomic resources make behavioral genetics a powerful approach for understanding mechanisms of taste. PMID:17903279

  19. Introductory molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Moulds, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with an overview of the current principles of genetics and molecular genetics. Over this foundation, it adds detailed and specialized information: a description of the translation, transcription, expression and regulation of DNA and RNA; a description of the manipulation of genetic material via promoters, enhancers, and gene splicing; and a description of cloning techniques, especially those for blood group genes. The last chapter looks to the impact of molecular genetics on transfusion medicine.

  20. Genetics in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Umesh, Shreekantiah; Nizamie, Shamshul Haque

    2014-01-01

    Today, psychiatrists are focusing on genetics aspects of various psychiatric disorders not only for a future classification of psychiatric disorders but also a notion that genetics would aid in the development of new medications to treat these disabling illnesses. This review therefore emphasizes on the basics of genetics in psychiatry as well as focuses on the emerging picture of genetics in psychiatry and their future implications. PMID:25400339

  1. Genetic Diversity and Genome Complexity of Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) as a C4 plant, is one of the most efficient crops in converting solar energy into chemical energy. Sugarcane cultivar improvement programs have not yet systematically utilized the most of the genetic sources of yield potential and resistance to stresses that may exist in t...

  2. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in,…

  3. The genetic difference principle.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Colin

    2004-01-01

    In the newly emerging debates about genetics and justice three distinct principles have begun to emerge concerning what the distributive aim of genetic interventions should be. These principles are: genetic equality, a genetic decent minimum, and the genetic difference principle. In this paper, I examine the rationale of each of these principles and argue that genetic equality and a genetic decent minimum are ill-equipped to tackle what I call the currency problem and the problem of weight. The genetic difference principle is the most promising of the three principles and I develop this principle so that it takes seriously the concerns of just health care and distributive justice in general. Given the strains on public funds for other important social programmes, the costs of pursuing genetic interventions and the nature of genetic interventions, I conclude that a more lax interpretation of the genetic difference principle is appropriate. This interpretation stipulates that genetic inequalities should be arranged so that they are to the greatest reasonable benefit of the least advantaged. Such a proposal is consistent with prioritarianism and provides some practical guidance for non-ideal societies--that is, societies that do not have the endless amount of resources needed to satisfy every requirement of justice. PMID:15186680

  4. The Genetics of Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Constance

    1987-01-01

    Reports on the findings of several studies into the genetic similarities of twins. Focuses on the relationships between personality and behavioral genetics and argues that genetic similarity seems to be a better predictor than environmental factors. Discusses psychopathology, cognitive abilities, and personality. (TW)

  5. Phenylketonuria Genetic Screening Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Patti

    2012-01-01

    After agreeing to host over 200 students on a daylong genetics field trip, the author needed an easy-to-prepare genetics experiment to accompany the DNA-necklace and gel-electrophoresis activities already planned. One of the student's mothers is a pediatric physician at the local hospital, and she suggested exploring genetic-disease screening…

  6. Genetics by the Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Science > Genetics by the Numbers Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Genetics by the Numbers By Chelsea ... Genetics NIH's National DNA Day This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  7. Genetic algorithms and supernovae type Ia analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanos, Charalampos; Nesseris, Savvas E-mail: nesseris@nbi.dk

    2009-05-15

    We introduce genetic algorithms as a means to analyze supernovae type Ia data and extract model-independent constraints on the evolution of the Dark Energy equation of state w(z) {identical_to} P{sub DE}/{rho}{sub DE}. Specifically, we will give a brief introduction to the genetic algorithms along with some simple examples to illustrate their advantages and finally we will apply them to the supernovae type Ia data. We find that genetic algorithms can lead to results in line with already established parametric and non-parametric reconstruction methods and could be used as a complementary way of treating SNIa data. As a non-parametric method, genetic algorithms provide a model-independent way to analyze data and can minimize bias due to premature choice of a dark energy model.

  8. Feline Genetics: Clinical Applications and Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately thirty-three genes contain fifty mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat’s appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab using a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat’s internal genome. PMID:21147473

  9. Feline genetics: clinical applications and genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2010-11-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately 33 genes contain 50 mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab with a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's internal genome. PMID:21147473

  10. Energy.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2012-01-01

    Energy is the capacity to do the things we are capable of and desire to accomplish. Most often this is thought of in terms of PEP--personal energy potential--a reservoir of individual vivacity and zest for work. Like a battery, energy can be conceived of as a resource that is alternatively used and replenished. Transitions between activities, variety of tasks, and choices of what to spend energy on are part of energy management. Energy capacity can be thought of at four levels: (a) so little that harm is caused and extraordinary steps are needed for recovery, (b) a deficit that slightly impairs performance but will recover naturally, (c) the typical range of functioning, and (d) a surplus that may or may not be useful and requires continual investment to maintain. "Flow" is the experience of optimal energy use when challenges balance capacity as a result of imposing order on our environment. There are other energy resources in addition to personal vim. Effective work design reduces demands on energy. Money, office design, and knowledge are excellent substitutes for personal energy. PMID:22856055

  11. How Is Genetic Testing Done?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing How is genetic testing done? How is genetic testing done? Once a person decides to proceed ... is called informed consent . For more information about genetic testing procedures: The Genetic Science Learning Center at ...

  12. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth > For Parents > Prenatal Genetic Counseling Print ... how can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating ...

  13. Genetic technology: Promises and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    Issues concerning the use of genetic technology are discussed. Some areas discussed include treating genetic disease, prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion, screening for genetic disease, and genetic counseling. Policy issues stemming from these capabilities are considered.

  14. Genetics of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Brautbar, Ariel; Leary, Emili; Rasmussen, Kristen; Wilson, Don P; Steiner, Robert D; Virani, Salim

    2015-04-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and premature cardiovascular disease, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 200-500 for heterozygotes in North America and Europe. Monogenic FH is largely attributed to mutations in the LDLR, APOB, and PCSK9 genes. Differential diagnosis is critical to distinguish FH from conditions with phenotypically similar presentations to ensure appropriate therapeutic management and genetic counseling. Accurate diagnosis requires careful phenotyping based on clinical and biochemical presentation, validated by genetic testing. Recent investigations to discover additional genetic loci associated with extreme hypercholesterolemia using known FH families and population studies have met with limited success. Here, we provide a brief overview of the genetic determinants, differential diagnosis, genetic testing, and counseling of FH genetics. PMID:25712136

  15. Synthetic Genetic Arrays: Automation of Yeast Genetics.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Elena; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Genome-sequencing efforts have led to great strides in the annotation of protein-coding genes and other genomic elements. The current challenge is to understand the functional role of each gene and how genes work together to modulate cellular processes. Genetic interactions define phenotypic relationships between genes and reveal the functional organization of a cell. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) methodology automates yeast genetics and enables large-scale and systematic mapping of genetic interaction networks in the budding yeast,Saccharomyces cerevisiae SGA facilitates construction of an output array of double mutants from an input array of single mutants through a series of replica pinning steps. Subsequent analysis of genetic interactions from SGA-derived mutants relies on accurate quantification of colony size, which serves as a proxy for fitness. Since its development, SGA has given rise to a variety of other experimental approaches for functional profiling of the yeast genome and has been applied in a multitude of other contexts, such as genome-wide screens for synthetic dosage lethality and integration with high-content screening for systematic assessment of morphology defects. SGA-like strategies can also be implemented similarly in a number of other cell types and organisms, includingSchizosaccharomyces pombe,Escherichia coli, Caenorhabditis elegans, and human cancer cell lines. The genetic networks emerging from these studies not only generate functional wiring diagrams but may also play a key role in our understanding of the complex relationship between genotype and phenotype. PMID:27037078

  16. Genetic selection and conservation of genetic diversity*.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, H D

    2012-08-01

    For 100s of years, livestock producers have employed various types of selection to alter livestock populations. Current selection strategies are little different, except our technologies for selection have become more powerful. Genetic resources at the breed level have been in and out of favour over time. These resources are the raw materials used to manipulate populations, and therefore, they are critical to the past and future success of the livestock sector. With increasing ability to rapidly change genetic composition of livestock populations, the conservation of these genetic resources becomes more critical. Globally, awareness of the need to steward genetic resources has increased. A growing number of countries have embarked on large scale conservation efforts by using in situ, ex situ (gene banking), or both approaches. Gene banking efforts have substantially increased and data suggest that gene banks are successfully capturing genetic diversity for research or industry use. It is also noteworthy that both industry and the research community are utilizing gene bank holdings. As pressures grow to meet consumer demands and potential changes in production systems, the linkage between selection goals and genetic conservation will increase as a mechanism to facilitate continued livestock sector development. PMID:22827378

  17. Molecular genetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, D E; Kusano, T

    1994-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is a gram-negative, highly acidophilic (pH 1.5 to 2.0), autotrophic bacterium that obtains its energy through the oxidation of ferrous iron or reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. It is usually dominant in the mixed bacterial populations that are used industrially for the extraction of metals such as copper and uranium from their ores. More recently, these bacterial consortia have been used for the biooxidation of refractory gold-bearing arsenopyrite ores prior to the recovery of gold by cyanidation. The commercial use of T. ferrooxidans has led to an increasing interest in the genetics and molecular biology of the bacterium. Initial investigations were aimed at determining whether the unique physiology and specialized habitat of T. ferrooxidans had been accompanied by a high degree of genetic drift from other gram-negative bacteria. Early genetic studies were comparative in nature and concerned the isolation of genes such as nifHDK, glnA, and recA, which are widespread among bacteria. From a molecular biology viewpoint, T. ferrooxidans appears to be a typical member of the proteobacteria. In most instances, cloned gene promoters and protein products have been functional in Escherichia coli. Although T. ferrooxidans has proved difficult to transform with DNA, research on indigenous plasmids and the isolation of the T. ferrooxidans merA gene have resulted in the development of a low-efficiency electroporation system for one strain of T. ferrooxidans. The most recent studies have focused on the molecular genetics of the pathways associated with nitrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, and components of the energy-producing mechanisms. PMID:8177170

  18. Caging and Uncaging Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Little, Tom J.; Colegrave, Nick

    2016-01-01

    It is important for biology to understand if observations made in highly reductionist laboratory settings generalise to harsh and noisy natural environments in which genetic variation is sorted to produce adaptation. But what do we learn by studying, in the laboratory, a genetically diverse population that mirrors the wild? What is the best design for studying genetic variation? When should we consider it at all? The right experimental approach depends on what you want to know. PMID:27458971

  19. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also

  20. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  1. Is genetic evolution predictable?

    PubMed

    Stern, David L; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2009-02-01

    Ever since the integration of Mendelian genetics into evolutionary biology in the early 20th century, evolutionary geneticists have for the most part treated genes and mutations as generic entities. However, recent observations indicate that all genes are not equal in the eyes of evolution. Evolutionarily relevant mutations tend to accumulate in hotspot genes and at specific positions within genes. Genetic evolution is constrained by gene function, the structure of genetic networks, and population biology. The genetic basis of evolution may be predictable to some extent, and further understanding of this predictability requires incorporation of the specific functions and characteristics of genes into evolutionary theory. PMID:19197055

  2. Genetics, society, and decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kowles, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides a conceptual understanding of the biology of genes and also gives current events and controversies in the field. Basic transmission genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics are covered, with additional discussions relating to such topics as agriculture, aging, forensic science, genetic counseling, gene splicing, and recombinant DNA. Low level radiation and its effects, drugs and heredity, IQ, heredity and racial variation, and creationism versus evolution are also described. ''Billboard'' style diagrams visually explain important concepts. Boldfaced key terms are defined within the text and in a comprehensive glossary. Selected readings, discussion questions and problems, and excellent chapter summaries further aid study.

  3. Genetics in Non-Genetic Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lois, Carlos; Groves, James O

    2011-01-01

    The past few decades have seen the field of genetic engineering evolve at a rapid pace, with neuroscientists now equipped with a wide range of tools for the manipulation of an animal's genome in order to study brain function. However, the number of species to which these technologies have been applied, namely the fruit fly, C. elegans, zebrafish and mouse, remains relatively few. This review will discuss the variety of approaches to genetic modification that have been developed in such traditional ‘genetic systems’, and highlight the progress that has been made to translate these technologies to alternative species such as rats, monkeys and birds, where certain neurobiological questions may be better studied. PMID:22119141

  4. Judaism, genetic screening and genetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Rosner, F

    1998-01-01

    Genetic screening, gene therapy and other applications of genetic engineering are permissible in Judaism when used for the treatment, cure, or prevention of disease. Such genetic manipulation is not considered to be a violation of God's natural law, but a legitimate implementation of the biblical mandate to heal. If Tay-Sachs disease, diabetes, hemophilia, cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease or other genetic diseases can be cured or prevented by "gene surgery," then it is certainly permitted in Jewish law. Genetic premarital screening is encouraged in Judaism for the purpose of discouraging at-risk marriages for a fatal illness such as Tay-Sachs disease. Neonatal screening for treatable conditions such as phenylketonuria is certainly desirable and perhaps required in Jewish law. Preimplantation screening and the implantation of only "healthy" zygotes into the mother's womb to prevent the birth of an affected child are probably sanctioned in Jewish law. Whether or not these assisted reproduction techniques may be used to choose the sex of one's offspring, to prevent the birth of a child with a sex-linked disease such as hemophilia, has not yet been ruled on by modern rabbinic decisions. Prenatal screening with the specific intent of aborting an affected fetus is not allowed according to most rabbinic authorities, although a minority view permits it "for great need." Not to have children if both parents are carriers of genetic diseases such as Tay-Sachs is not a Jewish option. Preimplantation screening is preferable. All screening test results must remain confidential. Judaism does not permit the alteration or manipulation of physical traits and characteristics such as height, eye and hair color, facial features and the like, when such change provides no useful benefit to mankind. On the other hand, it is permissible to clone organisms and microorganisms to facilitate the production of insulin, growth hormone, and other agents intended to benefit mankind and to

  5. Soybean Molecular Genetic Diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A history of the various DNA marker types used in the assessment of molecular genetic diversity in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is followed by a description of a number of studies on the assessment of genetic diversity. These studies include a review of reports on 1) the quantification and comp...

  6. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  7. Genetics of aging bone.

    PubMed

    Adams, Douglas J; Rowe, David W; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L

    2016-08-01

    With aging, the skeleton experiences a number of changes, which include reductions in mass and changes in matrix composition, leading to fragility and ultimately an increase of fracture risk. A number of aspects of bone physiology are controlled by genetic factors, including peak bone mass, bone shape, and composition; however, forward genetic studies in humans have largely concentrated on clinically available measures such as bone mineral density (BMD). Forward genetic studies in rodents have also heavily focused on BMD; however, investigations of direct measures of bone strength, size, and shape have also been conducted. Overwhelmingly, these studies of the genetics of bone strength have identified loci that modulate strength via influencing bone size, and may not impact the matrix material properties of bone. Many of the rodent forward genetic studies lacked sufficient mapping resolution for candidate gene identification; however, newer studies using genetic mapping populations such as Advanced Intercrosses and the Collaborative Cross appear to have overcome this issue and show promise for future studies. The majority of the genetic mapping studies conducted to date have focused on younger animals and thus an understanding of the genetic control of age-related bone loss represents a key gap in knowledge. PMID:27272104

  8. Blackberry Breeding and Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant Breeding Reviews has been published since the early 1980s and each edition presents a thorough review of the state of the are on breeding and genetics of specific crop plant. The extensive chapter on blackberry breeding and genetics is organized as follows: INTRODUCTION (Origin and Speciation...

  9. Genetic differential calculus.

    PubMed

    Mott, Richard

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput analysis of the phenotypes of mouse genetic knockouts presents several challenges, such as systematic measurement biases that can vary with time. A report from the EUMODIC consortium presents data from 320 genetic knockouts generated using standardized phenotyping pipelines and new statistical analyses aimed at increasing reproducibility across centers. PMID:26313224

  10. Genetics in the courts

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, Heather; Drell, Dan

    2000-12-01

    Various: (1)TriState 2000 Genetics in the Courts (2) Growing impact of the new genetics on the courts (3)Human testing (4) Legal analysis - in re G.C. (5) Legal analysis - GM ''peanots'', and (6) Legal analysis for State vs Miller

  11. [Human genetics and ethics].

    PubMed

    Zergollern, L

    1990-01-01

    Many new problems and dilemmas have occurred in the practice of medical geneticists with the development of human genetics and its subdisciplines--molecular genetics, ethic genetics and juridical genetics. Devoid of the possibility to get adequate education, genetic informer or better to say, counsellor, although a scientist and a professional who has already formed his ethic attitudes, often finds himself in a dilemma when he has to decide whether a procedure made possible by progress of science is ethical or not. Thus, due to different attitudes, same decision is ethical for some, while for the others it is not. Ethic committees are groups of moral and good people trying to find an objective approach to certain genetic and ethic problems. There are more and more ethically unanswered questions in modern human genetics, and particularly in medical genetics. Medical geneticist-ethicist still encounters numerous problems in his work. These are, for example, experiments with human gametes and embryos, possibilities of hybridization of human gametes with animal gametes, in vitro fertilization, detection of heterozygotes and homozygotes for monogene diseases. early detection of chromosomopathies, substitute mothers, homo and hetero insemination, transplantation of fetal and cadeveric organs, uncontrolled consumption of alcohol and drugs, environmental pollution, etc. It is almost impossible to create a single attitude which shall be shared by all those engaged in human health protection. Therefore, it is best to have a neutral eugenetic attitude which allows free ethical choice of each individual, in any case, for the well-being of man. PMID:2366624

  12. Genetic Influences on Learning Disabilties I: Clinical Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shelley D.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion of basic genetic principles is followed by a review of selected genetic syndromes involving learning disabilites (such as Noonan Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis, Pheuylketonuria, and cleft lip and palate). Guidelines for securing a genetic evaluation are given. (CL)

  13. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics.

    PubMed

    Paaby, Annalise B; Gibson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes-processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits. PMID:27304973

  14. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Paaby, Annalise B.; Gibson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes—processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits. PMID:27304973

  15. Genetics of gastrointestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Celli, Jacopo

    2014-08-01

    Gastrointestinal atresias are a common and serious feature within the spectrum of gastrointestinal malformations. Atresias tend to be lethal, although, now-days surgery and appropriate care can restore function to the affected organs. In spite of their frequency, their life threatening condition and report history gastrointestinal atresias' etiology remains mostly unclarified. Gastrointestinal atresias can occur as sporadic but they are more commonly seen in association with other anomalies. For the syndromic cases there is mounting evidence of a strong genetic component. Sporadic cases are generally thought to originate from mechanical or vascular incidents in utero, especially for the atresias of the lower intestinal tract. However, recent data show that a genetic component may be present also in these cases. Embryological and genetic studies are starting to uncover the mechanism of gastrointestinal development and their genetic components. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge of gastrointestinal atresias, their syndromic forms and the genetic pathways involved in gastrointestinal malformation. PMID:25019371

  16. Genetics of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jin-min; Liu, Ai-jun; Su, Ding-feng

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and the most common cause of disability in developed countries. Stroke is a multi-factorial disease caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Numerous epidemiologic studies have documented a significant genetic component in the occurrence of strokes. Genes encoding products involved in lipid metabolism, thrombosis, and inflammation are believed to be potential genetic factors for stroke. Although a large group of candidate genes have been studied, most of the epidemiological results are conflicting. Studies of stroke as a monogenic disease have made huge progress, and animal models serve as an indispensable tool to dissect the complex genetics of stroke. In the present review, we provide insight into the role of in vivo stroke models for the study of stroke genetics. PMID:20729874

  17. Evolutionary behavioral genetics

    PubMed Central

    Zietsch, Brendan P.; de Candia, Teresa R; Keller, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the scientific enterprise at the intersection of evolutionary psychology and behavioral genetics—a field that could be termed Evolutionary Behavioral Genetics—and how modern genetic data is revolutionizing our ability to test questions in this field. We first explain how genetically informative data and designs can be used to investigate questions about the evolution of human behavior, and describe some of the findings arising from these approaches. Second, we explain how evolutionary theory can be applied to the investigation of behavioral genetic variation. We give examples of how new data and methods provide insight into the genetic architecture of behavioral variation and what this tells us about the evolutionary processes that acted on the underlying causal genetic variants. PMID:25587556

  18. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanebrook, J. Richard

    This document describes a course designed to acquaint students with the many societal and technological problems facing the United States and the world due to the increasing demand for energy. The course begins with a writing assignment that involves readings on the environmental philosophy of Native Americans and the Chernobyl catastrophe.…

  19. Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment Overview How can learning ... gov] Top of page How can knowing about genetics help treat disease? Every year, more than two ...

  20. Genetic variation and its maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.F.; De Stefano, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains several papers divided among three sections. The section titles are: Genetic Diversity--Its Dimensions; Genetic Diversity--Its Origin and Maintenance; and Genetic Diversity--Applications and Problems of Complex Characters.

  1. Genetics & the Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the contribution made to the quality of human life by the study of genetics. Presents a description of the current status of genetics education. Suggests changes in genetics education necessary to keep up with new developments. (39 references) (CW)

  2. MedlinePlus: Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Counseling (National Human Genome Research Institute) Genetic Counseling (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Genetic Counseling (March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation) Also in Spanish Making Sense of ...

  3. Dairy Cattle: Breeding and Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five primary factors affect breeding genetically improved dairy cattle: 1) identification, 2) pedigree, 3) performance recording, 4) artificial insemination, and 5) genetic evaluation systems (traditional and genomic). Genetic progress can be measured as increased efficiency (higher performance with...

  4. National Society of Genetic Counselors

    MedlinePlus

    ... us: About NSGC About NSGC Join NSGC About Genetic Counselors NSGC in the News NSGC Leadership In ... Opportunities AEC Sponsors Healthcare Providers How can a genetic counselor help my practice? Genetic counselors can help ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the body's ability to break down the simple sugar glucose, which is the primary energy source for most cells. Researchers have described two major ...

  6. Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-01

    This factsheet describes a research project to replacing the more chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin with the less resistant hardwood guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) lignin genes. Achieving this genetic change would reduce the energy, chemical, and bleaching required in Kraft pulp production of softwoods.

  7. Genetics of population isolates.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Burgos, M; Muenke, M

    2002-04-01

    Genetic isolates, as shown empirically by the Finnish, Old Order Amish, Hutterites, Sardinian and Jewish communities among others, represent a most important and powerful tool in genetically mapping inherited disorders. The main features associated with that genetic power are the existence of multigenerational pedigrees which are mostly descended from a small number of founders a short number of generations ago, environmental and phenotypic homogeneity, restricted geographical distribution, the presence of exhaustive and detailed records correlating individuals in very well ascertained pedigrees, and inbreeding as a norm. On the other hand, the presence of a multifounder effect or admixture among divergent populations in the founder time (e.g. the Finnish and the Paisa community from Colombia) will theoretically result in increased linkage disequilibrium among adjacent loci. The present review evaluates the historical context and features of some genetic isolates with emphasis on the basic population genetic concepts of inbreeding and genetic drift, and also the state-of-the-art in mapping traits, both Mendelian and complex, on genetic isolates. PMID:12030885

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancies that do not survive to term (miscarriages and stillbirths). Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  9. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing statistically-based genetics problems. This issue is at the emerging edge of modern college-level genetics instruction, and this study attempts to identify key theoretical components for creating a specialized biological statistics curriculum. The goal of this curriculum will be to prepare biology students with the skills for assimilating quantitatively-based genetic processes, increasingly at the forefront of modern genetics. To fulfill this, two college level classes at two universities were surveyed. One university was located in the northeastern US and the other in the West Indies. There was a sample size of 42 students and a supplementary interview was administered to a select 9 students. Interviews were also administered to professors in the field in order to gain insight into the teaching of statistics in genetics. Key findings indicated that students had very little to no background in statistics (55%). Although students did perform well on exams with 60% of the population receiving an A or B grade, 77% of them did not offer good explanations on a probability question associated with the normal distribution provided in the survey. The scope and presentation of the applicable statistics/mathematics in some of the most used textbooks in genetics teaching, as well as genetics syllabi used by instructors do not help the issue. It was found that the text books, often times, either did not give effective explanations for students, or completely left out certain topics. The omission of certain statistical/mathematical oriented topics was seen to be also true with the genetics syllabi reviewed for this study. Nonetheless

  10. Genetics of Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Neto, Filipe Tenorio Lira; Bach, Phil Vu; Najari, Bobby Baback; Li, Philip Shihua; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-10-01

    While 7 % of the men are infertile, currently, a genetic etiology is identified in less than 25 % of those men, and 30 % of the infertile men lack a definitive diagnosis, falling in the "idiopathic infertility" category. Advances in genetics and epigenetics have led to several proposed mechanisms for male infertility. These advances may result in new diagnostic tools, treatment approaches, and better counseling with regard to treatment options and prognosis. In this review, we focus on clinical aspects of male infertility and the role of genetics in elucidating etiologies and the potential of treatments. PMID:27502429

  11. Genetics and antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jay

    2003-01-01

    This commentary article reviews a recent meta-analysis of genetic influences on antisocial behavior by Rhee and Waldman (2002). The authors combined the results of 51 twin and adoption studies and concluded that antisocial behavior has an important genetic component. However, twin and adoption studies contain several methodological flaws and are subject to the confounding influence of environmental factors. Therefore, Rhee and Waldman's conclusions in favor of genetic influences are not supported by the evidence. Two additional topics are Rhee and Waldman's incorrect description of the heritability concept and their failure to discuss several German criminal twin studies published during the Nazi era. PMID:15279006

  12. Genetically Engineered Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Ruanbao (Inventor); Gibbons, William (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The disclosed embodiments provide cyanobacteria spp. that have been genetically engineered to have increased production of carbon-based products of interest. These genetically engineered hosts efficiently convert carbon dioxide and light into carbon-based products of interest such as long chained hydrocarbons. Several constructs containing polynucleotides encoding enzymes active in the metabolic pathways of cyanobacteria are disclosed. In many instances, the cyanobacteria strains have been further genetically modified to optimize production of the carbon-based products of interest. The optimization includes both up-regulation and down-regulation of particular genes.

  13. Genetic autonomic disorders.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B

    2013-03-01

    Genetic disorders affecting the autonomic nervous system can result in abnormal development of the nervous system or they can be caused by neurotransmitter imbalance, an ion-channel disturbance or by storage of deleterious material. The symptoms indicating autonomic dysfunction, however, will depend upon whether the genetic lesion has disrupted peripheral or central autonomic centers or both. Because the autonomic nervous system is pervasive and affects every organ system in the body, autonomic dysfunction will result in impaired homeostasis and symptoms will vary. The possibility of genetic confirmation by molecular testing for specific diagnosis is increasing but treatments tend to remain only supportive and directed toward particular symptoms. PMID:23465768

  14. Genetics of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Apurva; Srivastava, Neena; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-10-01

    Numerous classical genetic studies have proved that genes are contributory factors for obesity. Genes are directly responsible for obesity associated disorders such as Bardet-Biedl and Prader-Willi syndromes. However, both genes as well as environment are associated with obesity in the general population. Genetic epidemiological approaches, particularly genome-wide association studies, have unraveled many genes which play important roles in human obesity. Elucidation of their biological functions can be very useful for understanding pathobiology of obesity. In the near future, further exploration of obesity genetics may help to develop useful diagnostic and predictive tests for obesity treatment. PMID:27605733

  15. Genetic Stroke Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Kevin M.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This review describes the clinical and radiographic features, genetic determinants, and treatment options for the most well-characterized monogenic disorders associated with stroke. Recent Findings: Stroke is a phenotype of many clinically important inherited disorders. Recognition of the clinical manifestations of genetic disorders associated with stroke is important for accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Genetic studies have led to the discovery of specific mutations associated with the clinical phenotypes of many inherited stroke syndromes. Summary: Several inherited causes of stroke have established and effective therapies, further underscoring the importance of timely diagnosis. PMID:24699489

  16. Genetic Time Travel.

    PubMed

    Krause, Johannes; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-05-01

    At its core, genetics is a historical discipline. Mutations are passed on from generation to generation and accumulate as a result of chance as well as of selection within and between populations and species. However, until recently, geneticists were confined to the study of present-day genetic variation and could only indirectly make inferences about the historical processes that resulted in the variation in present-day gene pools. This "time trap" has now been overcome thanks to the ability to analyze DNA extracted from ancient remains, and this is about to revolutionize several aspects of genetics. PMID:27183562

  17. Molecular Genetics of Mycobacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    HATFULL, GRAHAM F.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages have provided numerous essential tools for mycobacterial genetics, including delivery systems for transposons, reporter genes, and allelic exchange substrates, and components for plasmid vectors and mutagenesis. Their genetically diverse genomes also reveal insights into the broader nature of the phage population and the evolutionary mechanisms that give rise to it. The substantial advances in our understanding of the biology of mycobacteriophages including a large collection of completely sequenced genomes indicates a rich potential for further contributions in tuberculosis genetics and beyond. PMID:25328854

  18. Engineering Genetically Encoded FRET Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lindenburg, Laurens; Merkx, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins can be exploited to create fully genetically encoded and thus subcellularly targetable sensors. FRET sensors report changes in energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor fluorescent protein that occur when an attached sensor domain undergoes a change in conformation in response to ligand binding. The design of sensitive FRET sensors remains challenging as there are few generally applicable design rules and each sensor must be optimized anew. In this review we discuss various strategies that address this shortcoming, including rational design approaches that exploit self-associating fluorescent domains and the directed evolution of FRET sensors using high-throughput screening. PMID:24991940

  19. Genetics for the Human Race

    SciTech Connect

    Myles Axton; Francis Collins; Charles Rotimi; Charmaine Royal; David Goldstein, Daniel Drell; Georgia Dunston; Rick Kittles; Lynn Jorde; Mildred Cho; Joanna Mountain; Ari Patrinos; Neil Risch; Shomarka Keita; Kenneth Kidd; Mark Shriver; Sarah Tishkoff

    2004-11-01

    This supplement has its origins on May 15, 2003, when the National Human Genome Center at Howard University held a small but important workshop in Washington DC. The workshop, Human Genome Variation and 'Race', and this special issue of Nature Genetics were proposed by scientists at Howard University and financially supported by the Genome Programs of the US Department of Energy, through its Office of Science; the Irving Harris Foundation; the National Institutes of Health, through the National Human Genome Research Institute; and Howard University. As summarized by Francis Collins, director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, the workshop focused on several key questions: ''What does the current body of scientific information say about the connections among race, ethnicity, genetics and health? What remains unknown? What additional research is needed? How can this information be applied to benefit human health? How might this information be applied in nonmedical settings? How can we adopt policies that will achieve beneficial societal outcomes?'' This supplement, supported by the Department of Energy through a grant to Howard University, contains articles based on the presentations at this workshop.

  20. Genetics and Genetic Testing in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C; Shelton, Celeste A; Brand, Randall E

    2015-10-01

    Genetic testing of germline DNA is used in patients suspected of being at risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) to better define the individual's risk and to determine the mechanism of risk. A high genetic risk increases the pretest probability that a biomarker of early cancer is a true positive and warrants further investigation. The highest PDAC risk is generally associated with a hereditary predisposition. However, the majority of PDAC results from complex, progressive gene-environment interactions that currently fall outside the traditional risk models. Over many years, the combination of inflammation, exposure to DNA-damaging toxins, and failed DNA repair promote the accumulation of somatic mutations in pancreatic cells; PDAC risk is further increased by already present oncogenic germline mutations. Predictive models and new technologies are needed to classify patients into more accurate and mechanistic PDAC risk categories that can be linked to improved surveillance and preventative strategies. PMID:26255042

  1. Genetics Home Reference: anencephaly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions anencephaly anencephaly Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Anencephaly is a condition that prevents the normal development ...

  2. Transgenerational genetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2012-01-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to ‘missing heritability’. Under some conditions, these transgenerational genetic effects can be as frequent and strong as conventional inheritance, and can persist for multiple generations. Growing evidence suggests that RNA mediates these heritable epigenetic changes. The primary challenge now is to identify the molecular basis for these effects, characterize mechanisms and determine whether transgenerational genetic effects occur in humans. PMID:22122083

  3. Genetics Home Reference: galactosialidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... down sugar molecules (oligosaccharides) attached to certain proteins (glycoproteins) or fats (glycolipids). Cathepsin A is also found ... Inherited Metabolic Diseases ISMRD: The International Advocate for Glycoprotein Storage Diseases Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Combined ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: neuroblastoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions neuroblastoma neuroblastoma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Neuroblastoma is a type of cancer that most often ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: acatalasemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the CAT gene can cause acatalasemia . This gene provides instructions ... DNA, proteins, and cell membranes. Mutations in the CAT gene greatly reduce the activity of catalase. A ...

  6. Genetics of Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... study linked 32 novel genetic regions to bone mineral density. The findings may help researchers understand why ... or treating osteoporosis. Bones are made of a mineral and protein scaffold filled with bone cells. Bone ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: macrozoospermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... leads to an inability to father biological children (infertility). In affected males, almost all sperm cells have ... Sperm Analysis Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Infertility FAQs Genetic Testing Registry: Infertility associated with multi- ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hypochondroplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Description Hypochondroplasia is a form of short-limbed dwarfism. This condition affects the conversion of cartilage into ... Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Lordosis Health Topic: Dwarfism Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  9. LSD and Genetic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  10. Determinants of genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Ellegren, Hans; Galtier, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Genetic polymorphism varies among species and within genomes, and has important implications for the evolution and conservation of species. The determinants of this variation have been poorly understood, but population genomic data from a wide range of organisms now make it possible to delineate the underlying evolutionary processes, notably how variation in the effective population size (Ne) governs genetic diversity. Comparative population genomics is on its way to providing a solution to 'Lewontin's paradox' - the discrepancy between the many orders of magnitude of variation in population size and the much narrower distribution of diversity levels. It seems that linked selection plays an important part both in the overall genetic diversity of a species and in the variation in diversity within the genome. Genetic diversity also seems to be predictable from the life history of a species. PMID:27265362

  11. Genetics of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. This review focuses on the studies that have contributed to the discovery of genetic susceptibility factors in OA. The most relevant associations discovered until now are discussed in detail: GDF-5, 7q22 locus, MCF2L, DOT1L, NCOA3 and also some important findings from the arcOGEN study. Moreover, the different approaches that can be used to minimize the specific problems of the study of OA genetics are discussed. These include the study of microsatellites, phenotype standardization and other methods such as meta-analysis of GWAS and gene-based analysis. It is expected that these new approaches contribute to finding new susceptibility genetic factors for OA. PMID:24992825

  12. Genetics Home Reference: osteopetrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Open All Close All Description Osteopetrosis is a bone disease that makes bones abnormally dense and prone to ... Other Names for This Condition congenital osteopetrosis marble bone disease osteopetroses Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: alkaptonuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... homogentisate oxidase. This enzyme helps break down the amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine, which are important building blocks ... Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Alkaptonuria Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center ( ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: histidinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition characterized by elevated blood levels of the amino acid histidine, a building block of most proteins. Histidinemia ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hyperlysinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition characterized by elevated blood levels of the amino acid lysine, a building block of most proteins. Hyperlysinemia ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and ...

  16. Genetic Testing and PXE

    MedlinePlus

    ... with PXE International's board certified genetic counselor, please call 202.362.9599. Leave your name, address, email and phone ... Connecticut Avenue NW - Suite 404 • Washington DC 20008-2304 • Telephone: 202.362.9599

  17. Genetics Home Reference: sialidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? ... Morrone A. Type II sialidosis: review of the clinical spectrum and identification of a new splicing defect with chitotriosidase assessment in two patients. J ...

  18. Annual review of genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Campbelll, A. . Aerosol Lab.)

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on genome organization in mammals. Various species mentioned are: cats; dogs; rodents; primates; chinese hamster, cows, horses, pigs, etc. Genetic mapping, biological evolution and DNA sequencing are briefly discussed.

  19. Genetic research in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delone, N. L.; Antipov, V. V.; Ilyin, Ye. A.

    1988-01-01

    The role of the genetic apparatus in the adaptation of the organism to conditions of weightlessness is studied. The investigation includes studies at the gene, chromosome, cell, tissue, and organism levels, as well as studies at the population level.

  20. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. PMID:18230893

  1. Genetics of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hypochondrogenesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency Hypochondrogenesis and achondrogenesis , type 2 (a similar skeletal disorder) together affect ... of hypochondrogenesis: Genetic Testing Registry: ... Achondrogenesis These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions hemophilia hemophilia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder that slows the blood ...

  4. [Genetic effects of radiation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a short review of genetic effect of radiation. This includes methods and results of a large-scale genetic study on specific loci in mice and of various studies in the offspring of atomic-bomb survivors. As for the latter, there is no results obtained which suggest the effect of parental exposure to radiation. Further, in recent years, studies are conducted to the offspring born to parents who were survivors of childhood cancers. In several reports, the mean gonad dose is quite large whereas in most instances, the results do not indicate genetic effect following parental exposure to radiation. Possible reasons for the difficulties in detecting genetic effect of radiation are discussed. PMID:22514926

  5. Primer on molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  6. Contemporary Genetics for Gender Researchers: Not Your Grandma's Genetics Anymore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salk, Rachel H.; Hyde, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past century, much of genetics was deterministic, and feminist researchers framed justified criticisms of genetics research. However, over the past two decades, genetics research has evolved remarkably and has moved far from earlier deterministic approaches. Our article provides a brief primer on modern genetics, emphasizing contemporary…

  7. Synchronization of genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianshou; Zhang, Jiajun; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Chen, Luonan

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization of genetic or cellular oscillators is a central topic in understanding the rhythmicity of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. Here, we show how a collective rhythm across a population of genetic oscillators through synchronization-induced intercellular communication is achieved, and how an ensemble of independent genetic oscillators is synchronized by a common noisy signaling molecule. Our main purpose is to elucidate various synchronization mechanisms from the viewpoint of dynamics, by investigating the effects of various biologically plausible couplings, several kinds of noise, and external stimuli. To have a comprehensive understanding on the synchronization of genetic oscillators, we consider three classes of genetic oscillators: smooth oscillators (exhibiting sine-like oscillations), relaxation oscillators (displaying jump dynamics), and stochastic oscillators (noise-induced oscillation). For every class, we further study two cases: with intercellular communication (including phase-attractive and repulsive coupling) and without communication between cells. We find that an ensemble of smooth oscillators has different synchronization phenomena from those in the case of relaxation oscillators, where noise plays a different but key role in synchronization. To show differences in synchronization between them, we make comparisons in many aspects. We also show that a population of genetic stochastic oscillators have their own synchronization mechanisms. In addition, we present interesting phenomena, e.g., for relaxation-type stochastic oscillators coupled to a quorum-sensing mechanism, different noise intensities can induce different periodic motions (i.e., inhomogeneous limit cycles).

  8. Ecogeographic Genetic Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Chantel D.; Duell, Eric J.; Shi, Xun; Irwin, Rebecca; Andrew, Angeline S.; Williams, Scott M.; Moore, Jason H.

    2009-01-01

    Complex diseases such as cancer and heart disease result from interactions between an individual's genetics and environment, i.e. their human ecology. Rates of complex diseases have consistently demonstrated geographic patterns of incidence, or spatial “clusters” of increased incidence relative to the general population. Likewise, genetic subpopulations and environmental influences are not evenly distributed across space. Merging appropriate methods from genetic epidemiology, ecology and geography will provide a more complete understanding of the spatial interactions between genetics and environment that result in spatial patterning of disease rates. Geographic Information Systems (GIS), which are tools designed specifically for dealing with geographic data and performing spatial analyses to determine their relationship, are key to this kind of data integration. Here the authors introduce a new interdisciplinary paradigm, ecogeographic genetic epidemiology, which uses GIS and spatial statistical analyses to layer genetic subpopulation and environmental data with disease rates and thereby discern the complex gene-environment interactions which result in spatial patterns of incidence. PMID:19025788

  9. Genetic Manipulation in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, David H.; Galli, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of Review Recent developments in the field of genetic engineering have made it possible to add, delete or exchange genes from one species to another. This technology has special relevance to the field of xenotransplantation, in which the elimination of a species-specific disparity could make the difference between success or failure of an organ transplant. This review focuses on developments in both the techniques and applications of genetically modified animals. Recent Findings Advances have been made using existing techniques for genetic modifications of swine and in the development of new, emerging technologies, including enzymatic engineering and the use of siRNA. Applications of the modified animals have provided evidence that genetically modified swine have the potential to overcome both physiologic and immunologic barriers that have previously impeded this field. Use of GalT-KO animals as donors have shown marked improvements in xenograft survivals. Summary Techniques for genetic engineering of swine have been directed toward avoiding naturally existing cellular and antibody responses to species-specific antigens. Organs from genetically engineered animals have enjoyed markedly improved survivals in non-human primates, especially in protocols directed toward the induction of tolerance, presumably by avoiding immunization to new antigens. PMID:19469029

  10. Early Alzheimer's disease genetics.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2006-01-01

    The genetics community working on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias has made remarkable progress in the past 20 years. The cumulative efforts by multiple groups have lead to the identification of three autosomal dominant genes for early onset AD. These are the amyloid-beta protein precursor gene (APP), and the genes encoding presenilin1 and 2. The knowledge derived from this work has firmly established Abeta as a critical disease molecule and lead to candidate drugs currently in treatment trials. Work on a related disease, frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism - chromosome 17 type has also added to our understanding of pathogenesis by revealing that tau, the protein component of neurofibrillary tangles, is also a critical molecule in neurodegeneration. Lessons learned that still influence work on human genetics include the need to recognize and deal with genetic heterogeneity, a feature common to many genetic disorders. Genetic heterogeneity, if recognized, can be source of information. Another critical lesson is that clinical, molecular, and statistical scientists need to work closely on disease projects to succeed in solving the complex problems of common genetic disorders. PMID:16914874