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Sample records for energy-sensitive imaging detector

  1. Imaging MAMA detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-07-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  2. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  3. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  4. Mercubic iodine imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortale, C.; Padgett, L.; Schnepple, W. F.

    1983-07-01

    Linear and two-dimensional monolithic arrays of different configurations have been fabricated using photolithographic techniques. The fabrication technology, electronic setup, and pinhole imaging experiments are described. Spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm have been achieved.

  5. On the analogy between pulse-pile-up in energy-sensitive, photon-counting detectors and level-crossing of shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessl, Ewald; Bartels, Matthias; Daerr, Heiner; Proksa, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Shot noise processes are omnipresent in physics and many of their properties have been extensively studied in the past, including the particular problem of level crossing of shot noise. Energy-sensitive, photon-counting detectors using comparators to discriminate pulse-heights are currently heavily investigated for medical applications, e.g. for x-ray computed tomography and x-ray mammography. Surprisingly, no mention of the close relation between the two topics can be found in the literature on photon-counting detectors. In this paper, we point out the close analogy between level crossing of shot noise and the problem of determining count rates of photon- counting detectors subject to pulse pile-up. The latter is very relevant for obtaining precise forward models for photon-counting detectors operated under conditions of very high x-ray flux employed in clinical x-ray computed tomography. Although several attempts have been made to provide reasonably accurate, approximative models for the registered number of counts in x-ray detectors under conditions of high flux and arbitrary x-ray spectra, see, e.g., no exact, analytic solution is given in the literature for general continuous pulse shapes. In this paper we present such a solution for arbitrary response functions, x-ray spectra and continuous pulse shapes based on a result from the theory of level crossing. We briefly outline the theory of level crossing including the famous Rice theorem and translate from the language of level crossing to the language of photon-counting detection.

  6. Integrating IR detector imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, G. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An integrating IR detector array for imaging is provided in a hybrid circuit with InSb mesa diodes in a linear array, a single J-FET preamplifier for readout, and a silicon integrated circuit multiplexer. Thin film conductors in a fan out pattern deposited on an Al2O3 substrate connect the diodes to the multiplexer, and thick film conductors also connect the reset switch and preamplifier to the multiplexer. Two phase clock pulses are applied with a logic return signal to the multiplexer through triax comprised of three thin film conductors deposited between layers. A lens focuses a scanned image onto the diode array for horizontal read out while a scanning mirror provides vertical scan.

  7. Current state of ring imaging Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.B.

    1984-02-01

    This paper reviews several ring imaging Cherenkov detectors which are being used or developed to identify particles in high energy physics experiments. These detectors must have good detection efficiency for single photon-electrons and good spatial resolution over a large area. Emphasis is placed on the efficiencies and resolutions of these detectors as determined from ring imaging beam tests and other experiments. Following a brief review of the ring imaging technique, comparative evaluations are made of different forms of detectors and their respective materials.

  8. Intravascular imaging with a storage phosphor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Petrek, Peter; Matthews, Kenneth L., II; Fritz, Shannon G.; Bujenovic, L. Steven; Xu, Tong

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and test an intravascular positron imaging system based on a storage phosphor detector for imaging and detecting vulnerable plaques of human coronary arteries. The radiotracer F18-FDG accumulates in vulnerable plaques with inflammation of the overlying cap. The vulnerable plaques can, therefore, be imaged by recording positrons emitted from F18-FDG with a detector inserted into the artery. A prototype intravascular detector was constructed based on storage phosphor. The detector uses a flexible storage phosphor tube with 55 mm length, 2 mm diameter and 0.28 mm wall thickness. The intravascular detector is guided into the vessel using x-ray fluoroscopy and the accumulated x-ray signal must be erased prior to positron imaging. For this purpose, a light diffuser, 0.9 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length, was inserted into the detector tube. The light diffuser was connected to a laser source through a 2 m long optical fiber. The diffuser redirected the 0.38 W laser light to the inner surface of the phosphor detector to erase it. A heart phantom with 300 cm3 volume and three coronary arteries with 3.2 mm diameter and with several plaques was constructed. FDG solution with 0.5 µCi cm-3 activity concentration was filled in the heart and coronary arteries. The detector was inserted in a coronary artery and the signal from the plaques and surrounding background activity was recorded for 2 min. Then the phosphor detector was extracted and read out using a storage phosphor reader. The light diffuser erased the signal resulting from fluoroscopic exposure to level below that encountered during positron imaging. Vulnerable plaques with area activities higher than 1.2 nCi mm-2 were visualized by the detector. This activity is a factor of 10-20 lower than that expected in human vulnerable plaques. The detector was able to image the internal surface of the coronary vessels with 50 mm length and 360° circumference. Spatial resolution was 0

  9. Enhanced neutron imaging detector using optical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1992-08-01

    Existing neutron imaging detectors have limited count rates due to inherent property and electronic limitations. The popular multiwire proportional counter is qualified by gas recombination to a count rate of less than 10{sup 5} n/s over the entire array and the neutron Anger camera, even though improved with new fiber optic encoding methods, can only achieve 10{sup 6} cps over a limited array. We present a preliminary design for a new type of neutron imaging detector with a resolution of 2--5 mm and a count rate capability of 10{sup 6} cps pixel element. We propose to combine optical and electronic processing to economically increase the throughput of advanced detector systems while simplifying computing requirements. By placing a scintillator screen ahead of an optical image processor followed by a detector array, a high throughput imaging detector may be constructed.

  10. A new generation of detectors for scanning x-ray beam imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rommel, J. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Scanning x-ray beam imaging systems were first developed by American Science and Engineering, Inc. (AS&E) in the early 1970s [1]. Since then, these systems have found a wide range of applications in security inspection and non-destructive testing. Large-area detectors are most frequently used to collect backscattered radiation but smaller transmission detectors are also employed for selected applications. Until recently, only two basic detector designs have been used: large scintillator blocks with attached photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or large-volume light-sealed boxes, lined with scintillating screens and port windows for PMTs. In both cases, the detectors have required considerable depth to provide acceptable light collection efficiency. A new design recently developed by AS&E relies on wavelength shifting fibres (WSF) for light collection. For the first time, this approach enables the construction of thin large-area detectors. Stacking layers of WSF ribbons and scintillating screens in varying combinations enables optimization of the detection efficiency for different applications. Taking separate readings from different layers provides an energy-sensitive signal combination. Energy sensitivity can be improved further by adding filtration between the signal channels. Several prototype configurations have been built and characterized for both backscatter and transmission imaging. A WSF-based detector has been commercialized for a transmission x-ray imaging application.

  11. Ghost imaging with a single detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Yaron; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate pseudothermal ghost imaging and ghost diffraction using only a single detector. We achieve this by replacing the high-resolution detector of the reference beam with a computation of the propagating field, following a recent proposal by Shapiro [Phys. Rev. A 78, 061802(R) (2008)]. Since only a single detector is used, this provides experimental evidence that pseudothermal ghost imaging does not rely on nonlocal quantum correlations. In addition, we show the depth-resolving capability of this ghost imaging technique.

  12. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOEpatents

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  13. A simple controller for bidimensional image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeles, F.; Martínez, L. A.

    2012-07-01

    The increasing use of many and different kind of light detectors to acquire, monitor and control various aspects of the observation imposes the need to standardize the acquisition and processing of images and data. While scientific image acquisition systems usually include a complex controller, some less demanding subsystems require the development of electronics and software to read the image. Most of the times these image detectors are rather small and high speed is of no concern, so controllers need not to be fast; take for instance a telescope guider. With these directives in mind, in this work we present a very simple image acquisition system based on a Texas Instruments microcontroller of the family MSP430 and a serial static memory as a standard instrumentation starting for small image acquisition controllers.

  14. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Ratcliff, B.

    1988-10-01

    We present recent progress on the construction and testing of the first drift boxes and single electron detectors as they come from the production line. These detectors will be used for particle identification using the Ring Imaging technique in the SLD experiment at SLAC. Various experimental results are presented, including single electron pulse height measurements as a function of gas gain, detector gating capability, uniformity of response across the wire plane, charge division performance of a single electron signal, average pulse shape and its comparison with predicted shape, and cross-talk. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

    2013-02-01

    In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

  16. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1982-07-21

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  17. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1984-01-01

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  18. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, G.; Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Cavenago, M.; Claps, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m2) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards the

  19. Optical Ranicon detectors for photon counting imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark; Crocker, Jim; Paresce, Francesco; Rafal, Marc

    1988-08-01

    The design and development of two detectors, known as Ranicon and advanced Ranicon, for optical photon counting imaging on ground-based telescopes are discussed. The proximity focusing, microchannel-plate stack, resistive anode, and signal processing characteristics are described. The theory behind the overall resolution of the Ranicon system is reviewed. Resolution measurements for the instruments are reported and discussed.

  20. X-ray detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare systems are subject to continuous adaptation, following trends such as the change of demographic structures, the rise of life-style related and chronic diseases, and the need for efficient and outcome-oriented procedures. This also influences the design of new imaging systems as well as their components. The applications of X-ray imaging in the medical field are manifold and have led to dedicated modalities supporting specific imaging requirements, for example in computed tomography (CT), radiography, angiography, surgery or mammography, delivering projection or volumetric imaging data. Depending on the clinical needs, some X-ray systems enable diagnostic imaging while others support interventional procedures. X-ray detector design requirements for the different medical applications can vary strongly with respect to size and shape, spatial resolution, frame rates and X-ray flux, among others. Today, integrating X-ray detectors are in common use. They are predominantly based on scintillators (e.g. CsI or Gd2O2S) and arrays of photodiodes made from crystalline silicon (Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si) or they employ semiconductors (e.g. Se) with active a-Si readout matrices. Ongoing and future developments of X-ray detectors will include optimization of current state-of-the-art integrating detectors in terms of performance and cost, will enable the usage of large size CMOS-based detectors, and may facilitate photon counting techniques with the potential to further enhance performance characteristics and foster the prospect of new clinical applications.

  1. Automated lesion detectors in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, I N; Kumar, S; Oliveira, C M; Ramos, J D; Engquist, B

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a sight-threatening condition occurring in persons with diabetes, which causes progressive damage to the retina. The early detection and diagnosis of DR is vital for saving the vision of diabetic persons. The early signs of DR which appear on the surface of the retina are the dark lesions such as microaneurysms (MAs) and hemorrhages (HEMs), and bright lesions (BLs) such as exudates. In this paper, we propose a novel automated system for the detection and diagnosis of these retinal lesions by processing retinal fundus images. We devise appropriate binary classifiers for these three different types of lesions. Some novel contextual/numerical features are derived, for each lesion type, depending on its inherent properties. This is performed by analysing several wavelet bands (resulting from the isotropic undecimated wavelet transform decomposition of the retinal image green channel) and by using an appropriate combination of Hessian multiscale analysis, variational segmentation and cartoon+texture decomposition. The proposed methodology has been validated on several medical datasets, with a total of 45,770 images, using standard performance measures such as sensitivity and specificity. The individual performance, per frame, of the MA detector is 93% sensitivity and 89% specificity, of the HEM detector is 86% sensitivity and 90% specificity, and of the BL detector is 90% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Regarding the collective performance of these binary detectors, as an automated screening system for DR (meaning that a patient is considered to have DR if it is a positive patient for at least one of the detectors) it achieves an average 95-100% of sensitivity and 70% of specificity at a per patient basis. Furthermore, evaluation conducted on publicly available datasets, for comparison with other existing techniques, shows the promising potential of the proposed detectors. PMID:26378502

  2. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of DELPHI

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Albrecht, E.; Allen, D.

    1995-08-01

    A Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector system has been built and is now in full operation within the DELPHI experiment. Large data samples of Z{sup 0} decays are being collected with good resolution on the observed Cherenkov angles. Several studies of Z{sup 0} decays using the RICH have already been performed on limited samples. Disturbance of the detector operation caused by shrinkage of polymeric construction materials and by migration of radiator substance is reported. These effects have been counteracted and do not endanger the quality of the data.

  3. Dynamic cardiac volume imaging using area detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Herbert; Hoelzel, Arne; Stierstorfer, Karl; Rauscher, Annabella; Flohr, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    We present a reconstruction scheme for dynamic cardiac volume imaging using Area Detector Computed Tomography (CT) named Multi-Sector Cardiac Volume Reconstruction (MCVR) which is based on a 3D-backprojection of the Feldkamp-type. It is intended for circular scanning using area detectors covering the whole heart volume, but the method can easily be extended to cardiac spiral imaging using multi-slice CT. In cardiac imaging with multi-slice CT continuous data acquisition combined with the parallel recording of the patient's ECG enables retrospective gating of data segments for image reconstruction. Using consecutive heart cycles MCVR identifies complementary and time consistent projection data segments <= π using temporal information of the ECG. After a row by row parallel rebinning and temporal rebinning the projection data have to be filtered using conventional convolution kernels and finally reconstructed to image space using a 3D-backprojection. A dynamic anthropomorphic computer model of the human heart was developed in order to validate the MCVR approach. A 256-slice detector system with 0.5mm slice collimation was simulated operating in a circular scanning mode at a gantry rotation time of 330ms and compared to state-of-the-art 16-slice technology. At enddiastole the coronary anatomy can be visualized with excellent image quality. Although an area detector with large cone angling covering the entire heart volume was used no cone-artifacts could be observed. Using a 2-sector approach a nearly motion free 3D visualization of the heart chambers was obtained even at endsystole.

  4. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation. PMID:25877534

  5. The SORDS trimodal imager detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Daniel; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Li, Liqian; Bray, Nick; Locklin, Darren; Hynes, Michael V.; Toolin, Maurice; Harris, Bernard; McElroy, John; Wallace, Mark; Lanza, Richard

    2009-05-01

    The Raytheon Trimodal Imager (TMI) uses coded aperture and Compton imaging technologies as well as the nonimaging shadow technology to locate an SNM or radiological threat in the presence of background. The heart of the TMI is two arrays of NaI crystals. The front array serves as both a coded aperture and the first scatterer for Compton imaging. It is made of 35 5x5x2" crystals with specially designed low profile PMTs. The back array is made of 30 2.5x3x24" position-sensitive crystals which are read out at both ends. These crystals are specially treated to provide the required position resolution at the best possible energy resolution. Both arrays of detectors are supported by aluminum superstructures. These have been efficiently designed to allow a wide field of view and to provide adequate support to the crystals to permit use of the TMI as a vehicle-mounted, field-deployable system. Each PMT has a locally mounted high-voltage supply that is remotely controlled. Each detector is connected to a dedicated FPGA which performs automated gain alignment and energy calibration, event timing and diagnostic health checking. Data are streamed, eventby- event, from each of the 65 detector FPGAs to one master FPGA. The master FPGA acts both as a synchronization clock, and as an event sorting unit. Event sorting involves stamping events as singles or as coincidences, based on the approximately instantaneous detector hit pattern. Coincidence determination by the master FPGA provides a pre-sorting for the events that will ultimately be used in the Compton imaging and coded aperture imaging algorithms. All data acquisition electronics have been custom designed for the TMI.

  6. Multispectral imaging with type II superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, Gamini; Duran, Joshua M.; Grupen, Matt; Scheihing, John E.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Eismann, Michael T.

    2012-06-01

    Infrared (IR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multispectral detector elements promise significant advantages for airborne threat warning, surveillance, and targeting applications. At present, the use of type II superlattice (T2SL) structures based on the 6.1Å-family materials (InAs, GaSb, and AlSb) has become an area of interest for developing IR detectors and their FPAs. The ability to vary the bandgap in the IR range, suppression of Auger processes, prospective reduction of Shockley-Read-Hall centers by improved material growth capabilities, and the material stability are a few reasons for the predicted dominance of the T2SL technology over presently leading HgCdTe and quantum well technologies. The focus of the work reported here is on the development of T2SL based dual-band IR detectors and their applicability for multispectral imaging. A new NpBPN detector designed for the detection of IR in the 3-5 and 8-12 μm atmospheric windows is presented; comparing its advantages over other T2SL based approaches. One of the key challenges of the T2SL dual-band detectors is the spectral crosstalk associated with the LWIR band. The properties of the state-of-the-art T2SLs (i.e., absorption coefficient, minority carrier lifetime and mobility, etc.) and the present growth limitations that impact spectral crosstalk are discussed.

  7. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.H.

    1984-06-01

    The imaging of Cerenkov light on to photosensitive detectors promises to be a powerful technique for identifying particles in colliding beam spectrometers. Toward this end two and three dimensional imaging photon detectors are being developed at SLAC. The present techniques involve photon conversion using easily ionized exotic chemicals like tetrakisdimethyl-amino-ethylene (TMAE) in a drift and amplifying gas mixture of methane and isobutane. Single photoelectrons from Cerenkov light are currently being drifted 20 cm and a new device under study will be used to study drifting up to 80 cm along a magnetic field. A short description of a large device currently being designed for the SLD spectrometer at the Stanford Linear Collider will be given.

  8. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector's fast response, a scene's 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers. PMID:27103168

  9. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  10. Imaging the sensitivity inhomogeneities ofdiamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, R.; Tromson, D.; Hainaut, O.; Amosov, V. N.; Bergonzo, P.

    2003-03-01

    Diamond is a semiconducting material which can withstand high temperatures, a wide range of corrosive environments and exhibits high radiation hardness. This combination of properties makes it extremely attractive for use as photon and particle detectors. The ESRF ID21 SXM has been used to image the spatial variations of detector sensitivity over a range of both natural and Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) diamond devices. The measurements are performed by mapping the photon-induced current flow of the biased detectors. Evaluation of the sensitivity inhomogeneities are of dual interest; For detection applications involving relatively small beams it is important that the device response be as uniform as possible. Furthermore, from a fundamental aspect, the understanding of the origin of the sensitivity variations can be a route, for example in CVD materials, to modifying the growth and processing parameters in order to produce improved devices. This paper demonstrates an application of alternative detection modes in X-ray microscopy for a problem of technological interest. Moreover, it shows how the flexible control of the primary X-ray penetration depth by varying the probe energy permits an evaluation of the relative influence of the surface and bulk material.

  11. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector’s fast response, a scene’s 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers. PMID:27103168

  12. Computational imaging with a balanced detector.

    PubMed

    Soldevila, F; Clemente, P; Tajahuerce, E; Uribe-Patarroyo, N; Andrés, P; Lancis, J

    2016-01-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media. PMID:27353733

  13. Computational imaging with a balanced detector

    PubMed Central

    Soldevila, F.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Andrés, P.; Lancis, J.

    2016-01-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media. PMID:27353733

  14. Computational imaging with a balanced detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldevila, F.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Andrés, P.; Lancis, J.

    2016-06-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media.

  15. The endcap Cherenkov ring imaging detector at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hawegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dolinsky, S.

    1995-05-01

    The authors present the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector in the endcap regions of the SLD detector and report initial performance. The endcap CRID was completed and commissioned in 1993 and is fully operational for the 1994 run. First Cherenkov rings have been observed. The endcap CRID detectors and fluid systems are described and initial operational experience is discussed.

  16. The Hadron Blind Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatnik, Marie; Zajac, Stephanie; Hemmick, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab have hinted at the existence of a new form of matter at high gluon density, the Color Glass Condensate. High energy electron scattering off of nuclei, focusing on the low-x components of the nuclear wave function, will definitively measure this state of matter. However, when a nucleus contributes a low x parton, the reaction products are highly focused in the electron-going direction and have large momentum in the lab system. High-momentum particle identification is particularly challenging. A particle is identifiable by its mass, but tracking algorithms only yield a particle's momentum based on its track's curvature. The particle's velocity is needed to identify the particle. A ring-imaging Cerenkov detector is being developed for the forward angle particle identification from the technological advancements of PHENIX's Hadron-Blind Detector (HBD), which uses Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and pixelated pad planes to detect Cerenkov photons. The new HBD will focus the Cerenkov photons into a ring to determine the parent particle's velocity. Results from the pad plane simulations, construction tests, and test beam run will be presented.

  17. Software development for a Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-04-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12 GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  18. Software Development for Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting an update on my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  19. High time-resolution imaging with the MAMA detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Smith, Andrew M.; Hill, Bob; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Current uses of the MAMA detector which utilize the photon time-tagging capabilities of these detectors are reported. These applications currently include image stabilization by means of post-processing corrections of platform drift and speckle interferometry. The initial results of a sounding rocket experiment to obtain UV images of NGC 6240 and results from speckle interferometry of Neptune's moon Triton are presented.

  20. Mosaic-Detector-Based Fluorescence Spectral Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong

    2007-01-01

    A battery-powered, pen-sized, portable instrument for measuring molecular fluorescence spectra of chemical and biological samples in the field has been proposed. Molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is among the techniques used most frequently in laboratories to analyze compositions of chemical and biological samples. Heretofore, it has been possible to measure fluorescence spectra of molecular species at relative concentrations as low as parts per billion (ppb), with a few nm spectral resolution. The proposed instrument would include a planar array (mosaic) of detectors, onto which a fluorescence spectrum would be spatially mapped. Unlike in the larger laboratory-type molecular fluorescence spectrometers, mapping of wavelengths to spatial positions would be accomplished without use of relatively bulky optical parts. The proposed instrument is expected to be sensitive enough to enable measurement of spectra of chemical species at relative concentrations <1 ppb, with spectral resolution that could be tailored by design to be comparable to a laboratory molecular fluorescence spectrometer. The proposed instrument (see figure) would include a button-cell battery and a laser diode, which would generate the monochromatic ultraviolet light needed to excite fluorescence in a sample. The sample would be held in a cell bounded by far-ultraviolet-transparent quartz or optical glass. The detector array would be, more specifically, a complementary metal oxide/ semiconductor or charge-coupled- device imaging photodetector array, the photodetectors of which would be tailored to respond to light in the wavelength range of the fluorescence spectrum to be measured. The light-input face of the photodetector array would be covered with a matching checkerboard array of multilayer thin film interference filters, such that each pixel in the array would be sensitive only to light in a spectral band narrow enough so as not to overlap significantly with the band of an adjacent pixel. The

  1. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    PubMed Central

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors. PMID:25995846

  2. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  3. Imaging detectors and electronics - A view of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth

    2004-06-16

    Imaging sensors and readout electronics have made tremendous strides in the past two decades. The application of modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and the introduction of customized monolithic integrated circuits have made large scale imaging systems routine in high energy physics. This technology is now finding its way into other areas, such as space missions, synchrotron light sources, and medical imaging. I review current developments and discuss the promise and limits of new technologies. Several detector systems are described as examples of future trends. The discussion emphasizes semiconductor detector systems, but I also include recent developments for large-scale superconducting detector arrays.

  4. Infrared imaging using carbon nanotube-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongzhi; Xi, Ning; Song, Bo; Chen, Liangliang; Lai, King W. C.; Lou, Jianyong

    2011-06-01

    Using carbon nanotubes (CNT), high performance infrared detectors have been developed. Since the CNTs have extraordinary optoelectronics properties due to its unique one dimensional geometry and structure, the CNT based infrared detectors have extremely low dark current, low noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), short response time, and high dynamic range. Most importantly, it can detect 3-5 um middle-wave infrared (MWIR) at room temperature. This unique feature can significantly reduce the size and weight of a MWIR imaging system by eliminating a cryogenic cooling system. However, there are two major difficulties that impede the application of CNT based IR detectors for imaging systems. First, the small diameter of the CNTs results in low fill factor. Secondly, it is difficult to fabricate large scale of detector array for high resolution focal plane due to the limitations on the efficiency and cost of the manufacturing. In this paper, a new CNT based IR imaging system will be presented. Integrating the CNT detectors with photonic crystal resonant cavity, the fill factor of the CNT based IR sensor can reach as high as 0.91. Furthermore, using the compressive sensing technology, a high resolution imaging can be achieved by CNT based IR detectors. The experimental testing results show that the new imaging system can achieve the superb performance enabled by CNT based IR detectors, and, at the same time, overcame its difficulties to achieve high resolution and efficient imaging.

  5. Multianode microchannel array detectors for Space Shuttle imaging applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMAs) are a family of photoelectric, photoncounting array detectors that have been developed and qualified specifically for use in space. MAMA detectors with formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels are now in use or under construction for a variety of imaging and tracking applications. These photo-emissive detectors can be operated in a windowless configuration at extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths or in a sealed configuration at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. The construction and modes-of-operation of the MAMA detectors are briefly described and the scientific objectives of a number of sounding rocket and Space Shuttle instruments utilizing these detectors are outlined. Performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors that are of fundamental importance for operation in the Space Shuttle environment are described and compared with those of the photo-conductive array detectors such as the CCDs and CIDs.

  6. Anisotropic imaging performance in indirect x-ray imaging detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Badano, Aldo; Kyprianou, Iacovos S.; Sempau, Josep

    2006-08-15

    We report on the variability in imaging system performance due to oblique x-ray incidence, and the associated transport of quanta (both x rays and optical photons) through the phosphor, in columnar indirect digital detectors. The analysis uses MANTIS, a combined x-ray, electron, and optical Monte Carlo transport code freely available. We describe the main features of the simulation method and provide some validation of the phosphor screen models considered in this work. We report x-ray and electron three-dimensional energy deposition distributions and point-response functions (PRFs), including optical spread in columnar phosphor screens of thickness 100 and 500 {mu}m, for 19, 39, 59, and 79 keV monoenergetic x-ray beams incident at 0 deg., 10 deg., and 15 deg. . In addition, we present pulse-height spectra for the same phosphor thickness, x-ray energies, and angles of incidence. Our results suggest that the PRF due to the phosphor blur is highly nonsymmetrical, and that the resolution properties of a columnar screen in a tomographic, or tomosynthetic imaging system varies significantly with the angle of x-ray incidence. Moreover, we find that the noise due to the variability in the number of light photons detected per primary x-ray interaction, summarized in the information or Swank factor, is somewhat independent of thickness and incidence angle of the x-ray beam. Our results also suggest that the anisotropy in the PRF is not less in screens with absorptive backings, while the noise introduced by variations in the gain and optical transport is larger. Predictions from MANTIS, after additional validation, can provide the needed understanding of the extent of such variations, and eventually, lead to the incorporation of the changes in imaging performance with incidence angle into the reconstruction algorithms for volumetric x-ray imaging systems.

  7. Development of a GSO positron/single-photon imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Senda, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and tested a GSO (gadolinium oxyorthosilicate) position-sensitive gamma detector which can be used with positron and single-photon radionuclides for imaging breast cancer or sentinel lymph node detection. Because GSO has a relatively good energy resolution for annihilation gammas as well as low energy gamma photons, and does not contain any natural radioisotopes, it can be used for positron imaging and lower energy single-photon imaging. The imaging detector consists of a GSO block, 2 inch square multi-channel position-sensitive photo-multiplier tube (PSPMT), and associated electronics. The size of a single GSO element was 2.9 mm × 2.9 mm × 20 mm and these elements were arranged into 15 × 15 matrixes to form a block that was optically coupled to the PSPMT. It was possible to separate all GSO crystals into a two-dimensional position histogram for annihilation gammas (511 keV) and low energy gamma photons (122 keV). The typical energy resolution was 24% FWHM and 37% FWHM for 511 keV and 122 keV gamma photons, respectively. For the positron imaging, coincidence between the imaging detector and a single gamma probe is measured. For the single-photon imaging, a tungsten collimator is mounted in front of the imaging detector. With this configuration, it was possible to image both positron radionuclides and low energy single-photon radionuclides. We measured spatial resolution and sensitivity as well as image quality of the developed imaging detector. Results indicated that the developed imaging detector has the potential to be a new and useful instrument for nuclear medicine.

  8. The ring imaging Cherenkov detector for Fermilab experiment 665

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.B.; Dhawan, S.; Schuler, P.

    1988-02-01

    The authors describe a ring imaging Cherenkov counter (RICH) which uses a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) with cathode pad readout as a UV photon detector. The detector has 10800 pads, each connected to a charge sensitive amplifier, within an area of 55 x 95 cm/sup 2/. The detector offers high data rate capability and a chamber sensitive time of less than 250 nsec. In addition, the detector has 1 mm spatial resolution and a multi-hit capability of about 50 photons/event.

  9. Photoconducting positions monitor and imaging detector

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    2000-01-01

    A photoconductive, high energy photon beam detector/monitor for detecting x-rays and gamma radiation, having a thin, disk-shaped diamond substrate with a first and second surface, and electrically conductive coatings, or electrodes, of a predetermined configuration or pattern, disposed on the surfaces of the substrate. A voltage source and a current amplifier is connected to the electrodes to provide a voltage bias to the electrodes and to amplify signals from the detector.

  10. Imaging characteristics of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Kaplan, G. C.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite will conduct an all-sky survey over the wavelength range from 70 A to 760 A using four grazing-incidence telescopes and seven microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors. The imaging photon-counting MCP detectors have active areas of 19.6 cm2. Photon arrival position is determined using a wedge-and-strip anode and associated pulse-encoding electronics. The imaging characteristics of the EUVE flight detectors are presented including image distortion, flat-field response, and spatial differential nonlinearity. Also included is a detailed discussion of image distortions due to the detector mechanical assembly, the wedge-and-strip anode, and the electronics. Model predictions of these distortions are compared to preflight calibration images which show distortions less than 1.3 percent rms of the detector diameter of 50 mm before correction. The plans for correcting these residual detector image distortions to less than 0.1 percent rms are also presented.

  11. Photoacoustic section imaging with an integrating cylindrical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratt, Sibylle; Passler, Klaus; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Guenther

    2011-07-01

    A piezoelectric detector with cylindrical shape for photoacoustic section imaging is characterized. This detector is larger than the imaging object in direction of the cylinder axis, giving rise to its integrating properties. Its focal volume has the shape of a slice and the acquisition of signals for one section image requires rotation of an object about an axis perpendicular to this slice. Image reconstruction from the signals requires the application of the inverse Radon transform. It is shown that implementing the Abel transform is a suitable step in data processing, allowing speeding up the data acquisition since the scanning angle can be reduced. The resolution of the detector was estimated in directions perpendicular and parallel to the detection plane. An upper limit for the out of plane resolution is given and section images of a zebra fish are shown.

  12. A novel phoswich imaging detector for simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging of plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heyu; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2011-09-01

    To meet the growing demand for functional imaging technology for use in studying plant biology, we are developing a novel technique that permits simultaneous imaging of escaped positrons and coincidence gammas from annihilation of positrons within an intake leaf. The multi-modality imaging system will include two planar detectors: one is a typical PET detector array and the other is a phoswich imaging detector that detects both beta and gamma. The novel phoswich detector is made of a plastic scintillator, a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) array, and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The plastic scintillator serves as a beta detector, while the LSO array serves as a gamma detector and light guide that couples scintillation light from the plastic detector to the PMT. In our prototype, the PMT signal was fed into the Siemens QuickSilver electronics to achieve shaping and waveform sampling. Pulse-shape discrimination based on the detectors' decay times (2.1 ns for plastic and 40 ns for LSO) was used to differentiate beta and gamma events using the common PMT signals. Using our prototype phoswich detector, we simultaneously measured a beta image and gamma events (in single mode). The beta image showed a resolution of 1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum using F-18 line sources. Because this shows promise for plant-scale imaging, our future plans include development of a fully functional simultaneous beta-and-coincidence-gamma imager with sub-millimeter resolution imaging capability for both modalities.

  13. CMOS APS detector characterization for quantitative X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, Marco; Oliva, Piernicola; Golosio, Bruno; Delogu, Pasquale

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Imaging detector based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor and structured scintillator is characterized for quantitative X-ray imaging in the energy range 11-30 keV. Linearity, dark noise, spatial resolution and flat-field correction are the characteristics of the detector subject of investigation. The detector response, in terms of mean Analog-to-Digital Unit and noise, is modeled as a function of the energy and intensity of the X-rays. The model is directly tested using monochromatic X-ray beams and it is also indirectly validated by means of polychromatic X-ray-tube spectra. Such a characterization is suitable for quantitative X-ray imaging and the model can be used in simulation studies that take into account the actual performance of the detector.

  14. Flat detector ghost image reduction by UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeren, Rudolph M.; Steinhauser, Heidrun; Alving, Lex; Stouten, Hans; de With, Peter H. N.

    2009-02-01

    We study flat detectors for X-ray imaging performance degradation. In cone beam C-arm-CT, memory effects have a detrimental effect on image quality. Depending on the magnitude and history of irradiance differences, detector sensitivity variations may persist for a long period of time (days) and are visible as rings upon 3D reconstruction. A new method is proposed for reducing memory effects produced in CsI:Tl based Flat Detector X-ray imaging, which is based upon trap-filling by UV-light. For experiments, a commercial detector has been modified such that UV back-lighting is accomplished. A regular LED refresh light array for reducing photodiode temporal effects is interleaved with UV LED sub-arrays of different wavelengths in the near UV range. The array irradiates the scintillator through translucent parts of the detector substrate. In order to assess the efficacy of the method, ghost images are imprinted by well-defined transitions between direct radiation and attenuated or shuttered radiation. As an advantage, the new method accomplishes ghost-prevention, either by (1) continuous trap-filling at image-synchronous UV light pulsing, or (2) by applying a single dose of UV light. As a result, ring artefacts in reconstructed 3D-images are reduced to low levels. An effective wavelength has been found and an equilibrium UV dosage could be set for effective trap-filling. The overall sensitivity of the detector increases at saturated trap-filling. It was found that with optimised detector settings, i.e. optimum saturated trap-filling, the dependence on X-ray irradiation levels is low, so that the usage of the detector and its performance is robust.

  15. Microelectronics used for Semiconductor Imaging Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Heijne, Erik H. M.

    2010-01-05

    Semiconductor crystal technology, microelectronics developments and nuclear particle detection have been in a relation of symbiosis, all the way from the beginning. The increase of complexity in electronics chips can now be applied to obtain much more information on the incident nuclear radiation. Some basic technologies are described, in order to acquire insight in possibilities and limitations for the most recent detectors.

  16. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  17. Detectors for medical radioisotope imaging: demands and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. I.; Chepel, V.

    2004-10-01

    Radioisotope imaging is used to obtain information on biochemical processes in living organisms, being a tool of increasing importance for medical diagnosis. The improvement and expansion of these techniques depend on the progress attained in several areas, such as radionuclide production, radiopharmaceuticals, radiation detectors and image reconstruction algorithms. This review paper will be concerned only with the detector technology. We will review in general terms the present status of medical radioisotope imaging instrumentation with the emphasis put on the developments of high-resolution gamma cameras and PET detector systems for scinti-mammography and animal imaging. The present trend to combine two or more modalities in a single machine in order to obtain complementary information will also be considered.

  18. Simulation of computed radiography with imaging plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Mathy, F.; Schumm, A.

    2014-02-18

    Computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plate detectors is taking an increasing place in Radiography Testing. CR uses similar equipment as conventional radiography except that the classical X-ray film is replaced by a numerical detector, called image plate (IP), which is made of a photostimulable layer and which is read by a scanning device through photostimulated luminescence. Such digital radiography has already demonstrated important benefits in terms of exposure time, decrease of source energies and thus reduction of radioprotection area besides being a solution without effluents. This paper presents a model for the simulation of radiography with image plate detectors in CIVA together with examples of validation of the model. The study consists in a cross comparison between experimental and simulation results obtained on a step wedge with a classical X-ray tube. Results are proposed in particular with wire Image quality Indicator (IQI) and duplex IQI.

  19. Reconstruction algorithms for optoacoustic imaging based on fiber optic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamela, Horacio; Díaz-Tendero, Gonzalo; Gutiérrez, Rebeca; Gallego, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Optoacoustic Imaging (OAI), a novel hybrid imaging technology, offers high contrast, molecular specificity and excellent resolution to overcome limitations of the current clinical modalities for detection of solid tumors. The exact time-domain reconstruction formula produces images with excellent resolution but poor contrast. Some approximate time-domain filtered back-projection reconstruction algorithms have also been reported to solve this problem. A wavelet transform implementation filtering can be used to sharpen object boundaries while simultaneously preserving high contrast of the reconstructed objects. In this paper, several algorithms, based on Back Projection (BP) techniques, have been suggested to process OA images in conjunction with signal filtering for ultrasonic point detectors and integral detectors. We apply these techniques first directly to a numerical generated sample image and then to the laserdigitalized image of a tissue phantom, obtaining in both cases the best results in resolution and contrast for a waveletbased filter.

  20. Monte Carlo studies for medical imaging detector optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fois, G. R.; Cisbani, E.; Garibaldi, F.

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the Monte Carlo optimization studies of detection systems for Molecular Breast Imaging with radionuclides and Bremsstrahlung Imaging in nuclear medicine. Molecular Breast Imaging requires competing performances of the detectors: high efficiency and high spatial resolutions; in this direction, it has been proposed an innovative device which combines images from two different, and somehow complementary, detectors at the opposite sides of the breast. The dual detector design allows for spot compression and improves significantly the performance of the overall system if all components are well tuned, layout and processing carefully optimized; in this direction the Monte Carlo simulation represents a valuable tools. In recent years, Bremsstrahlung Imaging potentiality in internal radiotherapy (with beta-radiopharmaceuticals) has been clearly emerged; Bremsstrahlung Imaging is currently performed with existing detector generally used for single photon radioisotopes. We are evaluating the possibility to adapt an existing compact gamma camera and optimize by Monte Carlo its performance for Bremsstrahlung imaging with photons emitted by the beta- from 90 Y.

  1. A Photon Counting Imaging Detector for NASA Exoplanet Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald

    The key objective of the proposed project is to advance the maturity of a 256x256 pixel single-photon optical imaging detector. The detector has zero read noise and is resilient against the harsh effects of radiation in space. We expect that the device will have state-of-the-art performance in other parameters, e.g., high quantum efficiency from UV to 1 #m, low dark current, etc.

  2. Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Marshall, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Oxoby, G.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Suekane, F.; Toge, N.; Va'Vra, J.; Williams, S. ); Wilson, R.J.; Whitaker, J.S. . Dept.

    1990-10-01

    The SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector use a proportional wire detector for which a single channel hybrid has been developed. It consists of a preamplifier, gain selectable amplifier, load driver amplifier, power switching, and precision calibrator. For this hybrid, a bipolar, semicustom integrated circuit has been designed which includes video operational amplifiers for two of the gain stages. This approach allows maximization of the detector volume, allows DC coupling, and enables gain selection. System tests show good noise performance, calibration precision, system linearity, and signal shape uniformity over the full dynamic range. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Measurement dimensions compressed spectral imaging with a single point detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Feng; Yu, Wen-Kai; Yao, Xu-Ri; Dai, Bin; Li, Long-Zhen; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2016-04-01

    An experimental demonstration of spectral imaging with measurement dimensions compressed has been performed. With the method of dual compressed sensing (CS) we derive, the spectral image of a colored object can be obtained with only a single point detector, and sub-sampling is achieved in both spatial and spectral domains. The performances of dual CS spectral imaging are analyzed, including the effects of dual modulation numbers and measurement noise on the imaging quality. Our scheme provides a stable, high-flux measurement approach of spectral imaging.

  4. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirov, J. P.; Chigarev, N. V.; Matveev, O. I.; Omenetto, N.; Smith, B. W.; Winefordner, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm.

  5. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector for CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Rachel A.

    2013-12-01

    The energy increase of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12 GeV promises to greatly extend the physics reach of its experiments. This will include an upgrade of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to CLAS12, offering unique possibilities to study internal nucleon dynamics. For this excellent hadron identification over the full kinematical range of 3–8 GeV/c is essential. This will be achieved by the installation of a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector. A novel hybrid imaging design incorporating mirrors, aerogel radiators and Hamamatsu H8500 multianode photomultiplier tubes is proposed. Depending on the incident particle track angle, Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly or after two reflections and passes through the aerogel. The detector design is described, along with preliminary results on individual detector components tests and from recent testbeam studies.

  6. Astronomical imaging with infrared array detectors.

    PubMed

    Gatley, I; Depoy, D L; Fowler, A M

    1988-12-01

    History shows that progress in astronomy often stems directly from technological innovation and that each portion of the electromagnetic spectrum offers unique insights into the nature of the universe. Most recently, the widespread availability of infrared-sensitive two-dimensional array detectors has led to dramatic improvements in the capabilities of conventional ground-based observatories. The impact of this new technology on our understanding of a wide variety of phenomena is illustrated here by infrared pictures of star-forming regions, of nebulae produced by the late stages of stellar evolution, of the nucleus of our own galaxy(the Milky Way), and of activity in other galaxies. PMID:17817072

  7. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  8. The PICASSO digital detector for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging at ELETTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Arfelli, F.; Longo, R.; Castelli, E.; Astolfo, A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Vallazza, E.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.

    2010-07-23

    A clinical mammography program is in progress at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the Italian synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste. A conventional screen-film system is utilized as detector for the examinations on patients. For the next experimental step a digital detector has been designed taking into account the essential requirements for mammography such as high spatial and contrast resolution, high efficiency for low dose examinations and high speed for short acquisition time. A double-layer prototype has already been tested in the frame of the PICASSO project. In addition, an analyzer crystal set-up for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has been available for many years at the SYRMEP beamline. Applying the DEI technique several successful experiments have been carried out in biomedical imaging and in particular in-vitro breast imaging utilizing commercially available detectors. Recently a system upgrade yielded a double-crystal analyzer set-up with improved stability and higher angular resolution. In this study the PICASSO detector has been utilized in combination with the new analyzer set-up for imaging in-vitro breast tissue samples. In order to test the potential of the combined system planar and tomographic images have been acquired and the first results are here presented.

  9. The PICASSO digital detector for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging at ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Astolfo, A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2010-07-01

    A clinical mammography program is in progress at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the Italian synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste. A conventional screen-film system is utilized as detector for the examinations on patients. For the next experimental step a digital detector has been designed taking into account the essential requirements for mammography such as high spatial and contrast resolution, high efficiency for low dose examinations and high speed for short acquisition time. A double-layer prototype has already been tested in the frame of the PICASSO project. In addition, an analyzer crystal set-up for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has been available for many years at the SYRMEP beamline. Applying the DEI technique several successful experiments have been carried out in biomedical imaging and in particular in-vitro breast imaging utilizing commercially available detectors. Recently a system upgrade yielded a double-crystal analyzer set-up with improved stability and higher angular resolution. In this study the PICASSO detector has been utilized in combination with the new analyzer set-up for imaging in-vitro breast tissue samples. In order to test the potential of the combined system planar and tomographic images have been acquired and the first results are here presented.

  10. Design considerations for ultrasound detectors in photoacoustic breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Singh, Mithun K. A.; van Hespen, Johan C. G.; van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelft; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-03-01

    The ultrasound detector is the heart of a photoacoustic imaging system. In photoacoustic imaging of the breast there is a requirement to detect tumors located a few centimeters deep in tissue, where the light is heavily attenuated. Thus a sensitive ultrasound transducer is of crucial importance. As the frequency content of photoacoustic waves are inversely proportional to the dimensions of the absorbing structures, and in tissue can range from hundreds of kHz to tens of MHz, a broadband ultrasound transducer is required centered on an optimum frequency. A single element piezoelectric transducer structurally consists of the active piezoelectric material, front- and back-matching layers and a backing layer. To have both high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, the materials, their acoustic characteristics and their dimensions should be carefully chosen. In this paper, we present design considerations of an ultrasound transducer for imaging the breast such as the detector sensitivity and frequency response, which guides the selection of active material, matching layers and their geometries. We iterate between simulation of detector performance and experimental characterization of functional models to arrive at an optimized implementation. For computer simulation, we use 1D KLM and 3D finite-element based models. The optimized detector has a large-aperture possessing a center frequency of 1 MHz with fractional bandwidth of more than 80%. The measured minimum detectable pressure is 0.5 Pa, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the detector used in the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope.

  11. Velocity map imaging using an in-vacuum pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gademann, Georg; Huismans, Ymkje; Gijsbertsen, Arjan; Jungmann, Julia; Visschers, Jan; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The use of a new type in-vacuum pixel detector in velocity map imaging (VMI) is introduced. The Medipix2 and Timepix semiconductor pixel detectors (256×256 square pixels, 55×55 μm2) are well suited for charged particle detection. They offer high resolution, low noise, and high quantum efficiency. The Medipix2 chip allows double energy discrimination by offering a low and a high energy threshold. The Timepix detector allows to record the incidence time of a particle with a temporal resolution of 10 ns and a dynamic range of 160 μs. Results of the first time application of the Medipix2 detector to VMI are presented, investigating the quantum efficiency as well as the possibility to operate at increased background pressure in the vacuum chamber.

  12. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  13. A Compact Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Kumar, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector will simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beam splitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. The polarizing beam splitter can be either a Ronchi ruling, or an array of cylindrical lenslets, bonded to a birefringent wafer. The wafer, in turn, is bonded to the CCD so that light in the two orthogonal planes of polarization falls on adjacent pairs of pixels. The use of a high-index birefringent material, e.g., rutile, allows the IDID to operate at f-numbers as high as f/3.5. Other aspects of the detector are discussed.

  14. A compact imaging detector of polarization and spectral content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, D. M.; Kumar, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    A new type of image detector will simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beam splitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. The polarizing beam splitter can be either a Ronchi ruling, or an array of cylindrical lenslets, bonded to a birefringent wafer. The wafer, in turn, is bonded to the CCD so that light in the two orthogonal planes of polarization falls on adjacent pairs of pixels. The use of a high-index birefringent material, e.g., rutile, allows the IDID to operate at f-numbers as high as f/3.5. Other aspects of the detector are discussed.

  15. Detectors for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    MICHALET, X.; SIEGMUND, O.H.W.; VALLERGA, J.V.; JELINSKY, P.; MILLAUD, J.E.; WEISS, S.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule observation, characterization and manipulation techniques have recently come to the forefront of several research domains spanning chemistry, biology and physics. Due to the exquisite sensitivity, specificity, and unmasking of ensemble averaging, single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy have become, in a short period of time, important tools in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. These methods led to new ways of thinking about biological processes such as viral infection, receptor diffusion and oligomerization, cellular signaling, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions, and molecular machines. Such achievements require a combination of several factors to be met, among which detector sensitivity and bandwidth are crucial. We examine here the needed performance of photodetectors used in these types of experiments, the current state of the art for different categories of detectors, and actual and future developments of single-photon counting detectors for single-molecule imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:20157633

  16. A low-energy gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    We describe a hard-X-ray/soft-gamma-ray imaging detector, incorporating a microchannel-plate (MCP) electron multiplier for possible use in future telescopes. In contrast to previous attempts using MCP's this approach promises to achieve high quantum detection efficiencies in addition to high spatial and temporal resolution. Preliminary results indicate not only the capability of simultaneous imaging and single-photon counting, but also coarse energy resolution.

  17. A novel phoswich imaging detector for simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging of plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heyu; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2011-09-01

    To meet the growing demand for functional imaging technology for use in studying plant biology, we are developing a novel technique that permits simultaneous imaging of escaped positrons and coincidence gammas from annihilation of positrons within an intake leaf. The multi-modality imaging system will include two planar detectors: one is a typical PET detector array and the other is a phoswich imaging detector that detects both beta and gamma. The novel phoswich detector is made of a plastic scintillator, a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) array, and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The plastic scintillator serves as a beta detector, while the LSO array serves as a gamma detector and light guide that couples scintillation light from the plastic detector to the PMT. In our prototype, the PMT signal was fed into the Siemens QuickSilver electronics to achieve shaping and waveform sampling. Pulse-shape discrimination based on the detectors' decay times (2.1 ns for plastic and 40 ns for LSO) was used to differentiate beta and gamma events using the common PMT signals. Using our prototype phoswich detector, we simultaneously measured a beta image and gamma events (in single mode). The beta image showed a resolution of 1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum using F-18 line sources. Because this shows promise for plant-scale imaging, our future plans include development of a fully functional simultaneous beta-and-coincidence-gamma imager with sub-millimeter resolution imaging capability for both modalities. PMID:21828901

  18. Speckle imaging with the MAMA detector: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horch, E.; Heanue, J. F.; Morgan, J. S.; Timothy, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first successful speckle imaging studies using the Stanford University speckle interferometry system, an instrument that uses a multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector as the imaging device. The method of producing high-resolution images is based on the analysis of so-called 'near-axis' bispectral subplanes and follows the work of Lohmann et al. (1983). In order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the bispectrum, the frame-oversampling technique of Nakajima et al. (1989) is also employed. We present speckle imaging results of binary stars and other objects from V magnitude 5.5 to 11, and the quality of these images is studied. While the Stanford system is capable of good speckle imaging results, it is limited by the overall quantum efficiency of the current MAMA detector (which is due to the response of the photocathode at visible wavelengths and other detector properties) and by channel saturation of the microchannel plate. Both affect the signal-to-noise ratio of the power spectrum and bispectrum.

  19. CMOS Imaging Detectors as X-ray Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Inoue, Katsuaki

    2004-05-12

    CMOS imagers are matrix-addressed photodiode arrays, which have been utilized in devices such as commercially available digital cameras. The pixel size of CMOS imagers is usually larger than that of CCD and smaller than that of TFT, giving them a unique position. Although CMOS x-ray imaging devices have already become commercially available, they have not been used as an x-ray area detector in synchrotron radiation experiments. We tested performance of a CMOS detector from Rad-icon (Shad-o-Box1024) in medical imaging, small-angle scattering, and protein crystallography experiments. It has pixels of 0.048 mm square, read-out time of 0.45 sec, 12-bit ADC, and requires a frame grabber for image acquisition. The detection area is 5-cm square. It uses a Kodak Min-R scintillator screen as a phosphor. The sensitivity to x-rays with an energy less than 15 keV was low because of the thick window materials. Since the readout noise is high, the dynamic range is limited to 2000. The biggest advantages of this detector are cost-effectiveness (about 10,000 US dollars) and compactness (thickness < 3 cm, weight < 2 kg)

  20. Autoradiography Imaging in Targeted Alpha Therapy with Timepix Detector

    PubMed Central

    AL Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy. PMID:25688285

  1. Two-Sided Coded Aperture Imaging Without a Detector Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Cunningham, Mark F; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel design for a two-sided, coded-aperture, gamma-ray imager suitable for use in stand off detection of orphan radioactive sources. The design is an extension of an active-mask imager that would have three active planes of detector material, a central plane acting as the detector for two (active) coded-aperture mask planes, one on either side of the detector plane. In the new design the central plane is removed and the mask on the left (right) serves as the detector plane for the mask on the right (left). This design reduces the size, mass, complexity, and cost of the overall instrument. In addition, if one has fully position-sensitive detectors, then one can use the two planes as a classic Compton camera. This enhances the instrument's sensitivity at higher energies where the coded-aperture efficiency is decreased by mask penetration. A plausible design for the system is found and explored with Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Autoradiography imaging in targeted alpha therapy with Timepix detector.

    PubMed

    A L Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy. PMID:25688285

  3. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  4. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    SciTech Connect

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-06-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector.

  5. DUNBID, the Delft University neutron backscattering imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Bom, V R; van Eijk, C W E; Ali, M A

    2005-01-01

    In the search for low-metallic land mines, the neutron backscattering technique may be applied if the soil is sufficiently dry. An advantage of this method is the speed of detection: the scanning speed may be made comparable to that of a metal detector. A two-dimensional position sensitive detector is tested to obtain an image of the back scattered thermal neutron radiation. Results of experiments using a radionuclide neutron source are presented. The on-mine to no-mine signal ratio can be improved by the application of a window on the neutron time-of-flight. Results using a pulsed neutron generator are also presented. PMID:16029950

  6. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction as an Imaging Radiation Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, N. Y.; Rokutanda, E.; Kikuchi, K.; Kushino, A.; Ohashi, T.; Kurakado, M.

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as X-ray detectors have been developed mainly aiming at high resolution spectrometers. We archived an energy resolution of 106 eV at 5.9 keV (FWHM) using an STJ developed at Nippon Steel Corporation with a cooled (~ 100K) FET. Furthermore, series-connected STJs as an imaging radiation detector are developed. Both the pulse hight and the rise time of signals from 241Am α-particles irradiated on a series-connected STJ give a good position sensitivity, indicating the intrinsic position resolution less than 0.5 mm

  7. An Integrated Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector has been designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The Integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. It should be capable of 1:10(exp 4) polarization discrimination. The IDID should simplify the design and operation of imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmospheric and solar research. Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved 512 x 1024-pixel imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 6) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout of both images at 10 million pixels per second each; (4) on-chip analog signal processing to produce polarization maps in real time; (5) on-chip 10-bit A/D conversion. When used with a lithium-niobate Fabry-Perot etalon or other color filter that can encode spectral information as polarization, the IDID can collect and analyze simultaneous images at two wavelengths. Precise photometric analysis of molecular or atomic concentrations in the atmosphere is one suggested application. When used in a solar telescope, the IDID will charge the polarization, which can then be converted to maps of the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface.

  8. Compressive spectral imaging systems based on linear detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanli; Zhong, Xiaoming; Zhao, Haibo; Li, Huan

    2015-08-01

    The spectrometers capture large amount of raw and 3-dimensional (3D) spatial-spectral scene information with 2- dimensional (2D) focal plane arrays(FPA). In many applications, including imaging system and video cameras, the Nyquist rate is so high that too many samples result, making compression a precondition to storage or transmission. Compressive sensing theory employs non-adaptive linear projections that preserve the structure of the signal, the signal is then reconstructed from these projections using an optimization process. This article overview the fundamental spectral imagers based on compressive sensing, the coded aperture snapshot spectral imagers (CASSI) and high-resolution imagers via moving random exposure. Besides that, the article propose a new method to implement spectral imagers with linear detector imager systems based on spectrum compressed. The article describes the system introduction and code process, and it illustrates results with real data and imagery. Simulations are shown to illustrate the performance improvement attained by the new model and complexity of the imaging system greatly reduced by using linear detector.

  9. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented. PMID:26256630

  10. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  11. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented.

  12. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, F. Cassol; Clemens, J. C.; Hemmer, C.; Morel, C.

    2009-03-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures (~0.1-400 µGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than ~5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above ~110 µGy and ~50 µGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses (~3, 30 and 300 µGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of ~1, thanks to its high efficiency (~100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is ~0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of other digital devices in a similar radiation condition. The XPAD3-S/CdTe detector appears to be the best with the highest

  13. Hybrid CMOS SiPIN detectors as astronomical imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Lance Michael

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have dominated optical and x-ray astronomy since their inception in 1969. Only recently, through improvements in design and fabrication methods, have imagers that use Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology gained ground on CCDs in scientific imaging. We are now in the midst of an era where astronomers might begin to design optical telescope cameras that employ CMOS imagers. The first three chapters of this dissertation are primarily composed of introductory material. In them, we discuss the potential advantages that CMOS imagers offer over CCDs in astronomical applications. We compare the two technologies in terms of the standard metrics used to evaluate and compare scientific imagers: dark current, read noise, linearity, etc. We also discuss novel features of CMOS devices and the benefits they offer to astronomy. In particular, we focus on a specific kind of hybrid CMOS sensor that uses Silicon PIN photodiodes to detect optical light in order to overcome deficiencies of commercial CMOS sensors. The remaining four chapters focus on a specific type of hybrid CMOS Silicon PIN sensor: the Teledyne Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN Imager (HyViSI). In chapters four and five, results from testing HyViSI detectors in the laboratory and at the Kitt Peak 2.1m telescope are presented. We present our laboratory measurements of the standard detector metrics for a number of HyViSI devices, ranging from 1k×1k to 4k×4k format. We also include a description of the SIDECAR readout circuit that was used to control the detectors. We then show how they performed at the telescope in terms of photometry, astrometry, variability measurement, and telescope focusing and guiding. Lastly, in the final two chapters we present results on detector artifacts such as pixel crosstalk, electronic crosstalk, and image persistence. One form of pixel crosstalk that has not been discussed elsewhere in the literature, which we refer to as Interpixel Charge

  14. Cd1-xZnxTe detector imaging array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Jack F.; Friesenhahn, Stan J.; Lingren, Clinton L.; Apotovsky, Boris A.; Doty, F. P.; Ashburn, William L.; Dillon, William P.

    1993-09-01

    A prototype portable gamma ray camera using 32 X 32 channels was developed. An experimental 3 X 3 sub-array of 5 mm X 5 mm CZT detectors was fabricated for use in system checkout and to investigate the applicability of CZT imaging arrays to nuclear medical imaging. Experiments were carried out to make a direct comparison of the imaging capabilities of the CZT sub-array with a state-of-the-art Anger camera. In a linespread study using a Tc-99m source embedded in a tissue equivalent absorber, contrasts of 9.5 for the CZT array and 3.4 for the Anger camera were observed. In a dynamic imaging experiment, the CZT imager appeared to have comparable resolution to and be somewhat more regular than the Anger camera.

  15. Terahertz detectors for long wavelength multi-spectral imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Wanke, Michael Clement; Reno, John Louis; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Grine, Albert D.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a wavelength tunable detector for Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging. Our approach was to utilize plasmons in the channel of a specially designed field-effect transistor called the grating-gate detector. Grating-gate detectors exhibit narrow-linewidth, broad spectral tunability through application of a gate bias, and no angular dependence in their photoresponse. As such, if suitable sensitivity can be attained, they are viable candidates for Terahertz multi-spectral focal plane arrays. When this work began, grating-gate gate detectors, while having many promising characteristics, had a noise-equivalent power (NEP) of only 10{sup -5} W/{radical}Hz. Over the duration of this project, we have obtained a true NEP of 10{sup -8} W/{radical}Hz and a scaled NEP of 10{sup -9}W/{radical}Hz. The ultimate goal for these detectors is to reach a NEP in the 10{sup -9{yields}-10}W/{radical}Hz range; we have not yet seen a roadblock to continued improvement.

  16. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G; Wilson, David L

    2016-03-21

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR  <  0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR [Formula: see text] 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29  ±  0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42  ±  0.01 (p  <  0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50  ±  0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition

  17. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR  <  0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR ≈ 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29  ±  0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42  ±  0.01 (p  <  0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50  ±  0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition in a healthy

  18. Detector blur associated with MeV radiographic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Stuart A.; Lutz, Stephen S.; Smalley, Duane D.; Brown, Kristina K.; Danielson, Jeremy; Haines, Todd J.; Howe, Russell A.; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Morgan, Dane; Schultz, Larry J.

    2015-08-01

    We are investigating scintillator performance in radiographic imaging systems at x-ray endpoint energies of 0.4 and 2.3 MeV in single-pulse x-ray machines. The effect of scene magnification and geometric setup will be examined along with differences between the detector response of radiation and optical scatter. Previous discussion has reviewed energy absorption and efficiency of various imaging scintillators with a 2.3 MeV x-ray source. The focal point of our study is to characterize scintillator blur to refine system models. Typical detector geometries utilize thin tiled LYSO:Ce (cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate) assembled in a composite mosaic. Properties of individual tiles are being studied to understand system resolution effects present in the experimental setup. Comparison of two different experiments with different geometric configurations is examined. Results are then compared to different scene magnifications generated in a Monte-Carlo simulation.

  19. Fabrication of an X-Ray Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, G. E.; Burgess, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray detector array yields mosaic image of object emitting 1- to 30-keV range fabricated from n-doped silicon wafer. In proposed fabrication technique, thin walls of diffused n+ dopant divide wafer into pixels of rectangular cross section, each containing central electrode of thermally migrated p-type metal. This pnn+ arrangement reduces leakage current by preventing transistor action caused by pnp structure of earlier version.

  20. Construction and testing of the SLD Cerenkov ring imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Williams, D.A. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Zucchelli, P. . Ist. di Fisica); Jacques, P.; Piano, R.; Stamer, P. . Serin Physics Lab.); Whitaker, J.S.; Wilson, R.J. . Dept. of Physics); Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; HcHugh, S.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S. . Dept. of Physics); Antiligus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dosu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, B.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Valvre, J.; Williams, S. ); Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-06-01

    The authors report on the construction of the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider and the testing of its components. The authors include results from testing the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays, and mirrors for the barrel CRID. The authors also discuss development of the support systems essential for the operation of the CRID: gas and liquid recirculator systems and monitoring.

  1. Construction and testing of the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Williams, D.A.; Zucchelli, P. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Whitaker, J.S.; Wilson, R.J. . Dept. of Physics); Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S. . Dept. of Physics); Johns

    1990-01-01

    We report on the construction of the Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider and the testing of its components. We include results from testing the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays, and mirrors for the barrel CRID. We also discuss development of the support systems essential for the operation of the CRID: gas and liquid recirculator systems and monitoring. 15 refs., 9 figs.

  2. SLAC Large Detector (SLD) Image and Event Display Collections

    DOE Data Explorer

    Perl, Joseph; Cowan, Ray; Johnson, Tony

    The SLD makes use of the unique capabilities of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) to perform studies of polarized Z particles produced in collisions between electrons and positrons. The SLD Event Display Collection shows computer generated pictures of a number of Z particle decays as reconstructed by the SLD detector. More than 90 images, each in several formats, captured from 1991 - 1996 events, are archived here. There are also figures and data plots available.

  3. Power detectors for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun Jane; Li, James C.; Tang, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes and compares three different types of detectors, including CMOS power detectors, bipolar power detectors, and super-regenerative detectors, deployed in the literature for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies. Each detector has unique working mechanism and demonstrates different behavior with respects to bias conditions, input signal power, as well as bandwidth responses. Two Figure-of-Merits for both wideband and narrowband imaging have been defined to quantify the detector performance comparison. CMOS and Bipolar detectors are good for passive imaging, while super regenerative detectors are superior for active imaging. The analytical results have been verified by both simulation and measurement results. These analyses intend to provide design insights and guidance for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging power detectors.

  4. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  5. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  6. Phase unwrapping in spectral X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Epple, Franz M; Ehn, Sebastian; Thibault, Pierre; Koehler, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Herzen, Julia; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-03-01

    Grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging has proven to be feasible with conventional X-ray sources. The polychromatic spectrum generally limits the performance of the interferometer but benefit can be gained with an energy-sensitive detector. In the presented work, we employ the energy-discrimination capability to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts. We propose to use the phase shifts, which are measured in distinct energy bins, to estimate the optimal phase shift in the sense of maximum likelihood. We demonstrate that our method is able to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts, to improve the contrast-to-noise ratio and to reduce beam hardening due to the modelled energy dependency. The method is evaluated on experimental data which are measured with a laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer equipped with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source and an energy-sensitive photon-counting pixel detector. Our work shows, that spectral imaging is an important step to move differential phase-contrast imaging closer to pre-clinical and clinical applications, where phase wrapping is particularly problematic. PMID:25163054

  7. Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy and Energy-Resolving Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Frank; Raab, Walfried

    2015-08-01

    Imaging spectroscopy has seen rapid progress over the past 25 years, leading to breakthroughs in many fields of astronomy that would not have been otherwise possible. This review overviews the visible/infrared imaging spectroscopy techniques as well as energy-resolving detectors. We introduce the working principle of scanning Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers and explain the most common integral field concepts based on mirror slicers, lenslet arrays, and fibers. The main advantage of integral field spectrographs is the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral information. Although Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers can provide a larger field of view, it is ultimately the higher sensitivity of integral field units that make them the technique of choice. This is arguably the case for image slicers, which make the most efficient use of the available detector pixels and have equal or higher transmission than lenslet arrays and fiber integral field units, respectively. We also address the more specific issues of large étendue operation, focal ratio degradation, anamorphic magnification, and diffraction-limited operation. This review also covers the emerging technology of energy-resolving detectors, which promise very simple and efficient instrument designs. These energy-resolving detectors are based on superconducting thin film technology and exploit either the very small superconducting energy to count the number of quasi-particles excited in the absorption of the photon or the extremely steep phase transition between the normal- and superconducting phase to measure a temperature increase. We have put special emphasis on an overview of the underlying physical phenomena as well as on the recent technological progress and astronomical path finder experiments.

  8. New optics for resolution improving of Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, M.; Kramer, D.; Polak, J.; Steiger, L.; Finger, M.; Slunecka, M.

    2013-04-01

    The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is key tool for particle identification. Two reflecting spherical mirror surfaces, covering a total area of about 21 m2 hosted in the radiator vessel, provide Cherenkov radiation focusing to photon detectors. These ones are based on the use of multi-anode photo-multiplier tubes. They are coupled to individual lens telescopes, made from special fused silica aspherical lenses. Design, construction, and Hartmann test of lenses qualities and alignment were described. The RICH detector uses C4F10 as radiator gas. The refractive index of the radiator gas is substantial parameter. It varies with temperature, atmospheric pressure and gas purity. Its accurate knowledge is essential for the particle identification performance. A modified Jamin's interferometer was proposed, constructed and tested to allow on-line refractive index measurement with accuracy better than 10-6 The new types of fused silica Cherenkov radiators was designed to the tests of electron multiplier detector too.

  9. Dose Imaging Detectors for Radiotherapy Based on Gas Electron Multipliers

    PubMed Central

    Klyachko, A.V.; Friesel, D.L.; Kline, C.; Liechty, J.; Nichiporov, D.F.; Solberg, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    New techniques in charged particle therapy and widespread use of modern dynamic beam delivery systems demand new beam monitoring devices as well as accurate 2D dosimetry systems to verify the delivered dose distribution. We are developing dose imaging detectors based on gas electron multipliers (GEM) with the goal of improving dose measurement linearity, position and timing resolution, and to ultimately allow pre-treatment verification of dose distributions and dose delivery monitoring employing scanning beam technology. A prototype 10×10 cm2 double-GEM detector has been tested in the 205 MeV proton beam using electronic and optical readout modes. Preliminary results with electronic cross-strip readout demonstrate fast response and single-pixel (4 mm) position resolution. In optical readout mode, the line spread function of the detector was found to have σ=0.7 mm. In both readout modes, the detector response was linear up to dose rates of 50 Gy/min, with adequate representation of the Bragg peak in depth-dose profile measurements. PMID:21528010

  10. Sparse Detector Imaging Sensor with Two-Class Silhouette Classification

    PubMed Central

    Russomanno, David; Chari, Srikant; Halford, Carl

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test of a simple active near-infrared sparse detector imaging sensor. The prototype of the sensor is novel in that it can capture remarkable silhouettes or profiles of a wide-variety of moving objects, including humans, animals, and vehicles using a sparse detector array comprised of only sixteen sensing elements deployed in a vertical configuration. The prototype sensor was built to collect silhouettes for a variety of objects and to evaluate several algorithms for classifying the data obtained from the sensor into two classes: human versus non-human. Initial tests show that the classification of individually sensed objects into two classes can be achieved with accuracy greater than ninety-nine percent (99%) with a subset of the sixteen detectors using a representative dataset consisting of 512 signatures. The prototype also includes a Webservice interface such that the sensor can be tasked in a network-centric environment. The sensor appears to be a low-cost alternative to traditional, high-resolution focal plane array imaging sensors for some applications. After a power optimization study, appropriate packaging, and testing with more extensive datasets, the sensor may be a good candidate for deployment in vast geographic regions for a myriad of intelligent electronic fence and persistent surveillance applications, including perimeter security scenarios.

  11. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Worstell, W.A.

    1997-02-04

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions. 11 figs.

  12. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Worstell, William A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions.

  13. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector of the NA62 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, F.

    2012-08-01

    The NA62 experiment is designed to measure the branching ratio of the decay K+ -> π +ν bar {ν } with a 10% accuracy at the CERN SPS. To suppress the main background coming from the K+ → μ+ν decay, a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH), able to separate π and μ in the momentum range between 15 and 35 GeV/c with a muon contamination in a pion sample < 10-2 is needed. The RICH must also have an unprecedented time resolution (100 ps) to disentangle accidental time 115sociatioDll of beam particles with pions. The last updates of the detector layout are presented along with the results of the beam tests of the RICH prototype: the muon misidentification probability was found to be 0. 7% and the time resolution < 100 ps in all the momentum range.

  14. Raman characterization of high temperature materials using an imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, G.M.; Veirs, D.K.

    1989-03-01

    The characterization of materials by Raman spectroscopy has been advanced by recent technological developments in light detectors. Imaging photomultiplier-tube detectors are now available that impart position information in two dimensions while retaining photon-counting sensitivity, effectively greatly reducing noise. The combination of sensitivity and reduced noise allows smaller amounts of material to be analyzed. The ability to observe small amount of material when coupled with position information makes possible Raman characterization in which many spatial elements are analyzed simultaneously. Raman spectroscopy making use of these capabilities has been used, for instance, to analyze the phases present in carbon films and fibers and to map phase-transformed zones accompanying crack propagation in toughened zirconia ceramics. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The fluid systems for the SLD Cherenkov ring imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; McCulloch, M.; McShurley, D.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Peterson, H.; Ratcliff, B.; Reif, R.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Shaw, H.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Vavra, J.; Watt, R.; Weber, T.; Williams, S.H.; Baird, K.; Jacques, P.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R.; Stamer, P.; Word, G.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Yellin, S.; Ben-David, R.; Manly, S.; Snyder, J.; Turk, J.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Liu, X.; Schneider, M.; Williams, D.A.; Coller, J.; Shank, J.T.; Whitaker, J.S.; d`Oliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Martinez, J.; Nussbaum, M.; Santha, A.K.S.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Stockdale, I.; Wilson, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe the design and operation of the fluid delivery, monitor and control systems for the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). The systems deliver drift gas (C{sub 2}H{sub 6} + TMAE), radiator gas (C{sub 5}F{sub 12} + N{sub 2}) and radiator liquid (C{sub 6}F{sub 14}). Measured critical quantities such as electron lifetime in the drift gas and ultra-violet (UV) transparencies of the radiator fluids, together with the operational experience, are also reported.

  16. Development and construction of the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Bean, A.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Caldwell, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.

    1989-06-01

    We report on the development and construction of the Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC linear collider. In particular, we outline recent progress in the construction, and results from testing the first components of the barrel CRID, including the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays and mirror system. We also review progress in the construction of the barrel CRID gas radiator vessel, the liquid radiator recirculator system, and the electronic readout system. The development of a comprehensive monitor and control system -- upon which the stable operation and physics efficacy of the CRID depend -- is also described. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-07-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect. PMID:27446679

  18. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect.

  19. A QVD Detector for Focal Plane Hyperspectral Imaging in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, K. S.; Gulian, A. M.; Fritz, G. G.; VanVechten, D.

    2002-12-01

    We present the latest results on the development of a new detector, called ``QVD'' for single photons, being developed by NRL under DoD and NASA sponsorship. In this approach, incoming photons are absorbed and thermalized; the resulting elevation of temperature is detected as a thermoelectric voltage generated because of the resulting temperature differential from the absorption site to a reference at the baseline temperature. Heat (Q) is converted to voltage (V) and digitized in the readout (D). The design exploits the high value of the thermoelectric, or Seebeck, coefficient that some metals (so called Kondo metals) have at cryogenic temperatures. The best-known candidates are lanthanum-cerium hexaborides, with the Seebeck coefficient as high as 100 μ V/K at ~ 1 K temperatures reported in bulk crystals. Bulk crystals can be used in some modifications of the QVD detectors, but other crystalline modifications such as thin films or whiskers can yield better results. Thin films are most promising from the point of view of existing electronic device fabrication technologies. Thus we focus on developing thin films of hexaborides. We have currently reached S ~ 7 μ V/K. Work is in progress to improve films. We hope to get one order of magnitude improvement in the near future. Then, about 1 eV energy resolution is predicted for 6 keV photons and ~ 0.1 eV resolution for UV photons. A major feature of thermoelectric detectors is high speed (short pulse duration, ~tens of nanoseconds), already demonstrated with prototypes. Counting rates of MHz are possible for X-ray detecting designs and even higher rates for UV-detecting designs. The parameters of the absorber (dimensions and materials) can be chosen to achieve high quantum efficiency. Simplicity of the detector layout facilitates array construction for hyperspectral imaging.

  20. Laser system for testing radiation imaging detector circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrzycka, Weronika; Kasinski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Performance and functionality of radiation imaging detector circuits in charge and position measurement systems need to meet tight requirements. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly test sensors as well as read-out electronics. The major disadvantages of using radioactive sources or particle beams for testing are high financial expenses and limited accessibility. As an alternative short pulses of well-focused laser beam are often used for preliminary tests. There are number of laser-based devices available on the market, but very often their applicability in this field is limited. This paper describes concept, design and validation of laser system for testing silicon sensor based radiation imaging detector circuits. The emphasis is put on keeping overall costs low while achieving all required goals: mobility, flexible parameters, remote control and possibility of carrying out automated tests. The main part of the developed device is an optical pick-up unit (OPU) used in optical disc drives. The hardware includes FPGA-controlled circuits for laser positioning in 2 dimensions (horizontal and vertical), precision timing (frequency and number) and amplitude (diode current) of short ns-scale (3.2 ns) light pulses. The system is controlled via USB interface by a dedicated LabVIEW-based application enabling full manual or semi-automated test procedures.

  1. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  2. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  3. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam’s eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated “strip” CWO detector. Methods: A 361  ×  52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm2 gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work

  4. Characterization of an indirect X-ray imaging detector by simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Doshi, C; van Riessen, G; Balaur, E; de Jonge, M D; Peele, A G

    2015-01-01

    We describe a comprehensive model of a commercial indirect X-ray imaging detector that accurately predicts the detector point spread function and its dependence on X-ray energy. The model was validated by measurements using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and extended to polychromatic X-ray sources. Our approach can be used to predict the performance of an imaging detector and can be used to optimize imaging experiments with broad-band X-ray sources. PMID:25203971

  5. Development of a Navigator and Imaging Techniques for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilen, Chris; /Carleton Coll. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-22

    This project contributes to the detection of flaws in the germanium detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Specifically, after imaging the detector surface with a precise imaging and measuring device, they developed software to stitch the resulting images together, applying any necessary rotations, offsets, and averaging, to produce a smooth image of the whole detector that can be used to detect flaws on the surface of the detector. These images were also tiled appropriately for the Google Maps API to use as a navigation tool, allowing viewers to smoothly zoom and pan across the detector surface. Automated defect identification can now be implemented, increasing the scalability of the germanium detector fabrication.

  6. Imaging with SiPMs in noble-gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahlali, N.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; González, K.; Garcia, A. N. C.; Soriano, A.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photosensors widely used for imaging in a variety of high energy and nuclear physics experiments. In noble-gas detectors for double-beta decay and dark matter experiments, SiPMs are attractive photosensors for imaging. However they are insensitive to the VUV scintillation emitted by the noble gases (xenon and argon). This difficulty is overcome in the NEXT experiment by coating the SiPMs with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) to convert the VUV light into visible light. TPB requires stringent storage and operational conditions to prevent its degradation by environmental agents. The development of UV sensitive SiPMs is thus of utmost interest for experiments using electroluminescence of noble-gas detectors. It is in particular an important issue for a robust and background free ββ0ν experiment with xenon gas aimed by NEXT. The photon detection efficiency (PDE) of UV-enhanced SiPMs provided by Hamamatsu was determined for light in the range 250-500 nm. The PDE of standard SiPMs of the same model (S10362-33-50C), coated and non-coated with TPB, was also determined for comparison. In the UV range 250-350 nm, the PDE of the standard SiPM is shown to decrease strongly, down to about 3%. The UV-enhanced SiPM without window is shown to have the maximum PDE of 44% at 325 nm and 30% at 250 nm. The PDE of the UV-enhanced SiPM with silicon resin window has a similar trend in the UV range, although it is about 30% lower. The TPB-coated SiPM has shown to have about 6 times higher PDE than the non-coated SiPM in the range 250-315 nm. This is however below the performance of the UV-enhanced prototypes in the same wavelength range. Imaging in noble-gas detectors using UV-enhanced SiPMs is discussed.

  7. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, M; Dangendorf, V; Zboray, R; Prasser, H-M

    2014-07-01

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels. PMID:25085132

  8. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortesi, M.; Prasser, H.-M.; Dangendorf, V.; Zboray, R.

    2014-07-15

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  9. EPR Imaging at a Few Megahertz Using SQUID Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Day, Peter; Penanen, Konstantin; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus being developed for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging operates in the resonance-frequency range of about 1 to 2 MHz well below the microwave frequencies used in conventional EPR. Until now, in order to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise radios (SNRs) in conventional EPR, it has been necessary to place both detectors and objects to be imaged inside resonant microwave cavities. EPR imaging has much in common with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is described briefly in the immediately preceding article. In EPR imaging as in MRI, one applies a magnetic pulse to make magnetic moments (in this case, of electrons) precess in an applied magnetic field having a known gradient. The magnetic moments precess at a resonance frequency proportional to the strength of the local magnetic field. One detects the decaying resonance-frequency magnetic- field component associated with the precession. Position is encoded by use of the known relationship between the resonance frequency and the position dependence of the magnetic field. EPR imaging has recently been recognized as an important tool for non-invasive, in vivo imaging of free radicals and reduction/oxidization metabolism. However, for in vivo EPR imaging of humans and large animals, the conventional approach is not suitable because (1) it is difficult to design and construct resonant cavities large enough and having the required shapes; (2) motion, including respiration and heartbeat, can alter the resonance frequency; and (3) most microwave energy is absorbed in the first few centimeters of tissue depth, thereby potentially endangering the subject and making it impossible to obtain adequate signal strength for imaging at greater depth. To obtain greater penetration depth, prevent injury to the subject, and avoid the difficulties associated with resonant cavities, it is necessary to use lower resonance frequencies. An additional advantage of using lower resonance frequencies is that one can use

  10. Phasor imaging with a widefield photon-counting detector

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Weiss, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence lifetime can be used as a contrast mechanism to distinguish fluorophores for localization or tracking, for studying molecular interactions, binding, assembly, and aggregation, or for observing conformational changes via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor molecules. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is thus a powerful technique but its widespread use has been hampered by demanding hardware and software requirements. FLIM data is often analyzed in terms of multicomponent fluorescence lifetime decays, which requires large signals for a good signal-to-noise ratio. This confines the approach to very low frame rates and limits the number of frames which can be acquired before bleaching the sample. Recently, a computationally efficient and intuitive graphical representation, the phasor approach, has been proposed as an alternative method for FLIM data analysis at the ensemble and single-molecule level. In this article, we illustrate the advantages of combining phasor analysis with a widefield time-resolved single photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) for FLIM applications. In particular we show that phasor analysis allows real-time subsecond identification of species by their lifetimes and rapid representation of their spatial distribution, thanks to the parallel acquisition of FLIM information over a wide field of view by the H33D detector. We also discuss possible improvements of the H33D detector’s performance made possible by the simplicity of phasor analysis and its relaxed timing accuracy requirements compared to standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) methods. PMID:22352658

  11. sCMOS detector for imaging VNIR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Reulke, Ralf; Schwarzer, Horst; Venus, Holger; Neumann, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The facility Optical Information Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the scientific results of the institute of leading edge instruments and focal plane designs for EnMAP VIS/NIR spectrograph. EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) is one of the selected proposals for the national German Space Program. The EnMAP project includes the technological design of the hyper spectral space borne instrument and the algorithms development of the classification. The EnMAP project is a joint response of German Earth observation research institutions, value-added resellers and the German space industry like Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) and others to the increasing demand on information about the status of our environment. The Geo Forschungs Zentrum (GFZ) Potsdam is the Principal Investigator of EnMAP. DLR OS and KT were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for this project, new manufacturing accuracy and on-chip processing capability in order to keep pace with the ambitious scientific and user requirements. In combination with the engineering research, the current generations of space borne sensor systems are focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large swath and high spectral resolution with intelligent synchronization control, fast-readout ADC chains and new focal-plane concepts open the door to new remote-sensing and smart deep space instruments. The paper gives an overview over the detector verification program at DLR on FPA level, new control possibilities for sCMOS detectors in global shutter mode and key parameters like PRNU, DSNU, MTF, SNR, Linearity, Spectral Response, Quantum Efficiency, Flatness and Radiation Tolerance will be discussed in detail.

  12. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  13. An automatic coastline detector for use with SAR images

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, Ireena A.

    1998-09-01

    SAR imagery for coastline detection has many potential advantages over conventional optical stereoscopic techniques. For example, SAR does not have restrictions on being collected during daylight or when there is no cloud cover. In addition, the techniques for coastline detection witth SAR images can be automated. In this paper, we present the algorithmic development of an automatic coastline detector for use with SAR imagery. Three main algorithms comprise the automatic coastline detection algorithm, The first algorithm considers the image pre-processing steps that must occur on the original image in order to accentuate the land/water boundary. The second algorithm automatically follows along the accentuated land/water boundary and produces a single-pixel-wide coastline. The third algorithm identifies islands and marks them. This report describes in detail the development of these three algorithms. Examples of imagery are used throughout the paper to illustrate the various steps in algorithms. Actual code is included in appendices. The algorithms presented are preliminary versions that can be applied to automatic coastline detection in SAR imagery. There are many variations and additions to the algorithms that can be made to improve robustness and automation, as required by a particular application.

  14. Imaging performance of amorphous selenium based flat-panel detectors for digital mammography: characterization of a small area prototype detector.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Ji, W G; Debrie, Anne; Rowlands, J A

    2003-02-01

    Our work is to investigate and understand the factors affecting the imaging performance of amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat-panel detectors for digital mammography. Both theoretical and experimental methods were developed to investigate the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency [DQE(f)] of a-Se flat-panel detectors for digital mammography. Since the K edge of a-Se is 12.66 keV and within the energy range of a mammographic spectrum, a theoretical model was developed based on cascaded linear system analysis with parallel processes to take into account the effect of K fluorescence on the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and DQE(f) of the detector. This model was used to understand the performance of a small-area prototype detector with 85 microm pixel size. The presampling MTF, NPS, and DQE(f) of the prototype were measured, and compared to the theoretical calculation of the model. The calculation showed that K fluorescence accounted for a 15% reduction in the MTF at the Nyquist frequency (fNy) of the prototype detector, and the NPS at fNy was reduced to 89% of that at zero spatial frequency. The measurement of presampling MTF of the prototype detector revealed an additional source of blurring, which was attributed to charge trapping in the blocking layer at the interface between a-Se and the active matrix. This introduced a drop in both presampling MTF and NPS at high spatial frequency, and reduced aliasing in the NPS. As a result, the DQE(f) of the prototype detector at fNy approached 40% of that at zero spatial frequency. The measured and calculated DQE(f) using the linear system model have reasonable agreement, indicating that the factors controlling image quality in a-Se based mammographic detectors are fully understood, and the model can be used to further optimize detector imaging performance. PMID:12607843

  15. DQE analysis on a dual detector phase x-ray imaging system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da; Liu, Hong; Wu, Xizeng

    2008-09-21

    This study presents the characterization results of a newly developed dual detector in-line phase x-ray imaging prototype. Comparison of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for both detectors was conducted when they worked in the dual detection mode, in which two images are acquired simultaneously at a single exposure. The MTFs of the two detectors are almost identical, showing that the blurring caused by detector1 does not significantly weaken the resolving power of detector2. With a 40 kVp and 4 cm thick BR-12 phantom filtered x-ray beam, the transmittance of detector1 was measured to be 32%. The characteristic response and DQE of the two detectors almost coincide, showing that the two detectors have similar imaging performance under the imaging conditions of this study. The DQE of detector2 at the different source to detector distances (SID) also demonstrate a high level of agreement, implying that the reduced exposure level caused by elongated SID did not degrade the performance significantly. The study validated the design of the dual detection configuration for phase x-ray imaging, which has the potential for improving the accuracy of diagnostics at clinically acceptable radiation doses. PMID:18723931

  16. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  17. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H. PMID:18374710

  18. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  19. The capacitive division image readout: a novel imaging device for microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Conneely, T. M.; Leach, S. A.; Moore, L.

    2013-09-01

    The Capacitive Division Image Readout (C-DIR) is a simple and novel image readout for photon counting detectors offering major performance advantages. C-DIR is a charge centroiding device comprising three elements; (i) a resistive anode providing event charge localization, event current return path and electrical isolation from detector high voltage, (ii) a dielectric substrate which capacitively couples the event transient signal to the third element, (iii) the readout device; an array of capacitively coupled electrodes which divides the signal among the readout charge measurement nodes. The resistive anode and dielectric substrate constitute the rear interface of the detector and capacitively couple the signal to the external C-DIR readout device. The C-DIR device is a passive, multilayer printed circuit board type device comprising a matrix of isolated electrodes whose geometries define the capacitive network. C-DIR is manufactured using conventional PCB geometries and is straightforward and economical to construct. C-DIR's robustness and simplicity belie its performance advantages. Its capacitive nature avoids partition noise, the Poisson noise associated with collection of discrete charges. The dominant noise limiting position resolution is electronic noise. However C-DIR also presents a low input capacitance to the readout electronics, minimising this noise component thus maximising spatial resolution. Optimisation of the C-DIR pattern-edge geometry can provide ~90% linear dynamic range. We present data showing image resolution and linearity of the C-DIR device in a microchannel plate detector and describe various electronic charge measurement scheme designed to exploit the full performance potential of the C-DIR device.

  20. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2016-08-01

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  1. Imaging results and TOF studies with axial PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, Christian

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a fully operational PET demonstrator setup which allows true 3D reconstruction of the 511 keV photons and therefore leads to practically parallax free images. The AX-PET concept is based on thin 100 mm long scintillation crystals (LYSO), axially oriented and arranged in layers around the field of view. Layers of wavelength shifting plastic strips mounted in between the crystal layers give the axial coordinate. Both crystals and WLS strips are individually read out by G-APD (SiPM) photodetectors. The fully scalable concept overcomes the dilemma of sensitivity versus spatial resolution which is inherent to classical PET designs. A demonstrator set-up based on two axial modules was exhaustively characterized using point-like sources, phantoms filled with radiotracer and finally rats and a mouse. The results entirely meet the performance expectations (<2 mm FWHM in all three coordinates over the complete field of view) and also demonstrated the ability to include Compton interactions (inter-crystal scatter) in the reconstruction without noticeable performance loss. Our recent studies focus on a TOF extension of the AX-PET concept making use of the novel digital SiPM detectors by Philips. After reproducing comparable energy and spatial resolution on a small digital AX-PET set-up with 100 mm long crystals, we demonstrated a coincidence resolving time of about 210 ps FWHM.

  2. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    PubMed Central

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Philipp, Hugh T.; Wilke, Robin N.; Aquila, Andrew; Osterhoff, Markus; Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S.; Zozulya, Alexey V.; Salditt, Tim; Gruner, Sol M.; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 108 8-keV photons pixel−1 s−1, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 1010 photons µm−2 s−1 within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described. PMID:25178008

  3. Method for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael Eugene (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination. In operation, an imaging detector is provided. Additionally, a back surface contact (e.g. a delta-doped layer, etc.) is grown on the imaging detector utilizing a process that is performed at a temperature less than 450 degrees Celsius.

  4. UCD-SPI: Un-Collimated Detector Single-Photon Imaging System for Small Animal and Plant Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Katherine Leigh

    Medical imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes implement collimators in order to form images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in "thin" objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments. This flexible geometry un-collimated detector single-photon imaging (UCD-SPI) system consists of two large (5 cm x 10 cm), thin (3 mm and 5 mm), closely spaced, pixelated scintillation detectors of either NaI(Tl), CsI(Na), or BGO. The detectors are read out by two adjacent Hamamatsu H8500 multichannel photomultiplier tubes. The detector heads enable the interchange of scintillation detectors of different materials and thicknesses to optimize performance for a wide range of gamma-ray energies and imaging subjects. The detectors are horizontally oriented for animal imaging, and for plant imaging the system is rotated on its side to orient the detectors vertically. While this un-collimated detector system is unable to approach the sub-mm spatial resolution obtained by the most advanced preclinical pinhole SPECT systems, the high sensitivity could enable significant and new use in molecular imaging applications which do not require good spatial resolution- for example, screening applications for drug development (small animals), for material transport and sequestration studies for phytoremediation (plants), or for counting radiolabeled cells in vitro (well plates).

  5. Photon-counting H33D detector for biological fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a photon-counting High-temporal and High-spatial resolution, High-throughput 3-Dimensional detector (H33D) for biological imaging of fluorescent samples. The design is based on a 25 mm diameter S20 photocathode followed by a 3-microchannel plate stack, and a cross-delay line anode. We describe the bench performance of the H33D detector, as well as preliminary imaging results obtained with fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells and discuss applications of future generation detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions.

  6. Photon-Counting H33D Detector for Biological Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Michalet, X; Siegmund, O H W; Vallerga, J V; Jelinsky, P; Millaud, J E; Weiss, S

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a photon-counting High-temporal and High-spatial resolution, High-throughput 3-Dimensional detector (H33D) for biological imaging of fluorescent samples. The design is based on a 25 mm diameter S20 photocathode followed by a 3-microchannel plate stack, and a cross delay line anode. We describe the bench performance of the H33D detector, as well as preliminary imaging results obtained with fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells and discuss applications of future generation detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions. PMID:20151021

  7. Quantum structure based infrared detector research and development within Acreo’s centre of excellence IMAGIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, J. Y.; Höglund, L.; Noharet, B.; Wang, Q.; Ericsson, P.; Wissmar, S.; Asplund, C.; Malm, H.; Martijn, H.; Hammar, M.; Gustafsson, O.; Hellström, S.; Radamson, H.; Holtz, P. O.

    2010-07-01

    Acreo has a long tradition of working with quantum structure based infrared (IR) detectors and arrays. This includes QWIP (quantum well infrared photodetector), QDIP (quantum dot infrared photodetector), and InAs/GaInSb based photon detectors of different structure and composition. It also covers R&D on uncooled microbolometers. The integrated thermistor material of such detectors is advantageously based on quantum structures that are optimised for high temperature coefficient and low noise. Especially the SiGe material system is preferred due to the compatibility with silicon technology. The R&D work on IR detectors is a prominent part of Acreo's centre of excellence "IMAGIC" on imaging detectors and systems for non-visible wavelengths. IMAGIC is a collaboration between Acreo, several industry partners and universities like the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and Linköping University.

  8. Two dimensional and linear scintillation detectors for fast neutron imaging — comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikerov, V. I.; Koshelev, A. P.; Ozerov, O. V.; Sviridov, A. S.; Yurkov, D. I.

    2014-05-01

    The paper was aimed to compare performance capabilities of two types of scintillation detectors commonly used for fast neutron imaging: two dimensional and linear ones. Best-case values of quantum efficiency, spatial resolution and capacity were estimated for detectors with plastic converter-screen in case of 14 MeV neutrons. For that there were examined nuclear reactions produced in converter-screen by fast neutrons, spatial distributions of energy release of emerged charged particles and amplitude distributions of scintillations generated by these particles. The paper shows that the efficiency of the linear detector is essentially higher and this detector provides potentially better spatial resolution in comparison with the two dimensional detector. But, the two dimensional detector surpasses the linear one in capacity. The presented results can be used for designing radiographic fast neutron detectors with organic scintillators.

  9. Charge Detector for the Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Cosmic Ray Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS) Mission is planned to consist of a transition radiation detector (TRD) and a thin ionization calorimeter. In order to measure the charge of the primary cosmic ray, it is necessary for the calorimeter to have its own charge detector. Silicon detectors are chosen for the charge detector because of their excellent resolution, small size and nearly square shape. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to find the probability of misidentifying protons as alpha particles due to backscattered radiation from the calorimeter. Simulations were also used to investigate identifying primary cosmic rays that fragmented in the TRD before reaching the calorimeter. For this study algorithms have been developed for determining a direction of the core shower in the calorimeter. These algorithms are used to find the approximate location of the primary particle in the silicon detectors. Results show the probability to misidentify the charge depends upon the energy and direction of the primary particles.

  10. A decoupled coil detector array for fast image acquisition in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kwiat, D; Einav, S; Navon, G

    1991-01-01

    A method for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is investigated here, whereby an object is put under a homogeneous magnetic field, and the image is obtained by applying inverse source procedures to the data collected in an array of coil detectors surrounding the object. The induced current in each coil due to the precession of the magnetic dipole in each voxel depends on the characteristics of both the magnetic dipole frequency and strength, together with its distance from the coil, the coil direction in space, and the electrical properties of the coils. By calculating the induced current signals over an array of coil detectors, a relationship is established between the set of signals and the structure of the body under investigation. The linear relation can then be represented in matrix notation, and inversion of this matrix will produce an image of the body. Important problems which must be considered in the proposed method are signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and coupling between adjacent coils. Solutions to these problems will provide a new method for obtaining an instantaneous image by NMR, with no need for gradient switching for encoding. A general algorithm for decoupling of the coils is presented and fast sampling of the signal, instead of filtering, is used in order to reduce both noise and numerical roundoff errors at the same time. Sensitivity considerations are made with respect to the number of coils that is required and its connection with coil radius and SNR. A computer simulation demonstrates the feasibility of this new modality. Based on the solutions presented here for the problems involved in the use of a large number of coils for a simultaneous recording of the signal, an improved method of multicoil recording is suggested, whereby it is combined with the conventional zeugmatographic method with read and phase gradients, to result in a novel method of magnetic resonance imaging. In the combined method, there are no phase-encoding gradients. Only a

  11. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  12. DIRC, the internally reflecting ring imaging Cerenkov detector for BABAR: Properties of the quartz radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiening, Jochen

    1998-02-01

    A description of DIRC, a particle identification detector for the BABAR experiment at the Standard Linear Collider B Factory is given. It is the barrel region of the detector and its name is an acronym for detection of internally reflected Cherenkov radiation. It is a Cherenkov ring imaging device which utilizes totally internally reflected Cherenkov light in the visible and ultraviolet regions.

  13. Multi-class geospatial object detection and geographic image classification based on collection of part detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Junwei; Zhou, Peicheng; Guo, Lei

    2014-12-01

    The rapid development of remote sensing technology has facilitated us the acquisition of remote sensing images with higher and higher spatial resolution, but how to automatically understand the image contents is still a big challenge. In this paper, we develop a practical and rotation-invariant framework for multi-class geospatial object detection and geographic image classification based on collection of part detectors (COPD). The COPD is composed of a set of representative and discriminative part detectors, where each part detector is a linear support vector machine (SVM) classifier used for the detection of objects or recurring spatial patterns within a certain range of orientation. Specifically, when performing multi-class geospatial object detection, we learn a set of seed-based part detectors where each part detector corresponds to a particular viewpoint of an object class, so the collection of them provides a solution for rotation-invariant detection of multi-class objects. When performing geographic image classification, we utilize a large number of pre-trained part detectors to discovery distinctive visual parts from images and use them as attributes to represent the images. Comprehensive evaluations on two remote sensing image databases and comparisons with some state-of-the-art approaches demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the developed framework.

  14. Scintillating-fiber imaging detector for 14-MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.; Lerche, R.A.; Ellis, R.J.; Heaton, G.W.; Nelson, M.B.; Mant, G.; Lehr, D.E.

    1994-07-25

    The authors have created a detector to image the neutrons emitted by imploded inertial-confinement fusion targets. The 14-MeV neutrons, which are produced by deuterium-tritium fusion events in the target, pass through an aperture to create an image on the detector. The neutron radiation is converted to blue light (430 nm) with a 20-cm-square array of plastic scintillating fibers. Each fiber is 10-cm long with a 1-mm-square cross section; approximately 35-thousand fibers make up the array. The resulting blue-light image is reduced and amplified by a sequence of fiber-optic tapers and image intensifiers, then acquired by a CCD camera. The fiber-optic readout system was tested optically for overall throughput the resolution. The authors plan to characterize the scintillator array reusing an ion-beam neutron source as well as DT-fusion neutrons emitted by inertial confinement targets. Characterization experiments will measure the light-production efficiency, spatial resolution, and neutron scattering within the detector. Several neutron images of laser-fusion targets have been obtained with the detector. Several neutron images of laser-fusion targets have been obtained with the detector. They describe the detector and their characterization methods, present characterization results, and give examples of the neutron images.

  15. Radiation dose-rate meter using an energy-sensitive counter

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1988-01-01

    A radiation dose-rate meter is provided which uses an energy-sensitive detector and combines charge quantization and pulse-rate measurement to monitor radiation dose rates. The charge from each detected photon is quantized by level-sensitive comparators so that the resulting total output pulse rate is proportional to the dose-rate.

  16. POSITION SENSITIVE GERMANIUM DETECTORS FOR GAMMA-RAY IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gamma-ray imaging with position-sensitive germanium detectors offers the advantages of excellent energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and potentially good sptial resolution. The development of the amorphous-semiconductor electrical contact technology for germanium detec...

  17. Velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging on a single detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2012-09-15

    Here we report on a new simplified setup for velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging using only a single particle detector. We show that both photoelectrons and photoions can be extracted toward the same micro-channel-plate delay line detector by fast switching of the high voltages on the ion optics. This single detector setup retains essentially all the features of a standard two-detector coincidence imaging setup, viz., the high spatial resolution for electron and ion imaging, while only slightly decreasing the ion time-of-flight mass resolution. The new setup paves the way to a significant cost reduction in building a coincidence imaging setup for experiments aiming to obtain the complete correlated three-dimensional momentum distribution of electrons and ions.

  18. Effects of the energy-separation filter on the performance of each detector layer in the sandwich detector for single-shot dual-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, D. W.; Kam, S.; Park, E.; Youn, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-02-01

    A novel sandwich-style single-shot detector has been built by stacking two indirect-conversion flat-panel detectors for preclinical dual-energy mouse imaging. Although this single-shot method is more immune to motion artifacts compared with the conventional dual-shot method (i.e., fast kVp switching), it may suffer from reduced image quality because of poor spectral separation between the two detectors. Spectral separation can be improved by using an intermediate filter between the two detector layers. Adversely, the filter reduces the number of x-ray photons reaching the rear detector, hence probably increasing image noise. For a better design and practical use of the sandwich detector for single-shot dual-energy imaging, imaging performances of each detector layer in the sandwich detector are investigated for various spectral-separation extents and applied tube voltages. The imaging performances include the modulation-transfer function, the Wiener noise-power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency. According to the experimental results, impacts of the intermediate filter on the imaging performances of each detector layer are marginal. The detailed experimental results are shown in this study.

  19. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, B.; King, S. J.; Vallance, C.; Brouard, M.

    2014-02-15

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  20. Recent Developments: The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Imaging and Detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-07-01

    In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron emission to have a significant displacement. This result is surprising; co-spatially accelerated ions and electrons are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) balloon instrument will investigate particle transport in solar flares by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emission (20keV - 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include three-dimensional position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulating collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal. This capability (1) enables the MPRM design by acting as a second modulation grid, (2) provides significant background rejection and (3) makes solar polarization measurements possible. The MPRM imager provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162 arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid collimator system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution can resolve the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35 arcsecs for gamma-rays, making these footpoints resolvable in only the largest flares. Here, we present the intial calibration of GRIPS’ 3D-GED detectors using laboratory radioactive sources. We evaluate charge sharing between adjacent strips, the detection of coincidences and preliminary depth measurements. The detectors have been shown to have a linear response and resolve line emission. The MPRM modulation grid is constructed and we present initial results from calibration. GRIPS is scheduled for a

  1. Investigation of hybrid pixel detector arrays by synchrotron-radiation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfen, L.; Myagotin, A.; Pernot, P.; DiMichiel, M.; Mikulík, P.; Berthold, A.; Baumbach, T.

    2006-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation imaging was applied to the non-destructive testing of detector devices during their development cycle. Transmission imaging known as computed laminography was used to examine the microstructure of the interconnections in order to investigate the perfection of technological steps necessary for hybrid detector production. A characterisation of the solder bump microstructure can reveal production flaws such as missing or misaligned bumps, voids in bumps or bridges and thus give valuable information about the bonding process.

  2. Multispectral and polarimetric imaging in the LWIR: Intersubband detectors as a versatile solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, Alexandru; Guériaux, Vincent; Berurier, Arnaud; Brière de l'Isle, Nadia; Huet, Odile

    2013-07-01

    GaAs-based intersubband infrared detectors, such as Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors and Quantum Cascade Detectors have proven their ability to address not only conventional thermal imaging applications, but also advanced functionalities such as multispectral and polarimetric imaging. This paper illustrates this potential through the results achieved at III-V Lab in the frame of several ambitious projects, ranging from military applications to Earth observation and exo-planet detection. The advantages of these technologies at the system level are evidenced.

  3. X-ray imaging with ``edge-on'' microchannel plate detector: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Molloi, Sabee

    2003-09-01

    A novel scanning slit X-ray imaging system based on an "edge-on" microchannel plate detector was developed and tested. Images were acquired at 50 kV(p) X-ray tube voltage with a limiting spatial resolution of 7 lp/mm. The pixel noise was measured to be 0.3 count/pixel/s for a 50×70 μm 2 pixel size. This photon counting detector can be considered to be virtually noise free.

  4. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present stateof- the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 μm pixels and an active area of 12 cm x 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/μR and 0.55 μR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/μR and 2.77 μR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors.

  5. High-resolution pulse-counting array detectors for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn; Bybee, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    The performance characteristics of multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems which have formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels and which have application to imaging and spectroscopy at UV wavelengths are evaluated. Sealed and open-structure MAMA detector tubes with opaque CsI photocathodes can determine the arrival time of the detected photon to an accuracy of 100 ns or better. Very large format MAMA detectors with CsI and Cs2Te photocathodes and active areas of 52 x 52 mm (2048 x 2048 pixels) will be used as the UV solar blind detectors for the NASA STIS.

  6. Review on the characteristics of radiation detectors for dosimetry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Joao; Clasie, Ben; Partridge, Mike

    2014-10-01

    The enormous advances in the understanding of human anatomy, physiology and pathology in recent decades have led to ever-improving methods of disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Many of these achievements have been enabled, at least in part, by advances in ionizing radiation detectors. Radiology has been transformed by the implementation of multi-slice CT and digital x-ray imaging systems, with silver halide films now largely obsolete for many applications. Nuclear medicine has benefited from more sensitive, faster and higher-resolution detectors delivering ever-higher SPECT and PET image quality. PET/MR systems have been enabled by the development of gamma ray detectors that can operate in high magnetic fields. These huge advances in imaging have enabled equally impressive steps forward in radiotherapy delivery accuracy, with 4DCT, PET and MRI routinely used in treatment planning and online image guidance provided by cone-beam CT. The challenge of ensuring safe, accurate and precise delivery of highly complex radiation fields has also both driven and benefited from advances in radiation detectors. Detector systems have been developed for the measurement of electron, intensity-modulated and modulated arc x-ray, proton and ion beams, and around brachytherapy sources based on a very wide range of technologies. The types of measurement performed are equally wide, encompassing commissioning and quality assurance, reference dosimetry, in vivo dosimetry and personal and environmental monitoring. In this article, we briefly introduce the general physical characteristics and properties that are commonly used to describe the behaviour and performance of both discrete and imaging detectors. The physical principles of operation of calorimeters; ionization and charge detectors; semiconductor, luminescent, scintillating and chemical detectors; and radiochromic and radiographic films are then reviewed and their principle applications discussed. Finally, a general

  7. The New Maia Detector System: Methods For High Definition Trace Element Imaging Of Natural Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, C. G.; Siddons, D. P.; Kuczewski, A.; Kirkham, R.; Dunn, P. A.; Hough, R. M.; Lintern, M. J.; Cleverley, J.; Moorhead, G.; De Geronimo, G.; Paterson, D. J.; Jonge, M. D. de; Howard, D. L.; Kappen, P.

    2010-04-06

    Motivated by the need for megapixel high definition trace element imaging to capture intricate detail in natural material, together with faster acquisition and improved counting statistics in elemental imaging, a large energy-dispersive detector array called Maia has been developed by CSIRO and BNL for SXRF imaging on the XFM beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. A 96 detector prototype demonstrated the capacity of the system for real-time deconvolution of complex spectral data using an embedded implementation of the Dynamic Analysis method and acquiring highly detailed images up to 77 M pixels spanning large areas of complex mineral sample sections.

  8. Evaluation of XRI-UNO CdTe detector for nuclear medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.; Bugby, S. L.; Tipper, S.; Alqahtani, M. S.; Perkins, A. C.

    2015-06-01

    Over the last two decades advances in semiconductor detector technology have reached the point where they are sufficiently sensitive to become an alternative to scintillators for high energy gamma ray detection for application in fields such as medical imaging. This paper assessed the Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) XRI-UNO semiconductor detector produced by X-RAY Imatek for photon energies of interest in nuclear imaging. The XRI-UNO detector was found to have an intrinsic spatial resolution of <0.5mm and a high incident count rate capability up to at least 1680cps. The system spatial resolution, uniformity and sensitivity characteristics are also reported.

  9. Neutron diffractometer for bio-crystallography (BIX) with an imaging plate neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1994-12-31

    We have constructed a dedicated diffractometer for neutron crystallography in biology (BIX) on the JRR-3M reactor at JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). The diffraction intensity from a protein crystal is weaker than that from most inorganic materials. In order to overcome the intensity problem, an elastically bent silicon monochromator and a large area detector system were specially designed. A preliminary result of diffraction experiment using BIX has been reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility experiment was carried out on BIX. Results are reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility test was carried out using BIX.

  10. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  11. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  12. A design of an uncooled thermal imaging system to block image blurring using an optimum detector warm shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Junho; Youn, Byungyeol; Shin, Sanghoon; Park, Sangyeong; Kim, Youngjin; Lee, Jungsuk; Kim, Kihong

    2009-05-01

    Uncooled TIS is in the spotlight for its small size and low-voltage operation for personal and portable use compare to other TIS. Generally, uncooled TIS using temperature control by TEC converts the gap between TEC temperature and input-image into voltage by ROIC and outputs the analog image. For cooled detector, it is possible to block undesirable infrared input since F number of the optics and the detector are same but for uncooled detector, it is easy to get undesirable infrared input around because the F numbers are different. It becomes more obvious when temperature gap between the equipment and background gets bigger. For TIS, background temperature easily changes inside the system and around the detector because the radiating heat from the electrical circuit inside the system is getting higher as usage time passes, and it makes worse the non-uniformity output characteristics of the detector. In particular, the temperature change of the system itself which depends on its setting position and other temperaturechanging factors like electrical circuit inside the system make the additional non-uniformity worse which caused by infrared photon radiates from structures which includes optics and detector. This article would indicate the method of minimizing its image blurring which originates from the F number gap between optics and detector.

  13. A computer-controlled x-ray imaging scanner using a kinestatic charge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; DiBianca, Frank A.; Tenney, Charles R.; Vance, Joseph E.; Reed, Mark S. C.; Wilson, Donald W.; Dollas, Apostolos; McDaniel, David L.; Granfors, Paul; Petrick, Scott

    1990-02-01

    A prototype scanning imaging system which employs a kinestatic charge detector (KCD) and is under the control of a VAXstation II/GPX computer is described. The operating principles and advantages of the KCD method are reviewed. The detector is a 256-channel ionization drift chamber which creates a two-dimensional x-ray projection image by scanning the detector past the object of interest. The details of the drift chamber design, the signal collection electrodes (channels), and the Frisch grid geometry are given. Also described are the scanning gantry design, computer-controlled drive motor circuit, and safety features. The data acquisition system for the capture of a 1 M byte digital image is presented. This includes amplification, filtration, analog-to-digital conversion, data buffering, and transfer to the VAXstation II computer. The image processing and display techniques specific to the KCD are outlined and the first two-dimensional image taken with this system is presented.

  14. Vision 20/20: Single photon counting x-ray detectors in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-01-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed for medical x-ray computed tomography (CT) and x-ray (XR) imaging. Using detection mechanisms that are completely different from the current energy integrating detectors and measuring the material information of the object to be imaged, these PCDs have the potential not only to improve the current CT and XR images, such as dose reduction, but also to open revolutionary novel applications such as molecular CT and XR imaging. The performance of PCDs is not flawless, however, and it seems extremely challenging to develop PCDs with close to ideal characteristics. In this paper, the authors offer our vision for the future of PCD-CT and PCD-XR with the review of the current status and the prediction of (1) detector technologies, (2) imaging technologies, (3) system technologies, and (4) potential clinical benefits with PCDs. PMID:24089889

  15. Development and investigation of a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible microlens-based optical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, Steffen; Umathum, Reiner; Jiang, Xiaoming; Majer, Charles L.; Peter, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    A noncontact optical detector for in vivo imaging has been developed that is compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The optical detector employs microlens arrays and might be classified as a plenoptic camera. As a resulting of its design, the detector possesses a slim thickness and is self-shielding against radio frequency (RF) pulses. For experimental investigation, a total of six optical detectors were arranged in a cylindrical fashion, with the imaged object positioned in the center of this assembly. A purposely designed RF volume resonator coil has been developed and is incorporated within the optical imaging system. The whole assembly was placed into the bore of a 1.5 T patient-sized MRI scanner. Simple-geometry phantom studies were performed to assess compatibility and performance characteristics regarding both optical and MR imaging systems. A bimodal ex vivo nude mouse measurement was conducted. From the MRI data, the subject surface was extracted. Optical images were projected on this surface by means of an inverse mapping algorithm. Simultaneous measurements did not reveal influences from the magnetic field and RF pulses onto optical detector performance (spatial resolution, sensitivity). No significant influence of the optical imaging system onto MRI performance was detectable.

  16. Performance of SIS photon detectors for superconductive imaging submillimeter-wave camera (SISCAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nagata, H.; Mori, Y.; Kobayashi, J.; Okaniwa, T.; Yamakura, T.; Otani, C.; Ariyoshi, S.

    2006-06-01

    High sensitivity submillimeter-wave focal plane array using SIS photon detector is being developed, which we call SISCAM, the superconductive imaging submillimeter-wave camera. In the course of the detector evaluations, we have measured performance of the SIS photon detectors under various operating conditions. Advantages of the SIS photon detectors are explained by the nature of antenna coupled quantum detectors. Their input coupling can be designed to have band-pass characteristics owing to the distributed junction design. This reduces requirements for infrared blocking filters and enhances optical efficiency. The detector performance is evaluated under background loading and they show background limited performance. Measurement at 4 K shows the SIS photon detector operates under shot noise limit of thermal leakage current and its NEP is 1x10 -14 W/Hz 0.5, that is better than bolometers at 4.2 K, whereas the same detector has NEP of 10 -16 W/Hz 0.5 at 0.3 K. Dynamic range of SIS photon detectors is estimated to be higher than 10 9, which surpass the dynamic range achievable with TES bolometers. Nine-element array of SIS photon detector, SISCAM-9, is developed and their performance is evaluated in a submillimeter-wave telescope. With a development of integrated electronics with GaAs-JFET charge integrating readout circuit, the SIS photon detector will be an ideal imaging array in submillimeter-wave region. Due to its large dynamic range and shot noise limited performance under various operating condition, SIS photon detectors can be used for various astronomical instrumentations as well as for other fields of terahertz technologies.

  17. Megapixel digital InSb detector for midwave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkedy, Lior; Markovitz, Tuvy; Calahorra, Zipi; Hirsh, Itay; Shtrichman, Itay

    2011-06-01

    Since the late 1990s Semiconductor devices (SCDs) has developed and manufactured a variety of InSb two-dimensional (2D) focal plane arrays (FPAs) that were implemented in many infrared (IR) systems and applications. SCD routinely manufactures both analog and digital InSb FPAs with array formats of 320×256, 480×384, and 640×512 elements, and pitch size in the range 15 to 30 μm. These FPAs are available in many packaging configurations, including fully integrated detector-Dewar-cooler-assembly, with either closed-cycle Stirling or open-loop Joule-Thomson coolers. In response to a need for very high resolution midwave IR (MWIR) detectors and systems, SCD has developed a large format 2D InSb detector with 1280×1024 elements and pixel size of 15 μm. A digital readout integrated circuit (ROIC) is coupled by flip-chip bonding to the megapixel InSb array. The ROIC is fabricated in CMOS 0.18-μm technology, that enables the small pixel circuitry and relatively low power generation at the focal plane. The digital ROIC has an analog to digital (A/D) converter per-channel and allows for full frame readout at a rate of 100 Hz. Such on-chip A/D conversion eliminates the need for several A/D converters with fairly high power consumption at the system level. The digital readout, together with the InSb detector technology, lead to a wide linear dynamic range and low residual nonuniformity, which is stable over a long period of time following a nonuniformity correction procedure. A special Dewar was designed to withstand harsh environmental conditions while minimizing the contribution to the heat load of the detector. The Dewar together with the low power ROIC, enable a megapixel detector with overall low size, weight, and power with respect to comparable large format detectors. A variety of applications with this detector make use of different cold shields with different f-number and spectral filters. In this paper we present actual performance characteristics of the

  18. New Possibilities in Medical X-Ray Imaging with Photon Counting Pixel Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, J.; Bartl, P.; Guni, E.; Haas, W.; Ritter, A.; Takoukam Talla, P.; Weber, T.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.

    2010-04-01

    The new generation of X-ray photon counting pixel detectors like the Medipix2 and the Medipix3 opens a new field of applications in medical X-ray imaging. These detectors work with one or more energy windows, which makes energy information available in addition to the intensity. A detailled understanding of the detector response of such detectors is important. Results will be presented for Si and CdTe as sensor material. With this knowledge two methods called spectrum reconstruction and material reconstruction can be applied to energy resolved images in absorption radiography and computed tomography. Another new application is the measurement of the phase information in computed tomography in addition to the absorption information. The potential of phase contrast imaging will be discussed.

  19. Dead-time effects in microchannel-plate imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.; Fraser, George W.

    1991-01-01

    The observed counting rates of microchannel plate (MCP) based detectors for high resolution observations of celestial EUV and X-ray sources vary over many orders of magnitude; the counting capability of an individual channel, however, is not high, and is associated with dead-times ranging from 0.1 msec to 1 sec. The dead-time increases with the area illuminated; attention is presently given to laboratory determinations of the count rate characteristics of a MCP detector as a function of illuminated area, and a model is developed for these results' use in the interpretation of space observations.

  20. The Development of the Detector and Imaging Systems of the Masco Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damico, Flavio

    1997-08-01

    In this thesis the detector and imaging systems of the MASCO telescope are described. MASCO is a gamma-ray imaging telescope with both high angular resolution and sensitivity. Conceived to be able to individually study sources in crowded fields, MASCO is an ideal mission to map sky regions like the Galactic Center. A revision of recent observational results obtained with imaging telescopes of this particular region is presented. Also presented is the sensitivity of the telescope for pulsed gamma-ray sources, taking GX 1+4 as an example. MASCO employs the coded-aperture imaging technique, and will be the first telescope to use a new type of mask patterns, the modified uniformly redundant arrays (MURAs). The coded-aperture imaging technique is reviewed and interesting properties of the MURAs discussed. This work gives two original contributions for MURA based coded mask telescopes: an empirical rule that says which MURA pattern is convenient to build a mask when we want to make observations with the mask-antimask method and the definition of the rotation center of a MURA pattern. MASCO uses a large number of scintillation detectors. The main detector of the experiment is a 41 cm diameter and 5 cm thick inorganic NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in an Anger Camera configuration, with approximately 10% energy resolution in 662 keV. Organic scintillation detectors are used to minimize the telescope background. and large volume scintillation detectors were built for the first time in Brazil. MASCO uses 12 of these scintillation detectors and the fabrication process are discussed together with tests for 2 different types of these detectors. MASCO shall have an angular resolution of 14 min in a 14 deg field-of-view and 20 micro-s of temporal resolution. A simulated image of the Galactic Center region in the 50-150 keV energy band is presented in order to show the imaging capabilities of the telescope. Preliminary tests results obtained with the detector and imaging systems

  1. X-ray imaging using a 320 x 240 hybrid GaAs pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Irsigler, R.; Andersson, J.; Alverbro, J.

    1999-06-01

    The authors present room temperature measurements on 200 {micro}m thick GaAs pixel detectors, which were hybridized to silicon readout circuits. The whole detector array contains 320 x 240 square shaped pixel with a pitch of 38 {micro}m and is based on semi-insulating liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs material. After fabricating and dicing, the detector chips were indium bump flip chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration and finally evaluated. This readout chip was originally designed for the readout of flip chip bonded infrared detectors, but appears to be suitable for X-ray applications as well. A bias voltage between 50 V and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector at room temperature. The detector array did respond to x-ray radiation by an increase in current due to production of electron hole pairs by the ionization processes. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard X-ray source for dental imaging. The new X-ray hybrid detector was analyzed with respect to its imaging properties. Due to the high absorption coefficient for X-rays in GaAs and the small pixel size, the sensor shows a high modulation transfer function up to the Nyquist frequency.

  2. Photoacoustic projection imaging using a 64-channel fiber optic detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Felbermayer, Karoline; Bouchal, Klaus-Dieter; Veres, Istvan A.; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present photoacoustic projection imaging with a 64-channel integrating line detector array, which average the pressure over cylindrical surfaces. For imaging, the line detectors are arranged parallel to each other on a cylindrical surface surrounding a specimen. Thereby, the three-dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a twodimensional problem, facilitating projection imaging. After acquisition of a dataset of pressure signals, a twodimensional photoacoustic projection image is reconstructed. The 64 channel line detector array is realized using optical fibers being part of interferometers. The parts of the interferometers used to detect the ultrasonic pressure waves consist of graded-index polymer-optical fibers (POFs), which exhibit better sensitivity than standard glass-optical fibers. Ultrasonic waves impinging on the POFs change the phase of light in the fiber-core due to the strain-optic effect. This phase shifts, representing the pressure signals, are demodulated using high-bandwidth balanced photo-detectors. The 64 detectors are optically multiplexed to 16 detection channels, thereby allowing fast imaging. Results are shown on a Rhodamine B dyed microsphere.

  3. Comparison of spectral CT imaging methods based a photon-counting detector: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-04-01

    Photon-counting detectors allow spectral computed tomography (CT) imaging using energy-resolved information from a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The spectral CT images based on the photon-counting detectors are dependent on the energy ranges defined by energy bins for image acquisition. In this study, K-edge and energy weighting imaging methods were experimentally implemented by using a spectral CT system with a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based photon-counting detector. The spectral CT images were obtained by various energy bins and compared in terms of CNR improvement for investigating the effect of energy bins and the efficiency of the spectral CT imaging methods. The results showed that the spectral CT image quality was improved by using the particular energy bins, which were optimized for each spectral CT imaging method and target material. The CNR improvement was different for the spectral CT imaging methods and target materials. It can be concluded that an appropriate selection of imaging method for each target material and the optimization of energy bin can maximize the quality of spectral CT images.

  4. Development of a three-layer phoswich alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    For radiation monitoring at the sites of such nuclear power plant accidents as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors are needed not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. In some applications, imaging detectors are required to detect the distribution of plutonium particles that emit alpha particles and radiocesium in foods that emits beta particles and gamma photons. To solve these requirements, we developed an imaging detector that can measure the distribution of alpha and beta particles as well as gamma photons. The imaging detector consists of three-layer scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: ~5 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. Using pulse shape discrimination, the images of these layers can be separated. The position information is calculated by the Anger principle from 8×8 anode signals from the PSPMT. The images for the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons are individually formed by the pulse shape discriminations for each layer. We detected alpha particle images in the first layer and beta particle images in the second layer. Gamma photon images were detected in the second and third layers. The spatial resolution for the alpha and beta particles was ~1.25 mm FWHM and less than 2 mm FWHM for the gamma photons. We conclude that our developed alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector is promising for imaging applications not only for the environmental monitoring of radionuclides but also for medical and molecular imaging.

  5. A dynamic attenuator improves spectral imaging with energy-discriminating, photon counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2015-03-01

    Energy-discriminating, photon counting (EDPC) detectors have high potential in spectral imaging applications but exhibit degraded performance when the incident count rate approaches or exceeds the characteristic count rate of the detector. In order to reduce the requirements on the detector, we explore the strategy of modulating the X-ray flux field using a recently proposed dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator. A previous paper studied this modulation for photon counting detectors but did not explore the impact on spectral applications. In this work, we modeled detection with a bipolar triangular pulse shape (Taguchi et al., 2011) and estimated the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) of the variance of material selective and equivalent monoenergetic images, assuming deterministic errors at high flux could be corrected. We compared different materials for the dynamic attenuator and found that rare earth elements, such as erbium, outperformed previously proposed materials such as iron in spectral imaging. The redistribution of flux reduces the variance or dose, consistent with previous studies on benefits with conventional detectors. Numerical simulations based on DICOM datasets were used to assess the impact of the dynamic attenuator for detectors with several different characteristic count rates. The dynamic attenuator reduced the peak incident count rate by a factor of 4 in the thorax and 44 in the pelvis, and a 10 Mcps/mm (2) EDPC detector with dynamic attenuator provided generally superior image quality to a 100 Mcps/mm (2) detector with reference bowtie filter for the same dose. The improvement is more pronounced in the material images. PMID:25265628

  6. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray CT scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose, and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes claimed to be unsuitable for use in computed tomography because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that high-quality energy-resolved CT images can nonetheless be acquired with clinically realistic exposure parameters using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. We use basis material decomposition to obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  7. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  8. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contalbrigo, M.

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to -25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  9. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    Contalbrigo, Marco

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to –25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  10. A Quasiparticle Detector for Quantum Turbulence Imaging in Superfluid 3 He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Shaun; Bradley, Ian; Clovevcko, Marcel; Ahlstrom, Sean; Guise, Ed; Haley, Rich; Holt, Steve; Pickett, George; Schanon, Roch; Tsepelin, Viktor; Woods, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    We describe the development of a two-dimensional quasiparticle detector to visualise quantum turbulence in superfluid 3He-B at ultra-low temperatures. The detector consists of 25 pixels each containing a miniature quartz tuning fork. The damping on each fork provides a measure of the local quasiparticle flux. The detector is illuminated by a beam of ballistic quasiparticles generated from a near-by black-body radiator. Vortices have a large cross-section for Andreev reflecting ballistic quasiparticles at low temperatures. We generate a tangle of vortices (quantum turbulence) in the path of the beam using a vibrating wire resonator. The vortices cast a shadow onto the face of the detector due to the Andreev reflection. This allows us to image the vortex tangle and to investigate the tangle dynamics. We describe the detector and present some preliminary results.

  11. Performance of a small-field digital detector for soft x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Allen; Flynn, Michael J.; Shah, Manjul; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2001-06-01

    X-ray imaging detectors capable of very high resolution for a small field of view are important for x-ray micro-tomography, small specimen radiography, and certain x-ray scattering experiments. We have investigated the performance of small field detectors using scintillation phosphors coupled to a scientific CCD detector. The specific detector designs considered had fields of 8-12 mm that were used to record x-ray energies of 8-20 keV. The purpose of this work is to report the resolution (MTF) of designs that employed different optical coupling methods and different scintillation phosphor materials. For one detector system with a thin Gd2O2S phosphor a resolution of 48 lp/mm (presampled MTF = 0.10) was measured with pixels of 10.54 microns (Nyquist = 47.44) and a field of view of 12.14 mm x 13.09 mm.

  12. Development of the MAMA Detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector systems started in the early 1970's in order to produce multi-element detector arrays for use in spectrographs for solar studies from the Skylab-B mission. Development of the MAMA detectors for spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) began in the late 1970's, and reached its culmination with the successful installation of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the second HST servicing mission (STS-82 launched 11 February 1997). Under NASA Contract NAS5-29389 from December 1986 through June 1994 we supported the development of the MAMA detectors for STIS, including complementary sounding rocket and ground-based research programs. This final report describes the results of the MAMA detector development program for STIS.

  13. Imaging by time-tagging photons with the multi-anode microchannel array detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    The capability and initial use of the Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector in the time-tag mode is reported. The detector hardware currently in use consists of a visible-light detector tube with a semitransparent photocathode proximity-focused to a high-gain curved-channel microchannel plate MCP. The photoevents are detected by a (256 x 1024)-pixel coincidence-anode array with pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 microns connected to charge-sensitive amplifiers and event-detection circuitry. In the time-lag mode, the detector delivers the pixel address and the time of arrival for each detected photon to an accuracy of 10 microns. The maximum count rate is limited by the speed of data-acquisition hardware. The MAMA detector in the time-lag mode is currently being evaluated in programs of astrometry and speckle imaging.

  14. Non-volatile resistive photo-switches for flexible image detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, Sebastian; Wolf, Christoph; Sax, Stefan; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    The increasing quest to find lightweight, conformable or flexible image detectors for machine vision or medical imaging brings organic electronics into the spotlight for these fields of application. Here were we introduce a unique imaging device concept and its utilization in an organic, flexible detector array with simple passive matrix wiring. We present a flexible organic image detector array built up from non-volatile resistive multi-bit photo-switchable elements. This unique realization is based on an organic photodiode combined with an organic resistive memory device wired in a simple crossbar configuration. The presented concept exhibits significant advantages compared to present organic and inorganic detector array technologies, facilitating the detection and simultaneous storage of the image information in one detector pixel, yet also allowing for simple read-out of the information from a simple passive-matrix crossbar wiring. This concept is demonstrated for single photo-switchable pixels as well as for arrays with sizes up to 32 by 32 pixels (1024 bit). The presented results pave the way for a versatile flexible and easy-to-fabricate sensor array technology. In a final step, the concept was expanded to detection of x-rays.

  15. Image reconstruction for single detector rosette scanning systems based on compressive sensing theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzeler, Hande; Cakir, Serdar; Aytaç, Tayfun

    2016-02-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a signal processing technique that enables a signal that has a sparse representation in a known basis to be reconstructed using measurements obtained below the Nyquist rate. Single detector image reconstruction applications using CS have been shown to give promising results. In this study, we investigate the application of CS theory to single detector infrared (IR) rosette scanning systems which suffer from low performance compared to costly focal plane array (FPA) detectors. The single detector pseudoimaging rosette scanning system scans the scene with a specific pattern and performs processing to estimate the target location without forming an image. In this context, this generation of scanning systems may be improved by utilizing the samples obtained by the rosette scanning pattern in conjunction with the CS framework. For this purpose, we consider surface-to-air engagement scenarios using IR images containing aerial targets and flares. The IR images have been reconstructed from samples obtained with the rosette scanning pattern and other baseline sampling strategies. It has been shown that the proposed scheme exhibits good reconstruction performance and a large size FPA imaging performance can be achieved using a single IR detector with a rosette scanning pattern.

  16. Imaging microwell detectors for x-ray and gamma-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Phil; Hunter, Stanley D.; Jahoda, Keith; Huang, J.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Klauk, H.; Qian, W.

    2000-12-01

    Gas proportional counter arrays based on the micro-well are an example of a new generation of detectors that exploit narrow anode-cathode gaps, rather than fine anodes, to create gas gain. These are inherently imaging pixel detectors that can be made very large for reasonable costs. Because of their intrinsic gain and room-temperature operation, they can be instrumented at very low power per unit area, making them valuable for a variety of space-flight applications where large-area X-ray imaging or particle tracking is required. We discuss micro-well detectors as focal plane imager for Lobster-ISS, a proposed soft X-ray all-sky monitor, and as electron trackers for the Next Generation High-Energy Gamma Ray mission. We have developed a fabrication technique using a masked UV laser that allows us both to machine micro-wells in polymer substrates and to pattern metal electrodes. We have used this technique to fabricate detectors which image X-rays by simultaneously reading out orthogonal anode and cathode strips. We present imaging results from these detectors, as well as gain and energy resolution measurements that agree well with results from other groups.

  17. High-resolution X-ray imaging by polycapillary optics and lithium fluoride detectors combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Della Ventura, G.; Bellatreccia, F.; Magi, M.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Novel results on high-resolution X-ray imaging by a table-top laboratory system based on lithium fluoride (LiF) imaging radiation detectors and a X-ray tube combined with polycapillary optics are reported for the first time. In this paper, imaging experiments of reference objects, as well as thick geological samples, show some of the potentialities of this approach for the development of a compact laboratory X-ray microscopy apparatus. The high spatial resolution and dynamic range of versatile LiF imaging detectors, based on optical reading of photoluminescence from X-ray-induced color centers in LiF crystals and films, allow us to use very simple contact imaging techniques. Promising applications can be foreseen in the fields of bio-medical imaging diagnostics, characterization of X-ray sources and optical elements, material science and photonics.

  18. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Grbovic, Dragoslav; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G; Hunter, Scott Robert

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we describe the fabrication of an array of bimaterial detectors for infrared (IR) imaging that utilize SiO2 as a structural material. All the substrate material underneath the active area of each detector element was removed. Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four photolithographic steps with no wet etching or sacrificial layers. The thermomechanical deflection sensitivity was 7.9 10-3 rad/K which corresponds to a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 2.9 mK. In the present work the array was used to capture IR images while operating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and no need for vacuum packaging. The average measured NETD of our IR detector system was approximately 200 mK but some sensing elements exhibited an NETD of 50 mK.

  19. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  20. A multi-channel high time resolution detector for high content imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Fraser, G. W.; Miller, G. M.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Jarron, P.; Despeisse, M.; Powolny, F.; Howorth, J.; Milnes, J.

    2009-10-01

    Medical imaging has long benefited from advances in photon counting detectors arising from space and particle physics. We describe a microchannel plate-based detector system for high content (multi-parametric) analysis, specifically designed to provide a step change in performance and throughput for measurements in imaged live cells and tissue for the 'omics'. The detector system integrates multi-channel, high time resolution, photon counting capability into a single miniaturized detector with integrated ASIC electronics, comprising a fast, low power amplifier discriminator and TDC for every channel of the discrete pixel electronic readout, and achieving a pixel density improvement of order two magnitudes compared with current comparable devices. The device combines high performance, easy reconfigurability, and economy within a compact footprint. We present simulations and preliminary measurements in the context of our ultimate goals of 20 ps time resolution with multi-channel parallel analysis (1024 channels).

  1. Amorphous selenium detector utilizing a Frisch grid for photon-counting imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Fang, Y.; Karim, K. S.; Tousignant, O.; Mani, H.; Laperrière, L.

    2009-02-01

    Incomplete charge collection due to poor electron mobility in amorphous selenium (a-Se) results in depth-dependent signal variations. The slow signal rise-time for the portion of the induced charge due to electron-movement towards the anode and significant electron trapping cause ballistic deficit. In this paper, we investigate Frisch-grid detector design to reduce the depth dependent noise, increase the photon count-rate, and improve the spectral performance of positively biased amorphous selenium radiation detectors. In addition, we analyze the impact of using the Frisch grid detector design on x-ray sensitivity, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), modulation transfer function (MTF), and image lag of integrating-mode a-Se radiation detectors. Preliminary results based on theory are presented for emerging digital medical imaging modalities such as mammography tomosynthesis and fluoroscopy.

  2. Imaging pulse-counting detector systems for space ultraviolet astrophysics missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    A family of imaging, pulse-counting, photoelectric detector systems, the Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMAs), are now under active development for use on a number of space ultraviolet astrophysics missions at far-ultraviolet (FUV) and extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths between about 300 and 28 nm. Specifically, MAMA detectors are being fabricated and tested for use in two instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory mission, for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, and for the prime FUV spectrograph of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer FUSE/Lyman mission. The construction and performance characteristics of the different MAMA detector systems are described, and techniques for improving the spatial resolution of each of the detector systems by the use of custom application specific integrated circuits in the electronics are discussed.

  3. Ultraviolet /UV/ sensitive phosphors for silicon imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Cowens, M. W.; Butner, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence properties of UV sensitive organic phosphors and the radiometric properties of phosphor coated silicon detectors in the VUV, UV, and visible wavelengths are described. With evaporated films of coronene and liumogen, effective quantum efficiencies of up to 20% have been achieved on silicon photodiodes in the vacuum UV. With thin films of methylmethacrylate (acrylic), which are doped with organic laser dyes and deposited from solution, detector quantum efficiencies of the order of 15% for wavelengths of 120-165 nm and of 40% for wavelengths above 190 nm have been obtained. The phosphor coatings also act as antireflection coatings and thereby enhance the response of coated devices throughout the visible and near IR.

  4. Monte Carlo Simulations of Background Spectra in Integral Imager Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Dietz, K. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Predictions of the expected gamma-ray backgrounds in the ISGRI (CdTe) and PiCsIT (Csl) detectors on INTEGRAL due to cosmic-ray interactions and the diffuse gamma-ray background have been made using a coupled set of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (HETC, FLUKA, EGS4, and MORSE) and a detailed, 3-D mass model of the spacecraft and detector assemblies. The simulations include both the prompt background component from induced hadronic and electromagnetic cascades and the delayed component due to emissions from induced radioactivity. Background spectra have been obtained with and without the use of active (BGO) shielding and charged particle rejection to evaluate the effectiveness of anticoincidence counting on background rejection.

  5. Large-format electrographic and array detectors for a space Schmidt imaging telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Fischer, Jacqueline; Wray, James D.; Lowrance, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Possible optical designs of imaging detectors for the spaceborne Schmidt telescope proposed by Carruthers et al. (1990) are discussed, surveying the currently or potentially available technology. Consideration is given to FUV electrographic detectors of large format (e.g., 120 mm with 10-micron resolution) using CsI photocathodes, the possible extension of the same technology to the mid-UV using Cs2Te instead of CsI, large CCD arrays for the visible and NIR, electron-bombarded CCDs for the FUV and mid-UV, and the data handling and processing requirements of these detectors.

  6. Precise topographic surface measurements of warm and cold large image detectors for astronomical instrumentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiries, Sebastian; Iwert, Olaf; Stroebele, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes ESO's surface measurement device for large image detectors in astronomy. The machine was equipped with a sub-micrometer laser displacement sensor and is fully automated with LabView. On the example of newly developed curved CCDs, which are envisaged for future astronomical instruments, it was demonstrated that this machine can exactly determine the topographic surfaces of detectors. This works even at cryogenic temperatures through a dewar window. Included is the calculation of curvature radii from these cold curved CCDs after spherical fitting with MATLAB. In addition (and interesting for calibration of instruments) the micro-movements of the detector inside the cryostat are mapped.

  7. Lorentz angle studies for the SLD endcap Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, P.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.; Schneider, M.; Spencer, E.; Williams, D.; Ashford, V.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Gaillard, M.

    1987-11-01

    The design of the endcap Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detectors for SLD requires a detailed understanding of how electrons drift in gases under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields. In this report, we present recent measurements of Lorentz angles and drift velocities in gases suitable for the endcap CRID photon detectors. We compare these measurements to predictions from a theoretical model; good agreement is observed. Based on our results we present a design for detectors operating in a 0.6 Tesla transverse magnetic field. 14 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Super-resolution x-ray imaging by CdTe discrete detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Ishida, Y.; Morii, H.; Tomita, Y.; Ohashi, G.; Temmyo, J.; Hatanaka, Y.

    2005-08-01

    512-pixel CdTe super-liner imaging scanner was developed. This device was consist with 512 chips of M-π-n CdTe diode detector fabricated by excimer laser doping process, 8 chips of photon-counting mode 64ch ASIC with FPGA circuit, USB2.0 interface with 1-CPU. It has 5 discriminated levels and over 2Mcps count rate for X-ray penetration imaging. This imaging scanner has 512 discrete CdTe chips for detector arrays with the length of 2.0mm, width of 0.8mm and thickness of 0.5mm. These chips were mounted in four plover array rows for high-resolution imaging with 0.5mm-pitch, therefore the pixel pitch was over the pixel width. When images were taken with scanning system with this arrays, we could obtain over-resolution than pixel width. In this paper, this "over-resolution" imaging will be called "super resolution imaging". In high-resolution imaging device, the pixel devices on one substrate were formed by integrated process, or many discrete detector chips were installed on circuit board, usually. In the latter case, it is easer to make each detector chips than former case, and it are no need to consider charge sharing phenomena compare with one-chip pixel devices. However, a decrease in pixel pitch makes the mount to the detector chip to the ASIC board difficult because the handling will also be difficult The super-resolution technique in this scanner by pixel-shift method for X-ray imaging is shown in this paper

  9. Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: This article describes a method to achieve near optimal performance with low energy resolution detectors. Tapiovaara and Wagner [Phys. Med. Biol. 30, 519-529 (1985)] showed that an energy selective x-ray system using a broad spectrum source can produce images with a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR) than conventional systems using energy integrating or photon counting detectors. They showed that there is an upper limit to the SNR and that it can be achieved by measuring full spectrum information and then using an optimal energy dependent weighting. Methods: A performance measure is derived by applying statistical detection theory to an abstract vector space of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients of the two function approximation to the x-ray attenuation coefficient. The approach produces optimal results that utilize all the available energy dependent data. The method can be used with any energy selective detector and is applied not only to detectors using pulse height analysis (PHA) but also to a detector that simultaneously measures the total photon number and integrated energy, as discussed by Roessl et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 959-966 (2007)]. A generalization of this detector that improves the performance is introduced. A method is described to compute images with the optimal SNR using projections in a ''whitened'' vector space transformed so the noise is uncorrelated and has unit variance in both coordinates. Material canceled images with optimal SNR can also be computed by projections in this space. Results: The performance measure is validated by showing that it provides the Tapiovaara-Wagner optimal results for a detector with full energy information and also a conventional detector. The performance with different types of detectors is compared to the ideal SNR as a function of x-ray tube voltage and subject thickness. A detector that combines two bin PHA with a simultaneous measurement of integrated photon energy provides near ideal

  10. An inherent anti-scatter detector for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymurazyan, A.; Pang, G.

    2013-03-01

    Scattered x-rays are detrimental to the image quality of x-ray transmission radiography. Anti-scatter grids have been developed for kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging but are impractical to use for megavoltage (MV) x-ray imaging in radiation therapy. Our goal is to develop a new approach that uses an inherent anti-scatter detector for scatter reduction in MV x-ray imaging. A Monte Carlo simulation has been conducted to evaluate the response of a recently proposed Čerenkov electronic portal imaging device (CPID) to scattered x-rays. The proposed detector consists of a matrix of optical fibers aligned with the incident x-rays and coupled to an active matrix flat panel imager for image readout. The effects of scatter on the signal and noise of the CPID in comparison with those of conventional electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been investigated. It has been found that the CPID is ∼50% less sensitive to scattered x-rays than conventional EPIDs at 6 MV. The differential signal to noise ratio is also improved by up to 30% in the CPID. The results of our simulations have demonstrated that the recently proposed CPID system is an inherent anti-scatter detector, the first of this kind, for MV x-ray imaging.

  11. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  12. Absolute calibration of photostimulable image plate detectors used as (0.5-20 MeV) high-energy proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Mancić, A; Fuchs, J; Antici, P; Gaillard, S A; Audebert, P

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the absolute calibration of photostimulable image plates (IPs) used as proton detectors is presented. The calibration is performed in a wide range of proton energies (0.5-20 MeV) by exposing simultaneously the IP and calibrated detectors (radiochromic films and solid state detector CR39) to a source of broadband laser-accelerated protons, which are spectrally resolved. The final result is a calibration curve that enables retrieving the proton number from the IP signal. PMID:18681694

  13. High spatial resolution fast-neutron imaging detectors for Pulsed Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Katz, D.; Sayag, E.; Shmueli, I.; Cohen, Y.; Tal, A.; Vagish, Z.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendorf, V.; Mugai, D.; Tittelmeier, K.; Weierganz, M.

    2009-05-01

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber scintillator screen and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). This detector is designed for energy-selective neutron radiography with nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1-10 MeV) neutron beams. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, such a detector is capable of simultaneously capturing several images, each at a different neutron energy (TOF). In addition, a gamma-ray image can also be simultaneously registered, allowing combined neutron/gamma inspection of objects. This permits combining the sensitivity of the fast-neutron resonance method to low-Z elements with that of gamma radiography to high-Z materials.

  14. Ultrafast secondary emission X-ray imaging detectors: A possible application to TRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkerman, A.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Elkind, V.; Gibrekhterman, A.; Majewski, S.

    1992-05-01

    Fist high accuracy, X-ray imaging at high photon flux can be achieved when coupling thin solid convertors to gaseous electron multipliers, operating at low gas pressures. Secondary electrons emitted from the convertor foil are multiplied in several successive amplification elements. The obvious advantages of solid X-ray convertors, as compared to gaseous conversion, are the production of parallax-free images and the fast (subnanosecond) response. These X-ray detectors have many potential applications in basic and applied research. Of particular interest is the possibility of an efficient and ultrafast high resolution imaging of transition radiation (TR), with a reduced d E/d x background. We present experimental results on the operation of secondary emission X-ray (SEX) detectors, their detection efficiency, localization and time resolution. The experimental work is accompanied by mathematical modelling and computer simulation of transition radiation detectors (TRDs) based on CsI TR convertors.

  15. Standoff passive video imaging at 350 GHz with 251 superconducting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel; Gentry, Cale; Smirnov, Ilya; Ade, Peter; Beall, James; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Dicker, Simon; Duncan, William; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent; Li, Dale; Paulter, Nicholas; Reintsema, Carl; Schwall, Robert; Tucker, Carole

    2014-06-01

    Millimeter wavelength radiation holds promise for detection of security threats at a distance, including suicide bomb belts and maritime threats in poor weather. The high sensitivity of superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) detectors makes them ideal for passive imaging of thermal signals at these wavelengths. We have built a 350 GHz video-rate imaging system using a large-format array of feedhorn-coupled TES bolometers. The system operates at a standoff distance of 16m to 28m with a spatial resolution of 1:4 cm (at 17m). It currently contains one 251-detector subarray, and will be expanded to contain four subarrays for a total of 1004 detectors. The system has been used to take video images which reveal the presence of weapons concealed beneath a shirt in an indoor setting. We present a summary of this work.

  16. KENIS: a high-performance thermal imager developed using the OSPREY IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Tristan M.; Baker, Ian M.

    2000-07-01

    `KENIS', a complete, high performance, compact and lightweight thermal imager, is built around the `OSPREY' infrared detector from BAE systems Infrared Ltd. The `OSPREY' detector uses a 384 X 288 element CMT array with a 20 micrometers pixel size and cooled to 120 K. The relatively small pixel size results in very compact cryogenics and optics, and the relatively high operating temperature provides fast start-up time, low power consumption and long operating life. Requiring single input supply voltage and consuming less than 30 watts of power, the thermal imager generates both analogue and digital format outputs. The `KENIS' lens assembly features a near diffraction limited dual field-of-view optical system that has been designed to be athermalized and switches between fields in less than one second. The `OSPREY' detector produces near background limited performance with few defects and has special, pixel level circuitry to eliminate crosstalk and blooming effects. This, together with signal processing based on an effective two-point fixed pattern noise correction algorithm, results in high quality imagery and a thermal imager that is suitable for most traditional thermal imaging applications. This paper describes the rationale used in the development of the `KENIS' thermal imager, and highlights the potential performance benefits to the user's system, primarily gained by selecting the `OSPREY' infra-red detector within the core of the thermal imager.

  17. Automatic detection of cone photoreceptors in split detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images.

    PubMed

    Cunefare, David; Cooper, Robert F; Higgins, Brian; Katz, David F; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living retina is potentially useful for early diagnosis and prognosis of many ocular diseases. Non-confocal split detector based adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) imaging reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segment mosaics often not visualized on confocal AOSLO imaging. Despite recent advances in automated cone segmentation algorithms for confocal AOSLO imagery, quantitative analysis of split detector AOSLO images is currently a time-consuming manual process. In this paper, we present the fully automatic adaptive filtering and local detection (AFLD) method for detecting cones in split detector AOSLO images. We validated our algorithm on 80 images from 10 subjects, showing an overall mean Dice's coefficient of 0.95 (standard deviation 0.03), when comparing our AFLD algorithm to an expert grader. This is comparable to the inter-observer Dice's coefficient of 0.94 (standard deviation 0.04). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first validated, fully-automated segmentation method which has been applied to split detector AOSLO images. PMID:27231641

  18. Automatic detection of cone photoreceptors in split detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images

    PubMed Central

    Cunefare, David; Cooper, Robert F.; Higgins, Brian; Katz, David F.; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living retina is potentially useful for early diagnosis and prognosis of many ocular diseases. Non-confocal split detector based adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) imaging reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segment mosaics often not visualized on confocal AOSLO imaging. Despite recent advances in automated cone segmentation algorithms for confocal AOSLO imagery, quantitative analysis of split detector AOSLO images is currently a time-consuming manual process. In this paper, we present the fully automatic adaptive filtering and local detection (AFLD) method for detecting cones in split detector AOSLO images. We validated our algorithm on 80 images from 10 subjects, showing an overall mean Dice’s coefficient of 0.95 (standard deviation 0.03), when comparing our AFLD algorithm to an expert grader. This is comparable to the inter-observer Dice’s coefficient of 0.94 (standard deviation 0.04). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first validated, fully-automated segmentation method which has been applied to split detector AOSLO images. PMID:27231641

  19. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-03-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design.

  20. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design. PMID:25302003

  1. A detector system for neutron resonance capture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelli Cippo, E.; Borella, A.; Gorini, G.; Kockelmann, W.; Pietropaolo, A.; Postma, H.; Rhodes, N. J.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Tardocchi, M.; Wynants, R.; Ancient Charm Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is used in the Ancient Charm project to determine element concentrations in cultural heritage objects. NRCA employs gamma-ray detectors to determine time-of-flight spectra that reveal the resonance structure in neutron induced reaction cross sections. One of the objectives is to produce a high-detection efficient NRCA system capable of mapping element distributions. The detection system is described together with the results of neutron beam tests at the time-of-flight facility GELINA and at the pulsed neutron spallation source ISIS (UK).

  2. Novel Neutron Detector for High Rate Imaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey, L.

    2004-08-27

    The Phase II period performance was May 30, 2002 through May 29, 2004. This development effort was successfully completed within the period and budget allotted. The proposed design was successfully fabricated from B{sub 4}C-coated aluminum and copper film, slit and wound to form 4 mm diameter straws, cut to 100 cm in length, and threaded with resistive anode wires (20 {micro}m in diameter). This paper reports testing done with two 50-straw detector modules at the reactor of the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University (TAMU NSC).

  3. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  4. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  5. A YSO/LSO phoswich array detector for single and coincidence photon imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlbom, M.; MacDonald, L.R.; Schmand, M.; Eriksson, L.; Andreaco, M.; Williams, C.

    1998-06-01

    The performance of a phoswich array detector module for possible use in a combined single and coincidence photon imaging system has been evaluated. The assumption is that this detection module would allow the construction of a combined SPECT/PET imaging system with better count rate performance in the coincidence mode compared to current dual headed scintillation cameras. The detector consist of a linear array of discrete 4 x 4 x 15 mm{sup 3} YSO elements coupled to a combined detector array/light guide of LSO, 10 mm thick. Since the scintillation light decay time is different in YSO and LSO (70 and 40 ns, respectively), events originating from the two detector materials can be separated by pulse shape discrimination. The front layer of YSO could then be used for detection of low energy, single photon events and the LSO layer for coincidence detection of annihilation radiation. The light collection of the PMTs coupled to the detector was found to be adequate to accurately identify each detector element in the array using the same positioning logic used in conventional BGO block detectors. The average energy resolution of the YSO elements at 140 keV for the block detector was found to be 14.5% FWHM, ranging from 13.8 to 15.4%. Spatial resolution of the detector block in single photon mode, using a high resolution collimator (geometric resolution 6.5 mm at 10 cm) was measured by scanning a {sup 99m}Tc line source. The resolution at 5 and 10 cm from the collimator face was found to be 5.9 and 8.5 mm FWHM, respectively.

  6. A history of hybrid pixel detectors, from high energy physics to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpierre, P.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of hybrid pixel detectors from the origin to the application on medical imaging. We are going to recall the need for fast 2D detectors in the high energy physics experiments and to follow the different pixel electronic circuits created to satisfy this demand. The adaptation of these circuits for X-rays will be presented as well as their industrialization. Today, a number of applications are open for these cameras, particularly for biomedical imaging applications. Some developments for clinical CT will also be shown.

  7. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  8. SU-C-201-03: Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Using Pixelated Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S; Kaye, W; Jaworski, J; He, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Improved localization of gamma-ray emissions from radiotracers is essential to the progress of nuclear medicine. Polaris is a portable, room-temperature operated gamma-ray imaging spectrometer composed of two 3×3 arrays of thick CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, which detect gammas between 30keV and 3MeV with energy resolution of <1% FWHM at 662keV. Compton imaging is used to map out source distributions in 4-pi space; however, is only effective above 300keV where Compton scatter is dominant. This work extends imaging to photoelectric energies (<300keV) using coded aperture imaging (CAI), which is essential for localization of Tc-99m (140keV). Methods: CAI, similar to the pinhole camera, relies on an attenuating mask, with open/closed elements, placed between the source and position-sensitive detectors. Partial attenuation of the source results in a “shadow” or count distribution that closely matches a portion of the mask pattern. Ideally, each source direction corresponds to a unique count distribution. Using backprojection reconstruction, the source direction is determined within the field of view. The knowledge of 3D position of interaction results in improved image quality. Results: Using a single array of detectors, a coded aperture mask, and multiple Co-57 (122keV) point sources, image reconstruction is performed in real-time, on an event-by-event basis, resulting in images with an angular resolution of ∼6 degrees. Although material nonuniformities contribute to image degradation, the superposition of images from individual detectors results in improved SNR. CAI was integrated with Compton imaging for a seamless transition between energy regimes. Conclusion: For the first time, CAI has been applied to thick, 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Real-time, combined CAI and Compton imaging is performed using two 3×3 detector arrays, resulting in a source distribution in space. This system has been commercialized by H3D, Inc. and is being acquired for

  9. Imaging and spectroscopic performance studies of pixellated CdTe Timepix detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneuski, D.; Astromskas, V.; Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Marchal, J.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Wilhelm, H.; Wraight, K.; Zain, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the results on imaging and spectroscopic performances of 14 × 14 × 1 mm CdTe detectors with 55 × 55 μm and 110 × 110 μm pixel pitch bump-bonded to a Timepix chip are presented. The performance of the 110 × 110 μm pixel detector was evaluated at the extreme conditions beam line I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The energy of X-rays was set between 25 and 77 keV. The beam was collimated through the edge slits to 20 μm FWHM incident in the middle of the pixel. The detector was operated in the time-over-threshold mode, allowing direct energy measurement. Energy in the neighbouring pixels was summed for spectra reconstruction. Energy resolution at 77 keV was found to be ΔE/E = 3.9%. Comparative imaging and energy resolution studies were carried out between two pixel size detectors with a fluorescence target X-ray tube and radioactive sources. The 110 × 110 μm pixel detector exhibited systematically better energy resolution in comparison to 55 × 55 μm. An imaging performance of 55 × 55 μm pixellated CdTe detector was assessed using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) technique and compared to the larger pixel. A considerable degradation in MTF was observed for bias voltages below -300 V. Significant room for improvement of the detector performance was identified both for imaging and spectroscopy and is discussed.

  10. Evaluation of a CMOS image detector for low-cost and power medical x-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott T.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Wobschall, Darold C.; Jeong, Myoungki; Kim, Hyunkeun; Rudin, Stephen

    1999-05-01

    Recent developments in CMOS image detectors are changing the way digital imaging is performed for many applications. The replacement of charge coupled devices (CCDs), with CMOS detectors is a desirable paradigm shift that will depend on the ability to match the high performance characteristics of CCDs. Digital X-ray imaging applications (chest X-ray, mammography) would benefit greatly from this shift because CMOS detectors have the following inherent characteristics: (1) Low operating power (5 - 10 times lower than CCD/processing electronics). (2) Standard CMOS manufacturing process (CCD requires special manufacturing). (3) On-chip integration of analog/digital processing functions (difficult with CCD). (4) Low Cost (5 - 10 times lower cost than CCD). The achievement of both low cost and low power is highly desirable for portable applications as well as situations where large, expensive X-ray imaging machines are not feasible (small hospitals and clinics, emergency medical vehicles, remote sites). Achieving this goal using commercially available components would allow rapid development of such digital X-ray systems as compared with the development difficulties incurred through specialized direct detectors and systems. The focus of this paper is to evaluate a CMOS image detector for medical X-ray applications and to demonstrate the results obtained from a prototype CMOS digital X-ray camera. Results from the images collected from this optically-coupled camera are presented for a particular lens, X-ray conversion screen, and demagnification factor. Further, an overview of the overall power consumption and cost of a multi-sensor CMOS mosaic compared to its CCD counterpart are also reported.

  11. Fourier synthesis image reconstruction by use of one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Okada, Yuu; Negoro, Hitoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oda, Minoru

    2003-07-10

    An improvement of Fourier synthesis optics for hard x-ray imaging is described, and the basic performance of the new optics is confirmed through numerical simulations. The original concept of the Fourier synthesis imager utilizes nonposition-sensitive hard x-ray detectors coupled to individual bigrid modulation collimators. The improved concept employs a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (such as a CdTe strip detector) instead of the second grid layer of each bigrid modulation collimator. This improves the imaging performance in several respects over the original design. One performance improvement is a two-fold increase in the average transmission, from 1/4 to 1/2. The second merit is that both the sine and cosine components can be derived from a single grid-detector module, and hence the number of imaging modules can be halved. Furthermore, it provides information along the depth direction simultaneously. This in turn enables a three-dimensional imaging hard x-ray microscope for medical diagnostics, incorporating radioactive tracers. A conceptual design of such a microscope is presented, designed to provide a field of view of 4 mm and a spatial resolution of 400 microm. PMID:12856730

  12. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  13. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  14. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2002-10-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial resolution of 5 to 30 {micro}, are a promising approach to high-resolution imaging of NIF target plasmas. Gel bubble detectors were used in successful proof-of-principle imaging experiments on OMEGA. Until recently, bubble detectors appeared to be the only approach capable of achieving neutron images of NIF targets with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. In 2001, NIF reduced the required standoff distance from the target, so that diagnostic components can now be placed as close as 10 cm to the target plasma. This will allow neutron imaging with higher magnification and may make it possible to obtain 5 {micro}m resolution images on NIF using deuterated scintillators. Having accomplished all that they can hope to on OMEGA using gel detectors, they suggested that the 2002 NLUF shots be used to allow experimental tests of the spatial resolution of the CEA-built deuterated scintillators. The preliminary CEA data from the June 2002 run appears to show the spatial resolution using the deuterated scintillator detector array is improved over that obtained in earlier experiments using the proton-based scintillators. Gel detectors, which consist of {approx} 10 {micro}m diameter drops of bubble detector liquid suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume, were chosen for the initial tests on OMEGA since they are easy to use. The bubbles could be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. Imaging NIF target plasmas at neutron yields of 10{sup 15} will require a higher detection efficiency detector. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency which is comparable to that possible using scintillation detectors. A pressure-cycled liquid bubble detector will require a light

  15. Spot centroid sensitivity to angle of intensity on image detector with lenslet array.

    PubMed

    Hui, Mei; Zhou, Ping; Su, Peng; Zhao, Zhu

    2015-05-20

    Lenslet array was introduced to an image detector to compensate for low sensitivity. These lenses deviate the light from different incident angles and potentially introduce errors when subpixel accuracy is needed. We investigated the spot centroid position because the angle of incidence changes on a Kodak KAI-16000 image detector with lenslet array. In our experiment, we noticed that there is a cubic dependency on the incident angle. The experimental results show that dependence on the angle of incidence is related to the lenslet array in the Kodak detector used for the pentaprism test. This situation caused an error in spherical aberration on the test surface after integration. The magnitude of the cubic component at incident angle of 14° (equivalent to F/2) is 11.6 μm, which corresponds to a 48 nm rms spherical aberration for the test surface and brings the scanning pentaprism test closer to the principal test while there is a 56 nm rms discrepancy. The discrepancy in spherical aberration between the two tests reduced to 8 nm after this calibration. It also showed the contrast measurement results for the Kodak detector and PointGrey detector. We performed experiments with two different detectors to quantify this effect. PMID:26192498

  16. Performance characteristics of the imaging MAMA detector systems for SOHO, STIS, and FUSE/Lyman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    Imaging Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector systems with formats of 360 x 1024 pixels and pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 sq microns are being fabricated and tested for flight in two instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). In addition, very-large-format (1024 x 1024)- and (2048 x 2048)-pixel Far Ultraviolet (FUV) and EUV MAMA detectors with pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 sq microns are being fabricated and tested for use in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), a second-generation instrument scheduled for in-orbit installation in 1997. Finally, FUV MAMA detectors with formats of 224 x 960 pixels and pixel dimensions of 14 x 14 sq microns are being evaluated as prototypes of the detector for the prime FUV spectrograph of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE/Lyman) mission. The configurations and performance characteristics of the different detector systems are described, and the plans for further development of the Advanced Technology MAMA detector system discussed.

  17. Imaging at soft X-ray wavelengths with high-gain microchannel plate detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1986-01-01

    Multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with formats of 256 x 1024 pixels and active areas of 6 x 26 mm are now under evaluation at visible, UV and soft X-ray wavelengths. Very-large-format versions of the MAMA detectors with formats of 2048 x 2048 pixels and active areas of 52 x 52 mm are under development for use in the NASA Goddard Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). Open-structure versions of these detectors with Cs I photocathodes can provide a high-resolution imaging capability at EUV and soft X-ray wavelengths and can deliver a maximum count rate from each array in excess of 10 to the 6th counts/s. In addition, these detector systems have the unique capability to determine the arrival time of a detected photon to an accuracy of 100 ns or better. The construction, mode of operation, and performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors are described, and the program for the development of the very-large-format detectors is outlined.

  18. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  19. Wideband Optical Detector of Ultrasound for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Amir; Kellnberger, Stephan; Omar, Murad; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    Optical sensors of ultrasound are a promising alternative to piezoelectric techniques, as has been recently demonstrated in the field of optoacoustic imaging. In medical applications, one of the major limitations of optical sensing technology is its susceptibility to environmental conditions, e.g. changes in pressure and temperature, which may saturate the detection. Additionally, the clinical environment often imposes stringent limits on the size and robustness of the sensor. In this work, the combination of pulse interferometry and fiber-based optical sensing is demonstrated for ultrasound detection. Pulse interferometry enables robust performance of the readout system in the presence of rapid variations in the environmental conditions, whereas the use of all-fiber technology leads to a mechanically flexible sensing element compatible with highly demanding medical applications such as intravascular imaging. In order to achieve a short sensor length, a pi-phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating is used, which acts as a resonator trapping light over an effective length of 350 µm. To enable high bandwidth, the sensor is used for sideway detection of ultrasound, which is highly beneficial in circumferential imaging geometries such as intravascular imaging. An optoacoustic imaging setup is used to determine the response of the sensor for acoustic point sources at different positions. PMID:24895083

  20. High temporal resolution imaging and spectroscopy with RANICON detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, C. R.; Sen, A.; Ray, K.; Crocker, J. H.; Rafal, M. D.

    1990-07-01

    A data-collection system for use in astronomical observations with the resistive-anode detectors (Ranicons) described by Paresce et al. (1979 and 1988) is briefly characterized. Analog signals from the Ranicon pass through 12-bit A/D converters and (along with time information from a digital clock) into a 64-bit FIFO buffer, and the photon positions are calculated by a high-speed arithmetic-logic system capable of an event rate of 30 kHz (so that, by Poisson statistics, only about 21 percent of events will be missed). Results from successful timing tests of the system on the 2.2-m telescope at ESO are presented graphically.

  1. Track analysis of laser-illuminated etched track detectors using an opto-digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghan, Moses J.; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Oppon, Osborne C.

    2007-11-01

    An opto-digital imaging system for counting and analysing tracks on a LR-115 detector is described. One batch of LR-115 track detectors was irradiated with Am-241 for a determined period and distance for linearity test and another batch was exposed to radon gas. The laser-illuminated etched track detector area was imaged, digitized and analysed by the system. The tracks that were counted on the opto-digital system with the aid of media cybernetics software as well as spark gap counter showed comparable track density results ranging between 1500 and 2750 tracks cm-2 and 65 tracks cm-2 in the two different batch detector samples with 0.5% and 1% track counts, respectively. Track sizes of the incident alpha particles from the radon gas on the LR-115 detector demonstrating different track energies are statistically and graphically represented. The opto-digital imaging system counts and measures other track parameters at an average process time of 3-5 s.

  2. THCOBRA X-ray imaging detector operating in Ne/CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carramate, L. F. N. D.; Silva, A. L. M.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Covita, D. S.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Photon counting detection with energy resolution and the consequent possibility to improve image quality become possible with the development of energy resolved detectors. The 2D-Thick-COBRA (2D-THCOBRA), a recently introduced MicroPattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD), with an active area of 10 × 10 cm2, specially designed for imaging purposes allows to determine the interaction position and also the energy of each single photon reaching the detector. In this work, the performance of a single 2D-THCOBRA operating in Ne/CH4 (95/5) (at 1 bar) is presented based on studies of charge gain, energy resolution, count rate, stability and spatial resolution. The detector shown a very stable operation allowing for gains of about 104. An energy resolution of 22% for 8 keV, count rates up to 1 × 106 Hz/mm2 and a spatial resolution of about 1.2 mm were achieved with this detector. Some examples of X-ray transmission imaging of some biological samples are also shown.

  3. Current status and further improvements of the detector for imaging of explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulchenko, V. M.; Evdokov, O. V.; Shekhtman, L. I.; Ten, K. A.; Tolochko, B. P.; Zhogin, I. L.; Zhulanov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The described detector for imaging of explosions (DIMEX) has been designed for the studies of fast processes (explosions, combustion) at synchrotron radiation (SR) beam. DIMEX has been in operation on the SR beam-line on the VEPP-3 electron ring at Budker INP since 2002. DIMEX is based on a one-coordinate gas ionization chamber filled with a Xe-CO 2 (3:1) mixture at 7 atm and active Frisch-grid made of a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). The detector has a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm and dynamic range of ˜100, which allows one to achieve a signal measurement precision of a few percent. The future possibility to install a similar detector on the SR beam-line on the VEPP-4 electron ring is discussed and the last version of the detector is described.

  4. Recent results of the forward ring imaging Cherenkov detector of the DELPHI experiment at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Albrecht, E. ); Augustinus, A. )

    1994-08-01

    The Forward Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector covers both end-cap regions of the DELPHI experiment at LEP in the polar angel 15[degree] < [theta] < 35[degree] and 145[degree] < [theta] < 165[degree]. The detector combines a layer of liquid C[sub 6]F[sub 14] and a volume of gaseous C[sub 4]F[sub 10] into a single assembly. Ultraviolet photons from both radiators are converted in a single plane of photosensitive Time Projection Chambers. Identification of charged particles is provided for momenta up to 40 GeV/c. The design of the detector is briefly described. The detector is now fully installed in DELPHI and has participated in the 1993 data taking. The overall performance will be presented together with the expectations from Monte Carlo simulations. Results close to design values are obtained.

  5. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  6. Integrated filter and detector array for spectral imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A spectral imaging system having an integrated filter and photodetector array is disclosed. The filter has narrow transmission bands which vary in frequency along the photodetector array. The frequency variation of the transmission bands is matched to, and aligned with, the frequency variation of a received spectral image. The filter is deposited directly on the photodetector array by a low temperature deposition process. By depositing the filter directly on the photodetector array, permanent alignment is achieved for all temperatures, spectral crosstalk is substantially eliminated, and a high signal to noise ratio is achieved.

  7. ANL CT Image Reconstruction Algorithm for Utilizing Digital X-ray Detector Array

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-08-05

    Reconstructs X-ray computed tomographic images from large data sets known as 16-bit binary sinograms. The algorithm uses the concept of generation of an image from carefully obtained multiple l-D or 2-0 X-ray projections. The individual projections are filtered using a digital Fast Fourier Transform. The literature refers to this as filtered back projection. The software is capable of processing a large file for reconstructing single images or volumetnc (3-D) images from large area high resolutionmore » digital X-ray detectors.« less

  8. Investigation of image lag and modulation transfer function in fluoroscopy images obtained with a dynamic flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tanaka, Rie; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Matsubara, Kosuke; Iida, Hiroji; Sanada, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Digital imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) is commonly used in clinical practice. However, several factors reduce the accuracy of target tracking in fluoroscopic imaging, including image lag and blurring. There have been several reports focusing on the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in different types of FPD. However, there have been no studies comparing image lag and MTF properties in dynamic images obtained with indirect- and direct-conversion FPDs. We investigated the image lag and MTF under several imaging conditions in fluoroscopic images obtained with an indirect-conversion and a direct-conversion FPD system. The measurements of image lag and MTF were obtained under several conditions according to IEC 62220-1-3 standards. We examined whether the image lag and MTF were influenced by the dose level and target movement speed. Indirect-conversion FPD showed dependence on the dose level, which was not observed for direct-conversion FPD. Furthermore, there were large differences in MTF between images of static and moving plate with indirect-conversion FPD in comparison to the differences observed with direct-conversion FPD. These results will be useful for the determination of imaging conditions for target tracking and other types of dynamic imaging. PMID:23568338

  9. Feasibility study of a gas electron multiplier detector as an X-Ray image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sukyoung; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Soonhyouk

    2015-07-01

    For its ease of manufacture, flexible geometry, and cheap manufacturing cost, the gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector can be used as an X-ray image sensor. For this purpose, we acquired relative detection efficiencies and suggested a method to increase the detection efficiency in order to study the possibility of using a GEM detector as an X-ray image sensor. The GEM detector system is composed of GEM foils, the instrument system, the gas system, and the negative power supply. The instrument system consists of an A225 charge sensitive preamp, an A206 discriminator, and a MCA8000D multichannel analyzer. For the gas system, argon gas was mixed with CO2 in a ratio of 8:2, and for the negative 2,000 volts, a 3106D power supply was used. A CsI-coated GEM foil was used to increase the detection efficiency. Fe-55 was used as an X-ray source, and the relative efficiency was acquired by using the ratio of the efficiency of the GEM detector to that of the CdTe detector. The total count method and the energy spectrum method were used to calculate the relative efficiency. The relative detection efficiency of the GEM detector for Fe-55 by using total count method was 32%, and the relative detection efficiencies were 5, 43, 33, 37, 35, and 36%, respectively, for 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7- keV energy spectrum by using the energy spectrum method. In conclusion, we found that the detection efficiency of the two-layered GEM detector is insufficient for use as an X-ray image sensor, so we suggest a CsI-coated GEM foil to increase the efficiency, with resulting value being increased to 41%.

  10. Development of EXITE3, Imaging Detectors and a Long Duration Balloon Gondola

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this Report we summarize the work conducted for the EXITE program under grant NAG5-5103. This grant supported the ongoing EXITE program at Harvard for the development of imaging hard x-ray detectors and telescopes over the 3 year period 1997-2000 with a one year extension to 2001 to transition to the next SR&T grant in this program. Work was conducted in three major parts: analysis of the EXITE2 balloon flight data (from our May 1997 flight); development of pixellated imaging Cd-Zn-Te detector arrays and readout systems for the proposed EXITE3 detector and telescope; and development of systems for a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) gondola. Progress on all three major aspects of this research is summarized for each of the years of this grant.