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1

Cooling system for automotive engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

An internal combustion engine: a structure subject to heat flux; and a cooling system is described which consists of: a cooling circuit which includes: (a) a coolant jacket formed about the structure subject to high heat flux and into which coolant is introduced in liquid form, permitted to boil and discharged in gaseous form, (b) a radiator exposed to a

Hirano

1986-01-01

2

Boiling liquid engine cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A boiling liquid cooling system is described for an engine, comprising: means defining in the engine a coolant jacket into which coolant is introduced in liquid state and from which coolant is discharged in gaseous state; a radiator into which gaseous coolant from the coolant jacket is introduced to be liquified; an electric pump for pumping the coolant thus liquified

N. Miura; Y. Hayashi

1987-01-01

3

40 CFR 90.307 - Engine cooling system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity to maintain the engine at normal operating temperatures as prescribed by the engine manufacturer. Auxiliary fan(s) may be used to maintain sufficient engine cooling during engine dynamometer...

2010-07-01

4

40 CFR 91.307 - Engine cooling system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity to maintain the engine at normal operating temperatures as prescribed by the engine manufacturer. Auxiliary fan(s) may be used to maintain sufficient engine cooling during dynamometer...

2010-07-01

5

Engine cooling fan coupling system controlled in concert with a cooling system thermostat  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cooling fan coupling system is described for an engine for an automotive vehicle, the engine comprising a rotating member and a coolant circulation system comprising a coolant radiator, a cooling fan for propelling air past the radiator to cool the coolant radiator, and a thermostatic valve for controlling flow of coolant through the coolant radiator. The thermostatic valve is

S. Suzaki; T. Shira; H. Adachi; M. Hayashi; K. Hattori; Y. Takakura

1987-01-01

6

40 CFR 89.329 - Engine cooling system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity to maintain the engine at normal operating temperatures as prescribed by the engine manufacturer. [59 FR 31335, June 17, 1994. Redesignated at 63 FR 56995, Oct. 23,...

2010-07-01

7

Closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine  

DOEpatents

Method and apparatus are disclosed for providing a closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine. The method and apparatus provide for bleeding pressurized air from a gas turbine engine compressor for use in cooling the turbine components. The compressed air is cascaded through the various stages of the turbine. At each stage a portion of the compressed air is returned to the compressor where useful work is recovered.

North, William Edward (Winter Springs, FL)

2000-01-01

8

Intelligent Engine Systems: Thermal Management and Advanced Cooling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the Advanced Turbine Cooling and Thermal Management program is to develop intelligent control and distribution methods for turbine cooling, while achieving a reduction in total cooling flow and assuring acceptable turbine component safety and reliability. The program also will develop embedded sensor technologies and cooling system models for real-time engine diagnostics and health management. Both active and passive control strategies will be investigated that include the capability of intelligent modulation of flow quantities, pressures, and temperatures both within the supply system and at the turbine component level. Thermal management system concepts were studied, with a goal of reducing HPT blade cooling air supply temperature. An assessment will be made of the use of this air by the active clearance control system as well. Turbine component cooling designs incorporating advanced, high-effectiveness cooling features, will be evaluated. Turbine cooling flow control concepts will be studied at the cooling system level and the component level. Specific cooling features or sub-elements of an advanced HPT blade cooling design will be downselected for core fabrication and casting demonstrations.

Bergholz, Robert

2008-01-01

9

Application of system engineering processes to analyze and predict engine cooling fan system noise for off-highway machines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

System Engineering processes were applied to create a Cooling Fan System Noise Analysis Tool for a back-hoe loader machine. The Cooling Fan System Noise Analysis Tool combined elements of aeroacoustic theory, Fan Law, sound power measurements and particle image velocimetry into a single computer analysis tool. The cooling fan system consisted of a cooling fan, multiple radiators in front of the cooling fan, a shroud, a mock engine behind the cooling fan, and a simulated engine compartment. A vortex flow structure was measured in front of the cooling fan. The cooling fan system sound power spectrum was measured. The radiated sound power spectrum for the vortex interaction with the fan blades was calculated. Measured and predicted cooling fan system sound power results were compared. The overall structure and approach will be presented along with an overview of the theory and initial results.

Masini, Christopher P.; Mann, J. Adin

2005-09-01

10

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

SciTech Connect

A cooling system for an engine having a structure subject to a high heat flux is described comprising: a coolant jacket disposed about the structure; a radiator in fluid communication with the coolant jacket through a connection structure; a device associated with the radiator for varying the amount of heat exchange between the radiator and a cooling medium surrounding the same; a first temperature sensor disposed in the radiator, a reservoir which is fluidly discrete from the cooling circuit and in which liquid coolant is stored; a level control conduit fluidly interconnecting the reservoir and the coolant jacket; a pump disposed in the level control conduit; and a level sensor disposed in the coolant jacket.

Hirano, Y.

1988-02-02

11

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

SciTech Connect

A cooling system is described for an internal combustion engine having a structure subject to high heat flux and a lubricant system, comprising: a coolant jacket disposed about the structure and into which coolant is introduced in liquid form and permitted to boil; a radiator in which gaseous coolant is condensed to its liquid state; a vapor transfer conduit leading from the coolant jacket to the radiator for transferring coolant vapor from the coolant jacket to the radiator for condensation therein; means for returning liquid coolant from the radiator to the coolant jacket in a manner to maintain the structure immersed in a predetermined depth of liquid coolant; a device associated with the radiator for varying the rate of heat exchange between the radiator and a cooling medium which surrounds the radiator; a first parameter sensor for sensing a parameter which varies with the temperature of the coolant in the coolant jacket; a second parameter sensor for sensing a parameter which varies with the load on the engine; a circuit response to the first and second parameter sensors for operating the device in a manner which tends to maintain the temperature of the coolant in the coolant jacket at a level determined in response to the load on the engine; a housing in fluid communication with the coolant jacket; and a heat exchanger disposed in the housing and immersed in liquid coolant, the heat exchanger being arranged to have lubricant from engine lubricating system circulated therethrough.

Hayashi, Y.

1986-12-09

12

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described of cooling an internal combustion engine comprising the steps of: introducing liquid coolant into a cooling circuit which includes a coolant jacket formed about structure of the engine subject to high heat flux; permitting the coolant in the coolant jacket to boil and produce coolant vapor; transferring the coolant vapor to a radiator which defines a

Y. Hirano; T. Kubozuka

1986-01-01

13

AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT IV, MAINTAINING THE COOLING SYSTEM--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM. TOPICS ARE PURPOSE OF THE COOLING SYSTEM, CARE MAINTENANCE OF THE COOLING SYSTEM, COOLING SYSTEM COMPONENTS, AND TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL BRANCH PROGRAMED TRAINING…

Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

14

Combined engine cooling system and waste-heat driven heat pump  

Microsoft Academic Search

An improved engine cooling system is combined with a jet-driven heat pump system for utilizing otherwise wasted heat from an engine to produce refrigeration and heating of cabin, charge air and other media without requiring additional shaft power from the engine. In a closed cycle, vaporized refrigerant fluid is conveyed via jet ejectors from the engine cooling jacket at a

Lowi

1982-01-01

15

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes, in an internal combustion engine having a structure subject to high heat flux a cooling circuit for removing heat from the engine comprising: a coolant jacket formed about the structure, the coolant jacket being arranged to receive coolant in liquid form and discharge same in gaseous form; a radiator in which the gaseous coolant produced in the

Hirano

1986-01-01

16

Effect of Propeller on Engine Cooling System Drag and Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The pressure recovery of incoming cooling air and the drag associated with engine cooling of a typical general aviation twin-engine aircraft was Investigated experimentally. The semispan model was mounted vertically in the 40 x 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. The propeller was driven by an electric motor to provide thrust with low vibration levels for the cold-now configuration. It was found that the propeller slip-stream reduces the frontal air spillage around the blunt nacelle shape. Consequently, this slip-stream effect promotes flow reattachment at the rear section of the engine nacelle and improves inlet pressure recovery. These effects are most pronounced at high angles of attack; that is, climb condition. For the cruise condition those improvements were more moderate.

Katz, Joseph; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Barlow, Philip R.

1982-01-01

17

Research on the Compatibility of the Cooling Unit in an Automotive Exhaust-based Thermoelectric Generator and Engine Cooling System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of thermoelectric modules is a key factor affecting the conversion efficiency of an automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG). In the work discussed in this paper the compatibility of TEG cooling unit and engine cooling system was studied on the basis of the heat transfer characteristics of the TEG. A new engine-cooling system in which a TEG cooling unit was inserted was simulated at high power and high vehicle speed, and at high power and low vehicle speed, to obtain temperatures and flow rates of critical inlets and outlets. The results show that coolant temperature exceeds its boiling point at high power and low vehicle speed, so the new system cannot meet cooling requirements under these conditions. Measures for improvement to optimize the cooling system are proposed, and provide a basis for future research.

Deng, Y. D.; Liu, X.; Chen, S.; Xing, H. B.; Su, C. Q.

2014-06-01

18

Engineering and cost comparison of three different all-dry cooling systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of a detailed engineering and cost study of three different all-dry cooling systems to assess the potential for reducing the cost of all-dry cooling for steam electric power plants are described. The three types of cooling systems considered were: state-of-the-art (SOA) dry cooling system; with a conventional surface condenser, and water used to condense the steam is passed through

B. C. Fryer; D. J. Braun; D. W. Faletti; L. E. Wiles

1976-01-01

19

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an internal combustion engine having a structure subject to high heat flux a cooling system comprising: a coolant jacket disposed about the structure and into which coolant is introduced in liquid form, permitted to boil and discharged in gaseous form; a radiator in fluid communication with the coolant jacket which receives coolant vapor produced therein and condenses it to its liquid form. The radiator includes a small collection vessel disposed at the bottom thereof; a reservoir in which coolant is stored, the reservoir being fluidly interposed between the collection vessel of the radiator and the coolant jacket. The reservoir is sized so as to contain sufficient liquid to fill the radiator but insufficient to fill the radiator and the coolant jacket; means for returning condensate from the radiator to the coolant jacket in a manner which maintains the level of liquid coolant in the coolant jacket at a predetermined level; a first temperature sensor disposed in the radiator; a second temperature sensor disposed in the coolant jacket; a device associated with the radiator.

Hirano, Y.; Kubozuka, T.

1988-08-30

20

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes, in an internal combustion engine having a structure subject to high heat flux a cooling circuit for removing heat from the engine comprising: a coolant jacket formed about the structure, the coolant jacket being arranged to receive coolant in liquid form and discharge same in gaseous form; a radiator in which the gaseous coolant produced in the coolant jacket is condensed to its liquid form; a vapor transfer conduit leading from the coolant jacket to the radiator for transferring gaseous coolant from the coolant jacket to the radiator; a device associated with the radiator for varying the rate of heat exchange between the radiator and a cooling medium surrounding the radiator; a liquid coolant return conduit leading from the radiator to the coolant jacket for returning coolant condensed to its liquid state in the radiator to the coolant jacket; a reservoir the interior of which is maintained constantly at atmospheric pressure; and valve and conduit means for selectively interconnecting the reservoir and the cooling circuit, the valve and conduit means including a three-way valve disposed in the return conduit and a level control conduit leading from the three-way valve to the reservoir. The three-way valve has a first state wherein fluid communication between the radiator and the coolant jacket is interrupted and communication between the radiator and the reservoir established, and a second state wherein communication between the reservoir and the radiator is interrupted and communication between the radiator and the coolant jacket established.

Hirano, Y.

1986-12-23

21

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

SciTech Connect

An internal combustion engine is described having a structure subject to high heat flux; (a) a cooling circuit for removing heat from the engine comprising: a coolant jacket formed about the structure, the coolant jacket being arranged to receive coolant in liquid form and discharge same in gaseous form; a radiator in which the gaseous coolant produced in the coolant jacket is condensed to its liquid form; a vapor transfer conduit leading from the coolant jacket to the radiator for transferring gaseous coolant from the coolant jacket to the radiator; a device associated with the radiator for varying the rate of heat exchange between the radiator and a cooling medium surrounding the radiator; a liquid coolant return conduit leading from the radiator to the coolant jacket for returning coolant condensed to its liquid state in the radiator to the coolant jacket; (b) a reservoir the interior of which is maintained constantly at atmospheric pressure; (c) valve and conduit means for selectively interconnecting the reservoir and the cooling circuit, the valve and conduit means.

Hirano, Y.

1987-04-21

22

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an internal combustion engine having a structure subject to high heat flux; a cooling circuit for removing heat from the engine comprising: (a) a coolant jacket formed about the structure, the coolant jacket being arranged to receive coolant in liquid form and discharge same in gaseous form, (b) a radiator in which the gaseous coolant produced in the coolant jacket is condensed to its liquid form, and (c) a vapor transfer conduit leading from the coolant jacket to the radiator for transferring gaseous coolant from the coolant jacket to the radiator; a device associated with the radiator for varying the rate of heat exchange between the radiator and a cooling medium surrounding the radiator; a liquid coolant return conduit leading from the radiator to the coolant jacket for returning coolant condensed to its liquid state in the radiator to the coolant jacket; a reservoir the interior of which is maintained constantly at atmospheric pressure; and valve and conduit means for selectively interconnecting the reservoir and the cooling circuit.

Hirano, Y.; Hayashi, Y.

1987-03-03

23

46 CFR 119.420 - Engine cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...intake line of an engine cooling water system. (3...may be used to cool the engine. (b) A propulsion or auxiliary diesel engine may be air cooled or...air cooled jacket water radiator when: (1) Installed...ventilation for machinery cooling is available; or...

2011-10-01

24

46 CFR 119.420 - Engine cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...intake line of an engine cooling water system. (3...may be used to cool the engine. (b) A propulsion or auxiliary diesel engine may be air cooled or...air cooled jacket water radiator when: (1) Installed...ventilation for machinery cooling is available; or...

2013-10-01

25

46 CFR 119.420 - Engine cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...intake line of an engine cooling water system. (3...may be used to cool the engine. (b) A propulsion or auxiliary diesel engine may be air cooled or...air cooled jacket water radiator when: (1) Installed...ventilation for machinery cooling is available; or...

2010-10-01

26

46 CFR 119.420 - Engine cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...intake line of an engine cooling water system. (3...may be used to cool the engine. (b) A propulsion or auxiliary diesel engine may be air cooled or...air cooled jacket water radiator when: (1) Installed...ventilation for machinery cooling is available; or...

2012-10-01

27

Swirl nozzle for a cooling system in gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improved gas turbine engine of the type comprising an outer casing, axially spaced apart turbine wheels rotatably mounted within the casing and having radially outwardly extending blades mounted thereon. A stationary annular member includes air foil vanes positioned between each of the turbine wheels. The bladed turbine wheels and the stationary annular members define a hot gas path. An annular plenum is defined between the hot gas path and an outer wall of the stationary member and a diaphragm is depending from an inner wall of the stationary member. Air passageways through at least some of the air foil vanes for conducting cooling air from the annular plenum to the diaphragm.

Hook, R.B. Jr.; Montanye, R.D.

1987-05-19

28

Design, Fabrication, and Testing of an Auxiliary Cooling System for Jet Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the technical effort of the Active Cooling for Enhanced Performance (ACEP) program sponsored by NASA. It covers the design, fabrication, and integrated systems testing of a jet engine auxiliary cooling system, or turbocooler, that significantly extends the use of conventional jet fuel as a heat sink. The turbocooler is designed to provide subcooled cooling air to the engine exhaust nozzle system or engine hot section. The turbocooler consists of three primary components: (1) a high-temperature air cycle machine driven by engine compressor discharge air, (2) a fuel/ air heat exchanger that transfers energy from the hot air to the fuel and uses a coating to mitigate fuel deposits, and (3) a high-temperature fuel injection system. The details of the turbocooler component designs and results of the integrated systems testing are documented. Industry Version-Data and information deemed subject to Limited Rights restrictions are omitted from this document.

Leamy, Kevin; Griffiths, Jim; Andersen, Paul; Joco, Fidel; Laski, Mark; Balser, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

29

30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of...Requirements § 36.48 Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine,...

2010-07-01

30

30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.  

...2014-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of...Requirements § 36.48 Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine,...

2014-07-01

31

Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine  

SciTech Connect

Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

2005-04-01

32

Cooling system for automotive engine or the like  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of a coolant an arrangement, the steps of: boiling a liquid coolant in a coolant jacket; condensing the vapor produced in the boiling step, in a radiator; maintaining the radiator essentially empty of liquid coolant when the engine is warmed-up and running so as to maximize the surface area available for coolant vapor to release its latent heat of evaporation; storing coolant in a reservoir in fluid communication with the radiator; and reducing the surface area of the radiator via which the vapor produced in the coolant jacket can release its latent heat of evaporation by using a pressure differential between the reservoir and the radiator. This develops when the pressure in the radiator falls a predetermined amount below that prevailing in the reservoir to induct additional coolant from the reservoir into the radiator. An internal combustion engine is described having a combustion chamber: a radiator; a coolant jacket in which liquid coolant is boiled and the vapor produced conveyed to the radiator for condensation therein; a reservoir containing liquid coolant; and a first valve fluidly interposed between the radiator and the reservoir which opens in response to a pressure developing in the radiator which is a predetermined amount lower than that prevailing in the reservoir. The first valve is a check valve which permits flow of coolant from the reservoir to the radiator, but which prevents flow of coolant from the radiator to the reservoir.

Hayashi, Y.

1986-01-06

33

AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENACE 1. UNIT XV, I--MAINTAINING THE COOLING SYSTEM, CUMMINS DIESEL ENGINE, I--UNIT INSTALLATION--TRANSMISSION.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FUNCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM AND THE PROCEDURES FOR TRANSMISSION INSTALLATION. TOPICS ARE (1) IMPORTANCE OF THE COOLING SYSTEM, (2) COOLING SYSTEM COMPONENTS, (3) EVALUATING COOLING SYSTEM FAILURES, (4) CARING FOR THE COOLING SYSTEM,…

Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

34

Re-Engineering Control Systems using Automatic Generation Tools and Process Simulation: the LHC Water Cooling Case  

E-print Network

This paper presents the approach used at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) to perform the re-engineering of the control systems dedicated to the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) water cooling systems.

Booth, W; Bradu, B; Gomez Palacin, L; Quilichini, M; Willeman, D

2014-01-01

35

Gas turbine cooling system  

DOEpatents

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01

36

46 CFR 119.425 - Engine exhaust cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...exhaust cooling system. (c) Engine exhaust cooling systems built in accordance with the requirements of American Boat and Yacht Council (ABCY) P-1, “Installation of Exhaust Systems for Propulsion and Auxiliary Engines,” will be considered...

2011-10-01

37

46 CFR 119.425 - Engine exhaust cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...exhaust cooling system. (c) Engine exhaust cooling systems built in accordance with the requirements of American Boat and Yacht Council (ABCY) P-1, “Installation of Exhaust Systems for Propulsion and Auxiliary Engines,” will be considered...

2012-10-01

38

46 CFR 119.425 - Engine exhaust cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...exhaust cooling system. (c) Engine exhaust cooling systems built in accordance with the requirements of American Boat and Yacht Council (ABCY) P-1, “Installation of Exhaust Systems for Propulsion and Auxiliary Engines,” will be considered...

2013-10-01

39

46 CFR 119.425 - Engine exhaust cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...exhaust cooling system. (c) Engine exhaust cooling systems built in accordance with the requirements of American Boat and Yacht Council (ABCY) P-1, “Installation of Exhaust Systems for Propulsion and Auxiliary Engines,” will be considered...

2010-10-01

40

Cooling arrangement for water-cooled internal combustion engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cooling arrangement is described for a water-cooled internal combustion engine. The cooling arrangement comprises a radiator, a water jacket of the internal combustion engine, a cooling water passage for circulating the cooling between the radiator and the water jacket, and a cooling water temperature detecting means for outputting signal related to the cooling water temperature detecting means for outputting

T. Taguchi; M. Nakano; N. Hiramoto; H. Tominaga

1986-01-01

41

The heat transfer and the soot deposition characteristics in diesel engine exhaust gas recirculation system cooling devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooling devices are used in EGR systems to significantly reduce NOx emissions from diesel engines. However, the thermal and hydraulic performances of these devices change over time during operation due to the deposition of soot from the diesel exhaust gas in these devices. The objective of this work was to investigate in detail the heat transfer

Basel Ismail A Ismail

2004-01-01

42

System Engineering Program Applicability for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)  

SciTech Connect

This white paper identifies where the technical management and systems engineering processes and activities to be used in establishing the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC) should be addressed and presents specific considerations for these activities under each CTC alternative

Jeffrey Bryan

2009-06-01

43

Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

Silverstein, Calvin C.

1986-01-01

44

46 CFR 182.420 - Engine cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...a propulsion gasoline engine may be air cooled when...An auxiliary gasoline engine may be air cooled when...propulsion or auxiliary diesel engine may be air cooled or...air cooled jacket water radiator when: (1) Installed...ventilation for machinery cooling is available;...

2013-10-01

45

46 CFR 182.420 - Engine cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...a propulsion gasoline engine may be air cooled when...An auxiliary gasoline engine may be air cooled when...propulsion or auxiliary diesel engine may be air cooled or...air cooled jacket water radiator when: (1) Installed...ventilation for machinery cooling is available;...

2010-10-01

46

46 CFR 182.420 - Engine cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...a propulsion gasoline engine may be air cooled when...An auxiliary gasoline engine may be air cooled when...propulsion or auxiliary diesel engine may be air cooled or...air cooled jacket water radiator when: (1) Installed...ventilation for machinery cooling is available;...

2012-10-01

47

46 CFR 182.420 - Engine cooling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...a propulsion gasoline engine may be air cooled when...An auxiliary gasoline engine may be air cooled when...propulsion or auxiliary diesel engine may be air cooled or...air cooled jacket water radiator when: (1) Installed...ventilation for machinery cooling is available;...

2011-10-01

48

Transpiration cooled throat for hydrocarbon rocket engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective for the Transpiration Cooled Throat for Hydrocarbon Rocket Engines Program was to characterize the use of hydrocarbon fuels as transpiration coolants for rocket nozzle throats. The hydrocarbon fuels investigated in this program were RP-1 and methane. To adequately characterize the above transpiration coolants, a program was planned which would (1) predict engine system performance and life enhancements due to transpiration cooling of the throat region using analytical models, anchored with available data; (2) a versatile transpiration cooled subscale rocket thrust chamber was designed and fabricated; (3) the subscale thrust chamber was tested over a limited range of conditions, e.g., coolant type, chamber pressure, transpiration cooled length, and coolant flow rate; and (4) detailed data analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between the key performance and life enhancement variables.

May, Lee R.; Burkhardt, Wendel M.

1991-01-01

49

Transpiration And Regenerative Cooling Of Rocket Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Transpiration cooling extends limits of performance. Addition of transpiration cooling to regeneratively-cooled rocket-engine combustion chamber proposed. Modification improves performance of engine by allowing use of higher chamber pressure. Throat section of combustion-chamber wall cooled by transpiration, while chamber and nozzle sections cooled by fluid flowing in closed channels. Concept applicable to advanced, high-performance terrestrial engines or some kinds of industrial combustion chambers. With proper design, cooling scheme makes possible to achieve higher chamber pressure and higher overall performance in smaller engine.

Obrien, Charles J.

1989-01-01

50

Simulation of supercritical flows in rocket-motor engines: application to cooling channel and injection system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To address physical modeling of supercritical multicomponent fluid flows, ideal-gas law must be changed to real-gas equation of state (EoS), thermodynamic and transport properties have to incorporate dense fluid corrections, and turbulence modeling has to be reconsidered compared to classical approaches. Real-gas thermodynamic is presently investigated with validation by NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) data. Two major issues of Liquid Rocket Engines (LRE) are also presented. The first one is the supercritical fluid flow inside small cooling channels. In a context of LRE, a strong heat flux coming from the combustion chamber (locally ? ? 80 MW/m2) may lead to very steep density gradients close to the wall. These gradients have to be thermodynamically and numerically captured to properly reproduce in the simulation the mechanism of heat transfer from the wall to the fluid. This is done with a shock-capturing weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) numerical discretization scheme. The second issue is a supercritical fluid injection following experimental conditions [1] in which a trans- or supercritical nitrogen is injected into warm nitrogen. The two-dimensional results show vortex structures with high fluid density detaching from the main jet and persisting in the low-speed region with low fluid density.

Ribert, G.; Taieb, D.; Petit, X.; Lartigue, G.; Domingo, P.

2013-03-01

51

Mining Gold from your Cooling Water System  

E-print Network

Mining Gold from your Cooling Water System Tino Mendez Director Energy Engineering The Benham Companies, LLC Oklahoma City, Oklahoma ABSTRACT You may be missing on a fabulous opportunity to save on operating costs in your cooling water...Mining Gold from your Cooling Water System Tino Mendez Director Energy Engineering The Benham Companies, LLC Oklahoma City, Oklahoma ABSTRACT You may be missing on a fabulous opportunity to save on operating costs in your cooling water...

Mendez, T.

52

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-print Network

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower...

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01

53

Automotive non-pressure cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a non-pressure automotive engine cooling system comprising: a radiator containing a liquid coolant, coupling hoses that intercouple the radiator to the engine, pump means associated with the engine for circulating coolant through the engine and radiator. The pump means has a suction side, a radiator cap sealed on the radiator, an expansion tank disposed in the engine

1987-01-01

54

Cooling Water Systems Module  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Center for the Advancement of Process Technology presents this free sample module on cooling water systems in the process industry. The material includes 21 slides and will help learners understand related terms, the purpose of the basic equipment involved in cooling water systems and the safety, health and environmental concerns involved with these systems.

2013-01-04

55

40 CFR 1065.122 - Engine cooling and lubrication.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...1065.127 for more information related to exhaust gas recirculation cooling. (4) Measure temperatures at the manufacturer-specified...Forced cooldown. You may install a forced cooldown system for an engine and an exhaust aftertreatment device...

2011-07-01

56

40 CFR 1065.122 - Engine cooling and lubrication.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...1065.127 for more information related to exhaust gas recirculation cooling. (4) Measure temperatures at the manufacturer-specified...Forced cooldown. You may install a forced cooldown system for an engine and an exhaust aftertreatment device...

2013-07-01

57

40 CFR 1065.122 - Engine cooling and lubrication.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...1065.127 for more information related to exhaust gas recirculation cooling. (4) Measure temperatures at the manufacturer-specified...Forced cooldown. You may install a forced cooldown system for an engine and an exhaust aftertreatment device...

2012-07-01

58

Passive containment cooling system  

DOEpatents

A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Robinson Township, Allegheny County, PA); Stewart, William A. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1991-01-01

59

Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals i SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS January 2001;Systems Engineering Fundamentals Introduction ii #12;Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals iii ............................................................................................................................................. iv PART 1. INTRODUCTION Chapter 1. Introduction to Systems Engineering Management

Rhoads, James

60

Personal Cooling System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cool Head, a personal cooling system for use in heat stress occupations, is a spinoff of a channeled cooling garment for space wear. It is portable and includes a heat exchanger, control display unit, liquid reservoir and temperature control unit. The user can eliminate 40 to 60 percent of his body's heat storage and lower heart rate by 50 to 80 beats a minute. The system is used by the Army, Navy, crop dusting pilots, heavy equipment operators and auto racing drivers and is marketed by Life Enhancement Technologies, LLC. Further applications are under consideration.

1986-01-01

61

Superconductor rotor cooling system  

DOEpatents

A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed (Framingham, MA); Schwall, Robert E. (Northborough, MA); Driscoll, David I. (South Euclid, OH); Shoykhet, Boris A. (Beachwood, OH)

2002-01-01

62

Engineered design of SSC cooling ponds  

SciTech Connect

The cooling requirements of the SSC are significant and adequate cooling water systems to meet these requirements are critical to the project`s successful operation. The use of adequately designed cooling ponds will provide reliable cooling for operation while also meeting environmental goals of the project to maintain streamflow and flood peaks to preconstruction levels as well as other streamflow and water quality requirements of the Texas Water Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Bear, J.B.

1993-05-01

63

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Design guidelines for solar heating/cooling/power generation systems  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, design guidelines and analytical tools for the preliminary technical/economic evaluation of solar heating/cooling/power generation systems. In particular, it provides the theoretical framework, data bases and software tools for: determining the preliminary economic feasibility of solar-powered configurations compared with grid-supplied electric power and/or competing fossil fuels; selecting the optimum system configuration with respect to solar collector area and ''solar-side'' thermal storage capacity. Implementation of the methodology described in this report can be facilitated by the use of the accompanying IBM PC-compatible computer program ''SOLERAS''. This report represents the final task of the multi-year SOLERAS Program -- jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology -- which involved the development and field-testing of a solar-powered cooling system in Phoenix, AZ. 11 refs., 37 figs.

Not Available

1987-01-01

64

Waveguide cooling system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (inventors)

1981-01-01

65

Process Cooling Systems  

E-print Network

the information and basic techniques needed by the plant operating engineer for =npleting an eca10mic evaluation of a cooling tower efficiency irrprovement rroclification or investment. BASIC DEFINITIO~ FC - First Cost - 'll1is is the initial oost of any... to be in use. oc Depreciation Olarge - OC is the annual depreciation of the investJrent. For the thermal upgrade exarrple, straight line depreciation would be FC/EL. TYPES OF ECCN:MIC MEASURES funey saved today is rrore valuable than that saved at a...

McCann, C. J.

1983-01-01

66

Ground Water Cooling System  

E-print Network

has a total shop area of 128,000 square feet and the majority of the machine tools are equipped with computerized numerical controls. The cooling system was designed around five (5) floor mounted, 50,000 CFM, air handling units which had been...

Greaves, K.; Chave, G. H.

1984-01-01

67

NOISE RADIATION FROM ENGINE COOLING FANS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The semi-empirical formulation previously derived by the authors (Journal of Sound and Vibration200,379–399) for predicting noise spectra of axial flow fans running in a free field is extended to engine cooling fans installed in full-size vehicles. Because of the presence of shroud, upstream radiator\\/condenser, and downstream engine block, the ingested and discharged flow fields around the fan blades are completely

S. F. Wu; S. Su; H. Shah

1998-01-01

68

Cooling structure for an engine in a straddled type vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cooling structure is described for an engine in a dune buggy type vehicle provided with steerable left and right front wheels and an engine positioned at the center in a slanted direction to a vehicle body such as a four-wheel buggy car, the cooling structure comprising: a cooling fan disposed in front of the engine; an oil cooler engine

F. Inomata; T. Iwadate

1987-01-01

69

Cooling Duct Analysis for Transpiration/Film Cooled Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a low cost space transportation system requires that the propulsion system be reusable, have long life, with good performance and use low cost propellants. Improved performance can be achieved by operating the engine at higher pressure and temperature levels than previous designs. Increasing the chamber pressure and temperature, however, will increase wall heating rates. This necessitates the need for active cooling methods such as film cooling or transpiration cooling. But active cooling can reduce the net thrust of the engine and add considerably to the design complexity. Recently, a metal drawing process has been patented where it is possible to fabricate plates with very small holes with high uniformity with a closely specified porosity. Such a metal plate could be used for an inexpensive transpiration/film cooled liner to meet the demands of advanced reusable rocket engines, if coolant mass flow rates could be controlled to satisfy wall cooling requirements and performance. The present study investigates the possibility of controlling the coolant mass flow rate through the porous material by simple non-active fluid dynamic means. The coolant will be supplied to the porous material by series of constant geometry slots machined on the exterior of the engine.

Micklow, Gerald J.

1996-01-01

70

Correction of Temperatures of Air-Cooled Engine Cylinders for Variation in Engine and Cooling Conditions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Factors are obtained from semiempirical equations for correcting engine-cylinder temperatures for variation in important engine and cooling conditions. The variation of engine temperatures with atmospheric temperature is treated in detail, and correction factors are obtained for various flight and test conditions, such as climb at constant indicated air speed, level flight, ground running, take-off, constant speed of cooling air, and constant mass flow of cooling air. Seven conventional air-cooled engine cylinders enclosed in jackets and cooled by a blower were tested to determine the effect of cooling-air temperature and carburetor-air temperature on cylinder temperatures. The cooling air temperature was varied from approximately 80 degrees F. to 230 degrees F. and the carburetor-air temperature from approximately 40 degrees F. to 160 degrees F. Tests were made over a large range of engine speeds, brake mean effective pressures, and pressure drops across the cylinder. The correction factors obtained experimentally are compared with those obtained from the semiempirical equations and a fair agreement is noted.

Schey, Oscar W; Pinkel, Benjamin; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

1939-01-01

71

Research on hypersonic aircraft using pre-cooled turbojet engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Systems analysis of a Mach 5 class hypersonic aircraft is performed. The aircraft can fly across the Pacific Ocean in 2 h. A multidisciplinary optimization program for aerodynamics, structure, propulsion, and trajectory is used in the analysis. The result of each element model is improved using higher accuracy analysis tools. The aerodynamic performance of the hypersonic aircraft is examined through hypersonic wind tunnel tests. A thermal management system based on the data of the wind tunnel tests is proposed. A pre-cooled turbojet engine is adopted as the propulsion system for the hypersonic aircraft. The engine can be operated continuously from take-off to Mach 5. This engine uses a pre-cooling cycle using cryogenic liquid hydrogen. The high temperature inlet air of hypersonic flight would be cooled by the same liquid hydrogen used as fuel. The engine is tested under sea level static conditions. The engine is installed on a flight test vehicle. Both liquid hydrogen fuel and gaseous hydrogen fuel are supplied to the engine from a tank and cylinders installed within the vehicle. The designed operation of major components of the engine is confirmed. A large amount of liquid hydrogen is supplied to the pre-cooler in order to make its performance sufficient for Mach 5 flight. Thus, fuel rich combustion is adopted at the afterburner. The experiments are carried out under the conditions that the engine is mounted upon an experimental airframe with both set up either horizontally or vertically. As a result, the operating procedure of the pre-cooled turbojet engine is demonstrated.

Taguchi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Kojima, Takayuki; Ueno, Atsushi; Imamura, Shunsuke; Hongoh, Motoyuki; Harada, Kenya

2012-04-01

72

The Heat Transfer and the Soot Deposition Characteristics in Diesel Engine Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Cooling Devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooiing devices are used in EGR systems to significantly reduce NOx emissions from diesel engines. However, the thermal and hydraulic performances of these devices change over time during operation due to the deposition of soot from the diesel exhaust gas in these devices. The objective of this work was to investigate in detail the heat transfer

Basel Ismail A. Ismail

2004-01-01

73

District cooling engineering and design program  

SciTech Connect

The operation and performance of a system using large commercial heat pumps to heat and cool two public buildings are reported. One of the buildings houses local government offices and the other the jail. The system uses the underground salt water at the site as the energy exchange medium. Included are: the operations summary, system performance, operating procedures, and operating modes. (MHR)

Not Available

1992-09-01

74

Industrial and Systems engineering  

E-print Network

Industrial and Systems engineering COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofIndustrialandSystemsEngineering EDGE Engineering Entrepreneur Certificate Program is a great addition to an industrial and systems to expert clinical recommendations. engineering.wayne.edu/isefaculty Industrial and systems engineering

Berdichevsky, Victor

75

Stirling engines for gas fired micro-cogen and cooling  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and performance of free-piston Stirling engine-alternators particularly suited for use as natural gas fired micro-cogen and cooling devices. Stirling based cogen systems offer significant potential advantages over internal combustion engines in efficiency, to maintain higher efficiencies at lower power levels than than combustion engines significantly expands the potential for micro-cogen. System cost reduction and electric prices higher than the U.S. national average will have a far greater effect on commercial success than any further increase in Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling based cogen systems are competitive. Machines of this design are being considered for production in the near future as gas-fired units for combined heat and power in sufficiently large quantities to assure competitive prices for the final unit.

Lane, N.W.; Beale, W.T. [Sunpower, Inc., Athens, OH (United States)

1996-12-31

76

Integrated exhaust gas recirculation and charge cooling system  

DOEpatents

An intake system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger configured to deliver compressed intake charge, comprising exhaust gas from the exhaust system and ambient air, through an intake charge conduit and to cylinders of the internal combustion engine. An intake charge cooler is in fluid communication with the intake charge conduit. A cooling system, independent of the cooling system for the internal combustion engine, is in fluid communication with the intake charge cooler through a cooling system conduit. A coolant pump delivers a low temperature cooling medium from the cooling system to and through the intake charge cooler for the transfer of heat from the compressed intake charge thereto. A low temperature cooler receives the heated cooling medium through the cooling system conduit for the transfer or heat therefrom.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2013-12-10

77

Gas turbine vane cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cooling system for stationary vanes in the turbine section of a gas turbine is described. Combustors for the turbine are disposed in a chamber that receives compressed air from a compressor section. This compressed air forms both combustion air and cooling air. The cooling air portion of the compressed air is recirculated through the vanes by bleeding it from

A. G. Chen; G. G. McQuiggan

1995-01-01

78

Turbine engine component with cooling passages  

DOEpatents

A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-01-17

79

Thermoeconomic assessment of a multi-engine, multi-heat-pump CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power generation) system – A case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Design and operation of complex systems for combined cooling, heating and power generation (CCHP) are always a matter of matching performance and demand characteristics of a thermal system set to supply electrical, cooling and heating loads, according to specific usage demands. Equipment selection and operation require the characterization of power, heating and cooling load demands, and their time variation during

P. Roque Díaz; Y. R. Benito; J. A. R. Parise

2010-01-01

80

Heat-transfer processes in air-cooled engine cylinders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From a consideration of heat-transfer theory, semi-empirical expressions are set up for the transfer of heat from the combustion gases to the cylinder of an air-cooled engine and from the cylinder to the cooling air. Simple equations for the average head and barrel temperatures as functions of the important engine and cooling variables are obtained from these expressions. The expressions involve a few empirical constants, which may be readily determined from engine tests. Numerical values for these constants were obtained from single-cylinder engine tests for cylinders of the Pratt & Whitney 1535 and 1340-h engines. The equations provide a means of calculating the effect of the various engine and cooling variables on the cylinder temperatures and also of correlating the results of engine cooling tests. An example is given of the application of the equations to the correlation of cooling-test data obtained in flight.

Pinkel, Benjamin

1938-01-01

81

The problem of cooling an air-cooled cylinder on an aircraft engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis of the cooling problem has been to show by what means the cooling of an air-cooled aircraft engine may be improved. Each means of improving cooling is analyzed on the basis of effectiveness in cooling with respect to power for cooling. The altitude problem is analyzed for both supercharged and unsupercharged engines. The case of ground cooling is also discussed. The heat-transfer process from the hot gases to the cylinder wall is discussed on the basis of the fundamentals of heat transfer and thermodynamics. Adiabatic air-temperature rise at a stagnation point in compressible flow is shown to depend only on the velocity of flow.

Brevoort, M J; Joyner, U T

1941-01-01

82

Cooling fan shroud mounted on an engine vehicle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an easily removable cooling fan shroud adapted to be mounted between an engine and a radiator of an engine vehicle, comprising a rigid engine mounting, a rigid radiator mounting, and a flexible member formed as a circular cylindrical bellows normally extending between and connecting the engine mounting and the radiator mounting; wherein the bellows is spaced and separated from free ends of blades of a cooling fan, and the bellows extends from the radiator mounting to substantially a plane of rotation of the cooling fan and the bellows is axially compressible for removal of the cooling fan shroud through a space between the radiator and the cooling fan, lower portions of the engine mounting and the radiator mounting being engageable by slidably releasable U-shaped hook means with supports projecting from the engine and the radiator, upper portions of the engine mounting and the radiator being secureable to the engine and the radiator by means of bolts.

Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nagata, H.

1988-10-04

83

Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven split-system cooling equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station  

SciTech Connect

DOE`s Federal Energy Management Program supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenditures within the federal sector; one such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP)(formerly the Test Bed Demonstration program), seeks to evaluate new energy saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the federal government. This report describes the field evaluation conducted to examine the performance of a 15-ton natural-gas-engine- driven, split-system, air-conditioning unit. The unit was installed at a multiple-use building at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, a regular and reserve training facility north of Philadelphia, and its performance was monitored under the NTDP.

Armstrong, P.R.; Schmelzer, J.R.

1997-01-01

84

Noise Radiation from Engine Cooling Fans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The semi-empirical formulation previously derived by the authors (Journal of Sound and Vibration200,379-399) for predicting noise spectra of axial flow fans running in a free field is extended to engine cooling fans installed in full-size vehicles. Because of the presence of shroud, upstream radiator/condenser, and downstream engine block, the ingested and discharged flow fields around the fan blades are completely different from those in a free field. Accordingly, the noise generation mechanisms become much more difficult to analyze and model. The shroud may significantly increase the unsteady fluctuating forces exerted on the fan blades, thus greatly enhancing the levels of the discrete sounds centred at the blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The upstream radiator/condenser set may induce a significant amount of intake turbulence, thus raising the levels of the broadband sounds. The downstream engine block may force the airflow to recirculate to the front and more importantly, raise the static pressure drop across the fan assembly, which has a direct impact on the resulting flow rate. Obviously, an exact description of the effects of these factors on the resulting noise spectra is not possible. In this paper it is shown that these factors can be approximated by using certain shapes and functions. The computer model thus developed is used to predict the noise spectra from different fan assemblies under various working conditions, and the results thus obtained are compared with the measured data. Also, this model is used to calculate the overall sound pressure levels from dimensionally similar fans running under different working conditions, and the results are compared with those predicted by the fan laws currently in use by engineers in the automotive industry.

Wu, S. F.; Su, S.; Shah, H.

1998-09-01

85

Advanced fabrication techniques for cooled engine structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved design for regeneratively cooled engine structures was identified. This design uses photochemically machined (PCM) coolant passages. It permits the braze joint to be placed in a relatively cool area, remote from the critical hot face sheet. The geometry of the passages at the face sheet also minimizes stress concentration and, therefore, enhances the low cycle fatigue performance. The two most promising alloys identified for this application are Inconel 617 and Nickel 201. Inconel 617 was selected because it has excellent creep rupture properties, while Nickel 201 was selected because of its predicted good performance under low cycle fatigue loading. The fabrication of the PCM coolant passages in both Inconel 617 and Nickel 201 was successfully developed. During fabrication of Inconel 617, undesirable characteristics were observed in the braze joints. A development program to resolve this condition was undertaken and led to definition of an isothermal solidification process for joining Inconel 617 panels. This process produced joints which approach parent metal strength and homogeneity.

Buchmann, O. A.

1978-01-01

86

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOEpatents

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01

87

Cooling fan shroud mounted on an engine vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes an easily removable cooling fan shroud adapted to be mounted between an engine and a radiator of an engine vehicle, comprising a rigid engine mounting, a rigid radiator mounting, and a flexible member formed as a circular cylindrical bellows normally extending between and connecting the engine mounting and the radiator mounting; wherein the bellows is spaced and

Y. Yamaguchi; T. Yamaguchi; H. Nagata

1988-01-01

88

Gas turbine vane cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A cooling system for stationary vanes in the turbine section of a gas turbine is described. Combustors for the turbine are disposed in a chamber that receives compressed air from a compressor section. This compressed air forms both combustion air and cooling air. The cooling air portion of the compressed air is recirculated through the vanes by bleeding it from the chamber and further pressurizing it, after which it flows through a cooling air flow path in the vanes, thereby resulting in the cooling of the vanes and the heating of the air. The heated air is then returned to the chamber where it mixes with the incoming combustion air, thereby giving up a portion of the heat transferred from the vane to the combustion air. As a result, the temperature of the combustion air is increased, thereby increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of the gas turbine. The cooling scheme provides cooling to the vane inner and outer shrouds, as well as the airfoil, by means of circumferentially extending holes in the shrouds that connect with a cooling air cavity in the airfoil. 5 figs.

Chen, A.G.; McQuiggan, G.G.

1995-03-07

89

Non-intrusive cooling system  

DOEpatents

A readily replaceable heat exchange cooling jacket for applying fluid to a system conduit pipe. The cooling jacket comprises at least two members, separable into upper and lower portions. A chamber is formed between the conduit pipe and cooling jacket once the members are positioned about the pipe. The upper portion includes a fluid spray means positioned above the pipe and the bottom portion includes a fluid removal means. The heat exchange cooling jacket is adaptable with a drain tank, a heat exchanger, a pump and other standard equipment to provide a system for removing heat from a pipe. A method to remove heat from a pipe, includes the steps of enclosing a portion of the pipe with a jacket to form a chamber between an outside surface of the pipe and the cooling jacket; spraying cooling fluid at low pressure from an upper portion of the cooling jacket, allowing the fluid to flow downwardly by gravity along the surface of the pipe toward a bottom portion of the chamber; and removing the fluid at the bottom portion of the chamber.

Morrison, Edward F. (Burnt Hills, NY); Bergman, John W. (Barrington, NH)

2001-05-22

90

Cooling Tests of an Airplane Equipped with an NACA Cowling and a Wing-duct Cooling System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cooling tests were made of a Northrop A-17A attack airplane successively equipped with a conventional.NACA cowling and with a wing-duct cooling system. The method of cooling the engine by admitting air from the propeller slipstream into wing ducts, passing it first through the accessory compartment and then over the engine from rear to front, appeared to offer possibilities for improved engine cooling, increased cooling of the accessories, and better fairing of the power-plant installation. The results showed that ground cooling for the wing duct system without cowl flap was better than for the NACA cowling with flap; ground cooling was appreciably improved by installing a cowl flap. Satisfactory temperatures were maintained in both climb and high-speed flight, but, with the use of conventional baffles, a greater quantity of cooling air appeared to be required for the wing duct system.

Turner, L I , Jr; Bierman, David; Boothy, W B

1941-01-01

91

GeoEngineering Assessment & Research The climate cooling potential of  

E-print Network

GeoEngineering Assessment & Research The climate cooling potential of different geoengineering options Tim Lenton & Naomi Vaughan GeoEngineering Assessment & Research (GEAR) initiative School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK www.gear.uea.ac.uk #12;GeoEngineering Assessment

Polz, Martin

92

Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

1985-01-01

93

Solar-powered cooling system  

DOEpatents

A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system uses nanostructural materials made of high specific surface area adsorption aerogel as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material. A circulation system circulates refrigerant from the nanostructural material to a cooling unit.

Farmer, Joseph C

2013-12-24

94

THERMOFLUID OPTIMIZATION OF A HEATED HELICOPTER ENGINE COOLING BAY SURFACE  

E-print Network

1 THERMOFLUID OPTIMIZATION OF A HEATED HELICOPTER ENGINE COOLING BAY SURFACE D. Wang 1 , G. F Gillson Street Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3T 2N2 ABSTRACT In this paper, a global optimization technique effectiveness of an aircraft de-icing strategy by re-designing the cooling bay surface shape. The design

Wang, Gaofeng Gary

95

Lamination cooling system formation method  

DOEpatents

An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

Rippel, Wally E [Altadena, CA; Kobayashi, Daryl M [Monrovia, CA

2009-05-12

96

Serial cooling of a combustor for a gas turbine engine  

DOEpatents

A combustor for a gas turbine engine uses compressed air to cool a combustor liner and uses at least a portion of the same compressed air for combustion air. A flow diverting mechanism regulates compressed air flow entering a combustion air plenum feeding combustion air to a plurality of fuel nozzles. The flow diverting mechanism adjusts combustion air according to engine loading.

Abreu, Mario E. (Poway, CA); Kielczyk, Janusz J. (Escondido, CA)

2001-01-01

97

Congeneration system with a Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a cogeneration system for producing process heat for useful purposes and electric energy. It comprises an electric generator; a Stirling cycle engine having an output shaft operatively coupled to the generator for driving the generator, the engine including at least one internal fuel combustor; means for circulating a cooling liquid about the generator and engine to extract heat therefrom; an exhaust system coupled with the engine for exhausting combustion gases from the engine, the exhaust system including a condensing heat exchanger for cooling the combustion gases below the condensing, temperature of the water vapor in the exhaust gases; means for directing the cooling liquid around the condensing heat exchanger to extract heat therefrom and heat the liquid; and means for directing the cooling liquid for useful purposes.

Meijer, R.J.; Meijer, E.J.; Godett, T.M.

1991-12-24

98

Cooled highly twisted airfoil for a gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a cooled highly twisted airfoil for use in a gas turbine engine. The airfoil has a first cooling air cavity adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil, and a second cooling air cavity, separated from the first cavity by a wall. The second cavity provides cooling air to the first cavity by means of cooling holes provided in the wall. The improvement is characterized by: the wall comprising an integrally formed, continuous warped wall, defined as a surface of revolution about an axis, the axis determined such that the axis intersects the plane of a section close to a desired centerline of a series of impingement holes aligned in opposition to the leading edge, whereby cooling air is directed relatively precisely to the leading edge of the highly twisted airfoil through the impingement holes.

Kildea, R.J.

1988-04-19

99

Evaluation of existing cooling systems for reducing cooling power consumption  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work was designed to estimate the cooling load power consumption during the summer in the hot and humid areas of Iran. The actual electrical energy consumption for cooling systems of some typical buildings with various applications (3 residential home buildings, 2 industrial plant buildings, a trade center with 38 shops, 3 public sectors and a city hospital) in a

M. S. Hatamipour; H. Mahiyar; M. Taheri

2007-01-01

100

Systems engineering management plans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each

Tamara S

2009-01-01

101

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOEpatents

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed (Framingham, MA)

1998-01-01

102

46 CFR 153.432 - Cooling systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

(a) Each cargo cooling system must have an equivalent standby unit that is installed and that can be placed in operation immediately after failure of the primary cooling system. (b) Each tankship that has a cargo tank with a required cooling system must have a manual that...

2010-10-01

103

Surface cooling of scramjet engine inlets using heat pipe, transpiration, and film cooling  

SciTech Connect

This article reports the results of applying a finite-difference-based computational technique to the problem of predicting the transient thermal behavior of a scramjet engine inlet exposed to a typical hypersonic flight aerodynamic surface heating environment, including type IV shock interference heating. The leading-edge cooling model utilized incorporates liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling. Results include transient structural temperature distributions, aerodynamic heat inputs, and surface coolant distributions. It seems that these cooling techniques may be used to hold maximum skin temperatures to near acceptable values during the severe aerodynamic and type IV shock interference heating effects expected on the leading edge of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle scramjet engine. 15 refs.

Modlin, J.M.; Colwell, G.T. (U.S. Army, Strategic Defense Command, Huntsville, AL (United States) Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (United States))

1992-09-01

104

Keep it Cool âan Engineering Design Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help fourth grade students apply the concepts of the flow of heat from a hot object to a cold object and that heat flow may cause objects to change temperature. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

Herold, Leeanne

2012-09-13

105

An experimental investigation of the aerodynamics and cooling of a horizontally-opposed air-cooled aircraft engine installation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flight-test based research program was performed to investigate the aerodynamics and cooling of a horizontally-opposed engine installation. Specific areas investigated were the internal aerodynamics and cooling mechanics of the installation, inlet aerodynamics, and exit aerodynamics. The applicable theory and current state of the art are discussed for each area. Flight-test and ground-test techniques for the development of the cooling installation and the solution of cooling problems are presented. The results show that much of the internal aerodynamics and cooling technology developed for radial engines are applicable to horizontally opposed engines. Correlation is established between engine manufacturer's cooling design data and flight measurements of the particular installation. Also, a flight-test method for the development of cooling requirements in terms of easily measurable parameters is presented. The impact of inlet and exit design on cooling and cooling drag is shown to be of major significance.

Miley, S. J.; Cross, E. J., Jr.; Owens, J. K.; Lawrence, D. L.

1981-01-01

106

Program (systems) engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Program Systems Engineering applies the principles of Systems Engineering at the program level. Space programs are composed of interrelated elements which can include collections of projects, advanced technologies, information systems, etc. Some program elements are outside traditional engineering's physical systems, such as education and public outreach, public relations, resource flow, and interactions within the political environments.

Baroff, Lynn E.; Easter, Robert W.; Pomphrey, Richard B.

2004-01-01

107

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-print Network

simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak...

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01

108

Municipal District Heating and Cooling Co-generation System Feasibility Research  

E-print Network

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol.VI-7-4 Municipal District Heating and Cooling Co-generation System Feasibility Research Wencheng Zhang Wenji Guan Yungang Pan Gao Ding... Xiaochun Song Senior Engineer Senior Engineer Senior Engineer Senior Engineer Senior Engineer China Architecture design & research Group Beijing, China mep-h@263.net Yali Zhang Ying Li Hang Wei Yuping He Engineer Engineer Engineer Senior...

Zhang, W.; Guan, W.; Pan, Y.; Ding, G.; Song, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wei, H.; He, Y.

2006-01-01

109

Engineering Industrial & Systems  

E-print Network

Industrial Engineering Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering Leslie Monplaisir, Ph powerful tool sets used in industry today. -Brent Gillett, BSIE 2007 Advanced Planning Engineer at BMW I is available at: http://ise.wayne.edu/bs-industrial/index What is Industrial Engineering? The industrial

Berdichevsky, Victor

110

Description and cost analysis of a deluge dry\\/wet cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of combined dry\\/wet cooling systems for large base-load power plants offers the potential for significant water savings as compared to evaporatively cooled power plants and significant cost savings in comparison to dry cooled power plants. The results of a detailed engineering and cost study of one type of dry\\/wet cooling system are described. In the ''deluge'' dry\\/wet cooling

L. E. Wiles; J. A. Bamberger; D. J. Braun; D. W. Faletti; C. E. Willingham

1978-01-01

111

Cool systems for hot cities  

SciTech Connect

On a hot summer day, Los Angeles, CA, like Baltimore, MD, Phoenix, AZ, Washington, D.C., and Tokyo, Japan, is c. 6-8 degrees F hotter than its surrounding areas. Dark buildings and pavement have replaced urban vegetation in these cities, absorbing more solar heat. The urban heat islands that are created result in increased air-conditioning costs, energy use, and pollution. Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been studying the effects of roof system color and type on the energy used to cool a building. The results of this research indicate that roofing professionals should consider the reflectance (albedo) and emittance (release of absorbed heat) of the roof systems they install.

Akbari, Hashem; Bretz, Sarah

1998-09-02

112

Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system  

DOEpatents

The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

Carr, Peter (Cary, NC)

1991-01-01

113

Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system  

DOEpatents

The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

Carr, P.

1991-10-15

114

Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system  

DOEpatents

A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

Coleman, John H. (Salem Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1980-01-01

115

Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests  

E-print Network

Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering understands our students may work as Industrial Engineers in other engineering industries, and to help prepare them for these careers, the ISE Areas of Interest was formulated. The courses

Berdichevsky, Victor

116

Systems Engineering Handbook Foreword ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ ix  

E-print Network

NASA Systems Engineering Handbook SP-610S June 1995 #12;Contents Foreword ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 1 Fundamentals of System Engineering ................................ ............................ 3 Definition of Systems Engineering

Rhoads, James

117

Analysis of several methods of pumping cooling air for turbojet engine afterburners  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several methods of pumping air to an annular cooling passage surrounding a typical axial-flow turbojet-engine afterburner were evaluated and compared on the basis of thrust and specific fuel consumption of the systems. Each system was analyzed over a range of afterburner-wall temperatures, flight Mach numbers, and exhaust-gas temperatures at sea level and 35,000 feet. Ram pressure recovery, boundary-layer pressure recovery, and the engine-jet actuated ejector appear to be satisfactory systems at high Mach numbers. Cooling with compressor-exit air bleed was found to be unsatisfactory,but the use of compressor-exit bleed air as the primary fluid in a high-performance ejector was satisfactory. The use of an auxiliary compressor driven from the engine shaft increased the thrust and decreased the specific fuel consumption of the engine for many of the conditions investigated.

Samuels, John C; Yanowitz, Herbert

1953-01-01

118

Similarity constraints in testing of cooled engine parts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study is made of the effect of testing cooled parts of current and advanced gas turbine engines at the reduced temperature and pressure conditions which maintain similarity with the engine environment. Some of the problems facing the experimentalist in evaluating heat transfer and aerodynamic performance when hardware is tested at conditions other than the actual engine environment are considered. Low temperature and pressure test environments can simulate the performance of actual size prototype engine hardware within the tolerance of experimental accuracy if appropriate similarity conditions are satisfied. Failure to adhere to these similarity constraints because of test facility limitations or other reasons, can result in a number of serious errors in projecting the performance of test hardware to engine conditions.

Colladay, R. S.; Stepka, F. S.

1974-01-01

119

Systems Science and Engineering  

E-print Network

447 Systems Science and Industrial Engineering UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS The bachelor of science-Year Engineering Science Association (TYESA) agreement with community colleges in New York state. The emphasis with industry. The primary goal is to prepare the industrial and systems engineering bachelor of science

Suzuki, Masatsugu

120

Cooling system for electrical machine  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A hydraulic circuit branch of a cooling system in thermal contact with the stator winding of a hydraulic power generator is provided with a feed tube divided into two separate input tube sections. The downstream ends of the input tube sections are connected to respective multiplicities of subsidiary hydraulic circuit branches in the form of winding bars via a pair of semicircular manifolds. The current throughput through the winding bars is monitored by determining the difference between the rates of coolant flow through the approximately identical input tube sections. If the rates of coolant flow or throughputs in the input tube sections differ from one another by an amount which itself differs from a predetermined reference value by more than a preselected threshold, a warning signal is generated indicating that heat removal from the hydraulic power generator is being impaired.

1988-06-28

121

Reactor steam isolation cooling system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a reactor steam isolation cooling system. It comprises: a containment building having a containment wall; a reactor pressure vessel disposed inside the containment building and including a nuclear reactor core therein operable for generating reactor steam; an isolation pool disposed outside the containment building and adjacent to the containment wall and containing pool water; an isolation condenser including: a plurality of parallel heat pipes; a tube sheet disposed between the hot and cold tubes and through which the heat pipes are disposed in sealing contact therewith; and means for selectively channeling the reactor steam from the pressure vessel between the hot tubes of the evaporator assembly for removing heat therefrom to form reactor condensate.

Dillmann, C.W.

1992-10-27

122

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOEpatents

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

Cooke, F.E.

1992-12-08

123

Emergency cooling system and method  

DOEpatents

An improved emergency cooling system and method are disclosed that may be adapted for incorporation into or use with a nuclear BWR wherein a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) containing a nuclear core and a heat transfer fluid for circulation in a heat transfer relationship with the core is housed within an annular sealed drywell and is fluid communicable therewith for passage thereto in an emergency situation the heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and any noncondensibles present in the RPV, an annular sealed wetwell houses the drywell, and a pressure suppression pool of liquid is disposed in the wetwell and is connected to the drywell by submerged vents. The improved emergency cooling system and method has a containment condenser for receiving condensible heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and noncondensibles for condensing at least a portion of the heat transfer fluid. The containment condenser has an inlet in fluid communication with the drywell for receiving heat transfer fluid and noncondensibles, a first outlet in fluid communication with the RPV for the return to the RPV of the condensed portion of the heat transfer fluid and a second outlet in fluid communication with the drywell for passage of the noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles. The noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles passed to the drywell from the containment condenser are mixed with the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles from the RPV for passage into the containment condenser. A water pool is provided in heat transfer relationship with the containment condenser and is thermally communicable in an emergency situation with an environment outside of the drywell and the wetwell for conducting heat transferred from the containment condenser away from the wetwell and the drywell. 5 figs.

Oosterkamp, W.J.; Cheung, Y.K.

1994-01-04

124

Engineering scalable biological systems  

E-print Network

Synthetic biology is focused on engineering biological organisms to study natural systems and to provide new solutions for pressing medical, industrial, and environmental problems. At the core of engineered organisms are ...

Lu, Timothy K.

125

Internal convective cooling systems for hypersonic aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the relative merits of construction materials, coolants, and cooled panel concepts for internal convective cooling systems applied to airframe structures of hydrogen-fueled hypersonic aircraft. These parametric studies were then used as a means of comparing various cooled structural arrangements for a hypersonic transport and a hypersonic research airplane. The cooled airplane studies emphasized weight aspects as related to the choice of materials, structural arrangements, structural temperatures, and matching of the cooling system heat load to the available hydrogen fuel-flow heat sink. Consideration was given to reliability and to fatigue and fracture aspects, as well. Even when auxiliary thermal protection system items such as heat shielding, insulation, and excess hydrogen for cooling are considered the more attractive actively cooled airframe concepts indicated potential payload increases of from 40 percent to over 100 percent for the hypersonic transport as compared to the results of previous studies of the same vehicle configuration with an uncooled airframe.

Anthony, F. M.; Dukes, W. H.; Helenbrook, R. G.

1975-01-01

126

DEPARTMENT CHAIR Engineering Management & Systems Engineering Department  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT CHAIR Engineering Management & Systems Engineering Department Old Dominion University, Norfolk VA The Batten College of Engineering and Technology at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA, Dean's Office, 102 Kaufman Hall, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529. Review of applications

127

Optimization of the engineering design for the Lansing District Cooling System by comparative analysis of the impact of advanced technologies on a conventional design approach. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Lansing Board of Water and Light (LBWL) began investigating development of a cooling district in the Lansing Downtown in 1989 in order to retain and build summer load for its steam utility. A feasibility study was conducted in conjunction with SFT, Inc. and ZBA, Inc. which addressed many factors such as marketability of the product, impact on the summer steam load, distribution system development, system design, probable capital and operating costs, reliability and environmental and other regulatory impacts on a preliminary feasibility basis. The Phase I study completed in September of 1989 provided highly promising results for establishing a District Cooling System (DCS). An existing chilled water production facility owned by the State of Michigan was identified as a potential location for a DCS plant. With these changes a review of the feasibility with a new set of alternatives and sensitivities was evaluated. This enhancement to the Phase I Study was nearing completion when the LBWL in conjunction with Energy, Mines and Resources Canada proposed to conduct the Phase II project in conjunction with DOE. The project was structured to proceed along a dual track to demonstrate the impact of the application of various innovative technologies.

Not Available

1994-02-01

128

Automotive non-pressure cooling system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a non-pressure automotive engine cooling system comprising: a radiator containing a liquid coolant, coupling hoses that intercouple the radiator to the engine, pump means associated with the engine for circulating coolant through the engine and radiator. The pump means has a suction side, a radiator cap sealed on the radiator, an expansion tank disposed in the engine compartment, vent means on the tank for venting the tank to atmosphere, a coupling tube disposed between the radiator below the radiator cap and the expansion tank to enable free flow of the coolant under expansion from the radiator to the expansion tank. The radiator cap seals the radiator but provides a substantially non-pressure and unimpeded fluid path from the radiator to the coupling tube, a return line coupled from the expansion tank to the suction side of the pump means. The radiator has a gooseneck with the radiator cap sealably engaged with the gooseneck, an outlet port from the top of the radiator to which the coupling tube is connected. The outlet port is continuously open and unblocked by the radiator cap to provide free fluid flow from the radiator to the expansion tank over the entire operating temperature range, the radiator cap sealing only at the top of the gooseneck, and means for supporting the expansion tank at a position at a height corresponding to the top of the radiator. Under normal temperature operating conditions, the liquid level line is substantially the same in both the radiator and the expansion tank.

Skinner, A.A.

1987-07-07

129

INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering  

E-print Network

78 INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take of industries including consulting, technology development, software, supply chain manufacturing, engineering

Rohs, Remo

130

Effective use of cooling lakes and cooling towers in hybrid cooling systems. Completion report, July 1983August 1984  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research summarized in this report analyzes the consequences of the use of hybrid cooling systems for the dissipation of waste heat from thermoelectric power generation. The hybrid cooling system study consists of a combination of cooling towers and a cooling lake to receive a specified heat load. A transient computer simulation model of both the cooling lake stratification and

Sturm

1984-01-01

131

Engine Emission Control Using Optimized Cooling Air Distribution between Combustor and Turbine Hot Section  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presented paper is focused on turbine hot section cooling system design and the effects that it has on overall engine emission\\u000a characteristics. Much consideration is given to industrial gas turbines due to their continuous operation as prime drivers\\u000a for electric power generators and mechanical driven equipment like gas compressors and pumps. Although aircraft engines present\\u000a a major part of the

B. Glezer

132

Latent heat storage in cooling systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In building space conditioning applications where cooling is a major component, thermal energy storage can be used to shift the electrical cooling load imposed on a utility during peak cooling loads and small buildings located in summer peaking utility service areas are particularly attractive for application of this technology. Ice is the latent heat storage material most commonly used as the thermal storage medium for building cooling; however, new materials including clathrates, salt hydrates, and liquid-liquid systems are being explored. Cool storage applications are explored and provides an overview of research underway to develop these new latent heat materials is provided.

Tomlinson, J. J.

133

Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

Ward, Dan S.

1976-01-01

134

Unified Engineering Software System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Collection of computer programs performs diverse functions in prototype engineering. NEXUS, NASA Engineering Extendible Unified Software system, is research set of computer programs designed to support full sequence of activities encountered in NASA engineering projects. Sequence spans preliminary design, design analysis, detailed design, manufacturing, assembly, and testing. Primarily addresses process of prototype engineering, task of getting single or small number of copies of product to work. Written in FORTRAN 77 and PROLOG.

Purves, L. R.; Gordon, S.; Peltzman, A.; Dube, M.

1989-01-01

135

Radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improved radiant vessel passive cooling system for liquid-metal poor-type modular nuclear reactors having a reactor vessel and a surrounding containment vessel spaced apart from the reactor vessel to form a first interstitial region containing an inert gas, the improvement comprising: a shell spaced apart from and surrounding the containment vessel to form a second interstitial region comprising a circulatory air passage. The circulatory air passage has an air inlet at a first position and an air outlet at a second position which is vertically higher than the first position. The second interstitial region lies between the shell and the containment vessel; and surface area extension means in the shell is longitudinally disposed from the shell into the second interstitial region towards the containment vessel to receive thermal radiation from the containment vessel. The surface area extension means is spaced apart from the external surface of the containment vessel where heat radiated form the containment vessel is received at the surface extension means for convection, conduction and radiation to air in the circulatory passage.

Germer, J.H.

1987-07-07

136

Atmospheric impacts of evaporative cooling systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report summarizes available information on the effects of various power plant cooling systems on the atmosphere. While evaporative cooling systems sharply reduce the biological impacts of thermal discharges in water bodies, they create (at least, for heat-release rates comparable to those of two-unit nuclear generating stations) atmospheric changes. For an isolated site such as required for a nuclear power

1976-01-01

137

District cooling engineering and design program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The operation and performance of a system using large commercial heat pumps to heat and cool two public buildings are reported. One of the buildings houses local government offices and the other the jail. The system uses the underground salt water at the site as the energy exchange medium. Included are: the operations summary, system performance, operating procedures, and operating modes. (MHR)

Not Available

1992-09-01

138

Engine system assessment study using Martian propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A feasibility study was performed that identified and characterized promising chemical propulsion system designs that utilize two or more of the propellant combinations: LOX/H2, LOX/CH4 and LOX/CO. The engine systems examined focused on the usage of common subsystem/component hardware where feasible. From the evaluation baseline employed, tripropellant MTV LOX cooled and bipropellant LEV and MEV engine systems are identified.

Pelaccio, D.; Jacobs, M.; Collins, J.; Scheil, C.; Meyer, M.

1992-01-01

139

Engine system assessment study using Martian propellants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A feasibility study was performed that identified and characterized promising chemical propulsion system designs that utilize two or more of the propellant combinations: LOX/H2, LOX/CH4 and LOX/CO. The engine systems examined focused on the usage of common subsystem/component hardware where feasible. From the evaluation baseline employed, tripropellant MTV LOX cooled and bipropellant LEV and MEV engine systems are identified.

Pelaccio, D.; Jacobs, M.; Collins, J.; Scheil, C.; Meyer, M.

1992-07-01

140

Nuclear propulsion systems engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960`s and early 1970`s was dramatically successful, with no major failures during the entire testing program. This success was due in large part to the successful development of a systems engineering process. Systems engineering, properly implemented, involves all aspects of the system design and operation, and leads to optimization of theentire system: cost, schedule, performance, safety, reliability, function, requirements, etc. The process must be incorporated from the very first and continued to project completion. This paper will discuss major aspects of the NERVA systems engineering effort, and consider the implications for current nuclear propulsion efforts.

Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.: Van Haaften, D.H.

1992-12-31

141

Nuclear propulsion systems engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960's and early 1970's was dramatically successful, with no major failures during the entire testing program. This success was due in large part to the successful development of a systems engineering process. Systems engineering, properly implemented, involves all aspects of the system design and operation, and leads to optimization of theentire system: cost, schedule, performance, safety, reliability, function, requirements, etc. The process must be incorporated from the very first and continued to project completion. This paper will discuss major aspects of the NERVA systems engineering effort, and consider the implications for current nuclear propulsion efforts.

Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.: Van Haaften, D.H.

1992-01-01

142

Air-cooled type intercooler for a supercharged internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

A vehicle is described comprising an engine room having a radiator grille at a front end, an engine room hood lock support at a position behind the radiator grille, a bumper located below the radiator grille, and an air dam skirt located below the bumper. A transversely extending chamber-like space is formed between the radiator grille, the hood lock support, the bumper and the air dam skirt. An engine body is provided within the engine room. A supercharging system is in fluid communication with the engine body. The supercharging system comprises a pair of turbochargers arranged in parallel. An intercooler is provided in the chamber-like space. The cooler comprises an inlet tank in fluid communication with the supercharger system for receiving compressed air therefrom, an outlet tank in fluid communication with the engine body for introducing cool air into the engine body, and a radiator core arranged between the inlet tank and the outlet rank. The radiator core comprises horizontally juxtaposed and vertically extending heat exchanger pipes between which air can pass in order to cool compressed air in the heat exchanger pipes. The radiator core has a length in the horizontal direction which is greater than a height of the radiator core in the vertical direction. The air passing over the air dam skirt, below the bumper, is directed onto the vertically extending heat exchanger pipes of the intercooler.

Saito, T.; Kotani, A.

1987-10-27

143

Systems Engineering Research in the Engineering Systems Context  

E-print Network

Systems Engineering Research in the Engineering Systems Context: Value-Driven Architecting and Design of Engineering Systems Presented by: Dr. Donna H. Rhodes and Dr. Adam M. Ross Massachusetts Topics PART I. Systems Engineering Research in the Engineering Systems Context � Brief Overview

de Weck, Olivier L.

144

INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering  

E-print Network

78 INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take · Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 128 units · Industrial and Systems Engineering

Rohs, Remo

145

INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering  

E-print Network

78 INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in todays global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineers task is to take limited Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 128 units Industrial and Systems Engineering

Rohs, Remo

146

Determination of cooling air mass flow for a horizontally-opposed aircraft engine installation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The relationship between the amount of cooling air flow and the corresponding flow pressure difference across an aircraft engine was investigated in flight and on the ground. The flight test results were consistent with theory, but indicated a significant installation leakage problem. A ground test blower system was used to identify and reduce the leakage. The correlation between ground test cell determined engine orifice characteristics and flight measurements showed good agreement if the engine pressure difference was based on total pressure rather than static pressure.

Miley, S. J.; Cross, E. J., Jr.; Ghomi, N. A.; Bridges, P. D.

1979-01-01

147

District cooling engineering & design program. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Phoenix, Arizona is located in the Sonoran desert. Daytime temperatures typically rise to over 100 F during the three summer months. Average and peak temperatures have tended to rise over recent decades. This is generally attributed to what is known as the heat island effect, due to an increase in heat absorbing concrete and a decrease in irrigated farmland in the area. Phoenix is the eighth largest city in the US with a population of just over one million (1,000,000). The metropolitan area is one of the fastest growing in the nation. Over the last ten years its population has increased by over 40%. It is not an exaggeration to say the general availability of refrigerated air conditioning, both for buildings and automobiles has been an important factor enabling growth. The cost of operating public buildings has risen significantly in the last decade. In fiscal year 92/93 the City of Phoenix had energy expenses of over thirty four million dollars ($34,000,000). Because the City was planning a major new construction project, a new high-rise City Hall, it was decided to study and then optimize the design and selection of building systems to minimize long term owning and operating costs. The City Hall was to be constructed in downtown Phoenix. Phoenix presently owns other buildings in the area. A number of large cooling systems serving groups of buildings are currently operating in the Phoenix area. The City requested that the design consultants analyze the available options and present recommendations to the City`s engineering staff.

Not Available

1994-03-01

148

Heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts  

DOEpatents

A heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts receives heat from a heat source. The acoustic cooling engine comprises an elongated resonant pressure vessel having first and second ends. A compressible fluid having a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave is contained in the resonant pressure vessel. The heat source supplies heat to the first end of the vessel. A first heat exchanger in the vessel is spaced-apart from the first end and receives heat from the first end. A first thermodynamic element is adjacent to the first heat exchanger and converts some of the heat transmitted by the first heat exchanger into acoustic power. A second thermodynamic element has a first end located spaced-apart from the first thermodynamic element and a second end farther away from the first thermodynamic element than is its first end. The first end of the second thermodynamic element heats while its second end cools as a consequence of the acoustic power. A second heat exchanger is adjacent to and between the first and second thermodynamic elements. A heat sink outside of the vessel is thermally coupled to and receives heat from the second heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one-fourth wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir.

Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01

149

Desiccant Cooling Systems - A Review  

E-print Network

of the Pennington cycle. This has been investigated further by Tae Seok [lo] and he predicts a COP of 2.58 assuming ideal components. Due to the additional heat exchanger and the nature of the finned coil and cooling tower components, this cycle is more...' was chosen for the reversible nature of the evaporative cooling in the finned coil. Tae Seok [lo] predicted a COP of 1.25 for ARI conditions but again for unrealistic, ideal components. The low thermal COP'S found in the Pennington cycle...

Kettleborough, C. F.; Ullah, M. R.; Waugaman, D. G.

1986-01-01

150

Developing Data System Engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the early days of general computer systems for science data processing, staff members working on NASA's data systems would most often be hired as mathematicians. Computer engineering was very often filled by those with electrical engineering degrees. Today, the Goddard Space Flight Center has special position descriptions for data scientists or as they are more commonly called: data systems engineers. These staff members are required to have very diverse skills, hence the need for a generalized position description. There is always a need for data systems engineers to develop, maintain and operate the complex data systems for Earth and space science missions. Today's data systems engineers however are not just mathematicians, they are computer programmers, GIS experts, software engineers, visualization experts, etc... They represent many different degree fields. To put together distributed systems like the NASA Earth Observing Data and Information System (EOSDIS), staff are required from many different fields. Sometimes, the skilled professional is not available and must be developed in-house. This paper will address the various skills and jobs for data systems engineers at NASA. Further it explores how to develop staff to become data scientists.

Behnke, J.; Byrnes, J. B.; Kobler, B.

2011-12-01

151

The development of a solar residential heating and cooling system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The MSFC solar heating and cooling facility was assembled to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar energy for heating and cooling buildings, to provide an engineering evaluation of the total system and the key subsystems, and to investigate areas of possible improvement in design and efficiency. The basic solar heating and cooling system utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling. A complete description of all systems is given. Development activities for this test system included assembly, checkout, operation, modification, and data analysis, all of which are discussed. Selected data analyses for the first 15 weeks of testing are included, findings associated with energy storage and the energy storage system are outlined, and conclusions resulting from test findings are provided. An evaluation of the data for summer operation indicates that the current system is capable of supplying an average of 50 percent of the thermal energy required to drive the air conditioner. Preliminary evaluation of data collected for operation in the heating mode during the winter indicates that nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating can be supplied by the system.

1975-01-01

152

Cooling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

Amtmann, Hans H. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA)

1982-01-01

153

Biomedical Application of Aerospace Personal Cooling Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Personal thermoregulatory systems which are used by astronauts to alleviate thermal stress during extravehicular activity have been applied to the therapeutic management of multiple sclerosis. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of two passive and two active cooling vests and to measure the body temperature and circulatory changes produced by each cooling vest configuration. The MicroClimate Systems and the Life Enhancement Tech(LET) lightweight liquid cooling vests, the Steele Vest and LET's Zipper Front Garment were used to cool the chest region of 10 male and female subjects (25 to 55 yr.) in this study. Calf, forearm and finger blood flows were measured using a tetrapolar impedance rheograph. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx.22C), were tested for 60 min. with the cooling system operated at its maximum cooling capacity. Blood flows were recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. Oral, right and left ear temperatures and cooling system parameters were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; respiration; and an activity index were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. In general, the male and female subjects' oral and ear temperature responses to cooling were similar for all vest configurations tested. Oral temperatures during the recovery period were significantly (P<0.05) lower than during the control period, approx. 0.2 - 0.5C, for both men and women wearing any of the four different garments. The corresponding ear temperatures were significantly (P<0.05) decreased approx.0.2 - 0.4C by the end of the recovery period. Compared to the control period, no significant differences were found in rectal temperatures during cooling and recovery periods.

Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

1997-01-01

154

Cooling Systems Research at Argonne National Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Studies of the thermal plumes resulting from discharges from once-through cooling systems of electric generating stations are reviewed. The collection of large amounts of water temperature data for definition of the three-dimensional structure of a therma...

S. A. Spigarelli

1977-01-01

155

Combustion engine system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flow through catalytic reactor which selectively catalytically decomposes methanol into a soot free hydrogen rich product gas utilizing engine exhaust at temperatures of 200 to 650 C to provide the heat for vaporizing and decomposing the methanol is described. The reactor is combined with either a spark ignited or compression ignited internal combustion engine or a gas turbine to provide a combustion engine system. The system may be fueled entirely by the hydrogen rich gas produced in the methanol decomposition reactor or the system may be operated on mixed fuels for transient power gain and for cold start of the engine system. The reactor includes a decomposition zone formed by a plurality of elongated cylinders which contain a body of vapor permeable, methanol decomposition catalyst preferably a shift catalyst such as copper-zinc.

Houseman, John (inventor); Voecks, Gerald E. (inventor)

1986-01-01

156

Understanding aging in containment cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

A study has been performed to assess the effects of aging in nuclear power plant containment cooling systems. Failure records from national databases, as well as plant specific data were reviewed and analyzed to identify aging characteristics for this system. The predominant aging mechanisms were determined, along with the most frequently failed components and their associated failure modes. This paper discusses the aging mechanisms present in the containment spray system and the containment fan cooler system, which are two systems used to provide the containment cooling function. The failure modes, along with the relative frequency of each is also discussed.

Lofaro, R.J.

1993-12-01

157

Heat pipe radiation cooling of advanced hypersonic propulsion system components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Heat transfer, heat pipe, and system studies were performed to assess the newly proposed heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) concept. With an HPRC system, heat is removed from the ramburner and nozzle of a hypersonic aircraft engine by a surrounding, high-temperature, heat pipe nacelle structure, transported to nearby external surfaces, and rejected to the environment by thermal radiation. With HPRC, the Mach number range available for using hydrocarbon fuels for aircraft operation extends into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 range, up from the current limit of about Mach 4. Heat transfer studies using a newly developed HPRC computer code determine cooling system and ramburner and nozzle temperatures, heat loads, and weights for a representative combined-cycle engine cruising at Mach 5 at 80,000 ft altitude. Heat pipe heat transport calculations, using the Los Alamos code HTPIPE, reveal that adequate heat trasport capability is available using molybdenum-lithium heat pipe technology. Results show that the HPRC system radiator area is limited in size to the ramburner-nozzle region of the engine nacelle; reasonable system weights are expected; hot section temperatures are consistent with advanced structural materials development goals; and system impact on engine performance is minimal.

Martin, R. A.; Keddy, M.; Merrigan, M. A.; Silverstein, C. C.

1991-01-01

158

industrial & systems Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering  

E-print Network

78 industrial & systems Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take to introduce the philosophy, subject matter, aims, goals, and techniques of industrial and systems engineering

Rohs, Remo

159

industrial & systems Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering  

E-print Network

78 industrial & systems Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take s e n G i n e e r i n G ( i s e ) ISE 105 Introduction to Industrial and Systems Engineering (2, Fa

Rohs, Remo

160

Cooling systems research at Argonne National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of the thermal plumes resulting from discharges from once-through cooling systems of electric generating stations are reviewed. The collection of large amounts of water temperature data for definition of the three-dimensional structure of a thermal plume, of current data, and related ambient data for model evaluation purposes required the development of an integrated data collection system. The Argonne system

Spigarelli

1977-01-01

161

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. It consists of the combination of a reactor vessel enclosing a heat generating core and assembly containing fissionable fuel surrounded by a spaced apart encircling fuel core assembly support cylinder provided with an upper and a lower inward projecting flange for securing the fuel core assembly within the reactor vessel, a primary heat exchanger cylinder positioned concentrically intermediate the fuel core assembly support cylinder and the fuel core assembly in spaced apart relation with each the support cylinder and the fuel core assembly, the reactor vessel being substantially filled with liquid metal coolant whereby the fuel core assembly is submerged therein, the fuel core assembly having a multiplicity of vertical coolant passages extending through the axial length thereof providing for a primary heat exchanging convection circuit for the liquid metal coolant passing upward through the heat producing fuel core to an area above the fuel core assembly and returning around down through a space between the fuel core assembly and the primary heat exchanger cylinder for recycling around and up through the fuel core assembly.

Hunsbedt, A.; Fanning, A.W.

1991-06-04

162

Engine system assessment study using Martian propellants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A top-level feasibility study was conducted that identified and characterized promising chemical propulsion system designs which use two or more of the following propellant combinations: LOX/H2, LOX/CH4, and LOX/CO. The engine systems examined emphasized the usage of common subsystem/component hardware where possible. In support of this study, numerous mission scenarios were characterized that used various combinations of Earth, lunar, and Mars propellants to establish engine system requirements to assess the promising engine system design concept examined, and to determine overall exploration leverage of such systems compared to state-of-the-art cryogenic (LOX/H2) propulsion systems. Initially in the study, critical propulsion system technologies were assessed. Candidate expander and gas generator cycle LOX/H2/CO, LOX/H2/CH4, and LOX/CO/CH4 engine system designs were parametrically evaluated. From this evaluation baseline, tripropellant Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) LOX cooled and bipropellant Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) and Mars Excursion Vehicle (MEV) engine systems were identified. Representative tankage designs for a MTV were also investigated. Re-evaluation of the missions using the baseline engine design showed that in general the slightly lower performance, smaller, lower weight gas generator cycle-based engines required less overall mission Mars and in situ propellant production (ISPP) infrastructure support compared to the larger, heavier, higher performing expander cycle engine systems.

Pelaccio, Dennis; Jacobs, Mark; Scheil, Christine; Collins, John

1992-06-01

163

Engine system assessment study using Martian propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A top-level feasibility study was conducted that identified and characterized promising chemical propulsion system designs which use two or more of the following propellant combinations: LOX/H2, LOX/CH4, and LOX/CO. The engine systems examined emphasized the usage of common subsystem/component hardware where possible. In support of this study, numerous mission scenarios were characterized that used various combinations of Earth, lunar, and Mars propellants to establish engine system requirements to assess the promising engine system design concept examined, and to determine overall exploration leverage of such systems compared to state-of-the-art cryogenic (LOX/H2) propulsion systems. Initially in the study, critical propulsion system technologies were assessed. Candidate expander and gas generator cycle LOX/H2/CO, LOX/H2/CH4, and LOX/CO/CH4 engine system designs were parametrically evaluated. From this evaluation baseline, tripropellant Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) LOX cooled and bipropellant Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) and Mars Excursion Vehicle (MEV) engine systems were identified. Representative tankage designs for a MTV were also investigated. Re-evaluation of the missions using the baseline engine design showed that in general the slightly lower performance, smaller, lower weight gas generator cycle-based engines required less overall mission Mars and in situ propellant production (ISPP) infrastructure support compared to the larger, heavier, higher performing expander cycle engine systems.

Pelaccio, Dennis; Jacobs, Mark; Scheil, Christine; Collins, John

1992-01-01

164

Simulation of Laser Cooling and Trapping in Engineering Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advanced computer code is undergoing development for numerically simulating laser cooling and trapping of large numbers of atoms. The code is expected to be useful in practical engineering applications and to contribute to understanding of the roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and numbers of particles play in experiments using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms. The code is based on semiclassical theories of the forces exerted on atoms by magnetic and optical fields. Whereas computer codes developed previously for the same purpose account for only a few physical mechanisms, this code incorporates many more physical mechanisms (including atomic collisions, sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Stark and Zeeman energy shifts, gravitation, and evanescent-wave phenomena) that affect laser-matter interactions and the cooling of atoms to submillikelvin temperatures. Moreover, whereas the prior codes can simulate the interactions of at most a few atoms with a resonant light field, the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation by the present code is limited only by computer memory. Hence, the present code represents more nearly completely the complex physics involved when using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms in engineering applications. Another advantage that the code incorporates is the possibility to analyze the interaction between cold atoms of different atomic number. Some properties that cold atoms of different atomic species have, like cross sections and the particular excited states they can occupy when interacting with each other and light fields, play important roles not yet completely understood in the new experiments that are under way in laboratories worldwide to form ultracold molecules. Other research efforts use cold atoms as holders of quantum information, and more recent developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics also use ultracold atoms to explore and expand new information-technology ideas. These experiments give a hint on the wide range of applications and technology developments that can be tackled using cold atoms and light fields. From more precise atomic clocks and gravity sensors to the development of quantum computers, there will be a need to completely understand the whole ensemble of physical mechanisms that play a role in the development of such technologies. The code also permits the study of the dynamic and steady-state operations of technologies that use cold atoms. The physical characteristics of lasers and fields can be time-controlled to give a realistic simulation of the processes involved such that the design process can determine the best control features to use. It is expected that with the features incorporated into the code it will become a tool for the useful application of ultracold atoms in engineering applications. Currently, the software is being used for the analysis and understanding of simple experiments using cold atoms, and for the design of a modular compact source of cold atoms to be used in future research and development projects. The results so far indicate that the code is a useful design instrument that shows good agreement with experimental measurements (see figure), and a Windows-based user-friendly interface is also under development.

Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan; Lunblad, Nathan

2005-01-01

165

Engineering scalable biological systems.  

PubMed

Synthetic biology is focused on engineering biological organisms to study natural systems and to provide new solutions for pressing medical, industrial and environmental problems. At the core of engineered organisms are synthetic biological circuits that execute the tasks of sensing inputs, processing logic and performing output functions. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in developing basic designs for a wide range of biological circuits in bacteria, yeast and mammalian systems. However, significant challenges in the construction, probing, modulation and debugging of synthetic biological systems must be addressed in order to achieve scalable higher-complexity biological circuits. Furthermore, concomitant efforts to evaluate the safety and biocontainment of engineered organisms and address public and regulatory concerns will be necessary to ensure that technological advances are translated into real-world solutions. PMID:21468204

Lu, Timothy K

2010-01-01

166

14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with §...

2011-01-01

167

14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with §...

2013-01-01

168

14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041...

2011-01-01

169

14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041...

2012-01-01

170

14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041...

2010-01-01

171

14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with §...

2010-01-01

172

14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041...

2013-01-01

173

14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.  

...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047...procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041...

2014-01-01

174

14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with §...

2012-01-01

175

14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.  

...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics...UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045...procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with §...

2014-01-01

176

Regeneratively cooled rocket engine for space storable propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analyses and experimental studies were performed with the OF2 (F2/O2)/B2H6 propellant combination over a range in operating conditions to determine suitability for a space storable pressure fed engine configuration for an extended flight space vehicle configuration. The regenerative cooling mode selected for the thrust chamber was explored in detail with the use of both the fuel and oxidizer as coolants in an advanced milled channel construction thrust chamber design operating at 100 psia chamber pressure and a nominal mixture ratio of 3.0 with a 60:1 area ratio nozzle. Benefits of the simultaneous cooling as related to gaseous injection of both fuel and oxidizer propellants were defined. Heat transfer rates, performance and combustor stability were developed for impinging element triplet injectors in uncooled copper calorimeter hardware with flow, pressure and temperature instrumentation. Evaluation of the capabilities of the B2H6 and OF2 during analytical studies and numerous tests with flow through electrically heated blocks provided design criteria for subsequent regenerative chamber design and fabrication.

Wagner, W. R.; Waldman, B. J.

1973-01-01

177

The prediction of nozzle performance and heat transfer in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engines with transpiration cooling, film cooling, and high area ratios  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advanced engineering computational model has been developed to aid in the analysis and design of hydrogen/oxygen chemical rocket engines. The complete multi-species, chemically reacting and diffusing Navier-Stokes equations are modelled, finite difference approach that is tailored to be conservative in an axisymmetric coordinate system for both the inviscid and viscous terms. Demonstration cases are presented for a 1030:1 area ratio nozzle, a 25 lbf film cooled nozzle, and transpiration cooled plug-and-spool rocket engine. The results indicate that the thrust coefficient predictions of the 1030:1 nozzle and the film cooled nozzle are within 0.2 to 0.5 percent, respectively, of experimental measurements when all of the chemical reaction and diffusion terms are considered. Further, the model's predictions agree very well with the heat transfer measurements made in all of the nozzle test cases. The Soret thermal diffusion term is demonstrated to have a significant effect on the predicted mass fraction of hydrogen along the wall of the nozzle in both the laminar flow 1030:1 nozzle and the turbulent plug-and-spool rocket engine analysis cases performed. Further, the Soret term was shown to represent a significant fraction of the diffusion fluxes occurring in the transpiration cooled rocket engine.

Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Hoffman, Joe D.

1993-01-01

178

Ozone Treatment in Cooling Water Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ozone treatment for preventing the biofouling in cooling water systems is investigated.In the fresh water system, the separating effect of the ozonated water on the microorganisms such as the sphaerotilus and the zoogloea which adhere to the piping and form the slime is recognized. When the ozonated water is supplied intermittently to the piping without stopping the flow of the

N. Kaiga; T. Seki; K. Iyasu

1989-01-01

179

Readings in Systems Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This present collection was inspired by seven papers prepared by the NASA Alumni League, illustrating the members' systems engineering experience. These papers make up the heart of this collection. We have supplemented them with papers describing industry processes and other governmental practices to illustrate the diversity of systems engineering as it is formulated and practiced. This is one discipline that clearly benefits from cross-fertilization and infusion of new ideas. There is also a wide variety of tools and techniques described herein, some standard and some unique.

Hoban, Francis T. (editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (editor)

1993-01-01

180

Engineering the earth system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The post-war growth of the earth sciences has been fueled, in part, by a drive to quantify environmental insults in order to support arguments for their reduction, yet paradoxically the knowledge gained is grants us ever greater capability to deliberately engineer environmental processes on a planetary scale. Increased capability can arises though seemingly unconnected scientific advances. Improvements in numerical weather prediction such as the use of adjoint models in analysis/forecast systems, for example, means that weather modification can be accomplished with smaller control inputs. Purely technological constraints on our ability to engineer earth systems arise from our limited ability to measure and predict system responses and from limits on our ability to manage large engineering projects. Trends in all three constraints suggest a rapid growth in our ability to engineer the planet. What are the implications of our growing ability to geoengineer? Will we see a reemergence of proposals to engineer our way out of the climate problem? How can we avoid the moral hazard posed by the knowledge that geoengineering might provide a backstop to climate damages? I will speculate about these issues, and suggest some institutional factors that may provide a stronger constraint on the use of geoengineering than is provided by any purely technological limit.

Keith, D. W.

2005-12-01

181

Wing-Nacelle-Propeller Tests - Comparative Tests of Liquid-Cooled and Air-Cooled Engine Nacelles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report gives the results of measurements of the lift, drag, and propeller characteristics of several wing and nacelle combinations with a tractor propeller. The nacelles were so located that the propeller was about 31% of the wing chord directly ahead of the leading edge of the wing, a position which earlier tests (NASA Report No. 415) had shown to be efficient. The nacelles were scale models of an NACA cowled nacelle for a radial air-cooled engine, a circular nacelle with the V-type engine located inside and the radiator for the cooling liquid located inside and the radiator for the type, and a nacelle shape simulating the housing which would be used for an extension shaft if the engine were located entirely within the wing. The propeller used in all cases was a 4-foot model of Navy No. 4412 adjustable metal propeller. The results of the tests indicate that, at the angles of attack corresponding to high speeds of flight, there is no marked advantage of one type of nacelle over the others as far as low drag is concerned, since the drag added by any of the nacelles in the particular location ahead of the wing is very small. The completely cowled nacelle for a radial air-cooled engine appears to have the highest drag, the liquid-cooled engine appears to have the highest drag, the liquid-cooled engine nacelle with external radiator slightly less drag. The liquid-cooled engine nacelle with radiator in the cowling hood has about half the drag of the cowled radial air-cooled engine nacelle. The extension-shaft housing shows practically no increase in drag over that of the wing alone. A large part of the drag of the liquid-cooled engine nacelle appears to be due to the external radiator. The maximum propulsive efficiency for a given propeller pitch setting is about 2% higher for the liquid-cooled engine nacelle with the radiator in the cowling hood than that for the other cowling arrangements.

Wood, Donald H.

1934-01-01

182

Process Cooling Pumping Systems Analysis  

E-print Network

rejection while operating three pumps each. 2. Check Valve induced Pump Failure – While attempting to take readings, both systems exhibited check valve failure to hold. This failure causes significant short-circuiting of water to the cold well, causing...

Sherman, C.

2008-01-01

183

What is “engineering systems thinking”?  

Microsoft Academic Search

As technological systems grow larger, more complex, and interdisciplinary, electronics and hi-tech industries face a growing demand for engineers with a capacity for “engineering systems thinking”. This paper presents a multifunctional definition and 30 laws of “engineering systems thinking”. The definition and the laws are based on a study that its purpose was to identify the characteristics of engineers who

Moti Frank

2002-01-01

184

Understanding and reducing energy and costs in industrial cooling systems  

E-print Network

pressures as a retrofit. Considerations of free cooling and improved cooling tower operations are shown as additional "big hitters”. It is made clear that with appropriate measurements and an understanding of the cooling system, significant savings can...

Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.

2012-01-01

185

Integrated mine cooling and water conditioning system  

SciTech Connect

A method is described comprising: cooling an aqueous liquid at ground level, by means of a refrigeration system which rejects heat, to produce an aqueous ice slurry of ice crystals in the aqueous liquid; separating ice from some of the aqueous ice slurry produced at ground level, washing the ice and melting the ice to produce potable water at ground level, and using the potable water hydrostatic energy to power hydraulic machinery at the location below ground level; feeding the aqueous ice slurry from ground level to a location substantially below ground level to cool that location by heat exchange with the slurry, thereby producing warm aqueous liquid; withdrawing the warm aqueous liquid from the location, returning it to ground level and then cooling the aqueous liquid by means of the refrigeration system to again convert it to an aqueous ice slurry; and recycling the slurry to the location substantially below ground level.

Husain, M.; Nail, J.A.

1988-06-14

186

Developing systems engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systems engineering is a critical capability for our organisation's business following good growth in business but also because of risks in certain areas. Indeed, SE is of national importance if we are to sustain growth in the face of complex technologies. Ironically, there is a global shortage of these skills. This paper briefly reviews why it is difficult to develop

Duarte Gonçalves

2008-01-01

187

Comparison of temperature data from an engine investigation for film-cooled and non-film-cooled, panwise-finned vanes incorporating impingement cooling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The experimental temperature characteristics of two spanwise-finned, impingement-cooled vanes, one with film cooling and one without film cooling, were investigated in a modified J-75 research turbojet engine. Values of maximum temperature, average temperature, and maximum chordwise temperature difference were compared for the two vanes at the midspan. An analytical redesign of the two vane configurations indicated that the maximum and average temperatures and the maximum chordwise temperature difference could be significantly lowered. The experimental tests indicated that suction-surface film cooling may cause increased heat transfer near the trailing edge of the vane.

Gauntner, D. J.

1973-01-01

188

Transient Three-Dimensional Analysis of Nozzle Side Load in Regeneratively Cooled Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three-dimensional numerical investigations on the start-up side load physics for a regeneratively cooled, high-aspect-ratio nozzle were performed. The objectives of this study are to identify the three-dimensional side load physics and to compute the associated aerodynamic side load using an anchored computational methodology. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet condition based on an engine system simulation. Computations were performed for both the adiabatic and cooled walls in order to understand the effect of boundary conditions. Finite-rate chemistry was used throughout the study so that combustion effect is always included. The results show that three types of shock evolution are responsible for side loads: generation of combustion wave; transitions among free-shock separation, restricted-shock separation, and simultaneous free-shock and restricted shock separations; along with oscillation of shocks across the lip. Wall boundary conditions drastically affect the computed side load physics: the adiabatic nozzle prefers free-shock separation while the cooled nozzle favors restricted-shock separation, resulting in higher peak side load for the cooled nozzle than that of the adiabatic nozzle. By comparing the computed physics with those of test observations, it is concluded that cooled wall is a more realistic boundary condition, and the oscillation of the restricted-shock separation flow pattern across the lip along with its associated tangential shock motion are the dominant side load physics for a regeneratively cooled, high aspect-ratio rocket engine.

Wang, Ten-See

2005-01-01

189

PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

2005-01-01

190

Biological Systems Engineering Bioenvironmental Engineering Option  

E-print Network

(Organic Chemistry) 3 Micro 302 (Microorganisms) 1 Chem 231L (Organic Chemistry Lab) 1 Micro 302L Total Credits #12;Biological Systems Engineering Food Engineering Option 2013-2014 Catalog 128 Total of BSE) 4 Math 267 (Differential Equations) 3 Chem 231 (Organic Chemistry) 1 Chem 231L (Organic Chemistry

Lin, Zhiqun

191

NASA Systems Engineering Handbook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook is intended to provide general guidance and information on systems engineering that will be useful to the NASA community. It provides a generic description of Systems Engineering (SE) as it should be applied throughout NASA. A goal of the handbook is to increase awareness and consistency across the Agency and advance the practice of SE. This handbook provides perspectives relevant to NASA and data particular to NASA. The coverage in this handbook is limited to general concepts and generic descriptions of processes, tools, and techniques. It provides information on systems engineering best practices and pitfalls to avoid. There are many Center-specific handbooks and directives as well as textbooks that can be consulted for in-depth tutorials. This handbook describes systems engineering as it should be applied to the development and implementation of large and small NASA programs and projects. NASA has defined different life cycles that specifically address the major project categories, or product lines, which are: Flight Systems and Ground Support (FS&GS), Research and Technology (R&T), Construction of Facilities (CoF), and Environmental Compliance and Restoration (ECR). The technical content of the handbook provides systems engineering best practices that should be incorporated into all NASA product lines. (Check the NASA On-Line Directives Information System (NODIS) electronic document library for applicable NASA directives on topics such as product lines.) For simplicity this handbook uses the FS&GS product line as an example. The specifics of FS&GS can be seen in the description of the life cycle and the details of the milestone reviews. Each product line will vary in these two areas; therefore, the reader should refer to the applicable NASA procedural requirements for the specific requirements for their life cycle and reviews. The engineering of NASA systems requires a systematic and disciplined set of processes that are applied recursively and iteratively for the design, development, operation, maintenance, and closeout of systems throughout the life cycle of the programs and projects.

2007-01-01

192

Graduate Studies Transportation Systems Engineering  

E-print Network

for intermodal transportation, sustainable development and transporta- tion, application of geographicGraduate Studies Transportation Systems Engineering TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS The transportation that transportation systems engineering can promote a thriving economy and a better quality of life by ensuring

Jacobs, Laurence J.

193

Effective use of cooling lakes and cooling towers in hybrid cooling systems. Completion report, July 1983-August 1984  

SciTech Connect

The research summarized in this report analyzes the consequences of the use of hybrid cooling systems for the dissipation of waste heat from thermoelectric power generation. The hybrid cooling system study consists of a combination of cooling towers and a cooling lake to receive a specified heat load. A transient computer simulation model of both the cooling lake stratification and the cooling tower thermodynamic performance is developed. The model is calibrated and verified with field data. Simulations of various combinations of cooling lake and cooling tower capacities for a given power plant heat load are conducted to determine the effect on lake thermal structure, total water loss by evaporation, and power plant intake temperatures.

Sturm, T.W.

1984-08-01

194

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM  

E-print Network

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California that the uses of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been and recognizing the importance of publishing this work so it could be used by other researchers and decision

195

Research and development on passive cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments are carried out to investigate the effects of the natural convection of superheated gas as well as those of the standpipes on the temperature distributions of the components and the heat removal performance in the water-cooling panel system for the MHTGR for decay heat removal, and to verify reliability of the design and evaluation methods. The numerical results of

Shoji Takada

2004-01-01

196

ANALYSIS OF EFFECTIVENESS OF CAVITY COOLING SYSTEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) in an HTGR provides protection to the concrete structures surrounding the reactor and also provides a means for transporting parasitic heat losses from the reactor pressure vessel to the ultimate heat sink, i.e. the environment. PBMR propose to utilize large volume standpipes in order to simplify the piping layout and to increase the thermal

Martin P. van Staden

197

Numerical simulation of engine cooling air flow of a road vehicle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A modeling method for a heat exchanger is presented to predict engine cooling air flow rate. The comparison between calculations and experiments confirms accuracy of the modeling method. A modeling of vehicle body configuration is also discussed. It is found that precise modeling of engine room outlet configuration is important to improve estimation accuracy of engine cooling air flow rate. By taking into account these modeling methods, it is expected that the under floor flow field of a vehicle will be estimated accurately. This enables the study on flow interaction between engine cooling air flow and under floor flow numerically, which has been difficult to obtain physical image experimentally.

Ukita, Tetsuji; Kataoka, Takuya; China, Hiroshi

1993-09-01

198

Operating System Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From MIT's extraordinary OpenCourseWare projects comes this computer science course focused on operating system engineering. Taught by Frans Kaashoek in the Fall of 2006, this course covers "virtual memory, kernel and user mode, system calls, threads, context switches, interrupts, interprocess communication, coordination of concurrent activities, and the interface between software and hardware" and the interaction between these processes. On the site, visitors will find the course syllabus, lecture notes, lab activities, assignments, exams, and related links and tools. This is a great site for educators to use to bolster or create their own computer science modules on operating systems.

Kaashoek, Frans, 1965-

2006-01-01

199

An advanced engine thermal management system: nonlinear control and test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internal combustion engine thermal management system functionality can be enhanced through the introduction of smart thermostat valves and variable speed electric pumps and fans. The traditional automotive cooling system components include a wax based thermostat valve and crankshaft driven water pump. However, servo-motor driven valves, pumps, and fans can better regulate the engine's coolant fluid flow to realize fuel economy

Pradeep Setlur; John R. Wagner; Darren M. Dawson; Egidio Marotta

2005-01-01

200

Cooling apparatus for a gas transmission system  

SciTech Connect

An improved cooling apparatus is described for a gas transmission system, including: input means for receiving a medium to be cooled; output means for transmitting the medium after it is cooled; and, cooling means intercoupling the input means and the output means including radiator means having an input end and an output end, the input end connected to the input means and the output end connected to the output means; the cooling means including, in addition, fan means positioned to cooperate with the radiator means for producing a flow of cooling air across the radiator means; the fan means including a rotatable fan having a desired direction of rotation, a drive-motor for driving the fan in the desired direction and belt means intercoupling the drive-motor and the rotatable fan for rotation of the fan; the belt means includes a belt having, alternatively, a taut state and a slack state. Adjustable belt-tensioning means including a frame and being mechanically coupled to the belt for tensioning the belt between the taut state and the slack state, the adjustable belt-tensioning means including a sheave in rotating contact with the belt. A shaft having first and second ends, carrying the sheave at the first end and positioned in the frame substantially parallel to the plane of the belt and spaced from the belt an adjustable distance corresponding to the condition desired for the belt between the taut state and the slack state; a sprag-clutch having a first race fixedly connected to the frame and a unidirectionally rotatable second race coupled to the second end of the shaft. The second race having a direction of rotation relative to the first race which corresponds to the desired direction of rotation of the fan.

Leonard, P.A.

1987-07-21

201

Fuel-cell engine stream conditioning system  

DOEpatents

A stream conditioning system for a fuel cell gas management system or fuel cell engine. The stream conditioning system manages species potential in at least one fuel cell reactant stream. A species transfer device is located in the path of at least one reactant stream of a fuel cell's inlet or outlet, which transfer device conditions that stream to improve the efficiency of the fuel cell. The species transfer device incorporates an exchange media and a sorbent. The fuel cell gas management system can include a cathode loop with the stream conditioning system transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell related to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2002-01-01

202

Engineering the ULTra System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Advanced Transport Group at the University of Bristol, upon considering current traffic congestion problems in England and throughout the world, attempted to "identify the ideal system for future urban transport." The group's work has led to the development of the Urban Light Transport (ULTra) System. This paper, published in September 2002, describes the engineering challenges and accomplishments of the endeavor. Thus far, a test track has been constructed, and an initial vehicle design was successfully demonstrated. The ULTra home page provides much more information, documents, and videos.

Lowson, Martin.

2002-01-01

203

GENETIC ALGORITHMS CONTROL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

GENETIC ALGORITHMS IN CONTROL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING P. J. FLEMING R. C. PURSHOUSE Department. 789 May 2001 #12;Genetic algorithms in control systems engineering P. J. Fleming and R. C. Purshouse of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering University of Sheffield Sheffield, S1 3JD UK Research Report No

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

204

Laminated turbine vane design and fabrication. [utilizing film cooling as a cooling system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A turbine vane and associated endwalls designed for advanced gas turbine engine conditions are described. The vane design combines the methods of convection cooling and selective areas of full coverage film cooling. The film cooling technique is utilized on the leading edge, pressure side, and endwall regions. The turbine vane involves the fabrication of airfoils from a stack of laminates with cooling passages photoetched on the surface. Cold flow calibration tests, a thermal analysis, and a stress analysis were performed on the turbine vanes.

Hess, W. G.

1979-01-01

205

Hybrid optomechanical cooling by atomic ? systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate a hybrid quantum system consisting of a cavity optomechanical device optically coupled to an ultracold quantum gas. We show that the dispersive properties of the ultracold gas can be used to dramatically modify the optomechanical response of the mechanical resonator. We examine hybrid schemes wherein the mechanical resonator is coupled either to the motional or the spin degrees of freedom of the ultracold gas. In either case, we find an enhancement of more than two orders of magnitude in optomechanical cooling due to this hybrid interaction. Significantly, based on demonstrated parameters for the cavity optomechanical device, we identify regimes that enable the ground-state cooling of the resonator from room temperature. In addition, the hybrid system considered here represents a powerful interface for the use of an ultracold quantum gas for state preparation, sensing, and quantum manipulation of a mesoscopic mechanical resonator.

Bariani, F.; Singh, S.; Buchmann, L. F.; Vengalattore, M.; Meystre, P.

2014-09-01

206

Preliminary design package for solar heating and cooling systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Summarized preliminary design information on activities associated with the development, delivery and support of solar heating and cooling systems is given. These systems are for single family dwellings and commercial applications. The heating/cooling system use a reversible vapor compression heat pump that is driven in the cooling mode by a Rankine power loop, and in the heating mode by a variable speed electric motor. The heating/cooling systems differ from the heating-only systems in the arrangement of the heat pump subsystem and the addition of a cooling tower to provide the heat sink for cooling mode operation.

1978-01-01

207

Boiler control systems engineering  

SciTech Connect

The book provides in-depth coverage on how to safely and reliably control the firing of a boiler. Regardless of the capacity or fuel, certain fundamental control systems are required for boiler control. Large utility systems are more complex due to the number of burners and the overall capacity and equipment. This book covers engineering details on control systems and provides specific examples of boiler control including configuration and tuning. References to requirements are based on the 2004 NFPA 85 along with other ISA standards. Detailed chapters cover: Boiler fundamentals including piping and instrument diagrams (P&IDs) and a design basis checklist; Control of boilers, from strategies and bumpless transfer to interlock circuitry and final control elements; Furnace draft; Feedwater; Coal-fired boilers; Fuel and air control; Steam temperature; Burner management systems; Environment; and Control valve sizing. 2 apps.

Gilman, J.

2005-07-01

208

A Smart Multiple-Loop Automotive Cooling System—Model, Control, and Experimental Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The integration of computer-controlled electro-mechanical components in ground vehicle cooling systems can improve coolant temperature regulation and servomotor power consumption. Advanced thermal management systems for internal combustion engines can better regulate the combustion process by harmoniously controlling the cooling system's actuators to obtain desired thermal conditions in a power-efficient manner. In this paper, a comprehensive nonlinear control architecture is proposed

Mohammad H. Salah; Thomas H. Mitchell; John R. Wagner; Darren M. Dawson

2010-01-01

209

Evaluation of a Direct Evaporative Roof-Spray Cooling System  

E-print Network

Roof-Spray cooling systems are being extensively used to reduce the air-conditioning usage in industrial and commercial buildings. In buildings without air-conditioning, evaporative roof spray cooling systems help to reduce the interior temperatures...

Carrasco, A.; Pittard, R.; Kondepudi, S. N.; Somasundaram, S.

1987-01-01

210

Survey and Alignment of the Fermilab Electron Cooling System  

SciTech Connect

The goal of achieving the Tevatron luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} requires Electron Cooling in the Recycler Ring to provide an increased flux of antiprotons. The Fermilab Electron Cooling system has been designed to assist accumulation of antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. The installation along with the survey and alignment of the Electron Cooling system in the Recycler Ring were completed in November 2004. The Electron Cooling system was fully commissioned in May 2005 and the first cooling of antiprotons was achieved in July 2005. This paper discusses the alignment methodology employed to survey and align the Electron Cooling system.

Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; Leibfritz, Jerry

2006-09-01

211

A gas-cooled reactor surface power system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

1999-01-01

212

A gas-cooled reactor surface power system  

SciTech Connect

A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-1146, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

1999-01-22

213

Active cooling system alternatives for concentrating photovoltaic systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A design trade-off study was employed to choose an active cooling system for a large concentrating photovoltaic irrigation system. Wet cooling tower, air cooler-pond 'hybrid', and air cooler-evaporator designs were compared with respect to parasitic power requirements, initial cost, operating cost, reliability, maintenance requirements, load matching, and any corrosion, pollutants or residues resulting from operation. It is concluded that the

L. D. Clements; M. J. Oleary

1980-01-01

214

Energy conservation via solar energy applications to multi-family and commercial structures. Volume 3: An energy, engineering and economic analysis of heating and cooling systems for multi-family structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

An energy analysis was made for a multi family apartment model involving the heating, cooling, lumination and miscellaneous equipments energy consumption. The analysis compared various heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems with and without solar assistance to determine their merits on the basis of energy conservation and economic value. An electric resistance heating and electric air conditioning system were utilized

W. S. Fleming; T. Bender; T. Jagusztyn; P. Parkman; D. Sweetser

1977-01-01

215

Energy conservation via solar energy application to multi-family and commercial structures. Volume III. An energy, engineering and economic analysis of heating and cooling systems for multi-family structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

An energy analysis was made for a multi-family apartment model involving the heating, cooling, lumination and miscellaneous equipments energy consumption. The analysis compares various heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems with and without solar assistance to determine their merits on the basis of energy conservation and economic value. An electric resistance heating and electric air conditioning system were utilized

W. S. Fleming; T. Bender; T. Jagusztyn; P. Parkman; D. Sweetser

1977-01-01

216

Exhaust gas recirculation system for crankcase scavenged two cycle engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a two cycle crankcase scavenged engine comprising: a cylinder having a piston reciprocable disposed, the piston and cylinder forming a combustion chamber; a crankcase; an exhaust port opening into the combustion chamber; exhaust system means connected to the exhaust port for conducting exhaust gas away from the engine and cooling the exhaust gas; means for forming an

V. R. Kaufman; M. S. Geringer

1987-01-01

217

Performance of the dark energy camera liquid nitrogen cooling system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dark Energy Camera, the Imager and its cooling system was installed onto the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile in September 2012. The imager cooling system is a LN2 two-phase closed loop cryogenic cooling system. The cryogenic circulation processing is located off the telescope. Liquid nitrogen vacuum jacketed transfer lines are run up the outside of the telescope truss tubes to the imager inside the prime focus cage. The design of the cooling system along with commissioning experiences and initial cooling system performance is described. The LN2 cooling system with the DES imager was initially operated at Fermilab for testing, then shipped and tested in the Blanco Coudé room. Now the imager is operating inside the prime focus cage. It is shown that the cooling performance sufficiently cools the imager in a closed loop mode, which can operate for extended time periods without maintenance or LN2 fills.

Cease, H.; Alvarez, M.; Alvarez, R.; Bonati, M.; Derylo, G.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Lathrop, A.; Munoz, F.; Schmidt, R.; Schmitt, R. L.; Schultz, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Zhao, A.

2014-01-01

218

Cooling system and insulation concept for a Mach 5 turbo-ramjet aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A cooling system and insulation concept for a Mach 5 cruise aircraft, using non-cryogenic fuel is presented. Catalytic endothermic reaction of petroleum fuel is used as the heat sink for engine cooling. A secondary closed-loop coolant circuit removes heat from the engine and transfers this heat to the catalytic reactor. Insulation on the engine flow path surfaces reduces the cooling requirements. A high temperature insulation system, which is capable of a surface temperature of 4,000 F, is used for the combustor and nozzle. A complete closed-loop cooling system design is shown in detail. Main features of this system include a fuel preheater, a catalytic fuel reactor, and engine wall cooling panels. A silicone-based liquid polymer, designed for extended use at 750 F, is used as the coolant. The preheater and reactor design are based on the results of recent experimental work. The cooling panels are designed using a thermal fluid analysis computer program, which was originally developed for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). Major components are analyzed structurally as well as thermally and weights are presented.

Jones, S. C.; Petley, D. H.

1990-01-01

219

An Investigation of the Aerodynamics and Cooling of a Horizontally-Opposed Engine Installation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A research program to investigate the aerodynamics of reciprocating aircraft engine cooling installations is discussed. Current results from a flight test program are presented concerning installation flow measurement methods. The influence of different inlet designs on installation cooling effectiveness and efficiency are described.

Miley, S. J.

1977-01-01

220

Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

1977-01-01

221

Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++ [1], GAMANL [2], GRPANL [3]and MGAU [4], typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service [5]. The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted.

Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

1999-02-01

222

Polk power station syngas cooling system  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the site development and construction phase of the new Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. This will be the first unit at a new site and will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology. The unit will utilize Texaco`s oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification, along with combined cycle power generation, to produce nominal 260MW. Integral to the gasification process is the syngas cooling system. The design, integration, fabrication, transportation, and erection of this equipment have provided and continue to provide major challenges for this project.

Jenkins, S.D.

1995-01-01

223

Engine exhaust gas recirculation system  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine employs a recirculation control valve in a passageway connecting the engine exhaust passage to the engine intake passage downstream from the throttle valve. An air conduit having an air control valve therein furnishes atmospheric air to the intake passage downstream from the throttle valve. Vacuum responsive actuators are provided for

H. Nishimura; T. Shioya; T. Umemoto

1981-01-01

224

Engine exhaust gas recirculation system  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine employs a recirculation control valve in a passageway connecting the engine exhaust passage to the engine intake passage downstream from the throttle valve. An air conduit having an air control valve therein draws atmospheric air into the intake passage downstream from the throttle valve. Vacuum responsive actuators are provided for

K. Ishii; H. Nishimura; K. Osawa

1981-01-01

225

Improving the Water Efficiency of Cooling Production System  

E-print Network

For most of the time, cooling towers (CTs) of cooling systems operate under partial load conditions and by regulating the air circulation with a variable frequency drive (VFD), significant reduction in the fan power can be achieved. In Kuwait...

Maheshwari, G.; Al-Hadban, Y.; Al-Taqi, H. H.; Alasseri, R.

2010-01-01

226

Systems Simulation and Economic Analysis for Active Solar Cooling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A consistent methodology has been developed by which general solar cooling market capture goals have been translated into specific cost and performance goals for solar cooling systems and subsystems. Preliminary results indicate that realistic cost/perfor...

M. Warren, M. Wahlig

1981-01-01

227

A Free Cooling Based Chilled Water System at Kingston  

E-print Network

In efforts to reduce operating costs, the IBM site at Kingston, New York incorporated the energy saving concept of 'free cooling' (direct cooling of chilled water with condenser water) with the expansion of the site chilled water system. Free...

Jansen, P. R.

1984-01-01

228

The Thermodynamic and Cost Benefits of Floating Cooling Systems  

E-print Network

. The application of a floating cooling concept to evaporative heat rejection systems can have significant impact on improving plant performance. The floating cooling concept refers to the optimization of yearly plant output and energy consumption by taking...

Svoboda, K. J.; Klooster, H. J.; Johnnie, D. H., Jr.

1983-01-01

229

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test was reported. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single family residences, multiple family residences and commercial applications.

1977-01-01

230

CCHP System with Interconnecting Cooling and Heating Network  

E-print Network

The consistency between building heating load, cooling load and power load are analyzed in this paper. The problem of energy waste and low equipment usage in a traditional CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) system with generated electricity...

Fu, L.; Geng, K.; Zheng, Z.; Jiang, Y.

2006-01-01

231

Development of hybrid solar-assisted cooling\\/heating system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A solar-assisted ejector cooling\\/heating system (SACH) was developed in this study. The SACH combines a pump-less ejector cooling system (ECS) with an inverter-type heat pump (R22) and is able to provide a stable capacity for space cooling. The ECS is driven by solar heat and is used to cool the condenser of the R22 heat pump to increase its COP

B. J. Huang; J. H. Wu; H. Y. Hsu; J. H. Wang

2010-01-01

232

Passive-solar-cooling system concepts for small office buildings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the efforts of a small group of building design professionals and energy analysis experts to develop passive solar cooling concepts including first cost estimates for small office buildings. Two design teams were brought together at each of two workshops held in the fall of 1982. Each team included an architect, mechanical engineer, structural engineer, and energy analysis expert. This report presents the passive cooling system concepts resulting from the workshops. It summarizes the design problems, solutions and first-cost estimates relating to each technology considered, and documents the research needs identified by the participants in attempting to implement the various technologies in an actual building design. Each design problem presented at the workshops was based on the reference (base case) small office building analyzed as part of LBL's Cooling Assessment. Chapter II summarizes the thermal performance, physical specifications and estimated first-costs of the base case design developed for this work. Chapters III - VI describe the passive cooling system concepts developed for each technology: beam daylighting; mass with night ventilation; evaporative cooling; and integrated passive cooling systems. The final Chapters, VII and VIII present the preliminary implications for economics of passive cooling technologies (based on review of the design concepts) and recommendations of workshop participants for future research in passive cooling for commercial buildings. Appendices provide backup information on each chapter as indicated.

Whiddon, W.I.; Hart, G.K.

1983-02-01

233

Optimization of a heat-pipe-cooled space radiator for use with a reactor-powered Stirling engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design optimization of a reactor-Stirling heat-pipe-cooled radiator is presented. The radiator is a self-deploying concept that uses individual finned heat pipe 'petals' to reject waste heat from a Stirling engine. Radiator optimization methodology is presented, and the results of a parametric analysis of the radiator design variables for a 100-kW(e) system are given. The additional steps of optiminzing the radiator resulted in a net system mass savings of 3 percent.

Moriarty, Michael P.; French, Edward P.

234

Optimization of a heat-pipe-cooled space radiator for use with a reactor-powered Stirling engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design optimization of a reactor-Stirling heat-pipe-cooled radiator is presented. The radiator is a self-deploying concept that uses individual finned heat pipe 'petals' to reject waste heat from a Stirling engine. Radiator optimization methodology is presented, and the results of a parametric analysis of the radiator design variables for a 100-kW(e) system are given. The additional steps of optiminzing the radiator resulted in a net system mass savings of 3 percent.

Moriarty, Michael P.; French, Edward P.

1987-01-01

235

A cooled-gas pyrometer for use in hypersonic engine testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A cooled-gas pyrometer designed for application in a hypersonic research engine program was fabricated and tested. Design and operational considerations and calibration data are presented. The probe was tested in a rocket-engine exhaust stream operating at Mach 2 and 2300 K. Test temperature measurements agreed to within 2 percent with a radiation shielded thermocouple probe.

Glawe, G. E.

1973-01-01

236

Stirling engine heating system  

SciTech Connect

A hot gas engine is described wherein a working gas flows back and forth in a closed path between a relatively cooler compression cylinder side of the engine and a relatively hotter expansion cylinder side of the engine and the path contains means including a heat source and a heat sink acting upon the gas in cooperation with the compression and expansion cylinders to cause the gas to execute a thermodynamic cycle wherein useful mechanical output power is developed by the engine, the improvement in the heat source which comprises a plurality of individual tubes each forming a portion of the closed path for the working gas.

Johansson, L.N.; Houtman, W.H.; Percival, W.H.

1988-06-28

237

The development of a solar-powered residential heating and cooling system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Efforts to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar power for residential heating and cooling are described. These efforts were concentrated on the analysis, design, and test of a full-scale demonstration system which is currently under construction at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. The basic solar heating and cooling system under development utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating and water heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling.

1974-01-01

238

Regeneratively cooled rocket engine for space storable propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analysis, design, fabrication, and test efforts were performed for the existing OF2/B2H6 regeneratively cooled lK (4448 N) thrust chamber to illustrate simultaneous B2H6 fuel and OF2 oxidizer cooling and to provide results for a gaseous propellant condition injected into the combustion chamber. Data derived from performance, thermal and flow measurements confirmed predictions derived from previous test work and from concurrent analytical study. Development data derived from the experimental study were indicated to be sufficient to develop a preflight thrust chamber demonstrator prototype for future space mission objectives.

Wagner, W. R.

1973-01-01

239

Investigation of Water-spray Cooling of Turbine Blades in a Turbojet Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytical and experimental investigation was made with a J33-A-9 engine to determine the effectiveness of spray cooling as a means of increasing thrust by permitting engine operation at inlet-gas temperatures and speeds above rated. With the assumption of adequate spray cooling at a coolant-to-gas flow ratio of 3 percent, calculations for the sea-level static condition indicated a thrust may be achieved by engine operation at an inlet-gas temperature of 2000 degrees F and an overspeed of 10 percent. Of the water-injection configurations investigated experimentally, those located in the inner ring of the stator diaphragm provided the best cooling at rated engine speed.

Freche, John C; Stelpflug, William J

1953-01-01

240

NASA systems engineering handbook. Draft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook is intended to provide information on systems engineering that will be useful to NASA system engineers, especially new ones. Its primary objective is to provide a generic description of systems engineering as it should be applied throughout NASA. Field Center Handbooks are encouraged to provide center-specific details of implementation. For NASA system engineers to choose to keep a copy of this handbook at their elbows, it must provide answers that cannot be easily found elsewhere. Consequently, it provides NASA-relevant perspectives and NASA-particular data. NASA management instructions (NMI's) are referenced when applicable. This handbook's secondary objective is to serve as a useful companion to all of the various courses in systems engineering that are being offered under NASA's auspices. The coverage of systems engineering is general to techniques, concepts, and generic descriptions of processes, tools, and techniques. It provides good systems engineering practices, and pitfalls to avoid. This handbook describes systems engineering as it should be applied to the development of major NASA product and producing systems.

Shishko, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Aster, Robert; Bilardo, Vincent; Forsberg, Kevin; Hammond, Walter E.; Mooz, Harold; Polaski, Lou; Wade, Ron; Cassingham, Randy (editor)

1992-01-01

241

Altitude Cooling Investigation of the R-2800-21 Engine in the P-47G Airplane. IV - Engine Cooling-Air Pressure Distribution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study of the data obtained in a flight investigation of an R-2800-21 engine in a P-47G airplane was made to determine the effect of the flight variables on the engine cooling-air pressure distribution. The investigation consisted of level flights at altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet for the normal range of engine and airplane operation. The data showed that the average engine front pressures ranged from 0.73 to 0.82 of the impact pressure (velocity head). The average engine rear pressures ranged from 0.50 to 0.55 of the impact pressure for closed cowl flaps and from 0.10 to 0.20 for full-open cowl flaps. In general, the highest front pressures were obtained at the bottom of the engine. The rear pressures for the rear-row cylinders were .lower and the pressure drops correspondingly higher than for the front-row cylinders. The rear-pressure distribution was materially affected by cowl-flap position in that the differences between the rear pressures of the front-row and rear-row cylinders markedly increased as the cowl flaps were opened. For full-open cowl flaps, the pressure drops across the rear-row cylinders were in the order of 0.2 of the impact pressure greater than across the front-row cylinders. Propeller speed and altitude had little effect on the -coolingair pressure distribution, Increase in angle of inclination of the thrust axis decreased the front ?pressures for the cylinders at the top of the engine and increased them for the cylinders at the bottom of the engine. As more auxiliary air was taken from the engine cowling, the front pressures and, to a lesser extent, the rear pressures for the cylinders at the bottom of the engine decreased. No correlation existed between the cooling-air pressure-drop distribution and the cylinder-temperature distribution.

Kaufman, Samuel J.; Staudt, Robert C.; Valerino, Michael F.

1947-01-01

242

A model for radionuclide transport in the Cooling Water System  

Microsoft Academic Search

A radionuclide transport model developed to assess radiological levels in the K-reactor Cooling Water System (CWS) in the event of an inadvertent process water (PW) leakage to the cooling water (CW) in the heat exchangers (HX) is described. During and following a process water leak, the radionuclide transport model determines the time-dependent release rates of radionuclide from the cooling water

Kahook

1992-01-01

243

BPM System for Electron Cooling in the Fermilab Recycler Ring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a VXI based system used to acquire and process BPM data for the electron cooling system in the Fermilab Recycler ring. The BPM system supports acquisition of data from 19 BPM locations in five different sections of the electron cooling apparatus. Beam positions for both electrons and anti-protons can be detected simultaneously with a resolution of ±50 ?m. We calibrate the system independently for each beam type at each BPM location. We describe the system components, signal processing and modes of operation used in support of the electron-cooling project and present experimental results of system performance for the developmental electron cooling installation at Fermilab.

Joireman, Paul W.; Cai, Jerry; Chase, Brian E.; Saewert, Greg W.

2004-11-01

244

System safety engineering analysis handbook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic requirements and guidelines for the preparation of System Safety Engineering Analysis are presented. The philosophy of System Safety and the various analytic methods available to the engineering profession are discussed. A text-book description of each of the methods is included.

Ijams, T. E.

1972-01-01

245

An experimental investigation of a gas turbine disk cooling system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of an experimental study of the cooling of a model disk similar to an engine disk are compared with the results obtained by three-dimensional finite difference computation, and it is reconfirmed that the determination of cooling air temperature is one of the most important data for predicting the disk temperature. The minimum cooling air flow rate necessary to prevent ingress of external hot gas is determined by the fluctuation of cooling air temperature inside the wheel space with the external axial hot gas flow for values of the rotational Reynolds number of 0-6.5 million. The effect of rotational speed on the minimum cooling air flow rate is found to be negligible, and it is shown that the determination of the ingress of hot gas using the pressure difference criterion underestimates the minimum cooling air flow rate.

Kobayashi, N.; Matsumato, M.; Shizuya, M.

1983-03-01

246

The theory study on radiant floor heating and cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims at developing a radiant floor cooling system using the existing radiant floor heating system. The theoretical model of the system heat transfer was established and the heat transfer process was simulated by the finite element analysis method. The analysis results show that the cooling and heating system has good performance in energy supply. It can meet the

Ren Yanli; Li Deying

2011-01-01

247

Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure  

DOEpatents

A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Wade, Gentry E. (Saratoga, CA)

1990-01-01

248

Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure  

DOEpatents

A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Wade, Gentry E. (Saratoga, CA)

1989-01-01

249

industrial & systems (ISE) Industrial and Systems Engineers use engineering and business principles  

E-print Network

70 industrial & systems (ISE) Industrial and Systems Engineers use engineering and business systems to help companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems Engineer. Programs Available · Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 129 units · Industrial

Rohs, Remo

250

A dual-cooled hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine heat transfer analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential benefits of simultaneously using hydrogen and oxygen as rocket engine coolants are described. A plug-and-spool rocket engine was examined at heat fluxes ranging from 9290 to 163,500 kW/sq m, using a combined 3-D conduction/advection analysis. Both counter flow and parallel flow cooling arrangements were analyzed. The results indicate that a significant amount of heat transfer to the oxygen occurs, reducing both the hot side wall temperature of the rocket engine and also reducing the exit temperature of the hydrogen coolant. In all heat flux and coolant flow rates examined, the total amount of heat transferred to the oxygen was found to be largely independent of the oxygen coolant flow direction. At low heat flux/low coolant flow (throttled) conditions, the oxygen coolant absorbed more than 30 percent of the overall heat transfer from the rocket engine exhaust gasses. Also, hot side wall temperatures were judged to decrease by approximately 120 K in the throat area and up to a 170 K combustion chamber wall temperature reduction is expected if dual cooling is applied. The reduction in combustion chamber wall temperatures at throttled conditions is especially desirable since tha analysis indicates that a double temperature maxima, one at the throat and another in the combustion chamber, occurs with a traditional hydrogen cooled only engine. Conversely, a dual cooled engine essentially eliminates any concern for overheating in the combustion chamber.

Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

1991-01-01

251

Optimization of a heat-pipe-cooled space radiator for use with a reactor-powered Stirling engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design optimization of a reactor-Stirling heat-pipe-cooled radiator is presented. The radiator is a self-deploying concept that uses individual finned heat pipe 'petals' to reject waste heat from a Stirling engine. Radiator optimization methodology is presented, and the results of a parametric analysis of the radiator design variables for a 100-kW(e) system are given. The additional steps of optiminzing the

Michael P. Moriarty; Edward P. French

1987-01-01

252

Building solar energy heating system and cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A built-in solar combination heating and cooling system for a building, particularly a residence, having a sub-floor below grade, walls, one or more ceilings, and a peaked roof comprises a first heat exchange means and a second heat exchange means, where the first heat exchange means absorbs heat from the southerly surface of the roof, and the second heat exchange

Stilber

1980-01-01

253

Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Neymark, J. [Neymark (Joel), Golden, CO (United States)] [Neymark (Joel), Golden, CO (United States)

1994-11-01

254

Development of a solar-powered passive ejector cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development of an ejector refrigeration system that is powered by solar thermal energy. The cooling system contains no active parts and is therefore deemed passive. Water is used as the refrigerant though other natural refrigerants could be used for lower temperature operation. A prototype system was built with a nominal cooling capacity of 7 kW. This

V. M Nguyen; S. B Riffat; P. S Doherty

2001-01-01

255

Validation of Supersonic Film Cooling Modeling for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics include: upper stage engine key requirements and design drivers; Calspan "stage 1" results, He slot injection into hypersonic flow (air); test articles for shock generator diagram, slot injector details, and instrumentation positions; test conditions; modeling approach; 2-d grid used for film cooling simulations of test article; heat flux profiles from 2-d flat plate simulations (run #4); heat flux profiles from 2-d backward facing step simulations (run #43); isometric sketch of single coolant nozzle, and x-z grid of half-nozzle domain; comparison of 2-d and 3-d simulations of coolant nozzles (run #45); flowfield properties along coolant nozzle centerline (run #45); comparison of 3-d CFD nozzle flow calculations with experimental data; nozzle exit plane reduced to linear profile for use in 2-d film-cooling simulations (run #45); synthetic Schlieren image of coolant injection region (run #45); axial velocity profiles from 2-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); coolant mass fraction profiles from 2-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); heat flux profiles from 2-d film cooling simulations (run #45); heat flux profiles from 2-d film cooling simulations (runs #47, #45, and #47); 3-d grid used for film cooling simulations of test article; heat flux contours from 3-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); and heat flux profiles from 3-d and 2-d film cooling simulations (runs #44, #46, and #47).

Morris, Christopher I.; Ruf, Joseph H.

2010-01-01

256

Solar space heating and cooling by selective use of the components of a desiccant cooling system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The economic advantages of by-passing various components of a desiccant cooling system under conditions not requiring their use are estimated by evaluating the annual costs of heating and cooling a commercial building in three representative U.S. cities. Life-cycle costs of systems employing solar heat for space heating and desiccant regeneration are compared with those using electric heat. The costs of purchasing and operating heating and desiccant cooling systems, with and without solar heat supply, are compared with those employing conventional heating and vapor compression cooling. The conditions under which commercial buildings can be cooled with desiccant systems at costs competitive with conventional systems are identified. A commercially available vapor compression air conditioner is used as a standard of comparison for energy consumption and room comfort. Heating and cooling requirements of the building are determined by use of the BLAST computer model in a simulation of long term system operation. Performance of the desiccant cooling system and life cycle savings obtained by its use are determined by simulation employing the TRNSYS computer model. TRNSYS compatible subroutines are developed to simulate operation of the desiccant equipment, the building, and the controllers that operate and monitor the system components. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form. This study shows that in the widely different climates represented in Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, by-passing various components in the desiccant cooling system when they are not needed is economically advantageous. Operation cost of the complete system decreased by 47.3% in Los Angeles, by 30.9% in New York City, and by 23.9% in Miami by not operating the desiccant wheel and other elements. The ventilation desiccant cooling system has major economic advantage over conventional systems under conditions of moderate humidity, as in Los Angeles and New York City. In Miami, however, the thermal energy needed for desiccant cooling is three to four times greater than that for Los Angeles and New York, so the desiccant system is not a competitive option in hot, humid climates. Life cycle savings in the three locations show that operation of the desiccant cooling and heating system with solar energy is more costly than with conventional energy at 1996 prices. Solar energy would become competitive, however, if annual electric energy inflation rates exceed 10 percent.

Abbud, Ihsan Aladdin

257

Cooled railplug  

DOEpatents

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX)

1996-01-01

258

Intelligent Engine Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high bypass jet engine fan case represents one of the largest, heaviest single components in an engine. In addition to supporting the inlet and providing the fan flowpath, the most critical function is the containment of a failed fan blade. In this development program, a lightweight, low-cost composite containment case with diagnostic capabilities was developed, fabricated, and tested. The fan case design, containment methods, and diagnostic concepts evaluated in the initial Propulsion 21 program were improved and scaled up to a full case design.

Xie, Ming

2008-01-01

259

Engine Data Interpretation System (EDIS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A prototype of an expert system was developed which applies qualitative or model-based reasoning to the task of post-test analysis and diagnosis of data resulting from a rocket engine firing. A combined component-based and process theory approach is adopted as the basis for system modeling. Such an approach provides a framework for explaining both normal and deviant system behavior in terms of individual component functionality. The diagnosis function is applied to digitized sensor time-histories generated during engine firings. The generic system is applicable to any liquid rocket engine but was adapted specifically in this work to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The system is applied to idealized data resulting from turbomachinery malfunction in the SSME.

Cost, Thomas L.; Hofmann, Martin O.

1990-01-01

260

Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration  

DOEpatents

An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

Anstine, Larry D. (San Jose, CA); James, Dean B. (Saratoga, CA); Melaika, Edward A. (Berkeley, CA); Peterson, Jr., John P. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01

261

Optical monitoring system for a turbine engine  

DOEpatents

The monitoring system for a gas turbine engine including a viewing tube assembly having an inner end and an outer end. The inner end is located adjacent to a hot gas flow path within the gas turbine engine and the outer end is located adjacent to an outer casing of the gas turbine engine. An aperture wall is located at the inner end of the viewing tube assembly and an optical element is located within the viewing tube assembly adjacent to the inner end and is spaced from the aperture wall to define a cooling and purge chamber therebetween. An aperture is defined in the aperture wall for passage of light from the hot gas flow path to the optical element. Swirl passages are defined in the viewing tube assembly between the aperture wall and the optical element for passage of cooling air from a location outside the viewing tube assembly into the chamber, wherein swirl passages effect a swirling movement of air in a circumferential direction within the chamber.

Lemieux, Dennis H; Smed, Jan P; Williams, James P; Jonnalagadda, Vinay

2013-05-14

262

industrial & systems (ISE) Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles  

E-print Network

74 industrial & systems (ISE) Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business to help companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task. Programs Available · Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 128 units · Industrial

Rohs, Remo

263

Air cooled turbine component having an internal filtration system  

DOEpatents

A centrifugal particle separator is provided for removing particles such as microscopic dirt or dust particles from the compressed cooling air prior to reaching and cooling the turbine blades or turbine vanes of a turbine engine. The centrifugal particle separator structure has a substantially cylindrical body with an inlet arranged on a periphery of the substantially cylindrical body. Cooling air enters centrifugal particle separator through the separator inlet port having a linear velocity. When the cooling air impinges the substantially cylindrical body, the linear velocity is transformed into a rotational velocity, separating microscopic particles from the cooling air. Microscopic dust particles exit the centrifugal particle separator through a conical outlet and returned to a working medium.

Beeck, Alexander R. (Orlando, FL)

2012-05-15

264

Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Propulsion Engine Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments, and extend component lifetimes. For future high performance engines, the development of advanced ceramic barrier coating systems will allow these coatings to be used to simultaneously increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling requirements, thereby leading to significant improvements in engine power density and efficiency. In order to meet future engine performance and reliability requirements, the coating systems must be designed with increased high temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved thermal stress and erosion resistance. In this paper, ceramic coating design and testing considerations will be described for high temperature and high-heat-flux engine applications in hot corrosion and oxidation, erosion, and combustion water vapor environments. Further coating performance and life improvements will be expected by utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, and improved processing techniques, in conjunction with modeling and design tools.

Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

2004-01-01

265

Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

1978-01-01

266

Research on the Cooling System of a 4QT Prototype Machine Used for HEV  

Microsoft Academic Search

A four-quadrant transducer (4QT) is a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) power train concept. It can enable the internal combustion engine (ICE) to operate at optimum efficiency during all driving conditions with both torque and speed control. The thermal property is a vital problem due to its special configuration. Aiming to find the hot spot and investigate the cooling system of

Ping Zheng; Ranran Liu; Peter Thelin; Erik Nordlund; Chandur Sadarangani

2008-01-01

267

Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using

R. A. Martin; M. A. Merrigan; M. G. Elder; J. T. Sena; E. S. Keddy; C. C. Silverstein

1992-01-01

268

Numerical investigation on super-cooled large droplet icing of fan rotor blade in jet engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Icing (or ice accretion) is a phenomenon in which super-cooled water droplets impinge and accrete on a body. It is well known that ice accretion on blades and vanes leads to performance degradation and has caused severe accidents. Although various anti-icing and deicing systems have been developed, such accidents still occur. Therefore, it is important to clarify the phenomenon of ice accretion on an aircraft and in a jet engine. However, flight tests for ice accretion are very expensive, and in the wind tunnel it is difficult to reproduce all climate conditions where ice accretion can occur. Therefore, it is expected that computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which can estimate ice accretion in various climate conditions, will be a useful way to predict and understand the ice accretion phenomenon. On the other hand, although the icing caused by super-cooled large droplets (SLD) is very dangerous, the numerical method has not been established yet. This is why SLD icing is characterized by splash and bounce phenomena of droplets and they are very complex in nature. In the present study, we develop an ice accretion code considering the splash and bounce phenomena to predict SLD icing, and the code is applied to a fan rotor blade. The numerical results with and without the SLD icing model are compared. Through this study, the influence of the SLD icing model is numerically clarified.

Isobe, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Makoto

2014-10-01

269

Energy Systems Engineering Technician Curriculum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

St. Lawerence College of Ontario, Canada offers a two year program for students interested in becoming Energy Systems Engineering Technicians serving the alternative energy industry. The website offers a description of the program and links to required courses.

2010-06-07

270

Optical systems engineering - A tutorial  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper examines the use of the systems engineering approach in the design of optical systems, noting that the use of such an approach which involves an integrated interdisciplinary approach to the development of systems is most appropriate for optics. It is shown that the high precision character of optics leads to complex and subtle effects on optical system performance, resulting from structural, thermal dynamical, control system, and manufacturing and assembly considerations. Attention is given to communication problems that often occur among users and optical engineers due to the unique factors of optical systems. It is concluded that it is essential that the optics community provide leadership to resolve communication problems and fully formalize the field of optical systems engineering.

Wyman, C. L.

1979-01-01

271

MIT Engineering Systems Symposium, March 2004 1 The Case for Evolving Systems Engineering as a  

E-print Network

MIT Engineering Systems Symposium, March 2004 1 The Case for Evolving Systems Engineering as a Field within Engineering Systems Donna Rhodes and Daniel Hastings Engineering Systems Division. Engineering Systems is an important new field of study focusing on the complex engineering of systems

de Weck, Olivier L.

272

Exploratory Engine Test of Transpiration-cooled Turbine-rotor Blade with Wire-cloth Shell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Engine tests were made on a transpiration-cooled blade that was fabricated from an internal load-carrying member with an external surface of wire cloth. After operation in the engine, some damage was noted at the tip region of the trailing edge of the blades. On other sections of the blade, the wire cloth did not appear greatly overheated, and it appeared that satisfactory chordwise temperature distribution was provided by orifices in the blade base.

Donoughe, Patrick L; Diaguila, Anthony J

1954-01-01

273

Laboratory research on combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) systems offer the potential for a significant increase in fuel use efficiency by generating electricity onsite and recycling the exhaust gas for heating, cooling, or dehumidifying. A challenge for CCHP system is the efficient integration of distributed generation (DG) equipment with thermally-activated (TA) technologies. The China Ministry of Science and Technology and Tsinghua University

L. Fu; X. L. Zhao; S. G. Zhang; Y. Jiang; H. Li; W. W. Yang

2009-01-01

274

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. [prototype development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems, six heating and six heating and cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications, is reported. Schedules and technical discussions, along with illustrations on the progress made from April 1, 1977 through June 30, 1977 are detailed.

1977-01-01

275

COOLING FAN AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Upcoming emissions regulations (Tiers 3, 4a and 4b) are imposing significantly higher heat loads on the cooling system than lesser regulated machines. This work was a suite of tasks aimed at reducing the parasitic losses of the cooling system, or improving the design process through six distinct tasks: 1. Develop an axial fan that will provide more airflow, with less

Ronald Dupree

2005-01-01

276

Performance of a Fog System for Cooling Greenhouses  

Microsoft Academic Search

An evaporative cooling system for greenhouses based on spraying water in very fine droplets (in the fog-size range) without wetting the foliage, is proposed. The combination of ventilation and evaporation flow rates was determined as a function of solar radiation and the ambient climate conditions in order to provide the desired climate conditions. This cooling system can provide a wide

A. Arbel; O. Yekutieli; M. Barak

1999-01-01

277

Modeling and simulation of mixing layer flows for rocket engine film cooling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Film cooling has been selected for the thermal protection of the composite nozzle extension of the J-2X engine which is currently being developed for the second stage of NASA's next generation launch vehicle, the Ares I rocket. However, several challenges remain in order to achieve effective film cooling of the nozzle extension and to ensure its safe operation. The extreme complexity of the flow (three-dimensional wakes, lateral flows, vorticity, and flow separation) makes predicting film cooling performance difficult. There is also a dearth of useful supersonic film cooling data available for engineers to use in engine design and a lack of maturity of CFD tools to quantitatively match supersonic film cooling data. This dissertation advances the state of the art in film cooling by presenting semi-empirical analytical models which improve the basic physical understanding and prediction of the effects of pressure gradients, compressibility and density gradients on film cooling effectiveness. These models are shown to correlate most experimental data well and to resolve several conflicts in the open literature. The core-to-coolant stream velocity ratio, R, and the Kays acceleration parameter, KP, are identified as the critical parameters needed to understand how pressure gradients influence film cooling performance. The convective Mach number, MC, the total temperature ratio, theta0, and the Mach number of the high speed stream, MHS, are shown to be important when explaining the effects of compressibility and density gradient on film cooling effectiveness. An advance in the simulation of film cooling flows is also presented through the development of a computationally inexpensive RANS methodology capable of correctly predicting film cooling performance under turbulent, subsonic conditions. The subsonic simulation results suggest that it in order to obtain accurate predictions using RANS it is essential to thoroughly characterize the turbulent states at the inlet of the coolant and core streams of the film cooling flow. The limitations of this approach are established using a Grid Convergence Index (GCI) Test and a demonstration of the extension of this RANS methodology to supersonic conditions is presented.

Dellimore, Kiran Hamilton Jeffrey

278

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOEpatents

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

Pendergrass, J.C.

1997-05-13

279

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOEpatents

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

Pendergrass, Joseph C. (Gainesville, GA)

1997-01-01

280

Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES  

E-print Network

Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the building blocks and provides for an improved quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through physical construction and operation of transportation facilities, and through the travel

Wang, Yuhang

281

Current status of cooled IR detectors at i3system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper shows the current status of cooled IR detector technologies at i3system, South Korea. Mass production technology of i3system has successfully supplied lots of QVGA cooled IR detectors to camera customers. i3system has also developed small pitch cooled IR detectors with 320×256 and 640×512 formats for several different applications such as thermal sights and 24-hour operation observation units. In 2013, i3system's cooled IR detector has been launched in STSAT(Science and Technology SATellite)-2C through Naro-1 program which was South Korea's first successful launch vehicle for satellite. Owing to i3system's robust, intensive design and test programs, IR detector technologies have been space qualified without any further efforts by the space program. Currently, development programs for SXGA(1280×1024) with small pitch cooled detector are being progressed and its status is addressed.

Bae, Sooho; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Lee, Ho-Joon; Jung, Han

2014-06-01

282

Engineering Resilient Cyber-Physical Systems  

E-print Network

Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Thrust Area 6 Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Email: Overbye@illinois.edu Power Systems Engineering Research Center The Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC

283

Cooling System Using Natural Circulation for Air Conditioning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, Cooling systems with natural circulation loop of refrigerants are reviewed. The cooling system can largely reduce energy consumption of a cooling system for the telecommunication base site. The cooling system consists of two refrigeration units; vapor compression refrigeration unit and sub-cooling unit with a natural-circulation loop. The experiments and calculations were carried out to evaluate the cycle performance of natural circulation loop with HFCs and CO2. The experimental results showed that the cooling capacity of R410A is approximately 30% larger than that of R407C at the temperature difference of 20K and the cooling capacity of CO2 was approximately 4-13% larger than that of R410A under the two-phase condition. On the other hand, the cooling capacity of CO2 was approximately 11% smaller than that of R410A under the supercritical condition. The cooling capacity took a maximum value at an amount of refrigerant and lineally increased as the temperature difference increases and the slightly increased as the height difference. The air intake temperature profile in the inlet of the heat exchangers makes the reverse circulation under the supercritical state and the driving head difference for the reverse circulation depends on the density change to temperature under the supercritical state. Also, a new fan control method to convert the reverse circulation into the normal circulation was reviewed.

Okazaki, Takashi; Seshimo, Yu

284

Communication Engineering Systems Introduction to Communication Systems  

E-print Network

Communication Engineering Systems Introduction to Communication Systems (1) Assoc .. 4 #12;Outline Variety of Today's Communication SystemsVariety of Today s Communication Systems Design Challenges Basic of Communication Systems F d t l Li it tiFundamental Limitation Bandwidth

Kovintavewat, Piya

285

System Engineering Paper  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Iowa State University team, Team LunaCY, is composed of the following sub-teams: the main student organization, the Lunabotics Club; a senior mechanical engineering design course, ME 415; a senior multidisciplinary design course, ENGR 466; and a senior design course from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa. Team LunaCY designed and fabricated ART-E III, Astra Robotic Tractor- Excavator the Third, for the team's third appearance in the NASA Lunabotic Mining competition. While designing ART-E III, the team had four main goals for this year's competition:to reduce the total weight of the robot, to increase the amount of regolith simulant mined, to reduce dust, and to make ART-E III autonomous. After many designs and research, a final robot design was chosen that obtained all four goals of Team LunaCY. A few changes Team LunaCY made this year was to go to the electrical, computer, and software engineering club fest at Iowa State University to recruit engineering students to accomplish the task of making ART-E III autonomous. Team LunaCY chose to use LabView to program the robot and various sensors were installed to measure the distance between the robot and the surroundings to allow ART-E III to maneuver autonomously. Team LunaCY also built a testing arena to test prototypes and ART-E III in. To best replicate the competition arena at the Kennedy Space Center, a regolith simulant was made from sand, QuickCrete, and fly ash to cover the floor of the arena. Team LunaCY also installed fans to allow ventilation in the arena and used proper safety attire when working in the arena . With the additional practice in the testing arena and innovative robot design, Team LunaCY expects to make a strong appearance at the 2012 NASA Lunabotic Mining Competition. .

Heise, James; Hull, Bethanne J.; Bauer, Jonathan; Beougher, Nathan G.; Boe, Caleb; Canahui, Ricardo; Charles, John P.; Cooper, Zachary Davis Job; DeShaw, Mark A.; Fontanella, Luan Gasparetto; Friel, Mark; Goebel, Katie; Grant, Alex Martinsdacosta; Graves, Matt; Harms, Ryan Andrew; Hill, Aren; Lsely, Kevin Lee; Jose, Sonia; Klein, Andrew; Kolstad, Lauren Wickham; Lamp, Daniel A.; Lindquist, Mariangela Martin; Lopes, Daniel da Paula; Lourens, Rob; Matthews, Christopher

2012-01-01

286

Thermal design study of an air-cooled plug-nozzle system for a supersonic cruise aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A heat-transfer design analysis has been made of an air-cooled plug-nozzle system for a supersonic-cruise aircraft engine. The proposed 10deg half-angle conical plug is sting supported from the turbine frame. Plug cooling is accomplished by convection and film cooling. The flight profile studied includes maximum afterburning from takeoff to Mach 2.7 and supersonic cruise at Mach 2.7 with a low afterburner setting. The calculations indicate that, for maximum afterburning, about 2 percent of the engine primary flow, removed after the second stage of the nine-stage compressor, will adequately cool the plug and sting support. Ram air may be used for cooling during supersonic-cruise operations, however. Therefore, the cycle efficiency penalty paid for air cooling the plug and sting support should be low.

Clark, J. S.; Lieberman, A.

1972-01-01

287

A hemolysis study of an intravascular blood cooling system for localized organ tissue cooling.  

PubMed

Therapeutic hypothermia can reduce both ischemic and reperfusion injury arising after strokes and heart attacks. New localized organ cooling systems offer a way to reduce tissue damage more effectively with fewer side effects. To assess initial blood safety of our new organ cooling system, the CoolGuide Cooling System (CCS), we investigated safe operating conditions and configurations from a hemolysis perspective. The CCS consists of a peristaltic pump, a custom-built external heat exchanger, a chiller, biocompatible polyvinyl cellulose (PVC) tubing, and a control console. The CCS cools and circulates autologous blood externally and re-delivers cooled blood to the patient through a conventional catheter inserted directly into the organ at risk. Catheter configurations used included: a 7F guide catheter only, a 7F guide with a 0.038" wire inserted through the center and advanced 2 cm distal to the catheter distal tip, a 6F guide catheter only and a 6F guide with a 0.014" guidewire similarly inserted through the center. Using porcine blood, an in vitro test rig was used to measure the degree of hemolysis generation, defined as the percentage change in free hemoglobin, adjusted for total hemoglobin and hematocrit, between exiting and entering blood. The highest degree of hemolysis generation was 0.11±0.04%, based on the average behavior with a 6F catheter and a 0.014" guidewire configuration at a blood flow rate of approximately 130 mL/min. In terms of average percentage free hemoglobin exiting the system, based on total hemoglobin, the highest value measured was 0.17%±0.03%, using this 6F and 0.014" guidewire configuration. This result is significantly below the most stringent European guideline of 0.8% used for blood storage and transfusion. This study provides initial evidence showing hemolysis generation arising from the CoolGuide Cooling System is likely to be clinically insignificant. PMID:23047283

Merrill, T L; Mingin, T; Merrill, D R; Botbyl, J; Akers, J E

2013-01-01

288

Discrete-frequency and broadband noise radiation from diesel engine cooling fans  

Microsoft Academic Search

This effort focuses on measuring and predicting the discrete-frequency and broadband noise radiated by diesel engine cooling fans. Unsteady forces developed by the interaction of the fan blade with inlet flow are the dominant source for both discrete-frequency and broadband noise of the subject propeller fan. In many cases, a primary source of discrepancy between fan noise prediction and measurement

Geon-Seok Kim

2007-01-01

289

Redesigning Process Cooling Systems in the Plastics Industry  

E-print Network

with a combined chilled water load of approximately 650 tons. LIFETIME’S PLASTICS FACILITY Lifetime’s plastic facility has 21 blow molding machines with a total rated throughput of 35,000 lbs of plastic/hr. Each machine requires cooling... for the mold, hydraulic coolers, and gear box coolers. Additionally, the facility has four water cooled air compressors sized 100 hp and 200 hp. LIFETIME’S ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT Lifetime operated four individual process cooling systems in Building B11...

Anderson, G. R.

2006-01-01

290

Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The research activities described herein were concentrated on the areas of economics, heating and cooling systems, architectural design, materials characteristics, climatic conditions, educational information packages, and evaluation of solar energy systems and components.

Christensen, D. L.

1977-01-01

291

Cooling system early-stage design tool for naval applications  

E-print Network

This thesis utilizes concepts taken from the NAVSEA Design Practices and Criteria Manualfor Surface Ship Freshwater Systems and other references to create a Cooling System Design Tool (CSDT). With the development of new ...

Fiedel, Ethan R

2011-01-01

292

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress in the development of prototype solar heating/cooling systems is reported. Results obtained from refinement/improvement of the single family, multifamily, and commercial systems configurations and generalized studies on several of the subsystems are presented.

1977-01-01

293

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solar heating and heating/cooling systems were designed for single family, multifamily, and commercial applications. Subsystems considered included solar collectors, heat storage systems, auxiliary energy sources, working fluids, and supplementary controls, piping, and pumps.

1976-01-01

294

Parametric Study of Turbine Blade Internal Cooling and Film Cooling  

E-print Network

by increasing the turbine inlet temperatures. Since modern turbine inlet temperatures exceed the melting point of the constituent superalloys, it is necessary to provide an aggressive cooling system. Relatively cool air, ducted from the compressor of the engine...

Rallabandi, Akhilesh P.

2010-10-12

295

Solar residential heating and cooling system development test program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A solar heating and cooling system is described, which was installed in a simulated home at Marshall Space Flight Center. Performance data are provided for the checkout and initial operational phase for key subsystems and for the total system. Valuable information was obtained with regard to operation of a solar cooling system during the first summer of operation. Areas where improvements and modifications are required to optimize such a system are discussed.

Humphries, W. R.; Melton, D. E.

1974-01-01

296

Flight Investigation of the Cooling Characteristics of a Two-row Radial Engine Installation III : Engine Temperature Distribution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The temperature distribution of a two-row radial engine in a twin-engine airplane has been investigated in a series of flight tests. The test engine was operated over a wide range of conditions at density altitudes of 5000 and 20,000 feet; quantitative results are presented showing the effects of flight and engine variables upon average engine temperature and over-all temperature spread. Discussions of the effect of the variables on the shape of the temperature patterns and on the temperature distribution of individual cylinders are also included. The results indicate that, for the tests conducted, the temperature distribution patterns were chiefly determined by the fuel-air ratio and cooling-air distributions. It was possible to calculate individual cylinder temperature, on the assumption of equal power distribution among cylinders, to within an average of plus or minus 14 degrees F. of the actual temperature. A considerable change occurred in either the spread or the thrust axis, the average engine fuel-air ratio, the engine speed, the power, or the blower ratio. Smaller effects on the temperature pattern were noticed with a change in cowl-flap opening and altitude. In most of the tests, a change in conditions affected the temperature of the barrels less than that of the heads. The variation of flight and engine variables had a negligible effect on the temperature distributions of the individual cylinders. (author)

Rennak, Robert M; Messing, Wesley E; Morgan, James E

1946-01-01

297

Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines  

DOEpatents

Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts. 1 fig.

Huber, D.J.; Briesch, M.S.

1998-07-21

298

Earth Systems Science and Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Providing the essential energy and water systems to support human needs while understanding and addressing their environmental consequences is a watershed problem for the 21st century. The LLNL Earth System Science and Engineering Program seeks to provide the scientific understanding and technological expertise to help provide solutions at both global and regional scales. Our work is highly collaborative with universities,

Rotman

2006-01-01

299

Energy Engineering and Systems Analysis  

E-print Network

Energy Engineering and Systems Analysis Fission Process and Control In nuclear power reactors, called fission products, with significant heat generation. A nuclear reactor system is controlled the need arise, such as in an emergency or planned power shutoff, the control rods are inserted

Kemner, Ken

300

Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

None

2010-10-01

301

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This brief presents a model-based predictive control (MPC) approach to building cooling systems with thermal energy storage. We focus on buildings equipped with a water tank used for actively storing cold water produced by a series of chillers. First, simplified models of chillers, cooling towers, thermal storage tanks, and buildings are developed and validated for the purpose of model-based control

Yudong Ma; Francesco Borrelli; Brandon Hencey; Brian Coffey; Sorin Bengea; Philip Haves

2012-01-01

302

Cryogenic cooling system for the ground test accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH[sub 2]) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH[sub 2] run tank containing an LH[sub 2]/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Spulgis, I. (CVI, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States))

1993-01-01

303

Cryogenic cooling system for the Ground Test Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH{sub 2} run tank containing an LH{sub 2}/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Spulgis, I. [CVI, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

1994-12-31

304

Cryogenic cooling system for the ground test accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH{sub 2} run tank containing an LH{sub 2}/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Spulgis, I. [CVI, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-06-01

305

OPERATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF CLOSED CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper gives results of a study of operational and environmental impacts of closed cooling systems, used for about a quarter of the nation's steam-electric generating capacity. Conclusions relating to operational impacts include: (1) closed cycle cooling leads to increased pow...

306

Water cooling tower and water level control system therefor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes an improved water cooling tower system including a water cooling tower structure having a top portion, a bottom portion, an intermediate portion therebetween, a water-collecting basin operatively disposed in the bottom portion of the structure, a heat exchange means operatively disposed in the intermediate portion of the structure, means for recirculating the water from the water-collecting basin

Kinkead

1989-01-01

307

Isolation condenser with shutdown cooling system heat exchanger  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process is described for cooling a nuclear boiling water reactor, the reactor having a reactor core for heating reactor coolant to generate steam, a turbine-generator for receiving the steam and generating electric power, and a feedwater system for receiving spent steam and providing feedwater back into the reactor, the process comprising: providing a condenser cooling shell; filling the condenser

Gluntz

1989-01-01

308

Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Liquid-Rack Cooling Systems in Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and enterprise data centers, IT equipment product development, and research data center laboratories typically require continuous cooling to control inlet air temperatures within recommended operating levels for the IT equipment. The consolidation and higher density aggregation of slim computing, storage and networking hardware has resulted in higher power density than what the raised-floor system design, coupled with commonly used computer rack air conditioning (CRAC) units, was originally conceived to handle. Many existing data centers and newly constructed data centers adopt CRAC units, which inherently handle heat transfer within data centers via air as the heat transfer media. This results in energy performance of the ventilation and cooling systems being less than optimal. Understanding the current trends toward higher power density in IT computing, more and more IT equipment manufacturers are designing their equipment to operate in 'conventional' data center environments, while considering provisions of alternative cooling solutions to either their equipment or supplemental cooling in rack or row systems. In the meanwhile, the trend toward higher power density resulting from current and future generations of servers has created significant opportunities for precision cooling suppliers to engineer and manufacture packaged modular and scalable systems. The modular and scalable cooling systems aim at significantly improving efficiency while addressing the thermal challenges, improving reliability, and allowing for future needs and growth. Such pre-engineered and manufactured systems may be a significant improvement over current design; however, without an energy efficiency focus, their applications could also lead to even lower energy efficiencies in the overall data center infrastructure. The overall goal of the project supported by California Energy Commission was to characterize four commercially available, modular cooling systems installed in a data center. Such modular cooling systems are all scalable localized units, and will be evaluated in terms of their operating energy efficiency in a real data center, respectively, as compared to the energy efficiency of traditional legacy data center cooling systems. The technical objective of this project was to evaluate the energy performance of one of the four commercially available modular cooling systems installed in a data center in Sun Microsystems, Inc. This report is the result of a test plan that was developed with the industrial participants input, including specific design and operating characteristics of the selected modular localized cooling solution provided by vendor 3. The technical evaluation included monitoring and measurement of selected parameters, and establishing and calculating energy efficiency metrics for the selected cooling product, which is a modular, scalable liquid-rack cooling system in this study. The scope is to quantify energy performance of the modular cooling unit in operation as it corresponds to a combination of varied server loads and inlet air temperatures, under various chilled-water supply temperatures. The information generated from this testing when combined with documented energy efficiency of the host data center's central chilled water cooling plant can be used to estimate potential energy savings from implementing modular cooling compared to conventional cooling in data centers.

Xu, TengFang

2009-05-01

309

Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

2008-01-01

310

Computer systems and software engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The High Technologies Laboratory (HTL) was established in the fall of 1982 at the University of Houston Clear Lake. Research conducted at the High Tech Lab is focused upon computer systems and software engineering. There is a strong emphasis on the interrelationship of these areas of technology and the United States' space program. In Jan. of 1987, NASA Headquarters announced the formation of its first research center dedicated to software engineering. Operated by the High Tech Lab, the Software Engineering Research Center (SERC) was formed at the University of Houston Clear Lake. The High Tech Lab/Software Engineering Research Center promotes cooperative research among government, industry, and academia to advance the edge-of-knowledge and the state-of-the-practice in key topics of computer systems and software engineering which are critical to NASA. The center also recommends appropriate actions, guidelines, standards, and policies to NASA in matters pertinent to the center's research. Results of the research conducted at the High Tech Lab/Software Engineering Research Center have given direction to many decisions made by NASA concerning the Space Station Program.

Mckay, Charles W.

1988-01-01

311

The Effect of Valve Cooling upon Maximum Permissible Engine Output as Limited by Knock  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Wright GR-1820-G200 cylinder was tested over a wide range of fuel-air ratios at maximum permissible power output as limited by knock with three different degrees of valve cooling. The valves used were stock valves (solid inlet valve and hollow sodium-cooled exhaust valve), hollow valves with no coolant, and hollow valves with flowing water as a coolant. Curves showing the variation in maximum permissible values of inlet-air pressure, indicated mean effective pressure, cylinder charge, and indicated specific fuel consumption with change in fuel-air ratio and valve cooling are shown. The use of valves cooled by a stream of water passing through their hollow interiors permitted indicated mean effective pressures 10 percent higher than the mean effective pressures permissible with stock valves when the engine was operated with fuel-air ratios from 0.055 to 0.065. Operation of the engine with lean mixtures with uncooled hollow valves resulted in power output below the output obtained with the stock valves. The data show an increase in maximum permissible indicated mean effective pressure due to cooling the valves, which averages only 2.1 percent with fuel-air ratios from 0.075 to 0.105.

Munger, Maurice; Wilsted, H D; Mulcahy, B A

1942-01-01

312

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress made in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. A comparison of the proposed Solaron Heat Pump and Solar Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, installation drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities are included.

Bloomquist, D.; Oonk, R. L.

1977-01-01

313

Systems engineering at the nanoscale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanomaterials have provided some of the greatest leaps in technology over the past twenty years, but their relatively early stage of maturity presents challenges for their incorporation into engineered systems. Perhaps even more challenging is the fact that the underlying physics at the nanoscale often run counter to our physical intuition. The current state of nanotechnology today includes nanoscale materials and devices developed to function as components of systems, as well as theoretical visions for "nanosystems," which are systems in which all components are based on nanotechnology. Although examples will be given to show that nanomaterials have indeed matured into applications in medical, space, and military systems, no complete nanosystem has yet been realized. This discussion will therefore focus on systems in which nanotechnology plays a central role. Using self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia as an example, we will discuss how systems engineering concepts apply to nanotechnology.

Benkoski, Jason J.; Breidenich, Jennifer L.; Wei, Michael C.; Clatterbaughi, Guy V.; Keng, Pei Yuin; Pyun, Jeffrey

2012-06-01

314

Research on hypersonic aircraft using pre-cooled turbojet engines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systems analysis of a Mach 5 class hypersonic aircraft is performed. The aircraft can fly across the Pacific Ocean in two hours. A multidisciplinary optimization program for aerodynamics, structure, propulsion, and trajectory is used in the analysis. The result of each element model is improved using higher accuracy analysis tools. The aerodynamic performance of the hypersonic aircraft is examined through

Hideyuki Taguchi; Hiroaki Kobayashi; Takayuki Kojima; Atsushi Ueno; Shunsuke Imamura; Motoyuki Hongoh

315

INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use  

E-print Network

78 INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take · Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 128 units · Industrial and Systems Engineering

Rohs, Remo

316

Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting  

SciTech Connect

Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

2010-06-01

317

Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system  

SciTech Connect

This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-10-29

318

Biometric System Security Systems and Computer Engineering  

E-print Network

on their behavioral and biolog- ical characteristics", a vulnerability in biometric security results in incorrectBiometric System Security Andy Adler Systems and Computer Engineering Carleton University, Ottawa to confidentiality and integrity". Defining biometrics system security is difficult, because of the ways biometric

Adler, Andy

319

Numerical modeling of boundary-layer cooling of rocket engine combustion chambers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates boundary-layer cooling of rocket engine combustion chambers by means of numerical modeling. Using computational fluid dynamic methods to model the reacting viscous flow field in rocket combustion chambers, various propellant combinations and chamber geometries are analyzed. Specific propellants are hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. Chamber geometries used are the Space Shuttle Main Engine, 5.7 diameter research chamber, and the Apollo/Saturn F-1. Several modifications to existing codes are required to accommodate proposed boundary-layer cooling using fuel as the boundary fluid. This work discusses the mathematical basis for the numerical scheme used and the chemistry models needed to solve the reacting flow field, including specifically the field's boundary layer. Variables considered in the flow field are temperature, pressure, Mach number, species concentration, velocity, density, acoustic velocity, and heat transfer. Using results obtained in the study, a high pressure (Pc > 3000 psi) methane fueled rocket engine is proposed. Included is an analytical estimate of how thrust can be increased, with no loss of performance due to the active fuelfed boundary layer. The author concludes that numerical methods can effectively model the flow processes in boundary-layer cooled combustion chambers, giving designers the requisite information for analyzing rocket engines.

Pitalo, Gerald Alexander

2000-10-01

320

2.0 AEDL Systems Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some engineering topics: Some Initial Thoughts. Capability Description. Capability State-of-the-Art. Capability Requirements. Systems Engineering. Capability Roadmap. Capability Maturity. Candidate Technologies. Metrics.

Graves, Claude

2005-01-01

321

Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

Ream, L. W. (inventor)

1984-01-01

322

Security systems engineering overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crime prevention is on the minds of most people today. The concern for public safety and the theft of valuable assets are being discussed at all levels of government and throughout the public sector. There is a growing demand for security systems that can adequately safeguard people and valuable assets against the sophistication of those criminals or adversaries who pose

Steele

1996-01-01

323

Security systems engineering overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crime prevention is on the minds of most people today. The concern for public safety and the theft of valuable assets are being discussed at all levels of government and throughout the public sector. There is a growing demand for security systems that can adequately safeguard people and valuable assets against the sophistication of those criminals or adversaries who pose

Basil J. Steele

1997-01-01

324

Diesel engine fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

The film shows the basic structure of diesel systems, including the parts and operation of injectors and fuel pumps. It discusses Bosch, General Motors, and Excello Equipment. This title has been declared obsolete for use within the sponsoring agency, but may have content value for educational use.

Not Available

1994-01-01

325

Diesel engine fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

The film shows the basic structure of diesel systems, including the parts and operation of injectors and fuel pumps. It discusses Bosch, General Motors, and Excello Equipment. This title has been declared obsolete for use within the sponsoring agency, but may have content value for educational use.

NONE

1994-12-31

326

"SYSTEMS ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS  

E-print Network

for Future Submarines (CLASSIFIED) ['98] 19. Low Maintenance Surface Ships ['98] 20. "Carrier Islands" ['99/NAVSEA-Carderock 011 5 AUTOMATED UNDERWATER HULL MAINTENANCE AND MONITORING SYSTEM #12;12/10/2009 D. W. Byers Final: Develop and Assess Integrated Aircraft Carrier Island Concepts and Corresponding Implementation

327

Core Concepts of Systems Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This telecollaborative project is designed to provide students in grades 9-12 with an orientation to systems engineering concepts. Through guided activities students will reverse-engineer a common device that contains both electrical and mechanical components and then create a systems diagram for the deconstructed device. (In this case, the device is a disposable camera.) In partnership with other project participants across the country, learners will reassemble the device and test their reconstruction against quality controls. The project is free with teacher registration. The module includes lesson plans, comprehensive teacher tutorial, reference material, question sets and worksheets, and digital collaboration tools. This resource was developed by the Center for Innovation in Science and Engineering Education (CIESE). Participation is cost-free with teacher registration. Editor's Note: Several components of this activity specifically address a physics curriculum. Disposable flash cameras provide an opportunity for analysis of electric field, charging a capacitor, and energy storage on a capacitor.

328

Security systems engineering overview  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crime prevention is on the minds of most people today. The concern for public safety and the theft of valuable assets are being discussed at all levels of government and throughout the public sector. There is a growing demand for security systems that can adequately safeguard people and valuable assets against the sophistication of those criminals or adversaries who pose a threat. The crime in this country has been estimated at 70 billion dollars in direct costs and up to 300 billion dollars in indirect costs. Health insurance fraud alone is estimated to cost American businesses 100 billion dollars. Theft, warranty fraud, and counterfeiting of computer hardware totaled 3 billion dollars in 1994. A threat analysis is a prerequisite to any security system design to assess the vulnerabilities with respect to the anticipated threat. Having established a comprehensive definition of the threat, crime prevention, detection, and threat assessment technologies can be used to address these criminal activities. This talk will outline the process used to design a security system regardless of the level of security. This methodology has been applied to many applications including: government high security facilities; residential and commercial intrusion detection and assessment; anti-counterfeiting/fraud detection technologies; industrial espionage detection and prevention; security barrier technology.

Steele, Basil J.

1997-01-01

329

System Verification II Systems Engineering  

E-print Network

in safety critical systems to prevent unsafe values, e.g. high doses of radiation. Remember: not just should be able to: Explain the role & practice of debugging in the software process. Describe in detail the purpose, scope of, and activities comprising each of the three main phases of software testing. Conduct

Bryson, Joanna J.

330

2. VIEW SOUTH OF WIND TUNNEL 138 AND COOLING SYSTEM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW SOUTH OF WIND TUNNEL 138 AND COOLING SYSTEM 140, NORTH ELEVATION - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Subsonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

331

Heat pumps in district heating and district cooling systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis presents an analysis of heat pump operation in a District Heating and District Cooling system. Two heat pumps with supersonic centrifugal compressors use untreated sewage as their heat source/sink for the simultaneous production of heating and...

M. Havskjold

1993-01-01

332

Voraussetzungen: Control Systems I & II, System Modeling, Engine Class (IC Engines and Propulsion Systems,  

E-print Network

Systems, Introduction to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems,...), MATLAB Design for a Novel Engine Concept Position Control for an Internal Combustion Engine (Simulation) German. The control task is to make an internal combustion engine piston follow a reference position trajectory

Lygeros, John

333

Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A summary is given of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences, Multiple-family Residences and commercial applications.

1978-01-01

334

Engineering evaluation of magma cooling-tower demonstration at Nevada Power Company's Sunrise Station  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Magma Cooling Tower (MCT) process utilizes a falling film heat exchanger integrated into an induced draft cooling tower to evaporate waste water. A hot water source such as return cooling water provides the energy for evaporation. Water quality control is maintained by removing potential scaling constituents to make concentrations of the waste water possible without scaling heat transfer surfaces. A pilot-scale demonstration test of the MCT process was performed from March 1979 through June 1979 at Nevada Power Company's Sunrise Station in Las Vegas, Nevada. The pilot unit extracted heat from the powerplant cooling system to evaporate cooling tower blowdown. Two water quality control methods were employed: makeup/sidestream softening and fluidized bed crystallization. The 11 week softening mode test was successful.

1980-11-01

335

Engineering intelligent tutoring systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have defined an object-oriented software architecture for Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS's) to facilitate the rapid development, testing, and fielding of ITS's. This software architecture partitions the functionality of the ITS into a collection of software components with well-defined interfaces and execution concept. The architecture was designed to isolate advanced technology components, partition domain dependencies, take advantage of the increased availability of commercial software packages, and reduce the risks involved in acquiring ITS's. A key component of the architecture, the Executive, is a publish and subscribe message handling component that coordinates all communication between ITS components.

Warren, Kimberly C.; Goodman, Bradley A.

1993-01-01

336

Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative  

E-print Network

for sharing perspectives on a topic. A research summit provides an opportunity for sharing knowledge, the summit featured research overview and project briefings on advanced systems engineering topics. SEAri research portfolio topics were described by researchers, with alternating short student research summary

de Weck, Olivier L.

337

77 FR 36014 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling- Water Reactors.'' This guide describes...cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs). DATES:...

2012-06-15

338

Engine system for motor vehicle  

SciTech Connect

An engine system of the invention comprises an internal combustion engine; a carburetor; an exhaust gas recirculation system; an exhaust gas treatment device; and a source of secondary air, in which there is provided a fluid network which interconnects the source of secondary air, the engine exhaust system at a position upstream of the exhaust gas treatment device and the exhaust gas recirculation system at a position upstream of an exhaust gas recirculation valve and there is also provided an air injection control valve fluidly disposed in the fluid network intermediate the source of secondary air and the exhaust gas recirculation system. The air injection control valve is adapted to selectively permit and prevent the admission of air to the exhaust gas recirculation system. A controller for the air injection control valve is also disclosed which comprises a detector that generates as an output signal a first signal responsive to urban driving conditions which are empirically determined to occur when the motor vehicle is driven in urban areas and a second signal responsive to rural driving conditions which are empirically determined to occur when the motor vehicle is driven in rural areas. The controller causes the air injection valve to permit the admission of air to the egr system when the detector detects the rural driving conditions.

Nakajima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Sugihara, K.; Takami, M.

1980-12-23

339

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24

340

Cooling systems for satellite remote sensing instrumentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current and developing state-of-the-art in cryogenic coolers for satellite sensors was studied for earth oriented satellites. Six representative sensor categories in the 77 K to 300 K range were defined. Cooling capacities were 50 to 1000 mw; both continuous and intermittent duty cycles were considered; lifetimes were one to two years. Conceptual designs were prepared for the most promising coolers in each category. These coolers are Joule-Thomson, Solid Cryogen, Vuilleumier, Thermoelectric, Shielded Radiator, Optical Solar Reflector Radiator and Unshielded Radiator. Weight, envelope, power requirements and operating characteristics of each cooler are described. Scaling data for each cooler are included.

Copeland, R. J.; Oren, J. A.

1975-01-01

341

Solar heating and cooling system design and development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design and development of marketable solar heating and cooling systems for single family and commercial applications is described. The delivery, installation, and monitoring of the prototype systems are discussed. Seven operational test sites are discussed in terms of system performance. Problems encountered with equipment and installation were usually due to lack of skills required for solar system installation.

1979-01-01

342

Systems Engineering Positions New England Healthcare Engineering Partnership  

E-print Network

Systems Engineering Positions New England Healthcare Engineering Partnership (NEHCEP) An exciting, resource utilization and cost savings. The New England Healthcare Engineering Partnership (NEHCEP. There will also be opportunities to assist and consult at all facilities In our New England region: 8 medical care

de Weck, Olivier L.

343

Water cooling system using a piezoelectrically actuated flow pump for a medical headlight system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The microchips inside modern electronic equipment generate heat and demand, each day, the use of more advanced cooling techniques as water cooling systems, for instance. These systems combined with piezoelectric flow pumps present some advantages such as higher thermal capacity, lower noise generation and miniaturization potential. The present work aims at the development of a water cooling system based on

Rogério F. Pires; Sandro L. Vatanabe; Amaury R. de Oliveira; Paulo H. Nakasone; Emílio C. Silva

2007-01-01

344

Steam cooling system for a gas turbine  

DOEpatents

The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows.

Wilson, Ian David (Mauldin, SC); Barb, Kevin Joseph (Halfmoon, NY); Li, Ming Cheng (Cincinnati, OH); Hyde, Susan Marie (Schenectady, NY); Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY); Wesorick, Ronald Richard (Albany, NY); Glynn, Christopher Charles (Hamilton, OH); Hemsworth, Martin C. (Cincinnati, OH)

2002-01-01

345

Microscale liquid cooling system for high heat flux processor cooling applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The requirements for thermal management in high performance computers are rapidly outpacing the capabilities of the best commercial heat sinks, including those with integrated heat pipes. The problem lies in three compounding trends: a) higher total chip power, b) higher local heat flux in chip hotspots, and c) smaller system enclosures. Pumped liquid cooling is a promising alternative, but this

Girish Upadhya; Mark Munch; Peng Zhou; J. Horn; Douglas Werner; Mark McMaster

2006-01-01

346

Heat-Transfer Characteristics of Partially Film Cooled Plug Nozzle on a J-85 Afterburning Turbojet Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plug nozzle film cooling data were obtained downstream of a slot located at 42 percent of the total plug length on a J-85 engine. Film cooling reduced the aft end wall temperature as much as 150 K, reduced total pressure loss in the upstream convection cooling passages by 50 percent, and reduced estimated compressor bleed flow requirement by 14 percent compared to an all convectively cooled nozzle. Shock waves along the plug surface strongly influenced temperature distributions on both convection and film cooled portions. The effect was most severe at nozzle pressure ratios below 10 where adverse pressure gradients were most severe.

Nosek, S. M.; Straight, D. M.

1976-01-01

347

Systems Engineering Integrating Project Management, Science, Engineering, and  

E-print Network

, high altitude balloons, aircraft, and sounding rockets � Designing systems for multiple environments&C) � Guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) � Spacecraft fault management � Embedded software systems � ControlSystems Engineering Integrating Project Management, Science, Engineering, and Mission Operations

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

348

NONWATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF CLOSED-CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS AND THE INTERACTION OF STACK GAS AND COOLING TOWER PLUMES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a literature survey of the nonwater quality impacts of closed-cycle cooling systems. Following discussions of cooling tower and stack gas plumes, interactions of these plumes are considered. For cooling tower plumes, plume types, behavior, salt drift g...

349

Evaluation of two cooling systems under a firefighter coverall.  

PubMed

Firemen often suffer from heat strain. This study investigated two chest cooling systems for use under a firefighting suit. In nine male subjects, a vest with water soaked cooling pads and a vest with water perfused tubes were compared to a control condition. Subjects performed 30 min walking and 10 min recovery in hot conditions, while physiological and perceptual parameters were measured. No differences were observed in heart rate and rectal temperature, but scapular skin temperature and fluid loss were lower using the perfused vest. Thermal sensation was cooler for the perfused vest than for the other conditions, while the cool pad vest felt initially cooler than control. However, comfort and RPE scores were similar. We conclude that the cooling effect of both tested systems, mainly providing a (temporally) cooler thermal sensation, was limited and did not meet the expectations. PMID:24798511

Teunissen, Lennart P J; Wang, Li-Chu; Chou, Shih-Nung; Huang, Chin-Hsien; Jou, Gwo-Tsuen; Daanen, Hein A M

2014-11-01

350

The RF System for the International Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment  

E-print Network

The International Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of ionisation cooling to reduce the phase space footprint of a charged particle beam, principally to allow the subsequent acceleration of muons for next generation colliders and/or neutrino factories. The experiment (and indeed any subsequent accelerator cooling channel based on the same principles) poses certain unusual requirements on its RF system, whilst the precision measurement of the ionisation cooling process demands special diagnostics. This paper shall outline the key features of the RF system, including the low level RF control, the power amplifier chain, distribution network, cavities, tuners and couplers, many parts of which are required to operate in a high magnetic field environment. The RF diagnostics which, in conjunction with the other MICE diagnostics, shall allow detailed knowledge of the amplitude and phase of the acceleration field during the transit of each individual muon will also ...

Ronald, K.; Dick, A.J.; Speirs, D.C.; Moss, A.; Grant, A.; White, C.; Griffiths, S.; Stanley, T.; Li, D.; DeMello, A.J.; Virostek, S.; Moretti, A.; Pasquinelli, R.; Peterson, D.; Schultz, R.; Volk, J.; Popovic, M.; Torun, Y.; Hanlet, P.; Alsari, S.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Hunt, C.; Summers, D.; Luo, T.; Smith, P.J.

2014-01-01

351

The organizational and political challenges of Enterprise Systems Engineering : a survey of senior systems engineers  

E-print Network

Systems engineering efforts are becoming increasingly complex, novel and interdependent, making traditional systems engineering approaches only partially applicable to such efforts. Consequently, a new discipline is emerging ...

Rashid, Faaiza

2008-01-01

352

Electron Beam Size Measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

Kroc, T. K.; Burov, A. V.; Bolshakov, T. B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S. M.

2006-03-01

353

Closed-loop electroosmotic microchannel cooling system for VLSI circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing heat generation rates in VLSI circuits motivate research on compact cooling technologies with low thermal resistance. This paper develops a closed-loop two-phase microchannel cooling system using electroosmotic pumping for the working fluid. The design, fabrication, and open-loop performance of the heat exchanger and pump are summarized. The silicon heat exchanger, which attaches to the test chip (1 cm2),

Linan Jiang; James Mikkelsen; Jae-Mo Koo; David Huber; Shuhuai Yao; Lian Zhang; Peng Zhou; James G. Maveety; Ravi Prasher; Juan G. Santiago; Thomas W. Kenny; Kenneth E. Goodson

2002-01-01

354

Electron beam size measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

Kroc, T.K.; Burov, A.V.; Bolshakov, T.B.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab; Seletskiy, S.M.; /Rochester U.

2005-09-01

355

Frameworks and Models in Engineering Systems / Engineering System Design  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This class, created by Prof. Joseph Sussman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, provides an introduction to quantitative models and qualitative frameworks for studying complex engineering systems. Also taught is the art of abstracting a complex system into a model for purposes of analysis and design while dealing with complexity, emergent behavior, stochasticity, non-linearities and the requirements of many stakeholders with divergent objectives. The successful completion of the class requires a semester-long class project that deals with critical contemporary issues which require an integrative, interdisciplinary approach using the above models and frameworks.

Sussman, Joseph

2011-01-20

356

A practical solar energy heating and cooling system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent study has concluded that solar-powered residential heating and cooling system is non technically and economically feasible. Proposed system provides space heating, air conditioning, and hot water. Installation costs will be greater than for conventional heating systems, but this difference will eventually be defrayed by very low operating costs.

Oneill, M. J.; Mcdanal, A. J.; Sims, W. H.

1973-01-01

357

Systems engineering: A problem of perception  

SciTech Connect

The characterization of systems engineering as a discipline, process, procedure or a set of heuristics will have an impact on the implementation strategy, the training methodology, and operational environment. The systems engineering upgrade activities in the New Mexico Weapons Development Center and a search of systems engineering related information provides evidence of a degree of ambiguity in this characterization of systems engineering. A case is made in this article for systems engineering being the engineering discipline applied to the science of complexity. Implications of this characterization and some generic issues are delineated with the goal of providing an enterprise with a starting point for developing its business environment.

Senglaub, M.

1995-08-01

358

Heat engine generator control system  

DOEpatents

An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

1998-05-12

359

Heat engine generator control system  

DOEpatents

An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

Rajashekara, Kaushik (Carmel, IN); Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata (Towson, MD); McMullen, Steven Robert (Anderson, IN); Raibert, Robert Joseph (Fishers, IN)

1998-01-01

360

Contingency power for small turboshaft engines using water injection into turbine cooling air  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because of one engine inoperative requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot day, high altitude takeoff situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stresses is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

1987-01-01

361

Fusion Engineering and Design 48 (2000) 371378 Blanket system selection for the ARIES-ST  

E-print Network

center column from radiation damage. The cooling and heat removal from the center column is a difficultFusion Engineering and Design 48 (2000) 371­378 Blanket system selection for the ARIES-ST Dai is a water-cooled Cu normal conductor. This selection has a major impact on the blanket design and selection

California at San Diego, University of

362

Use of a temperature-initiated passive cooling system (TIPACS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS)  

SciTech Connect

A new type of passive cooling system has been invented (Forsberg 1993): the Temperature-Initiated Passive Cooling System (TIPACS). The characteristics of the TIPACS potentially match requirements for an improved reactor-cavity-cooling system (RCCS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). This report is an initial evaluation of the TIPACS for the MHTGR with a Rankines (steam) power conversion cycle. Limited evaluations were made of applying the TIPACS to MHTGRs with reactor pressure vessel temperatures up to 450 C. These temperatures may occur in designs of Brayton cycle (gas turbine) and process heat MHTGRs. The report is structured as follows. Section 2 describes the containment cooling issues associated with the MHTGR and the requirements for such a cooling system. Section 3 describes TIPACS in nonmathematical terms. Section 4 describes TIPACS`s heat-removal capabilities. Section 5 analyzes the operation of the temperature-control mechanism that determines under what conditions the TIPACS rejects heat to the environment. Section 6 addresses other design and operational issues. Section 7 identifies uncertainties, and Section 8 provides conclusions. The appendixes provide the detailed data and models used in the analysis.

Forsberg, C.W.; Conklin, J.; Reich, W.J.

1994-04-01

363

Performance evaluation of a radiant floor cooling system integrated with dehumidified ventilation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radiant floor cooling system can be used as an alternative to all-air cooling systems, using the existing Ondol system (a radiant floor heating system) in Korea to save energy and maintain indoor thermal comfort. Unfortunately, a radiant floor cooling system may cause condensation on the floor surface under hot and humid conditions during the cooling season. In addition, the

Doosam Song; Taeyeon Kim; Suwon Song; Suckho Hwang; Seung-Bok Leigh

2008-01-01

364

Detailed design for incorporating CBI Capacitive Cooling System in the ACT Faciity in Bakersfield, California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A study has been made for adding on Chicago Bridge and Iron Co.'s Capacitive Cooling System to the existing Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) Facility located at Kern Power Station in Bakersfield, California. The ACT Facility presents an opportunity to demonstrate a capacitive cooling system used in conjunction with an ammonia-based dry-cooling system. It has been determined that it is feasible to add on the system to the ACT Facility. All design, detail engineering, and construction planning has been completed so that the construction phase of the project can proceed. If the construction phase is started in December 1981, all construction and check-out work can be completed in May 1982. Testing of the capacitive system can begin immediately following the construction phase. This volume contains technical descriptions of the capacity cooling system and of the ACT Facility.

Naegelen, R.J.; Seale, J.L.; Husain, M.

1982-07-01

365

District cooling: Phase 2, Direct freeze ice slurry system testing  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research are to: extend the range of pressure drop data for ice-water slurry flows, and design and build a prototypical ice slurry distribution system which demonstrates ice slurry handling at an end user's heat exchanger, without sending ice slurry directly through the heat exchanger. The results of Phase 1 work demonstrated a 40% reduction in pump power required to move an ice-water slurry versus the same mass flow of water only. In addition to lower pressure drop, pumping ice slurries is advantageous because of the large latent and sensible heat cooling capacity stored in the ice compared to only sensible heat in chilled water. For example, an ice-water slurry with a 20% ice fraction (by mass) has a mass flow rate that is 70% less than the mass flow rate required for a chilled water system cooling and equivalent load. The greatly reduced mass flow combined with the friction reducing effects of ice-water slurries results in a total savings of 83% in pumping power. Therefore, a substantial savings potential exists for capital costs and system operating costs in ice-water slurry district cooling systems. One potential disadvantage of an ice-slurry district cooling system is the introduction of ice into equipment not so designed, such as air handlers at end user locations. A prototypic ice slurry distribution loop will demonstrate a cooling network which will provide ice slurry to an end user but sends ice free water into the actual heat transfer.

Winters, P.J.

1991-01-02

366

Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characteristics of six designs for power levels of 2, 10, and 20 MWe for operating time of 1 and 7 years are described. The operating conditions for these arbitrary designs were chosen to minimize system specific mass. The designs are based on recent work which benefits from earlier analyses of nuclear space power systems conducted at LLNL. Both gas and liquid cooled reactors had been considered. Pitts and Walter reported on the results of a detailed study of a 10 MWe lithium cooled reactor in a potassium Rankine system. Unpublished results of a computer analysis provide details of an argon cooled reactor in an argon Brayton system. The gas cooled reactor design was based on extensive development work on the 500 MWth reactor for the nuclear ramjet (Pluto) as described by Walter. The designs discussed here draw heavily on the Pluto project experience, which culminated in a successful full power ground test as reported by Reynolds. At higher power levels gas cooled reactors coupled with Brayton systems with advanced radiator designs becomes attractive.

Walter, C. E.

367

industrial & systems (ISE) Industrial and Systems Engineers use engineering and business prin-  

E-print Network

70 industrial & systems (ISE) Industrial and Systems Engineers use engineering and business prin to help companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems Engineer's task Available · Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 129 units · Industrial and Systems

Rohs, Remo

368

Stirling Engine Dynamic System Modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Thermo-Mechanical systems branch at the Glenn Research Center focuses a large amount time on Stirling engines. These engines will be used on missions where solar power is inefficient, especially in deep space. I work with Tim Regan and Ed Lewandowski who are currently developing and validating a mathematical model for the Stirling engines. This model incorporates all aspects of the system including, mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic components. Modeling is done through Simplorer, a program capable of running simulations of the model. Once created and then proven to be accurate, a model is used for developing new ideas for engine design. My largest specific project involves varying key parameters in the model and quantifying the results. This can all be done relatively trouble-free with the help of Simplorer. Once the model is complete, Simplorer will do all the necessary calculations. The more complicated part of this project is determining which parameters to vary. Finding key parameters depends on the potential for a value to be independently altered in the design. For example, a change in one dimension may lead to a proportional change to the rest of the model, and no real progress is made. Also, the ability for a changed value to have a substantial impact on the outputs of the system is important. Results will be condensed into graphs and tables with the purpose of better communication and understanding of the data. With the changing of these parameters, a more optimal design can be created without having to purchase or build any models. Also, hours and hours of results can be simulated in minutes. In the long run, using mathematical models can save time and money. Along with this project, I have many other smaller assignments throughout the summer. My main goal is to assist in the processes of model development, validation and testing.

Nakis, Christopher G.

2004-01-01

369

Comparison of wet, dry, hybrid and dry/wet cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper attempts to guide the developer, engineer and operator through the choices of condensing and cooling systems available for turbine exhaust steam condensing. It will describe the available and its main operating characteristics as well as the parameters that have the most significant influence on the initial cost, the operating and maintenance cost and other cost considerations. The resulting life cycle cost of the various systems are compared for economic evaluation purpose. Factors that may rule out one or the other system are discussed from a philosophical and strategic perspective. In conclusion the system choice may not at all be affected by (lowest) initial cost, but by the most practical, expedient, political or environmental acceptable method. The USA is seeing an encouraging but still, compared to the rest of the world, slow development into advanced cooling systems with an installed base of approximately 2,000 MW.

NONE

1995-02-01

370

Sub-cooled nitrogen cryogenic cooling system for superconducting fault current limiter by using GM-cryocooler  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 21st Century Frontier R&D Program was planned to develop and commercialize the inductive Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL) in Korea until 2011. The 1.2 kV/80 A inductive SFCL was planned to develop at the first year in the first phase (2001-2002) and the 6.6 kV/200 A inductive SFCL for short run operation test was planned to develop at the second and third year in the first phase (2002-2004). The experimental characteristics of conduction-cooled cooling system developed in the first year was very weak from the sudden large thermal disturbance. Therefore, the conduction-cooled cooling system was concluded not appropriate for the cryogenic technology of the application of superconducting fault current limiter. In the third year research, the improved sub-cooled nitrogen cooling system was adopted and investigated. In this paper, the characteristics of each cooling type was compared and the basic deign of ameliorated cooling system was introduced and the total heat load of the cooling system was calculated and compared with the heat load of the cooling system developed at 2nd year research.

Kang, Hyoungku; Kim, Hyung Jin; Bae, Duck Kweon; Ahn, Min Cheol; Chang, Ho-Myung; Ko, Tae Kuk

2005-01-01

371

_q .. SP-6102 -" IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

_�q .. SP-6102 -" READINGS IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Edited by Francis T. Hoban and William M. Lawbaugh co ! (NASA-SP-6102) REAOINGS IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (NASa) 215 p N93-24678 --THRU-- N93-24693 Unclas H1/31 0158570 #12;.J T ,j J #12;READINGS IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Edited by Francis T. Hoban

Rhoads, James

372

Hybrid Kansei engineering system and design support  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose the new framework of Kansei Engineering System (KES), called Hybrid KES, which can support both consumer and designer as the decision support system (DSS). Kansei Engineering is defined as “translating technology of a consumer's feeling and image for a product into design elements” (Nagamachi, 1989). It is the Kansei Engineering System which we developed to

Yukihiro Matsubara; Mitsuo Nagamachi

1997-01-01

373

Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering Department  

E-print Network

SSIS Engineering Research Center Center for future Energy Systems Center for automation Technologies and Systems;electrical, computer, and systems engineering 4 Engineering and Innovation MODERN ECONOMy in the "To the experiences of Japan, South Korea, India, and Brazil--among others--support this hypothesis. Once an economy

Bystroff, Chris

374

Warehouse control system cools energy costs 20%  

SciTech Connect

Developed specifically for the food-processing industry, Levy Systems' Refrigeration Control and Monitoring System (RCMS) uses four basic techniques to lower electric-power costs: reducing defrost heat loads, reducing fan-operation heat loads, controlling coil usage, and incorporating utility variable rate structures into the coil operation. With this system, employees know the temperatures throughout the facility, the status and efficiency of every coil and every blast freezer, and actual product temperatures - all from a single computer terminal.

Not Available

1985-10-01

375

Electro-kinetic microchannel cooling system for servers  

Microsoft Academic Search

While servers have always required careful thermal design, three compounding trends are making system design unusually demanding with next generation: a) higher power in individual chips, b) higher local heat flux in chip hotspots, and c) the goal of integrating more chips with less separation on a 1U rack system. Pumped liquid cooling is a promising alternative because it allows

G. Upadhya; Peng Zhou; J. Hom; K. Goodson; M. Munch

2004-01-01

376

Risk-informed design changes for a passive cooling system  

E-print Network

The failure probability of a passive decay heat removal system after a LOCA is evaluated as part of a risk-informed design process for a helium-cooled fast reactor. The system was modeled using RELAP5-3D. The epistemic ...

Patalano, Giovanbattista

2007-01-01

377

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress is reviewed in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consisted of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

1978-01-01

378

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These combined quarterly reports summarize the activities from November 1977 through September 1978, and over the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

1978-01-01

379

Preliminary design study of astronomical detector cooling system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The preliminary design of an astronomical detector cooling system for possible use in the NASA C-141 Airborne Infrared Observatory is presented. The system consists of the following elements: supercritical helium tank, Joule-Thomson supply gas conditioner, Joule-Thomson expander (JTX), optical cavity dewar, optical cavity temperature controller, adjustable J-T discharge gas pressure controller, and vacuum pump.

Norman, R. H.

1976-01-01

380

Resonance Control Cooling System for the APT/LEDA RFQ  

SciTech Connect

The Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) resonance control cooling system (RCCS) for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) is described. Constant flow regulating valves to distribute the required flow to the 424 channels and to permit use of centrifugal pumps is discussed. Control system schema are described to regulate resonance frequency during steady state operation.

Domer, G.A.; Floersch, R.H.

1998-11-04

381

The evaporative cooling system for the ATLAS inner detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the evaporative system used to cool the silicon detector structures of the inner detector sub-detectors of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The motivation for an evaporative system, its design and construction are discussed. In detail the particular requirements of the ATLAS inner detector, technical choices and the qualification and manufacture of final components

D. Attree; B. Anderson; E. C. Anderssen; V. Akhnazarov; R. J. Apsimon; P. Barclay; L. E. Batchelor; R. L. Bates; M. Battistin; J. Bendotti; S. Berry; A. Bitadze; J. P. Bizzel; P. Bonneau; M. Bosteels; J. M. Butterworth; S. Butterworth; A. A. Carter; J. R. Carter; A. Catinaccio; F. Corbaz; H. O. Danielsson; E. Danilevich; N. Dixon; S. D. Dixon; F. Doherty; O. Dorholt; M. Doubrava; K. Egorov; K. Einsweiler; A. C. Falou; P. Feraudet; P. Ferrari; K. Fowler; J. T. Fraser; R. S. French; M. Galuska; F. Gannaway; G. Gariano; M. D. Gibson; M. Gilchriese; D. Giugni; J. Godlewski; I. Gousakov; B. Gorski; G. D. Hallewell; N. Hartman; R. J. Hawkings; S. J. Haywood; N. P. Hessey; I. Ilyashenko; S. Infante; J. N. Jackson; T. J. Jones; J. Kaplon; S. Katunin; S. Lindsay; L. Luisa; N. Massol; F. Mc Ewan; S. J. Mc Mahon; C. Menot; J. Mistry; J. Morris; D. M. Muskett; K. Nagai; A. Nichols; R. Nicholson; R. B. Nickerson; S. L. Nielsen; P. E. Nordahl; M. Olcese; M. Parodi; F. Perez-Gomez; H. Pernegger; E. Perrin; L. P. Rossi; A. Rovani; E. Ruscino; H. Sandaker; A. Smith; V. Sopko; S. Stapnes; M. Stodulski; J. Tarrant; J. Thadome; D. Tovey; M. Turala; M. Tyndel; V. Vacek; E. van der Kraaij; G. H. A. Viehhauser; E. Vigeolas; P. S. Wells; S. Wenig; P. Werneke

2008-01-01

382

A COOLING SYSTEM FOR BUIDINGS USING WIND ENERGY  

E-print Network

A COOLING SYSTEM FOR BUIDINGS USING WIND ENERGY Hamid Daiyan Islamic Azad University - Semnan in dray land, and only uses wind energy for conditioning. It technologies date back over 1000 years. Wind system, Wind energy, Temperature Fig.1 Wind tower of Doulat-Abad garden of Yazd with it's altitude is 33

383

A Historical Systems Study of Liquid Rocket Engine Throttling Capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a comprehensive systems study to examine and evaluate throttling capabilities of liquid rocket engines. The focus of this study is on engine components, and how the interactions of these components are considered for throttling applications. First, an assessment of space mission requirements is performed to determine what applications require engine throttling. A background on liquid rocket engine throttling is provided, along with the basic equations that are used to predict performance. Three engines are discussed that have successfully demonstrated throttling. Next, the engine system is broken down into components to discuss special considerations that need to be made for engine throttling. This study focuses on liquid rocket engines that have demonstrated operational capability on American space launch vehicles, starting with the Apollo vehicle engines and ending with current technology demonstrations. Both deep throttling and shallow throttling engines are discussed. Boost and sustainer engines have demonstrated throttling from 17% to 100% thrust, while upper stage and lunar lander engines have demonstrated throttling in excess of 10% to 100% thrust. The key difficulty in throttling liquid rocket engines is maintaining an adequate pressure drop across the injector, which is necessary to provide propellant atomization and mixing. For the combustion chamber, cooling can be an issue at low thrust levels. For turbomachinery, the primary considerations are to avoid cavitation, stall, surge, and to consider bearing leakage flows, rotordynamics, and structural dynamics. For valves, it is necessary to design valves and actuators that can achieve accurate flow control at all thrust levels. It is also important to assess the amount of nozzle flow separation that can be tolerated at low thrust levels for ground testing.

Betts, Erin M.; Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

2010-01-01

384

Automatic heating/cooling energy distribution system. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This project consisted of developing and installing a computerized heating and cooling air distribution system. The features of the system are as follows: (1) reduced temperature variation because of a constant flow of energy and more precise temperature control. This characteristic allows the facility to be operated at a lower temperature in winter and a higher temperature in the summer with the same creature comfort because the occupants are not being exposed to constant temperature variations or bursts of heating or cooling air. (2) Ability to reduce the energy required by any room for any period of time when the room is unoccupied or the activity in the room doesn't require the same temperature as other parts of the facility. The description of the system in this report assumes the logic consistent with winter heating requirements. An interpretation of summer cooling operation could be developed by substituting air-conditions on-time for furnace burn-time in the discussion.

Not Available

1983-03-14

385

Traveling Wave RF Systems for Helical Cooling Channels  

SciTech Connect

The great advantage of the helical ionization cooling channel (HCC) is its compact structure that enables the fast cooling of muon beam 6-dimensional phase space. This compact aspect requires a high average RF gradient, with few places that do not have cavities. Also, the muon beam is diffuse and requires an RF system with large transverse and longitudinal acceptance. A traveling wave system can address these requirements. First, the number of RF power coupling ports can be significantly reduced compared with our previous pillbox concept. Secondly, by adding a nose on the cell iris, the presence of thin metal foils traversed by the muons can possibly be avoided. We show simulations of the cooling performance of a traveling wave RF system in a HCC, including cavity geometries with inter-cell RF power couplers needed for power propagation.

Yonehara, K.; Lunin, A.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Romanov, G.; /Fermilab; Neubauer, M.; Johnson, R.P.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Thorndahl, L.; /CERN

2009-05-01

386

The Prediction of Nozzle Performance and Heat Transfer in Hydrogen/Oxygen Rocket Engines with Transpiration Cooling, Film Cooling, and High Area Ratios  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advanced engineering computational model has been developed to aid in the analysis of chemical rocket engines. The complete multispecies, chemically reacting and diffusing Navier-Stokes equations are modelled, including the Soret thermal diffusion and Dufour energy transfer terms. Demonstration cases are presented for a 1030:1 area ratio nozzle, a 25 lbf film-cooled nozzle, and a transpiration-cooled plug-and-spool rocket engine. The results indicate that the thrust coefficient predictions of the 1030:1 nozzle and the film-cooled nozzle are within 0.2 to 0.5 percent, respectively, of experimental measurements. Further, the model's predictions agree very well with the heat transfer measurements made in all of the nozzle test cases. It is demonstrated that thermal diffusion has a significant effect on the predicted mass fraction of hydrogen along the wall of the nozzle and was shown to represent a significant fraction of the diffusion fluxes occurring in the transpiration-cooled rocket engine.

Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Hoffman, Joe D.

1994-01-01

387

Thermotunneling Based Cooling Systems for High Efficiency Buildings  

SciTech Connect

GE Global Research's overall objective was to develop a novel thermotunneling-cooling device. The end use for these devices is the replacement of vapor cycle compression (VCC) units in residential and commercial cooling and refrigeration systems. Thermotunneling devices offer many advantages over vapor cycle compression cooling units. These include quiet, reliable, non-moving parts operation without refrigerant gases. Additionally theoretical calculations suggest that the efficiency of thermotunneling devices can be 1.5-2x that of VCC units. Given these attributes it can be seen that thermotunneling devices have the potential for dramatic energy savings and are environmentally friendly. A thermotunneling device consists of two low work function electrodes separated by a sub 10 nanometer-sized gap. Cooling by thermotunneling refers to the transport of hot electrons across the gap, from the object to be cooled (cathode) to the heat rejection electrode (anode), by an applied potential. GE Global Research's goal was to model, design, fabricate devices and demonstrate cooling base on the thermotunneling technology.

Aimi, Marco; Arik, Mehmet; Bray, James; Gorczyca, Thomas; Michael, Darryl; Weaver, Stan

2007-09-30

388

Tests and procedures for optimizing EMIR cooling system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EMIR is a wide-field camera and a multi-object, intermediate resolution near-infrared spectrograph for the GTC telescope. EMIR is a cryogenic instrument whose cooling system is based on four two-stage CCCs' Leybold Coolpower 5/100 whose cooling capacity is 100W@80K, in the 1st stage, and 5W@20K, in the 2nd stage, operated directly by two compressors in dual mode (two cold heads for each compressor). During the verification phase some phenomena affecting the cooling system efficiency have been observed. In consequence, the possible influences of the temperature of the water in the cooling unit the compressor, the compressor input power and the quality of the insulating vacuum in the instrument have been studied. Contamination in the Closed Helium Cycle is another possible cause that has been evaluated. The methods used in the tests and the cleaning procedures are described. The results allow us to reach some conclusions regarding the use and maintenance of this type of cooling systems.

Fernández Izquierdo, Patricia; Lizon, Jean Louis; Núñez Cagigal, Miguel Á.; Patrón Recio, Jesús; Barreto Cabrera, Maria; Garzón López, Francisco

2014-07-01

389

The Suitability and Feasibility of Floor Radiant Cooling System in Northern  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the application of radiant floor heating, system design, and laying status, this paper advances a design idea of using natural cooling source such as ground water or evaporation cooling water for `free cooling'. Based on the above, a mathematic model of low-temperature radiant floor heating\\/cooling is constructed. This paper studies the matching of radiant floor's cooling capacity and

Shousong Liu; Yanqiang Di; Tao Meng; Li Liu; Fei Ma

2009-01-01

390

Optimized Design of a Furnace Cooling System  

E-print Network

and into the atmosphere after each use, but plans exist to implement a recapture system to re-cycle the gas through the system multiple times. FIGURE 1. FURNACE SCHEMATIC. The outer chamber wall is made of stainless steel and cannot be exposed to extreme... endangering the structural integrity of the stainless steel pressure vessel wall. The inner chamber temperature that corresponds with this process is displayed in Fig. 3. The outer chamber wall also contains a water jacket with a 40 gal/min flow rate...

Morelli, F.; Bretschneider, R.; Dauzat, J.; Guymon, M.; Studebaker, J.; Rasmussen, B. P.

2013-01-01

391

Extension of similarity test procedures to cooled engine components with insulating ceramic coatings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Material thermal conductivity was analyzed for its effect on the thermal performance of air cooled gas turbine components, both with and without a ceramic thermal-barrier material, tested at reduced temperatures and pressures. The analysis shows that neglecting the material thermal conductivity can contribute significant errors when metal-wall-temperature test data taken on a turbine vane are extrapolated to engine conditions. This error in metal temperature for an uncoated vane is of opposite sign from that for a ceramic-coated vane. A correction technique is developed for both ceramic-coated and uncoated components.

Gladden, H. J.

1980-01-01

392

Soy-Based, Water-Cooled, TC W-III Two Cycle Engine Oil  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to achieve technical approval and commercial launch for a biodegradable soy oil-based, environmentally safe, TC W-III performance, water-cooled, two cycle engine oil. To do so would: (1) develop a new use for RBD soybean oil; (2) increase soybean utilization in North America in the range of 500 K-3.0 MM bushels; and (3) open up supply opportunities of 1.5-5.0 MM bushels worldwide. These goals have been successfully obtained.

Scharf, Curtis R.; Miller, Mark E.

2003-08-30

393

Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems Engineering  

E-print Network

, Additional Cost #12;Renewable Energy Options Wind Solar Small Hydro Biomass Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean ¡ ¢ £ ¡ ¤ ¥ ¦ ¡ ¢ § ¡ ¦ ¨ ¢£ ¤ Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems Engineering IIT Bombay Rotary Club¨ © © ¨ ¨ #12; ¡ ¢ £ ¤ ¥ ¤ £ ¢ ¦ § ¨ © ¡ £ ¡ ¡ © § ¦ § ¡ Diesel 0.4% Wind 1.0% Nuclear 2.5% Gas 8.7% Coal

Banerjee, Rangan

394

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A combination of monthly progress reports are presented. It contains a summary of activities and progress made from November 1, 1978, to February 28, 1979. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

1979-01-01

395

Research Proposal for the Design and Engineering Phase of a Solar Heating and Cooling System Experiment at the Warner Robins Public Library, Warner Robins, Georgia. Submitted to the United States Energy Research and Development Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of reasons are advanced to include a solar heating and cooling experiment in a library building. The unique aspects of the experiment are to be a seasonally adjustable collector tilt and testing of a new generation of absorption air conditioners. After a brief description of the proposed experiment, the proposal contains forms filed by…

Phillips, Warren H.; And Others

396

DIII-D water-cooling system upgrades through modeling and power saving projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DIII-D water-cooling system for the fusion facility at General Atomics consists of the vessel and coil cooling water systems (DIII-D water), components cooling water systems (power supplies, ion-sources, diagnostics and gyrotrons), and heat rejection system (cooling tower and heat exchanger) for the operation of the fusion facility. Since 2005 the water-cooling systems have undergone major upgrades, resulting in average

H. H. Yip; P. S. Mauzey; P. M. Anderson; T. Le; T. Hegstad; A. Thomas; D. Leung

2009-01-01

397

Systems Engineering Integrating Project Management, Science, Engineering, and  

E-print Network

Systems Engineering Integrating Project Management, Science, Engineering, and Mission Operations, to component supplier (mission list: http://lasp .colorado.edu/home/missions-projects/) · Mission (MESSENGER), PPS (Voyager 1); many built and awaiting launch: EXIS (GOES-R), SIM (TSIS), TIM (TSIS), RS

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

398

Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first phase of a planned multiphase program to develop a Phosphoric is addressed. This report describes the efforts performed that culminated in the: (1) Establishment of the preliminary design requirements and system conceptual design for the nominally rated 375 kW PAFC module and is interfacing power plant systems; (2) Establishment of PAFC component and stack performance, endurance, and design parameter data needed for design verification for power plant application; (3) Improvement of the existing PAFC materials data base and establishment of materials specifications and process procedes for the cell components; and (4) Testing of 122 subscale cell atmospheric test for 110,000 cumulative test hours, 12 subscale cell pressurized tests for 15,000 cumulative test hours, and 12 pressurized stack test for 10,000 cumulative test hours.

Feret, J. M.

1983-01-01

399

Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first phase of a planned multiphase program to develop a Phosphoric is addressed. This report describes the efforts performed that culminated in the: (1) Establishment of the preliminary design requirements and system conceptual design for the nominally rated 375 kW PAFC module and is interfacing power plant systems; (2) Establishment of PAFC component and stack performance, endurance, and design parameter data needed for design verification for power plant application; (3) Improvement of the existing PAFC materials data base and establishment of materials specifications and process procedes for the cell components; and (4) Testing of 122 subscale cell atmospheric test for 110,000 cumulative test hours, 12 subscale cell pressurized tests for 15,000 cumulative test hours, and 12 pressurized stack test for 10,000 cumulative test hours.

Feret, J. M.

1983-08-01

400

A study on a multi-stage hybrid gasifier-engine system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of a study on a multi-stage hybrid biomass–charcoal gasification to produce low tar content gas for engine application using coconut shell as a fuel. The performance of a gasifier-engine system consisting of the hybrid biomass–charcoal gasifier, a gas cleaning\\/cooling system and a diesel engine is also discussed.The lowest tar content found in hybrid coconut shell-charcoal

S. C Bhattacharya; San Shwe Hla; Hoang-Luang Pham

2001-01-01

401

CFD Analysis of Axial Flow Fans for Radiator Cooling in AutomobileEngines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiators are installed in automobiles to remove heat from the coolant.\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009The use of higher output engines with tightly compacted under hood\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009packaging, the addition of new emission components, and aerodynamic\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009front end styling with narrower openings are creating a hostile thermal\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009environment in the engine compartment. This results in a smaller\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009volume of under hood cooling air. So, to

Rao D Nageswara; Kaur Bhatti Sukhvinder; Kumar S Ravi; KumarI N Niranjan

2007-01-01

402

Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

1993-01-01

403

System design package for a solar heating and cooling system installed at Akron, Ohio  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information used to evaluate the design of a solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system is given. A conventional heat pump provides summer cooling items as the design data brochure, system performance specification, system hazard analysis, spare parts list, and detailed design drawings. A solar system is installed in a single-family dwelling at Akron, Ohio, and at Duffield, Virginia.

1979-01-01

404

Applying System Engineering to Pharmaceutical Safety  

E-print Network

While engineering techniques are used in the development of medical devices and have been applied to individual healthcare processes, such as the use of checklists in surgery and ICUs, the application of system engineering ...

Couturier, Matthieu

405

REPOSITORY ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

A Viability Assessment (VA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is being completed for delivery in September of 1998. A major element of the VA is the design of a high level waste repository on the Nevada Test Site. The repository is made up of surface and subsurface facilities. The engineered barrier includes the man-made elements of the system that act to retard the migration of radionuclides from a geologic repository. They act in conjunction with the geologic barriers present at Yucca Mountain. The engineered barrier system (EBS) consists of the Waste Package and the underground facility. The focus of this paper is the status of the design of the underground facility portion of the EBS. In addition to a robust waste package, the EBS components in the reference design include a number of features that impede naturally occurring infiltration from reaching and corroding the waste packages. In addition, and as a defense-in-depth strategy, a number of other optional features are being considered. They include drip shields above the waste packages to intercept dripping water and granular backfill around the waste packages to form a diffusion barrier. Plans are being made to test a number of the EBS materials and structures. The Viability Assessment document will discuss the various EBS options and alternative designs and lay out a plan for determining those to be included in the License Application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) scheduled for completion in 2002.

DANIEL G. MCKENZIE III PE, DR. KALYAN K. BHATTACHARYYA AND PAUL G. HARRINGTON

1998-07-29

406

Engineering evaluation of magma cooling-tower demonstration at Nevada Power Company's Sunrise Station. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Magma Cooling Tower (MCT) process utilizes a falling film heat exchanger integrated into an induced draft cooling tower to evaporate wastewater. A hot water source such as return cooling water (90/sup 0/F to 110/sup 0/F) provides the energy for evaporation. Water quality control is maintained by removing potential scaling constituents to make concentration of the wastewater possible without scaling heat transfer surfaces. A pilot-scale demonstration test of the MCT process was performed from March 1979 through June 1979 at Nevada Power Company's Sunrise Station in Las Vegas, Nevada. The pilot unit extracted heat from the powerplant cooling system to evaporate cooling tower blowdown. Two water quality control methods were employed: makeup/sidestream softening and fluidized bed crystallization. The 11-week softening mode test was successful. The unit operated without biofouling or scaling at 100,000 ppM TDS levels under a wide range of operating conditions. Successful operation was not demonstrated in the 10-day crystallization mode test; calcium sulfate (CaSO/sub 4/) scaling occurred on the last day of the test at a maximum brine concentration of less than 40,000 ppM. An economic and technical comparison with other zero-discharge technologies showed that, for application at Sunrise, the MCT process had competitive capital, operating, and levelized annual costs. No major technical problems were encountered that would preclude the commercial application of a properly designed MCT unit operating in the softening mode.

Not Available

1980-11-01

407

Static characteristics of equilibrium two-phase transpiration cooling systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem is formulated on steady two-phase cooling of a homogeneous porous plate. A close relationship is shown to exist between thermal and hydrodynamic components of the process governed by a nonlinear closed system of differential equations. The laws of filtration movement of a coolant with its phase conversions inside a porous wall are analysed. On the basis of the

A. V. Luikov; L. L. Vasiliev; V. A. Maiorov

1975-01-01

408

Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A monitoring system for detecting changes in the liquid levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting changes in the density of the liquid in these regions. A plurality of gamma radiation detectors are used, arranged

DeVolpi

1987-01-01

409

Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large amounts of electric power are required for some of the systems envisioned in support of SDI. Since various applications are being considered, and an overall power architecture study has not been completed, the required power levels and corresponding operating times for specific systems are not known. The characteristics of six designs for power levels of 2, 10 and 20 MWe for operating time of 1 and 7 yrs are described. The operating conditions for these arbitrary designs were chosen to minimize system specific mass. Both gas and liquid cooled reactors are considered. The designs discussed draw heavily on the Pluto project experience. Gas cooled thermal reactors coupled with Brayton cycle power conversion appear to provide reasonable multimegawatt space power systems. An advanced radiation design must be developed which can meet the mass limit assumed. The inherent high temperature capability of the reactors considered removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance.

Walter, Carl E.

410

Cooling system, for power generating plant, using split or partitioned heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus and method comprising a base cooling system using a refrigeration cycle, a peak-shaving system using a secondary cooling liquid, and a regeneration system for the peak-shaving system secondary cooling liquid. A split or partitioned heat exchanger alternately condenses only the refrigerant in the base cooling system or it condenses that refrigerant and a refrigerant used to cool hot secondary cooling liquid. The apparatus can be used in power generating plants with the split heat exchanger located in a cooling tower.

Husain, M.; Lai, B.; Schmitt, R.L.

1982-02-16

411

Improvement of Cooling Performance of a Thermoelectric Air Cooling System Using a Vapor Chamber Heat Sink  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since vapor chambers exhibit excellent thermal performance, they are suited to use as the basis of a heat sink. This work presents the results of tests carried out to investigate the potential application of a vapor chamber heat sink for improving the cooling performance of a thermoelectric (TE) air cooling system. To this end, two sets of TE air coolers were constructed. The cold side of the TE module of both sets was fixed to a conventional plate-fin heat sink. The hot side of one set was fixed to a vapor chamber heat sink, whereas the other set was fixed to a conventional plate-fin heat sink. The effects of air flow rate and electric current supplied to the TE module on the cooling performance were considered. Experimental data were compared with corresponding data for a conventional plate-fin heat sink. It also has been experimentally proven that the use of a vapor chamber heat sink increases the coefficient of performance (COP) by up to 34.2%.

Lertsatitthanakorn, C.; Tipsaenprom, W.; Rungsiyopas, M.

2014-06-01

412

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Dwight look College of Engineering  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Dwight look College of Engineering .NOTICE of Industrial &Systems Engineering; participate in scholarly activities such as conducting research.D. in industrial and systems engineering, cognitive psychology or a closely related discipline. SALARY

Behmer, Spencer T.

413

Unsteady, Cooled Turbine Simulation Using a PC-Linux Analysis System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The fist stage of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) of the GE90 engine was simulated with a three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Sokes solver, MSU Turbo, which uses source terms to simulate the cooling flows. In addition to the solver, its pre-processor, GUMBO, and a post-processing and visualization tool, Turbomachinery Visual3 (TV3) were run in a Linux environment to carry out the simulation and analysis. The solver was run both with and without cooling. The introduction of cooling flow on the blade surfaces, case, and hub and its effects on both rotor-vane interaction as well the effects on the blades themselves were the principle motivations for this study. The studies of the cooling flow show the large amount of unsteadiness in the turbine and the corresponding hot streak migration phenomenon. This research on the GE90 turbomachinery has also led to a procedure for running unsteady, cooled turbine analysis on commodity PC's running the Linux operating system.

List, Michael G.; Turner, Mark G.; Chen, Jen-Pimg; Remotigue, Michael G.; Veres, Joseph P.

2004-01-01

414

Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A solar heating and cooling is described which is designed to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2,200 square feet. Five 3 ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3,000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two 3,000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

1980-06-01

415

Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A solar heating and cooling is described which is designed to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2,200 square feet. Five 3 ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3,000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two 3,000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

1980-01-01

416

Current cost and performance requirements for residential cool storage systems  

SciTech Connect

This study defines the current cost and performance requirements for residential cool storage technologies based on the characteristics of conventional air conditioning equipment and residential time-of-day (TOD) rate structures existing during the 1986--1987 time frame. Currently, rate structures are changing rapidly. Given the volatility of rate structures, the establishment of cost goal is challenging. The goals presented in this study are based on the utility rate structure as of 1986. This study serves to define residential cool storage cost and performance requirements in the current economic environment as well as the many issues affecting the requirements for residential cool storage systems both now and in the future. The same methodology can be employed to establish long-run goals once future rate structures are adequately defined. 12 refs., 6 figs., 18 tabs.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1988-08-01

417

Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering School of Engineering  

E-print Network

4 5 Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering 1st Year School of Engineering of Materials Science and Engineering Department of Integrated System Engineering Electrical Engineering Course Engineering Department of Materials Science Department of Applied Science for Integrated System Engineering

Kourai, Kenichi

418

Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water  

SciTech Connect

This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

Michael Corradini; Mark Anderson; Yassin Hassan; Akira Tokuhiro

2013-01-16

419

Systems engineering and analysis. Third edition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topics presented in this book have been organized into 6 parts and 19 chapters. Part 1 presents an introduction to systems and systems engineering in the context of system science and good engineering practice. Part 2 addresses the system design process as a series of evolutionary steps, progressing from the identification of a need through conceptual design, preliminary design,

B. S. Blanchard; W. J. Fabrycky

1998-01-01

420

Modelling of an adsorption system driven by engine waste heat for truck cabin A\\/C. Performance estimation for a standard driving cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the main characteristics of an innovative cooling system for the air conditioning of a truck cabin, as well as a first estimation of its performance during a standard driving cycle, obtained with a specifically developed vehicle-engine-cooling system overall model. The innovative cooling system consists of a water–zeolite adsorption–desorption system, which employs the waste heat from the engine

M. Verde; L. Cortés; J. M. Corberán; A. Sapienza; S. Vasta; G. Restuccia

2010-01-01

421

Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System  

SciTech Connect

The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is a key heat removal system during normal and off-normal conditions. The design and validation of the RCCS is necessary to demonstrate that VHTRs can survive to the postulated accidents. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) STAR-CCM+/V3.06.006 code was used for three-dimensional system modeling and analysis of the RCCS. A CFD model was developed to analyze heat exchange in the RCCS. The model incorporates a 180-deg section resembling the VHTR RCCS experimentally reproduced in a laboratory-scale test facility at Texas A&M University. All the key features of the experimental facility were taken into account during the numerical simulations. The objective of the present work was to benchmark CFD tools against experimental data addressing the behavior of the RCCS following accident conditions. Two cooling fluids (i.e., water and air) were considered to test the capability of maintaining the RCCS concrete walls' temperature below design limits. Different temperature profiles at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall obtained from the experimental facility were used as boundary conditions in the numerical analyses to simulate VHTR transient evolution during accident scenarios. Mesh convergence was achieved with an intensive parametric study of the two different cooling configurations and selected boundary conditions. To test the effect of turbulence modeling on the RCCS heat exchange, predictions using several different turbulence models and near-wall treatments were evaluated and compared. The comparison among the different turbulence models analyzed showed satisfactory agreement for the temperature distribution inside the RCCS cavity medium and at the standpipes walls. For such a complicated geometry and flow conditions, the tested turbulence models demonstrated that the realizable k-epsilon model with two-layer all y+ wall treatment performs better than the other k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models when compared to the experimental results and the Reynolds stress transport turbulence model results. A scaling analysis was developed to address the distortions introduced by the CFD model in simulating the physical phenomena inside the RCCS system with respect to the full plant configuration. The scaling analysis demonstrated that both the experimental facility and the CFD model achieve a satisfactory resemblance of the main flow characteristics inside the RCCS cavity region, and convection and radiation heat exchange phenomena are properly scaled from the actual plant.

Angelo Frisani; Yassin A. Hassan; Victor M. Ugaz

2010-11-02

422

Performance evaluation of an active solar cooling system utilizing low cost plastic collectors and an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the summer of 1982, air conditioning in Solar House 3 at Colorado State University was provided by an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. The single-effect lithium bromide chiller is an experimental three-ton unit from which heat is rejected by direct evaporative cooling of the condenser and absorber walls, thereby eliminating the need for a separate cooling tower. Domestic hot water was also provided by use of a double-walled heat exchanger and 80-gal hot water tank. A schematic of the system is given. Objectives of the project were: (1) evaluation of system performance over the course of one cooling season in Fort Collins, Colorado; (2) optimization of system operation and control; (3) development of a TRNSYS compatible model of the chiller; and (4) determination of cooling system performance in several U.S. climates by use of the model.

Lof, G. O.; Westhoff, M. A.; Karaki, S.

1984-02-01

423

A STUDY ON THE APPLICATION OF THE RADIANT FLOOR COOLING SYSTEM INTEGRATED WITH A DEHUMIDIFICATION SYSTEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

When applying the radiant floor cooling system, it is important to prevent condensation on the floor surface. To solve this problem, a radiant floor cooling system integrated with the dehumidification system has been proposed and evaluated. In doing so, the relationship between the control variables in preventing floor surface condensation is first analyzed, and the control methods are evaluated through

Jae-Han Lim; Myoung-Souk Yeo; Kwang-Woo Kim

424

Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels  

SciTech Connect

Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01

425

Characteristics of cooling water fouling in a heat exchange system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the efficiency of the physical water treatment method in preventing and controlling fouling accumulation\\u000a on heat transfer surfaces in a laboratory heat exchange system with tap and artificial water. To investigate the fouling characteristics,\\u000a an experimental test facility with a plate type heat exchange system was newly built, where cooling and hot water moved in\\u000a opposite directions

Sun-Kyung Sung; Sang-Ho Suh; Dong-Woo Kim

2008-01-01

426

Emergency core cooling system for a fast reactor. [LMFBR  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main heat transport system for a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor is constructed with elevated piping and guard vessels or pipes around all components of the system below the elevation of the elevated piping so the head developed by the pumps at emergency motor speed will be unsufficient to lift the liquid-metal-coolant over the top of the guard tanks or pipes

H. G. Johnson; R. N. Madsen

1976-01-01

427

Next-Generation Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) is currently underway at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features two new evaporative cooling systems, the Reduced Volume Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (RVP SWME), and the Auxiliary Cooling Loop (ACL). The RVP SWME is the third generation of hollow fiber SWME hardware, and like its predecessors, RVP SWME provides nominal crewmember and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crewmember and PLSS electronics. Major design improvements, including a 36% reduction in volume, reduced weight, and more flight like back-pressure valve, facilitate the packaging of RVP SWME in the AEMU PLSS envelope. In addition to the RVP SWME, the Auxiliary Cooling Loop (ACL), was developed for contingency crewmember cooling. The ACL is a completely redundant, independent cooling system that consists of a small evaporative cooler--the Mini Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), independent pump, independent feed-water assembly and independent Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The Mini-ME utilizes the same hollow fiber technology featured in the RVP SWME, but is only 25% of the size of RVP SWME, providing only the necessary crewmember cooling in a contingency situation. The ACL provides a number of benefits when compared with the current EMU PLSS contingency cooling technology; contingency crewmember cooling can be provided for a longer period of time, more contingency situations can be accounted for, no reliance on a Secondary Oxygen Vessel (SOV) for contingency cooling--thereby allowing a SOV reduction in size and pressure, and the ACL can be recharged-allowing the AEMU PLSS to be reused, even after a contingency event. The development of these evaporative cooling systems will contribute to a more robust and comprehensive AEMU PLSS.

Makinen, Janice V.; Anchondo, Ian; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Colunga, Aaron

2012-01-01

428

Alkali Metal Backup Cooling for Stirling Systems - Experimental Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 degC temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 degC temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental results from integrating the VCHP with an operating Stirling convertor and describes the methodology used to achieve their successful combined operation.

Schwendeman, Carl; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.

2013-01-01

429

Alkali Metal Backup Cooling for Stirling Systems - Experimental Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 C temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 C temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental results from integrating the VCHP with an operating Stirling convertor and describes the methodology used to achieve their successful combined operation.

Schwendeman, Carl; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.

2013-01-01

430

Cooling Off  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners are introduced to challenges of maintaining temperatures while living in space. Thinking and acting like scientists and engineers, learners experiment to learn how to measure the specific heat capacity (or simply, specific heat) of water and then design an improved cooling system like those used in spacesuits. This lesson is developed using a 5E model of learning. In the ENGAGE section of the lesson, learners look at NASA technology and its relationship to improvements in athletic clothing and equipment. They learn about technology in spacesuit design and the use of this technology in everyday life. Working in teams, students conduct experiments relating to specific heat capacity on a cooling system they design in the EXPLORE and EXPLAIN sections. They are challenged to improve the cooling system in the EXTEND section of this lesson. Learners assess their understanding and abilities throughout the lesson and revisit the Essential Questions during the EVALUATE section.

Nasa

2014-06-27

431

Emission control system and method for internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

Fresh air is introduced into the exhaust pipe leading to the muffler for an internal combustion engine, while the air and exhaust gas mixture is cooled, not only in the muffler but also in a circuitous tube which extends from the muffler to the normal discharge or tail pipe and in which a special cooler may be installed. From the outlet of the special cooling tube, which faces forwardly, a portion of the air and exhaust gas mixture, now cooled, is led from a Y-connection to the intake tube of the air filter, so that the air and exhaust gas mixture will be introduced into the intake system prior to the carburetor. A rearwardly slanting arm of the Y-connection connects the front end of the special cooling pipe with the normal tail pipe. The carburetor has one or more air bleed tubes leading into the mixture passage at or below the butterfly valves, so that at idling speeds, a small amount of fresh air is introduced, irrespective of the position of the butterfly valves, to overcome any tendency for the engine, when idling, to cough or sputter due to the introduction of an air and exhaust gas mixture to the air filter intake.

Owens, L.

1980-06-03

432

Egr control system for diesel engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

An egr control system for a diesel engine, comprises an egr passageway connecting an intake passageway and an exhaust passageway to recirculate engine exhaust gas back to the engine, an egr control valve operatively disposed in the egr passageway to control the flow of the recirculated exhaust gas passing through the egr passageway, a detecting device for detecting at least

M. Shiobara; Y. Yoshiba

1983-01-01

433

EGR control system for diesel engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an EGR control system for a diesel engine, the EGR amount is controlled by controlling the pressure in a diaphragm chamber of an EGR valve using the output signal of a computer, responsive to signals from a plurality of engine running condition sensors, for calculating the EGR amount wich corrections according to the engine running conditions and the excess

K. Sekiguehi; T. Igashira; H. Kawai; T. Tanaka

1984-01-01

434

Fuel conservation system for internal combustion engines  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system is provided for varying the number of active cylinders in a multi-cylinder internal combustion engine, in response to the operating requirements of the engine. When the engine reaches that part of its operating range where the torque requirement is such that operation of all of the cylinders is not required to provide adequate and efficient power, certain cylinders

1980-01-01

435

CARMENES ultra-stable cooling system: very promising results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CARMENES is a high resolution spectrograph to detect planets through the variation of radial velocity, destined for the Calar Alto Observatory in Almeria, Spain. The optical bench has a working temperature of 140K with a 24 hours stability of ±0,1K; goal ±0,01K. It is enclosed with a radiation shield actively cooled with thermalized nitrogen gas that flows through strategically positioned heat exchangers to remove its radiative load. The cooling system has an external preparation unit (N2GPU), which provides the nitrogen gas through actively vaporizing liquid nitrogen with heating resistances and a three stage circuit flow, each one controlled by an independent PID. Since CARMENES is still in the construction phase, a dedicated test facility has been built in order to simulate the instrument and correctly establish the N2GPU parameters. Furthermore, the test facility allows a wide range of configurations set-ups, which enables a full characterization of the N2GPU and the cooling system. The N2GPU has been designed to offer a wide temperature range of thermally stabilized nitrogen gas flow, which apart from CARMENES could also be used to provide ultra-high thermal stability in other cryogenic instruments. The present paper shows the testing of the cooling performance, the hardware used and the very promising results obtained.

Mirabet, E.; Carvas, P.; Lizon, J.-L.; Becerril, S.; Rodríguez, E.; Abril, M.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Morales, R.; Pérez, D.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Amado, P. J.; Seifert, W.; Quirrenbach, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Dreizler, S.

2014-07-01

436

ENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering Biomedical engineering chemical engineering civil and environmental engineering  

E-print Network

modeling, environmental engineering, fluid mechanics and rheology, materials processing, nanotechnology resources engineering (hydraulics and fluid mechanics, hydrology, and systems planning and designENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering § Biomedical engineering § chemical

California at Davis, University of

437

ENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering Biomedical engineering chemical engineering civil and environmental engineering  

E-print Network

properties and devices, fluid mechanics and rheology, green engineering and design, interfaces, mathematical resources engineering (hydraulics and fluid mechanics, hydrology, and systems planning and designENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering § Biomedical engineering § chemical

California at Davis, University of

438

Space shuttle main engine: Hydraulic system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The hydraulic actuation system of the space shuttle main engine is discussed. The system consists of five electrohydraulic actuators and a single engine filter used to control the five different propellant valves, which in turn control thrust and mixture ratio of the space shuttle main engine. The hydraulic actuation system provides this control with a precision of 98.7 percent or an error in position no greater than 1.3 percent of full scale rotational travel for critical positions.

Geller, G.; Lamb, C. D.

1981-01-01

439

Open air–vapor compression refrigeration system for air conditioning and hot water cooled by cool water  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an open air–vapor compression refrigeration system for air conditioning and hot water cooled by cool water and proves its feasibility through performance simulation. Pinch technology is used in analysis of heat exchange in the surface heat exchanger, and the temperature difference at the pinch point is selected as 6°C. Its refrigeration depends mainly on both air and

Shaobo Hou; Huacong Li; Hefei Zhang

2007-01-01

440

Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS) is the development of a specialized software system for the construction of geometric descriptive and discrete analytical models of engine parts, components, and substructures which can be transferred to finite element analysis programs such as NASTRAN. The NASA Lewis Engine Structures Program is concerned with the development of technology for the rational structural design and analysis of advanced gas turbine engines with emphasis on advanced structural analysis, structural dynamics, structural aspects of aeroelasticity, and life prediction. Fundamental and common to all of these developments is the need for geometric and analytical model descriptions at various engine assembly levels which are generated using ESMOSS.

1991-01-01

441

Tank waste remediation system engineering plan  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Plan describes the engineering process and controls that will be in place to support the Technical Baseline definition and manage its evolution and implementation to the field operations. This plan provides the vision for the engineering required to support the retrieval and disposal mission through Phase 1 and 2, which includes integrated data management of the Technical Baseline. Further, this plan describes the approach for moving from the ``as is`` condition of engineering practice, systems, and facilities to the desired ``to be`` configuration. To make this transition, Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Engineering will become a center of excellence for TWRS which,will perform engineering in the most effective manner to meet the mission. TWRS engineering will process deviations from sitewide systems if necessary to meet the mission most effectively.

Rifaey, S.H.

1998-01-09

442

ATK Launch Systems Engineering NASA Programs Engineering Examples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation provides an overview of the work done at ATK Launch Systems with and indication of how engineering knowledge can be applied to several real world problems. All material in the presentation has been screened to meet ITAR restrictions. The information provided is a compilation of general engineering knowledge and material available in the public domain. The presentation provides an overview of ATK Launch Systems and NASA programs. Some discussion is provided about the types of engineering conducted at the Promontory plant with added detail about RSRM nozzle engineering. Some brief examples of examples of nozzle technical issues with regard to adhesives and phenolics are shared. These technical issue discussions are based on material available in the public domain.

Richardson, David

2007-01-01

443

Overspeed limiter schemes for Full Authority Digital Engine Control System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engine control system of aircraft is used for controlling the engine parameters. In today's world Full Authority Digital Engine Control System (FADECS) is used for controlling engine of aircrafts. FADEC system broadly consists of the hydro-mechanical systems, sensors, harnesses, dedicated electronics and embedded software for controlling the engine parameters. FADEC system controls various engine parameters as per the control laws

P. Gupta

2010-01-01

444

Earth Systems Science and Engineering  

SciTech Connect

Providing the essential energy and water systems to support human needs while understanding and addressing their environmental consequences is a watershed problem for the 21st century. The LLNL Earth System Science and Engineering Program seeks to provide the scientific understanding and technological expertise to help provide solutions at both global and regional scales. Our work is highly collaborative with universities, laboratories and industrial partners across the world and involves observational data, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations. The energy systems we have enjoyed for the last 100 years have resulted in the advanced standard of living in the developed world and a major emerging problem with climate change. Now we face a simultaneous realization that our reliance on fossil fuels is a source of conflict and economic disruption as well as causing potentially abrupt, even catastrophic global climate change. The climate and energy problem is perhaps the greatest challenge ever faced by mankind. Fossil fuel remains the least expensive and most available source of energy and the basis of our economy. The use of fossil fuels, especially over the last 100 years has led to a 30% increase in CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The problem is growing. The population of the Earth will increase by several billion people in the next 50 years. If economic growth is to continue, the demand for energy is estimated to approximately double in the next 50 years so that we will need approximately 10 TW more energy than the 15 TW we use now. Much of this demand will come from the developing world where most of the population growth will occur and where advanced energy technology is not generally used. The problem affects and is affected by a complex system of systems. The climate and energy problem will affect resources, social structure and the probability of increased conflict. No one person, no one nation, no one technology can solve the problem. There is no parallel precedent on which to model a solution. On these grounds, we have chosen to tackle four key tasks: (1) Understanding the natural Earth system and anthropogenic systems examining key forcings and processes driving these systems and the interactions between systems; (2) Identify climate change impacts important to society and develop strategies and technologies to adapt to the climate change that is inevitable given past, current, and potential emissions; (3) Developing strategies and technologies to reduce/eliminate greenhouse gas emissions thereby mitigating climate change while generating energy that is economically and socially viable; and (4) Engaging with appropriate economic, legal, social, and political structures to inform key decisions.

Rotman, D A

2006-02-21

445

Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Industrial and Management Systems Engineering  

E-print Network

Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Industrial and Management and Engineering Department of Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Research Instruction Application; Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Industrial and Management Systems

Kaji, Hajime

446

Vibrational cooling and thermoelectric response of nanoelectromechanical systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An important goal in nanoelectromechanics is to cool the vibrational motion, ideally to its quantum ground state. Cooling by an applied charge current is a particularly simple and hence attractive strategy to this effect. Here we explore this phenomenon in the context of the general theory of thermoelectrics. In linear response, this theory describes thermoelectric refrigerators in terms of their cooling efficiency ? and figure of merit ZT. We show that both concepts carry over to phonon cooling in nanoelectromechanical systems. As an important consequence, this allows us to discuss the efficiency of phonon refrigerators in relation to the fundamental Carnot efficiency. We illustrate these general concepts by thoroughly investigating a simple double-quantum-dot model with the dual advantage of being quite realistic experimentally and amenable to a largely analytical analysis theoretically. Specifically, we obtain results for the efficiency, the figure of merit, and the effective temperature of the vibrational motion in two regimes. In the quantum regime in which the vibrational motion is fast compared to the electronic degrees of freedom, we can describe the electronic and phononic dynamics of the model in terms of master equations. In the complementary classical regime of slow vibrational motion, the dynamics is described in terms of an appropriate Langevin equation. Remarkably, we find that the efficiency can approach the maximal Carnot value in the quantum regime, with large associated figures of merit. In contrast, the efficiencies are typically far from the Carnot limit in the classical regime. Our theoretical results should provide guidance to implementing efficient vibrational cooling of nanoelectromechanical systems in the laboratory.

Arrachea, Liliana; Bode, Niels; von Oppen, Felix

2014-09-01

447

Perspective on use of fresh water for cooling systems of thermoelectric powerplants in florida. Water resources investigations (final report)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report considers the cooling-water requirement for 3 types of cooling systems generally used in Florida: cooling ponds, evaporative cooling towers, and once-through cooling. A distinction is made between the quantity of water withdrawn from a water supply for cooling purposes and the quantity of water that is consumed as a result of the cooling process. (GRA)

1975-01-01

448

System Engineering of Autonomous Space Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human exploration of the solar system requires fully autonomous systems when travelling more than 5 light minutes from Earth. This autonomy is necessary to manage a large, complex spacecraft with limited crew members and skills available. The communication latency requires the vehicle to deal with events with only limited crew interaction in most cases. The engineering of these systems requires an extensive knowledge of the spacecraft systems, information theory, and autonomous algorithm characteristics. The characteristics of the spacecraft systems must be matched with the autonomous algorithm characteristics to reliably monitor and control the system. This presents a large system engineering problem. Recent work on product-focused, elegant system engineering will be applied to this application, looking at the full autonomy stack, the matching of autonomous systems to spacecraft systems, and the integration of different types of algorithms. Each of these areas will be outlined and a general approach defined for system engineering to provide the optimal solution to the given application context.

Watson, Michael D.; Johnson, Stephen B.; Trevino, Luis

2014-01-01

449

Thermal Stress Calculations for Heatpipe-Cooled Reactor Power Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A heatpipe-cooled fast reactor concept has been under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the past several years, to be used as a power source for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) or as a planetary surface power system. The reactor core consists of an array of modules that are held together by a core lateral restraint system. Each module includes a single heatpipe surrounded by 3-6 clad fuel pins. As part of this development effort, a partial array of a candidate heatpipe-cooled reactor is to be tested in the SAFE-100 experimental program at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The partial array comprises 19 3-pin modules, which are powered by resistance heaters. This paper describes the analyses that were performed in support of this test program, to assess thermal and structural performance and to specify the test conditions needed to simulate reactor operating conditions.

Kapernick, Richard J.; Guffee, Ray M.

2003-01-01

450

Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The acquisition and processing of selected parametric data for inclusion in a computerized Data Base using the Marshall Information Retrieval and Data System (MIRADS) developed by NASA-MSFC is discussed. This data base provides extensive technical and socioeconomic information related to solar energy heating and cooling on a national scale. A broadly based research approach was used to assist in the support of program management and the application of a cost-effective program for solar energy development and demonstration.

Christensen, D. L.

1976-01-01

451

Cooling dominated Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump System application  

Microsoft Academic Search

â–º Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump System covers the loads of an office glass building. â–º Two glazing and ground loop fluid temperatures entering heat pump are examined. â–º Extensive cooling tower sizing is performed for four packings in above conditions. â–º Smallest approach applies for biggest number of transfer units for the same flows. â–º Lowest ratio of pressure

Z. Sagia; C. Rakopoulos; E. Kakaras

2012-01-01

452

Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Solar Energy System was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4,096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5,000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system. Hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building.

1980-01-01

453

Cooling system using an oil-in-alcohol containing consolute antifreeze composition  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of cooling an internal combustion engine which comprises contacting hot metal portions of an operating internal combustion engine coolant system with an oil-in-alcohol containing consolute and antifreeze composition thereby rasing the temperature of the antifreeze to at least a cloud point of about 40/sup 0/C., thereby causing the oil in the consolute antifreeze composition to become insoluble therein and to separate therefrom and coat metal surfaces of the coolant system with an oil film, thereby imparting a corrosion inhibition property to the antifreeze composition with respect to the metal surfaces. The antifreeze composition is a microemulsion and additionally contains an emulsifier providing a cloud point between 40/sup 0/C. and 125/sup 0/C. for the antifreeze composition. The emulsifier consists of a mixture of at least one non-ionic surfactant together with at least one anionic or cationic surfactant.

Goddard, E.D.; Leung, P.S.; Mohr, P.H.

1986-09-09

454

ACCRETION AND OUTFLOW FROM A MAGNETIZED, NEUTRINO COOLED TORUS AROUND THE GAMMA-RAY BURST CENTRAL ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the structure and short-term evolution of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) central engine in the form of a turbulent torus accreting onto a stellar mass black hole. Our models apply to the short GRB events, in which a remnant torus forms after the neutron star-black hole or a double neutron star merger and is subsequently accreted. We study the two-dimensional, relativistic models and concentrate on the effects of the black hole and flow parameters as well as the neutrino cooling. We compare the resulting structure and neutrino emission to the results of our previous one-dimensional simulations. We find that the neutrino cooled torus launches a powerful mass outflow, which contributes to the total neutrino luminosity and mass loss from the system. The neutrino luminosity may exceed the Blandford-Znajek luminosity of the polar jets and the subsequent annihilation of neutrino-antineutrino pairs will provide an additional source of power to the GRB emission.

Janiuk, Agnieszka; Mioduszewski, Patryk [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Moscibrodzka, Monika, E-mail: agnes@cft.edu.pl [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 South Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

2013-10-20

455

Application of the control methods for radiant floor cooling system in residential buildings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In applying radiant floor cooling, its control system must prevent the floor surface condensation in hot and humid weather conditions. With no additional dehumidification system, only the radiant floor cooling system prevents floor condensation. In this case, the effects of the control of the cooling system on the indoor conditions can be changed because of the thermal inertia of the

Jae-Han Lima; Jae-Hun Jo; Yong-Yee Kim; Myoung-Souk Yeo; Kwang-Woo Kim

2006-01-01

456

System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

2008-01-01

457

Center for Information & Systems Engineering  

E-print Network

of scholarship, funding and industry collaboration, CISE faculty bring vast research experience to addressing Engineering is a groundbreaking graduate program that cuts across traditional engineering departments to en & Control Research in this area aims at advancing the state of the art in the control and optimization

Goldberg, Bennett

458

Critical Design Issues of Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER's Fusion Reactor  

SciTech Connect

U.S. ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). The TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak to cooling water during nominal pulsed operation 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. This water contains radionuclides because impurities (e.g., tritium) diffuse from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200 240 C at up to 4.4MPa, and corrosion products become activated by neutron bombardment. The system is designated as safety important class (SIC) and will be fabricated to comply with the French Order concerning nuclear pressure equipment (December 2005) and the EU Pressure Equipment Directive using ASME Section VIII, Div 2 design codes. The complexity of the TCWS design and fabrication presents unique challenges. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed with several issues that need to be resolved to move to next stage of the design. Those issues include flow balancing between over hundreds of branch pipelines in parallel to supply cooling water to blankets, determination of optimum flow velocity while minimizing the potential for cavitation damage, design for freezing protection for cooling water flowing through cryostat (freezing) environment, requirements for high-energy piping design, and electromagnetic impact to piping and components. Although the TCWS consists of standard commercial components such as piping with valves and fittings, heat exchangers, and pumps, complex requirements present interesting design challenges. This paper presents a brief description of TCWS conceptual design and critical design issues that need to be resolved.

Kim, Seokho H [ORNL] [ORNL; Berry, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01

459

Keeping cool while planning a major cooling system modification for a large base-loaded power plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses vital considerations which need to be addressed to help ensure that the wisest approach is used for evaluating or modifying existing open or closed cycle cooling systems. (authors)

Mallory, J. [Sargent and Lundy LLC, 55 East Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States); Randels, R. [Sargent and Lundy LLC, 1860 N. 95th Lane, Phoenix, AZ 85037 (United States); Penrose, J.; Ludovisi, D. [Sargent and Lundy LLC, 55 East Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

2012-07-01

460

Improving the Efficiency of Your Process Cooling System  

E-print Network

Many industries require process cooling to achieve desired outcomes of specific processes. This cooling may come from cooling towers, once-through water, mechanical refrigeration, or cryogenic sources such as liquid nitrogen or dry ice. This paper...

Baker, R.

2005-01-01

461

Turbocharged engine exhaust gas recirculation system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improved exhaust gas recirculation systems for turbocharged gas engines that include an exhaust pipe, a turbocharger connected thereto, and a carburetor connected with a source of gas for the engine. The recirculation system includes an air conduit extending from the turbocharger compressor discharge to a venturi, an exhaust gas conduit that extends from a connection with the exhaust pipe between

Stachowicz

1984-01-01

462

Hanno Kogaku II Chemical System Engineering  

E-print Network

Hanno Kogaku II Chemical System Engineering Instructors: Prof. S. Ted Oyama, Dept. of Chemical System Engineering Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku Tokyo 113-8656 Text: H. S. Fogler, Elements of Chemical changes. Considerable emphasis will be placed on solving non-linar and differential equations using

Yamamoto, Hirosuke