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Sample records for engineered ethanologenic yeast

  1. Evolutionarily engineered ethanologenic yeast detoxifies lignocellulosic biomass conversion inhibitors by reprogrammed pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Lewis; Ma, Menggen; Song, Mingzhou

    2009-09-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion inhibitors, furfural and HMF, inhibit microbial growth and interfere with subsequent fermentation of ethanol, posing significant challenges for a sustainable cellulosic ethanol conversion industry. Numerous yeast genes were found to be associated with the inhibitor tolerance. However, limited knowledge is available about mechanisms of the tolerance and the detoxification of the biomass conversion inhibitors. Using a robust standard for absolute mRNA quantification assay and a recently developed tolerant ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50049, we investigate pathway-based transcription profiles relevant to the yeast tolerance and the inhibitor detoxification. Under the synergistic inhibitory challenges by furfural and HMF, Y-50049 was able to withstand the inhibitor stress, in situ detoxify furfural and HMF, and produce ethanol, while its parental control Y-12632 failed to function till 65 h after incubation. The tolerant strain Y-50049 displayed enriched genetic background with significantly higher abundant of transcripts for at least 16 genes than a non-tolerant parental strain Y-12632. The enhanced expression of ZWF1 appeared to drive glucose metabolism in favor of pentose phosphate pathway over glycolysis at earlier steps of glucose metabolisms. Cofactor NAD(P)H generation steps were likely accelerated by enzymes encoded by ZWF1, GND1, GND2, TDH1, and ALD4. NAD(P)H-dependent aldehyde reductions including conversion of furfural and HMF, in return, provided sufficient NAD(P)(+) for NAD(P)H regeneration in the yeast detoxification pathways. Enriched genetic background and a well maintained redox balance through reprogrammed expression responses of Y-50049 were accountable for the acquired tolerance and detoxification of furfural to furan methanol and HMF to furan dimethanol. We present significant gene interactions and regulatory networks involved in NAD(P)H regenerations and functional aldehyde reductions under

  2. Evolutionarily Engineered Ethanologenic Yeast Detoxifies Lignocellulosic Biomass Conversion Inhibitors by Reprogrammed Pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion inhibitors furfural and HMF inhibit microbial growth and interfere with subsequent fermentation of ethanol, posing significant challenges for a sustainable cellulosic ethanol conversion industry. Numerous yeast genes were found to be associated with the inhibitor ...

  3. Discrete dynamical system modelling for gene regulatory networks of 5-hydroxymethylfural tolerance for ethanologenic yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composed of linear difference equations, a discrete dynamic system model was designed to reconstruct transcriptional regulations in gene regulatory networks in response to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, a bioethanol conversion inhibitor for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The modeling aims ...

  4. Two new native ß-glucosidases from Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 confer its dual function as cellobiose fermenting ethanologenic yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clavispora NRRL Y-50464, a dual functional cellobiose fermenting and ethanologenic yeast strain, is a candidate biocatalyst for lower cost lignocellulose-to-ethanol production using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. A ß-glucosidase BGL1 protein from this strain was recently reported an...

  5. A linear discrete dynamic system model for temporal gene interaction and regulatory network influence in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor HMF for ethanologenic yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A linear discrete dynamic system model is constructed to represent the temporal interactions among significantly expressed genes in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study identifies the most significant linear...

  6. Automated Yeast Mating Protocol Using Open Reading Frames from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome to Improve Yeast Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Engineering the industrial ethanologen Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars from lignocellulosic biomass is critical for commercializing cellulosic fuel ethanol production. Approaches to engineer pentose-fermenting yeasts have required expression of additional genes. We implemented a...

  7. Metabolic engineering of yeasts by heterologous enzyme production for degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose from biomass: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kricka, William; Fitzpatrick, James; Bond, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on current approaches to metabolic engineering of ethanologenic yeast species for the production of bioethanol from complex lignocellulose biomass sources. The experimental strategies for the degradation of the cellulose and xylose-components of lignocellulose are reviewed. Limitations to the current approaches are discussed and novel solutions proposed. PMID:24795706

  8. Mechanisms of in situ detoxification of furfural and HMF by ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are major inhibitory compounds generated from biomass pretreatment using dilute acid hydrolysis. Remediation of inhibitors adds cost and generates extra waste products. Few yeast strains tolerant to inhibitors are available and the need for tolerant strai...

  9. Two New Native β-Glucosidases from Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 Confer Its Dual Function as Cellobiose Fermenting Ethanologenic Yeast.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Liu, Z Lewis; Weber, Scott A; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast strain Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 is able to produce cellulosic ethanol from lignocellulosic materials without addition of external β-glucosidase by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. A β-glucosidase BGL1 protein from this strain was recently reported supporting its cellobiose utilization capability. Here, we report two additional new β-glucosidase genes encoding enzymes designated as BGL2 and BGL3 from strain NRRL Y-50464. Quantitative gene expression was analyzed and the gene function of BGL2 and BGL3 was confirmed by heterologous expression using cellobiose as a sole carbon source. Each gene was cloned and partially purified protein obtained separately for direct enzyme assay using varied substrates. Both proteins showed the highest specific activity at pH 5 and relatively strong affinity with a Km of 0.08 and 0.18 mM for BGL2 and BGL3, respectively. The optimum temperature was found to be 50°C for BGL2 and 55°C for BGL3. Both proteins were able to hydrolyze 1,4 oligosaccharides evaluated in this study. They also showed a strong resistance to glucose product inhibition with a Ki of 61.97 and 38.33 mM for BGL2 and BGL3, respectively. While BGL3 was sensitive showing a significantly reduced activity to 4% ethanol, BGL2 demonstrated tolerance to ethanol. Its activity was enhanced in the presence of ethanol but reduced at concentrations greater than 16%. The presence of the fermentation inhibitors furfural and HMF did not affect the enzyme activity. Our results suggest that a β-glucosidase gene family exists in Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 with at least three members in this group that validate its cellobiose hydrolysis functions for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production. Results of this study confirmed the cellobiose hydrolysis function of strain NRRL Y-50464, and further supported this dual functional yeast as a candidate for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production and next-generation biocatalyst development in potential industrial

  10. Two New Native β-Glucosidases from Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 Confer Its Dual Function as Cellobiose Fermenting Ethanologenic Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Liu, Z. Lewis; Weber, Scott A.; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast strain Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 is able to produce cellulosic ethanol from lignocellulosic materials without addition of external β-glucosidase by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. A β-glucosidase BGL1 protein from this strain was recently reported supporting its cellobiose utilization capability. Here, we report two additional new β-glucosidase genes encoding enzymes designated as BGL2 and BGL3 from strain NRRL Y-50464. Quantitative gene expression was analyzed and the gene function of BGL2 and BGL3 was confirmed by heterologous expression using cellobiose as a sole carbon source. Each gene was cloned and partially purified protein obtained separately for direct enzyme assay using varied substrates. Both proteins showed the highest specific activity at pH 5 and relatively strong affinity with a Km of 0.08 and 0.18 mM for BGL2 and BGL3, respectively. The optimum temperature was found to be 50°C for BGL2 and 55°C for BGL3. Both proteins were able to hydrolyze 1,4 oligosaccharides evaluated in this study. They also showed a strong resistance to glucose product inhibition with a Ki of 61.97 and 38.33 mM for BGL2 and BGL3, respectively. While BGL3 was sensitive showing a significantly reduced activity to 4% ethanol, BGL2 demonstrated tolerance to ethanol. Its activity was enhanced in the presence of ethanol but reduced at concentrations greater than 16%. The presence of the fermentation inhibitors furfural and HMF did not affect the enzyme activity. Our results suggest that a β-glucosidase gene family exists in Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 with at least three members in this group that validate its cellobiose hydrolysis functions for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production. Results of this study confirmed the cellobiose hydrolysis function of strain NRRL Y-50464, and further supported this dual functional yeast as a candidate for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production and next-generation biocatalyst development in potential industrial

  11. Production of Candida antarctica lipase B gene open reading frame using automated PCR gene assembly protocol on robotic workcell and expression in an ethanologenic yeast for use as resin-bound biocatalyst in biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; Moser, Bryan R; Harmsen, Amanda J; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Jones, Marjorie A; Pinkelman, Rebecca; Bang, Sookie S; Tasaki, Ken; Doll, Kenneth M; Qureshi, Nasib; Saha, Badal C; Liu, Siqing; Jackson, John S; Robinson, Samantha; Cotta, Michael C; Rich, Joseph O; Caimi, Paolo

    2011-02-01

    A synthetic Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) gene open reading frame (ORF) for expression in yeast was constructed, and the lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1) C3 variant gene ORF, potentially to improve the availability of the active enzyme at the surface of the yeast cell, was added in frame with the CALB ORF using an automated PCR assembly and DNA purification protocol on an integrated robotic workcell. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing CALB protein or CALB Lyt-1 fusion protein were first grown on 2% (w/v) glucose, producing 9.3 g/L ethanol during fermentation. The carbon source was switched to galactose for GAL1-driven expression, and the CALB and CALB Lyt-1 enzymes expressed were tested for fatty acid ethyl ester (biodiesel) production. The synthetic enzymes catalyzed the formation of fatty acid ethyl esters from ethanol and either corn or soybean oil. It was further demonstrated that a one-step-charging resin, specifically selected for binding to lipase, was capable of covalent attachment of the CALB Lyt-1 enzyme, and that the resin-bound enzyme catalyzed the production of biodiesel. High-level expression of lipase in an ethanologenic yeast strain has the potential to increase the profitability of an integrated biorefinery by combining bioethanol production with coproduction of a low-cost biocatalyst that converts corn oil to biodiesel. PMID:21609683

  12. Transcriptional regulatory analysis reveals PDR3 and GCR1 as regulators of significantly induced genes by 5-hydroxymethylfurfural stress involved in bioethanol conversion for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is one of major inhibitory compounds derived from dehydration of hexoses during biomass degradation using dilute acid hydrolysis. It inhibits yeast growth, reduces enzymatic activities, breaks down DNA, and represses protein and RNA synthesis. We study stress toleranc...

  13. DEVELOPING GRAM-POSITIVE ETHANOLOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microbial fermentation of almost all the C5 & C6 sugars to biofuel is vital to the overall economic conversion process from lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Currently available ethanologens can only use C6, not the mixture of C5 & C6, and relatively low concentrations of ethanol kill the fer...

  14. Yeast oligo-mediated genome engineering (YOGE).

    PubMed

    DiCarlo, James E; Conley, Andrew J; Penttilä, Merja; Jäntti, Jussi; Wang, Harris H; Church, George M

    2013-12-20

    High-frequency oligonucleotide-directed recombination engineering (recombineering) has enabled rapid modification of several prokaryotic genomes to date. Here, we present a method for oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering in the model eukaryote and industrial production host Saccharomyces cerevisiae , which we call yeast oligo-mediated genome engineering (YOGE). Through a combination of overexpression and knockouts of relevant genes and optimization of transformation and oligonucleotide designs, we achieve high gene-modification frequencies at levels that only require screening of dozens of cells. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach in three divergent yeast strains, including those involved in industrial production of biobased chemicals. Furthermore, YOGE can be iteratively executed via cycling to generate genomic libraries up to 10 (5) individuals at each round for diversity generation. YOGE cycling alone or in combination with phenotypic selections or endonuclease-based negative genotypic selections can be used to generate modified alleles easily in yeast populations with high frequencies. PMID:24160921

  15. Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE)

    PubMed Central

    DiCarlo, JE; Conley, AJ; Penttilä, M; Jäntti, J; Wang, HH; Church, GM

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency oligonucleotide-directed recombination engineering (recombineering) has enabled rapid modification of several prokaryotic genomes to date. Here, we present a method for oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering in the model eukaryote and industrial production host S. cerevisiae, which we call Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE). Through a combination of overexpression and knockouts of relevant genes and optimization of transformation and oligonucleotide designs, we achieve high gene modification frequencies at levels that only require screening of dozens of cells. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach in three divergent yeast strains, including those involved in industrial production of bio-based chemicals. Furthermore, YOGE can be iteratively executed via cycling to generate genomic libraries up to 105 individuals at each round for diversity generation. YOGE cycling alone, or in combination with phenotypic selections or endonuclease-based negative genotypic selections, can be used to easily generate modified alleles in yeast populations with high frequencies. PMID:24160921

  16. Engineering alcohol tolerance in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Felix H.; Ghaderi, Adel; Fink, Gerald R.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol toxicity in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae limits titer and productivity in the industrial production of transportation bioethanol. We show that strengthening the opposing potassium and proton electrochemical membrane gradients is a mechanism that enhances general resistance to multiple alcohols. Elevation of extracellular potassium and pH physically bolster these gradients, increasing tolerance to higher alcohols and ethanol fermentation in commercial and laboratory strains (including a xylose-fermenting strain) under industrial-like conditions. Production per cell remains largely unchanged with improvements deriving from heightened population viability. Likewise, up-regulation of the potassium and proton pumps in the laboratory strain enhances performance to levels exceeding industrial strains. Although genetically complex, alcohol tolerance can thus be dominated by a single cellular process, one controlled by a major physicochemical component but amenable to biological augmentation. PMID:25278607

  17. GENE ENGINEERING OF YEASTS FOR THE DEGRADATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research examined the structure and function of cytochrome P-450 genes in yeast as a model for gene engineering such as eukaryotic P-450 enzymes for biodegradation of hazardous waste by yeasts. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis are two yeasts known to produce ma...

  18. Metabolic Engineering of Sesquiterpene Metabolism in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shunji; Yeo, Yunsoo; Greenhagen, Bryan T.; McMullin, Tom; Song, Linsheng; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Rosson, Reinhardt; Noel, Joseph P.; Chappell, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Terpenes are structurally diverse compounds that are of interest because of their biological activities and industrial value. These compounds consist of chirally rich hydrocarbon backbones derived from terpene synthases, which are subsequently decorated with hydroxyl substituents catalyzed by terpene hydroxylases. Availability of these compounds is, however, limited by intractable synthetic means and because they are produced in low amounts and as complex mixtures by natural sources. We engineered yeast for sesquiterpene accumulation by introducing genetic modifications that enable the yeast to accumulate high levels of the key intermediate farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Co-expression of terpene synthase genes diverted the enlarged FPP pool to greater than 80 mg/L of sesquiterpene. Efficient coupling of terpene production with hydroxylation was also demonstrated by coordinate expression of terpene hydroxylase activity, yielding 50 mg/L each of hydrocarbon and hydroxylated products. These yeast now provide a convenient format for investigating catalytic coupling between terpene synthases and hydroxylases, as well as a platform for the industrial production of high value, single-entity and stereochemically unique terpenes. PMID:17013941

  19. Applications of yeast surface display for protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cherf, Gerald M.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The method of displaying recombinant proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae via genetic fusion to an abundant cell wall protein, a technology known as yeast surface display, or simply, yeast display, has become a valuable protein engineering tool for a broad spectrum of biotechnology and biomedical applications. This review focuses on the use of yeast display for engineering protein affinity, stability, and enzymatic activity. Strategies and examples for each protein engineering goal are discussed. Additional applications of yeast display are also briefly presented, including protein epitope mapping, identification of protein-protein interactions, and uses of displayed proteins in industry and medicine. PMID:26060074

  20. Yeast surface display for protein engineering and characterization.

    PubMed

    Gai, S Annie; Wittrup, K Dane

    2007-08-01

    Yeast surface display is being employed to engineer desirable properties into proteins for a broad variety of applications. Labeling with soluble ligands enables rapid and quantitative analysis of yeast-displayed libraries by flow cytometry, while cell-surface selections allow screening of libraries with insoluble or even as-yet-uncharacterized binding targets. In parallel, the utilization of yeast surface display for protein characterization, including in particular the mapping of functional epitopes mediating protein-protein interactions, represents a significant recent advance. PMID:17870469

  1. Gradient Sensing: Engineering the Yeast Love Affair.

    PubMed

    Goryachev, Andrew B; Leda, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    A new study in fission yeasts promotes the notion that transient polarity patches that wander the cell surface at the onset of mating are discrete agents of gradient sensing. This concept unexpectedly bridges the modes of gradient sensing in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. PMID:27269722

  2. ENGINEERING THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF STYRENE IN YEAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The strategy pursued was to insert genes for phenylalanine ammonia lysase (pal) and phenolic acid decarboxylase (pad) into the yeast that would convert phenylalanine to styrene through a cinnamic acid intermediate.

    An engineered yeast efficiently secreting penicillin.

    PubMed

    Gidijala, Loknath; Kiel, Jan A K W; Douma, Rutger D; Seifar, Reza M; van Gulik, Walter M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN). As yet, the industrial production of this beta-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT) and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL) resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L). PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel) beta-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents), whose production involves NRPS's. PMID:20016817

  3. Engineered yeast for enhanced CO2 mineralization†

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Roberto; Carnelli, Lino; Simon, Anna; Kao, Albert; Monforte, Alessandra d’Arminio; Riccò, Moreno; Bianchi, Daniele; Belcher, Angela

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a biologically catalyzed CO2 mineralization process for the capture of CO2 from point sources was designed, constructed at a laboratory scale, and, using standard chemical process scale-up protocols, was modeled and evaluated at an industrial scale. A yeast display system in Saccharomyces cerevisae was used to screen several carbonic anhydrase isoforms and mineralization peptides for their impact on CO2 hydration, CaCO3 mineralization, and particle settling rate. Enhanced rates for each of these steps in the CaCO3 mineralization process were confirmed using quantitative techniques in lab-scale measurements. The effect of these enhanced rates on the CO2 capture cost in an industrial scale CO2 mineralization process using coal fly ash as the CaO source was evaluated. The model predicts a process using bCA2- yeast and fly ash is ~10% more cost effective per ton of CO2 captured than a process with no biological molecules, a savings not realized by wild-type yeast and high-temperature stable recombinant CA2 alone or in combination. The levelized cost of electricity for a power plant using this process was calculated and scenarios in which this process compares favorably to CO2 capture by MEA absorption process are presented. PMID:25289021

  4. Production of Candida antaractica Lipase B Gene Open Reading Frame using Automated PCR Gene Assembly Protocol on Robotic Workcell & Expression in Ethanologenic Yeast for use as Resin-Bound Biocatalyst in Biodiesel Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A synthetic Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) gene open reading frame (ORF) for expression in yeast was produced using an automated PCR assembly and DNA purification protocol on an integrated robotic workcell. The lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1) C3 variant gene ORF was added in-frame with the CALB ORF to pote...

  5. Metabolic engineering of yeast for production of fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; Larsson, Christer; van Maris, Antonius; Pronk, Jack

    2013-06-01

    Microbial production of fuels and chemicals from renewable carbohydrate feedstocks offers sustainable and economically attractive alternatives to their petroleum-based production. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers many advantages as a platform cell factory for such applications. Already applied on a huge scale for bioethanol production, this yeast is easy to genetically engineer, its physiology, metabolism and genetics have been intensively studied and its robustness enables it to handle harsh industrial conditions. Introduction of novel pathways and optimization of its native cellular processes by metabolic engineering are rapidly expanding its range of cell-factory applications. Here we review recent scientific progress in metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for the production of bioethanol, advanced biofuels, and chemicals. PMID:23611565

  6. Synthetic biology for engineering acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl-CoA can be formed from glucose in high yield. Here the perspective of generating yeast platform strains that have such properties is discussed in the context of a major breakthrough with expression of a functional pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol. PMID:25370498

  7. Reduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol by ethanologenic strains of bacteria and its effect on ethanol production from xylose.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Tony; Buszko, Marian L; Ingram, Lonnie O; Preston, James F

    2002-01-01

    The ethanologenic bacteria Escherichia coli strains KO11 and LYO1, and Klebsiella oxytoca strain P2, were investigated for their ability to metabolize furfural. Using high performance liquid chromatography and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, furfural was found to be completely biotransformed into furfuryl alcohol by each of the three strains with tryptone and yeast extract as sole carbon sources. This reduction appears to be constitutive with NAD(P)H acting as electron donor. Glucose was shown to be an effective source of reducing power. Succinate inhibited furfural reduction, indicating that flavins are unlikely participants in this process. Furfural at concentrations >10 mM decreased the rate of ethanol formation but did not affect the final yield. Insight into the biochemical nature of this furfural reduction process may help efforts to mitigate furfural toxicity during ethanol production by ethanologenic bacteria. PMID:12018260

  8. PGASO: A synthetic biology tool for engineering a cellulolytic yeast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To achieve an economical cellulosic ethanol production, a host that can do both cellulosic saccharification and ethanol fermentation is desirable. However, to engineer a non-cellulolytic yeast to be such a host requires synthetic biology techniques to transform multiple enzyme genes into its genome. Results A technique, named Promoter-based Gene Assembly and Simultaneous Overexpression (PGASO), that employs overlapping oligonucleotides for recombinatorial assembly of gene cassettes with individual promoters, was developed. PGASO was applied to engineer Kluyveromycesmarxianus KY3, which is a thermo- and toxin-tolerant yeast. We obtained a recombinant strain, called KR5, that is capable of simultaneously expressing exoglucanase and endoglucanase (both of Trichodermareesei), a beta-glucosidase (from a cow rumen fungus), a neomycin phosphotransferase, and a green fluorescent protein. High transformation efficiency and accuracy were achieved as ~63% of the transformants was confirmed to be correct. KR5 can utilize beta-glycan, cellobiose or CMC as the sole carbon source for growth and can directly convert cellobiose and beta-glycan to ethanol. Conclusions This study provides the first example of multi-gene assembly in a single step in a yeast species other than Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We successfully engineered a yeast host with a five-gene cassette assembly and the new host is capable of co-expressing three types of cellulase genes. Our study shows that PGASO is an efficient tool for simultaneous expression of multiple enzymes in the kefir yeast KY3 and that KY3 can serve as a host for developing synthetic biology tools. PMID:22839502

  9. Systems-level engineering of nonfermentative metabolism in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Caleb J; Boyle, Patrick M; Waks, Zeev; Silver, Pamela A

    2009-09-01

    We designed and experimentally validated an in silico gene deletion strategy for engineering endogenous one-carbon (C1) metabolism in yeast. We used constraint-based metabolic modeling and computer-aided gene knockout simulations to identify five genes (ALT2, FDH1, FDH2, FUM1, and ZWF1), which, when deleted in combination, predicted formic acid secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions. Once constructed, the quintuple mutant strain showed the predicted increase in formic acid secretion relative to a formate dehydrogenase mutant (fdh1 fdh2), while formic acid secretion in wild-type yeast was undetectable. Gene expression and physiological data generated post hoc identified a retrograde response to mitochondrial deficiency, which was confirmed by showing Rtg1-dependent NADH accumulation in the engineered yeast strain. Formal pathway analysis combined with gene expression data suggested specific modes of regulation that govern C1 metabolic flux in yeast. Specifically, we identified coordinated transcriptional regulation of C1 pathway enzymes and a positive flux control coefficient for the branch point enzyme 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH). Together, these results demonstrate that constraint-based models can identify seemingly unrelated mutations, which interact at a systems level across subcellular compartments to modulate flux through nonfermentative metabolic pathways. PMID:19564482

  10. Engineering biosynthesis of the anticancer alkaloid noscapine in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanran; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Noscapine is a potential anticancer drug isolated from the opium poppy Papaver somniferum, and genes encoding enzymes responsible for the synthesis of noscapine have been recently discovered to be clustered on the genome of P. somniferum. Here, we reconstitute the noscapine gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to achieve the microbial production of noscapine and related pathway intermediates, complementing and extending previous in planta and in vitro investigations. Our work provides structural validation of the secoberberine intermediates and the description of the narcotoline-4′-O-methyltransferase, suggesting this activity is catalysed by a unique heterodimer. We also reconstitute a 14-step biosynthetic pathway of noscapine from the simple alkaloid norlaudanosoline by engineering a yeast strain expressing 16 heterologous plant enzymes, achieving reconstitution of a complex plant pathway in a microbial host. Other engineered yeasts produce previously inaccessible pathway intermediates and a novel derivative, thereby advancing protoberberine and noscapine related drug discovery. PMID:27378283

  11. Engineering biosynthesis of the anticancer alkaloid noscapine in yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanran; Smolke, Christina D

    2016-01-01

    Noscapine is a potential anticancer drug isolated from the opium poppy Papaver somniferum, and genes encoding enzymes responsible for the synthesis of noscapine have been recently discovered to be clustered on the genome of P. somniferum. Here, we reconstitute the noscapine gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to achieve the microbial production of noscapine and related pathway intermediates, complementing and extending previous in planta and in vitro investigations. Our work provides structural validation of the secoberberine intermediates and the description of the narcotoline-4'-O-methyltransferase, suggesting this activity is catalysed by a unique heterodimer. We also reconstitute a 14-step biosynthetic pathway of noscapine from the simple alkaloid norlaudanosoline by engineering a yeast strain expressing 16 heterologous plant enzymes, achieving reconstitution of a complex plant pathway in a microbial host. Other engineered yeasts produce previously inaccessible pathway intermediates and a novel derivative, thereby advancing protoberberine and noscapine related drug discovery. PMID:27378283

  12. Promising ethanologens for xylose fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.; Franden, M.A.; Newman, M.

    1995-12-31

    An economical biomass-to-ethanol process depends on the efficient conversion of both its cellulose and hemicellulose components. On a dry weight basis, the typical feedstock contains approx 25-50% (w/w) glucose, 10-30% (w/w) xylose, 15-30% (w/w) lignin, and 1-5% (w/w) of other minor pentose and hexose sugars. Although many microorganisms can ferment the glucose component in cellulose to ethanol, conversion of pentose sugars in the hemicellulose fraction, particularly xylose, has been hindered by the lack of a suitable biocatalyst. Despite the development of recombinant strains with improved fermentation performance, increased ethanol yields and concentrations and shorter fermentation times are key targets that have yet to be achieved from lignocellulosic hydrolyzates. Our objective is to develop biocatalysts for the rapid and efficient conversion of xylose by engineering key metabolic pathways in selected organisms. To identify promising biocatalysts for these efforts, we have surveyed several industrial microorganisms according to several primary traits considered to be essential, as well as a number of secondary traits considered to be desirable, in a commercial biomass-to-ethanol process.

  13. Enhanced fermentative capacity of yeasts engineered in storage carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Matallana, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    During yeast biomass production, cells are grown through several batch and fed-batch cultures on molasses. This industrial process produces several types of stresses along the process, including thermic, osmotic, starvation, and oxidative stress. It has been shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced stress resistance present enhanced fermentative capacity of yeast biomass produced. On the other hand, storage carbohydrates have been related to several types of stress resistance in S. cerevisiae. Here we have engineered industrial strains in storage carbohydrate metabolism by overexpressing the GSY2 gene, that encodes the glycogen synthase enzyme, and deleting NTH1 gene, that encodes the neutral trehalase enzyme. Industrial biomass production process simulations were performed with control and modified strains to measure cellular carbohydrates and fermentation capacity of the produced biomass. These modifications increased glycogen and trehalose levels respectively during bench-top trials of industrial biomass propagation. We finally show that these strains display an improved fermentative capacity than its parental strain after biomass production. Modification of storage carbohydrate content increases fermentation or metabolic capacity of yeast which can be an interesting application for the food industry. PMID:25219977

  14. Engineering Promoter Architecture in Oleaginous Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Shabbir Hussain, Murtaza; Gambill, Lauren; Smith, Spencer; Blenner, Mark A

    2016-03-18

    Eukaryotic promoters have a complex architecture to control both the strength and timing of gene transcription spanning up to thousands of bases from the initiation site. This complexity makes rational fine-tuning of promoters in fungi difficult to predict; however, this very same complexity enables multiple possible strategies for engineering promoter strength. Here, we studied promoter architecture in the oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica. While recent studies have focused on upstream activating sequences, we systematically examined various components common in fungal promoters. Here, we examine several promoter components including upstream activating sequences, proximal promoter sequences, core promoters, and the TATA box in autonomously replicating expression plasmids and integrated into the genome. Our findings show that promoter strength can be fine-tuned through the engineering of the TATA box sequence, core promoter, and upstream activating sequences. Additionally, we identified a previously unreported oleic acid responsive transcription enhancement in the XPR2 upstream activating sequences, which illustrates the complexity of fungal promoters. The promoters engineered here provide new genetic tools for metabolic engineering in Y. lipolytica and provide promoter engineering strategies that may be useful in engineering other non-model fungal systems. PMID:26635071

  15. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production. PMID:24677744

  16. Engineering lipid overproduction in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Kangjian; Imam Abidi, Syed Hussain; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Haoran; Chakraborty, Sagar; Watson, Nicki; Kumaran Ajikumar, Parayil; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Conversion of carbohydrates to lipids at high yield and productivity is essential for cost-effective production of renewable biodiesel. Although some microorganisms can convert sugars to oils, conversion yields and rates are typically low due primarily to allosteric inhibition of the lipid biosynthetic pathway by saturated fatty acids. By reverse engineering the mammalian cellular obese phenotypes, we identified the delta-9 stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) as a rate limiting step and target for the metabolic engineering of the lipid synthesis pathway in Yarrowia lipolytica. Simultaneous overexpression of SCD, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1), and Diacylglyceride acyl-transferase (DGA1) in Y. lipolytica yielded an engineered strain exhibiting highly desirable phenotypes of fast cell growth and lipid overproduction including high carbon to lipid conversion yield (84.7% of theoretical maximal yield), high lipid titers (~55g/L), enhanced tolerance to glucose and cellulose-derived sugars. Moreover, the engineered strain featured a three-fold growth advantage over the wild type strain. As a result, a maximal lipid productivity of ~1g/L/h is obtained during the stationary phase. Furthermore, we showed that the engineered yeast required cytoskeleton remodeling in eliciting the obesity phenotype. Altogether, our work describes the development of a microbial catalyst with the highest reported lipid yield, titer and productivity to date. This is an important step towards the development of an efficient and cost-effective process for biodiesel production from renewable resources. PMID:25732624

  17. Multiplex engineering of industrial yeast genomes using CRISPRm.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Owen W; Cate, Jamie H D

    2014-01-01

    Global demand has driven the use of industrial strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for large-scale production of biofuels and renewable chemicals. However, the genetic basis of desired domestication traits is poorly understood because robust genetic tools do not exist for industrial hosts. We present an efficient, marker-free, high-throughput, and multiplexed genome editing platform for industrial strains of S. cerevisiae that uses plasmid-based expression of the CRISPR/Cas9 endonuclease and multiple ribozyme-protected single guide RNAs. With this multiplex CRISPR (CRISPRm) system, it is possible to integrate DNA libraries into the chromosome for evolution experiments, and to engineer multiple loci simultaneously. The CRISPRm tools should therefore find use in many higher-order synthetic biology applications to accelerate improvements in industrial microorganisms. PMID:25398354

  18. Improvements In Ethanologenic Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella Oxytoca

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David Nunn

    2010-09-30

    The current Verenium cellulosic ethanol process is based on the dilute-acid pretreatment of a biomass feedstock, followed by a two-stage fermentation of the pentose sugar-containing hydrolysate by a genetically modified ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain and a separate simultaneous saccharification-fermentation (SSF) of the cellulosic fraction by a genetically modified ethanologenic Klebsiella oxytoca strain and a fungal enzyme cocktail. In order to reduce unit operations and produce a fermentation beer with higher ethanol concentrations to reduce distillation costs, we have proposed to develop a simultaneous saccharification co-fermentation (SScF) process, where the fermentation of the pentose-containing hydrolysate and cellulosic fraction occurs within the same fermentation vessel. In order to accomplish this goal, improvements in the ethanologens must be made to address a number of issues that arise, including improved hydrolysate tolerance, co-fermentation of the pentose and hexose sugars and increased ethanol tolerance. Using a variety of approaches, including transcriptomics, strain adaptation, metagenomics and directed evolution, this work describes the efforts of a team of scientists from Verenium, University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Genomatica to improve the E. coli and K. oxytoca ethanologens to meet these requirements.

  19. Signature gene expressions of cell wall integrity pathway concur with tolerance response of industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae against biomass pretreatment inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional industrial ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a robust performance under various environmental conditions and can be served as a candidate for the next-generation biocatalyst development for advanced biofuels production using lignocellulose mateials. Overcoming toxic compou...

  1. Rolling adhesion kinematics of yeast engineered to express selectins.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sujata K; Swers, Jeffrey S; Camphausen, Raymond T; Wittrup, K Dane; Hammer, Daniel A

    2003-01-01

    Selectins are cell adhesion molecules that mediate capture of leukocytes on vascular endothelium as an essential component of the inflammatory response. Here we describe a method for yeast surface display of selectins, together with a functional assay that measures rolling adhesion of selectin-expressing yeast on a ligand-coated surface. E-selectin-expressing yeast roll specifically on surfaces bearing sialyl-Lewis-x ligands. Observation of yeast rolling dynamics at various stages of their life cycle indicates that the kinematics of yeast motion depends on the ratio of the bud radius to the parent radius (B/P). Large-budded yeast "walk" across the surface, alternately pivoting about bud and parent. Small-budded yeast "wobble" across the surface, with bud pivoting about parent. Tracking the bud location of budding yeast allows measurement of the angular velocity of the yeast particle. Comparison of translational and angular velocities of budding yeast demonstrates that selectin-expressing cells are rolling rather than slipping across ligand-coated surfaces. PMID:12790675

  2. Construction of cell surface-engineered yeasts displaying antigen to detect antibodies by immunofluorescence and yeast-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu Qian; Han, Shuang Yan; Zheng, Hong; Wu, Lin; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Wang, Xiao Ning; Lin, Ying

    2008-07-01

    In order to detect monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from insufficient and unavailable human proteins, yeast cells were engineered to display human antigens on their surface and consequently endowed with the ability to specifically bind antibodies. Thus, a fusion gene for the expression of the human proteasome subunit alpha 6 (hPSA6) and human profilin I (hProI) were assembled, respectively, with a His.tag marker at the C-terminal and displayed on yeast surface. With anti-His.tag MAb as the primary antibody and the fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-mouse Immunoglobulin G as the second antibody, the surface display of hPSA6 and hProI were verified by immunofluorescence labeling. The antigen-displayed yeast particles were used for MAbs detection from ascites through both immunofluorescence and yeast-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The results were verified by Western blotting and indirect ELISA. By improving the sensitivity, the novel MAbs detection can be applied in the generation and screening of positive hybridoma. It is suggested that by combining the DNA immunization, the present study can evolve into a quick and protein-free way of MAbs production for insufficient and unavailable antigen. PMID:18542951

  3. CRISPR-Cas-Assisted Multiplexing (CAM): Simple Same-Day Multi-Locus Engineering in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jessica M; Chandran, Sunil S; Horwitz, Andrew A

    2016-12-01

    Demands on the industrial and academic yeast strain engineer have increased significantly in the era of synthetic biology. Installing complex biosynthetic pathways and combining point mutations are tedious and time-consuming using traditional methods. With multiplex engineering tools, these tasks can be completed in a single step, typically achieving up to sixfold compression in strain engineering timelines. To capitalize on this potential, a variety of yeast CRISPR-Cas methods have been developed, differing largely in how the guide RNA (gRNA) reagents that direct the Cas9 nuclease are delivered. However, in nearly all reported protocols, the time savings of multiplexing is offset by multiple days of cloning to prepare the required reagents. Here, we discuss the advantages and opportunities of CRISPR-Cas-assisted multiplexing (CAM), a same-day, cloning-free method for multi-locus engineering in yeast. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2563-2569, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991244

  4. Breeding of a new wastewater treatment yeast by genetic engineering

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We previously developed a host vector system for the wastewater treatment yeast Hansenula fabianii J640. The promoter and terminator regions of the gene encoding glucoamylase from H. fabianii J640 were used for a new expression vector, pHFGE-1. The performance of pHFGE-1 was compared with that of the widely used pG-1 transformant vector. H. fabianii J640 (HF-TAMY) cells were transformed with pHFGE-1, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPH-499 (SC-TAMY) cells were transformed with pG-1, both of which carried the Taka-amylase. Expression of Taka-amylase by HF-TAMY showed higher than that by SC-TAMY. By using this new system, we bred the new wastewater treatment yeast that shows α-amylase activity. This yeast appears to grow well under experimental wastewater conditions, and is effective in treating model wastewater containing soluble and insoluble starch. PMID:21906339

  5. Molecular Adaptation Mechanisms Employed by Ethanologenic Bacteria in Response to Lignocellulose-derived Inhibitory Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Omodele; Ndimba, Bongani K.

    2013-01-01

    Current international interest in finding alternative sources of energy to the diminishing supplies of fossil fuels has encouraged research efforts in improving biofuel production technologies. In countries which lack sufficient food, the use of sustainable lignocellulosic feedstocks, for the production of bioethanol, is an attractive option. In the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic feedstocks for ethanol production, various chemicals and/or enzymatic processes are employed. These methods generally result in a range of fermentable sugars, which are subjected to microbial fermentation and distillation to produce bioethanol. However, these methods also produce compounds that are inhibitory to the microbial fermentation process. These compounds include products of sugar dehydration and lignin depolymerisation, such as organic acids, derivatised furaldehydes and phenolic acids. These compounds are known to have a severe negative impact on the ethanologenic microorganisms involved in the fermentation process by compromising the integrity of their cell membranes, inhibiting essential enzymes and negatively interact with their DNA/RNA. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitions, and the mechanisms by which these microorganisms show increased adaptation to such inhibitors. Presented here is a concise overview of the molecular adaptation mechanisms of ethanologenic bacteria in response to lignocellulose-derived inhibitory compounds. These include general stress response and tolerance mechanisms, which are typically those that maintain intracellular pH homeostasis and cell membrane integrity, activation/regulation of global stress responses and inhibitor substrate-specific degradation pathways. We anticipate that understanding these adaptation responses will be essential in the design of 'intelligent' metabolic engineering strategies for the generation of hyper-tolerant fermentation bacteria strains. PMID:23847442

  6. Molecular adaptation mechanisms employed by ethanologenic bacteria in response to lignocellulose-derived inhibitory compounds.

    PubMed

    Ibraheem, Omodele; Ndimba, Bongani K

    2013-01-01

    Current international interest in finding alternative sources of energy to the diminishing supplies of fossil fuels has encouraged research efforts in improving biofuel production technologies. In countries which lack sufficient food, the use of sustainable lignocellulosic feedstocks, for the production of bioethanol, is an attractive option. In the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic feedstocks for ethanol production, various chemicals and/or enzymatic processes are employed. These methods generally result in a range of fermentable sugars, which are subjected to microbial fermentation and distillation to produce bioethanol. However, these methods also produce compounds that are inhibitory to the microbial fermentation process. These compounds include products of sugar dehydration and lignin depolymerisation, such as organic acids, derivatised furaldehydes and phenolic acids. These compounds are known to have a severe negative impact on the ethanologenic microorganisms involved in the fermentation process by compromising the integrity of their cell membranes, inhibiting essential enzymes and negatively interact with their DNA/RNA. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitions, and the mechanisms by which these microorganisms show increased adaptation to such inhibitors. Presented here is a concise overview of the molecular adaptation mechanisms of ethanologenic bacteria in response to lignocellulose-derived inhibitory compounds. These include general stress response and tolerance mechanisms, which are typically those that maintain intracellular pH homeostasis and cell membrane integrity, activation/regulation of global stress responses and inhibitor substrate-specific degradation pathways. We anticipate that understanding these adaptation responses will be essential in the design of 'intelligent' metabolic engineering strategies for the generation of hyper-tolerant fermentation bacteria strains. PMID:23847442

  7. Engineering industrial yeast for renewable advanced biofuels applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a candidate for the next-generation biocatalyst development due to its unique genomic background and robust performance in fermentation-based production. In order to meet challenges of renewable and sustainable advanced biofuels conversion including ...

  8. Engineering of yeast Put4 permease and its application to lager yeast for efficient proline assimilation.

    PubMed

    Omura, Fumihiko; Fujita, Atsushi; Miyajima, Keiji; Fukui, Nobuyuki

    2005-06-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Put4 permease is significant for the transport of proline, alanine, and glycine. Put4p downregulation is counteracted by npi1 mutation that affects the cellular ubiquitination function. Here we describe mutant Put4 permeases, in which up to nine lysine residues in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain have been replaced by arginine. The steady-state protein level of the mutant permease Put4-20p (Lys9, Lys34, Lys35, Lys60, Lys68, Lys71, Lys93, Lys105, Lys107 --> Arg) was largely higher compared to that of the wild-type Put4p, indicating that the N-terminal lysines can undergo ubiquitination and the subsequent degradation steps. Proline is the only amino acid that yeast assimilates with difficulty under standard brewing conditions. A lager yeast strain provided with Put4-20p was able to assimilate proline efficiently during beer fermentations. These results suggest possible industrial applications of the mutant Put4 permeases in improved fermentation systems for beer and other alcoholic beverages based on proline-rich fermentable sources. PMID:15973048

  9. Non-Genetic Engineering Approaches for Isolating and Generating Novel Yeasts for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, P. J.; Bellon, J. R.; Schmidt, S. A.; Varela, C.; Pretorius, I. S.

    Generating novel yeast strains for industrial applications should be quite straightforward; after all, research into the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of Baker's Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has paved the way for many advances in the modern biological sciences. We probably know more about this humble eukaryote than any other, and it is the most tractable of organisms for manipulation using modern genetic engineering approaches. In many countries, however, there are restrictions on the use of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs), particularly in foods and beverages, and the level of consumer acceptance of GMOs is, at best, variable. Thus, many researchers working with industrial yeasts use genetic engineering techniques primarily as research tools, and strain development continues to rely on non-GM technologies. This chapter explores the non-GM tools and strategies available to such researchers.

  10. Process development of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic sugars using gentically engineered yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, M.S.; Xia, Y.; Ho, N.W.Y.

    1996-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an ideal feedstock for the large scale manufacture of fuel ethanol. Glucose and xylose represent the two major fermentable sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and efficient fermentation of both these sugars is essential for the economical production of fuel ethanol. In our laboratory, a genetically engineered yeast 1400 (pLNH33) has been developed which can ferment glucose and xylose simultaneously to ethanol. This recombinant yeast has a very high ethanol tolerance (13.6% w/v) which allows high ethanol concentrations to accumulate in the fermentation medium, thus reducing downstream processing mu significantly. For large scale application of this genetically engineered cell culture, the fermentation kinetics have been investigated. We have studied the effects of substrate and product inhibition for both the host post 1400 and the engineered yeast 1400 (pLNH33) during fermentation of glucose, xylose and mixtures of glucose and xylose. Plasmid instability is an important factor influencing cell culture scale up. This aspect w investigated in selective, non-selective and partially selective fermentation media and the results will be reported in this paper. Based on these kinetic studies, a model has been developed which can simulate the fermentation of glucose and xylose to ethanol using the genetically engineered yeast 1400 (pLNH33), in both batch and continuous cultures.

  11. Production of flavin mononucleotide by metabolically engineered yeast Candida famata.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshyn, Valentyna Y; Ishchuk, Olena P; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Fedorovych, Daria V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2009-05-01

    Recombinant strains of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata able to overproduce flavin mononucleotide (FMN) that contain FMN1 gene encoding riboflavin (RF) kinase driven by the strong constitutive promoter TEF1 (translation elongation factor 1alpha) were constructed. Transformation of these strains with the additional plasmid containing the FMN1 gene under the TEF1 promoter resulted in the 200-fold increase in the riboflavin kinase activity and 100-fold increase in FMN production as compared to the wild-type strain (last feature was found only in iron-deficient medium). Overexpression of the FMN1 gene in the mutant that has deregulated riboflavin biosynthesis pathway and high level of riboflavin production in iron-sufficient medium led to the 30-fold increase in the riboflavin kinase activity and 400-fold increase in FMN production of the resulted transformants. The obtained C. famata recombinant strains can be used for the further construction of improved FMN overproducers. PMID:19558965

  12. Conversion of xylan to ethanol by ethanologenic strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca

    SciTech Connect

    Burchhardt, G.; Ingram, L.O. )

    1992-04-01

    A two-stage process was evaluated for the fermentation of polymeric feedstocks to ethanol by a single, genetically engineered microorganism. The truncated xylanase gene (xynZ) from the thermophilic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum was fused with the N terminus of lacZ to eliminate secretory signals. This hybrid gene was expressed at high levels in ethanologenic strains of Escherichia coli KO11 and Klebsiella oxytoca M5A1(pLOI555). Large amounts of xylanase (25 to 93 mU/mg of cell protein) accumulated as intracellular products during ethanol production. Cells containing xylanase for saccharification. After cooling, the hydrolysate was fermented to ethanol with the same organism (30C), thereby replenishing the supply of xylanase for a subsequent saccharification. Recombinant E. coli metabolized only xylose, while recombinant K. oxytoca M5A1 metabolized xylose, xylobiose, and xylotriose but not xylotetrose. Derivatives of this latter organism produced large amounts of intracellular xylosidase, and the organism is presumed to transport both xylobiose and xylotriose for intracellular hydrolysis. By using recombinant M5A1, approximately 34% of the maximal theoretical yield of ethanol was obtained from xylan by this two-stage process. The yield appeared to be limited by the digestability of commercial xylan rather than by a lack of sufficient xylanase or by ethanol toxicity. In general form, this two-stage process, which uses a single, genetically engineered microorganism, should be applicable for the production of useful chemicals from a wide range of biomass polymers.

  13. Producing human ceramide-NS by metabolic engineering using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Suguru; Shimamoto, Toshi; Nagano, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Okuhara, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Tojo, Hiromasa; Kodama, Yukiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide is one of the most important intercellular components responsible for the barrier and moisture retention functions of the skin. Because of the risks involved with using products of animal origin and the low productivity of plants, the availability of ceramides is currently limited. In this study, we successfully developed a system that produces sphingosine-containing human ceramide-NS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating the genes for yeast sphingolipid hydroxylases (encoded by SUR2 and SCS7) and introducing the gene for a human sphingolipid desaturase (encoded by DES1). The inactivation of the ceramidase gene YDC1, overexpression of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C gene ISC1, and endoplasmic reticulum localization of the DES1 gene product resulted in enhanced production of ceramide-NS. The engineered yeast strains can serve as hosts not only for providing a sustainable source of ceramide-NS but also for developing further systems to produce sphingosine-containing sphingolipids. PMID:26573460

  14. Producing human ceramide-NS by metabolic engineering using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Suguru; Shimamoto, Toshi; Nagano, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Okuhara, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Tojo, Hiromasa; Kodama, Yukiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide is one of the most important intercellular components responsible for the barrier and moisture retention functions of the skin. Because of the risks involved with using products of animal origin and the low productivity of plants, the availability of ceramides is currently limited. In this study, we successfully developed a system that produces sphingosine-containing human ceramide-NS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating the genes for yeast sphingolipid hydroxylases (encoded by SUR2 and SCS7) and introducing the gene for a human sphingolipid desaturase (encoded by DES1). The inactivation of the ceramidase gene YDC1, overexpression of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C gene ISC1, and endoplasmic reticulum localization of the DES1 gene product resulted in enhanced production of ceramide-NS. The engineered yeast strains can serve as hosts not only for providing a sustainable source of ceramide-NS but also for developing further systems to produce sphingosine-containing sphingolipids. PMID:26573460

  15. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  16. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  17. Direct ethanol fermentation of the algal storage polysaccharide laminarin with an optimized combination of engineered yeasts.

    PubMed

    Motone, Keisuke; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-08-10

    Laminarin is the algal storage glucan and represents up to 35% of the dry weight of brown macroalgae. In this study, a novel laminarinase, Gly5M, was first found using focused proteome analysis of a laminarin-assimilating marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans, and the encoding gene was isolated. A Gly5M-displaying yeast strain was prepared with the cell surface display system using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It showed a laminarin-degrading activity on the cell surface and caused the dominant accumulation of gentiobiose. The obtained gentiobiose was converted into glucose and could be assimilated by an Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase (BG)-displaying yeast strain. When Gly5M- and BG-displaying yeasts were anaerobically cultivated together in fermentation medium containing 20g/L laminarin as a sole carbon source, the coculture system with the combination of optimized ratios of the 2 yeast strains directly produced 5.2g/L ethanol. This coculture system of the 2 engineered yeast strains would be a platform for the use of laminarin and contribute to the complete utilization of brown macroalgae. PMID:27287535

  18. Reverse Engineering the Yeast RNR1 Transcriptional Control System

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription is controlled by multi-protein complexes binding to short non-coding regions of genomic DNA. These complexes interact combinatorially. A major goal of modern biology is to provide simple models that predict this complex behavior. The yeast gene RNR1 is transcribed periodically during the cell cycle. Here, we present a pilot study to demonstrate a new method of deciphering the logic behind transcriptional regulation. We took regular samples from cell cycle synchronized cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and extracted nuclear protein. We tested these samples to measure the amount of protein that bound to seven different 16 base pair sequences of DNA that have been previously identified as protein binding locations in the promoter of the RNR1 gene. These tests were performed using surface plasmon resonance. We found that the surface plasmon resonance signals showed significant variation throughout the cell cycle. We correlated the protein binding data with previously published mRNA expression data and interpreted this to show that transcription requires protein bound to a particular site and either five different sites or one additional sites. We conclude that this demonstrates the feasibility of this approach to decipher the combinatorial logic of transcription. PMID:21103376

  19. Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strain Engineered to Convert Glucose, Mannose, Arabinose, and Xylose (GMAX) to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technology for engineering an industrial yeast strain for production of ethanol from glucose, mannose, arabinose, and xylose (GMAX-yeast) using both corn starch and cellulosic feedstocks with simultaneous production of valuable coproducts, including biodiesel, will be discussed. A stable industrial...

  20. A new beta-glucosidase producing yeast for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production from xylose-extracted corncob residues by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional cellulose-to-ethanol conversion by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF)requires enzymatic saccharification using both cellulase and ß-glucosidase allowing cellulose utilization by common ethanologenic yeast. Here we report a new yeast strain of Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 th...

  1. Engineering strategy of yeast metabolism for higher alcohol production

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a promising host for cost-effective biorefinary processes due to its tolerance to various stresses during fermentation, the metabolically engineered S. cerevisiae strains exhibited rather limited production of higher alcohols than that of Escherichia coli. Since the structure of the central metabolism of S. cerevisiae is distinct from that of E. coli, there might be a problem in the structure of the central metabolism of S. cerevisiae. In this study, the potential production of higher alcohols by S. cerevisiae is compared to that of E. coli by employing metabolic simulation techniques. Based on the simulation results, novel metabolic engineering strategies for improving higher alcohol production by S. cerevisiae were investigated by in silico modifications of the metabolic models of S. cerevisiae. Results The metabolic simulations confirmed that the high production of butanols and propanols by the metabolically engineered E. coli strains is derived from the flexible behavior of their central metabolism. Reducing this flexibility by gene deletion is an effective strategy to restrict the metabolic states for producing target alcohols. In contrast, the lower yield using S. cerevisiae originates from the structurally limited flexibility of its central metabolism in which gene deletions severely reduced cell growth. Conclusions The metabolic simulation demonstrated that the poor productivity of S. cerevisiae was improved by the introduction of E. coli genes to compensate the structural difference. This suggested that gene supplementation is a promising strategy for the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae to produce higher alcohols which should be the next challenge for the synthetic bioengineering of S. cerevisiae for the efficient production of higher alcohols. PMID:21902829

  2. Process engineering for bioflavour production with metabolically active yeasts - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Carlquist, Magnus; Gibson, Brian; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca; Paraskevopoulou, Adamantini; Sandell, Mari; Angelov, Angel I; Gotcheva, Velitchka; Angelov, Angel D; Etschmann, Marlene; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Lidén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Flavours are biologically active molecules of large commercial interest in the food, cosmetics, detergent and pharmaceutical industries. The production of flavours can take place by either extraction from plant materials, chemical synthesis, biological conversion of precursor molecules or de novo biosynthesis. The latter alternatives are gaining importance through the rapidly growing fields of systems biology and metabolic engineering, giving efficient production hosts for the so-called 'bioflavours', which are natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds obtained with cell factories or enzymatic systems. Yeasts are potential production hosts for bioflavours. In this mini-review, we give an overview of bioflavour production in yeasts from the process-engineering perspective. Two specific examples, production of 2-phenylethanol and vanillin, are used to illustrate the process challenges and strategies used. PMID:25400136

  3. Glycolic acid production in the engineered yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycolic acid is a C2 hydroxy acid that is a widely used chemical compound. It can be polymerised to produce biodegradable polymers with excellent gas barrier properties. Currently, glycolic acid is produced in a chemical process using fossil resources and toxic chemicals. Biotechnological production of glycolic acid using renewable resources is a desirable alternative. Results The yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis are suitable organisms for glycolic acid production since they are acid tolerant and can grow in the presence of up to 50 g l-1 glycolic acid. We engineered S. cerevisiae and K. lactis for glycolic acid production using the reactions of the glyoxylate cycle to produce glyoxylic acid and then reducing it to glycolic acid. The expression of a high affinity glyoxylate reductase alone already led to glycolic acid production. The production was further improved by deleting genes encoding malate synthase and the cytosolic form of isocitrate dehydrogenase. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced up to about 1 g l-1 of glycolic acid in a medium containing d-xylose and ethanol. Similar modifications in K. lactis resulted in a much higher glycolic acid titer. In a bioreactor cultivation with d-xylose and ethanol up to 15 g l-1 of glycolic acid was obtained. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of engineering yeast to produce glycolic acid. Prior to this work glycolic acid production through the glyoxylate cycle has only been reported in bacteria. The benefit of a yeast host is the possibility for glycolic acid production also at low pH, which was demonstrated in flask cultivations. Production of glycolic acid was first shown in S. cerevisiae. To test whether a Crabtree negative yeast would be better suited for glycolic acid production we engineered K. lactis in the same way and demonstrated it to be a better host for glycolic acid production. PMID:24053654

  4. Effect of organic acids on the growth and fermentation of ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY01

    SciTech Connect

    Zaldivar, J.; Ingram, L.O.

    1999-07-01

    Hemicellulose residues can be hydrolyzed into a sugar syrup using dilute mineral acids. Although this syrup represents a potential feedstock for biofuel production, toxic compounds generated during hydrolysis limit microbial metabolism. Escherichia coli LY01, an ethanologenic biocatalyst engineered to ferment the mixed sugars in hemicellulose syrups, has been tested for resistance to selected organic acids that re present in hemicellulose hydrolysates. Compounds tested include aromatic acids derived from lignin (ferulic, gallic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, syringic, and vanillic acids), acetic acid from the hydrolysis of acetylxylan, and others derived from sugar destruction (furoic, formic, levulinic, and caproic acids). Toxicity was related to hydrophobicity. Combinations of acids were roughly additive as inhibitors of cell growth. When tested at concentrations that inhibited growth by 80%, none appeared to strongly inhibit glycolysis and energy generation, or to disrupt membrane integrity. Toxicity was not markedly affected by inoculum size or incubation temperature. The toxicity of all acids except gallic acid was reduced by an increase in initial pH (from pH 6.0 to pH 7.0 to pH 8.0). Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that both aliphatic and mononuclear organic acids inhibit growth and ethanol production in LY01 by collapsing ion gradients and increasing internal anion concentrations.

  5. Optimization of a yeast RNA interference system for controlling gene expression and enabling rapid metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Crook, Nathan C; Schmitz, Alexander C; Alper, Hal S

    2014-05-16

    Reduction of endogenous gene expression is a fundamental operation of metabolic engineering, yet current methods for gene knockdown (i.e., genome editing) remain laborious and slow, especially in yeast. In contrast, RNA interference allows facile and tunable gene knockdown via a simple plasmid transformation step, enabling metabolic engineers to rapidly prototype knockdown strategies in multiple strains before expending significant cost to undertake genome editing. Although RNAi is naturally present in a myriad of eukaryotes, it has only been recently implemented in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous pathway and so has not yet been optimized as a metabolic engineering tool. In this study, we elucidate a set of design principles for the construction of hairpin RNA expression cassettes in yeast and implement RNA interference to quickly identify routes for improvement of itaconic acid production in this organism. The approach developed here enables rapid prototyping of knockdown strategies and thus accelerates and reduces the cost of the design-build-test cycle in yeast. PMID:24328131

  6. GENE ENGINEERING IN YEAST FOR BIODEGRADATION: IMMUNOLOGICAL CROSS-REACTIVITY AMONG CYTOCHROME P-450 SYSTEM PROTEINS OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monoxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. e are examining the molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Sa...

  7. Tandem repeat coupled with endonuclease cleavage (TREC): a seamless modification tool for genome engineering in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Noskov, Vladimir N.; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H.; Chuang, Ray-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The complete synthetic Mycoplasma genitalium genome (∼583 kb) has been assembled and cloned as a circular plasmid in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Attempts to engineer the cloned genome by standard genetic methods involving the URA3/5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA) counter-selection have shown a high background of 5-FOA resistant clones derived from spontaneous deletions of the bacterial genome maintained in yeast. Here, we report a method that can seamlessly modify the bacterial genome in yeast with high efficiency. This method requires two sequential homologous recombination events. First, the target region is replaced with a mutagenesis cassette that consists of a knock-out CORE (an18-bp I-SceI recognition site, the SCEI gene under the control of the GAL1 promoter, and the URA3 marker) and a DNA fragment homologous to the sequence upstream of the target site. The replacement generates tandem repeat sequences flanking the CORE. Second, galactose induces the expression of I-SceI, which generates a double-strand break (DSB) at the recognition site. This DSB promotes intra-molecular homologous recombination between the repeat sequences, and leads to an excision of the CORE. As a result, a seamless modification is generated. This method can be adapted for a variety of genomic modifications and may provide an important tool to modify and design natural or synthetic genomes propagated in yeast. PMID:20228123

  8. Construction of a starch-utilizing yeast by cell surface engineering.

    PubMed Central

    Murai, T; Ueda, M; Yamamura, M; Atomi, H; Shibasaki, Y; Kamasawa, N; Osumi, M; Amachi, T; Tanaka, A

    1997-01-01

    We have engineered the cell surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anchoring active glucoamylase protein on the cell wall, and we have endowed the yeast cells with the ability to utilize starch directly as the sole carbon source. The gene encoding Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase with its secretion signal peptide was fused with the gene encoding the C-terminal half (320 amino acid residues from the C terminus) of yeast alpha-agglutinin, a protein involved in mating and covalently anchored to the cell wall. The constructed plasmid containing this fusion gene was introduced into S. cerevisiae and expressed under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter from S. cerevisiae. The glucoamylase activity as not detected in the culture medium, but it was detected in the cell pellet fraction. The glucoamylase protein transferred to the soluble fraction from the cell wall fraction after glucanase treatment but not after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment, indicating the covalent binding of the fusion protein to the cell wall. Display of the fused protein was further confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. The transformant cells could surely grow on starch as the sole carbon source. These results showed that the glucoamylase was anchored on the cell wall and displayed as its active form. This is the first example of an application of cell surface engineering to utilize and improve the metabolic ability of cells. PMID:9097432

  9. Development of yeast cell factories for consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol through cell surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    To build an energy and material secure future, a next generation of renewable fuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass is required. Although lignocellulosic biomass, which represents an abundant, inexpensive and renewable source for bioethanol production, is of great interest as a feedstock, the complicated ethanol production processes involved make the cost of producing bioethanol from it higher compared to corn starch and cane juice. Therefore, consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which combines enzyme production, saccharification and fermentation in a single step, has gained increased recognition as a potential bioethanol production system. CBP requires a highly engineered microorganism developed for several different process-specific characteristics. The dominant strategy for engineering a CBP biocatalyst is to express multiple components of a cellulolytic system from either fungi or bacteria in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The development of recombinant yeast strains displaying cellulases and hemicellulases on the cell surface represents significant progress toward realization of CBP. Regardless of the process used for biomass hydrolysis, CBP-enabling microorganisms encounter a variety of toxic compounds produced during biomass pretreatment that inhibit microbial growth and ethanol yield. Systems biology approaches including disruptome screening, transcriptomics, and metabolomics have been recently exploited to gain insight into the molecular and genetic traits involved in tolerance and adaptation to the fermentation inhibitors. In this review, we focus on recent advances in development of yeast strains with both the ability to directly convert lignocellulosic material to ethanol and tolerance in the harsh environments containing toxic compounds in the presence of ethanol. PMID:22085593

  10. Tandem-yeast expression system for engineering and producing unspecific peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Molina-Espeja, Patricia; Ma, Su; Mate, Diana M; Ludwig, Roland; Alcalde, Miguel

    2015-06-01

    Unspecific peroxygenase (UPO) is a highly efficient biocatalyst with a peroxide dependent monooxygenase activity and many biotechnological applications, but the absence of suitable heterologous expression systems has precluded its use in different industrial settings. Recently, the UPO from Agrocybe aegerita was evolved for secretion and activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [8]. In the current work, we describe a tandem-yeast expression system for UPO engineering and large scale production. By harnessing the directed evolution process in S. cerevisiae, the beneficial mutations for secretion enabled Pichia pastoris to express the evolved UPO under the control of the methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 promoter. Whilst secretion levels were found similar for both yeasts in flask fermentation (∼8mg/L), the recombinant UPO from P. pastoris showed a 27-fold enhanced production in fed-batch fermentation (217mg/L). The P. pastoris UPO variant maintained similar biochemical properties of the S. cerevisiae counterpart in terms of catalytic constants, pH activity profiles and thermostability. Thus, this tandem-yeast expression system ensures the engineering of UPOs to use them in future industrial applications as well as large scale production. PMID:26002501

  11. Engineering strategies for the fermentative production of plant alkaloids in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Trenchard, Isis J.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial hosts engineered for the biosynthesis of plant natural products offer enormous potential as powerful discovery and production platforms. However, the reconstruction of these complex biosynthetic schemes faces numerous challenges due to the number of enzymatic steps and challenging enzyme classes associated with these pathways, which can lead to issues in metabolic load, pathway specificity, and maintaining flux to desired products. Cytochrome P450 enzymes are prevalent in plant specialized metabolism and are particularly difficult to express heterologously. Here, we describe the reconstruction of the sanguinarine branch of the benzylisoquinoline alkaloid pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in microbial biosynthesis of protoberberine, protopine, and benzophenanthridine alkaloids through to the end-product sanguinarine, which we demonstrate can be efficiently produced in yeast in the absence of the associated biosynthetic enzyme. We achieved titers of 676 µg/L stylopine, 548 µg/L cis-N-methylstylopine, 252 µg/L protopine, and 80 µg/L sanguinarine from the engineered yeast strains. Through our optimization efforts, we describe genetic and culture strategies supporting the functional expression of multiple plant cytochrome P450 enzymes in the context of a large multi-step pathway. Our results also provided insight into relationships between cytochrome P450 activity and yeast ER physiology. We were able to improve the production of critical intermediates by 32-fold through genetic techniques and an additional 45-fold through culture optimization. PMID:25981946

  12. Engineering of Immunoglobulin Fc Heterodimers Using Yeast Surface-Displayed Combinatorial Fc Library Screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye-Ji; Kim, Ye-Jin; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin Fc heterodimers, which are useful scaffolds for the generation of bispecific antibodies, have been mostly generated through structure-based rational design methods that introduce asymmetric mutations into the CH3 homodimeric interface to favor heterodimeric Fc formation. Here, we report an approach to generate heterodimeric Fc variants through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. We developed a combinatorial heterodimeric Fc library display system by mating two haploid yeast cell lines, one haploid cell line displayed an Fc chain library (displayed FcCH3A) with mutations in one CH3 domain (CH3A) on the yeast cell surface, and the other cell line secreted an Fc chain library (secreted FcCH3B) with mutations in the other CH3 domain (CH3B). In the mated cells, secreted FcCH3B is displayed on the cell surface through heterodimerization with the displayed FcCH3A, the detection of which enabled us to screen the library for heterodimeric Fc variants. We constructed combinatorial heterodimeric Fc libraries with simultaneous mutations in the homodimer-favoring electrostatic interaction pairs K370-E357/S364 or D399-K392/K409 at the CH3 domain interface. High-throughput screening of the libraries using flow cytometry yielded heterodimeric Fc variants with heterodimer-favoring CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, some of them showed high heterodimerization yields (~80–90%) with previously unidentified CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, such as hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions. Our study provides a new approach for engineering Fc heterodimers that could be used to engineer other heterodimeric protein-protein interactions through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. PMID:26675656

  13. Improvement of robustness and ethanol production of ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae under co-stress of heat and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Cheng, Yan-Fei; He, Xiu-Ping; Guo, Xue-Na; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2012-01-01

    Bioethanol is an attractive alternative to fossil fuels. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most important ethanol producer. However, yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses during the industrial process of ethanol production. The robustness under heat, acetic acid, and furfural stresses was improved for ethanologenic S. cerevisiae in this work using genome shuffling. Recombinant yeast strain R32 could grow at 45°C, and resist 0.55% (v/v) acetic acid and 0.3% (v/v) furfural at 40°C. When ethanol fermentation was conducted at temperatures ranging from 30 to 42°C, recombinant strain R32 always gave high ethanol production. After 42 h of fermentation at 42°C, 187.6 ± 1.4 g/l glucose was utilized by recombinant strain R32 to produce 81.4 ± 2.7 g/l ethanol, which were respectively 3.4 and 4.1 times those of CE25. After 36 h of fermentation at 40°C with 0.5% (v/v) acetic acid, 194.4 ± 1.2 g/l glucose in the medium was utilized by recombinant strain R32 to produce 84.2 ± 4.6 g/l of ethanol. The extent of glucose utilization and ethanol concentration of recombinant strain R32 were 6.3 and 7.9 times those of strain CE25. The ethanol concentration produced by recombinant strain R32 was 8.9 times that of strain CE25 after fermentation for 48 h under 0.2% (v/v) furfural stress at 40°C. The strong physiological robustness and fitness of yeast strain R32 support its potential application for industrial production of bioethanol from renewable resources such as lignocelluloses. PMID:21698486

  14. In vitro assay using engineered yeast vacuoles for neuronal SNARE-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Joon; Lee, Miriam; Kang, KyeongJin; Song, Woo Keun; Jun, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular membrane fusion requires not only SNARE proteins but also other regulatory proteins such as the Rab and Sec1/Munc18 (SM) family proteins. Although neuronal SNARE proteins alone can drive the fusion between synthetic liposomes, it remains unclear whether they are also sufficient to induce the fusion of biological membranes. Here, through the use of engineered yeast vacuoles bearing neuronal SNARE proteins, we show that neuronal SNAREs can induce membrane fusion between yeast vacuoles and that this fusion does not require the function of the Rab protein Ypt7p or the SM family protein Vps33p, both of which are essential for normal yeast vacuole fusion. Although excess vacuolar SNARE proteins were also shown to mediate Rab-bypass fusion, this fusion required homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting complex, which bears Vps33p and was accompanied by extensive membrane lysis. We also show that this neuronal SNARE-driven vacuole fusion can be stimulated by the neuronal SM protein Munc18 and blocked by botulinum neurotoxin serotype E, a well-known inhibitor of synaptic vesicle fusion. Taken together, our results suggest that neuronal SNARE proteins are sufficient to induce biological membrane fusion, and that this new assay can be used as a simple and complementary method for investigating synaptic vesicle fusion mechanisms. PMID:24821814

  15. Global transcription engineering of brewer's yeast enhances the fermentation performance under high-gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cuijuan; Wang, Zhikun; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2010-08-01

    Global transcription engineering was developed as a tool to reprogram gene transcription for eliciting new phenotypes important for technological applications (Science 2006, 314(5805):1565-1568). A recent report indicated that the beneficial growth advantage of yeast cells expressing the SPT15-300 mutation is the result of enhanced uptake and/or improved utilization of leucine and thus was seen only on defined media with low concentrations of leucine (Appl Environ Microbiol 2009, 75(19):6055-6061). Further investigation towards a leucine-prototrophic strain of industrial lager brewer's yeast indicated that integration one copy of SPT15-300 in SPT15 allele, however, did lead to an increased ethanol tolerance on complex rich medium at high gravity fermentation condition. Under brewing conditions, the SPT15-300 mutant produced 80.78 g/L ethanol from 200 g/L carbohydrates after 384 h, almost twice as much as that of the wild-type strain. The results convinced us that the effect of global regulator modification of yeast is at multi-genes level and is extremely complicated. PMID:20461507

  16. Fuzzy-decision-making problems of fuel ethanol production using a genetically engineered yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.S.; Jing, C.H.; Tsao, G.T.

    1998-08-01

    A fuzzy-decision-making procedure is applied to find the optimal feed policy of a fed-batch fermentation process for fuel ethanol production using a genetically engineered Saccharomyces yeast 1400 (pLNH33). The policy consisted of feed flow rate, feed concentration, and fermentation time. The recombinant yeast 1400 (pLNH33) can utilize glucose and xylose simultaneously to produce ethanol. However, the parent yeast utilizes glucose only. A partially selective model is used to describe the kinetic behavior of the process. In this study, this partially selective fermentation process is formulated as a general multiple-objective optimal control problem. By using an assigned membership function for each of the objectives, the general multiple-objective optimization problem can be converted into a maximizing decision problem. In order to obtain a global solution, a hybrid method of differential evolution is introduced to solve the maximizing decision problem. A simple guideline is introduced in the interactive programming procedures to find a satisfactory solution to the general multiple-objective optimization problem.

  17. In vitro assay using engineered yeast vacuoles for neuronal SNARE-mediated membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young-Joon; Lee, Miriam; Kang, KyeongJin; Song, Woo Keun; Jun, Youngsoo

    2014-05-27

    Intracellular membrane fusion requires not only SNARE proteins but also other regulatory proteins such as the Rab and Sec1/Munc18 (SM) family proteins. Although neuronal SNARE proteins alone can drive the fusion between synthetic liposomes, it remains unclear whether they are also sufficient to induce the fusion of biological membranes. Here, through the use of engineered yeast vacuoles bearing neuronal SNARE proteins, we show that neuronal SNAREs can induce membrane fusion between yeast vacuoles and that this fusion does not require the function of the Rab protein Ypt7p or the SM family protein Vps33p, both of which are essential for normal yeast vacuole fusion. Although excess vacuolar SNARE proteins were also shown to mediate Rab-bypass fusion, this fusion required homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting complex, which bears Vps33p and was accompanied by extensive membrane lysis. We also show that this neuronal SNARE-driven vacuole fusion can be stimulated by the neuronal SM protein Munc18 and blocked by botulinum neurotoxin serotype E, a well-known inhibitor of synaptic vesicle fusion. Taken together, our results suggest that neuronal SNARE proteins are sufficient to induce biological membrane fusion, and that this new assay can be used as a simple and complementary method for investigating synaptic vesicle fusion mechanisms. PMID:24821814

  18. A new yeast producing beta-glucosidase and tolerant to lignocellulose hydrolysate inhibitors for cellulosic ethanol production using SSF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional cellulose-to-ethanol conversion requires cellulose degradation in order to be utilized for growth and fermentation by common ethanologenic yeast. Cellulose is commonly enzymatically degraded into cellobiose by cellulase and subsequently cellobiose broken down into glucose by beta-glucos...

  19. Continuous ethanol production from wheat straw hydrolysate by recombinant ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain FBR5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous production of ethanol from alkaline peroxide pretreated and enzymatically saccharified wheat straw hydrolyzate by ethanologenic recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5 was investigated under various conditions at controlled pH 6.5 and 35 deg C. The strain FBR5 was chosen because of its a...

  20. The hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and similar anaerobic thermophiles. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J.

    1995-07-01

    A Xylanase was fractionated from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, an ethanologenic thermophile, and the preparation so obtained was used to determined enzymatic parameters such as pH profile of enzyme activity. The ability of various mono- and di-saccharides as well as temperature variations to induce this enzyme activity were studied.

  1. Genome-wide analytical approaches for reverse metabolic engineering of industrially relevant phenotypes in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Oud, Bart; Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T

    2012-01-01

    Successful reverse engineering of mutants that have been obtained by nontargeted strain improvement has long presented a major challenge in yeast biotechnology. This paper reviews the use of genome-wide approaches for analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains originating from evolutionary engineering or random mutagenesis. On the basis of an evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of different methods, we conclude that for the initial identification of relevant genetic changes, whole genome sequencing is superior to other analytical techniques, such as transcriptome, metabolome, proteome, or array-based genome analysis. Key advantages of this technique over gene expression analysis include the independency of genome sequences on experimental context and the possibility to directly and precisely reproduce the identified changes in naive strains. The predictive value of genome-wide analysis of strains with industrially relevant characteristics can be further improved by classical genetics or simultaneous analysis of strains derived from parallel, independent strain improvement lineages. PMID:22152095

  2. Production of the antimalarial drug precursor artemisinic acid in engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Paradise, Eric M; Ouellet, Mario; Fisher, Karl J; Newman, Karyn L; Ndungu, John M; Ho, Kimberly A; Eachus, Rachel A; Ham, Timothy S; Kirby, James; Chang, Michelle C Y; Withers, Sydnor T; Shiba, Yoichiro; Sarpong, Richmond; Keasling, Jay D

    2006-04-13

    Malaria is a global health problem that threatens 300-500 million people and kills more than one million people annually. Disease control is hampered by the occurrence of multi-drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Synthetic antimalarial drugs and malarial vaccines are currently being developed, but their efficacy against malaria awaits rigorous clinical testing. Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide extracted from Artemisia annua L (family Asteraceae; commonly known as sweet wormwood), is highly effective against multi-drug-resistant Plasmodium spp., but is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria sufferers. Although total synthesis of artemisinin is difficult and costly, the semi-synthesis of artemisinin or any derivative from microbially sourced artemisinic acid, its immediate precursor, could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly, high-quality and reliable source of artemisinin. Here we report the engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high titres (up to 100 mg l(-1)) of artemisinic acid using an engineered mevalonate pathway, amorphadiene synthase, and a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP71AV1) from A. annua that performs a three-step oxidation of amorpha-4,11-diene to artemisinic acid. The synthesized artemisinic acid is transported out and retained on the outside of the engineered yeast, meaning that a simple and inexpensive purification process can be used to obtain the desired product. Although the engineered yeast is already capable of producing artemisinic acid at a significantly higher specific productivity than A. annua, yield optimization and industrial scale-up will be required to raise artemisinic acid production to a level high enough to reduce artemisinin combination therapies to significantly below their current prices. PMID:16612385

  3. [The Engineering of a Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast Strain Capable of Homologous Recombination of the Mitochondrial Genome].

    PubMed

    Isakova, E P; Epova, E Yu; Sekova, V Yu; Trubnikova, E V; Kudykina, Yu K; Zylkova, M V; Guseva, M A; Deryabina, Yu I

    2015-01-01

    None of the studied eukaryotic species has a natural system for homologous recombination of the mitochondrial genome. We propose an integrated genetic construct pQ-SRUS, which allows introduction of the recA gene from Bacillus subtilis into the nuclear genome of an extremophilic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica. The targeting of recombinant RecA to the yeast mitochondria is provided by leader sequences (5'-UTR and 3'-UTR) derived from the SOD2 gene mRNA, which exhibits affinity to the outer mitochondrial membrane and thus provides cotranslational transport of RecA to the inner space of the mitochondria. The Y. lipolytica strain bearing the pQ-SRUS construct has the unique ability to integrate DNA constructs into the mitochondrial genome. This fact was confirmed using a tester construct, pQ-NIHN, intended for the introduction of the EYFP gene into the translation initiation region of the Y. lipolytica ND1 mitochondrial gene. The Y. lipolytica strain bearing pQ-SRUS makes it possible to engineer recombinant producers based on Y. lipolytica bearing transgenes in the mitochondrial genome. They are promising for the construction of a genetic system for in vivo replication and modification of the human mitochondrial genome. These strains may be used as a tool for the treatment of human mitochondrial diseases (including genetically inherited ones). PMID:26204776

  4. Engineered Cellulosic Yeast for Direct Production of Energy-Dense, Infrastructure-Compatible Fuels from CO2 and Cellulosic Sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of yeast expressing novel lipase will be engineered to produce two energy-dense liquid fuels using an improved column-based process for production of biodiesel and alcohol was developed using a column containing a strongly basic anion-exchange resin in sequence with a column containing a res...

  5. Bioethanol Production from Uncooked Raw Starch by Immobilized Surface-engineered Yeast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Wu, Kuo-Wei; Fukuda, Hideki

    Surface-engineered yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae codisplaying Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase and Streptococcus bovis α-amylase on the cell surface was used for direct production of ethanol from uncooked raw starch. By using 50 g/L cells during batch fermentation, ethanol concentration could reach 53 g/L in 7 days. During repeated batch fermentation, the production of ethanol could be maintained for seven consecutive cycles. For cells immobilized in loofa sponge, the concentration of ethanol could reach 42 g/L in 3 days in a circulating packed-bed bioreactor. However, the production of ethanol stopped thereafter because of limited contact between cells and starch. The bioreactor could be operated for repeated batch production of ethanol, but ethanol concentration dropped to 55% of its initial value after five cycles because of a decrease in cell mass and cell viability in the bioreactor. Adding cells to the bioreactor could partially restore ethanol production to 75% of its initial value.

  6. Bioethanol production from uncooked raw starch by immobilized surface-engineered yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Wu, Kuo-Wei; Fukuda, Hideki

    2008-03-01

    Surface-engineered yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae codisplaying Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase and Streptococcus bovis alpha-amylase on the cell surface was used for direct production of ethanol from uncooked raw starch. By using 50 g/L cells during batch fermentation, ethanol concentration could reach 53 g/L in 7 days. During repeated batch fermentation, the production of ethanol could be maintained for seven consecutive cycles. For cells immobilized in loofa sponge, the concentration of ethanol could reach 42 g/L in 3 days in a circulating packed-bed bioreactor. However, the production of ethanol stopped thereafter because of limited contact between cells and starch. The bioreactor could be operated for repeated batch production of ethanol, but ethanol concentration dropped to 55% of its initial value after five cycles because of a decrease in cell mass and cell viability in the bioreactor. Adding cells to the bioreactor could partially restore ethanol production to 75% of its initial value. PMID:18425612

  7. Engineering the push and pull of lipid biosynthesis in oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mitchell; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Microbial oil production by heterotrophic organisms is a promising path for the cost-effective production of biofuels from renewable resources provided high conversion yields can be achieved. To this end, we have engineered the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. We first established an expression platform for high expression using an intron-containing translation elongation factor-1α (TEF) promoter and showed that this expression system is capable of increasing gene expression 17-fold over the intronless TEF promoter. We then used this platform for the overexpression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGA1), the final step of the triglyceride (TAG) synthesis pathway, which yielded a 4-fold increase in lipid production over control, to a lipid content of 33.8% of dry cell weight (DCW). We also show that the overexpression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1), the first committed step of fatty acid synthesis, increased lipid content 2-fold over control, or 17.9% lipid content. Next we combined the two genes in a tandem gene construct for the simultaneous coexpression of ACC1 and DGA1, which further increased lipid content to 41.4%, demonstrating synergistic effects of ACC1+DGA1 coexpression. The lipid production characteristics of the ACC1+DGA1 transformant were explored in a 2-L bioreactor fermentation, achieving 61.7% lipid content after 120h. The overall yield and productivity were 0.195g/g and 0.143g/L/h, respectively, while the maximum yield and productivity were 0.270g/g and 0.253g/L/h during the lipid accumulation phase of the fermentation. This work demonstrates the excellent capacity for lipid production by the oleaginous yeast Y. lipolytica and the effects of metabolic engineering of two important steps of the lipid synthesis pathway, which acts to divert flux towards the lipid synthesis and creates driving force for TAG synthesis. PMID:23026119

  8. Plug-and-Play Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Biosynthetic Gene Discovery in Engineered Yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dastmalchi, M; Li, J; Chang, L; Chen, X; Hagel, J M; Facchini, P J

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) metabolism has been the focus of a considerable research effort over the past half-century, primarily because of the pharmaceutical importance of several compounds produced by opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Advancements in genomics technologies have substantially accelerated the rate of gene discovery over the past decade, such that most biosynthetic enzymes involved in the formation of the major alkaloids of opium poppy have now been isolated and partially characterized. Not unexpectedly, the availability of all perceived biosynthetic genes has facilitated the reconstitution of several BIA pathways in microbial hosts, including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Product yields are currently insufficient to consider the commercial production of high-value BIAs, such as morphine. However, the rudimentary success demonstrated by the uncomplicated and routine assembly of a multitude of characterized BIA biosynthetic genes provides a valuable gene discovery tool for the rapid functional identification of the plethora of gene candidates available through increasingly accessible genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic databases. BIA biosynthetic gene discovery represents a substantial research opportunity largely owing to the wealth of existing enzyme data mostly obtained from a single plant species. Functionally novel enzymes and variants with potential metabolic engineering applications can be considered the primary targets. Selection of candidates from sequence repositories is facilitated by the monophyletic relationship among biosynthetic genes belonging to a wide range of enzyme families, such as the numerous cytochromes P450 and AdoMet-dependent O- and N-methyltransferases that operate in BIA metabolism. We describe methods for the rapid functional screening of uncharacterized gene candidates encoding potential BIA biosynthetic enzymes using yeast strains engineered to perform selected metabolic conversions. As an initial

  9. Genome and transcriptome analyses reveal that MAPK- and phosphatidylinositol-signaling pathways mediate tolerance to 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde for industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The industrial ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a promising biocatalyst for next-generation advanced biofuels applications including lignocellulose-to-ethanol conversion. Here we present the first insight into the genomic background of NRRL Y-12632, a type strain from a worldwide coll...

  10. Gene engineering of yeasts for the degradation of hazardous waste. Environmental research brief, July 1983-June 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Loper, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This research examined the structure and function of cytochrome P-450 genes in yeast as a model for gene engineering such as eukaryotic P-450 enzymes for biodegradation of hazardous waste by yeasts. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis are two yeasts known to produce major P-450 enzymes. These enzymes were purified, and antibodies produced in rabbits were then used in the isolation or characterization of clones containing a P-450 gene from each organism. DNA sequence was determined for the gene isolated from S. cerevisiae and for several hundred bases of chromosomal DNA on each side of the gene, and deletion experiments in the promoter region were conducted. The deduced protein sequence from this gene was compared to those of the other known subfamilies of eukaryotic P-450 genes; the several features identified included a new homology region for these protein sequences. The C. tropicalis gene and its promoter region have been partially sequenced.

  11. Metabolic Engineering of Yeast and Plants for the Production of the Biologically Active Hydroxystilbene, Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Jeandet, Philippe; Delaunois, Bertrand; Aziz, Aziz; Donnez, David; Vasserot, Yann; Cordelier, Sylvain; Courot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbenic compound deriving from the phenyalanine/polymalonate route, being stilbene synthase the last and key enzyme of this pathway, recently has become the focus of a number of studies in medicine and plant physiology. Increased demand for this molecule for nutraceutical, cosmetic and possibly pharmaceutic uses, makes its production a necessity. In this context, the use of biotechnology through recombinant microorganisms and plants is particularly promising. Interesting results can indeed arise from the potential of genetically modified microorganisms as an alternative mechanism for producing resveratrol. Strategies used to tailoring yeast as they do not possess the genes that encode for the resveratrol pathway, will be described. On the other hand, most interest has centered in recent years, on STS gene transfer experiments from various origins to the genome of numerous plants. This work also presents a comprehensive review on plant molecular engineering with the STS gene, resulting in disease resistance against microorganisms and the enhancement of the antioxidant activities of several fruits in transgenic lines. PMID:22654481

  12. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering. PMID:26743658

  13. Improving polyketide and fatty acid synthesis by engineering of the yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Wook; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2014-10-10

    Polyketides and fatty acids are important in the production of pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals, and biofuels. The synthesis of the malonyl-CoA building block, catalyzed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1), is considered a limiting step to achieving high titers of polyketides and fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Acc1 is deactivated by AMP-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (Snf1) when glucose is depleted. To prevent this deactivation, the enzyme was aligned with the Rattus norvegicus (rat) Acc1 to identify a critical amino acid (Ser-1157) for phosphorylation and deactivation. Introduction of a S1157A mutation into Acc1 resulted in 9-fold higher specific activity following glucose depletion. The enzyme was tested in yeast engineered to produce the polyketide 6-methylsalisylic acid (6-MSA). Both 6-MSA and native fatty acid levels increased by 3-fold. Utilization of this modified Acc1 enzyme will also be beneficial for other products built from malonyl-CoA. PMID:25078432

  14. Ethanol production using a soy hydrolysate-based medium or a yeast autolysate-based medium

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.

    2000-01-01

    This invention presents a method for the production of ethanol that utilizes a soy hydrolysate-based nutrient medium or a yeast autolysate-based medium nutrient medium in conjunction with ethanologenic bacteria and a fermentable sugar for the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. The invention offers several advantages over presently available media for use in ethanol production, including consistent quality, lack of toxins and wide availability.

  15. Engineering yeast consortia for surface-display of complex cellulosome structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wilfred

    2014-03-31

    As our society marches toward a more technologically advanced future, energy and environmental sustainability are some of the most challenging problems we face today. Biomass is one of the most abundant renewable-feedstock for sustainable production of biofuels. However, the main technological obstacle to more widespread uses of this resource is the lack of low-cost technologies to overcome the recalcitrant nature of the cellulosic structure, especially the hydrolysis step on highly ordered celluloses. In this proposal, we successfully engineered several efficient and inexpensive whole-cell biocatalysts in an effort to produce economically compatible and sustainable biofuels, namely cellulosic ethanol. Our approach was to display of a highly efficient cellulolytic enzyme complex, named cellulosome, on the surface of a historical ethanol producer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the simultaneous and synergistic saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to ethanol. We first demonstrated the feasibility of assembling a mini-cellulosome by incubating E. coli lysates expressing three different cellulases. Resting cells displaying mini-cellulosomes produced 4-fold more ethanol from phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose (PASC) than cultures with only added enzymes. The flexibility to assemble the mini-cellulosome structure was further demonstrated using a synthetic yeast consortium through intracellular complementation. Direct ethanol production from PASC was demonstrated with resting cell cultures. To create a microorganism suitable for a more cost-effective process, called consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), a synthetic consortium capable of displaying mini-cellulosomes on the cell surface via intercellular complementation was created. To further improve the efficiency, a new adaptive strategy of employing anchoring and adaptor scaffoldins to amplify the number of enzymatic subunits was developed, resulting in the creation of an artificial tetravalent cellulosome on the

  16. Gene engineering in yeast for biodegradation: Immunological cross-reactivity among cytochrome p-450 system proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and candida tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Loper, J.C.; Chen, C.; Dey, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. The molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and an n-alkane utilizing yeast, Candida tropicalis ATCC750 are examined. Standard methods were used to purify cytochrome P-450 and NADPH-cytochrome c (P-450) reductase proteins from cells cultured by semi-anaerobic glucose fermentation (S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis) and by growth on tetradecane (C. tropicalis). Polyvalent antisera prepared in rabbits to some of these proteins were used in tests of immunological relatedness among the purified proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose filter immunoblots. The results provide evidence for gene relationships which should prove useful in gene isolation and subsequent engineering of P-450 enzyme systems in yeast.

  17. Production of bioactive ginsenosides Rh2 and Rg3 by metabolically engineered yeasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingping; Wei, Yongjun; Fan, Yun; Liu, Qunfang; Wei, Wei; Yang, Chengshuai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Guoping; Yue, Jianmin; Yan, Xing; Zhou, Zhihua

    2015-05-01

    Ginsenosides Rh2 and Rg3 represent promising candidates for cancer prevention and therapy and have low toxicity. However, the concentrations of Rh2 and Rg3 are extremely low in the bioactive constituents (triterpene saponins) of ginseng. Despite the available heterologous biosynthesis of their aglycone (protopanaxadiol, PPD) in yeast, production of Rh2 and Rg3 by a synthetic biology approach was hindered by the absence of bioparts to glucosylate the C3 hydroxyl of PPD. In this study, two UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) were cloned and identified from Panax ginseng. UGTPg45 selectively transfers a glucose moiety to the C3 hydroxyl of PPD and its ginsenosides. UGTPg29 selectively transfers a glucose moiety to the C3 glucose of Rh2 to form a 1-2-glycosidic bond. Based on the two UGTs and a yeast chassis to produce PPD, yeast cell factories were built to produce Rh2 and/or Rg3 from glucose. The turnover number (kcat) of UGTPg29 was more than 2500-fold that of UGTPg45, which might explain the higher Rg3 yield than that of Rh2 in the yeast cell factories. Building yeast cell factories to produce Rh2 or Rg3 from simple sugars by microbial fermentation provides an alternative approach to replace the traditional method of extracting ginsenosides from Panax plants. PMID:25769286

  18. Construction of a novel selection system for endoglucanases exhibiting carbohydrate-binding modules optimized for biomass using yeast cell-surface engineering

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To permit direct cellulose degradation and ethanol fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 (Δsed1) codisplaying 3 cellulases (Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II [EG], T. reesei cellobiohydrolase II [CBH], and Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase I [BG]) was constructed by yeast cell-surface engineering. The EG used in this study consists of a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and a catalytic module. A comparison with family 1 CBMs revealed conserved amino acid residues and flexible amino acid residues. The flexible amino acid residues were at positions 18, 23, 26, and 27, through which the degrading activity for various cellulose structures in each biomass may have been optimized. To select the optimal combination of CBMs of EGs, a yeast mixture with comprehensively mutated CBM was constructed. The mixture consisted of yeasts codisplaying EG with mutated CBMs, in which 4 flexible residues were comprehensively mutated, CBH, and BG. The yeast mixture was inoculated in selection medium with newspaper as the sole carbon source. The surviving yeast consisted of RTSH yeast (the mutant sequence of CBM: N18R, S23T, S26S, and T27H) and wild-type yeast (CBM was the original) in a ratio of 1:46. The mixture (1 RTSH yeast and 46 wild-type yeasts) had a fermentation activity that was 1.5-fold higher than that of wild-type yeast alone in the early phase of saccharification and fermentation, which indicates that the yeast mixture with comprehensively mutated CBM could be used to select the optimal combination of CBMs suitable for the cellulose of each biomass. PMID:23092441

  19. Genetic engineering of brewing yeast to reduce the content of ethanol in beer.

    PubMed

    Nevoigt, Elke; Pilger, Rita; Mast-Gerlach, Edeltraud; Schmidt, Ulrike; Freihammer, Silke; Eschenbrenner, Martin; Garbe, Leif; Stahl, Ulf

    2002-05-01

    The GPD1 gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was overexpressed in an industrial lager brewing yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae ssp. carlsbergensis) to reduce the content of ethanol in beer. The amount of glycerol produced by the GPD1-overexpressing yeast in fermentation experiments simulating brewing conditions was increased 5.6 times and ethanol was decreased by 18% when compared to the wild-type. Overexpression of GPD1 does not affect the consumption of wort sugars. Only minor changes in the concentration of higher alcohols, esters and fatty acids could be observed in beer produced by the GPD1-overexpressing brewing yeast. However, the concentrations of several other by-products, particularly acetoin, diacetyl and acetaldehyde, were considerably increased. PMID:12702310

  20. Nanolaser Spectroscopy of Genetically Engineered Yeast: New Tool for a Better Brew?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K.; Yaffe, Michael P.

    2006-03-01

    A basic function of the cell membrane is to selectively uptake ions or molecules from its environment to concentrate them into the interior. This concentration difference results in an osmostic pressure difference across the membrane. Ultimately, this pressure and its fluctuation from cell to cell will be limited by the availability and fluctuations of the solute concentrations in solution, the extent of inter-cell communication, and the state of respiring intracellular mitochondria that fuel the process. To measure these fluctuations, we have employed a high-speed nanolaser technique that samples the osmotic pressure in individual yeast cells and isolated mitochondria. We analyzed 2 yeast cell strains, normal baker’s yeast and a genetically-altered version, that differ only by the presence of mitochondrial DNA. The absence of mitochondrial DNA results in the complete loss of all the mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes. These cells have mitochondria, but the mitochondria lack most normal respiratory chain complexes. The frequency distributions in the nanolaser spectra produced by wild-type and modified cells and mitochondria show a striking shift from Gaussian to Poissonian distributions, revealing a powerful novel method for studying statistical physics of yeast.

  1. Predicting complex phenotype-genotype interactions to enable yeast engineering: Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism and a cell factory.

    PubMed

    Dikicioglu, Duygu; Pir, Pınar; Oliver, Stephen G

    2013-09-01

    There is an increasing use of systems biology approaches in both "red" and "white" biotechnology in order to enable medical, medicinal, and industrial applications. The intricate links between genotype and phenotype may be explained through the use of the tools developed in systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering. Biomedical and biotechnological research are among the fields that could benefit most from the elucidation of this complex relationship. Researchers have studied fitness extensively to explain the phenotypic impacts of genetic variations. This elaborate network of dependencies and relationships so revealed are further complicated by the influence of environmental effects that present major challenges to our achieving an understanding of the cellular mechanisms leading to healthy or diseased phenotypes or optimized production yields. An improved comprehension of complex genotype-phenotype interactions and their accurate prediction should enable us to more effectively engineer yeast as a cell factory and to use it as a living model of human or pathogen cells in intelligent screens for new drugs. This review presents different methods and approaches undertaken toward improving our understanding and prediction of the growth phenotype of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as both a model and a production organism. PMID:24031036

  2. Functional Heterologous Protein Expression by Genetically Engineered Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Lauren E.; Fasken, Milo B.; McDermott, Courtney D.; McBride, Shonna M.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Guiliano, David B.; Corbett, Anita H.; Lamb, Tracey J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the potential of probiotic organisms to be adapted for the synthesis and delivery of oral therapeutics. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii would be especially well suited for this purpose due to its ability, in contrast to probiotic prokaryotes, to perform eukaryotic post translational modifications. This probiotic yeast thus has the potential to express a broad array of therapeutic proteins. Currently, however, use of wild type (WT) S. boulardii relies on antibiotic resistance for the selection of transformed yeast. Here we report the creation of auxotrophic mutant strains of S. boulardii that can be selected without antibiotics and demonstrate that these yeast can express functional recombinant protein even when recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues in mice. A UV mutagenesis approach was employed to generate three uracil auxotrophic S. boulardii mutants that show a low rate of reversion to wild type growth. These mutants can express recombinant protein and are resistant in vitro to low pH, bile acid salts, and anaerobic conditions. Critically, oral gavage experiments using C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that mutant S. boulardii survive and are taken up into gastrointestinal immune tissues on a similar level as WT S. boulardii. Mutant yeast recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues furthermore retain expression of functional recombinant protein. These data show that auxotrophic mutant S. boulardii can safely express recombinant protein without antibiotic selection and can deliver recombinant protein to gastrointestinal immune tissues. These auxotrophic mutants of S. boulardii pave the way for future experiments to test the ability of S. boulardii to deliver therapeutics and mediate protection against gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25391025

  3. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  4. Systems biology and pathway engineering enable Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize C-5 and C-6 sugars simultaneously for cellulosic ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a traditional industrial workhorse for ethanol production. However, conventional ethanologenic yeast is superior in fermentation of hexose sugars (C-6) such as glucose but unable to utilize pentose sugars (C-5) such as xylose richly embedded in lignocellulosic biomass. In...

  5. Expression of Different Levels of Ethanologenic Enzymes from Zymomonas mobilis in Recombinant Strains of Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, L. O.; Conway, T.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II in Escherichia coli converted this organism from the production of organic acids to the production of ethanol. Ethanol was produced during both anaerobic and aerobic growth. The extent to which these ethanologenic enzymes were expressed correlated with the extent of ethanol production. The replacement of organic acids with ethanol as a metabolic product during aerobic and anaerobic growth resulted in dramatic increases in final cell density, indicating that these acids (and the associated decline in pH) are more damaging than the production of ethanol. Of the plasmids examined, the best plasmid for growth and ethanol production expressed pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II at levels of 6.5 and 2.5 IU/mg of total cell protein, respectively. PMID:16347553

  6. Hydrophobin-Based Surface Engineering for Sensitive and Robust Quantification of Yeast Pheromones.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefan; Rödel, Gerhard; Ostermann, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Detection and quantification of small peptides, such as yeast pheromones, are often challenging. We developed a highly sensitive and robust affinity-assay for the quantification of the α-factor pheromone of Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on recombinant hydrophobins. These small, amphipathic proteins self-assemble into highly stable monolayers at hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces. Upon functionalization of solid supports with a combination of hydrophobins either lacking or exposing the α-factor, pheromone-specific antibodies were bound to the surface. Increasing concentrations of the pheromone competitively detached the antibodies, thus allowing for quantification of the pheromone. By adjusting the percentage of pheromone-exposing hydrophobins, the sensitivity of the assay could be precisely predefined. The assay proved to be highly robust against changes in sample matrix composition. Due to the high stability of hydrophobin layers, the functionalized surfaces could be repeatedly used without affecting the sensitivity. Furthermore, by using an inverse setup, the sensitivity was increased by three orders of magnitude, yielding a novel kind of biosensor for the yeast pheromone with the lowest limit of detection reported so far. This assay was applied to study the pheromone secretion of diverse yeast strains including a whole-cell biosensor strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe modulating α-factor secretion in response to an environmental signal. PMID:27128920

  7. Hydrophobin-Based Surface Engineering for Sensitive and Robust Quantification of Yeast Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Stefan; Rödel, Gerhard; Ostermann, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Detection and quantification of small peptides, such as yeast pheromones, are often challenging. We developed a highly sensitive and robust affinity-assay for the quantification of the α-factor pheromone of Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on recombinant hydrophobins. These small, amphipathic proteins self-assemble into highly stable monolayers at hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces. Upon functionalization of solid supports with a combination of hydrophobins either lacking or exposing the α-factor, pheromone-specific antibodies were bound to the surface. Increasing concentrations of the pheromone competitively detached the antibodies, thus allowing for quantification of the pheromone. By adjusting the percentage of pheromone-exposing hydrophobins, the sensitivity of the assay could be precisely predefined. The assay proved to be highly robust against changes in sample matrix composition. Due to the high stability of hydrophobin layers, the functionalized surfaces could be repeatedly used without affecting the sensitivity. Furthermore, by using an inverse setup, the sensitivity was increased by three orders of magnitude, yielding a novel kind of biosensor for the yeast pheromone with the lowest limit of detection reported so far. This assay was applied to study the pheromone secretion of diverse yeast strains including a whole-cell biosensor strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe modulating α-factor secretion in response to an environmental signal. PMID:27128920

  8. [Construction of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata strains with high riboflavin kinase activity using gene engineering].

    PubMed

    Ishchuk, O P; Iatsyshyn, V Iu; Dmytruk, K V; Voronovs'kyĭ, A Ia; Fedorovych, D V; Sybirnyĭ, A A

    2006-01-01

    The recombinant strains of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata, which contain the DNA fragment consisting of the FMN1 gene (encoding the riboflavin kinase, enzyme that converts riboflavin to flavinmononucleotide) driven by the strong promoters (the regulated RIB1 or constitutive TEF1 promoter) were isolated. Riboflavin kinase activity in the isolated transformants was tested. The 6-8-fold increase of the riboflavin kinase activity was shown in the recombinant strains containing the integrated Debaryomyces hansenii FMN1 gene under the strong constitutive TEF1 promoter. The recombinant strains can be used for the following construction of flavinmononucleotide overproducers. PMID:17290783

  9. Glyco-engineering of human IgG1-Fc through combined yeast expression and in vitro chemoenzymatic glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yadong; Li, Cishan; Huang, Wei; Li, Bing; Strome, Scott; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2009-01-01

    The presence and precise structures of the glycans attached at the Fc domain of monoclonal antibodies play an important role in determining antibody's effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement activation, and anti-inflammatory activity. This paper describes a novel approach for glyco-engineering of human IgG1-Fc that combines high-yield expression of human IgG1-Fc in yeast and subsequent in vitro enzymatic glycosylation, using the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation as the key reaction. Human IgG1-Fc was first overproduced in Pichia pastoris. Then the heterogeneous yeast glycans were removed by Endo-H treatment to give the GlcNAc-containing IgG1-Fc as a homodimer. Finally, selected homogeneous glycans were attached to the GlcNAc-primer in the IgG1-Fc through an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation, using sugar oxazolines as the donor substrates. It was found that the enzymatic transglycosylation was efficient with native GlcNAc-containing IgG1-Fc homodimer without the need to denature the protein, and the reaction could proceed to completion to give homogeneous glycoforms of IgG1-Fc when excess of oligosaccharide oxazolines was used as the donor substrates. The binding of the synthetic IgG1-Fc glycoforms to the FcγIIIa receptor was also investigated. This novel glyco-engineering approach should be useful for providing various homogeneous, natural or synthetic glycoforms of IgG1-Fc for structure-function relationship studies, and for future clinical applications. PMID:18771295

  10. Summary of clinical findings on Engerix-B, a genetically engineered yeast derived hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    André, F E; Safary, A

    1987-01-01

    Between February 1984 and August 1986 results have been obtained in 58 completed or ongoing clinical studies by 33 investigators in 19 countries on a yeast-derived recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B). Among the 6100 subjects enrolled in these studies, 5664 subjects (150 normal neonates, 178 neonates of hepatitis B carrier mothers, 330 children aged 3-10 years, 3697 young healthy adults, 438 homosexual males, 110 older healthy adults, 139 drug addicts, 262 institutionalized mentally retarded patients, 59 thalassaemics, 25 sicklaemics, 270 patients on chronic haemodialysis and 6 haemophiliacs) received one or more (up to 4) injections of different doses of the yeast-derived vaccine according to either a 0, 1, 2, and 12 month or a 0, 1, and 6 month vaccination schedule. In randomized comparative studies 436 subjects received either one of two commercially available plasma-derived vaccines. The results reviewed in the present summary have shown that Engerix-B is safe, clinically well tolerated, gives an anti-HBs response which is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that obtained with plasma-derived vaccines and confers protection against infection and disease. Engerix-B can be considered as a valid alternative to existing hepatitis B vaccines. PMID:3317357

  11. Exploring medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates production in the engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cuijuan; Qi, Qingsheng; Madzak, Catherine; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2015-09-01

    Medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs) are a large class of biopolymers that have attracted extensive attention as renewable and biodegradable bio-plastics. They are naturally synthesized via fatty acid de novo biosynthesis pathway or β-oxidation pathway from Pseudomonads. The unconventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has excellent lipid/fatty acid catabolism and anabolism capacity depending of the mode of culture. Nevertheless, it cannot naturally synthesize PHA, as it does not express an intrinsic PHA synthase. Here, we constructed a genetically modified strain of Y. lipolytica by heterologously expressing PhaC1 gene from P. aeruginosa PAO1 with a PTS1 peroxisomal signal. When in single copy, the codon optimized PhaC1 allowed the synthesis of 0.205 % DCW of PHA after 72 h cultivation in YNBD medium containing 0.1 % oleic acid. By using a multi-copy integration strategy, PHA content increased to 2.84 % DCW when the concentration of oleic acid in YNBD was 1.0 %. Furthermore, when the recombinant yeast was grown in the medium containing triolein, PHA accumulated up to 5.0 % DCW with as high as 21.9 g/L DCW, which represented 1.11 g/L in the culture. Our results demonstrated the potential use of Y. lipolytica as a promising microbial cell factory for PHA production using food waste, which contains lipids and other essential nutrients. PMID:26153503

  12. Complex Physiology and Compound Stress Responses during Fermentation of Alkali-Pretreated Corn Stover Hydrolysate by an Escherichia coli Ethanologen

    PubMed Central

    Schwalbach, Michael S.; Tremaine, Mary; Marner, Wesley D.; Zhang, Yaoping; Bothfeld, William; Higbee, Alan; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Cotten, Cameron; Reed, Jennifer L.; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Jin, Mingjie; Balan, Venkatesh; Ellinger, James; Dale, Bruce; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of ethanologenic Escherichia coli grown anaerobically in alkali-pretreated plant hydrolysates is complex and not well studied. To gain insight into how E. coli responds to such hydrolysates, we studied an E. coli K-12 ethanologen fermenting a hydrolysate prepared from corn stover pretreated by ammonia fiber expansion. Despite the high sugar content (∼6% glucose, 3% xylose) and relatively low toxicity of this hydrolysate, E. coli ceased growth long before glucose was depleted. Nevertheless, the cells remained metabolically active and continued conversion of glucose to ethanol until all glucose was consumed. Gene expression profiling revealed complex and changing patterns of metabolic physiology and cellular stress responses during an exponential growth phase, a transition phase, and the glycolytically active stationary phase. During the exponential and transition phases, high cell maintenance and stress response costs were mitigated, in part, by free amino acids available in the hydrolysate. However, after the majority of amino acids were depleted, the cells entered stationary phase, and ATP derived from glucose fermentation was consumed entirely by the demands of cell maintenance in the hydrolysate. Comparative gene expression profiling and metabolic modeling of the ethanologen suggested that the high energetic cost of mitigating osmotic, lignotoxin, and ethanol stress collectively limits growth, sugar utilization rates, and ethanol yields in alkali-pretreated lignocellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:22389370

  13. (Genetic engineering of yeasts for fermentation of xylose to ethanol). Progress report, April 1-October 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-31

    This progress report summarizes research on expression of xylose isomerase protein in S. cerevisiae, aggregation of xylose isomerase in yeast extracts, solubilization of yeast-made xylose isomerase, and disulfide bond content compared to the E. coli enzyme.

  14. Cellular and molecular engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for advanced biobutanol production.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Butanol is an attractive alternative energy fuel owing to several advantages over ethanol. Among the microbial hosts for biobutanol production, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a great potential as a microbial host due to its powerful genetic tools, a history of successful industrial use, and its inherent tolerance to higher alcohols. Butanol production by S. cerevisiae was first attempted by transferring the 1-butanol-producing metabolic pathway from native microorganisms or using the endogenous Ehrlich pathway for isobutanol synthesis. Utilizing alternative enzymes with higher activity, eliminating competitive pathways, and maintaining cofactor balance achieved significant improvements in butanol production. Meeting future challenges, such as enhancing butanol tolerance and implementing a comprehensive strategy by high-throughput screening, would further elevate the biobutanol-producing ability of S. cerevisiae toward an ideal microbial cell factory exhibiting high productivity of biobutanol. PMID:26712533

  15. Metabolic and bioprocess engineering of the yeast Candida famata for FAD production.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshyn, Valentyna Y; Fedorovych, Dariya V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2014-05-01

    Flavins in the form of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) play an important role in metabolism as cofactors for oxidoreductases and other enzymes. Flavin nucleotides have applications in the food industry and medicine; FAD supplements have been efficiently used for treatment of some inheritable diseases. FAD is produced biotechnologically; however, this compound is much more expensive than riboflavin. Flavinogenic yeast Candida famata synthesizes FAD from FMN and ATP in the reaction catalyzed by FAD synthetase, a product of the FAD1 gene. Expression of FAD1 from the strong constitutive promoter TEF1 resulted in 7- to 15-fold increase in FAD synthetase activity, FAD overproduction, and secretion to the culture medium. The effectiveness of FAD production under different growth conditions by one of these recombinant strains, C. famata T-FD-FM 27, was evaluated. First, the two-level Plackett-Burman design was performed to screen medium components that significantly influence FAD production. Second, central composite design was adopted to investigate the optimum value of the selected factors for achieving maximum FAD yield. FAD production varied most significantly in response to concentrations of adenine, KH2PO4, glycine, and (NH4)2SO4. Implementation of these optimization strategies resulted in 65-fold increase in FAD production when compared to the non-optimized control conditions. Recombinant strain that has been cultivated for 40 h under optimized conditions achieved a FAD accumulation of 451 mg/l. So, for the first time yeast strains overproducing FAD were obtained, and the growth media composition for maximum production of this nucleotide was designed. PMID:24595668

  16. A generic approach to engineer antibody pH-switches using combinatorial histidine scanning libraries and yeast display

    PubMed Central

    Schröter, Christian; Günther, Ralf; Rhiel, Laura; Becker, Stefan; Toleikis, Lars; Doerner, Achim; Becker, Janine; Schönemann, Andreas; Nasu, Daichi; Neuteboom, Berend; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the fast and robust engineering of protein pH-sensitivity that aims to reduce binding at acidic pH, compared to neutral pH. Here, we describe a novel strategy for the incorporation of pH-sensitive antigen binding functions into antibody variable domains using combinatorial histidine scanning libraries and yeast surface display. The strategy allows simultaneous screening for both, high affinity binding at pH 7.4 and pH-sensitivity, and excludes conventional negative selection steps. As proof of concept, we applied this strategy to incorporate pH-dependent antigen binding into the complementary-determining regions of adalimumab. After 3 consecutive rounds of separate heavy and light chain library screening, pH-sensitive variants could be isolated. Heavy and light chain mutations were combined, resulting in 3 full-length antibody variants that revealed sharp, reversible pH-dependent binding profiles. Dissociation rate constants at pH 6.0 increased 230- to 780-fold, while high affinity binding at pH 7.4 in the sub-nanomolar range was retained. Furthermore, binding to huFcRn and thermal stability were not affected by histidine substitutions. Overall, this study emphasizes a generalizable strategy for engineering pH-switch functions potentially applicable to a variety of antibodies and further proteins-based therapeutics. PMID:25523975

  17. Metabolic engineering and classic selection of the yeast Candida famata (Candida flareri) for construction of strains with enhanced riboflavin production.

    PubMed

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Yatsyshyn, Valentyna Y; Sybirna, Natalia O; Fedorovych, Daria V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the mutant of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata dep8 isolated by classic mutagenesis and selection is used for industrial riboflavin production. Here we report on construction of a riboflavin overproducing strain of C. famata using a combination of random mutagenesis based on the selection of mutants resistant to different antimetabolites as well as rational approaches of metabolic engineering. The conventional mutagenesis involved consecutive selection for resistance to riboflavin structural analog 7-methyl-8-trifluoromethyl-10-(1'-d-ribityl)isoalloxazine), 8-azaguanine, 6-azauracil, 2-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine and guanosine as well as screening for yellow colonies at high pH. The metabolic engineering approaches involved introduction of additional copies of transcription factor SEF1 and IMH3 (coding for IMP dehydrogenase) orthologs from Debaryomyces hansenii, and the homologous genes RIB1 and RIB7, encoding GTP cyclohydrolase II and riboflavin synthetase, the first and the last enzymes of riboflavin biosynthesis pathway, respectively. Overexpression of the aforementioned genes in riboflavin overproducer AF-4 obtained by classical selection resulted in a 4.1-fold increase in riboflavin production in shake-flask experiments. D. hansenii IMH3 and modified ARO4 genes conferring resistance to mycophenolic acid and fluorophenylalanine, respectively, were successfully used as new dominant selection markers for C. famata. PMID:21040798

  18. Direct detection of recombinant gene expression by two genetically engineered yeasts in soil on the transcriptional and translational levels.

    PubMed Central

    Tebbe, C C; Wenderoth, D F; Vahjen, W; Lübke, K; Munch, J C

    1995-01-01

    The expression of a recombinant gene by yeasts seeded into soil samples was directly measured by analyzing transcripts and gene product occurrences in soil extracts. Two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae WHL292 and Hansenula polymorpha LR9-Apr4, both engineered by a synthetic gene sequence encoding the mammalian peptide aprotinin, produced and secreted this peptide in batch cultures at concentrations of 90 and 64 ng ml-1, respectively. In S. cerevisiae, the aprotinin gene was located on plasmid p707 and expressed constitutively. H. polymorpha carried the gene chromosomally integrated, and its expression was inducible by methanol. To detect aprotinin transcripts, cells were directly lysed in the soil samples and the crude lysates were hybridized to oligo(dT)-coated magnetized polystyrene beads (Dynabeads). After separation and purification in a magnetic field, aprotinin mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase PCR with aprotinin gene-specific primers. Transcripts from 10 cells g of soil-1 were sufficient for detection. When 10(7) cells of S. cerevisiae were inoculated into soil, aprotinin mRNA was detectable during the first 4 days. Addition of methanol and a combined nutrient solution was necessary to induce aprotinin gene expression of H. polymorpha in soil. Aprotinin could be detected directly in soil extracts by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with monoclonal aprotinin-specific antibodies. The detection threshold was 45 pg g of soil-1. In presterilized soil inoculated with S. cerevisiae (10(6) CFU g-1), aprotinin accumulated during the first 10 days to 12 ng g of soil-1 and then remained constant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8534097

  19. Effect of selected aldehydes on the growth and fermentation of ethanologenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Zaldivar, J.; Ingram, L.O.; Martinez, A. |

    1999-10-05

    Bioethanol production from lignocellulosic raw-materials requires the hydrolysis of carbohydrate polymers into a fermentable syrup. During the hydrolysis of hemicellulose with dilute acid, a variety of toxic compounds are produced such as soluble aromatic aldehydes from lignin and furfural from pentose destruction. In this study, the authors have investigated the toxicity of representative aldehydes (furfural, 5-hydroxymethlyfurfural, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, syringaldehyde, and vanillin) as inhibitors of growth and ethanol production by ethanologenic derivatives of Escherichia coli B (strains K011 and LY01). Aromatic aldyhydes were at least twice as toxic as furfural of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural on a weight basis. The toxicities of all aldehydes (and ethanol) except furfural were additive when tested in binary combinations. In all cases, combinations with furfural were unexpectedly toxic. Although the potency of these aldehydes was directly related to hydrophobicity indicating a hydrophobic site of action, none caused sufficient membrane damage to allow the leakage of intracellular magnesium even when present at sixfold the concentrations required for growth inhibition. Of the aldehydes tested, only furfural strongly inhibited ethanol production in vitro. A comparison with published results for other microorganisms indicates that LY01 is equivalent or more resistant than other biocatalysts to the aldehydes examined in this study.

  20. Evolutionary engineering strategies to enhance tolerance of xylose utilizing recombinant yeast to inhibitors derived from spruce biomass

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the crucial factors for a sustainable and economical production of lignocellulosic based bioethanol is the availability of a robust fermenting microorganism with high tolerance to inhibitors generated during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic raw materials, since these inhibitors are known to severely hinder growth and fermentation. Results A long-term adaptation in repetitive batch cultures in shake flasks using a cocktail of 12 different inhibitors and a long-term chemostat adaptation using spruce hydrolysate were used as evolutionary engineering strategies to improve the inhibitor tolerance in the metabolically engineered xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TMB3400. The yeast was evolved for a period of 429 and 97 generations in repetitive batch cultures and chemostat cultivation, respectively. During the evolutionary engineering in repetitive batch cultures the maximum specific growth rate increased from 0.18 h-1 to 0.33 h-1 and the time of lag phase was decreased from 48 h to 24 h. In the chemostat adaptation, after 97 generations, the specific conversion rates of HMF and furfural were found to be 3.5 and 4 folds higher respectively, compared to rates after three generations. Two evolved strains (RK60-5, RKU90-3) and one evolved strain (KE1-17) were isolated from evolutionary engineering in repetitive batches and chemostat cultivation, respectively. The strains displayed significantly improved growth performance over TMB3400 when cultivated in spruce hydrolysate under anaerobic conditions, the evolved strains exhibited 25 to 38% increase in specific consumption rate of sugars and 32 to 50% increased specific ethanol productivity compared to TMB3400. The evolved strains RK60-5 and RKU90-3 were unable to consume xylose under anaerobic conditions, whereas, KE1-17 was found to consume xylose at similar rates as TMB3400. Conclusion Using evolutionary engineering strategies in batch and chemostat cultivations we have generated three

  1. Automated Yeast Transformation Protocol to Engineer S. cerevisiae Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production with Open Reading Frames that Express Proteins Binding to Xylose Isomerase Identified using Robotic Two-hybrid Screen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. Since S. cerevisiae naturally metabolizes xylulose, one approach involves introducing xylose isomerase (XI...

  2. YeastFab: the design and construction of standard biological parts for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yakun; Dong, Junkai; Zhou, Tong; Auxillos, Jamie; Li, Tianyi; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Lihui; Shen, Yue; Luo, Yisha; Zheng, Yijing; Lin, Jiwei; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Qingyu; Cai, Yizhi; Dai, Junbiao

    2015-01-01

    It is a routine task in metabolic engineering to introduce multicomponent pathways into a heterologous host for production of metabolites. However, this process sometimes may take weeks to months due to the lack of standardized genetic tools. Here, we present a method for the design and construction of biological parts based on the native genes and regulatory elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have developed highly efficient protocols (termed YeastFab Assembly) to synthesize these genetic elements as standardized biological parts, which can be used to assemble transcriptional units in a single-tube reaction. In addition, standardized characterization assays are developed using reporter constructs to calibrate the function of promoters. Furthermore, the assembled transcription units can be either assayed individually or applied to construct multi-gene metabolic pathways, which targets a genomic locus or a receiving plasmid effectively, through a simple in vitro reaction. Finally, using β-carotene biosynthesis pathway as an example, we demonstrate that our method allows us not only to construct and test a metabolic pathway in several days, but also to optimize the production through combinatorial assembly of a pathway using hundreds of regulatory biological parts. PMID:25956650

  3. Glycerol Overproduction by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast Strains Leads to Substantial Changes in By-Product Formation and to a Stimulation of Fermentation Rate in Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Remize, F.; Roustan, J. L.; Sablayrolles, J. M.; Barre, P.; Dequin, S.

    1999-01-01

    Six commercial wine yeast strains and three nonindustrial strains (two laboratory strains and one haploid strain derived from a wine yeast strain) were engineered to produce large amounts of glycerol with a lower ethanol yield. Overexpression of the GPD1 gene, encoding a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, resulted in a 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in glycerol production and a slight decrease in ethanol formation under conditions simulating wine fermentation. All the strains overexpressing GPD1 produced a larger amount of succinate and acetate, with marked differences in the level of these compounds between industrial and nonindustrial engineered strains. Acetoin and 2,3-butanediol formation was enhanced with significant variation between strains and in relation to the level of glycerol produced. Wine strains overproducing glycerol at moderate levels (12 to 18 g/liter) reduced acetoin almost completely to 2,3-butanediol. A lower biomass concentration was attained by GPD1-overexpressing strains, probably due to high acetaldehyde production during the growth phase. Despite the reduction in cell numbers, complete sugar exhaustion was achieved during fermentation in a sugar-rich medium. Surprisingly, the engineered wine yeast strains exhibited a significant increase in the fermentation rate in the stationary phase, which reduced the time of fermentation. PMID:9872772

  4. Engineering Yeast Hexokinase 2 for Improved Tolerance Toward Xylose-Induced Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sandström, Anders G.; Borgström, Celina; Boonyawan, Tarinee; van Niel, Ed W. J.; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F.

    2013-01-01

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a bi-functional enzyme being both a catalyst and an important regulator in the glucose repression signal. In the presence of xylose Hxk2p is irreversibly inactivated through an autophosphorylation mechanism, affecting all functions. Consequently, the regulation of genes involved in sugar transport and fermentative metabolism is impaired. The aim of the study was to obtain new Hxk2p-variants, immune to the autophosphorylation, which potentially can restore the repressive capability closer to its nominal level. In this study we constructed the first condensed, rationally designed combinatorial library targeting the active-site in Hxk2p. We combined protein engineering and genetic engineering for efficient screening and identified a variant with Phe159 changed to tyrosine. This variant had 64% higher catalytic activity in the presence of xylose compared to the wild-type and is expected to be a key component for increasing the productivity of recombinant xylose-fermenting strains for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks. PMID:24040384

  5. Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for improved xylose utilization with a three-plasmid SUMO yeast expression system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-plasmid yeast expression system utilizing the portable small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) vector set combined with the efficient endogenous yeast protease Ulp1 was developed for production of large amounts of soluble functional protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each vector has a differ...

  6. Engineering and production of laccase from Trametes versicolor in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Theerachat, Monnat; Emond, Stéphane; Cambon, Emmanuelle; Bordes, Florence; Marty, Alain; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Chulalaksananukul, Warawut; Guieysse, David; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; Morel, Sandrine

    2012-12-01

    The lcc1 gene coding for the laccase from Trametes versicolor DSM11269 was cloned into the genome of Yarrowia lipolytica using either single or multiple integration sites. The levels of the recombinant laccase activity secreted in the culture media were 0.25 and 1 U ml(-1) for single and multiple integrations, respectively. The strain with a single integration was successfully used to express variant libraries which were screened on ABTS substrate. The strain encoding the double mutant L185P/Q214K (rM4A) showed a sixfold enhancement in secreted enzyme activity. The catalytic efficiency of the purified rM-4A laccase was respectively increased 2.4- and 2.8-fold towards ABTS and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, compared to the rWT. Culture supernatants containing either rWT or rM-4A catalyzed the almost complete decolorization of an Amaranth solution (70 nMs(-1)). Taken together, our results open new perspectives for the use of Y. lipolytica as a molecular evolution platform to engineer laccases with improved properties. PMID:23026343

  7. Genetically Engineered Yeast Expressing a Lytic Peptide from Bee Venom (Melittin) Kills Symbiotic Protozoa in the Gut of Formosan Subterranean Termites.

    PubMed

    Husseneder, Claudia; Donaldson, Jennifer R; Foil, Lane D

    2016-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, is a costly invasive urban pest in warm and humid regions around the world. Feeding workers of the Formosan subterranean termite genetically engineered yeast strains that express synthetic protozoacidal lytic peptides has been shown to kill the cellulose digesting termite gut protozoa, which results in death of the termite colony. In this study, we tested if Melittin, a natural lytic peptide from bee venom, could be delivered into the termite gut via genetically engineered yeast and if the expressed Melittin killed termites via lysis of symbiotic protozoa in the gut of termite workers and/or destruction of the gut tissue itself. Melittin expressing yeast did kill protozoa in the termite gut within 56 days of exposure. The expressed Melittin weakened the gut but did not add a synergistic effect to the protozoacidal action by gut necrosis. While Melittin could be applied for termite control via killing the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, it is unlikely to be useful as a standalone product to control insects that do not rely on symbiotic protozoa for survival. PMID:26985663

  8. Genetically Engineered Yeast Expressing a Lytic Peptide from Bee Venom (Melittin) Kills Symbiotic Protozoa in the Gut of Formosan Subterranean Termites

    PubMed Central

    Husseneder, Claudia; Donaldson, Jennifer R.; Foil, Lane D.

    2016-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, is a costly invasive urban pest in warm and humid regions around the world. Feeding workers of the Formosan subterranean termite genetically engineered yeast strains that express synthetic protozoacidal lytic peptides has been shown to kill the cellulose digesting termite gut protozoa, which results in death of the termite colony. In this study, we tested if Melittin, a natural lytic peptide from bee venom, could be delivered into the termite gut via genetically engineered yeast and if the expressed Melittin killed termites via lysis of symbiotic protozoa in the gut of termite workers and/or destruction of the gut tissue itself. Melittin expressing yeast did kill protozoa in the termite gut within 56 days of exposure. The expressed Melittin weakened the gut but did not add a synergistic effect to the protozoacidal action by gut necrosis. While Melittin could be applied for termite control via killing the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, it is unlikely to be useful as a standalone product to control insects that do not rely on symbiotic protozoa for survival. PMID:26985663

  9. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2014-09-23

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  10. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  11. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics, it can multiply and cause an infection. Yeast infections affect different parts of the body in different ways: Thrush is a yeast infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida ...

  12. Effect of reduced sulfur compounds on the fermentation of phosphoric acid pretreated sugarcane bagasse by ethanologenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nieves, I U; Geddes, C C; Miller, E N; Mullinnix, M T; Hoffman, R W; Fu, Z; Tong, Z; Ingram, L O

    2011-04-01

    The addition of reduced sulfur compounds (thiosulfate, cysteine, sodium hydrosulfite, and sodium metabisulfite) increased growth and fermentation of dilute acid hydrolysate of sugarcane bagasse by ethanologenic Escherichia coli (strains LY180, EMFR9, and MM160). With sodium metabisulfite (0.5mM), toxicity was sufficiently reduced that slurries of pretreated biomass (10% dry weight including fiber and solubles) could be fermented by E. coli strain MM160 without solid-liquid separation or cleanup of sugars. A 6-h liquefaction step was added to improve mixing. Sodium metabisulfite also caused spectral changes at wavelengths corresponding to furfural and soluble products from lignin. Glucose and cellobiose were rapidly metabolized. Xylose utilization was improved by sodium metabisulfite but remained incomplete after 144 h. The overall ethanol yield for this liquefaction plus simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation process was 0.20 g ethanol/g bagasse dry weight, 250 L/tonne (61 gal/US ton). PMID:21353535

  13. The flexible feedstock concept in Industrial Biotechnology: Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and yeast strains for access to alternative carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Volker F; Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Gil Lopez, Marina; Hennig, Guido; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Sgobba, Elvira; Veldmann, Kareen H

    2016-09-20

    Most biotechnological processes are based on glucose that is either present in molasses or generated from starch by enzymatic hydrolysis. At the very high, million-ton scale production volumes, for instance for fermentative production of the biofuel ethanol or of commodity chemicals such as organic acids and amino acids, competing uses of carbon sources e.g. in human and animal nutrition have to be taken into account. Thus, the biotechnological production hosts E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, bacilli and Baker's yeast used in these large scale processes have been engineered for efficient utilization of alternative carbon sources. This flexible feedstock concept is central to the use of non-glucose second and third generation feedstocks in the emerging bioeconomy. The metabolic engineering efforts to broaden the substrate scope of E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, B. subtilis and yeasts to include non-native carbon sources will be reviewed. Strategies to enable simultaneous consumption of mixtures of native and non-native carbon sources present in biomass hydrolysates will be summarized and a perspective on how to further increase feedstock flexibility for the realization of biorefinery processes will be given. PMID:27491712

  14. Engineering the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for the production of therapeutic proteins homogeneously glycosylated with Man8GlcNAc2 and Man5GlcNAc2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-based therapeutics represent the fastest growing class of compounds in the pharmaceutical industry. This has created an increasing demand for powerful expression systems. Yeast systems are widely used, convenient and cost-effective. Yarrowia lipolytica is a suitable host that is generally regarded as safe (GRAS). Yeasts, however, modify their glycoproteins with heterogeneous glycans containing mainly mannoses, which complicates downstream processing and often interferes with protein function in man. Our aim was to glyco-engineer Y. lipolytica to abolish the heterogeneous, yeast-specific glycosylation and to obtain homogeneous human high-mannose type glycosylation. Results We engineered Y. lipolytica to produce homogeneous human-type terminal-mannose glycosylated proteins, i.e. glycosylated with Man8GlcNAc2 or Man5GlcNAc2. First, we inactivated the yeast-specific Golgi α-1,6-mannosyltransferases YlOch1p and YlMnn9p; the former inactivation yielded a strain producing homogeneous Man8GlcNAc2 glycoproteins. We tested this strain by expressing glucocerebrosidase and found that the hypermannosylation-related heterogeneity was eliminated. Furthermore, detailed analysis of N-glycans showed that YlOch1p and YlMnn9p, despite some initial uncertainty about their function, are most likely the α-1,6-mannosyltransferases responsible for the addition of the first and second mannose residue, respectively, to the glycan backbone. Second, introduction of an ER-retained α-1,2-mannosidase yielded a strain producing proteins homogeneously glycosylated with Man5GlcNAc2. The use of the endogenous LIP2pre signal sequence and codon optimization greatly improved the efficiency of this enzyme. Conclusions We generated a Y. lipolytica expression platform for the production of heterologous glycoproteins that are homogenously glycosylated with either Man8GlcNAc2 or Man5GlcNAc2 N-glycans. This platform expands the utility of Y. lipolytica as a heterologous expression host

  15. Genetically engineered Pichia pastoris yeast for conversion of glucose to xylitol by a single-fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hairong; Lv, Jiyang; Wang, Hengwei; Wang, Ben; Li, Zilong; Deng, Zixin

    2014-04-01

    Xylitol is industrially synthesized by chemical reduction of D-xylose, which is more expensive than glucose. Thus, there is a growing interest in the production of xylitol from a readily available and much cheaper substrate, such as glucose. The commonly used yeast Pichia pastoris strain GS115 was shown to produce D-arabitol from glucose, and the derivative strain GS225 was obtained to produce twice amount of D-arabitol than GS115 by adaptive evolution during repetitive growth in hyperosmotic medium. We cloned the D-xylulose-forming D-arabitol dehydrogenase (DalD) gene from Klebsiella pneumoniae and the xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) gene from Gluconobacter oxydans. Recombinant P. pastoris GS225 strains with the DalD gene only or with both DalD and XDH genes could produce xylitol from glucose in a single-fermentation process. Three-liter jar fermentation results showed that recombinant P. pastoris cells with both DalD and XDH converted glucose to xylitol with the highest yield of 0.078 g xylitol/g glucose and productivity of 0.29 g xylitol/L h. This was the first report to convert xylitol from glucose by the pathway of glucose-D-arabitol-D-xylulose-xylitol in a single process. The recombinant yeast could be used as a yeast cell factory and has the potential to produce xylitol from glucose. PMID:24419799

  16. Gene Integration and Expression and Extracellular Secretion of Erwinia chrysanthemi Endoglucanase CelY (celY) and CelZ (celZ) in Ethanologenic Klebsiella oxytoca P2†

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengde; Davis, F. C.; Ingram, L. O.

    2001-01-01

    The development of methods to reduce costs associated with the solubilization of cellulose is essential for the utilization of lignocellulose as a renewable feedstock for fuels and chemicals. One promising approach is the genetic engineering of ethanol-producing microorganisms that also produce cellulase enzymes during fermentation. By starting with an ethanologenic derivative (strain P2) of Klebsiella oxytoca M5A1 with the native ability to metabolize cellobiose, the need for supplemental β-glucosidase was previously eliminated. In the current study, this approach has been extended by adding genes encoding endoglucanase activities. Genes celY and celZ from Erwinia chrysanthemi have been functionally integrated into the chromosome of P2 using surrogate promoters from Zymomonas mobilis for expression. Both were secreted into the extracellular milieu, producing more than 20,000 endoglucanase units (carboxymethyl cellulase activity) per liter of fermentation broth. During the fermentation of crystalline cellulose with low levels of commercial cellulases of fungal origin, these new strains produced up to 22% more ethanol than unmodified P2. Most of the beneficial contribution was attributed to CelY rather than to CelZ. These results suggest that fungal enzymes with substrate profiles resembling CelY (preference for long-chain polymers and lack of activity on soluble cello-oligosaccharides of two to five glucosyl residues) may be limiting in commercial cellulase preparations. PMID:11133422

  17. Citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 and purification of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-11-01

    In this study, citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 was investigated. After the compositions of the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers for citric acid production were optimized, the results showed that natural components of extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers without addition of any other components were suitable for citric acid production by the yeast strain. During 10 L fermentation using the extract containing 84.3 g L(-1) total sugars, 68.3 g L(-1) citric acid was produced and the yield of citric acid was 0.91 g g(-1) within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 9.2 g L(-1) of residual total sugar and 2.1 g L(-1) of reducing sugar were left in the fermented medium. At the same time, citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was purified. It was found that 67.2 % of the citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was recovered and purity of citric acid in the crystal was 96 %. PMID:23584740

  18. Characterization of Panax ginseng UDP-Glycosyltransferases Catalyzing Protopanaxatriol and Biosyntheses of Bioactive Ginsenosides F1 and Rh1 in Metabolically Engineered Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Pingping; Wei, Yongjun; Liu, Qunfang; Yang, Chengshuai; Zhao, Guoping; Yue, Jianmin; Yan, Xing; Zhou, Zhihua

    2015-09-01

    Ginsenosides, the main pharmacologically active natural compounds in ginseng (Panax ginseng), are mostly the glycosylated products of protopanaxadiol (PPD) and protopanaxatriol (PPT). No uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferase (UGT), which catalyzes PPT to produce PPT-type ginsenosides, has yet been reported. Here, we show that UGTPg1, which has been demonstrated to regio-specifically glycosylate the C20-OH of PPD, also specifically glycosylates the C20-OH of PPT to produce bioactive ginsenoside F1. We report the characterization of four novel UGT genes isolated from P. ginseng, sharing high deduced amino acid identity (>84%) with UGTPg1. We demonstrate that UGTPg100 specifically glycosylates the C6-OH of PPT to produce bioactive ginsenoside Rh1, and UGTPg101 catalyzes PPT to produce F1, followed by the generation of ginsenoside Rg1 from F1. However, UGTPg102 and UGTPg103 were found to have no detectable activity on PPT. Through structural modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified several key amino acids of these UGTs that may play important roles in determining their activities and substrate regio-specificities. Moreover, we constructed yeast recombinants to biosynthesize F1 and Rh1 by introducing the genetically engineered PPT-producing pathway and UGTPg1 or UGTPg100. Our study reveals the possible biosynthetic pathways of PPT-type ginsenosides in Panax plants, and provides a sound manufacturing approach for bioactive PPT-type ginsenosides in yeast via synthetic biology strategies. PMID:26032089

  19. Pilot studies on scale-up biocatalysis of 7-β-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol and its analogues by an engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Cang; Zhu, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Paclitaxel content in yew tree is extremely low, causing a worldwide shortage of this important anticancer drug. Yew tree can also produce abundant 7-β-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol that can be bio-converted into 10-deacetyltaxol for semi-synthesis of paclitaxel. However, the bio-conversion by the screened natural microorganisms was inefficient. We have constructed the recombinant yeast with a glycoside hydrolase gene from Lentinula edodes and explored the bioconversion. Based on previously established reaction conditions, the bioconversion of 7-β-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol or its extract was further optimized and scaled up with the engineered yeast harvested from 200-L scale high-cell-density fermentation. The optimization included the freeze-dried cell amount, dimethyl sulfoxide concentration, addition of 0.5% antifoam supplement, and substrate concentration. A 93-95% bioconversion and 83% bioconversion of 10 and 15 g/L 7-β-xylosyltaxanes in 10 L reaction volume were achieved, respectively. The yield of 10-deacetyltaxol reached 10.58 g/L in 1 L volume with 15 g/L 7-β-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol. The conversion efficiencies were not only much higher than those of other reports and our previous work, but also realized in 10 L reaction volume. A pilot-scale product purification was also established. Our study bridges the gap between the basic research and commercial utilization of 7-β-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol for the industrial production of semi-synthetic paclitaxel. PMID:25860125

  20. Yeast tolerance to the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Shi, Shuang; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Simmons, Christopher W

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic plant biomass is the target feedstock for production of second-generation biofuels. Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment can enhance deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. Although biomass is typically washed following IL pretreatment, small quantities of residual IL can inhibit fermentative microorganisms downstream, such as the widely used ethanologenic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The aim of this study was to identify yeasts tolerant to the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, one of the top performing ILs known for biomass pretreatment. One hundred and sixty eight strains spanning the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla were selected for screening, with emphasis on yeasts within or closely related to the Saccharomyces genus and those tolerant to saline environments. Based on growth in media containing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, tolerance to IL levels ranging 1-5% was observed for 80 strains. The effect of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate concentration on maximum cell density and growth rate was quantified to rank tolerance. The most tolerant yeasts included strains from the genera Clavispora, Debaryomyces, Galactomyces, Hyphopichia, Kazachstania, Meyerozyma, Naumovozyma, Wickerhamomyces, Yarrowia, and Zygoascus. These yeasts included species known to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides and those capable of ethanol fermentation. These yeasts warrant further investigation for use in saccharification and fermentation of IL-pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol or other products. PMID:25348480

  1. Molecular mechanisms of yeast tolerance and in situ detoxification of lignocellulose hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Lewis

    2011-05-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production generates inhibitory compounds that interfere with microbial growth and subsequent fermentation. Remediation of the inhibitors by current physical, chemical, and biological abatement means is economically impractical, and overcoming the inhibitory effects of lignocellulose hydrolysate poses a significant technical challenge for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production. Development of tolerant ethanologenic yeast strains has demonstrated the potential of in situ detoxification for numerous aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulose biomass pretreatment and conversion. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in understanding mechanisms of yeast tolerance for tolerant strain development. Enriched genetic backgrounds, enhanced expression, interplays, and global integration of many key genes enable yeast tolerance. Reprogrammed pathways support yeast functions to withstand the inhibitor stress, detoxify the toxic compounds, maintain energy and redox balance, and complete active metabolism for ethanol fermentation. Complex gene interactions and regulatory networks as well as co-regulation are well recognized as involved in yeast adaptation and tolerance. This review presents our current knowledge on mechanisms of the inhibitor detoxification based on molecular studies and genomic-based approaches. Our improved understanding of yeast tolerance and in situ detoxification provide insight into phenotype-genotype relationships, dissection of tolerance mechanisms, and strategies for more tolerant strain development for biofuels applications. PMID:21380517

  2. Fully Automated Molecular Biology Routines on a Plasmid-Based Functional Proteomic Workcell: Evaluation and Characterization of Yeast Strains Optimized for Growth on Xylose and Engineered to Express an Insecticidal Peptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimization of genes important to production of fuel ethanol from hemicellulosic biomass for use in engineering improved commercial yeast strains is necessary to meet the United States' rapidly expanding need for ethanol. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Nati...

  3. In Vivo Validation of In Silico Predicted Metabolic Engineering Strategies in Yeast: Disruption of α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase and Expression of ATP-Citrate Lyase for Terpenoid Production

    PubMed Central

    Gruchattka, Evamaria; Kayser, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineering of the central carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to redirect metabolic flux towards cytosolic acetyl-CoA has become a central topic in yeast biotechnology. A cell factory with increased flux into acetyl-CoA can be used for heterologous production of terpenoids for pharmaceuticals, biofuels, fragrances, or other acetyl-CoA derived compounds. In a previous study, we identified promising metabolic engineering targets in S. cerevisiae using an in silico stoichiometric metabolic network analysis. Here, we validate selected in silico strategies in vivo. Results Patchoulol was produced by yeast via a heterologous patchoulol synthase of Pogostemon cablin. To increase the metabolic flux from acetyl-CoA towards patchoulol, a truncated HMG-CoA reductase was overexpressed and farnesyl diphosphate synthase was fused with patchoulol synthase. The highest increase in production could be achieved by modifying the carbon source; sesquiterpenoid titer increased from glucose to ethanol by a factor of 8.4. Two strategies predicted in silico were chosen for validation in this work. Disruption of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase gene (KGD1) was predicted to redirect the metabolic flux via the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass towards acetyl-CoA. The metabolic flux was redirected as predicted, however, the effect was dependent on cultivation conditions and the flux was interrupted at the level of acetate. High amounts of acetate were produced. As an alternative pathway to synthesize cytosolic acetyl-CoA, ATP-citrate lyase was expressed as a polycistronic construct, however, in vivo performance of the enzyme needs to be optimized to increase terpenoid production. Conclusions Stoichiometric metabolic network analysis can be used successfully as a metabolic prediction tool. However, this study highlights that kinetics, regulation and cultivation conditions may interfere, resulting in poor in vivo performance. Main sites of regulation need to be released and

  4. An engineered PrPsc-like molecule from the chimera of mammalian prion protein and yeast Ure2p prion-inducing domain.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shao-Man; Sy, Man-Sun; Po, Tien

    2004-02-01

    Production of the pathogenic prion isoform PrPsc-like molecules is thought to be useful for understanding the mysterious mechanism of conformational conversion process of prion diseases and proving the "protein-only" hypothesis. In this report, an engineered PrPsc-like conformation was produced from a chimera of mammalian bovine prion protein (bPrP) and yeast Ure2p prion-inducing domain (UPrD). Compared with the normal form of bPrP, the engineered recombinant protein, termed bPrP-UPrD, spontaneously aggregated into ordered fibrils under physiological condition, displaying amyloid-like characteristics, such as fibrillar morphology, birefringence upon binding to Congo red and increased fluorescence intensity with Thioflavine T. Limited resistance to protease K digestion and CD spectroscopy experiments suggested that the structure of bPrP-UPrD had been changed, and adopted a new, high content beta-sheet conformation during the fibrils formation. Moreover, bPrP-UPrD amyloid fibrils could recruit more soluble forms into the aggregates. Therefore, the engineered molecules could mimic significant behaviors of PrPsc and will be helpful for further understanding the mechanism of conformational conversion process. PMID:14970909

  5. Inverse metabolic engineering based on transient acclimation of yeast improves acid-containing xylose fermentation and tolerance to formic and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Improving the production of ethanol from xylose is an important goal in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae must produce ethanol in the presence of weak acids (formate and acetate) generated during pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, weak acid-containing xylose fermentation was significantly improved using cells that were acclimated to the weak acids during pre-cultivation. Transcriptome analyses showed that levels of transcripts for transcriptional/translational machinery-related genes (RTC3 and ANB1) were enhanced by formate and acetate acclimation. Recombinant yeast strains overexpressing RTC3 and ANB1 demonstrated improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of the weak acids, along with improved tolerance to the acids. Novel metabolic engineering strategy based on the combination of short-term acclimation and system-wide analysis was developed, which can develop stress-tolerant strains in a short period of time, although conventional evolutionary engineering approach has required long periods of time to isolate inhibitor-adapted strains. PMID:26521247

  6. Yeast cell-surface expression of chitosanase from Paenibacillus fukuinensis.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Isogawa, Danya; Takagi, Madoka; Kato-Murai, Michiko; Kimoto, Hisashi; Kusaoke, Hideo; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Suye, Shin-Ichiro

    2007-11-01

    To produce chitoorigosaccharides using chitosan, we attempted to construct Paenibacillus fukuinensis chitosanase-displaying yeast cells as a whole-cell biocatalyst through yeast cell-surface engineering. The localization of the chitosanase on the yeast cell surface was confirmed by immunofluorescence labeling of cells. The chitosanase activity of the constructed yeast was investigated by halo assay and the dinitrosalicylic acid method. PMID:17986777

  7. Efficient fermentation of Pinus sp. acid hydrolysates by an ethanologenic strain of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, M.F.S. de; Ingram, L.O. ); Beck, M.J. ); Fein, J.E.; Potts, D. )

    1992-04-01

    Process conditions for the acid hydrolysis of pine hemicellulose and cellulose have been described which provide a biocompatible sugar solution. By using an improved strain of recombinant Escherichia coli, strain KO11, hydrolysates supplemented with yeast extract and tryptone nutrients were converted to ethanol with an efficiency of 85% to over 100% on the basis of monomer sugar content (approximately 72 g/liter) and with the production of 35 g of ethanol per liter in 48 h. In the process described, approximately 347 liters of ethanol could be produced per dry metric ton of lignocellulose.

  8. GMAX Yeast Background Strain Made from Industrial Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Engineered to Convert Sucrose, Starch and Cellulosic Sugars Universally to Ethanol Anaerobically with Concurrent Coproduct Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tailored GMAX yeast background strain technology for universal ethanol production industrially. Production of the stable baseline glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose-utilizing (GMAX) yeast will be evaluated by taking the genes identified in high-throughput screening for a plasmid-based yeast to uti...

  9. GMAX Yeast Background Strain Made from Industrial Tolerant Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Engineered to Convert Pretreated Lignocellulosic Starch and Cellulosic Sugars Universally to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tailored GMAX yeast background strain technology for universal ethanol production industrially: Production of the stable baseline glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose-utilizing (GMAX) yeast will be evaluated by taking the genes identified in high-throughput screening for a plasmid-based yeast to util...

  10. A rationally engineered yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p introduces sialylation-like properties in neo-human-type complex oligosaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Yoshinaga, Sho; Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakakita, Shin-ichi; Kanekiyo, Miho; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvylation onto the terminus of oligosaccharide, widely seen from prokaryote to eukaryote, confers negative charges on the cell surface and seems to be functionally similar to sialylation, which is found at the end of human-type complex oligosaccharide. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying pyruvylation have not been clarified well. Here, we first determined the crystal structure of fission yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p at a resolution of 2.46 Å. Subsequently, by combining molecular modeling with mutational analysis of active site residues, we obtained a Pvg1p mutant (Pvg1pH168C) that efficiently transferred pyruvyl moiety onto a human-type complex glycopeptide. The resultant pyruvylated human-type complex glycopeptide recognized similar lectins on lectin arrays as the α2,6-sialyl glycopeptides. This newly-generated pyruvylation of human-type complex oligosaccharides would provide a novel method for glyco-bioengineering. PMID:27194449

  11. A rationally engineered yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p introduces sialylation-like properties in neo-human-type complex oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Yoshinaga, Sho; Yoritsune, Ken-Ichi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Kanekiyo, Miho; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvylation onto the terminus of oligosaccharide, widely seen from prokaryote to eukaryote, confers negative charges on the cell surface and seems to be functionally similar to sialylation, which is found at the end of human-type complex oligosaccharide. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying pyruvylation have not been clarified well. Here, we first determined the crystal structure of fission yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p at a resolution of 2.46 Å. Subsequently, by combining molecular modeling with mutational analysis of active site residues, we obtained a Pvg1p mutant (Pvg1p(H168C)) that efficiently transferred pyruvyl moiety onto a human-type complex glycopeptide. The resultant pyruvylated human-type complex glycopeptide recognized similar lectins on lectin arrays as the α2,6-sialyl glycopeptides. This newly-generated pyruvylation of human-type complex oligosaccharides would provide a novel method for glyco-bioengineering. PMID:27194449

  12. Hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and related anaerobic thermophiles. Final report, September 1992--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J.

    1998-09-01

    The short term goals of this application were to characterize hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles on the biochemical and molecular level to extend the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophilic bacteria. This objective includes the following tasks: (1) Traditional purification and biochemical/biophysical characterization of xylanases from the newly isolated, slightly alkalitolerant strain NDF190, and the slightly acid-tolerant strain YS485, both with high xylanolytic activities, and of the 4-O-methyl glucuronidase and arabinosidase from strain NDF190 and the acetyl (xylan) esterase from T. ethanolicus. This also includes determining the N-terminal sequences and obtaining gene probes. (2) Elucidation of the regulation of hemicellulolytic enzymes in anaerobic thermophiles. (3) To clone into E. coli and identify the multiplicity of the enzymes involved in hemicellulose degradation by T. ethanolicus and other suitable organisms. (4) To purify and characterize the recombinant enzymes with the goal of identifying the best enzymes for cloning into the ethanologenic T. ethanolicus to obtain an optimized hemicellulose utilization by this bacterium.

  13. Hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and related anaerobic thermophiles. Final report, September 1992--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J.

    1998-05-01

    The SHORT TERM GOALS of this application were to characterize hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles on the biochemical and molecular level to extend the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophilic bacteria. This objective includes the following TASKS: (1) Traditional purification and biochemical/biophysical characterization of xylanases from the newly isolated, slightly alkalitolerant strain NDF190, and the slightly acid-tolerant strain YS485, both with high xylanolytic activities, and of the 4-0-methyl glucuronidase and arabinosidase from strain NDF190 and the acetyl (xylan) esterase from T. ethanolicus. This also includes determining the N-terminal sequences and obtaining gene probes. (2) Elucidation of the regulation of hemicellulolytic enzymes in anaerobic thermophiles. (3) To clone into E. coli and identify the multiplicity of the enzymes involved in hemicellulose degradation by T. ethanolicus and other suitable organisms. (4) To purify and characterize the recombinant enzymes with the goal of identifying the best enzymes for cloning into the ethanologenic T. ethanolicus to obtain an optimized hemicellulose utilization by this bacterium (one of our long term goals).

  14. Metabolic engineering of the chloroplast genome reveals that the yeast ArDH gene confers enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought in plants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sarwar; Kanwal, Benish; Nazir, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Osmoprotectants stabilize proteins and membranes against the denaturing effect of high concentrations of salts and other harmful solutes. In yeast, arabitol dehydrogenase (ArDH) reduces D-ribulose to D-arabitol where D-ribulose is derived by dephosphorylating D-ribulose-5-PO4 in the oxidized pentose pathway. Osmotolerance in plants could be developed through metabolic engineering of chloroplast genome by introducing genes encoding polyols since chloroplasts offer high level transgene expression and containment. Here, we report that ArDH expression in tobacco chloroplasts confers tolerance to NaCl (up to 400 mM). Transgenic plants compared to wild type (WT) survived for only 4-5 weeks on 400 mM NaCl whereas plants remained green and grew normal on concentrations up to 350 mM NaCl. Further, a-week-old seedlings were also challenged with poly ethylene glycol (PEG, up to 6%) in the liquid medium, considering that membranes and proteins are protected under stress conditions due to accumulation of arabitol in chloroplasts. Seedlings were tolerant to 6% PEG, suggesting that ARDH enzyme maintains integrity of membranes in chloroplasts under drought conditions via metabolic engineering. Hence, the gene could be expressed in agronomic plants to withstand abiotic stresses. PMID:26442039

  15. Metabolic engineering of the chloroplast genome reveals that the yeast ArDH gene confers enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought in plants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Sarwar; Kanwal, Benish; Nazir, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Osmoprotectants stabilize proteins and membranes against the denaturing effect of high concentrations of salts and other harmful solutes. In yeast, arabitol dehydrogenase (ArDH) reduces D-ribulose to D-arabitol where D-ribulose is derived by dephosphorylating D-ribulose-5-PO4 in the oxidized pentose pathway. Osmotolerance in plants could be developed through metabolic engineering of chloroplast genome by introducing genes encoding polyols since chloroplasts offer high level transgene expression and containment. Here, we report that ArDH expression in tobacco chloroplasts confers tolerance to NaCl (up to 400 mM). Transgenic plants compared to wild type (WT) survived for only 4–5 weeks on 400 mM NaCl whereas plants remained green and grew normal on concentrations up to 350 mM NaCl. Further, a-week-old seedlings were also challenged with poly ethylene glycol (PEG, up to 6%) in the liquid medium, considering that membranes and proteins are protected under stress conditions due to accumulation of arabitol in chloroplasts. Seedlings were tolerant to 6% PEG, suggesting that ARDH enzyme maintains integrity of membranes in chloroplasts under drought conditions via metabolic engineering. Hence, the gene could be expressed in agronomic plants to withstand abiotic stresses. PMID:26442039

  16. Engineering of xylose reductase and overexpression of xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase improves xylose alcoholic fermentation in the thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Dmytruk, Olena V; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Abbas, Charles A; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2008-01-01

    Background The thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is capable of alcoholic fermentation of xylose at elevated temperatures (45 – 48°C). Such property of this yeast defines it as a good candidate for the development of an efficient process for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. However, to be economically viable, the main characteristics of xylose fermentation of H. polymorpha have to be improved. Results Site-specific mutagenesis of H. polymorpha XYL1 gene encoding xylose reductase was carried out to decrease affinity of this enzyme toward NADPH. The modified version of XYL1 gene under control of the strong constitutive HpGAP promoter was overexpressed on a Δxyl1 background. This resulted in significant increase in the KM for NADPH in the mutated xylose reductase (K341 → R N343 → D), while KM for NADH remained nearly unchanged. The recombinant H. polymorpha strain overexpressing the mutated enzyme together with native xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase on Δxyl1 background was constructed. Xylose consumption, ethanol and xylitol production by the constructed strain were determined for high-temperature xylose fermentation at 48°C. A significant increase in ethanol productivity (up to 7.3 times) was shown in this recombinant strain as compared with the wild type strain. Moreover, the xylitol production by the recombinant strain was reduced considerably to 0.9 mg × (L × h)-1 as compared to 4.2 mg × (L × h)-1 for the wild type strain. Conclusion Recombinant strains of H. polymorpha engineered for improved xylose utilization are described in the present work. These strains show a significant increase in ethanol productivity with simultaneous reduction in the production of xylitol during high-temperature xylose fermentation. PMID:18651968

  17. Simultaneous utilization of cellobiose, xylose, and acetic acid from lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production by an engineered yeast platform.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Oh, Eun Joong; Million, Gyver; Cate, Jamie H D; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-06-19

    The inability of fermenting microorganisms to use mixed carbon components derived from lignocellulosic biomass is a major technical barrier that hinders the development of economically viable cellulosic biofuel production. In this study, we integrated the fermentation pathways of both hexose and pentose sugars and an acetic acid reduction pathway into one Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for the first time using synthetic biology and metabolic engineering approaches. The engineered strain coutilized cellobiose, xylose, and acetic acid to produce ethanol with a substantially higher yield and productivity than the control strains, and the results showed the unique synergistic effects of pathway coexpression. The mixed substrate coutilization strategy is important for making complete and efficient use of cellulosic carbon and will contribute to the development of consolidated bioprocessing for cellulosic biofuel. The study also presents an innovative metabolic engineering approach whereby multiple substrate consumption pathways can be integrated in a synergistic way for enhanced bioconversion. PMID:25587748

  18. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  19. Production of a yeast artificial chromosome for stable expression of a synthetic xylose isomerase-xylulokinase polyprotein in a fuel ethanol yeast strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) was engineered to contain a polyprotein gene construct expressing xylos...

  20. Polyamine transporters and polyamines increase furfural tolerance during xylose fermentation with ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain LY180.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Ryan D; Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Miller, Elliot N; Zheng, Huabao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-10-01

    Expression of genes encoding polyamine transporters from plasmids and polyamine supplements increased furfural tolerance (growth and ethanol production) in ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180 (in AM1 mineral salts medium containing xylose). This represents a new approach to increase furfural tolerance and may be useful for other organisms. Microarray comparisons of two furfural-resistant mutants (EMFR9 and EMFR35) provided initial evidence for the importance of polyamine transporters. Each mutant contained a single polyamine transporter gene that was upregulated over 100-fold (microarrays) compared to that in the parent LY180, as well as a mutation that silenced the expression of yqhD. Based on these genetic changes, furfural tolerance was substantially reconstructed in the parent, LY180. Deletion of potE in EMFR9 lowered furfural tolerance to that of the parent. Deletion of potE and puuP in LY180 also decreased furfural tolerance, indicating functional importance of the native genes. Of the 8 polyamine transporters (18 genes) cloned and tested, half were beneficial for furfural tolerance (PotE, PuuP, PlaP, and PotABCD). Supplementing AM1 mineral salts medium with individual polyamines (agmatine, putrescine, and cadaverine) also increased furfural tolerance but to a smaller extent. In pH-controlled fermentations, polyamine transporter plasmids were shown to promote the metabolism of furfural and substantially reduce the time required to complete xylose fermentation. This increase in furfural tolerance is proposed to result from polyamine binding to negatively charged cellular constituents such as nucleic acids and phospholipids, providing protection from damage by furfural. PMID:25063650

  1. Polyamine Transporters and Polyamines Increase Furfural Tolerance during Xylose Fermentation with Ethanologenic Escherichia coli Strain LY180

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Ryan D.; Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Miller, Elliot N.; Zheng, Huabao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of genes encoding polyamine transporters from plasmids and polyamine supplements increased furfural tolerance (growth and ethanol production) in ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180 (in AM1 mineral salts medium containing xylose). This represents a new approach to increase furfural tolerance and may be useful for other organisms. Microarray comparisons of two furfural-resistant mutants (EMFR9 and EMFR35) provided initial evidence for the importance of polyamine transporters. Each mutant contained a single polyamine transporter gene that was upregulated over 100-fold (microarrays) compared to that in the parent LY180, as well as a mutation that silenced the expression of yqhD. Based on these genetic changes, furfural tolerance was substantially reconstructed in the parent, LY180. Deletion of potE in EMFR9 lowered furfural tolerance to that of the parent. Deletion of potE and puuP in LY180 also decreased furfural tolerance, indicating functional importance of the native genes. Of the 8 polyamine transporters (18 genes) cloned and tested, half were beneficial for furfural tolerance (PotE, PuuP, PlaP, and PotABCD). Supplementing AM1 mineral salts medium with individual polyamines (agmatine, putrescine, and cadaverine) also increased furfural tolerance but to a smaller extent. In pH-controlled fermentations, polyamine transporter plasmids were shown to promote the metabolism of furfural and substantially reduce the time required to complete xylose fermentation. This increase in furfural tolerance is proposed to result from polyamine binding to negatively charged cellular constituents such as nucleic acids and phospholipids, providing protection from damage by furfural. PMID:25063650

  2. Adaptive laboratory evolution of ethanologenic Zymomonas mobilis strain tolerant to furfural and acetic acid inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shui, Zong-Xia; Qin, Han; Wu, Bo; Ruan, Zhi-yong; Wang, Lu-shang; Tan, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jing-Li; Tang, Xiao-Yu; Dai, Li-Chun; Hu, Guo-Quan; He, Ming-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Furfural and acetic acid from lignocellulosic hydrolysates are the prevalent inhibitors to Zymomonas mobilis during cellulosic ethanol production. Developing a strain tolerant to furfural or acetic acid inhibitors is difficul by using rational engineering strategies due to poor understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, strategy of adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was used for development of a furfural and acetic acid-tolerant strain. After three round evolution, four evolved mutants (ZMA7-2, ZMA7-3, ZMF3-2, and ZMF3-3) that showed higher growth capacity were successfully obtained via ALE method. Based on the results of profiling of cell growth, glucose utilization, ethanol yield, and activity of key enzymes, two desired strains, ZMA7-2 and ZMF3-3, were achieved, which showed higher tolerance under 7 g/l acetic acid and 3 g/l furfural stress condition. Especially, it is the first report of Z. mobilis strain that could tolerate higher furfural. The best strain, Z. mobilis ZMF3-3, has showed 94.84% theoretical ethanol yield under 3-g/l furfural stress condition, and the theoretical ethanol yield of ZM4 is only 9.89%. Our study also demonstrated that ALE method might also be used as a powerful metabolic engineering tool for metabolic engineering in Z. mobilis. Furthermore, the two best strains could be used as novel host for further metabolic engineering in cellulosic ethanol or future biorefinery. Importantly, the two strains may also be used as novel-tolerant model organisms for the genetic mechanism on the "omics" level, which will provide some useful information for inverse metabolic engineering. PMID:25935346

  3. Yeast Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Baochi; Upadhyaya, Arpita; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Brenner, Michael

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that the Young's law and surface tension govern the shape of liquid droplets on solid surfaces. Here we address through experiments and theory the shape of growing aggregates of yeast on agar substrates, and assess whether these ideas still hold. Experiments are carried out on Baker's yeast, with different levels of expressions of an adhesive protein governing cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. Changing either the agar concentration or the expression of this protein modifies the local contact angle of a yeast droplet. When the colony is small, the shape is a spherical cap with the contact angle obeying Young's law. However, above a critical volume this structure is unstable, and the droplet becomes nonspherical. We present a theoretical model where this instability is caused by bulk elastic effects. The model predicts that the transition depends on both volume and contact angle, in a manner quantitatively consistent with our experiments.

  4. Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, S.; Poli, G.; Siman-Tov, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Identification of candidate genes for yeast engineering to improve bioethanol production in very high gravity and lignocellulosic biomass industrial fermentations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The optimization of industrial bioethanol production will depend on the rational design and manipulation of industrial strains to improve their robustness against the many stress factors affecting their performance during very high gravity (VHG) or lignocellulosic fermentations. In this study, a set of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes found, through genome-wide screenings, to confer resistance to the simultaneous presence of different relevant stresses were identified as required for maximal fermentation performance under industrial conditions. Results Chemogenomics data were used to identify eight genes whose expression confers simultaneous resistance to high concentrations of glucose, acetic acid and ethanol, chemical stresses relevant for VHG fermentations; and eleven genes conferring simultaneous resistance to stresses relevant during lignocellulosic fermentations. These eleven genes were identified based on two different sets: one with five genes granting simultaneous resistance to ethanol, acetic acid and furfural, and the other with six genes providing simultaneous resistance to ethanol, acetic acid and vanillin. The expression of Bud31 and Hpr1 was found to lead to the increase of both ethanol yield and fermentation rate, while Pho85, Vrp1 and Ygl024w expression is required for maximal ethanol production in VHG fermentations. Five genes, Erg2, Prs3, Rav1, Rpb4 and Vma8, were found to contribute to the maintenance of cell viability in wheat straw hydrolysate and/or the maximal fermentation rate of this substrate. Conclusions The identified genes stand as preferential targets for genetic engineering manipulation in order to generate more robust industrial strains, able to cope with the most significant fermentation stresses and, thus, to increase ethanol production rate and final ethanol titers. PMID:22152034

  6. Production of Protein Complexes in Non-methylotrophic and Methylotrophic Yeasts : Nonmethylotrophic and Methylotrophic Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Querol-García, Javier; Vega, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes can be produced in multimilligram quantities using nonmethylotrophic and methylotrophic yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Komagataella (Pichia) pastoris. Yeasts have distinct advantages as hosts for recombinant protein production owing to their cost efficiency, ease of cultivation and genetic manipulation, fast growth rates, capacity to introduce post-translational modifications, and high protein productivity (yield) of correctly folded protein products. Despite those advantages, yeasts have surprisingly lagged behind other eukaryotic hosts in their use for the production of multisubunit complexes. As our knowledge of the metabolic and genomic bottlenecks that yeast microorganisms face when overexpressing foreign proteins expands, new possibilities emerge for successfully engineering yeasts as superb expression hosts. In this chapter, we describe the current state of the art and discuss future possibilities for the development of yeast-based systems for the production of protein complexes. PMID:27165323

  7. Screening of novel yeast inulinases and further application to bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Susana M; Teixeira, Pedro D; Silva, Tiago P; Teixeira, Alexandra V; Alves, Luís

    2013-09-25

    Inulin is a carbohydrate composed of linear chains of β-2,1-linked D-fructofuranose molecules terminated by a glucose residue through a sucrose-type linkage at the reducing end. Jerusalem artichoke (JA) is one of the most interesting materials among unconventional and renewable raw materials, with levels of inulin reaching 50-80% of dry matter. Inulin or inulin-rich materials can be actively hydrolyzed by microbial inulinases to produce glucose and fructose syrups that can be used in bioprocesses. In this study, several microbial strains were isolated and their ability to inulinase biosynthesis was evaluated. The novel yeast strain Talf1, identified as Zygosaccharomyces bailii, was the best inulinase producer, attaining 8.67 U/ml of inulinase activity when JA juice was used as the inducer substrate. Z. bailii strain Talf1 and/or its enzymatic crude extract were further applied for bioethanol production and biodesulfurization (BDS) processes, using inulin and JA juice as carbon source. In a consolidated bioprocessing for ethanol production from 200 g/l inulin, Z. bailii strain Talf1 was able to produce 67 g/l of ethanol. This ethanol yield was improved in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process, with the ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 and the Talf1 inulinases, achieving a production of 78 g/l ethanol. However, the highest ethanol yield (∼48%) was obtained in a SSF process from JA juice (∼130 g/l fermentable sugars), where the S. cerevisiae produced 63 g/l ethanol. Relatively to the dibenzothiophene BDS tests, the Gordonia alkanivorans strain 1B achieved a desulfurization rate of 4.8 μM/h within a SSF process using Talf1 inulinases and JA juice, highlighting the potential of JA as a less expensive alternative carbon source. These results showed the high potential of Z. bailii strain Talf1 inulinases as a versatile tool for bioprocesses using inulin-rich materials. PMID:23419675

  8. Evaluation of yeast strains for production of fuel ethanol from biomass hydrolysates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Robust industrial yeast strains are needed for profitable production of fuel ethanol from mixed biomass waste. USDA, ARS, NCAUR, RPT has been evaluating ethanol-producing yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, engineered GMAX Saccharomyces cerevisiae, irradiated Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Pi...

  9. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  10. Direct Production of Ethanol from Raw Corn Starch via Fermentation by Use of a Novel Surface-Engineered Yeast Strain Codisplaying Glucoamylase and α-Amylase

    PubMed Central

    Shigechi, Hisayori; Koh, Jun; Fujita, Yasuya; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Bito, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Satoh, Eiichi; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2004-01-01

    Direct and efficient production of ethanol by fermentation from raw corn starch was achieved by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae codisplaying Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase and Streptococcus bovis α-amylase by using the C-terminal-half region of α-agglutinin and the flocculation functional domain of Flo1p as the respective anchor proteins. In 72-h fermentation, this strain produced 61.8 g of ethanol/liter, with 86.5% of theoretical yield from raw corn starch. PMID:15294847

  11. Direct production of ethanol from raw corn starch via fermentation by use of a novel surface-engineered yeast strain codisplaying glucoamylase and alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Shigechi, Hisayori; Koh, Jun; Fujita, Yasuya; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Bito, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Satoh, Eiichi; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2004-08-01

    Direct and efficient production of ethanol by fermentation from raw corn starch was achieved by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae codisplaying Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase and Streptococcus bovis alpha-amylase by using the C-terminal-half region of alpha-agglutinin and the flocculation functional domain of Flo1p as the respective anchor proteins. In 72-h fermentation, this strain produced 61.8 g of ethanol/liter, with 86.5% of theoretical yield from raw corn starch. PMID:15294847

  12. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the vagina , ...

  13. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  14. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... t diagnose this condition by a person’s medical history and physical examination. They usually diagnose yeast infection by examining vaginal secretions under a microscope for evidence of yeast. Treatment Various antifungal vaginal ...

  15. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells. PMID:26425545

  16. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells. PMID:26425545

  17. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J; Filsinger Interrante, Maria; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-09-01

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines, despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. We engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required the expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof of principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale-up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds. PMID:26272907

  18. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J.; Interrante, Maria Filsinger; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. Here, we engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof-of-principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds. PMID:26272907

  19. Reprogrammed glucose metabolic pathways of inhibitor-tolerant yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Representative inhibitory compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural generated from lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment inhibit yeast growth and interfere with the subsequent ethanol fermentation. Evolutionary engineering under laboratory settings is a powerful tool that can be used to...

  20. Reprogrammed Glucose Metabolic Pathways of Inhibitor-Tolerant Yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Representative inhibitory compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural generated from lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment inhibit yeast growth and interfere with the subsequent ethanol fermentation. Evolutionary engineering under laboratory settings is a powerful tool that can be used to ...

  1. Increase in furfural tolerance in ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180 by plasmid-based expression of thyA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huabao; Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2012-06-01

    Furfural is an inhibitory side product formed during the depolymerization of hemicellulose by mineral acids. Genomic libraries from three different bacteria (Bacillus subtilis YB886, Escherichia coli NC3, and Zymomonas mobilis CP4) were screened for genes that conferred furfural resistance on plates. Beneficial plasmids containing the thyA gene (coding for thymidylate synthase) were recovered from all three organisms. Expression of this key gene in the de novo pathway for dTMP biosynthesis improved furfural resistance on plates and during fermentation. A similar benefit was observed by supplementation with thymine, thymidine, or the combination of tetrahydrofolate and serine (precursors for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the methyl donor for ThyA). Supplementation with deoxyuridine provided a small benefit, and deoxyribose was of no benefit for furfural tolerance. A combination of thymidine and plasmid expression of thyA was no more effective than either alone. Together, these results demonstrate that furfural tolerance is increased by approaches that increase the supply of pyrimidine deoxyribonucleotides. However, ThyA activity was not directly affected by the addition of furfural. Furfural has been previously shown to damage DNA in E. coli and to activate a cellular response to oxidative damage in yeast. The added burden of repairing furfural-damaged DNA in E. coli would be expected to increase the cellular requirement for dTMP. Increased expression of thyA (E. coli, B. subtilis, or Z. mobilis), supplementation of cultures with thymidine, and supplementation with precursors for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (methyl donor) are each proposed to increase furfural tolerance by increasing the availability of dTMP for DNA repair. PMID:22504824

  2. Turning yeast sequence into protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Heijne, G. von

    1996-04-01

    The complete genome sequencing of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae leads us into a new era of potential use for such data base information. Protein engineering studies suggest that genetic selection of overproducing strains may aid the assignment of protein function. Data base management and sequencing software have been developed to scan entire genomes.

  3. Engineering Cofactor Preference of Ketone Reducing Biocatalysts: A Mutagenesis Study on a γ-Diketone Reductase from the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Serving as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Katzberg, Michael; Skorupa-Parachin, Nàdia; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie-Françoise; Bertau, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of pharmaceuticals and catalysts more and more relies on enantiopure chiral building blocks. These can be produced in an environmentally benign and efficient way via bioreduction of prochiral ketones catalyzed by dehydrogenases. A productive source of these biocatalysts is the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whose genome also encodes a reductase catalyzing the sequential reduction of the γ-diketone 2,5-hexanedione furnishing the diol (2S,5S)-hexanediol and the γ-hydroxyketone (5S)-hydroxy-2-hexanone in high enantio- as well as diastereoselectivity (ee and de >99.5%). This enzyme prefers NADPH as the hydrogen donating cofactor. As NADH is more stable and cheaper than NADPH it would be more effective if NADH could be used in cell-free bioreduction systems. To achieve this, the cofactor binding site of the dehydrogenase was altered by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the rational approach based on a homology model of the enzyme allowed us to generate a mutant enzyme having a relaxed cofactor preference and thus is able to use both NADPH and NADH. Results obtained from other mutants are discussed and point towards the limits of rationally designed mutants. PMID:20480039

  4. Yeast diversity and native vigor for flavor phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Carrau, Francisco; Gaggero, Carina; Aguilar, Pablo S

    2015-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the yeast used widely for beer, bread, cider, and wine production, is the most resourceful eukaryotic model used for genetic engineering. A typical concern about using engineered yeasts for food production might be negative consumer perception of genetically modified organisms. However, we believe the true pitfall of using genetically modified yeasts is their limited capacity to either refine or improve the sensory properties of fermented foods under real production conditions. Alternatively, yeast diversity screening to improve the aroma and flavors could offer groundbreaking opportunities in food biotechnology. We propose a 'Yeast Flavor Diversity Screening' strategy which integrates knowledge from sensory analysis and natural whole-genome evolution with information about flavor metabolic networks and their regulation. PMID:25630239

  5. Pexophagy in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Oku, Masahide; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Pexophagy, selective degradation of peroxisomes via autophagy, is the main system for reducing organelle abundance. Elucidation of the molecular machinery of pexophagy has been pioneered in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the methylotrophic yeasts Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha. Recent analyses using these yeasts have elucidated the molecular machineries of pexophagy, especially in terms of the interactions and modifications of the so-called adaptor proteins required for guiding autophagic membrane biogenesis on the organelle surface. Based on the recent findings, functional relevance of pexophagy and another autophagic pathway, mitophagy (selective autophagy of mitochondria), is discussed. We also discuss the physiological importance of pexophagy in these yeast systems. PMID:26409485

  6. Establishment of a yeast platform strain for production of p-coumaric acid through metabolic engineering of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Angelica; Kildegaard, Kanchana R; Li, Mingji; Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Aromatic amino acids are precursors of numerous plant secondary metabolites with diverse biological functions. Many of these secondary metabolites are already being used as active pharmaceutical or nutraceutical ingredients, and there are numerous exploratory studies of other compounds with promising applications. p-Coumaric acid is derived from aromatic amino acids and, besides being a valuable chemical building block, it serves as precursor for biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites, such as polyphenols, flavonoids, and some polyketides. Here we developed a p-coumaric acid-overproducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae platform strain. First, we reduced by-product formation by knocking out phenylpyruvate decarboxylase ARO10 and pyruvate decarboxylase PDC5. Second, different versions of feedback-resistant DAHP synthase and chorismate mutase were overexpressed. Finally, we identified shikimate kinase as another important flux-controlling step in the aromatic amino acid pathway by overexpressing enzymes from Escherichia coli, homologous to the pentafunctional enzyme Aro1p and to the bifunctional chorismate synthase-flavin reductase Aro2p. The highest titer of p-coumaric acid of 1.93 ± 0.26 g L(-1) was obtained, when overexpressing tyrosine ammonia-lyase TAL from Flavobacterium johnsoniaeu, DAHP synthase ARO4(K229L), chorismate mutase ARO7(G141S) and E. coli shikimate kinase II (aroL) in Δpdc5Δaro10 strain background. To our knowledge this is the highest reported titer of an aromatic compound produced by yeast. The developed S. cerevisiae strain represents an attractive platform host for production of p-coumaric-acid derived secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids, polyphenols, and polyketides. PMID:26292030

  7. Synthetic Yeast Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wenying; Burton, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Cooperation is wide-spread and has been postulated to drive major transitions in evolution. However, Darwinian selection favors ``cheaters'' that consume benefits without paying a fair cost. How did cooperation evolve against the threat of cheaters? To investigate the evolutionary trajectories of cooperation, we created a genetically tractable system that can be observed as it evolves from inception. The system consists of two engineered yeast strains -- a red-fluorescent strain that requires adenine and releases lysine and a yellow-fluorescent strain that requires lysine and releases adenine. Cells that consume but not supply metabolites would be cheaters. From the properties of two cooperating strains, we calculated and experimentally verified the minimal initial cell densities required for the viability of the cooperative system in the absence of exogenously added adenine and lysine. Strikingly, evolved cooperative systems were viable at 100-fold lower initial cell densities than their ancestors. We are investigating the nature and diversity of pro-cooperation changes, the dynamics of cooperator-cheater cocultures, and the effects of spatial environment on cooperation and cheating.

  8. A Course in... Biochemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Terry K-L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a chemical engineering course for senior undergraduates and first year graduate students in biochemical engineering. Discusses five experiments used in the course: aseptic techniques, dissolved oxygen measurement, oxygen uptake by yeast, continuous sterilization, and cultivation of microorganisms. (MVL)

  9. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production.

    PubMed

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  10. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    PubMed Central

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  11. Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.B.

    1984-02-28

    An internal combustion engine has a piston rack depending from each piston. This rack is connected to a power output shaft through a mechanical rectifier so that the power output shaft rotates in only one direction. A connecting rod is pivotally connected at one end to the rack and at the other end to the crank of a reduced function crankshaft so that the crankshaft rotates at the same angular velocity as the power output shaft and at the same frequency as the pistons. The crankshaft has a size, weight and shape sufficient to return the pistons back into the cylinders in position for the next power stroke.

  12. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  13. Comparison of recombinant xylose-fermenting saccharomyces and natural xylose-fermenting yeasts in fermenting mixed sugars containing both glucose and xylose

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, N.W.Y.; Chen, Zhengdao; Brainard, A.

    1995-12-01

    Cellulosic biomass is an ideal renewable feedstock for the production of ethanol fuels. A Saccharomyces yeast has been genetically engineered to ferment xylose, a constituent of biomass. Results are described and compared with other natural xylose-fermenting yeasts.

  14. Forces in yeast flocculation

    PubMed Central

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Flos, Marta Abellán; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (“flocculation”) is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding. PMID:25515338

  15. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  16. Yeast biotechnology: teaching the old dog new tricks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are regarded as the first microorganisms used by humans to process food and alcoholic beverages. The technology developed out of these ancient processes has been the basis for modern industrial biotechnology. Yeast biotechnology has gained great interest again in the last decades. Joining the potentials of genomics, metabolic engineering, systems and synthetic biology enables the production of numerous valuable products of primary and secondary metabolism, technical enzymes and biopharmaceutical proteins. An overview of emerging and established substrates and products of yeast biotechnology is provided and discussed in the light of the recent literature. PMID:24602262

  17. Improving industrial yeast strains: exploiting natural and artificial diversity.

    PubMed

    Steensels, Jan; Snoek, Tim; Meersman, Esther; Picca Nicolino, Martina; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-09-01

    Yeasts have been used for thousands of years to make fermented foods and beverages, such as beer, wine, sake, and bread. However, the choice for a particular yeast strain or species for a specific industrial application is often based on historical, rather than scientific grounds. Moreover, new biotechnological yeast applications, such as the production of second-generation biofuels, confront yeast with environments and challenges that differ from those encountered in traditional food fermentations. Together, this implies that there are interesting opportunities to isolate or generate yeast variants that perform better than the currently used strains. Here, we discuss the different strategies of strain selection and improvement available for both conventional and nonconventional yeasts. Exploiting the existing natural diversity and using techniques such as mutagenesis, protoplast fusion, breeding, genome shuffling and directed evolution to generate artificial diversity, or the use of genetic modification strategies to alter traits in a more targeted way, have led to the selection of superior industrial yeasts. Furthermore, recent technological advances allowed the development of high-throughput techniques, such as 'global transcription machinery engineering' (gTME), to induce genetic variation, providing a new source of yeast genetic diversity. PMID:24724938

  18. Ethanologenic Enzymes of Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    1999-03-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a unique microorganism in being both obligately fermentative and utilizing a Entner-Doudoroff pathway for glycolysis. Glycolytic flux in this organism is readily measured as evolved carbon dioxide, ethanol, or glucose consumed and exceeds 1 {micro}mole glucose/min per mg cell protein. To support this rapid glycolysis, approximately 50% of cytoplasmic protein is devoted to the 13 glycolytic and fermentative enzymes which constitute this central catabolic pathway. Only 1 ATP (net) is produced from each glucose metabolized. During the past grant period, we have completed the characterization of 11 of the 13 glycolytic genes from Z. mobilis together with complementary but separate DOE-fimded research by a former post-dot and collaborator, Dr. Tyrrell Conway. Research funded in my lab by DOE, Division of Energy Biosciences can be divided into three sections: A. Fundamental studies; B. Applied studies and utility; and C. Miscellaneous investigations.

  19. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy R.; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24018767

  20. Oxygen requirements of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Visser, W; Scheffers, W A; Batenburg-van der Vegte, W H; van Dijken, J P

    1990-01-01

    Type species of 75 yeast genera were examined for their ability to grow anaerobically in complex and mineral media. To define anaerobic conditions, we added a redox indicator, resazurin, to the media to determine low redox potentials. All strains tested were capable of fermenting glucose to ethanol in oxygen-limited shake-flask cultures, even those of species generally regarded as nonfermentative. However, only 23% of the yeast species tested grew under anaerobic conditions. A comparative study with a number of selected strains revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae stands out as a yeast capable of rapid growth at low redox potentials. Other yeasts, such as Torulaspora delbrueckii and Candida tropicalis, grew poorly mu max, 0.03 and 0.05 h-1, respectively) under anaerobic conditions in mineral medium supplemented with Tween 80 and ergosterol. The latter organisms grew rapidly under oxygen limitation and then displayed a high rate of alcoholic fermentation. It can be concluded that these yeasts have hitherto-unidentified oxygen requirements for growth. Images PMID:2082825

  1. Yeasts in spa establishments.

    PubMed

    Svorcová, L

    1982-05-01

    It was investigated occurrence of yeasts on bathsurfaces, in sauna rooms, in swimming and therapeutic pool water. The number of yeasts decreased depending on patients age, if the rooms were furnished with bath. The lowest contamination was found after bath of 40-60 years-old women. In the saunas were yeasts not found on the upper benches with temperature above 55 degrees C. Much higher counts on lower benches and wood mats with temperature 35-40 degrees C, on basin walls and bottom-up to 10(4)-10(6)/100 cm2. It was isolated 172 yeast strains. The occurrence of some selected strains is given in Table 7, with the toxic effect of disinfectants. The most strains were resistant to Peracetic acid and Chloramin B. Since most of the isolated and determinated strains were found in contaminated environment or during various diseases, the yeasts of the genus Cryptococcus, Candida, Rhodotorula, Torulopsis and Metschnikowia should not occur in bath establishment, and should be classified among indicators of contamination of environment including water. PMID:7124167

  2. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells. PMID:25033548

  3. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  4. Evolutionary history of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 20 ascomyceteous yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comp...

  5. Genetics of Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  6. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  7. Conversion of pentoses by yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.S.; Claypool, T.A.; Maun, C.M.; Mccracken, L.D.; Tsao, G.T.; Ueng, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization and conversion of D-xylose, D-xyulose, L-arabinose, and xylitol by yeast strains have been investigated with the following results: 1) The majority of yeasts tested utilize D-xylose and produce polyols, ethanol, and organic acids. The type and amount of products formed varies with the yeast strains used. The most commonly detected product is xylitol. 2) The majority of yeasts tested utilize D-xylulose aerobically and fermentatively to produce ethanol, xylitol D-arabitol, and organic acids. The type and amount of products varies depending upon the yeast strains used. 3) Xylitol is a poor carbon and energy source for most yeasts tested. Some yeast strains produce small amounts of ethanol from xylitol. 4) Most yeast strains utilize L-arabinose, and L-arabitol is the common product. Small amounts of ethanol are also produced by some yeast strains. 5) Of the four substrates examined, D-xylulose was the preferred substrate, followed by D-xylose, L-arabinose, and xylitol. 6) Mutant yeast strains that exhibit different metabolic product patterns can be induced and isolated from Candida sp. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and other yeasts. These mutant strains can be used for ethanol production from D-xylose as well as for the study of metabolic regulation of pentose utilization in yeasts.

  8. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  9. The Red and White Yeast Lab: An Introduction to Science as a Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an experimental system based on an engineered strain of bakers' yeast that is designed to involve students in the process by which scientific knowledge is generated. Students are asked to determine why the yeast grow to form a reproducible pattern of red and white. (WRM)

  10. Evaluation of a recombinant insect-derived amylase performance in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process with industrial yeasts.

    PubMed

    Celińska, Ewelina; Borkowska, Monika; Białas, Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    Starch is the dominant feedstock consumed for the bioethanol production, accounting for 60 % of its global production. Considering the significant contribution of bioethanol to the global fuel market, any improvement in its major operating technologies is economically very attractive. It was estimated that up to 40 % of the final ethanol unit price is derived from the energy input required for the substrate pre-treatment. Application of raw starch hydrolyzing enzymes (RSHE), combined with operation of the process according to a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) strategy, constitutes the most promising solutions to the current technologies limitations. In this study, we expressed the novel RSHE derived from an insect in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain dedicated for the protein overexpression. Afterwards, the enzyme performance was assessed in SSF process conducted by industrial ethanologenic or thermotolerant yeast species. Comparison of the insect-derived RSHE preparation with commercially available amylolytic RSH preparation was conducted. Our results demonstrate that the recombinant alpha-amylase from rice weevil can be efficiently expressed and secreted with its native signal peptide in S. cerevisiae INVSc-pYES2-Amy1 expression system (accounting for nearly 72 % of the strain's secretome). Application of the recombinant enzyme-based preparation in SSF process secured sufficient amylolytic activity for the yeast cell propagation and ethanol formation from raw starch. (Oligo)saccharide profiles generated by the compared preparations differed with respect to homogeneity of the sugar mixtures. Concomitantly, as demonstrated by a kinetic model developed in this study, the kinetic parameters describing activity of the compared preparations were different. PMID:26545757

  11. De Novo Biosynthesis of Vanillin in Fission Yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R.; Bünner, Camilla M.; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R.; Okkels, Finn T.; Olsen, Carl E.; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin β-d-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity. PMID:19286778

  12. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  13. Water Transport in Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Farzana; Prista, Catarina; Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C; Soveral, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Water moves across membranes through the lipid bilayer and through aquaporins, in this case in a regulated manner. Aquaporins belong to the MIP superfamily and two subfamilies are represented in yeasts: orthodox aquaporins considered to be specific water channels and aquaglyceroporins (heterodox aquaporins). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, four aquaporin isoforms were identified, two of which are genetically close to orthodox aquaporins (ScAqy1 and ScAqy2) and the other two are more closely related to the aquaglyceroporins (ScFps1 and ScAqy3). Advances in the establishment of water channels structure are reviewed in this chapter in relation with the mechanisms of selectivity, conductance and gating. Aquaporins are important for key aspects of yeast physiology. They have been shown to be involved in sporulation, rapid freeze-thaw tolerance, osmo-sensitivity, and modulation of cell surface properties and colony morphology, although the underlying exact mechanisms are still unknown. PMID:26721272

  14. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  15. Improvement of Saccharomyces yeast strains used in brewing, wine making and baking.

    PubMed

    Donalies, Ute E B; Nguyen, Huyen T T; Stahl, Ulf; Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Yeast was the first microorganism domesticated by mankind. Indeed, the production of bread and alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine dates from antiquity, even though the fact that the origin of alcoholic fermentation is a microorganism was not known until the nineteenth century. The use of starter cultures in yeast industries became a common practice after methods for the isolation of pure yeast strains were developed. Moreover, effort has been undertaken to improve these strains, first by classical genetic methods and later by genetic engineering. In general, yeast strain development has aimed at improving the velocity and efficiency of the respective production process and the quality of the final products. This review highlights the achievements in genetic engineering of Saccharomyces yeast strains applied in food and beverage industry. PMID:18463806

  16. Genetic improvement of brewer's yeast: current state, perspectives and limits.

    PubMed

    Saerens, Sofie M G; Duong, C Thuy; Nevoigt, Elke

    2010-05-01

    Brewer's yeast strain optimisation may lead to a more efficient beer production process, better final quality or healthier beer. However, brewer's yeast genetic improvement is very challenging, especially true when it comes to lager brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) which contributes to 90% of the total beer market. This yeast is a genetic hybrid and allopolyploid. While early studies applying traditional genetic approaches encountered many problems, the development of rational metabolic engineering strategies successfully introduced many desired properties into brewer's yeast. Recently, the first genome sequence of a lager brewer's strain became available. This has opened the door for applying advanced omics technologies and facilitating inverse metabolic engineering strategies. The latter approach takes advantage of natural diversity and aims at identifying and transferring the crucial genetic information for an interesting phenotype. In this way, strains can be optimised by introducing "natural" mutations. However, even when it comes to self-cloned strains, severe concerns about genetically modified organisms used in the food and beverage industry are still a major hurdle for any commercialisation. Therefore, research efforts will aim at developing new sophisticated screening methods for the isolation of natural mutants with the desired properties which are based on the knowledge of genotype-phenotype linkage. PMID:20195857

  17. New yeast study finds strength in numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J.

    1996-06-07

    This article reports on the debate about whether the modern industrial society is producing hormonelike pollutants that can interfere with human reproductions, including pesticides, the plastic ingredient bisphenol-A and some polychlorinated biphenyls. A recent article has added fuel to the debate by presenting results that indicate a mixture of two weakly estrogenic chemicals can be far more potent than individual compounds, using a screening system based on genetically engineered yeast cells. The debate may need to be taken into account by a USEPA advisory panel now being formed to come up with in vitro tests to screen for environmental estrogens.

  18. Comparative genomics of biotechnologically important yeasts.

    PubMed

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Lopes, Mariana R; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Göker, Markus; Salamov, Asaf A; Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Long, Tanya M; Calvey, Christopher H; Aerts, Andrea L; Barry, Kerrie W; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; Coughlan, Aisling Y; Deshpande, Shweta; Douglass, Alexander P; Hanson, Sara J; Klenk, Hans-Peter; LaButti, Kurt M; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika A; Lipzen, Anna M; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Ohm, Robin A; Otillar, Robert P; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L; Peng, Yi; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos A; Scheuner, Carmen; Sibirny, Andriy A; Slot, Jason C; Stielow, J Benjamin; Sun, Hui; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Blackwell, Meredith; Grigoriev, Igor V; Jeffries, Thomas W

    2016-08-30

    Ascomycete yeasts are metabolically diverse, with great potential for biotechnology. Here, we report the comparative genome analysis of 29 taxonomically and biotechnologically important yeasts, including 16 newly sequenced. We identify a genetic code change, CUG-Ala, in Pachysolen tannophilus in the clade sister to the known CUG-Ser clade. Our well-resolved yeast phylogeny shows that some traits, such as methylotrophy, are restricted to single clades, whereas others, such as l-rhamnose utilization, have patchy phylogenetic distributions. Gene clusters, with variable organization and distribution, encode many pathways of interest. Genomics can predict some biochemical traits precisely, but the genomic basis of others, such as xylose utilization, remains unresolved. Our data also provide insight into early evolution of ascomycetes. We document the loss of H3K9me2/3 heterochromatin, the origin of ascomycete mating-type switching, and panascomycete synteny at the MAT locus. These data and analyses will facilitate the engineering of efficient biosynthetic and degradative pathways and gateways for genomic manipulation. PMID:27535936

  19. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  20. Breeding research on sake yeasts in Japan: history, recent technological advances, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Sake is an alcoholic beverage of Japan, with a tradition lasting more than 1,300 years; it is produced from rice and water by fermenting with the koji mold Aspergillus oryzae and sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Breeding research on sake yeasts was originally developed in Japan by incorporating microbiological and genetic research methodologies adopted in other scientific areas. Since the advent of a genetic paradigm, isolation of yeast mutants has been a dominant approach for the breeding of favorable sake yeasts. These sake yeasts include (a) those that do not form foams (produced by isolating a mutant that does not stick to foams, thus decreasing the cost of sake production); (b) those that do not produce urea, which leads to the formation of ethyl carbamate, a possible carcinogen (isolated by positive selection in a canavanine-, arginine-, and ornithine-containing medium); (c) those that produce an increased amount of ethyl caproate, an apple-like flavor (produced by isolating a mutant resistant to cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty-acid synthesis); and (d) those that produce a decreased amount of pyruvate (produced by isolating a mutant resistant to an inhibitor of mitochondrial transport, thus decreasing the amount of diacetyl). Given that sake yeasts perform sexual reproduction, sporulation and mating are potent approaches for their breeding. Recently, the genome sequences of sake yeasts have been determined and made publicly accessible. By utilizing this information, the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the brewing characteristics of sake yeasts have been identified, which paves a way to DNA marker-assisted selection of the mated strains. Genetic engineering technologies for experimental yeast strains have recently been established by academic groups, and these technologies have also been applied to the breeding of sake yeasts. Sake yeasts whose genomes have been modified with these technologies correspond to genetically modified organisms (GMOs

  1. A Highly Characterized Yeast Toolkit for Modular, Multipart Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael E; DeLoache, William C; Cervantes, Bernardo; Dueber, John E

    2015-09-18

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an increasingly attractive host for synthetic biology because of its long history in industrial fermentations. However, until recently, most synthetic biology systems have focused on bacteria. While there is a wealth of resources and literature about the biology of yeast, it can be daunting to navigate and extract the tools needed for engineering applications. Here we present a versatile engineering platform for yeast, which contains both a rapid, modular assembly method and a basic set of characterized parts. This platform provides a framework in which to create new designs, as well as data on promoters, terminators, degradation tags, and copy number to inform those designs. Additionally, we describe genome-editing tools for making modifications directly to the yeast chromosomes, which we find preferable to plasmids due to reduced variability in expression. With this toolkit, we strive to simplify the process of engineering yeast by standardizing the physical manipulations and suggesting best practices that together will enable more straightforward translation of materials and data from one group to another. Additionally, by relieving researchers of the burden of technical details, they can focus on higher-level aspects of experimental design. PMID:25871405

  2. New and emerging yeast pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, K C

    1995-01-01

    The most common yeast species that act as agents of human disease are Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The incidence of infections by other yeasts has increased during the past decade. The most evident emerging pathogens are Malassezia furfur, Trichosporon beigelii, Rhodotorula species, Hansenula anomala, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida krusei. Organisms once considered environmental contaminants or only industrially important, such as Candida utilis and Candida lipolytica, have now been implicated as agents of fungemia, onychomycosis, and systemic disease. The unusual yeasts primarily infect immunocompromised patients, newborns, and the elderly. The role of central venous catheter removal and antifungal therapy in patient management is controversial. The antibiograms of the unusual yeasts range from resistant to the most recent azoles and amphotericin B to highly susceptible to all antifungal agents. Current routine methods for yeast identification may be insufficient to identify the unusual yeasts within 2 days after isolation. The recognition of unusual yeasts as agents of sometimes life-threatening infection and their unpredictable antifungal susceptibilities increase the burden on the clinical mycology laboratory to pursue complete species identification and MIC determinations. Given the current and evolving medical practices for management of seriously ill patients, further evaluations of the clinically important data about these yeasts are needed. PMID:8665465

  3. Transcriptional activators in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription activation domains (ADs) are not well defined on the proteome scale. We systematicallly tested ∼6000 yeast proteins for transcriptional activity using a yeast one-hybrid system and identified 451 transcriptional activators. We then determined their transcription activation strength using fusions to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain and a His3 reporter gene which contained a promoter with a Gal4-binding site. Among the 132 strongest activators 32 are known transcription factors while another 35 have no known function. Although zinc fingers, helix–loop–helix domains and several other domains are highly overrepresented among the activators, only few contain characterized ADs. We also found some striking correlations: the stronger the activation activity, the more acidic, glutamine-rich, proline-rich or asparagine-rich the activators were. About 29% of the activators have been found previously to specifically interact with the transcription machinery, while 10% are known to be components of transcription regulatory complexes. Based on their transcriptional activity, localization and interaction patterns, at least six previously uncharacterized proteins are suggested to be bona fide transcriptional regulators (namely YFL049W, YJR070C, YDR520C, YGL066W/Sgf73, YKR064W and YCR082W/Ahc2). PMID:16464826

  4. Phage and Yeast Display.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jared; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-02-01

    Despite the availability of antimicrobial drugs, the continued development of microbial resistance--established through escape mutations and the emergence of resistant strains--limits their clinical utility. The discovery of novel, therapeutic, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offers viable clinical alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. Human mAb-based therapies are typically nontoxic in patients and demonstrate high specificity for the intended microbial target. This specificity prevents negative impacts on the patient microbiome and avoids driving the resistance of nontarget species. The in vitro selection of human antibody fragment libraries displayed on phage or yeast surfaces represents a group of well-established technologies capable of generating human mAbs. The advantage of these forms of microbial display is the large repertoire of human antibody fragments present during a single selection campaign. Furthermore, the in vitro selection environments of microbial surface display allow for the rapid isolation of antibodies--and their encoding genes--against infectious pathogens and their toxins that are impractical within in vivo systems, such as murine hybridomas. This article focuses on the technologies of phage display and yeast display, as these strategies relate to the discovery of human mAbs for the treatment and vaccine development of infectious diseases. PMID:26104550

  5. Eighteen new oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Cajka, Tomas; Chandra, Idelia; Shi, Sandy; Lin, Ting; German, J Bruce; Fiehn, Oliver; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2016-07-01

    Of 1600 known species of yeasts, about 70 are known to be oleaginous, defined as being able to accumulate over 20 % intracellular lipids. These yeasts have value for fundamental and applied research. A survey of yeasts from the Phaff Yeast Culture Collection, University of California Davis was performed to identify additional oleaginous species within the Basidiomycota phylum. Fifty-nine strains belonging to 34 species were grown in lipid inducing media, and total cell mass, lipid yield and triacylglycerol profiles were determined. Thirty-two species accumulated at least 20 % lipid and 25 species accumulated over 40 % lipid by dry weight. Eighteen of these species were not previously reported to be oleaginous. Triacylglycerol profiles were suitable for biodiesel production. These results greatly expand the number of known oleaginous yeast species, and reveal the wealth of natural diversity of triacylglycerol profiles within wild-type oleaginous Basidiomycetes. PMID:27072563

  6. A Method of Visualizing Three-Dimensional Distribution of Yeast in Bread Dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Shiraga, Seizaburou; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Takeya, Koji; Endo, Shigeru

    A novel technique was developed to monitor the change in three-dimensional (3D) distribution of yeast in frozen bread dough samples in accordance with the progress of mixing process. Application of a surface engineering technology allowed the identification of yeast in bread dough by bonding EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) to the surface of yeast cells. The fluorescent yeast (a biomarker) was recognized as bright spots at the wavelength of 520 nm. A Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS) with a fluorescence microscope was utilized to acquire cross-sectional images of frozen dough samples sliced at intervals of 1 μm. A set of successive two-dimensional images was reconstructed to analyze 3D distribution of yeast. Samples were taken from each of four normal mixing stages (i.e., pick up, clean up, development, and final stages) and also from over mixing stage. In the pick up stage yeast distribution was uneven with local areas of dense yeast. As the mixing progressed from clean up to final stages, the yeast became more evenly distributed throughout the dough sample. However, the uniformity in yeast distribution was lost in the over mixing stage possibly due to the breakdown of gluten structure within the dough sample.

  7. [Study of animal viruses in yeast].

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Yuko

    2006-06-01

    Yeast is often considered to be a model eukaryotic organism, in a manner analogous to E. coli as a model prokaryotic organism. Yeast has been extensively characterized and the genomes completely sequenced. Despite the small genome size, yeast displays most of features of higher eukaryotes. The facts that most of cellular machinery is conserved among different eukaryotes and that the powerful technologies of genetics and molecular biology are available have made yeast model eukaryotic cells in biological and biomedical sciences including virology. Cumulative data indicate that yeast can be a host for animal viruses. I briefly describe yeast gene expression and review viral replication in yeast. Great discovery include complete replication of animal viruses and production of virus-like particle vaccines in yeast. Current studies on yeast focus on identification of host factors and machinery used for viral replication. The studies are based on traditional yeast genetics and genome-wide identification using a complete set of yeast deletion strains. PMID:17038807

  8. Optimising yeast as a host for recombinant protein production (review).

    PubMed

    Bonander, Nicklas; Bill, Roslyn M

    2012-01-01

    Having access to suitably stable, functional recombinant protein samples underpins diverse academic and industrial research efforts to understand the workings of the cell in health and disease. Synthesising a protein in recombinant host cells typically allows the isolation of the pure protein in quantities much higher than those found in the protein's native source. Yeast is a popular host as it is a eukaryote with similar synthetic machinery to the native human source cells of many proteins of interest, while also being quick, easy, and cheap to grow and process. Even in these cells the production of some proteins can be plagued by low functional yields. We have identified molecular mechanisms and culture parameters underpinning high yields and have consolidated our findings to engineer improved yeast cell factories. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the opportunities available to improve yeast as a host system for recombinant protein production. PMID:22454109

  9. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes. PMID:25267117

  10. Short Synthetic Terminators for Improved Heterologous Gene Expression in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Curran, Kathleen A; Morse, Nicholas J; Markham, Kelly A; Wagman, Allison M; Gupta, Akash; Alper, Hal S

    2015-07-17

    Terminators play an important role both in completing the transcription process and impacting mRNA half-life. As such, terminators are an important synthetic component considered in applications such as heterologous gene expression and metabolic engineering. Here, we describe a panel of short (35-70 bp) synthetic terminators that can be used for modulating gene expression in yeast. The best of these synthetic terminator resulted in 3.7-fold more fluorescent protein output and 4.4-fold increase in transcript level compared to that with the commonly used CYC1 terminator. These synthetic terminators offer several advantages over native sequences, including an easily synthesized short length, minimal sequence homology to native sequences, and similar or better performance characteristics than those of commonly used longer terminators. Furthermore, the synthetic terminators are highly functional in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and an alternative yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, demonstrating that these synthetic designs are transferrable between diverse yeast species. PMID:25686303

  11. Plasmidic Expression of nemA and yafC* Increased Resistance of Ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180 to Nonvolatile Side Products from Dilute Acid Treatment of Sugarcane Bagasse and Artificial Hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiqin; Zheng, Huabao; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolysate-resistant Escherichia coli SL100 was previously isolated from ethanologenic LY180 after sequential transfers in AM1 medium containing a dilute acid hydrolysate of sugarcane bagasse and was used as a source of resistance genes. Many genes that affect tolerance to furfural, the most abundant inhibitor, have been described previously. To identify genes associated with inhibitors other than furfural, plasmid clones were selected in an artificial hydrolysate that had been treated with a vacuum to remove furfural. Two new resistance genes were discovered from Sau3A1 libraries of SL100 genomic DNA: nemA (N-ethylmaleimide reductase) and a putative regulatory gene containing a mutation in the coding region, yafC*. The presence of these mutations in SL100 was confirmed by sequencing. A single mutation was found in the upstream regulatory region of nemR (nemRA operon) in SL100. This mutation increased nemA activity 20-fold over that of the parent organism (LY180) in AM1 medium without hydrolysate and increased nemA mRNA levels >200-fold. Addition of hydrolysates induced nemA expression (mRNA and activity), in agreement with transcriptional control. NemA activity was stable in cell extracts (9 h, 37°C), eliminating a role for proteinase in regulation. LY180 with a plasmid expressing nemA or yafC* was more resistant to a vacuum-treated sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate and to a vacuum-treated artificial hydrolysate than LY180 with an empty-vector control. Neither gene affected furfural tolerance. The vacuum-treated hydrolysates inhibited the reduction of N-ethylmaleimide by NemA while also serving as substrates. Expression of the nemA or yafC* plasmid in LY180 doubled the rate of ethanol production from the vacuum-treated sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate. PMID:26826228

  12. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  13. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  14. Fission yeast septation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Juan C. G.; Ramos, Mariona; Osumi, Masako; Pérez, Pilar; Ribas, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In animal cells cytokinesis relies on the contraction of an actomyosin ring that pulls the plasma membrane to create a cleavage furrow, whose ingression finally divides the mother cell into two daughter cells. Fungal cells are surrounded by a tough and flexible structure called cell wall, which is considered to be the functional equivalent of the extracellular matrix in animal cells. Therefore, in addition to cleavage furrow ingression, fungal cytokinesis also requires the centripetal formation of a septum wall structure that develops between the dividing cells, whose genesis must be strictly coordinated with both the actomyosin ring closure and plasma membrane ingression. Here we briefly review what is known about the septum structure and composition in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the recent progress about the relationship between septum biosynthesis and actomyosin ring constriction, and the importance of the septum and ring in the steady progression of the cleavage furrow. PMID:27574536

  15. Fission yeast septation.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Juan C G; Ramos, Mariona; Osumi, Masako; Pérez, Pilar; Ribas, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In animal cells cytokinesis relies on the contraction of an actomyosin ring that pulls the plasma membrane to create a cleavage furrow, whose ingression finally divides the mother cell into two daughter cells. Fungal cells are surrounded by a tough and flexible structure called cell wall, which is considered to be the functional equivalent of the extracellular matrix in animal cells. Therefore, in addition to cleavage furrow ingression, fungal cytokinesis also requires the centripetal formation of a septum wall structure that develops between the dividing cells, whose genesis must be strictly coordinated with both the actomyosin ring closure and plasma membrane ingression. Here we briefly review what is known about the septum structure and composition in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the recent progress about the relationship between septum biosynthesis and actomyosin ring constriction, and the importance of the septum and ring in the steady progression of the cleavage furrow. PMID:27574536

  16. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  17. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  18. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  19. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida...

  20. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  1. Marine yeast isolation and industrial application

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Abdelrahman Saleh; Tucker, Gregory A; Daw, Zakaria Yehia; Du, Chenyu

    2014-01-01

    Over the last century, terrestrial yeasts have been widely used in various industries, such as baking, brewing, wine, bioethanol and pharmaceutical protein production. However, only little attention has been given to marine yeasts. Recent research showed that marine yeasts have several unique and promising features over the terrestrial yeasts, for example higher osmosis tolerance, higher special chemical productivity and production of industrial enzymes. These indicate that marine yeasts have great potential to be applied in various industries. This review gathers the most recent techniques used for marine yeast isolation as well as the latest applications of marine yeast in bioethanol, pharmaceutical and enzyme production fields. PMID:24738708

  2. The Yeast Sphingolipid Signaling Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Matmati, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are recognized as signaling mediators in a growing number of pathways, and represent potential targets to address many diseases. The study of sphingolipid signaling in yeast has created a number of breakthroughs in the field, and has the potential to lead future advances. The aim of this article is to provide an inclusive view of two major frontiers in yeast sphingolipid signaling. In the first section, several key studies in the field of sphingolipidomics are consolidated to create a yeast sphingolipidome that ranks nearly all known sphingolipid species by their level in a resting yeast cell. The second section presents an overview of most known phenotypes identified for sphingolipid gene mutants, presented with the intention of illuminating not yet discovered connections outside and inside of the field. PMID:24220500

  3. Growth and manipulation of yeast.

    PubMed

    Treco, D A; Reynolds, A; Lundblad, V

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes preparation of selected media for growing yeast and also discusses strain storage and revival. Protocols are provided for the assay of beta-galactosidase in liquid culture and for transformation using lithium acetate. PMID:18429086

  4. Applications of yeast cell-surface display in bio-refinery.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Akihiko; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Ogino, Chiaki

    2010-11-01

    The dependency on depleting natural resources is a challenge for energy security that can be potentially answered by bioenergy. Bioenergy is derived from starchy and lignocellulosic biomass in the form of bioethanol or from vegetable oils in the form of biodiesel fuel. The acid and enzymatic methods have been developed for the hydrolysis of biomass and for transesterifiaction of plant oils. However, acid hydrolysis results in the production of unnatural compounds which has adverse effects on yeast fermentation. Recent advancements in the yeast cell surface engineering developed strategies to genetically immobilize amylolytic, cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes on yeast cell surface for the production of fuel ethanol from biomass. This review gives an insight in to the recent technological developments in the production of bioenergy, i.e, bioethanol using surface engineered yeast. PMID:21171959

  5. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  6. Efficient ethanol production from potato and corn processing industry waste using E. coli engineered to express Vitreoscilla haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Fatma; Stark, Benjamin C; Yesilcimen Akbas, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Engineering of ethanologenic E. coli to express the haemoglobin (VHb) from the bacterium Vitreoscilla has been shown to enhance ethanol production by fermentation of pure sugars, sugars from hydrolysis of lignocellulose, components of whey, and sugars from wastewater produced during potato processing. Here, these studies were extended to see whether the same effect could be seen when a mixture of waste materials from processing of potatoes and corn into potato and corn chips were used as sugar sources. Consistent increases in ethanol production coincident with VHb expression were seen in shake flasks at both low aeration and high aeration conditions. The ethanol increases were due almost entirely to increases in the amount of ethanol produced per unit of cell mass. The VHb strategy for increasing fermentation to ethanol (and perhaps other valuable fermentation products) may be of general use, particularly regarding conversion of otherwise discarded materials into valuable commodities. PMID:25766084

  7. Riboneogenesis in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Clasquin, Michelle F.; Melamud, Eugene; Singer, Alexander; Gooding, Jessica R.; Xu, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiping; Cui, Hong; Campagna, Shawn R.; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Caudy, Amy A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Gluconeogenesis converts three carbon units into glucose. Here we identify an analogous pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for converting three carbon units into ribose, a component of nucleic acids and nucleotides. This riboneogenic pathway involves the enzyme sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SHB17), whose activity was identified based on accumulation of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate in the corresponding knockout strain. We determined the crystal structure of Shb17 in complex with sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate, and found that the sugar is bound in the closed furan form in the active site. Like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate is produced by aldolase, in this case from erythrose 4-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. Hydrolysis of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate by SHB17 provides an energetically favorable input to the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to drive ribose production. Flux through SHB17 is enhanced under conditions when ribose demand is high relative to demand for NADPH, including during ribosome biogenesis in metabolically synchronized yeast cells. Thus, riboneogenesis provides a thermodynamically-driven route of ribose production uncoupled from formation of NADPH. PMID:21663798

  8. Yeast Mitochondrial Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mathilde; Darzacq, Xavier; Devaux, Frederic; Singer, Robert H.; Jacq, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Although 30 years ago it was strongly suggested that some cytoplasmic ribosomes are bound to the surface of yeast mitochondria, the mechanisms and the raison d’ětre of this process are not understood. For instance, it is not perfectly known which of the several hundred nuclearly encoded genes have to be translated to the mitochondrial vicinity to guide the import of the corresponding proteins. One can take advantage of several modern methods to address a number of aspects of the site-specific translation process of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Three complementary approaches are presented to analyze the spatial distribution of mRNAs coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Starting from biochemical purifications of mitochondria-bound polysomes, we describe a genomewide approach to classify all the cellular mRNAs according to their physical proximity with mitochondria; we also present real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction monitoring of mRNA distribution to provide a quantified description of this localization. Finally, a fluorescence microscopy approach on a single living cell is described to visualize the in vivo localization of mRNAs involved in mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:18314748

  9. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  10. Yeast as a cell factory: current state and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kavšček, Martin; Stražar, Martin; Curk, Tomaž; Natter, Klaus; Petrovič, Uroš

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the oldest and most frequently used microorganisms in biotechnology with successful applications in the production of both bulk and fine chemicals. Yet, yeast researchers are faced with the challenge to further its transition from the old workhorse to a modern cell factory, fulfilling the requirements for next generation bioprocesses. Many of the principles and tools that are applied for this development originate from the field of synthetic biology and the engineered strains will indeed be synthetic organisms. We provide an overview of the most important aspects of this transition and highlight achievements in recent years as well as trends in which yeast currently lags behind. These aspects include: the enhancement of the substrate spectrum of yeast, with the focus on the efficient utilization of renewable feedstocks, the enhancement of the product spectrum through generation of independent circuits for the maintenance of redox balances and biosynthesis of common carbon building blocks, the requirement for accurate pathway control with improved genome editing and through orthogonal promoters, and improvement of the tolerance of yeast for specific stress conditions. The causative genetic elements for the required traits of the future yeast cell factories will be assembled into genetic modules for fast transfer between strains. These developments will benefit from progress in bio-computational methods, which allow for the integration of different kinds of data sets and algorithms, and from rapid advancement in genome editing, which will enable multiplexed targeted integration of whole heterologous pathways. The overall goal will be to provide a collection of modules and circuits that work independently and can be combined at will, depending on the individual conditions, and will result in an optimal synthetic host for a given production process. PMID:26122609