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Sample records for engineering clostridium strain

  1. Physiology, Genomics, and Pathway Engineering of an Ethanol-Tolerant Strain of Clostridium phytofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Zuroff, Trevor R.; Ramya, Mohandass; Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Curtis, Wayne R.

    2015-01-01

    Novel processing strategies for hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass in a single reactor offer large potential cost savings for production of biocommodities and biofuels. One critical challenge is retaining high enzyme production in the presence of elevated product titers. Toward this goal, the cellulolytic, ethanol-producing bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans was adapted to increased ethanol concentrations. The resulting ethanol-tolerant (ET) strain has nearly doubled ethanol tolerance relative to the wild-type level but also reduced ethanol yield and growth at low ethanol concentrations. The genome of the ET strain has coding changes in proteins involved in membrane biosynthesis, the Rnf complex, cation homeostasis, gene regulation, and ethanol production. In particular, purification of the mutant bifunctional acetaldehyde coenzyme A (CoA)/alcohol dehydrogenase showed that a G609D variant abolished its activities, including ethanol formation. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase in the ET strain increased cellulose consumption and restored ethanol production, demonstrating how metabolic engineering can be used to overcome disadvantageous mutations incurred during adaptation to ethanol. We discuss how genetic changes in the ET strain reveal novel potential strategies for improving microbial solvent tolerance. PMID:26048945

  2. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. PMID:25336453

  3. Physiology, Genomics, and Pathway Engineering of an Ethanol-Tolerant Strain of Clostridium phytofermentans.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Zuroff, Trevor R; Ramya, Mohandass; Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-08-15

    Novel processing strategies for hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass in a single reactor offer large potential cost savings for production of biocommodities and biofuels. One critical challenge is retaining high enzyme production in the presence of elevated product titers. Toward this goal, the cellulolytic, ethanol-producing bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans was adapted to increased ethanol concentrations. The resulting ethanol-tolerant (ET) strain has nearly doubled ethanol tolerance relative to the wild-type level but also reduced ethanol yield and growth at low ethanol concentrations. The genome of the ET strain has coding changes in proteins involved in membrane biosynthesis, the Rnf complex, cation homeostasis, gene regulation, and ethanol production. In particular, purification of the mutant bifunctional acetaldehyde coenzyme A (CoA)/alcohol dehydrogenase showed that a G609D variant abolished its activities, including ethanol formation. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase in the ET strain increased cellulose consumption and restored ethanol production, demonstrating how metabolic engineering can be used to overcome disadvantageous mutations incurred during adaptation to ethanol. We discuss how genetic changes in the ET strain reveal novel potential strategies for improving microbial solvent tolerance. PMID:26048945

  4. Consolidated bioprocessing of transgenic switchgrass by an engineered and evolved Clostridium thermocellum strain

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Kelsey L; Rodriguez Jr, Miguel; Thompson, Olivia A; Fu, Chunxiang; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Davison, Brian H; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Switchgrass is an abundant and dedicated bioenergy feedstock however its inherent recalcitrance is one of the economic hurdles for producing biofuels. The down-regulation of the caffeic acid O-methyl transferase (COMT) gene in the lignin pathway of switchgrass reduced lignin content and S/G ratio, and the transgenic lines showed improved fermentation yield with S. cerevisiae and C. thermocellum (ATCC 27405) in comparison to the wild-type switchgrass. Results: Here we examine the fermentation potential of the COMT transgenic switchgrass and its wild-type line, with an engineered and evolved Clostridium thermocellum (M1570) strain. The fermentation of the transgenic switchgrass had superior conversion relative to the control line with an increase of 20% and ethanol was the primary metabolite accounting for 90% of the total metabolites measured by HPLC. Conclusions: The down-regulation of the COMT gene in switchgrass reduced recalcitrance and improved microbial bioconversion yield. Moreover, these results showed ethanol as the main fermentation metabolite produced by an engineered and evolved C. thermocellum strain grown on a transgenic switchgrass.

  5. Converting carbon dioxide to butyrate with an engineered strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P; Woodard, Trevor L; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. Importance: The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  6. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Woodard, TL; Lovley, DR

    2014-08-26

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H-2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. IMPORTANCE The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  7. Nicotinamide cofactor ratios in engineered strains of Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum.

    PubMed

    Beri, Dhananjay; Olson, Daniel G; Holwerda, Evert K; Lynd, Lee R

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum are bacteria under investigation for production of biofuels from plant biomass. Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum has been engineered to produce ethanol at high yield (>90% of theoretical) and titer (>70 g/l). Efforts to engineer C. thermocellum have not, to date, been as successful, and efforts are underway to transfer the ethanol production pathway from T. saccharolyticum to C. thermocellum One potential challenge in transferring metabolic pathways is the possibility of incompatible levels of nicotinamide cofactors. These cofactors (NAD(+), NADH, NADP(+) and NADPH) and their oxidation state are important in the context of microbial redox metabolism. In this study we directly measured the concentrations and reduced oxidized ratios of these cofactors in a number of strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum by using acid/base extraction and enzymatic assays. We found that cofactor ratios are maintained in a fairly narrow range, regardless of the metabolic network modifications considered. We have found that the ratios are similar in both organisms, which is a relevant observation in the context of transferring the T. saccharolyticum ethanol production pathway to C. thermocellum. PMID:27190292

  8. Process engineering and scale-up of autotrophic Clostridium strain P11 syngas fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundiyana, Dimple Kumar Aiyanna

    Scope and Method of Study. Biomass gasification followed by fermentation of syngas to ethanol is a potential process to produce bioenergy. The process is currently being researched under laboratory- and pilot-scale in an effort to optimize the process conditions and make the process feasible for commercial production of ethanol and other biofuels such as butanol and propanol. The broad research objectives for the research were to improve ethanol yields during syngas fermentation and to design a economical fermentation process. The research included four statistically designed experimental studies in serum bottles, bench-scale and pilot-scale fermentors to screen alternate fermentation media components, to determine the effect of process parameters such as pH, temperature and buffer on syngas fermentation, to determine the effect of key limiting nutrients of the acetyl-CoA pathway in a continuous series reactor design, and to scale-up the syngas fermentation in a 100-L pilot scale fermentor. Findings and Conclusions. The first experimental study identified cotton seed extract (CSE) as a feasible medium for Clostridium strain P11 fermentation. The study showed that CSE at 0.5 g L-1 can potentially replace all the standard Clostridium strain P11 fermentation media components while using a media buffer did not significantly improve the ethanol production when used in fermentation with CSE. Scale-up of the CSE fermentation in 2-L and 5-L stirred tank fermentors showed 25% increase in ethanol yield. The second experimental study showed that syngas fermentation at 32°C without buffer was associated with higher ethanol concentration and reduced lag time in switching to solventogenesis. Conducting fermentation at 40°C or by lowering incubation pH to 5.0 resulted in reduced cell growth and no production of ethanol or acetic acid. The third experiment studied the effect of three limiting nutrients, calcium pantothenate, vitamin B12 and CoCl2 on syngas fermentation. Results

  9. Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum strain deficient in acetate production

    SciTech Connect

    Rothstein, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    A mutant of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum that is blocked in acetate production was isolated after treatment with nitrosoguanidine and selection for fluoroacetate resistance. The mutant produced more ethanol than the parent strain did.

  10. Simultaneous production of isopropanol, butanol, ethanol and 2,3-butanediol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 engineered strains.

    PubMed

    Collas, Florent; Kuit, Wouter; Clément, Benjamin; Marchal, Rémy; López-Contreras, Ana M; Monot, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Isopropanol represents a widely-used commercial alcohol which is currently produced from petroleum. In nature, isopropanol is excreted by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii, simultaneously with butanol and ethanol during the isopropanol butanol ethanol (IBE) fermentation. In order to increase isopropanol production, the gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme from C. beijerinckii NRRL B593 (adh) which catalyzes the reduction of acetone to isopropanol, was cloned into the acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE)-producing strain C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The transformants showed high capacity for conversion of acetone into isopropanol (> 95%). To increase isopropanol production levels in ATCC 824, polycistronic transcription units containing, in addition to the adh gene, homologous genes of the acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), and/or the acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA transferase subunits A and B (ctfA and ctfB) were constructed and introduced into the wild-type strain. Combined overexpression of the ctfA and ctfB genes resulted in enhanced solvent production. In non-pH-controlled batch cultures, the total solvents excreted by the transformant overexpressing the adh, ctfA, ctfB and adc genes were 24.4 g/L IBE (including 8.8 g/L isopropanol), while the control strain harbouring an empty plasmid produced only 20.2 g/L ABE (including 7.6 g/L acetone). The overexpression of the adc gene had limited effect on IBE production. Interestingly, all transformants with the adh gene converted acetoin (a minor fermentation product) into 2,3-butanediol, highlighting the wide metabolic versatility of solvent-producing Clostridia. PMID:22909015

  11. Simultaneous production of isopropanol, butanol, ethanol and 2,3-butanediol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 engineered strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Isopropanol represents a widely-used commercial alcohol which is currently produced from petroleum. In nature, isopropanol is excreted by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii, simultaneously with butanol and ethanol during the isopropanol butanol ethanol (IBE) fermentation. In order to increase isopropanol production, the gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme from C. beijerinckii NRRL B593 (adh) which catalyzes the reduction of acetone to isopropanol, was cloned into the acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE)-producing strain C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The transformants showed high capacity for conversion of acetone into isopropanol (> 95%). To increase isopropanol production levels in ATCC 824, polycistronic transcription units containing, in addition to the adh gene, homologous genes of the acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), and/or the acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA transferase subunits A and B (ctfA and ctfB) were constructed and introduced into the wild-type strain. Combined overexpression of the ctfA and ctfB genes resulted in enhanced solvent production. In non-pH-controlled batch cultures, the total solvents excreted by the transformant overexpressing the adh, ctfA, ctfB and adc genes were 24.4 g/L IBE (including 8.8 g/L isopropanol), while the control strain harbouring an empty plasmid produced only 20.2 g/L ABE (including 7.6 g/L acetone). The overexpression of the adc gene had limited effect on IBE production. Interestingly, all transformants with the adh gene converted acetoin (a minor fermentation product) into 2,3-butanediol, highlighting the wide metabolic versatility of solvent-producing Clostridia. PMID:22909015

  12. Draft genome sequences of clostridium strains native to Colombia with the potential to produce solvents.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Morales, Juan Pablo; Perez-Mancilla, Ximena; López-Kleine, Liliana; Montoya Castaño, Dolly; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Genomes from four Clostridium sp. strains considered to be mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, isolated from crop soil in Colombia, with a strong potential to produce alcohols like 1,3-propanediol, were analyzed. We present the draft genome of these strains, which will be useful for developing genetic engineering strategies. PMID:25999575

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Clostridium Strains Native to Colombia with the Potential To Produce Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Morales, Juan Pablo; Perez-Mancilla, Ximena; López-Kleine, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Genomes from four Clostridium sp. strains considered to be mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, isolated from crop soil in Colombia, with a strong potential to produce alcohols like 1,3-propanediol, were analyzed. We present the draft genome of these strains, which will be useful for developing genetic engineering strategies. PMID:25999575

  14. Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile strains (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile strains CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile strains. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strains. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent strains were identified. PMID:22398929

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. O. S.; Salvarani, F.M.; Assis, R.A.; Martins, N.R.S.; Pires, P.S.; Lobato, F.C.F.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis and colangio hepatitis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven different compounds used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis was determined by agar dilution method for 55 C. perfringens strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens. All strains showed high susceptibility to penicillin, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Only 7.3% of the strains showed an intermediated sensitivity to lincomycin, and 49 (89.1%) were considered susceptible. For tetracycline and bacitracin, 41.8% and 47.3% of strains, respectively, were considered resistant. PMID:24031355

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Silva, R O S; Salvarani, F M; Assis, R A; Martins, N R S; Pires, P S; Lobato, F C F

    2009-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis and colangio hepatitis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven different compounds used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis was determined by agar dilution method for 55 C. perfringens strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens. All strains showed high susceptibility to penicillin, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Only 7.3% of the strains showed an intermediated sensitivity to lincomycin, and 49 (89.1%) were considered susceptible. For tetracycline and bacitracin, 41.8% and 47.3% of strains, respectively, were considered resistant. PMID:24031355

  17. Genomic Analysis of Carbon Monoxide Utilization and Butanol Production by Clostridium carboxidivorans Strain P7T

    PubMed Central

    Bruant, Guillaume; Lévesque, Marie-Josée; Peter, Chardeen; Guiot, Serge R.; Masson, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Increasing demand for the production of renewable fuels has recently generated a particular interest in microbial production of butanol. Anaerobic bacteria, such as Clostridium spp., can naturally convert carbohydrates into a variety of primary products, including alcohols like butanol. The genetics of microorganisms like Clostridium acetobutylicum have been well studied and their solvent-producing metabolic pathways characterized. In contrast, less is known about the genetics of Clostridium spp. capable of converting syngas or its individual components into solvents. In this study, the type of strain of a new solventogenic Clostridium species, C. carboxidivorans, was genetically characterized by genome sequencing. C. carboxidivorans strain P7T possessed a complete Wood-Ljungdahl pathway gene cluster, involving CO and CO2 fixation and conversion to acetyl-CoA. Moreover, with the exception of an acetone production pathway, all the genetic determinants of canonical ABE metabolic pathways for acetate, butyrate, ethanol and butanol production were present in the P7T chromosome. The functionality of these pathways was also confirmed by growth of P7T on CO and production of CO2 as well as volatile fatty acids (acetate and butyrate) and solvents (ethanol and butanol). P7T was also found to harbour a 19 Kbp plasmid, which did not include essential or butanol production related genes. This study has generated in depth knowledge of the P7T genome, which will be helpful in developing metabolic engineering strategies to improve C. carboxidivorans's natural capacity to produce potential biofuels from syngas. PMID:20885952

  18. Rabbit Ileal Loop Response to Strains of Clostridium perfringens1

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Charles L.; Sugiyama, H.; Strong, Dorothy H.

    1968-01-01

    The ligated loop of the rabbit intestine was investigated as a possible experimental model for the study of Clostridium perfringens food poisoning. The method of preparation of the challenge inoculum was important in determining whether a given strain would provoke a response. When cultures were grown for 4 hr at 37 C in Skim Milk (Difco), 14 of 29 type A strains isolated from food-poisoning outbreaks consistently produced exudation of fluid and consequent dilation of the ileal segments. In contrast, 15 of the 18 strains derived from other sources failed to elicit a response. By use of different inoculum preparations, nearly all strains could be made to give at least an occasional positive loop reaction. Diarrhea was not obtained in rabbits by intraluminal injection into the normal ileum or by per os administration of the cultures. Lecithinase, purified and in concentrated culture supernatant fractions, failed to produce a response in the isolated ileal loops. Images PMID:4297020

  19. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes. PMID:26331212

  20. Biodegradation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) by a strain of Clostridium bifermentans

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.Y.; Crawford, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    A Clostridium capable of degrading 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) cometabolically was isolated from a mixed culture obtained from a bioreactor fed TNT. This bacterium, identified as a strain of Clostridium bifermentans, and designated strain CYS-1, was able to degrade TNT via 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT) and 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene (2,4-DANT) to aliphatic polar products which are now being identified and are assumed to be organic acids. CYS 1 cells are tolerant of TNT and capable of degrading it at starting concentrations of up to {ge}100 mg/L TNT. The number of cells inoculated and the availability of cosubstrate nutrients are significant factors influencing TNT degradation, as are TNT tolerance and survival of the cells at high TNT concentrations. In liquid media, at high TNT concentrations, TNT toxicity could be overcome by increasing the amount of inoculum and supplementing the culture with appropriate rich organic cosubstrates. Under these conditions, the reduction of 4-ADNT to 2,4-DANT occurred very fast, whereas the further degradation of 2,4-DANT proceeded more slowly.

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of 17 French Clostridium botulinum Group III Strains

    PubMed Central

    Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Mermoud, Isabelle; Desoutter, Denise; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Animal botulism is mainly associated with Clostridium botulinum group III strains producing neurotoxin types C, C/D, D, and D/C. In this report, we present the draft genome sequences of fourteen strains of Clostridium botulinum producing type C/D and two strains producing type D/C isolated in France, and one strain producing type D/C that originated from New Caledonia. PMID:26430029

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of 17 French Clostridium botulinum Group III Strains.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cédric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Mermoud, Isabelle; Desoutter, Denise; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Animal botulism is mainly associated with Clostridium botulinum group III strains producing neurotoxin types C, C/D, D, and D/C. In this report, we present the draft genome sequences of fourteen strains of Clostridium botulinum producing type C/D and two strains producing type D/C isolated in France, and one strain producing type D/C that originated from New Caledonia. PMID:26430029

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS STRAINS ASSOCIATED WITH FOOD AND FOOD-BORNE DISEASE.

    PubMed

    HALL, H E; ANGELOTTI, R; LEWIS, K H; FOTER, M J

    1963-05-01

    Hall, Herbert E. (Robert A. Taft Sanitary Engineering Center, Cincinnati, Ohio), Robert Angelotti, Keith H. Lewis, and Milton J. Foter. Characteristics of Clostridium perfringens strains associated with food and food-borne disease. J. Bacteriol. 85:1094-1103. 1963.-A total of 83 strains of Clostridium perfringens-30 from England, Europe, and Asia, associated with food-poisoning outbreaks; 28 from the United States, associated with outbreaks or contaminated foods; and 25 from natural or pathological sources-have been studied to determine their serological relationships, sporulation and heat-resistance of spores, and their hemolytic activity on mammalian bloods. A comparison of the results obtained with these three groups of strains reveals that the Eurasian group is characterized by serological typability, poor sporulation with the production of heat-resistant spores, and a hemolytic activity limited to the production of partial hemolysis on horse, ox, and sheep bloods, whereas the strains from natural and pathological sources in this country are not serologically typable, sporulate well but the spores are not heat-resistant, and are hemolytically active, producing both partial and complete hemolysis on horse, ox, and sheep bloods. The American food-poisoning strains have a wide variety of characteristics. Some strains resemble the Eurasian in their serological typability and the production of heat-resistant spores, but sporulation and hemolytic activity are more like the strains from classical sources. On the basis of these data, it appears unlikely that C. perfringens food-poisoning outbreaks in the United States are restricted to strains meeting the criteria of classification described by British workers and that the isolation of large numbers of any strain of this organism from an incriminated food must be considered as having a possible bearing on the etiology of the outbreak. PMID:14044000

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sporogenes Strain UC9000 Isolated from Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Angela; Zotta, Teresa; Orrù, Luigi; Lamontanara, Antonella; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a causative agent of food spoilage and is often used as the nontoxigenic surrogate for Clostridium botulinum. Here, we described the draft genome sequence and annotation of C. sporogenes strain UC9000 isolated from raw milk. PMID:27081128

  5. NAP1 Strain Type Predicts Outcomes from Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    See, Isaac; Mu, Yi; Cohen, Jessica; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Winston, Lisa G.; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Holzbauer, Stacy; Dunn, John; Farley, Monica M.; Lyons, Carol; Johnston, Helen; Phipps, Erin; Perlmutter, Rebecca; Anderson, Lydia; Gerding, Dale N.; Lessa, Fernanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies conflict regarding the importance of the fluoroquinolone-resistant North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1 (NAP1) strain in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) outcome. We describe strain types causing CDI and evaluate their association with patient outcomes. Methods CDI cases were identified from population-based surveillance. Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the associations of strain type with severe disease (ileus, toxic megacolon, or pseudomembranous colitis within 5 days; or white blood cell count ≥15,000/mm3 within one day of positive test), severe outcome (intensive care unit admission after positive test, colectomy for C. difficile infection, or death within 30 days of positive test), and death within 14 days of positive test. Results Strain typing results were available for 2,057 cases. Severe disease occurred in 363 (17.7%) cases, severe outcome in 100 (4.9%), and death within 14 days in 56 (2.7%). The most common strain types were NAP1 (28.4%), NAP4 (10.2%) and NAP11 (9.1%). In unadjusted analysis, NAP1 was associated with greater odds of severe disease than other strains. After controlling for patient risk factors, healthcare exposure, and antibiotic use, NAP1 was associated with severe disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36–2.22), severe outcome (aOR 1.66, 95% CI, 1.09–2.54), and death within 14 days (aOR 2.12, 95% CI, 1.22–3.68). Conclusion NAP1 was the most prevalent strain and a predictor of severe disease, severe outcome, and death. Strategies to reduce NAP1 prevalence, such as antibiotic stewardship to reduce fluoroquinolone use, might reduce CDI morbidity. PMID:24604900

  6. ClosTron-mediated engineering of Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Kuehne, Sarah A.; Minton, Nigel P.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the genus Clostridium are of both medical and industrial importance. The molecular tools necessary to study and exploit their wide ranging physiological diversity through directed mutational analysis have until recently been lacking. The situation was transformed in the mid-2000s with the specific adaptation of intron re-targeting technology to the genus, through the development of the ClosTron. By making a handful of nucleotide changes to the group II intron encoding region, the intron can be directed to insert into almost any region within the genome. Through the use of a retrotransposition-activated marker (RAM), based on the ermB gene, successful insertion is selected on the basis of acquisition of resistance to erythromycin. The re-targeted region is designed using an online re-targeting algorithm (www.clostron.com), and then an order is placed with DNA2.0 for both the synthesis of the re-targeted region and its custom cloning into the ClosTron vector. Re-targeted ClosTrons are delivered ready for use in 10–14 days, allowing mutants to be isolated 5–7 days after receipt. Its availability has revolutionized clostridial molecular biology. PMID:22750794

  7. Genomic characterization of Italian Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Francesco; Fillo, Silvia; Anselmo, Anna; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fortunato, Antonella; Gentile, Bernardina; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Ferdinando; Pittiglio, Valentina; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Lista, Florigio

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a gram-positive bacterium capable of producing the botulinum neurotoxin, a powerful poison that causes botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease. Its genome has been sequenced entirely and its gene content has been analyzed. To date, 19 full genomes and 64 draft genomes are available. The geographical origin of these genomes is predominantly from the US. In the present study, 10 Italian genomes of C. botulinum group I were analyzed and compared with previously sequenced group I genomes, in order to genetically characterize the Italian population of C. botulinum group I and to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among different lineages. Using the suites of software ClonalFrame and ClonalOrigin to perform genomic analysis, we demonstrated that Italian C. botulinum group I population is phylogenetically heterogeneous encompassing different and distant lineages including overseas strains, too. Moreover, a high recombination rate was demonstrated in the evolution of C. botulinum group I species. Finally, genome sequencing of the strain 357 led us to identify a novel botulinum neurotoxin subtype, F8. PMID:26341861

  8. Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for Isopropanol-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sung Jun; Im, Jung Ae; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung Hee; Seung, Do Young; Papoutsakis, E. Terry; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum naturally produces acetone as well as butanol and ethanol. Since acetone cannot be used as a biofuel, its production needs to be minimized or suppressed by cell or bioreactor engineering. Thus, there have been attempts to disrupt or inactivate the acetone formation pathway. Here we present another approach, namely, converting acetone to isopropanol by metabolic engineering. Since isopropanol can be used as a fuel additive, the mixture of isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) produced by engineered C. acetobutylicum can be directly used as a biofuel. IBE production is achieved by the expression of a primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-593 (i.e., adhB-593) in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. To increase the total alcohol titer, a synthetic acetone operon (act operon; adc-ctfA-ctfB) was constructed and expressed to increase the flux toward isopropanol formation. When this engineering strategy was applied to the PJC4BK strain lacking in the buk gene (encoding butyrate kinase), a significantly higher titer and yield of IBE could be achieved. The resulting PJC4BK(pIPA3-Cm2) strain produced 20.4 g/liter of total alcohol. Fermentation could be prolonged by in situ removal of solvents by gas stripping, and 35.6 g/liter of the IBE mixture could be produced in 45 h. PMID:22210214

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Thermophile Clostridium clariflavum Strain 4-2a.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Elise A; Rowe, Kenneth T; Guseva, Anna; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James K; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor M; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R; Izquierdo, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum strain 4-2a, a novel strain isolated from a thermophilic biocompost pile, has demonstrated an extensive capability to utilize both cellulose and hemicellulose under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. Here, we report the draft genome of this strain. PMID:26205857

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium ultunense Strain BS (DSMZ 10521), Recovered from a Mixed Culture.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongjun; Zhou, Haokui; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yuezhu; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Zhihua; Yan, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium ultunense BS is the first isolated strain (type strain) of C. ultunense that was identified as a mesophilic syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacterium (SAOB). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which will help us to elucidate the mechanism of syntrophic acetate oxidization. PMID:24504003

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium ultunense Strain BS (DSMZ 10521), Recovered from a Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongjun; Zhou, Haokui; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yuezhu; Wang, Shengyue

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium ultunense BS is the first isolated strain (type strain) of C. ultunense that was identified as a mesophilic syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacterium (SAOB). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which will help us to elucidate the mechanism of syntrophic acetate oxidization. PMID:24504003

  12. Strain Engineering in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Neto, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Graphene is a unique example of a one atom thick metallic membrane. Hence, graphene brings together properties of soft and hard condensed matter systems. The elementary electronic excitations in graphene, the Dirac quasiparticles, couple in a singular way to structural distortions in the form of scalar and vector potentials. Therefore, graphene has an effective electrodynamics where structural deformations couple to the Dirac particles at equal footing to electric and magnetic fields. This so-called strain engineering of the electronic properties of graphene opens doors for a new paradigm in terms of electronic devices, where electronic properties can be manipulated at will using its membrane-like properties. I thank partial support from from DOE Grant DE-FG02-08ER46512 and ONR Grant MURI N00014-09-1-1063.

  13. Analysis of the pathogenicity locus in Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S H; Tang, Y J; Silva, J

    2000-02-01

    The genes for Clostridium difficile toxins A and B (tcdA and tcdB) are part of a 19.6-kb pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) that includes the genes tcdD, tcdE, and tcdC. To determine whether the C. difficile PaLoc is a stable and conserved genetic unit in toxigenic strains, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze 50 toxigenic, 39 nontoxigenic, and 2 toxin-defective isolates. The respective amplicons were identified for tcdA-E in the toxigenic isolates; these were absent in the nontoxigenic isolates. C. difficile P-829 lacked at least a fragment of tcdD, tcdB, tcdE, and tcdC, but tcdA was present. C. difficile 8864 had deletions in the tcdA and tcdC genes. These data suggest that the PaLoc is highly stable in toxigenic C. difficile, nontoxigenic isolates lack the unit, and isolates with a defective PaLoc can still cause clinical disease. Further studies are needed to define the role of individual genes in the pathogenesis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. PMID:10669352

  14. Reannotation of the genome sequence of Clostridium difficile strain 630.

    PubMed

    Monot, Marc; Boursaux-Eude, Caroline; Thibonnier, Marie; Vallenet, David; Moszer, Ivan; Medigue, Claudine; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    A regular update of genome annotations is a prerequisite step to help maintain the accuracy and relevance of the information they contain. Five years after the first publication of the complete genome sequence of Clostridium difficile strain 630, we manually reannotated each of the coding sequences (CDSs), using a high-level annotation platform. The functions of more than 500 genes annotated previously with putative functions were reannotated based on updated sequence similarities to proteins whose functions have been recently identified by experimental data from the literature. We also modified 222 CDS starts, detected 127 new CDSs and added the enzyme commission numbers, which were not supplied in the original annotation. In addition, an intensive project was undertaken to standardize the names of genes and gene products and thus harmonize as much as possible with the HAMAP project. The reannotation is stored in a relational database that will be available on the MicroScope web-based platform (https://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/microscope/mage/viewer.php?S_id=752&wwwpkgdb=a78e3466ad5db29aa8fe49e8812de8a7). The original submission stored in the (International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration) INSDC nucleotide sequence databases was also updated. PMID:21349987

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain DL-VIII, a Novel Solventogenic Clostridium Species Isolated from Anaerobic Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Izquierdo, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain DL-VIII, a novel Gram-positive, endospore-forming, solventogenic bacterium isolated from activated anaerobic sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. Aside from a complete sol operon, the 6,477,357-bp genome of DL-VIII reveals genes for several unique enzymes with applications in lignocellulose degradation, including two phenolic acid decarboxylases. PMID:23929491

  16. Comparative analysis of the ability of Clostridium clariflavum strains and Clostridium thermocellumto utilize hemicellulose and unpretreated plant material

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, Javier A.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Guseva, Anna; Hahn, Michael G.; Lynd, Lee R.

    2014-11-18

    Among themophilic consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) candidate organisms, environmental isolates of Clostridium clariflavum have demonstrated the ability to grow on xylan, and the genome of C. clariflavum DSM 19732 has revealed a number of mechanisms that foster solubilization of hemicellulose that are distinctive relative to the model cellulolytic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. Growth experiments on xylan, xylooligosaccharides, and xylose reveal that C. clariflavum strains are able to completely break down xylan to xylose and that the environmental strain C. clariflavum sp. 4-2a is able to grow on monomeric xylose. C. clariflavum strains were able to utilize a larger proportion of unpretreated switchgrass, and solubilize a higher proportion of glucan, xylan, and arabinan, with strain 4-2a reaching the highest extent of solubilization of these components (64.7 to 69.4%) compared to C. thermocellum (29.5 to 42.5%). In addition, glycome immunoanalyses of residual plant biomass reveal differences in the extent of degradation of easily accessible xylans, with C. clariflavum strains having increased solubilization of this fraction of xylans relative to C. thermocellum. In conclusion, C. clariflavum strains exhibit higher activity than C. thermocellum in the breakdown of hemicellulose and are capable of degrading xylan to xylooligomers and xylose. This capability seems to also play a role in the higher levels of utilization of unpretreated plant material.

  17. Comparative analysis of the ability of Clostridium clariflavum strains and Clostridium thermocellumto utilize hemicellulose and unpretreated plant material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Izquierdo, Javier A.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Guseva, Anna; Hahn, Michael G.; Lynd, Lee R.

    2014-11-18

    Among themophilic consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) candidate organisms, environmental isolates of Clostridium clariflavum have demonstrated the ability to grow on xylan, and the genome of C. clariflavum DSM 19732 has revealed a number of mechanisms that foster solubilization of hemicellulose that are distinctive relative to the model cellulolytic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. Growth experiments on xylan, xylooligosaccharides, and xylose reveal that C. clariflavum strains are able to completely break down xylan to xylose and that the environmental strain C. clariflavum sp. 4-2a is able to grow on monomeric xylose. C. clariflavum strains were able to utilize a larger proportion of unpretreated switchgrass,more » and solubilize a higher proportion of glucan, xylan, and arabinan, with strain 4-2a reaching the highest extent of solubilization of these components (64.7 to 69.4%) compared to C. thermocellum (29.5 to 42.5%). In addition, glycome immunoanalyses of residual plant biomass reveal differences in the extent of degradation of easily accessible xylans, with C. clariflavum strains having increased solubilization of this fraction of xylans relative to C. thermocellum. In conclusion, C. clariflavum strains exhibit higher activity than C. thermocellum in the breakdown of hemicellulose and are capable of degrading xylan to xylooligomers and xylose. This capability seems to also play a role in the higher levels of utilization of unpretreated plant material.« less

  18. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH...

  19. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium paradoxum Strain JW-YL-7

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, W. Andrew; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Poole, Farris L.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 is a moderately thermophilic anaerobic alkaliphile isolated from the municipal sewage treatment plant in Athens, GA. We report the near-complete genome sequence of C. paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 obtained by using PacBio DNA sequencing and Pilon for sequence assembly refinement with Illumina data. PMID:27151784

  20. Near complete genome sequence of Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lancaster, Andrew; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Poole, Farris; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Elias, Dwayne A.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-05-05

    Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 is a moderately thermophilic anaerobic alkaliphile isolated from the municipal sewage treatment plant in Athens, GA. We report the near-complete genome sequence of C. paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 obtained by using PacBio DNA sequencing and Pilon for sequence assembly refinement with Illumina data.

  1. Multidisciplinary Analysis of a Nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile Strain with Stable Resistance to Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Ines; Monot, Marc; Tani, Chiara; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Norais, Nathalie; Dupuy, Bruno; Bouza, Emilio; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Stable resistance to metronidazole in a nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile strain was investigated at both the genomic and proteomic levels. Alterations in the metabolic pathway involving the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase were found, suggesting that reduction of metronidazole, required for its activity, may be less efficient in this strain. Proteomic studies also showed a cellular response to oxidative stress. PMID:24913157

  2. Multidisciplinary analysis of a nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile strain with stable resistance to metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Moura, Ines; Monot, Marc; Tani, Chiara; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Norais, Nathalie; Dupuy, Bruno; Bouza, Emilio; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2014-08-01

    Stable resistance to metronidazole in a nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile strain was investigated at both the genomic and proteomic levels. Alterations in the metabolic pathway involving the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase were found, suggesting that reduction of metronidazole, required for its activity, may be less efficient in this strain. Proteomic studies also showed a cellular response to oxidative stress. PMID:24913157

  3. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain RPT-4213

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found to produce butyrate under anaerobic conditions. Fermentations using Lactobacilli MRS Broth produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from glucose (0.48 g/g glucose). However, the strain was not capable of utilizing five carbon sugars. To assess the a...

  4. Diverse Temperate Bacteriophage Carriage in Clostridium difficile 027 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nale, Janet Y.; Shan, Jinyu; Hickenbotham, Peter T.; Fawley, Warren N.; Wilcox, Mark H.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 can be classified into subtypes, but it unknown if these differ in terms of severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). Genomic studies of C. difficile 027 strains have established that they are rich in mobile genetic elements including prophages. This study combined physiological studies, electron microscopy analysis and molecular biology to determine the potential role of temperate bacteriophages in disease and diversity of C. difficile 027. Methodology/Principal Findings We induced prophages from 91 clinical C. difficile 027 isolates and used transmission electron microscopy and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to characterise the bacteriophages present. We established a correlation between phage morphology and subtype. Morphologically distinct tailed bacteriophages belonging to Myoviridae and Siphoviridae were identified in 63 and three isolates, respectively. Dual phage carriage was observed in four isolates. In addition, there were inducible phage tail-like particles (PT-LPs) in all isolates. The capacity of two antibiotics mitomycin C and norfloxacin to induce prophages was compared and it was shown that they induced specific prophages from C. difficile isolates. A PCR assay targeting the capsid gene of the myoviruses was designed to examine molecular diversity of C. difficile myoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the capsid gene sequences from eight ribotypes showed that all sequences found in the ribotype 027 isolates were identical and distinct from other C. difficile ribotypes and other bacteria species. Conclusion/Significance A diverse set of temperate bacteriophages are associated with C. difficile 027. The observed correlation between phage carriage and the subtypes suggests that temperate bacteriophages contribute to the diversity of C. difficile 027 and may play a role in severity of disease associated with this ribotype. The capsid gene can be used as a tool to identify C. difficile

  5. Implications of Genome-Based Discrimination between Clostridium botulinum Group I and Clostridium sporogenes Strains for Bacterial Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Michael R.; Pena-Gonzalez, Angela; Shirey, Timothy B.; Broeker, Robin G.; Ishaq, Maliha K.; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic classification of Clostridium botulinum is based on the production of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), while closely related, nontoxic organisms are classified as Clostridium sporogenes. However, this taxonomic organization does not accurately mirror phylogenetic relationships between these species. A phylogenetic reconstruction using 2,016 orthologous genes shared among strains of C. botulinum group I and C. sporogenes clearly separated these two species into discrete clades which showed ∼93% average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Clustering of strains based on the presence of variable orthologs revealed 143 C. sporogenes clade-specific genetic signatures, a subset of which were further evaluated for their ability to correctly classify a panel of presumptive C. sporogenes strains by PCR. Genome sequencing of several C. sporogenes strains lacking these signatures confirmed that they clustered with C. botulinum strains in a core genome phylogenetic tree. Our analysis also identified C. botulinum strains that contained C. sporogenes clade-specific signatures and phylogenetically clustered with C. sporogenes strains. The genome sequences of two bont/B2-containing strains belonging to the C. sporogenes clade contained regions with similarity to a bont-bearing plasmid (pCLD), while two different strains belonging to the C. botulinum clade carried bont/B2 on the chromosome. These results indicate that bont/B2 was likely acquired by C. sporogenes strains through horizontal gene transfer. The genome-based classification of these species used to identify candidate genes for the development of rapid assays for molecular identification may be applicable to additional bacterial species that are challenging with respect to their classification. PMID:26048939

  6. Clostridium difficile strains from community-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Limbago, Brandi M; Long, Cherie M; Thompson, Angela D; Killgore, George E; Hannett, George E; Havill, Nancy L; Mickelson, Stephanie; Lathrop, Sarah; Jones, Timothy F; Park, Mahin M; Harriman, Kathleen H; Gould, L Hannah; McDonald, L Clifford; Angulo, Frederick J

    2009-09-01

    Clostridium difficile isolates from presumed community-associated infections (n = 92) were characterized by toxinotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, tcdC and cdtB PCR, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Nine toxinotypes (TOX) and 31 PFGE patterns were identified. TOX 0 (48, 52%), TOX III (18, 20%), and TOX V (9, 10%) were the most common; three isolates were nontoxigenic. PMID:19571021

  7. Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Stringer, Sandra; Fagan, Robert P; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a non-pathogenic close relative and surrogate for Group I (proteolytic) neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strains. The exosporium, the sac-like outermost layer of spores of these species, is likely to contribute to adhesion, dissemination, and virulence. A paracrystalline array, hairy nap, and several appendages were detected in the exosporium of C. sporogenes strain NCIMB 701792 by EM and AFM. The protein composition of purified exosporium was explored by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides from major individual SDS-PAGE-separated protein bands, and from bulk exosporium. Two high molecular weight protein bands both contained the same protein with a collagen-like repeat domain, the probable constituent of the hairy nap, as well as cysteine-rich proteins CsxA and CsxB. A third cysteine-rich protein (CsxC) was also identified. These three proteins are also encoded in C. botulinum Prevot 594, and homologues (75-100% amino acid identity) are encoded in many other Group I strains. This work provides the first insight into the likely composition and organization of the exosporium of Group I C. botulinum spores. PMID:27375261

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain. PMID:26941139

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium ultunense Strain Esp, a Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidizing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Shahid; Müller, Bettina; Niazi, Adnan; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Schnürer, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium ultunense strain Esp belongs to the functional group of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB), which have been identified as key organisms for efficient biogas production from protein-rich materials. Genome analysis and comparative genomics might aid us to define physiological features that are essential for maintaining this particular syntrophic lifestyle. PMID:23538905

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium ultunense Strain Esp, a Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Shahid; Niazi, Adnan; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Schnürer, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium ultunense strain Esp belongs to the functional group of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB), which have been identified as key organisms for efficient biogas production from protein-rich materials. Genome analysis and comparative genomics might aid us to define physiological features that are essential for maintaining this particular syntrophic lifestyle. PMID:23538905

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of the Solvent Producer Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum Strain DSM 14923

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Krabben, Preben; Dürre, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum strain DSM 14923 is known as a butanol-producing bacterium. Various organic compounds such as glucose, fructose, sucrose, mannose, and cellobiose are fermented. The genome consists of one chromosome and one circular megaplasmid. C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum was used in industrial fermentation processes to produce the solvents acetone, butanol, and ethanol. PMID:25323722

  12. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis. PMID:24509933

  13. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  14. Simultaneous Fermentation of Glucose and Xylose to Butanol by Clostridium sp. Strain BOH3

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Fengxue; Wu, Yi-Rui

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose and hemicellulose constitute the major components in sustainable feedstocks which could be used as substrates for biofuel generation. However, following hydrolysis to monomer sugars, the solventogenic Clostridium will preferentially consume glucose due to transcriptional repression of xylose utilization genes. This is one of the major barriers in optimizing lignocellulosic hydrolysates that produce butanol. Unlike studies on existing bacteria, this study demonstrates that newly reported Clostridium sp. strain BOH3 is capable of fermenting 60 g/liter of xylose to 14.9 g/liter butanol, which is similar to the 14.5 g/liter butanol produced from 60 g/liter of glucose. More importantly, strain BOH3 consumes glucose and xylose simultaneously, which is shown by its capability for generating 11.7 g/liter butanol from a horticultural waste cellulosic hydrolysate containing 39.8 g/liter glucose and 20.5 g/liter xylose, as well as producing 11.9 g/liter butanol from another horticultural waste hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing 58.3 g/liter xylose and 5.9 g/liter glucose. The high-xylose-utilization capability of strain BOH3 is attributed to its high xylose-isomerase (0.97 U/mg protein) and xylulokinase (1.16 U/mg protein) activities compared to the low-xylose-utilizing solventogenic strains, such as Clostridium sp. strain G117. Interestingly, strain BOH3 was also found to produce riboflavin at 110.5 mg/liter from xylose and 76.8 mg/liter from glucose during the fermentation process. In summary, Clostridium sp. strain BOH3 is an attractive candidate for application in efficiently converting lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels and other value-added products, such as riboflavin. PMID:24858088

  15. Enhanced butanol fermentation using metabolically engineered Clostridium acetobutylicum with ex situ recovery of butanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jung Yeon; Cheong, Nam Yong; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-10-01

    In this study, metabolic target reactions for strain engineering were searched via intracellular coenzyme A (CoA) metabolite analysis. The metabolic reactions catalyzed by thiolase (AtoB) and aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE1) were considered potential rate-limiting steps. In addition, CoA transferase (CtfAB) was highlighted as being important for the assimilation of organic acids, in order to achieve high butanol production. Based on this quantitative analysis, the BEKW_E1AB-atoB strain was constructed by overexpressing the thl (atoB), adhE1, and ctfAB genes in Clostridium acetobutylicum strain BEKW, which has the phosphotransacetylase (pta) and butyrate kinase (buk) genes knocked out. After 100h of continuous fermentation coupled with adsorptive ex situ butanol recovery, the concentrations found after considering desorption, yield, and productivity for the BEKW_E1AB-atoB strain were 55.7g/L, 0.38g/g, and 2.64g/L/h, respectively. The level of butanol production achieved (2.64g/L/h) represents the highest reported value obtained after adsorptive, long-term fermentation. PMID:27441828

  16. Diversity of Group I and II Clostridium botulinum Strains from France Including Recently Identified Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Bouvet, Philippe; Popoff, Michel R.

    2016-01-01

    In France, human botulism is mainly food-borne intoxication, whereas infant botulism is rare. A total of 99 group I and II Clostridium botulinum strains including 59 type A (12 historical isolates [1947–1961], 43 from France [1986–2013], 3 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), 31 type B (3 historical, 23 recent isolates, 4 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), and 9 type E (5 historical, 3 isolates, and 1 collection strain) were investigated by botulinum locus gene sequencing and multilocus sequence typing analysis. Historical C. botulinum A strains mainly belonged to subtype A1 and sequence type (ST) 1, whereas recent strains exhibited a wide genetic diversity: subtype A1 in orfX or ha locus, A1(B), A1(F), A2, A2b2, A5(B2′) A5(B3′), as well as the recently identified A7 and A8 subtypes, and were distributed into 25 STs. Clostridium botulinum A1(B) was the most frequent subtype from food-borne botulism and food. Group I C. botulinum type B in France were mainly subtype B2 (14 out of 20 historical and recent strains) and were divided into 19 STs. Food-borne botulism resulting from ham consumption during the recent period was due to group II C. botulinum B4. Type E botulism is rare in France, 5 historical and 1 recent strains were subtype E3. A subtype E12 was recently identified from an unusual ham contamination. Clostridium botulinum strains from human botulism in France showed a wide genetic diversity and seems to result not from a single evolutionary lineage but from multiple and independent genetic rearrangements. PMID:27189984

  17. Diversity of Group I and II Clostridium botulinum Strains from France Including Recently Identified Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Bouvet, Philippe; Popoff, Michel R

    2016-01-01

    In France, human botulism is mainly food-borne intoxication, whereas infant botulism is rare. A total of 99 group I and II Clostridium botulinum strains including 59 type A (12 historical isolates [1947-1961], 43 from France [1986-2013], 3 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), 31 type B (3 historical, 23 recent isolates, 4 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), and 9 type E (5 historical, 3 isolates, and 1 collection strain) were investigated by botulinum locus gene sequencing and multilocus sequence typing analysis. Historical C. botulinum A strains mainly belonged to subtype A1 and sequence type (ST) 1, whereas recent strains exhibited a wide genetic diversity: subtype A1 in orfX or ha locus, A1(B), A1(F), A2, A2b2, A5(B2') A5(B3'), as well as the recently identified A7 and A8 subtypes, and were distributed into 25 STs. Clostridium botulinum A1(B) was the most frequent subtype from food-borne botulism and food. Group I C. botulinum type B in France were mainly subtype B2 (14 out of 20 historical and recent strains) and were divided into 19 STs. Food-borne botulism resulting from ham consumption during the recent period was due to group II C. botulinum B4. Type E botulism is rare in France, 5 historical and 1 recent strains were subtype E3. A subtype E12 was recently identified from an unusual ham contamination. Clostridium botulinum strains from human botulism in France showed a wide genetic diversity and seems to result not from a single evolutionary lineage but from multiple and independent genetic rearrangements. PMID:27189984

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium septicum Strain CSUR P1044, Isolated from the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Benamar, Samia; Cassir, Nadim; Caputo, Aurélia; Cadoret, Frédéric; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is one of the first pathogenic anaerobes to be identified. Here, we announce the genome draft sequence of C. septicum strain CSUR P1044 isolated from the gut of a healthy adult. Its chromosome genome consists of 3.2 Mbp with a plasmid of 32 Kbp. C. septicum strain CSUR P1044 has a G+C content of 27.5%, and is composed of 3,125 protein-coding genes together with 103 RNA genes, including 22 rRNA genes. PMID:27609912

  19. Clostridium perfringens: Comparative effects of heat and osmotic stress on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic strains.

    PubMed

    Abbona, Cinthia Carolina; Stagnitta, Patricia Virginia

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens isolates associated with food poisoning carries a chromosomal cpe gene, while non-foodborne human gastrointestinal disease isolates carry a plasmid cpe gene. The enterotoxigenic strains tested produced vegetative cells and spores with significantly higher resistance than non-enterotoxigenic strains. These results suggest that the vegetative cells and spores have a competitive advantage over non-enterotoxigenic strains. However, no explanation has been provided for the significant associations between chromosomal cpe genotypes with the high resistance, which could explain the strong relationship between chromosomal cpe isolates and C. perfringens type A food poisoning. Here, we analyse the action of physical and chemical agent on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic regional strains. And this study tested the relationship between the sensitivities of spores and their levels SASPs (small acid soluble proteins) production in the same strains examined. PMID:27012900

  20. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  1. Specific detection of toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile in stool specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Gumerlock, P H; Tang, Y J; Weiss, J B; Silva, J

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the infectious agent responsible for antibiotic-associated colitis. We report the use of the polymerase chain reaction technique to identify toxigenic strains of C. difficile in human stool specimens. A set of primers based on the nucleotide sequence of the toxin B gene, which amplified a 399-bp fragment from isolates producing toxin B, was designed. We examined 28 known toxigenic strains, which were all positive by this assay. DNAs from the nontoxigenic strains examined and from strains of Clostridium sordellii and C. bifermentans were not amplified with these primers. The sensitivity of this assay allowed us to identify as little as 10% toxigenic C. difficile cells in the presence of 90% nontoxigenic cells and to detect the toxin B gene in 1 pg of DNA from a toxigenic strain. DNAs extracted from 18 clinical stool specimens that were positive for toxin B by the tissue culture cytotoxicity assay were also positive by this assay. In addition, we detected toxin B sequences in DNA from 2 of 18 stool specimens that were negative for toxin B by the cytotoxicity assay. These two stool specimens were from patients who had a clinical pattern of colitis that was compatible with C. difficile causation. This rapid, sensitive assay will be useful for specific identification of toxigenic C. difficile and for revealing cases that are undetected by analysis of fecal samples for toxin B alone. Images PMID:8458943

  2. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin B Mediated by Engineered Lactobacilli That Produce Single-Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kasper Krogh; Strokappe, Nika M.; Hultberg, Anna; Truusalu, Kai; Smidt, Imbi; Mikelsaar, Raik-Hiio; Mikelsaar, Marika; Verrips, Theo; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the Western world. The major virulence factors of C. difficile are two exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which cause extensive colonic inflammation and epithelial damage manifested by episodes of diarrhea. In this study, we explored the basis for an oral antitoxin strategy based on engineered Lactobacillus strains expressing TcdB-neutralizing antibody fragments in the gastrointestinal tract. Variable domain of heavy chain-only (VHH) antibodies were raised in llamas by immunization with the complete TcdB toxin. Four unique VHH fragments neutralizing TcdB in vitro were isolated. When these VHH fragments were expressed in either secreted or cell wall-anchored form in Lactobacillus paracasei BL23, they were able to neutralize the cytotoxic effect of the toxin in an in vitro cell-based assay. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of two strains of engineered L. paracasei BL23 expressing two neutralizing anti-TcdB VHH fragments (VHH-B2 and VHH-G3) delayed killing in a hamster protection model where the animals were challenged with spores of a TcdA− TcdB+ strain of C. difficile (P < 0.05). Half of the hamsters in the treated group survived until the termination of the experiment at day 5 and showed either no damage or limited inflammation of the colonic mucosa despite having been colonized with C. difficile for up to 4 days. The protective effect in the hamster model suggests that the strategy could be explored as a supplement to existing therapies for patients. PMID:26573738

  3. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin B Mediated by Engineered Lactobacilli That Produce Single-Domain Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kasper Krogh; Strokappe, Nika M; Hultberg, Anna; Truusalu, Kai; Smidt, Imbi; Mikelsaar, Raik-Hiio; Mikelsaar, Marika; Verrips, Theo; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the Western world. The major virulence factors of C. difficile are two exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which cause extensive colonic inflammation and epithelial damage manifested by episodes of diarrhea. In this study, we explored the basis for an oral antitoxin strategy based on engineered Lactobacillus strains expressing TcdB-neutralizing antibody fragments in the gastrointestinal tract. Variable domain of heavy chain-only (VHH) antibodies were raised in llamas by immunization with the complete TcdB toxin. Four unique VHH fragments neutralizing TcdB in vitro were isolated. When these VHH fragments were expressed in either secreted or cell wall-anchored form in Lactobacillus paracasei BL23, they were able to neutralize the cytotoxic effect of the toxin in an in vitro cell-based assay. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of two strains of engineered L. paracasei BL23 expressing two neutralizing anti-TcdB VHH fragments (VHH-B2 and VHH-G3) delayed killing in a hamster protection model where the animals were challenged with spores of a TcdA(-) TcdB(+) strain of C. difficile (P < 0.05). Half of the hamsters in the treated group survived until the termination of the experiment at day 5 and showed either no damage or limited inflammation of the colonic mucosa despite having been colonized with C. difficile for up to 4 days. The protective effect in the hamster model suggests that the strategy could be explored as a supplement to existing therapies for patients. PMID:26573738

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Multiply Antibiotic-Resistant Clostridium perfringens Strains from Porcine Feces

    PubMed Central

    Rood, Julian I.; Maher, Eileen A.; Somers, Eileen B.; Campos, Elena; Duncan, Charles L.

    1978-01-01

    Multiply antibiotic-resistant strains of Clostridium perfringens were isolated from porcine feces. Strains that were resistant to tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, and lincomycin were isolated, but no penicillin- or chloramphenicol-resistant strains were obtained. Typical minimal inhibitory concentrations for resistant strains were 16 to 64 μg of tetracycline per ml, 64 to >128 μg of erythromycin per ml, ≥128 μg of lincomycin per ml, and 16 to 128 μg of clindamycin per ml. Resistance to erythromycin was always associated with resistance to lincomycin and clindamycin. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined for 258 strains from six farms that used antibiotics in their feeds and 240 strains from five farms that did not use antibiotics. The results show that 77.9 and 22.7% of the strains from the former farms were resistant to tetracycline and erythromycin-clindamycin-lincomycin, respectively. The comparable data from the latter farms were 25.0 and 0.8%, respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis failed to reveal a plasmid band that was common to the resistant strains but absent in the susceptible strains. Attempts to transfer tetracycline, erythromycin, and clindamycin resistance from one strain, CW459, were not successful. Antibiotic-susceptible mutants were not isolated from this strain, despite the use of a variety of curing agents. Images PMID:208463

  5. Synergistic Inactivation of Spores of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Strains by High Pressure and Heat Is Strain and Product Dependent▿

    PubMed Central

    Bull, M. K.; Olivier, S. A.; van Diepenbeek, R. J.; Kormelink, F.; Chapman, B.

    2009-01-01

    The combined high pressure and heat resistances of spores of five proteolytic Clostridium botulinum strains and of the nonpathogenic surrogate strain Clostridium sporogenes PA3679 were compared with their heat-only resistances on the basis of equivalent accumulated thermal lethality, expressed as equivalent minutes at a reference temperature of 105°C (F105°C). Comparisons were made with three model (i.e., diluted) products, namely, 30% (wt/wt) Bolognese sauce, 50% (wt/wt) cream sauce, and rice water agar. Pressure was determined to act synergistically with heat during high-pressure thermal (HPT) processing for C. botulinum FRRB 2802 (NCTC 7273) and C. botulinum FRRB 2804 (NCTC 3805 and 62A) in the Bolognese and cream sauces and for C. botulinum FRRB 2807 (213B) in the Bolognese sauce only. No synergy was observed for C. botulinum FRRB 2803 (NCTC 2916) or FRRB 2806 (62A) or C. sporogenes FRRB 2790 (NCTC 8594 and PA3679) in any of the model products. No significant protective effect of pressure against spore inactivation was determined for any Clostridium strain in any product. Because synergy was not consistently observed among strains of C. botulinum or among products, the prediction of inactivation of C. botulinum spores by HPT sterilization (HPTS) for the present must assume a complete lack of synergy. Therefore, any HPTS process for low-acid shelf-stable foods must be at least thermally equivalent to an F0 process of 2.8 min, in line with current good manufacturing practices. The results of this study suggest that the use of C. sporogenes PA3679 as a surrogate organism may risk overestimating inactivation of C. botulinum by HPT processing. PMID:19011055

  6. Clinical Utility of Laboratory Detection of Clostridium difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile strain BI/NAP1/027 is associated with increased C. difficile infection (CDI) rates and severity, and the efficacy of some CDI therapies may be strain dependent. Although cultured C. difficile isolates can be reliably subtyped by various methods, the long turnaround times, high cost, and limited availability of strain typing preclude their routine use. Nucleic acid amplification tests identify BI/NAP1/027 rapidly from stool, but the emergence of closely related strains compromises test specificity. Although detection of epidemiologically significant pathogens is generally useful for infection control programs, specific data supporting use of rapid detection of BI/NAP1/027 as an infection control tool are still awaited. PMID:26511742

  7. Clinical Utility of Laboratory Detection of Clostridium difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Larry K; Gerding, Dale N

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile strain BI/NAP1/027 is associated with increased C. difficile infection (CDI) rates and severity, and the efficacy of some CDI therapies may be strain dependent. Although cultured C. difficile isolates can be reliably subtyped by various methods, the long turnaround times, high cost, and limited availability of strain typing preclude their routine use. Nucleic acid amplification tests identify BI/NAP1/027 rapidly from stool, but the emergence of closely related strains compromises test specificity. Although detection of epidemiologically significant pathogens is generally useful for infection control programs, specific data supporting use of rapid detection of BI/NAP1/027 as an infection control tool are still awaited. PMID:26511742

  8. Epidemic Clostridium difficile Strains Demonstrate Increased Competitive Fitness Compared to Nonepidemic Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Catherine D.; Auchtung, Jennifer M.; Collins, James

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the most common cause of severe cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and is a significant health burden. Recent increases in the rate of C. difficile infection have paralleled the emergence of a specific phylogenetic clade of C. difficile strains (ribotype 027; North American pulsed-field electrophoresis 1 [NAP1]; restriction endonuclease analysis [REA] group BI). Initial reports indicated that ribotype 027 strains were associated with increased morbidity and mortality and might be hypervirulent. Although subsequent work has raised some doubt as to whether ribotype 027 strains are hypervirulent, the strains are considered epidemic isolates that have caused severe outbreaks across the globe. We hypothesized that one factor that could lead to the increased prevalence of ribotype 027 strains would be if these strains had increased competitive fitness compared to strains of other ribotypes. We developed a moderate-throughput in vitro model of C. difficile infection and used it to test competition between four ribotype 027 clinical isolates and clinical isolates of four other ribotypes (001, 002, 014, and 053). We found that ribotype 027 strains outcompeted the strains of other ribotypes. A similar competitive advantage was observed when two ribotype pairs were competed in a mouse model of C. difficile infection. Based upon these results, we conclude that one possible mechanism through which ribotype 027 strains have caused outbreaks worldwide is their increased ability to compete in the presence of a complex microbiota. PMID:24733099

  9. Distribution of Neuraminidase among Food-poisoning Strains of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Moss, C. Wayne; Schekter, Marcia A.; Cherry, William B.

    1967-01-01

    A survey was made to determine the distribution of the enzyme neuraminidase among 76 strains of Clostridium perfringens. Representative strains from each toxigenic type (A to F) and atypical C. perfringens type A food-poisoning strains of both American and English (Hobbs types) origin were tested. Both the American food-poisoning and nonfood-poisoning associated cultures consisted of both neuraminidase-positive and -negative strains. Furthermore, American strains which could not be differentiated from the original Hobbs cultures consisted of both neuraminidase-positive and -negative representatives. In contrast, the English (Hobbs) strains uniformly failed to produce an active intracellular or extracellular neuraminidase. No enzyme activity was detected in these strains when cultures were grown in different growth media, when grown in the presence of substrate (neuraminlactose), or upon extended incubation of enzyme preparations with substrate. With the exception of a type F strain, representative strains of the other toxigenic types (A to F) produced neuraminidase; 85% of the typical type A strains contained the enzyme. PMID:4292823

  10. Characterization of Clostridium thermocellum strains with disrupted fermentation end-product pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Veen, Douwe; Lo, Jonathan; Brown, Steven D; Johnson, Courtney M; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Martin, Madhavi Z; Engle, Nancy L; Van den Berg, Robert A; Argyros, Aaron; Caiazza, Nicky; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, cellulolytic anaerobe that is a candidate microorganism for industrial biofuels production. Strains with mutations in genes associated with production of L-lactate (Dldh) and/or acetate (Dpta) were characterized to gain insight into the intracellular processes that convert cellobiose to ethanol and other fermentation end-products. Cellobiose-grown cultures of the Dldh strain had identical biomass accumulation, fermentation end-products, transcription profile, and intracellular metabolite concentrations compared to its parent strain (DSM1313 Dhpt Dspo0A). The Dpta-deficient strain grew slower and had 30 % lower final biomass concentration compared to the parent strain, yet produced 75% more ethanol. A Dldh Dpta double-mutant strain evolved for faster growth had a growth rate and ethanol yield comparable to the parent strain, whereas its biomass accumulation was comparable to Dpta. Free amino acids were secreted by all examined strains, with both Dpta strains secreting higher amounts of alanine, valine, isoleucine, proline, glutamine, and threonine. Valine concentration for Dldh Dpta reached 5 mM by the end of growth, or 2.7 % of the substrate carbon utilized. These secreted amino acid concentrations correlate with increased intracellular pyruvate concentrations, up to sixfold in the Dpta and 16-fold in the Dldh Dpta strain. We hypothesize that the deletions in fermentation end-product pathways result in an intracellular redox imbalance, which the organism attempts to relieve, in part by recycling NADP* through increased production of amino acids.

  11. Characterization of Clostridium thermocellum strains with disrupted fermentation end product pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Veen, Douwe; Lo, Jonathan; Brown, Steven D; Johnson, Courtney M; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Martin, Madhavi Z; Engle, Nancy L; Argyros, Aaron; Van den Berg, Robert A; Caiazza, Nicky; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, cellulolytic anaerobe that is a candidate microorganism for industrial biofuels production. Strains with mutations in genes associated with production of Llactate ( ldh) and/or acetate ( pta) were characterized to gain insight into the intracellular processes that convert cellobiose to ethanol and other fermentation end products. Cellobiose-grown cultures of the ldh strain had identical biomass accumulation, fermentation end products, transcription profile and intracellular metabolite concentrations compared to its parent strain (DSM1313 hpt spo0A). The pta-deficient strain grew slower and had 30% lower final biomass concentration compared to the parent strain, yet produced 75% more ethanol. A ldh pta double mutant strain evolved for faster growth had growth rate and ethanol yield comparable to the parent strain, whereas its biomass accumulation was comparable to pta. Free amino acids were secreted by all examined strains, with both pta strains secreting higher amounts of alanine, valine, isoleucine, proline, glutamine, and threonine. Valine concentration for ldh pta reached 5 mM by the end of growth, or 2.7% of the substrate carbon utilized. These secreted amino acid concentrations correlate with increased intracellular pyruvate concentrations, up to 6-fold in the pta and 16-fold in the ldh pta strain. We hypothesize that the deletions in fermentation end product pathways result in an intracellular redox imbalance, which the organism attempts to relieve, in part by recycling NADP+ through increased production of amino acids.

  12. A recombinant Bacillus anthracis strain producing the Clostridium perfringens Ib component induces protection against iota toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Sirard, J C; Weber, M; Duflot, E; Popoff, M R; Mock, M

    1997-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis toxinogenic Sterne strain is currently used as a live veterinary vaccine against anthrax. The capacity of a toxin-deficient derivative strain to produce a heterologous antigen by using the strong inducible promoter of the B. anthracis pag gene was investigated. The expression of the foreign gene ibp, encoding the Ib component of iota toxin from Clostridium perfringens, was analyzed. A pag-ibp fusion was introduced by allelic exchange into a toxin-deficient Sterne strain, thereby replacing the wild-type pag gene. This recombinant strain, called BAIB, was stable and secreted large quantities of Ib protein in induced culture conditions. Mice given injections of live BAIB spores developed an antibody response specific to the Ib protein. The pag-ibp fusion was therefore functional both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the immunized animals were protected against a challenge with C. perfringens iota toxin or with the homologous Clostridium spiroforme toxin. The protective immunity was mediated by neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, B. anthracis is promising for the development of live veterinary vaccines. PMID:9169728

  13. The molecular-genetic analysis of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broilers on farms in Central Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the research was to perform phenotypic and molecular-genetic typing of Clostridium perfringens strains commonly spread on poultry farms in Central Russia. Samples of homogenized iliac and cecal contents from 760 broilers were assayed and 325 C. perfringens strains (42.8 %) were isol...

  14. Clostridium difficile infection: Early history, diagnosis and molecular strain typing methods.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Van Broeck, J; Taminiau, B; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2016-08-01

    Recognised as the leading cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains high despite efforts to improve prevention and reduce the spread of the bacterium in healthcare settings. In the last decade, many studies have focused on the epidemiology and rapid diagnosis of CDI. In addition, different typing methods have been developed for epidemiological studies. This review explores the history of C. difficile and the current scope of the infection. The variety of available laboratory tests for CDI diagnosis and strain typing methods are also examined. PMID:27238460

  15. Susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains from broiler chickens to antibiotics and anticoccidials.

    PubMed

    Martel, A; Devriese, L A; Cauwerts, K; De Gussem, K; Decostere, A; Haesebrouck, F

    2004-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains isolated in 2002 from the intestines of broiler chickens from 31 different farms located in Belgium were tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis. All strains were uniformly sensitive to the ionophore antibiotics monensin, lasalocid, salinomycin, maduramycin and narasin. All were sensitive to avilamycin, tylosin and amoxicillin, while flavomycin (bambermycin) showed low or no activity. Chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline were active at very low concentrations, but low-level acquired resistance was detected in 66% of the strains investigated. Fifty percent of these strains carried the tetP(B) resistance gene, while the tet(Q) gene was detected in only one strain. One strain with high-level resistance against tetracyclines carried the tet(M) gene. Sixty-three percent of the strains showed low-level resistance to lincomycin. The lnu(A) and lnu(B) genes were each only found in one strain. Compared with a similar investigation carried out in 1980, an increase was seen in resistance percentages with lincomycin (63% against 49%) and a slight decrease with tetracycline (66% against 74%). PMID:14681061

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium butyricum Strain NOR 33234, Isolated from an Elderly Patient with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Jamie S. L.; Ip, Margaret; Chan, Ting-Fung; Lam, Wai-Yip

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum is one of the species frequently present in patients’ stool samples. However, the identification of this species is sometimes difficult. Here, we present the draft genome of Clostridium butyricum NOR 33234, which was isolated from a patient with suspected Clostridium difficile infection-associated diarrhea and resembles Clostridium clostridioforme in biochemical tests. PMID:25540356

  17. Systemic colonization of clover (Trifolium repens) by Clostridium botulinum strain 2301

    PubMed Central

    Zeiller, Matthias; Rothballer, Michael; Iwobi, Azuka N.; Böhnel, Helge; Gessler, Frank; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cases of botulism in cattle and other farm animals and also in farmers increased dramatically. It was proposed, that these cases could be affiliated with the spreading of compost or other organic manures contaminated with Clostridium botulinum spores on farm land. Thus, soils and fodder plants and finally farm animals could be contaminated. Therefore, the colonization behavior and interaction of the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT D) producing C. botulinum strain 2301 and the non-toxin producing Clostridium sporogenes strain 1739 were investigated on clover (Trifolium repens) in a field experiment as well as in phytochamber experiments applying axenic and additionally soil based systems under controlled conditions. Plants were harvested and divided into root and shoot parts for further DNA isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays; subsamples were fixed for fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, we observed significant differences in the growth behavior of clover plants when inoculated with clostridial spores, indicating a plant growth promoting effect. Inoculated plants showed an increased growth index (shoot size, wet and dry weight) and an enlarged root system induced by the systemic colonization of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301. To target C. botulinum and C. sporogenes, 16S rDNA directed primers were used and to specifically detect C. botulinum, BoNT D toxin genes targeted primers, using a multiplex PCR approach, were applied. Our results demonstrate an effective colonization of roots and shoots of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301 and C. sporogenes strain 1739. Detailed analysis of colonization behavior showed that C. botulinum can occur as individual cells, in cell clusters and in microcolonies within the rhizosphere, lateral roots and within the roots tissue of clover. PMID:26583010

  18. Recovery of a strain of Clostridium botulinum producing both neurotoxin A and neurotoxin B from canned macrobiotic food.

    PubMed

    Franciosa, G; Fenicia, L; Pourshaban, M; Aureli, P

    1997-03-01

    A rare strain of Clostridium botulinum subtype Ab was isolated from a canned macrobiotic food suspected of being linked to a fatal case of food-borne botulism. The strain was recovered and identified by conventional methods modified by the inclusion of a PCR assay (G. Franciosa, J.L. Ferreira, and C.L. Hatheway, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:1911-1917, 1994). The titers of neurotoxins produced by the strain were evaluated by a mouse bioassay. PMID:9055430

  19. Recovery of a strain of Clostridium botulinum producing both neurotoxin A and neurotoxin B from canned macrobiotic food.

    PubMed Central

    Franciosa, G; Fenicia, L; Pourshaban, M; Aureli, P

    1997-01-01

    A rare strain of Clostridium botulinum subtype Ab was isolated from a canned macrobiotic food suspected of being linked to a fatal case of food-borne botulism. The strain was recovered and identified by conventional methods modified by the inclusion of a PCR assay (G. Franciosa, J.L. Ferreira, and C.L. Hatheway, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:1911-1917, 1994). The titers of neurotoxins produced by the strain were evaluated by a mouse bioassay. PMID:9055430

  20. Investigation of toxin gene diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Clostridium difficile strains

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, SHANSHAN; ZHANG, HUAPING; ZHANG, XINSHENG; WANG, CHAO; FAN, GUANGMING; ZHANG, WEIFENG; SUN, GANG; CHEN, HUIHONG; ZHANG, LIMING; LI, ZHAOYUN

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been previously reported in a number of studies. However, data collected from the Chinese population is limited. In the present study, the diversity of the toxin genes, tcdA and tcdB, of 57 Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) isolates from a Chinese population were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (38 A+B+, 14 A-B+ and 5 A-B−). Quantitative PCR was used to check the expression of these two genes and it was found that the genes were not expressed by all the strains. The absence of tcdA or tcdB expression in certain strains could be due to the lower expression of tcdD and the higher expression of tcdC, which are positive and negative regulators for these two toxin genes, respectively. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 57 isolates were investigated. Therefore, these data would aid in the future prevention of CDI outbreaks and improve the understanding of the infection. PMID:25054021

  1. Investigation of toxin gene diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shanshan; Zhang, Huaping; Zhang, Xinsheng; Wang, Chao; Fan, Guangming; Zhang, Weifeng; Sun, Gang; Chen, Huihong; Zhang, Liming; Li, Zhaoyun

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been previously reported in a number of studies. However, data collected from the Chinese population is limited. In the present study, the diversity of the toxin genes, tcdA and tcdB, of 57 Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) isolates from a Chinese population were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (38 A(+)B(+), 14 A(-)B(+) and 5 A(-)B(-)). Quantitative PCR was used to check the expression of these two genes and it was found that the genes were not expressed by all the strains. The absence of tcdA or tcdB expression in certain strains could be due to the lower expression of tcdD and the higher expression of tcdC, which are positive and negative regulators for these two toxin genes, respectively. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 57 isolates were investigated. Therefore, these data would aid in the future prevention of CDI outbreaks and improve the understanding of the infection. PMID:25054021

  2. Characterization of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from patients in Ontario, Canada, from 2004 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Martin, H; Willey, B; Low, D E; Staempfli, H R; McGeer, A; Boerlin, P; Mulvey, M; Weese, J S

    2008-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is the bacterium most commonly surmised to cause antimicrobial- and hospital-associated diarrhea in developed countries worldwide, and such infections are thought to be increasing in frequency and severity. A laboratory-based study was carried out to characterize C. difficile strains isolated from persons in Ontario, Canada, during 2004 to 2006 according to toxin type (enterotoxin A, cytotoxin B, and binary toxin [CDT]), tcdC gene characterization, ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and toxinotyping. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 1,080/1,152 (94%) samples from 21 diagnostic laboratories. Isolates with toxin profiles A(+) B(+) CDT(-), A(+) B(+) CDT(+), A(-) B(+) CDT(-), and A(-) B(+) CDT(+) accounted for 63%, 34%, 2.4%, and 0.6% of isolates, respectively. Alterations in tcdC were detected in six different ribotypes, including ribotype 027. A total of 39 different ribotypes were identified, with ribotype 027/North American pulsotype 1 (NAP1), an internationally recognized outbreak strain associated with severe disease, being the second most common ribotype (19% of isolates). Transient resistance to metronidazole was identified in 19 (1.8%) isolates. While a large number of ribotypes were found, a few predominated across the province. The high prevalence and wide distribution of ribotype 027/NAP1 are disconcerting in view of the severity of disease associated with it. PMID:18650360

  3. Clonal Spread of a Clostridium difficile Strain with a Complete Set of Toxin A, Toxin B, and Binary Toxin Genes among Polish Patients with Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Pituch, Hanna; Kreft, Deborah; Obuch-Woszczatyński, Piotr; Wultańska, Dorota; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, Felicja; Łuczak, Mirosław; van Belkum, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Clinically relevant Clostridium difficile strains usually produce toxins A and B. Some C. difficile strains can produce an additional binary toxin. We report clonality among five strains carrying all toxin genes from Polish patients with C. difficile-associated diarrhea. In another strain, possible recombination between binary toxin genes is documented. PMID:15635019

  4. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  5. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  6. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed. PMID:21874277

  7. Phenotypic characterization of Clostridium botulinum strains isolated from infant botulism cases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Sagua, M D; Lúquez, C; Barzola, C P; Bianco, M I; Fernández, R A

    2009-01-01

    Infant botulism is the most common form of human botulism; however, its transmission has not been completely explained yet. Some of the most recognized potential sources of Clostridium botulinum spores are the soil, dust, honey and medicinal herbs. In Argentina, 456 cases of infant botulism were reported between 1982 and 2007. C. botulinum type A was identified in 455 of these cases whereas type B was identified in just one case. However, in Argentina, types A, B, E, F, G, and Af have been isolated from environmental sources. It is not clearly known if strains isolated from infant botulism cases have different characteristics from strains isolated from other sources. During this study, 46 C. botulinum strains isolated from infant botulism cases and from environmental sources were typified according to phenotypic characteristics. Biochemical tests, antimicrobial activity, and haemagglutinin-negative botulinum neurotoxin production showed uniformity among all these strains. Despite the variability observed in the botulinum neurotoxin's binding to cellular receptors, no correlation was found between these patterns and the source of the botulinum neurotoxin. However, an apparent geographical clustering was observed, since strains isolated from Argentina had similar characteristics to those isolated from Italy and Japan, but different to those isolated from the United States. PMID:19831311

  8. [Life-threatening infections with a new strain of Clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    Krausz, S; Bessems, M; Boermeester, M A; Kuijper, E J; Visser, C E; Speelman, P

    2005-09-17

    Three men, aged 39, 73, and 66 years, respectively, developed an infection with a new strain ofClostridium difficile, ribotype 027.C.difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) occurred in two patients after multiple abdominal surgery and in the third patient one week after autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation. Within a few days, despite antibiotic therapy, all three patients developed severe (pseudomembranous) colitis with sepsis for which admission to the Intensive Care Unit was required. Two patients underwent (sub)total colectomy and received an intensive course of oral and/or rectal vancomycin. In all patients who develop diarrhoea in hospital, especially during or after treatment with antibiotics or chemotherapeutic agents, an infection with C. difficile ribotype 027 should be suspected. Recent outbreaks of this hypervirulent strain of C. difficile have been reported in Canada, the United States, United Kingdom, and The Netherlands. Demonstration of C. difficile toxin in faeces confirms the clinical suspicion of CDAD and ribotyping of the strain may reveal whether the 027 strain is present. For treatment of these 027 infections, vancomycin is preferred to metronidazole. After a severe course of colitis or in case of recurrence a 'tapering and pulse' course ofvancomycin can be prescribed; alternatively, treatment with bovine antibody-enriched whey may be considered. The introduction of this hypervirulent strain has led to reinforcement of the hygienic measures in accordance with the recommendations of the Dutch Working Party on Infection Prevention and a policy to deter the use of fluoroquinolones. PMID:16201595

  9. Molecular characterization of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from diseased turkeys in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giovanardi, Davide; Drigo, Ilenia; De Vidi, Beatrice; Agnoletti, Fabrizio; Viel, Laura; Capello, Katia; Berto, Giacomo; Bano, Luca

    2016-06-01

    One hundred and six Clostridium perfringens field strains, isolated from diseased turkeys in Italy between 2006 and 2015, were toxinotyped by polymerase chain reaction. Strains were derived from intestines (87), livers (17) and subcutaneous tissues (2). In addition to the four major toxins, strains were also screened for NetB toxin, enterotoxin and beta2 toxin encoding genes. The intestinal gross lesions of turkeys with enteric disorders were statistically studied with respect to the presence of C. perfringens beta2 toxin encoding gene and coccidia in the gut. All the isolates belonged to the toxinotype A and were netB negative. Enterotoxin (cpe) and beta2 toxin (cpb2) encoding genes were detected in two (2.63%) and 76 (71.69%) strains, respectively. Toxinotype results agree with the few published reports concerning the genetic characterization of C. perfringens of turkey origin. On the contrary, the presence of netB and cpb2 genes differs from the results of a previous study where these genes were detected respectively in 6.6% and in 0.5% of the tested strains. Necrotic enteritis in turkeys was not statistically correlated either to the presence of cpb2 gene, or to the synergistic effect operated by coccidia, even though a high percentage of birds with these protozoa in the gut showed necrotic enteritis lesions (64.29%). PMID:26950690

  10. Identification and genetic characterization of Clostridium botulinum serotype A strains from commercially pasteurized carrot juice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kristin M; Nowaczyk, Louis; Raphael, Brian H; Skinner, Guy E; Rukma Reddy, N

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is an important foodborne pathogen capable of forming heat resistant endospores and producing deadly botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). In 2006, C. botulinum was responsible for an international outbreak of botulism attributed to the consumption of commercially pasteurized carrot juice. The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize strains of C. botulinum from the adulterated product. Carrot juice bottles retrieved from the manufacturing facility were analyzed for the presence of BoNT and BoNT-producing isolates using DIG-ELISA. Toxigenic isolates from the carrot juice were analyzed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA microarray analysis to determine their genetic relatedness to the original outbreak strains CDC51348 and CDC51303. PFGE revealed that isolates CJ4-1 and CJ10-1 shared an identical pulsotype with strain CDC51303, whereas isolate CJ5-1 displayed a unique restriction banding pattern. DNA microarray analysis identified several phage related genes unique to strain CJ5-1, and Southern hybridization analysis of XhoI digested and nondigested DNA showed their chromosomal location, while a homolog to pCLI_A009 of plasmid pCLI of C. botulinum serotype Langeland F, was located on a small plasmid. The acquisition or loss of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements among C. botulinum strains has epidemiological and evolutionary implications. PMID:25084657

  11. Butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and hydrolysed wheat straw by an adapted Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain

    PubMed Central

    Baroi, G N; Baumann, I; Westermann, P; Gavala, H N

    2015-01-01

    Butyric acid is a valuable building-block for the production of chemicals and materials and nowadays it is produced exclusively from petroleum. The aim of this study was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces butyric acid at a high yield and selectivity from lignocellulosic biomasses. Pretreated (by wet explosion) and enzymatically hydrolysed wheat straw (PHWS), rich in C6 and C5 sugars (71.6 and 55.4 g l−1 of glucose and xylose respectively), was used as substrate. After one year of serial selections, an adapted strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. The adapted strain was able to grow in 80% (v v−1) PHWS without addition of yeast extract compared with an initial tolerance to less than 10% PHWS and was able to ferment both glucose and xylose. It is noticeable that the adapted C. tyrobutyricum strain was characterized by a high yield and selectivity to butyric acid. Specifically, the butyric acid yield at 60–80% PHWS lie between 0.37 and 0.46 g g−1 of sugar, while the selectivity for butyric acid was as high as 0.9–1.0 g g−1 of acid. Moreover, the strain exhibited a robust response in regards to growth and product profile at pH 6 and 7. PMID:26230610

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Clostridium botulinum Group II (Nonproteolytic) Type B Strains (DB-2 and KAPB-3).

    PubMed

    Petronella, Nicholas; Kenwell, Robyn; Pagotto, Franco; Pightling, Arthur W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is important for food safety and studies of neurotoxins associated with human botulism. We present the draft genome sequences of two strains belonging to group II type B: one collected from Pacific Ocean sediments (DB-2) and another obtained during a botulism outbreak (KAPB-3). PMID:25377702

  13. The analysis of para-cresol production and tolerance in Clostridium difficile 027 and 012 strains

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the major cause of antibiotic associated diarrhoea and in recent years its increased prevalence has been linked to the emergence of hypervirulent clones such as the PCR-ribotype 027. Characteristically, C. difficile infection (CDI) occurs after treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, which disrupt the normal gut microflora and allow C. difficile to flourish. One of the relatively unique features of C. difficile is its ability to ferment tyrosine to para-cresol via the intermediate para-hydroxyphenylacetate (p-HPA). P-cresol is a phenolic compound with bacteriostatic properties which C. difficile can tolerate and may provide the organism with a competitive advantage over other gut microflora, enabling it to proliferate and cause CDI. It has been proposed that the hpdBCA operon, rarely found in other gut microflora, encodes the enzymes responsible for the conversion of p-HPA to p-cresol. Results We show that the PCR-ribotype 027 strain R20291 quantitatively produced more p-cresol in-vitro and was significantly more tolerant to p-cresol than the sequenced strain 630 (PCR-ribotype 012). Tyrosine conversion to p-HPA was only observed under certain conditions. We constructed gene inactivation mutants in the hpdBCA operon in strains R20291 and 630Δerm which curtails their ability to produce p-cresol, confirming the role of these genes in p-cresol production. The mutants were equally able to tolerate p-cresol compared to the respective parent strains, suggesting that tolerance to p-cresol is not linked to its production. Conclusions C. difficile converts tyrosine to p-cresol, utilising the hpdBCA operon in C. difficile strains 630 and R20291. The hypervirulent strain R20291 exhibits increased production of and tolerance to p-cresol, which may be a contributory factor to the virulence of this strain and other hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 027 strains. PMID:21527013

  14. Comparison of toxin and spore production in clinically relevant strains of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Prerna; Poxton, Ian R

    2011-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial diarrhoea. The toxins that it produces (TcdA and TcdB) are responsible for the characteristic pathology of C. difficile infection (CDI), while its spores persist in the environment, causing its widespread transmission. Many different strains of C. difficile exist worldwide and the epidemiology of the strains is ever-changing: in Scotland, PCR ribotype 012 was once prevalent, but currently ribotypes 106, 001 and 027 are endemic. This study aimed to identify the differences among these ribotypes with respect to their growth, and toxin and spore production in vitro. It was observed that the hypervirulent ribotype 027 produces significantly more toxin than the other ribotypes in the exponential and stationary phases of growth. Further, the endemic strains produce significantly more toxins and spores than ribotype 012. Of note was the observation that tcdC expression did not decrease into the stationary phase of growth, implying that it may have a modulatory rather than repressive effect on toxin production. Further, the increased expression of tcdE in ribotype 027 suggests its importance in the release of the toxins. It can thus be concluded that several genotypic and phenotypic traits might synergistically contribute to the hypervirulence of ribotype 027. These observations might suggest a changing trend towards increased virulence in the strains currently responsible for CDI. PMID:21330434

  15. Screening of Bacteriocin-producing Enterococcus faecalis Strains for Antagonistic Activities against Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate and characterize bacteriocin-producing bacteria against Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) from domestic animals to determine their usefulness as probiotics. Bacteriocin-producing bacteria were isolated from pig feces by the spot-on-lawn method. A total of 1,370 bacterial stains were isolated, and six were tentatively selected after identifying the inhibitory activity against the pathogenic indicator C. perfringens KCTC 3269 and KCTC 5100. The selected strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) by 16s rRNA sequencing. Most of the isolated bacterial strains were resistant to 0.5% bile salts for 48 h and remained viable after 2 h at pH 3.0. Some E. faecalis also showed strong inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes KCTC 3569, KCTC 3586 and KCTC 3710. In the present study, we finally selected E. faecalis AP 216 and AP 45 strain based on probiotic selection criteria such as antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens and tolerance to acid and bile salts. The bacteriocins of E. faecalis AP 216 and AP 45 strains were highly thermostable, showing anticlostridial activities even after incubation at 121℃ for 15 min. These bacteriocinproducing bacteria and/or bacteriocins could be used in feed manufacturing as probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics in the livestock industry. PMID:26761495

  16. Mechanisms of microbial oil recovery by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, T.L.; Zhang, X.; Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Sharma, P.K.; Jackson, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Core displacement experiments at elevated pressures were conducted to determine whether microbial processes are effective under conditions that simulate those found in an actual oil reservoir. The in-situ growth of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2 resulted in the recovery of residual oil. About 21 and 23% of the residual oil was recovered by C. acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2, respectively. Flooding cores with cell-free culture fluids of C. acetobutylicum with and without the addition of 50 mM acetone and 100 mM butanol did not result in the recovery of residual oil. Mathematical simulations showed that the amount of gas produced by the clostridial fermentation was not showed that the amount of gas produced by the clostridial fermentation was not sufficient to recover residual oil. Oil recovery by Bacillus strain JF-2 was highly correlated to surfactant production. A biosurfactant-deficient mutant of strain JF-2 was not capable of recovering residual oil. These data show that surfactant production is an important mechanism for microbially enhanced oil recovery. The mechanism for oil recovery by C. acetobutylicum is not understood at this time, but the production of acids, solvents, or gases alone cannot explain the observed increases in oil recovery by this organism.

  17. Genetically Diverse Clostridium difficile Strains Harboring Abundant Prophages in an Estuarine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, K. R.; Colvin, H. V.; Patel, K. V.; Clokie, J. J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrheal disease in health care settings across the world. Despite its pathogenic capacity, it can be carried asymptomatically and has been found in terrestrial and marine ecosystems outside hospital environments. Little is known about these environmental strains, and few studies have been conducted on estuarine systems. Although prophage abundance and diversity are known to occur within clinical strains, prophage carriage within environmental strains of C. difficile has not previously been explored. In this study, we isolated C. difficile from sites sampled in two consecutive years in an English estuarine system. Isolates were characterized by PCR ribotype, antibiotic resistance, and motility. The prevalence and diversity of prophages were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a phage-specific PCR assay. We show that a dynamic and diverse population of C. difficile exists within these sediments and that it includes isolates of ribotypes which are associated with severe clinical infections and those which are more frequently isolated from outside the hospital environment. Prophage carriage was found to be high (75%), demonstrating that phages play a role in the biology of these strains. PMID:23913427

  18. Genomic diversity of necrotic enteritis-associated strains of Clostridium perfringens: a review.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Jake A; Johanesen, Priscilla A; Lyras, Dena; Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    The investigation of genomic variation between Clostridium perfringens isolates from poultry has been an important tool to enhance our understanding of the genetic basis of strain pathogenicity and the epidemiology of virulent and avirulent strains within the context of necrotic enteritis (NE). The earliest studies used whole genome profiling techniques such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to differentiate isolates and determine their relative levels of relatedness. DNA sequencing has been used to investigate genetic variation in (a) individual genes, such as those encoding the alpha and NetB toxins; (b) panels of housekeeping genes for multi-locus sequence typing and (c) most recently whole genome sequencing to build a more complete picture of genomic differences between isolates. Conclusions drawn from these studies include: differential carriage of large conjugative plasmids accounts for a large proportion of inter-strain differences; plasmid-encoded genes are more highly conserved than chromosomal genes, perhaps indicating a relatively recent origin for the plasmids; isolates from NE-affected birds fall into three distinct sequence-based clades while non-pathogenic isolates from healthy birds tend to be more genomically diverse. Overall, the NE causing strains are closely related to C. perfringens isolates from other birds and other diseases whereas the non-pathogenic poultry strains are generally more remotely related to either the pathogenic strains or the strains from other birds. Genomic analysis has indicated that genes in addition to netB are associated with NE pathogenic isolates. Collectively, this work has resulted in a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of this important poultry disease. PMID:26949841

  19. Strain engineering of graphene: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Chen; Sun, Zhimei; Liu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Graphene has intrigued the science community by many unique properties not found in conventional materials. In particular, it is the strongest two-dimensional material ever measured, being able to sustain reversible tensile elastic strain larger than 20%, which yields an interesting possibility to tune the properties of graphene by strain and thus opens a new field called ``straintronics''. In this article, the current progress in the strain engineering of graphene is reviewed. We first summarize the strain effects on the electronic structure and Raman spectra of graphene. We then highlight the electron-phonon coupling greatly enhanced by the biaxial strain and the strong pseudomagnetic field induced by the non-uniform strain with specific distribution. Finally, the potential application of strain-engineering in the self-assembly of foreign atoms on the graphene surface is also discussed. Given the short history of graphene straintronics research, the current progress has been notable, and many further advances in this field are expected.

  20. Clostridium perfringens Type A Food Poisoning II. Response of the Rabbit Ileum as an Indication of Enteropathogenicity of Strains of Clostridium perfringens in Human Beings

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Dorothy H.; Duncan, Charles L.; Perna, Giuseppe

    1971-01-01

    The effect of feeding human beings individual strains of Clostridium perfringens or culture filtrates thereof was examined. The strains selected for challenge included both those which had previously been shown to produce fluid accumulation in the ligated ileum or overt diarrhea when injected into the nonligated ileum of the rabbit, or had produced both, and those which did not regularly produce these responses. Challenge doses prepared by allowing each strain to grow in beef stew for 3 hr at 46 C resulted in a 61% incidence of diarrhea when rabbit-positive cells were used. No diarrhea occurred among the subjects fed rabbit-negative strains prepared in a similar manner. The procedures employed in preparing the challenge dose appeared to influence the results obtained. When cell-free filtrates were fed, 4 of 15 persons consuming filtrates from rabbit-positive strains developed diarrhea. All subjects fed filtrates from rabbit-negative strains remained free from diarrhea. Serological tests were carried out to compare the identity of the strains of C. perfringens consumed by the subjects and those excreted in the feces. Heat resistance measured as D100 values varied greatly among the rabbit-positive strains. PMID:16557937

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Bivalent Clostridium botulinum Strain IBCA10-7060, Encoding Botulinum Neurotoxin B and a New FA Mosaic Type.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Thirunavukkarasu, Nagarajan; Singh, Ajay; Toro, Magaly; Brown, Eric W; Zink, Donald; Rummel, Andreas; Sharma, Shashi K

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the genome sequence of a Clostridium botulinum strain IBCA10-7060 producing botulinum neurotoxin serotype B and a new toxin serotype. Multilocus sequence typing analysis revealed that this strain belongs to a new sequence type, and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism analysis showed that this strain clustered with strains in lineage 2 from group I. PMID:25502671

  2. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment.

  3. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment. PMID:25501371

  4. Direct conversion of xylan to butanol by a wild-type Clostridium species strain G117.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu; Basu, Anindya; Li, Tinggang; He, Jianzhong

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has great potential for use as a carbon source for the production of second-generation biofuels by solventogenic bacteria. Here we describe the production of butanol by a newly discovered wild-type Clostridium species strain G117 with xylan as the sole carbon source for fermentation. Strain G117 produced 0.86 ± 0.07 g/L butanol and 53.4 ± 0.05 mL hydrogen directly from 60 g/L xylan provided that had undergone no prior enzymatic hydrolysis. After process optimization, the amount of butanol produced from xylan was increased to 1.24 ± 0.37 g/L. In contrast to traditional acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) solventogenic fermentation, xylan supported fermentation in strain G117 and negligible amount of acetone was produced. The expression of genes normally associated with acetone production (adc and ctfB2) were down-regulated compared to xylose fed cultures. This lack of acetone production may greatly simplify downstream separation process. Moreover, higher amount of butanol (2.94 g/L) was produced from 16.99 g/L xylo-oligosaccharides, suggesting a major role for strain G117 in butanol production from xylan and its oligosaccharides. The unique ability of strain G117 to produce a considerable amount of butanol directly from xylan without producing undesirable fermentation byproducts opens the door to the possibility of cost-effective biofuels production in a single step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1702-1710. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26803924

  5. Flagellin Diversity in Clostridium botulinum Groups I and II: a New Strategy for Strain Identification▿

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Catherine J.; Twine, Susan M.; Tam, Kevin J.; Mullen, James A.; Kelly, John F.; Austin, John W.; Logan, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Strains of Clostridium botulinum are traditionally identified by botulinum neurotoxin type; however, identification of an additional target for typing would improve differentiation. Isolation of flagellar filaments and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that C. botulinum produced multiple flagellin proteins. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis of in-gel tryptic digests identified peptides in all flagellin bands that matched two homologous tandem flagellin genes identified in the C. botulinum Hall A genome. Designated flaA1 and flaA2, these open reading frames encode the major structural flagellins of C. botulinum. Colony PCR and sequencing of flaA1/A2 variable regions classified 80 environmental and clinical strains into group I or group II and clustered isolates into 12 flagellar types. Flagellar type was distinct from neurotoxin type, and epidemiologically related isolates clustered together. Sequencing a larger PCR product, obtained during amplification of flaA1/A2 from type E strain Bennett identified a second flagellin gene, flaB. LC-MS analysis confirmed that flaB encoded a large type E-specific flagellin protein, and the predicted molecular mass for FlaB matched that observed by SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the molecular mass of FlaA was 2 to 12 kDa larger than the mass predicted by the flaA1/A2 sequence of a given strain, suggesting that FlaA is posttranslationally modified. While identification of FlaB, and the observation by SDS-PAGE of different masses of the FlaA proteins, showed the flagellin proteins of C. botulinum to be diverse, the presence of the flaA1/A2 gene in all strains examined facilitates single locus sequence typing of C. botulinum using the flagellin variable region. PMID:17351097

  6. Structure and Genetic Content of the Megaplasmids of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Type E Strains from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Iacobino, Angelo; Scalfaro, Concetta; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    We determined the genetic maps of the megaplasmids of six neutoroxigenic Clostridium butyricum type E strains from Italy using molecular and bioinformatics techniques. The megaplasmids are circular, not linear as we had previously proposed. The differently-sized megaplasmids share a genetic region that includes structural, metabolic and regulatory genes. In addition, we found that a 168 kb genetic region is present only in the larger megaplasmids of two tested strains, whereas it is absent from the smaller megaplasmids of the four remaining strains. The genetic region unique to the larger megaplasmids contains, among other features, a locus for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated (cas) genes, i.e. a bacterial adaptive immune system providing sequence-specific protection from invading genetic elements. Some CRISPR spacer sequences of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains showed homology to prophage, phage and plasmid sequences from closely related clostridia species or from distant species, all sharing the intestinal habitat, suggesting that the CRISPR locus might be involved in the microorganism adaptation to the human or animal intestinal environment. Besides, we report here that each of four distinct CRISPR spacers partially matched DNA sequences of different prophages and phages, at identical nucleotide locations. This suggests that, at least in neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E, the CRISPR locus is potentially able to recognize the same conserved DNA sequence of different invading genetic elements, besides targeting sequences unique to previously encountered invading DNA, as currently predicted for a CRISPR locus. Thus, the results of this study introduce the possibility that CRISPR loci can provide resistance to a wider range of invading DNA elements than previously appreciated. Whether it is more advantageous for the peculiar neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains to maintain or to lose the

  7. Structure and genetic content of the megaplasmids of neurotoxigenic clostridium butyricum type E strains from Italy.

    PubMed

    Iacobino, Angelo; Scalfaro, Concetta; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    We determined the genetic maps of the megaplasmids of six neutoroxigenic Clostridium butyricum type E strains from Italy using molecular and bioinformatics techniques. The megaplasmids are circular, not linear as we had previously proposed. The differently-sized megaplasmids share a genetic region that includes structural, metabolic and regulatory genes. In addition, we found that a 168 kb genetic region is present only in the larger megaplasmids of two tested strains, whereas it is absent from the smaller megaplasmids of the four remaining strains. The genetic region unique to the larger megaplasmids contains, among other features, a locus for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated (cas) genes, i.e. a bacterial adaptive immune system providing sequence-specific protection from invading genetic elements. Some CRISPR spacer sequences of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains showed homology to prophage, phage and plasmid sequences from closely related clostridia species or from distant species, all sharing the intestinal habitat, suggesting that the CRISPR locus might be involved in the microorganism adaptation to the human or animal intestinal environment. Besides, we report here that each of four distinct CRISPR spacers partially matched DNA sequences of different prophages and phages, at identical nucleotide locations. This suggests that, at least in neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E, the CRISPR locus is potentially able to recognize the same conserved DNA sequence of different invading genetic elements, besides targeting sequences unique to previously encountered invading DNA, as currently predicted for a CRISPR locus. Thus, the results of this study introduce the possibility that CRISPR loci can provide resistance to a wider range of invading DNA elements than previously appreciated. Whether it is more advantageous for the peculiar neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains to maintain or to lose the

  8. Engineering Clostridium acetobutylicum for production of kerosene and diesel blendstock precursors.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Sebastian; Baer, Zachary C; Sreekumar, Sanil; Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Dean Toste, F; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2014-09-01

    Processes for the biotechnological production of kerosene and diesel blendstocks are often economically unattractive due to low yields and product titers. Recently, Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation products acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) were shown to serve as precursors for catalytic upgrading to higher chain-length molecules that can be used as fuel substitutes. To produce suitable kerosene and diesel blendstocks, the butanol:acetone ratio of fermentation products needs to be increased to 2-2.5:1, while ethanol production is minimized. Here we show that the overexpression of selected proteins changes the ratio of ABE products relative to the wild type ATCC 824 strain. Overexpression of the native alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (AAD) has been reported to primarily increase ethanol formation in C. acetobutylicum. We found that overexpression of the AAD(D485G) variant increased ethanol titers by 294%. Catalytic upgrading of the 824(aad(D485G)) ABE products resulted in a blend with nearly 50wt%≤C9 products, which are unsuitable for diesel. To selectively increase butanol production, C. beijerinckii aldehyde dehydrogenase and C. ljungdhalii butanol dehydrogenase were co-expressed (strain designate 824(Cb ald-Cl bdh)), which increased butanol titers by 27% to 16.9gL(-1) while acetone and ethanol titers remained essentially unaffected. The solvent ratio from 824(Cb ald-Cl bdh) resulted in more than 80wt% of catalysis products having a carbon chain length≥C11 which amounts to 9.8gL(-1) of products suitable as kerosene or diesel blendstock based on fermentation volume. To further increase solvent production, we investigated expression of both native and heterologous chaperones in C. acetobutylicum. Expression of a heat shock protein (HSP33) from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus increased the total solvent titer by 22%. Co-expression of HSP33 and aldehyde/butanol dehydrogenases further increased ABE formation as well as acetone and butanol yields. HSP33 was

  9. Human hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains exhibit increased sporulation as well as robust toxin production.

    PubMed

    Merrigan, Michelle; Venugopal, Anilrudh; Mallozzi, Michael; Roxas, Bryan; Viswanathan, V K; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N; Vedantam, Gayatri

    2010-10-01

    Toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains produce two toxins (TcdA and TcdB) during the stationary phase of growth and are the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. C. difficile isolates of the molecular type NAP1/027/BI have been associated with severe disease and hospital outbreaks worldwide. It has been suggested that these "hypervirulent" strains produce larger amounts of toxin and that a mutation in a putative negative regulator (TcdC) allows toxin production at all growth phases. To rigorously explore this possibility, we conducted a quantitative examination of the toxin production of multiple hypervirulent and nonhypervirulent C. difficile strains. Toxin gene (tcdA and tcdB) and toxin gene regulator (tcdR and tcdC) expression was also monitored. To obtain additional correlates for the hypervirulence phenotype, sporulation kinetics and efficiency were measured. In the exponential phase, low basal levels of tcdA, tcdB, and tcdR expression were evident in both hypervirulent and nonhypervirulent strains, but contrary to previous assumptions, toxin levels were below the detectable thresholds. While hypervirulent strains displayed robust toxin production during the stationary phase of growth, the amounts were not significantly different from those of the nonhypervirulent strains tested; further, total toxin amounts were directly proportional to tcdA, tcdB, and tcdR gene expression. Interestingly, tcdC expression did not diminish in stationary phase, suggesting that TcdC may have a modulatory rather than a strictly repressive role. Comparative genomic analyses of the closely related nonhypervirulent strains VPI 10463 (the highest toxin producer) and 630 (the lowest toxin producer) revealed polymorphisms in the tcdR ribosome binding site and the tcdR-tcdB intergenic region, suggesting that a mechanistic basis for increased toxin production in VPI 10463 could be increased TcdR translation and read-through transcription of the tcdA and tcdB genes

  10. Primary structure of O-linked carbohydrate chains in the cellulosome of different Clostridium thermocellum strains.

    PubMed

    Gerwig, G J; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F; Morag, E; Lamed, R; Bayer, E A

    1991-02-26

    The cell-free forms of the multiple cellulase-containing protein complex (cellulosome), isolated from the cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum strains YS, ATCC 27405 and LQRI, have a total carbohydrate content of 5-7% (by mass), consisting of O-linked oligosaccharide chains. The carbohydrate chains were liberated by alkaline-borohydride treatment and fractionated as oligosaccharide alditols via gel-permeation chromatography and HPLC. The fractions were investigated by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy in combination with monosaccharide and methylation analysis and with fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). In addition to the previously described major oligosaccharide, (formula; see text) [Gerwig, G. J., de Waard, P., Kamerling, J. P., Vliegenthart, J. F. G., Morgenstern, E., Lamed, R. & Bayer, E. A. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 1027-1035], the following partial structures of this compound could be established: (formula; see text). Cell-free and cell-associated forms of the cellulosome of C. thermocellum, as determined for strain YS, have the same oligosaccharide pattern. Based on the oligosaccharide structures, a biosynthetic pathway is suggested. PMID:2001693

  11. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis for strain typing of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Sawires, Youhanna S; Songer, J Glenn

    2005-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens is ubiquitous in the environment and causes diseases in man and animals, with syndromes ranging from enteritis, enterotoxemia, and sudden death to food poisoning and gas gangrene. Understanding the epidemiology of these infections and of the evolution of virulence in C. perfringens necessitate an efficient, time and cost effective strain typing method. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has been applied to typing of other pathogens and we describe here the development of a MLVA scheme for C. perfringens. We characterized five variable tandem repeat (VNTR) loci, four of which are contained within protein encoding genes and screened 112 C. perfringens isolates to evaluate typability, reproducibility, and discriminatory power of the scheme. All the isolates were assigned a MLVA genotype and the technique has excellent reproducibility, with a numerical index of discrimination for the five VNTR loci of 0.995. Thus MLVA is an efficient tool for C. perfringens strain typing, and being PCR based makes it rapid, easy, and cost effective. In addition, it can be employed in epidemiological, ecological, and evolutionary investigations of the organism. PMID:16701582

  12. Clostridium difficile infection caused by the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jennifer R; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N

    2009-05-01

    Rates and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hospitals in North America and Europe have increased since 2000 and correlate with dissemination of an epidemic strain characterized by higher than usual toxin A and B production, the presence of a third toxin, binary toxin, and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolone antibiotics. The strain, which is restriction endonuclease analysis group BI, pulse-field gel electrophoresis type NAP1, and polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027, is designated BI/NAP1/027. How this strain has become so widely distributed geographically and produces such severe CDI is the subject of active investigation. The deletion at position 117 of the tcdC gene, a repressor of toxin A and B production, is one possible contributor to increased levels of the toxins. The role of binary toxin is unknown. Recent isolates of BI/NAP1/027 were found to be resistant to fluoroquinolones, which is likely to contribute to the dissemination of this strain. Other virulence factors such as increased sporulation and surface layer protein adherence are also under investigation. Infections caused by this organism are particularly frequent among elderly hospitalized patients, in whom the attributable 30-day mortality is greater than 5%. Major risk factors for BI/NAP1/027 infection include advanced age, hospitalization, and exposure to specific antimicrobials, especially fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins. When CDI is severe, vancomycin treatment is more effective than metronidazole; for mild disease either agent can be used. Control of hospital outbreaks caused by BI/NAP1/027 is difficult but possible through a combination of barrier precautions, environmental cleaning, and antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:19457419

  13. New Role for Human α-Defensin 5 in the Fight against Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile Strains

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, Rossella; Bianchini, Valentina; Ossi, Cristina; Cichero, Paola; Cirillo, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), one of the most common hospital-acquired infections, is increasing in incidence and severity with the emergence and diffusion of hypervirulent strains. CDI is precipitated by antibiotic treatment that destroys the equilibrium of the gut microbiota. Human α-defensin 5 (HD5), the most abundant enteric antimicrobial peptide, is a key regulator of gut microbiota homeostasis, yet it is still unknown if C. difficile, which successfully evades killing by other host microbicidal peptides, is susceptible to HD5. We evaluated, by means of viability assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, and electron microscopy, the antimicrobial activities of α-defensins 1 and 5 against a panel of C. difficile strains encompassing the most prevalent epidemic and hypervirulent PCR ribotypes in Europe (012, 014/020, 106, 018, 027, and 078). Here we show that (i) concentrations of HD5 within the intestinal physiological range produced massive C. difficile cell killing; (ii) HD5 bactericidal activity was mediated by membrane depolarization and bacterial fragmentation with a pattern of damage peculiar to C. difficile bacilli, compared to commensals like Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis; and (iii) unexpectedly, hypervirulent ribotypes were among the most susceptible to both defensins. These results support the notion that HD5, naturally present at very high concentrations in the mucosa of the small intestine, could indeed control the very early steps of CDI by killing C. difficile bacilli at their germination site. As a consequence, HD5 can be regarded as a good candidate for the containment of hypervirulent C. difficile strains, and it could be exploited in the therapy of CDI and relapsing C. difficile-associated disease. PMID:25547793

  14. Identification of Novel Pathogenicity Loci in Clostridium perfringens Strains That Cause Avian Necrotic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Valeria R.; Marri, Pradeep R.; Rosey, Everett L.; Gong, Joshua; Songer, J. Glenn; Vedantam, Gayatri; Prescott, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Type A Clostridium perfringens causes poultry necrotic enteritis (NE), an enteric disease of considerable economic importance, yet can also exist as a member of the normal intestinal microbiota. A recently discovered pore-forming toxin, NetB, is associated with pathogenesis in most, but not all, NE isolates. This finding suggested that NE-causing strains may possess other virulence gene(s) not present in commensal type A isolates. We used high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies to generate draft genome sequences of seven unrelated C. perfringens poultry NE isolates and one isolate from a healthy bird, and identified additional novel NE-associated genes by comparison with nine publicly available reference genomes. Thirty-one open reading frames (ORFs) were unique to all NE strains and formed the basis for three highly conserved NE-associated loci that we designated NELoc-1 (42 kb), NELoc-2 (11.2 kb) and NELoc-3 (5.6 kb). The largest locus, NELoc-1, consisted of netB and 36 additional genes, including those predicted to encode two leukocidins, an internalin-like protein and a ricin-domain protein. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Southern blotting revealed that the NE strains each carried 2 to 5 large plasmids, and that NELoc-1 and -3 were localized on distinct plasmids of sizes ∼85 and ∼70 kb, respectively. Sequencing of the regions flanking these loci revealed similarity to previously characterized conjugative plasmids of C. perfringens. These results provide significant insight into the pathogenetic basis of poultry NE and are the first to demonstrate that netB resides in a large, plasmid-encoded locus. Our findings strongly suggest that poultry NE is caused by several novel virulence factors, whose genes are clustered on discrete pathogenicity loci, some of which are plasmid-borne. PMID:20532244

  15. Identification of novel pathogenicity loci in Clostridium perfringens strains that cause avian necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Lepp, Dion; Roxas, Bryan; Parreira, Valeria R; Marri, Pradeep R; Rosey, Everett L; Gong, Joshua; Songer, J Glenn; Vedantam, Gayatri; Prescott, John F

    2010-01-01

    Type A Clostridium perfringens causes poultry necrotic enteritis (NE), an enteric disease of considerable economic importance, yet can also exist as a member of the normal intestinal microbiota. A recently discovered pore-forming toxin, NetB, is associated with pathogenesis in most, but not all, NE isolates. This finding suggested that NE-causing strains may possess other virulence gene(s) not present in commensal type A isolates. We used high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies to generate draft genome sequences of seven unrelated C. perfringens poultry NE isolates and one isolate from a healthy bird, and identified additional novel NE-associated genes by comparison with nine publicly available reference genomes. Thirty-one open reading frames (ORFs) were unique to all NE strains and formed the basis for three highly conserved NE-associated loci that we designated NELoc-1 (42 kb), NELoc-2 (11.2 kb) and NELoc-3 (5.6 kb). The largest locus, NELoc-1, consisted of netB and 36 additional genes, including those predicted to encode two leukocidins, an internalin-like protein and a ricin-domain protein. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Southern blotting revealed that the NE strains each carried 2 to 5 large plasmids, and that NELoc-1 and -3 were localized on distinct plasmids of sizes approximately 85 and approximately 70 kb, respectively. Sequencing of the regions flanking these loci revealed similarity to previously characterized conjugative plasmids of C. perfringens. These results provide significant insight into the pathogenetic basis of poultry NE and are the first to demonstrate that netB resides in a large, plasmid-encoded locus. Our findings strongly suggest that poultry NE is caused by several novel virulence factors, whose genes are clustered on discrete pathogenicity loci, some of which are plasmid-borne. PMID:20532244

  16. In vitro activity of MCB3681 against Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Dalhoff, Axel; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2014-08-01

    One hundred fourteen Clostridium difficile strains were collected from 67 patients and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B by the cell cytotoxoicity neutralization assay, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped. The MICs of the isolates were determined against MCB3681 and nine other antimicrobial agents by the agar dilution method. All isolates were positive for toxin B as well as for toxin A and B genes. In addition, 13 isolates were positive for the binary toxin genes. Thirty-two different ribotypes were identified. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. All 114 isolates were sensitive to MCB3681 (0.008-0.5 mg/l), cadazolid (0.064-0.5 mg/l), fidaxomicin (0.008-0.125 mg/l), metronidazole (0.125-2 mg/l), vancomycin (0.125-1 mg/l) and tigecycline (0.032-0.25 mg/l). Three isolates were resistant to linezolid (8 mg/l), 12 isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin (8-32 mg/l), 87 isolates were resistant to clindamycin (8-256 mg/l) and 107 isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin (8-256 mg/l). No association between toxins A, B and binary toxin, ribotypes and the sensitivity to MCB3681 could be found. MCB3681 has a potent in vitro activity against C. difficile. PMID:25016084

  17. Fulminant colitis from Clostridium difficile infection, the epidemic strain ribotype 027, in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Itaru; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Tsukimori, Ayaka; Sato, Akihiro; Fukushima, Shinji; Mizuno, Yasutaka; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    In December 2012, a 32-year-old woman with no previous medical history and no previous antibiotic treatment had a fever and diarrhea 2 days after a cesarean section in which cefazolin was used as a prophylactic antimicrobial agent. She was transferred to our hospital 5 days after the cesarean for severe colitis. A rapid test of stool for Clostridium difficile toxin A and B was positive. Although oral vancomycin (0.5-2.0 g/day) and intravenous immunoglobulin (5 g/day) were administered after her transfer, 7 days after admission emergency exploratory surgery was performed because of poor response to therapy. Bowel perforation was noted and a temporary colostomy was created without colectomy. Vancomycin (2.0 g/day) was administered via the colostomy, in addition to a vancomycin enema (2.0 g/day), oral metronidazole (1500 mg/day), and oral vancomycin (2.0 g/day). Three days after the operation, linezolid (1200 mg/day IV) was added. She was treated with antibiotics against C. difficile for a total of 18 days after the operation. The same strain was not isolated from other patients in the same ward. Microbiological analysis of the isolate revealed housekeeping gene (tpi), toxin A gene (tcdA), toxin B gene (tcdB), and binary toxin gene (cdtA and cdtB). DNA sequencing of tcdC revealed a base 117 deletion and contained an 18-bp tcdC deletion. PCR ribotyping showed ribotype 027 patterns. The MIC of moxifloxacin was >32 μg/ml, indicating resistance to fluoroquinolones. This isolate was considered as the epidemic strain. Our case of fulminant colitis is apparently the first case involving the epidemic strain ribotype 027 in Japan. PMID:24726377

  18. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Clostridium difficile Strains from Patients and the Hospital Environment in Belarus

    PubMed Central

    Titov, Leonid; Lebedkova, Natalia; Shabanov, Alexander; Tang, Yajarayma J.; Cohen, Stuart H.; Silva, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Toxigenic Clostridium difficile is the most common etiologic agent of hospital-acquired diarrhea in developed countries. The role of this pathogen in nosocomial diarrhea in Eastern Europe has not been clearly established. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of C. difficile in patients and the hospital environment in Belarus and to characterize these isolates as to the presence of toxin genes and their molecular type. C. difficile was isolated from 9 of 509 (1.8%) patients analyzed and recovered from 28 of 1,300 (2.1%) environmental sites cultured. A multiplex PCR assay was used to analyze the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) of all isolates, and strain identity was determined by an arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR). The targeted sequences for all the genes in the PaLoc were amplified in all C. difficile strains examined. A predominantly homogenous group of strains was found among these isolates, with five major AP-PCR groups being identified. Eighty-three percent of environmental isolates were classified into two groups, while patient isolates grouped into three AP-PCR types, two of which were also found in the hospital environment. Although no data on the role of C. difficile infection or epidemiology of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) in this country exist, the isolation of toxigenic C. difficile from the hospital environment suggests that this pathogen may be responsible for cases of diarrhea of undiagnosed origin and validates our effort to further investigate the significance of CDAD in Eastern Europe. PMID:10699022

  19. [Comparison of susceptibility of spores of Bacillus subtilis and Czech strains of Clostridium difficile to disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Votava, M; Slitrová, B

    2009-02-01

    An important factor in the prevention of nosocomial outbreaks caused by Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 is the disinfection of a patient environment by reliable sporicidal disinfectants. Sporicidal activity of particular agents is tested on spores of Bacillus subtilis. Questions are brought up if the disinfectant which works on B. subtilis spores will be equally effective on the spores of C. difficile. Therefore we have compared the effects of five disinfectants available on the Czech market on the spores of collection strains of both microbes and on the spores of ten C. difficile field strains isolated from feces of hospitalized patients. The effective substances were: disinfectant No. 1 chloramine B, No. 2 chlorine dioxide, No. 3 formaldehyde and ethan-2-dion, No. 4 peracetic and acetic acids and hydrogen peroxide, No. 5 ethanol and propan-2-ol. The testing was performed using the dilution neutralization method according to (SN EN 13704, the agent reducing the number of spores by more than 3 orders was considered sporicidal. In addition to the standard time 60 min a 15-minutes exposition was used and the effect was tested also under the protein burden. Disinfectant No. 1 showed better effect on the C. difficile than B. subtilis spores, even in lower (1%) concentration. Similarly, the sensitivity of the C. difficile spores to disinfectants No. 2 and 3 was somewhat higher. The sporicidity of the disinfectant No. 4 was so high that it reduced the number of spores of all strains within 15 minutes by more than 4 orders; possible difference in the susceptibility of spores was not observed. Whereas the disinfectant No. 5 was not reliably effective on the spores of B. subtilis, surprisingly it showed the sporicidal effect on the spores of field C. difficile strains. We conclude that spores of field C. difficile strains in particular turned out to be more sensitive to disinfectants than the spores of the collection strain ofB. subtilis. Therefore B. subtilis remains

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sporogenes Strain UC9000 Isolated from Raw Milk.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Angela; Bassi, Daniela; Zotta, Teresa; Orrù, Luigi; Lamontanara, Antonella; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenesis a causative agent of food spoilage and is often used as the nontoxigenic surrogate forClostridium botulinum Here, we described the draft genome sequence and annotation ofC. sporogenesstrain UC9000 isolated from raw milk. PMID:27081128

  1. Isolation of a new butanol-producing Clostridium strain: high level of hemicellulosic activity and structure of solventogenesis genes of a new Clostridium saccharobutylicum isolate.

    PubMed

    Berezina, Oksana V; Brandt, Agnieszka; Yarotsky, Sergey; Schwarz, Wolfgang H; Zverlov, Vladimir V

    2009-10-01

    New isolates of solventogenic bacteria exhibited high hemicellulolytic activity. They produced butanol and acetone with high selectivity for butanol (about 80% of butanol from the total solvent yield). Their 16S rDNA sequence was 99% identical to that of Clostridium saccharobutylicum. The genes responsible for the last steps of solventogenesis and encoding crotonase, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron-transport protein subunits A and B, 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, alcohol dehydrogenase, CoA-transferase (subunits A and B), acetoacetate decarboxylase, and aldehyde dehydrogenase were identified in the new C. saccharobutylicum strain Ox29 and cloned into Escherichia coli. The genes for crotonase, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron-transport protein subunits A and B, and 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase composed the bcs-operon. A monocistronic operon containing the alcohol dehydrogenase gene was located downstream of the bcs-operon. Genes for aldehyde dehydrogenase, CoA-transferase (subunits A and B), and acetoacetate decarboxylase composed the sol-operon. The gene sequences and the gene order within the sol- and bcs-operons of C. saccharobutylicum Ox29 were most similar to those of Clostridium beijerinckii. The activity of some of the bcs-operon genes, expressed in heterologous E. coli, was determined. PMID:19674858

  2. Safety assessment of the Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588® probiotic strain including evaluation of antimicrobial sensitivity and presence of Clostridium toxin genes in vitro and teratogenicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Isa, K; Oka, K; Beauchamp, N; Sato, M; Wada, K; Ohtani, K; Nakanishi, S; McCartney, E; Tanaka, M; Shimizu, T; Kamiya, S; Kruger, C; Takahashi, M

    2016-08-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms ingested for the purpose of conferring a health benefit on the host. Development of new probiotics includes the need for safety evaluations that should consider factors such as pathogenicity, infectivity, virulence factors, toxicity, and metabolic activity. Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588(®) (CBM 588(®)), an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, has been developed as a probiotic for use by humans and food animals. Safety studies of this probiotic strain have been conducted and include assessment of antimicrobial sensitivity, documentation of the lack of Clostridium toxin genes, and evaluation of CBM 588(®) on reproductive and developmental toxicity in a rodent model. With the exception of aminoglycosides, to which anaerobes are intrinsically resistant, CBM 588(®) showed sensitivity to all antibiotic classes important in human and animal therapeutics. In addition, analysis of the CBM 588(®) genome established the absence of genes for encoding for α, β, or ε toxins and botulin neurotoxins types A, B, E, or F. There were no deleterious reproductive and developmental effects observed in mice associated with the administration of CBM 588(®) These data provide further support for the safety of CBM 588(®) for use as a probiotic in animals and humans. PMID:26437792

  3. [Progress on engineered strains for ethanol production].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan-qiang; Xu, Ping

    2006-08-01

    With the 21 century's coming, the era of cheap oil is coming to the end. There has been an increasing worldwide interest in fuel ethanol. In the last two decades, lots of work has been done to develop strains for ethanol producing. Research progress on metabolic engineering of strains for fuel ethanol production is summarized, including genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize starch, pentose and cellulose, Zymomonas mobilis to ferment arabinose and xylose, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca to introduce heterogenous ethanol production pathway. The aim of engineering these strains is to obtain an ideal microorganism which can converse the available carbon sources to ethanol rapidly and efficiently with high tolerance to ethanol and to inhibitory components in the cheap materials such as lignocellulose hydrolysate. The importance of fuel ethanol will be a stimulus to develop engineered hardy strains to utilize cheap materials for high ethanol concentration production. Since both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis are generally regarded as safe (GRAS), genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae which can utilize raw starch directly and recombinant Zymomonas mobilis which can ferment glucose, arabinose and xylose in the lignocellulose hydrolysate have potential application to industry in the near future. PMID:17037078

  4. Strain engineering of graphene: a review.

    PubMed

    Si, Chen; Sun, Zhimei; Liu, Feng

    2016-02-14

    Graphene has intrigued the science community by many unique properties not found in conventional materials. In particular, it is the strongest two-dimensional material ever measured, being able to sustain reversible tensile elastic strain larger than 20%, which yields an interesting possibility to tune the properties of graphene by strain and thus opens a new field called "straintronics". In this article, the current progress in the strain engineering of graphene is reviewed. We first summarize the strain effects on the electronic structure and Raman spectra of graphene. We then highlight the electron-phonon coupling greatly enhanced by the biaxial strain and the strong pseudomagnetic field induced by the non-uniform strain with specific distribution. Finally, the potential application of strain-engineering in the self-assembly of foreign atoms on the graphene surface is also discussed. Given the short history of graphene straintronics research, the current progress has been notable, and many further advances in this field are expected. PMID:26796960

  5. Biodiversity of Clostridium botulinum type E strains isolated from fish and fishery products.

    PubMed

    Hyytiä, E; Hielm, S; Björkroth, J; Korkeala, H

    1999-05-01

    The genetic biodiversity of Clostridium botulinum type E strains was studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with two macrorestriction enzymes (SmaI-XmaI and XhoI) and by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with two primers (OPJ 6 and OPJ 13) to characterize 67 Finnish isolates from fresh fish and fishery products, 15 German isolates from farmed fish, and 10 isolates of North American or North Atlantic origin derived mainly from different types of seafood. The effects of fish species, processing, and geographical origin on the epidemiology of the isolates were evaluated. Cluster analysis based on macrorestriction profiles was performed to study the genetic relationships of the isolates. PFGE and RAPD analyses were combined and resulted in the identification of 62 different subtypes among the 92 type E isolates analyzed. High genetic biodiversity among the isolates was observed regardless of their source. Finnish and North American or North Atlantic isolates did not form distinctly discernible clusters, in contrast with the genetically homogeneous group of German isolates. On the other hand, indistinguishable or closely related genetic profiles among epidemiologically unrelated samples were detected. It was concluded that the high genetic variation was probably a result of a lack of strong selection factors that would influence the evolution of type E. The wide genetic biodiversity observed among type E isolates indicates the value of DNA-based typing methods as a tool in contamination studies in the food industry and in investigations of botulism outbreaks. PMID:10224001

  6. [Cellobiohydrolase from Clostridium thermocellum, synthesized by a recombinant E. coli strain].

    PubMed

    Mel'nik, M S; Rabinovich, M L; Voznyĭ, Ia V

    1991-10-01

    Clostridium thermocellum cellobiohydrolase was isolated in preparative amounts from the recombinant strain of E. coli K12 C600 carrying plasmid pCU 304 with a C. thermocellum chromosomal DNA insertion. The isolation procedure included chromatography on Ultrogel AcA 44, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, rechromatography on Ultrogel and FPLC on Mono Q resulting in a 17.6% yield and 1530-fold purification. According to data from sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis performed under nondenaturing conditions and analytical gel isoelectrofocusing, the enzyme preparation contains only one active protein band with Mr 56.2 +/- 1.0 kDa and pI 4.15. The enzyme does not reduce the viscosity of the CM-cellulose solution but forms reducing sugars from this soluble substrate. Cellobiose (93-97%) is the major component produced by the enzyme from crystalline and amorphous cellulose (specific activity 2.3 x 10(-3) and 2.8 x 10(-2) U/mg, respectively). The activity optimum of the enzyme is at pH 5.6, 60 degrees C. The half-inactivation time at 60 degrees C and 65 degrees C is 450 and 15.5 min, respectively. The action pattern of the enzyme on the low molecular fluorogenic cellooligosaccharides suggests that the enzyme pertains to typical cellobiohydrolases. PMID:1777519

  7. Biodiversity of Clostridium botulinum Type E Strains Isolated from Fish and Fishery Products

    PubMed Central

    Hyytiä, Eija; Hielm, Sebastian; Björkroth, Johanna; Korkeala, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    The genetic biodiversity of Clostridium botulinum type E strains was studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with two macrorestriction enzymes (SmaI-XmaI and XhoI) and by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with two primers (OPJ 6 and OPJ 13) to characterize 67 Finnish isolates from fresh fish and fishery products, 15 German isolates from farmed fish, and 10 isolates of North American or North Atlantic origin derived mainly from different types of seafood. The effects of fish species, processing, and geographical origin on the epidemiology of the isolates were evaluated. Cluster analysis based on macrorestriction profiles was performed to study the genetic relationships of the isolates. PFGE and RAPD analyses were combined and resulted in the identification of 62 different subtypes among the 92 type E isolates analyzed. High genetic biodiversity among the isolates was observed regardless of their source. Finnish and North American or North Atlantic isolates did not form distinctly discernible clusters, in contrast with the genetically homogeneous group of German isolates. On the other hand, indistinguishable or closely related genetic profiles among epidemiologically unrelated samples were detected. It was concluded that the high genetic variation was probably a result of a lack of strong selection factors that would influence the evolution of type E. The wide genetic biodiversity observed among type E isolates indicates the value of DNA-based typing methods as a tool in contamination studies in the food industry and in investigations of botulism outbreaks. PMID:10224001

  8. Kinetics of biotransformation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane by Clostridium sp. strain TCAIIB.

    PubMed Central

    Gälli, R; McCarty, P L

    1989-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to examine the effects of high concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) on the biotransformation of TCA by Clostridium sp. strain TCAIIB. The biotic dehalogenation of TCA to 1,1-dichloroethane by nongrowing cells was measured at 35 degrees C, and the data were used to obtain the kinetic parameters of the Monod relationship half-velocity coefficient Ks (31 microM) and the coefficient of maximum rate of TCA biotransformation (kTCA; 0.28 mumol per mg per day). The yield of biomass decreased with an increase in the TCA concentration, although TCA concentrations up to 750 microM did not completely inhibit bacterial growth. Also, kTCA was higher in the presence of high concentrations of TCA. A mathematical model based on a modified Monod equation was used to describe the biotransformation of TCA. The abiotic transformation of TCA to 1,1-dichloroethene was measured at 35 degrees C, and the first-order formation rate coefficient for 1,1-dichloroethene (ke) was determined to be 0.86 per year. PMID:2729986

  9. Purification and characterization of thermostable glucose isomerase from Clostridium thermosulfurogenes and Thermoanaerobacter strain B6A.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C Y; Zeikus, J G

    1991-01-01

    Glucose isomerases produced by Thermoanaerobacter strain B6A and Clostridium thermosulfurogenes strain 4B were purified 10-11-fold to homogeneity and their physicochemical and catalytic properties were determined. Both purified enzymes displayed very similar properties (native Mr 200,000, tetrameric subunit composition, and apparent pH optima 7.0-7.5). The enzymes were stable at pH 5.5-12.0, and maintained more than 90% activity after incubation at high temperature (85 degrees C) for 1 h in the presence of metal ions. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of both thermostable glucose isomerases were Met-Asn-Lys-Tyr-Phe-Glu-Asn and were not similar to that of the thermolabile Bacillus subtilis enzyme. The glucose isomerase from C. thermosulfurogenes and Thermoanaerobacter displayed pI values of 4.9 and 4.8, and their kcat. and Km values for D-glucose at 65 degrees C were 1040 and 1260 min-1 and 140 and 120 mM respectively. Both enzymes displayed higher kcat. and lower Km values for D-xylose than for D-glucose. The C. thermosulfurogenes enzyme required Co2+ or Mg2+ for thermal stability and glucose isomerase activity, and Mn2+ or these metals for xylose isomerase activity. Crystals of C. thermosulfurogenes glucose isomerase were formed at room temperature by the hanging-drop method using 16-18% poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 4000 in 0.1 M-citrate buffer. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:1996956

  10. Characterization of the extracellular cellulase from a mesophilic clostridium (strain C7).

    PubMed Central

    Cavedon, K; Leschine, S B; Canale-Parola, E

    1990-01-01

    An extracellular, 700,000-Mr multiprotein complex that catalyzed the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose (Avicel) was isolated from cultures of Clostridium sp. strain C7, a mesophile from freshwater sediment. In addition to cellulose (Avicel, ball-milled filter paper), the multiprotein complex hydrolyzed carboxymethylcellulose, cellodextrins, xylan, and xylooligosaccharides. Hydrolysis of cellulose or cellotetraose by the complex yielded cellobiose as the main product. Cellopentaose or cellohexaose was hydrolyzed by the complex to cellotriose or cellotetraose, respectively, in addition to cellobiose. Xylobiose was the main product of xylan hydrolysis, and xylobiose and xylotriose were the major products of xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. Activity (Avicelase) resulting in hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose required Ca2+ and a reducing agent. The multiprotein complex had temperature optima for Avicelase, carboxymethylcellulase, and xylanase activities at 45, 55, and 55 degrees C, respectively, and pH optima at 5.6 to 5.8, 5.5, and 6.55, respectively. Electron microscopy of the 700,000-Mr enzyme complex revealed particles relatively uniform in size (12 to 15 nm wide) and apparently composed of subunit structures. Elution of strain C7 concentrated culture fluid from Sephacryl S-300 columns yielded an A280 peak in the 130,000-Mr region. Pooled fractions from the 130,000-Mr peak had carboxymethylcellulase activity but lacked Avicelase activity. Except for the inability to hydrolyze cellulose, the 130,000-Mr preparation had a substrate specificity identical to that of the 700,000-Mr protein complex. A comparison by immunoblotting techniques of proteins in the 130,000- and 700,000-Mr preparations, indicated that the two enzyme preparations had cross-reacting antigenic determinants. Images PMID:2376560

  11. Structural and biochemical analyses of alanine racemase from the multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile strain 630

    PubMed Central

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Nelson, Sarah K.; Mootien, Sara; Lee, Yashang; Rezende, Wanderson C.; Hyman, Daniel A.; Matsumoto, Monica M.; Reiling, Scott; Kelleher, Alan; Ledizet, Michel; Koski, Raymond A.; Anthony, Karen G.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium, is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients. C. difficile is frequently associated with antibiotic treatment, and causes diseases ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to life-threatening pseudo­membranous colitis. The severity of C. difficile infections is exacerbated by the emergence of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant strains, which are difficult to treat and are often associated with increased mortality rates. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible racemization of l- and d-alanine. Since d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan, and there are no known Alr homologs in humans, this enzyme is being tested as an antibiotic target. Cycloserine is an antibiotic that inhibits Alr. In this study, the catalytic properties and crystal structures of recombinant Alr from the virulent and multidrug-resistant C. difficile strain 630 are presented. Three crystal structures of C. difficile Alr (CdAlr), corresponding to the complex with PLP, the complex with cycloserine and a K271T mutant form of the enzyme with bound PLP, are presented. The structures are prototypical Alr homodimers with two active sites in which the cofactor PLP and cycloserine are localized. Kinetic analyses reveal that the K271T mutant CdAlr has the highest catalytic constants reported to date for any Alr. Additional studies are needed to identify the basis for the high catalytic activity. The structural and activity data presented are first steps towards using CdAlr for the development of structure-based therapeutics for C. difficile infections. PMID:25004969

  12. Strain engineering water transport in graphene nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Ma, Ming; Xu, Zhiping; Sheridan, John; Zheng, Quanshui

    2011-11-01

    Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulations, we found that engineering the strain on the graphene planes forming a channel can drastically change the interfacial friction of water transport through it. There is a sixfold change of interfacial friction stress when the strain changes from -10% to 10%. Stretching the graphene walls increases the interfacial shear stress, while compressing the graphene walls reduces it. Detailed analysis of the molecular structure reveals the essential roles of the interfacial potential energy barrier and the structural commensurateness between the solid walls and the first water layer. Our results suggest that the strain engineering is an effective way of controlling the water transport inside nanochannels. The resulting quantitative relations between shear stress and slip velocity and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms will be invaluable in designing graphene nanochannel devices. PMID:22181520

  13. Fermentative hydrogen production from glucose and starch using pure strains and artificial co-cultures of Clostridium spp.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pure bacterial strains give better yields when producing H2 than mixed, natural communities. However the main drawback with the pure cultures is the need to perform the fermentations under sterile conditions. Therefore, H2 production using artificial co-cultures, composed of well characterized strains, is one of the directions currently undertaken in the field of biohydrogen research. Results Four pure Clostridium cultures, including C. butyricum CWBI1009, C. pasteurianum DSM525, C. beijerinckii DSM1820 and C. felsineum DSM749, and three different co-cultures composed of (1) C. pasteurianum and C. felsineum, (2) C. butyricum and C. felsineum, (3) C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum, were grown in 20 L batch bioreactors. In the first part of the study a strategy composed of three-culture sequences was developed to determine the optimal pH for H2 production (sequence 1); and the H2-producing potential of each pure strain and co-culture, during glucose (sequence 2) and starch (sequence 3) fermentations at the optimal pH. The best H2 yields were obtained for starch fermentations, and the highest yield of 2.91 mol H2/ mol hexose was reported for C. butyricum. By contrast, the biogas production rates were higher for glucose fermentations and the highest value of 1.5 L biogas/ h was observed for the co-culture (1). In general co-cultures produced H2 at higher rates than the pure Clostridium cultures, without negatively affecting the H2 yields. Interestingly, all the Clostridium strains and co-cultures were shown to utilize lactate (present in a starch-containing medium), and C. beijerinckii was able to re-consume formate producing additional H2. In the second part of the study the co-culture (3) was used to produce H2 during 13 days of glucose fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). In addition, the species dynamics, as monitored by qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR), showed a stable coexistence of C. pasteurianum and C. butyricum during this

  14. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens Type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  15. Variant forms of the binary toxin CDT locus and tcdC gene in Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Stare, Barbara Geric; Delmée, Michel; Rupnik, Maja

    2007-03-01

    Variability in the genes for toxin A, toxin B and other pathogenicity locus regions is well known and is the basis for the distribution of Clostridium difficile strains into variant toxinotypes. Previous data have indicated that some C. difficile strains have a non-functional truncated form of the binary toxin (CDT) locus. This study analysed variability in the CDT locus and the presence of deleted tcdC genes in C. difficile strains. A total of 146 strains were screened, including known variant toxinotypes and non-variant A+B+ (toxinotype 0) and A-B- C. difficile strains. In all of the strains studied, only two forms of the CDT locus were found: a full-length 4.3 kb fragment encoding the functional binary toxin or a truncated 2.3 kb fragment. Whilst the full-length CDT locus was found almost exclusively in variant toxinotypes, the truncated form was detected in 79% of toxinotype 0 strains. Non-toxinogenic A-B- strains with a truncated version were not found and only rarely possessed the full-length CDT locus (A-B-CDT+ strains). Four different forms of the tcdC gene were found; three represented deleted versions and typically were found in toxinotypes III-VII, XI, XIV-XVI and XXIV. PMID:17314362

  16. Strain measurements in a rotary engine housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. M.; Bond, T. H.; Addy, H. E.; Chun, K. S.; Lu, C. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The development of structural design tools for Rotary Combustion Engines (RCE) using Finite Element Modeling (FEM) requires knowledge about the response of engine materials to various service conditions. This paper describes experimental work that studied housing deformation as a result of thermal, pressure and mechanical loads. The measurement of thermal loads, clamping pressure, and deformation was accomplished by use of high-temperature strain gauges, thermocouples, and a high speed data acquisition system. FEM models for heat transfer stress analysis of the rotor housing will be verified and refined based on these experimental results.

  17. Relationship Between Bacterial Strain Type, Host Biomarkers, and Mortality in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A. Sarah; Eyre, David W.; Wyllie, David H.; Dingle, Kate E.; Griffiths, David; Shine, Brian; Oakley, Sarah; O'Connor, Lily; Finney, John; Vaughan, Alison; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilcox, Mark H.; Peto, Tim E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite substantial interest in biomarkers, their impact on clinical outcomes and variation with bacterial strain has rarely been explored using integrated databases. Methods. From September 2006 to May 2011, strains isolated from Clostridium difficile toxin enzyme immunoassay (EIA)–positive fecal samples from Oxfordshire, United Kingdom (approximately 600 000 people) underwent multilocus sequence typing. Fourteen-day mortality and levels of 15 baseline biomarkers were compared between consecutive C. difficile infections (CDIs) from different clades/sequence types (STs) and EIA-negative controls using Cox and normal regression adjusted for demographic/clinical factors. Results. Fourteen-day mortality was 13% in 2222 adults with 2745 EIA-positive samples (median, 78 years) vs 5% in 20 722 adults with 27 550 EIA-negative samples (median, 74 years) (absolute attributable mortality, 7.7%; 95% CI, 6.4%–9.0%). Mortality was highest in clade 5 CDIs (25% [16 of 63]; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 078/ST 11), then clade 2 (20% [111 of 560]; 99% PCR ribotype 027/ST 1) versus clade 1 (12% [137 of 1168]; adjusted P < .0001). Within clade 1, 14-day mortality was only 4% (3 of 84) in ST 44 (PCR ribotype 015) (adjusted P = .05 vs other clade 1). Mean baseline neutrophil counts also varied significantly by genotype: 12.4, 11.6, and 9.5 × 109 neutrophils/L for clades 5, 2 and 1, respectively, vs 7.0 × 109 neutrophils/L in EIA-negative controls (P < .0001) and 7.9 × 109 neutrophils/L in ST 44 (P = .08). There were strong associations between C. difficile-type-specific effects on mortality and neutrophil/white cell counts (rho = 0.48), C-reactive-protein (rho = 0.43), eosinophil counts (rho = −0.45), and serum albumin (rho = −0.47). Biomarkers predicted 30%–40% of clade-specific mortality differences. Conclusions. C. difficile genotype predicts mortality, and excess mortality correlates with genotype-specific changes in biomarkers, strongly

  18. Production and Characterization of Chemically Inactivated Genetically Engineered Clostridium difficile Toxoids.

    PubMed

    Vidunas, Eugene; Mathews, Antony; Weaver, Michele; Cai, Ping; Koh, Eun Hee; Patel-Brown, Sujata; Yuan, Hailey; Zheng, Zi-Rong; Carriere, Marjolaine; Johnson, J Erik; Lotvin, Jason; Moran, Justin

    2016-07-01

    A recombinant Clostridium difficile expression system was used to produce genetically engineered toxoids A and B as immunogens for a prophylactic vaccine against C. difficile-associated disease. Although all known enzymatic activities responsible for cytotoxicity were genetically abrogated, the toxoids exhibited residual cytotoxic activity as measured in an in vitro cell-based cytotoxicity assay. The residual cytotoxicity was eliminated by treating the toxoids with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide. Mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis of the EDC-inactivated toxoids identified crosslinks, glycine adducts, and β-alanine adducts. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that modifications resulting from the chemical treatment did not appreciably affect recognition of epitopes by both toxin A- and B-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Compared to formaldehyde-inactivated toxoids, the EDC/N-hydroxysuccinimide-inactivated toxoids exhibited superior stability in solution with respect to reversion of cytotoxic activity. PMID:27233688

  19. Strain Types and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Clostridium difficile Isolates from the United States, 2011 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Goering, Richard V.; Whitmore, Joseph D.; Lynn, Ashley N. W.; Persing, David H.; Tenover, Fred C.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the PCR ribotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 508 toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolates collected between 2011 and 2013 from 32 U.S. hospitals. Of the 29 PCR ribotypes identified, the 027 strain type was the most common (28.1%), although the rates varied by geographic region. Ribotype 014/020 isolates appear to be emerging. Clindamycin and moxifloxacin resistances (36.8% and 35.8%, respectively) were the most frequent resistance phenotypes observed. Reduced susceptibility to vancomycin was observed in 39.1% of 027 isolates. PMID:24752264

  20. Proteomic analysis to elucidate degeneration of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and role of Ca(2+) in strain recovery from degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jia; Jiao, Shengyin; Du, Renjia; Zhang, Ruijuan; Zhang, Yan; Han, Bei

    2016-06-01

    Degeneration of solventogenic Clostridium strains is one of the major barriers in bio-butanol production. A degenerated Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 strain (DG-8052) was obtained without any genetic manipulation. Supplementation of CaCO3 to fermentation medium could partially recover metabolism of DG-8052 by more than 50 % increase of cell growth and solvent production. This study investigated the protein expression profile of DG-8052 and its response to CaCO3 treatment. Compared with WT-8052, the lower expressed proteins were responsible for disruption of RNA secondary structures and DNA repair, sporulation, signal transduction, transcription regulation, and membrane transport in DG-8052. Interestingly, accompanied with the decreased glucose utilization and lower solvent production, there was a decreased level of sigma-54 modulation protein which may indicate that the level of sigma-54 activity may be associated with the observed strain degeneration. For the addition of CaCO3, proteomic and biochemical study results revealed that besides buffer capacity, Ca(2+) could stabilize heat shock proteins, increase DNA synthesis and replication, and enhance expression of solventogenic enzymes in DG-8052, which has a similar contribution in WT-8052. PMID:27021843

  1. Engineering Clostridium beijerinckii with the Cbei_4693 gene knockout for enhanced ferulic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Guo, Ting; Shen, Xiaoning; Xu, Jiahui; Wang, Junzhi; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Dong; Niu, Huanqing; Liang, Lei; Ying, Hanjie

    2016-07-10

    A mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052, C. beijerinckii M11, which exhibited ferulic acid tolerance up to 0.9g/L, was generated using atmospheric pressure glow discharge and high-throughput screening. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that this strain harbored a mutation of the Cbei_4693 gene, which encodes a hypothetical protein suspected to be an NADPH-dependent FMN reductase. After disrupting the Cbei_4693 gene in C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 using the ClosTron group II intron-based gene inactivation system, we obtained the Cbei_4693 gene inactivated mutant strain, C. beijerinckii 4693::int. Compared with C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052, 6.23g/L of butanol was produced in P2 medium containing 0.5g/L of ferulic acid by 4693::int, and the ferulic acid tolerance was also significantly increased up to 0.8g/L. These data showed, for the first time, that the Cbei_4693 gene plays an important role in regulating ferulic acid tolerance in ABE fermentation by C. beijerinckii. PMID:27164255

  2. Identification of a Lambda Toxin-Negative Clostridium perfringens Strain that Processes and Activates Epsilon Prototoxin Intracellularly

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, Justine M.; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B and D strains produce epsilon toxin (ETX), which is one of the most potent clostridial toxins and is involved in enteritis and enterotoxemias of domestic animals. ETX is produced initially as an inactive prototoxin that is typically then secreted and processed by intestinal proteases or possibly, for some strains, lambda toxin. During the current work a unique C. perfringens strain was identified that intracellularly processes epsilon prototoxin to an active form capable of killing MDCK cells. This activated toxin is not secreted but instead is apparently released upon lysis of bacterial cells entering stationary phase. These findings broaden understanding of the pathogenesis of type B and D infections by identifying a new mechanism of ETX activation. PMID:22982043

  3. Genetic, physiological and nutritional studies on Clostridium strains isolated and screened for characteristics useful in enhanced oil recovery, with special reference to high salt tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Grula, M.M.; Russell, H.H.

    1990-03-01

    This work is concerned with a group of microorganisms generally thought to have the highest potential for usefulness in microbial enhancement of oil recovery (MEOR), namely, fermentative species of the genus Clostridium. The report consists of two parts: (1) a study of the effects of various environmental factors (mainly chemical) on growth, gas production, sporulation, and spore germination of several strains of Clostridium in laboratory media; and (2) a study of the effects of core minerals and pore volume on solvent, acid, and gas production and refeedability (in cores) of similar freshly isolated Clostridium strains. In addition, the bacterial strains were characterized, and their basic nutritional requirements were determined. 15 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  4. Genetic Diversity among Clostridium botulinum Strains Harboring bont/A2 and bont/A3 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Brian H.; Joseph, Lavin A.; Meno, Sarah R.; Fernández, Rafael A.; Maslanka, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type A strains are known to be genetically diverse and widespread throughout the world. Genetic diversity studies have focused mainly on strains harboring one type A botulinum toxin gene, bont/A1, although all reported bont/A gene variants have been associated with botulism cases. Our study provides insight into the genetic diversity of C. botulinum type A strains, which contain bont/A2 (n = 42) and bont/A3 (n = 4) genes, isolated from diverse samples and geographic origins. Genetic diversity was assessed by using bont nucleotide sequencing, content analysis of the bont gene clusters, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sequences of bont genes obtained in this study showed 99.9 to 100% identity with other bont/A2 or bont/A3 gene sequences available in public databases. The neurotoxin gene clusters of the subtype A2 and A3 strains analyzed in this study were similar in gene content. C. botulinum strains harboring bont/A2 and bont/A3 genes were divided into six and two MLST profiles, respectively. Four groups of strains shared a similarity of at least 95% by PFGE; the largest group included 21 out of 46 strains. The strains analyzed in this study showed relatively limited genetic diversity using either MLST or PFGE. PMID:23042179

  5. Genetic diversity among Clostridium botulinum strains harboring bont/A2 and bont/A3 genes.

    PubMed

    Lúquez, Carolina; Raphael, Brian H; Joseph, Lavin A; Meno, Sarah R; Fernández, Rafael A; Maslanka, Susan E

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum type A strains are known to be genetically diverse and widespread throughout the world. Genetic diversity studies have focused mainly on strains harboring one type A botulinum toxin gene, bont/A1, although all reported bont/A gene variants have been associated with botulism cases. Our study provides insight into the genetic diversity of C. botulinum type A strains, which contain bont/A2 (n = 42) and bont/A3 (n = 4) genes, isolated from diverse samples and geographic origins. Genetic diversity was assessed by using bont nucleotide sequencing, content analysis of the bont gene clusters, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sequences of bont genes obtained in this study showed 99.9 to 100% identity with other bont/A2 or bont/A3 gene sequences available in public databases. The neurotoxin gene clusters of the subtype A2 and A3 strains analyzed in this study were similar in gene content. C. botulinum strains harboring bont/A2 and bont/A3 genes were divided into six and two MLST profiles, respectively. Four groups of strains shared a similarity of at least 95% by PFGE; the largest group included 21 out of 46 strains. The strains analyzed in this study showed relatively limited genetic diversity using either MLST or PFGE. PMID:23042179

  6. Analysis of a unique Clostridium botulinum strain from the Southern hemisphere producing a novel type E botulinum neurotoxin subtype

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium botulinum strains that produce botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) are most commonly isolated from botulism cases, marine environments, and animals in regions of high latitude in the Northern hemisphere. A strain of C. botulinum type E (CDC66177) was isolated from soil in Chubut, Argentina. Previous studies showed that the amino acid sequences of BoNT/E produced by various strains differ by < 6% and that the type E neurotoxin gene cluster inserts into the rarA operon. Results Genetic and mass spectral analysis demonstrated that the BoNT/E produced by CDC66177 is a novel toxin subtype (E9). Toxin gene sequencing indicated that BoNT/E9 differed by nearly 11% at the amino acid level compared to BoNT/E1. Mass spectrometric analysis of BoNT/E9 revealed that its endopeptidase substrate cleavage site was identical to other BoNT/E subtypes. Further analysis of this strain demonstrated that its 16S rRNA sequence clustered with other Group II C. botulinum (producing BoNT types B, E, and F) strains. Genomic DNA isolated from strain CDC66177 hybridized with fewer probes using a Group II C. botulinum subtyping microarray compared to other type E strains examined. Whole genome shotgun sequencing of strain CDC66177 revealed that while the toxin gene cluster inserted into the rarA operon similar to other type E strains, its overall genome content shared greater similarity with a Group II C. botulinum type B strain (17B). Conclusions These results expand our understanding of the global distribution of C. botulinum type E strains and suggest that the type E toxin gene cluster may be able to insert into C. botulinum strains with a more diverse genetic background than previously recognized. PMID:23113872

  7. Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for Biofuel Production (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Adam Guss of Oak Ridge National Lab on "Metabolic engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for biofuel production" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  8. Inhibitory effect of a copper-dipeptide complex on the establishment of a Clostridium perenne strain in the intestinal tract of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dubos, F; Pelissier, J P; Andrieux, C; Ducluzeau, R; Raibaud, P

    1985-01-01

    A semisynthetic diet fed to axenic mice was found to prevent the establishment of a Clostridium perenne strain in their intestinal tract. This inhibitory effect did not occur when axenic mice were preinoculated with a strain of Clostridium difficile. The inhibitory effect was related to the presence in the intestinal contents of axenic mice of both dietary copper and a dipeptide, aspartic-epsilon-lysine. When C. difficile was inoculated into axenic mice, the dipeptide disappeared from the digesta, and C. perenne became established even in the presence of high concentrations of copper. PMID:4091557

  9. Some Properties of Heat-Resistant and Heat-Sensitive Strains of Clostridium perfringens I. Heat Resistance and Toxigenicity1

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Karl F.; Strong, Dorothy H.

    1967-01-01

    Heat resistance at 100 C (D-values), sporulating ratios, toxigenicity for mice, and lecithinase activity (as micrograms per milliliter of enzyme, ascertained by the lecithovitellin reaction) were determined for four strains of Clostridium perfringens. A definite inverse relationship between thermal resistance and toxigenicity was found. The D-values ranged from 17.6 for the most heat-resistant strain to 0.3 for the strain possessing the least heat resistance, with corresponding lecithinase activities from 25 to 133 μg/ml of enzyme. The sporulating ratios did not differ greatly between the strains. The heat stability of the toxin was greater at 100 C than at 75 C. There was a noticeable difference between the heat stabilities of the toxin in the culture fluids of the heat-sensitive and heat-resistant strains at pH 7.0 when the toxic filtrates were held at 100 C. At a holding temperature of 75 C, a similar but lesser difference was observed at pH 5.5. Heat resistance and lecithinase activity did not change when a substrain of the least heat-resistant parent strain was obtained through heat selection by a single transfer, or when the most heat-resistant strain was transferred serially 12 times. PMID:4289809

  10. Genome sequence of a proteolytic (Group I) Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A and comparative analysis of the clostridial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sebaihia, Mohammed; Peck, Michael W.; Minton, Nigel P.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Mitchell, Wilfrid J.; Carter, Andrew T.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Mason, David R.; Crossman, Lisa; Paul, Catherine J.; Ivens, Alasdair; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.J.; Davis, Ian J.; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M.; Churcher, Carol; Quail, Michael A.; Chillingworth, Tracey; Feltwell, Theresa; Fraser, Audrey; Goodhead, Ian; Hance, Zahra; Jagels, Kay; Larke, Natasha; Maddison, Mark; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Sanders, Mandy; Simmonds, Mark; White, Brian; Whithead, Sally; Parkhill, Julian

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a heterogeneous Gram-positive species that comprises four genetically and physiologically distinct groups of bacteria that share the ability to produce botulinum neurotoxin, the most poisonous toxin known to man, and the causative agent of botulism, a severe disease of humans and animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of a representative of Group I (proteolytic) C. botulinum (strain Hall A, ATCC 3502). The genome consists of a chromosome (3,886,916 bp) and a plasmid (16,344 bp), which carry 3650 and 19 predicted genes, respectively. Consistent with the proteolytic phenotype of this strain, the genome harbors a large number of genes encoding secreted proteases and enzymes involved in uptake and metabolism of amino acids. The genome also reveals a hitherto unknown ability of C. botulinum to degrade chitin. There is a significant lack of recently acquired DNA, indicating a stable genomic content, in strong contrast to the fluid genome of Clostridium difficile, which can form longer-term relationships with its host. Overall, the genome indicates that C. botulinum is adapted to a saprophytic lifestyle both in soil and aquatic environments. This pathogen relies on its toxin to rapidly kill a wide range of prey species, and to gain access to nutrient sources, it releases a large number of extracellular enzymes to soften and destroy rotting or decayed tissues. PMID:17519437

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of the Nonpathogenic Soil-Dwelling Bacterium Clostridium sporogenes Strain NCIMB 10696

    PubMed Central

    Kubiak, Aleksandra M.; Poehlein, Anja; Budd, Patrick; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Winzer, Klaus; Theys, Jan; Lambin, Philip; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a harmless spore-forming anaerobe that is widely distributed in soil/water and in the intestines of humans and animals. It is extensively used as a safe model to test the suitability of new preservative methods by the food industry and has potential to deliver therapeutic agents to tumors. PMID:26294634

  12. Prevalence and pathogenicity of binary toxin–positive Clostridium difficile strains that do not produce toxins A and B

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, C.; Emirian, A.; Le Monnier, A.; Cathala, L.; De Montclos, H.; Goret, J.; Berger, P.; Petit, A.; De Chevigny, A.; Jean-Pierre, H.; Nebbad, B.; Camiade, S.; Meckenstock, R.; Lalande, V.; Marchandin, H.; Barbut, F.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are the toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). A third toxin, called binary toxin (CDT), can be detected in 17% to 23% of strains, but its role in human disease has not been clearly defined. We report six independent cases of patients with diarrhoea suspected of having C. difficile infection due to strains from toxinotype XI/PCR ribotype 033 or 033-like, an unusual toxinotype/PCR ribotype positive for CDT but negative for TcdA and TcdB. Four patients were considered truly infected by clinicians and were specifically treated with oral metronidazole. One of the cases was identified during a prevalence study of A−B−CDT+ strains. In this study, we screened a French collection of 220 nontoxigenic strains and found only one (0.5%) toxinotype XI/PCR ribotype 033 or 033-like strain. The description of such strains raises the question of the role of binary toxin as a virulence factor and could have implications for laboratory diagnostics that currently rarely include testing for binary toxin. PMID:25755885

  13. Prevalence and pathogenicity of binary toxin-positive Clostridium difficile strains that do not produce toxins A and B.

    PubMed

    Eckert, C; Emirian, A; Le Monnier, A; Cathala, L; De Montclos, H; Goret, J; Berger, P; Petit, A; De Chevigny, A; Jean-Pierre, H; Nebbad, B; Camiade, S; Meckenstock, R; Lalande, V; Marchandin, H; Barbut, F

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are the toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). A third toxin, called binary toxin (CDT), can be detected in 17% to 23% of strains, but its role in human disease has not been clearly defined. We report six independent cases of patients with diarrhoea suspected of having C. difficile infection due to strains from toxinotype XI/PCR ribotype 033 or 033-like, an unusual toxinotype/PCR ribotype positive for CDT but negative for TcdA and TcdB. Four patients were considered truly infected by clinicians and were specifically treated with oral metronidazole. One of the cases was identified during a prevalence study of A(-)B(-)CDT(+) strains. In this study, we screened a French collection of 220 nontoxigenic strains and found only one (0.5%) toxinotype XI/PCR ribotype 033 or 033-like strain. The description of such strains raises the question of the role of binary toxin as a virulence factor and could have implications for laboratory diagnostics that currently rarely include testing for binary toxin. PMID:25755885

  14. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression

    PubMed Central

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Grande, Laura; Morabito, Stefano; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although they carry several putative beta-lactamase genes. Instead, we found that the megaplasmids are essential for growth of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains at the relatively low temperature of 15°C, and are also relevant for growth of strains under limiting pH and salinity conditions, as well as under favorable environmental conditions. Moreover, the presence of the megaplasmids was associated with increased transcript levels of the gene encoding BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains, indicating that the megaplasmids likely contain transcriptional regulators. However, the levels of BoNT/E in the supernatants of the cured and uncured strains were similar after 24 and 48 h culture, suggesting that expression of BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains is not ultimately controlled by the megaplasmids. Together, our results reveal that the C. butyricum type E megaplasmids exert pleiotropic effects on the growth of their microbial hosts under optimal and limiting environmental conditions, and also highlight the possibility of original regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression of BoNT/E. PMID:26941734

  15. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression.

    PubMed

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Grande, Laura; Morabito, Stefano; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although they carry several putative beta-lactamase genes. Instead, we found that the megaplasmids are essential for growth of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains at the relatively low temperature of 15°C, and are also relevant for growth of strains under limiting pH and salinity conditions, as well as under favorable environmental conditions. Moreover, the presence of the megaplasmids was associated with increased transcript levels of the gene encoding BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains, indicating that the megaplasmids likely contain transcriptional regulators. However, the levels of BoNT/E in the supernatants of the cured and uncured strains were similar after 24 and 48 h culture, suggesting that expression of BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains is not ultimately controlled by the megaplasmids. Together, our results reveal that the C. butyricum type E megaplasmids exert pleiotropic effects on the growth of their microbial hosts under optimal and limiting environmental conditions, and also highlight the possibility of original regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression of BoNT/E. PMID:26941734

  16. Three enzymatically active neurotoxins of Clostridium botulinum strain Af84: BoNT/A2, /F4, and /F5.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Baudys, Jakub; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Barr, John R

    2014-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by various species of clostridia and are potent neurotoxins which cause the disease botulism, by cleaving proteins needed for successful nerve transmission. There are currently seven confirmed serotypes of BoNTs, labeled A-G, and toxin-producing clostridia typically only produce one serotype of BoNT. There are a few strains (bivalent strains) which are known to produce more than one serotype of BoNT, producing either both BoNT/A and /B, BoNT/A and /F, or BoNT/B and /F, designated as Ab, Ba, Af, or Bf. Recently, it was reported that Clostridium botulinum strain Af84 has three neurotoxin gene clusters: bont/A2, bont/F4, and bont/F5. This was the first report of a clostridial organism containing more than two neurotoxin gene clusters. Using a mass spectrometry based proteomics approach, we report here that all three neurotoxins, BoNT/A2, /F4, and /F5, are produced by C. botulinum Af84. Label free MS(E) quantification of the three toxins indicated that toxin composition is 88% BoNT/A2, 1% BoNT/F4, and 11% BoNT/F5. The enzymatic activity of all three neurotoxins was assessed by examining the enzymatic activity of the neurotoxins upon peptide substrates, which mimic the toxins' natural targets, and monitoring cleavage of the substrates by mass spectrometry. We determined that all three neurotoxins are enzymatically active. This is the first report of three enzymatically active neurotoxins produced in a single strain of Clostridium botulinum. PMID:24605815

  17. Purification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin FA from a Genetically Modified Clostridium botulinum Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H.; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Dykes, Janet K.; Lin, Guangyun; Nawrocki, Erin M.; Pier, Christina L.; Barr, John R.; Maslanka, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridial species, are the cause of the severe disease botulism in humans and animals. Early research on BoNTs has led to their classification into seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) based upon the selective neutralization of their toxicity in mice by homologous antibodies. Recently, a report of a potential eighth serotype of BoNT, designated “type H,” has been controversial. This novel BoNT was produced together with BoNT/B2 in a dual-toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strain. The data used to designate this novel toxin as a new serotype were derived from culture supernatant containing both BoNT/B2 and novel toxin and from sequence information, although data from two independent laboratories indicated neutralization by antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, and classification as BoNT/FA was proposed. The sequence data indicate a chimeric structure consisting of a BoNT/A1 receptor binding domain, a BoNT/F5 light-chain domain, and a novel translocation domain most closely related to BoNT/F1. Here, we describe characterization of this toxin purified from the native strain in which expression of the second BoNT (BoNT/B) has been eliminated. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the toxin preparation contained only BoNT/FA and confirmed catalytic activity analogous to that of BoNT/F5. The in vivo mouse bioassay indicated a specific activity of this toxin of 3.8 × 107 mouse 50% lethal dose (mLD50) units/mg, whereas activity in cultured human neurons was very high (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.02 mLD50/well). Neutralization assays in cells and mice both indicated full neutralization by various antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, although at 16- to 20-fold-lower efficiency than for BoNT/A1. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by anaerobic bacteria, are the cause of the potentially deadly, neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNTs have been classified into seven serotypes

  18. Purification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin FA from a Genetically Modified Clostridium botulinum Strain.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R; Dykes, Janet K; Lin, Guangyun; Nawrocki, Erin M; Pier, Christina L; Barr, John R; Maslanka, Susan E; Johnson, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridial species, are the cause of the severe disease botulism in humans and animals. Early research on BoNTs has led to their classification into seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) based upon the selective neutralization of their toxicity in mice by homologous antibodies. Recently, a report of a potential eighth serotype of BoNT, designated "type H," has been controversial. This novel BoNT was produced together with BoNT/B2 in a dual-toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strain. The data used to designate this novel toxin as a new serotype were derived from culture supernatant containing both BoNT/B2 and novel toxin and from sequence information, although data from two independent laboratories indicated neutralization by antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, and classification as BoNT/FA was proposed. The sequence data indicate a chimeric structure consisting of a BoNT/A1 receptor binding domain, a BoNT/F5 light-chain domain, and a novel translocation domain most closely related to BoNT/F1. Here, we describe characterization of this toxin purified from the native strain in which expression of the second BoNT (BoNT/B) has been eliminated. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the toxin preparation contained only BoNT/FA and confirmed catalytic activity analogous to that of BoNT/F5. The in vivo mouse bioassay indicated a specific activity of this toxin of 3.8 × 10(7) mouse 50% lethal dose (mLD50) units/mg, whereas activity in cultured human neurons was very high (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.02 mLD50/well). Neutralization assays in cells and mice both indicated full neutralization by various antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, although at 16- to 20-fold-lower efficiency than for BoNT/A1. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by anaerobic bacteria, are the cause of the potentially deadly, neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNTs have been classified into seven serotypes, serotypes A

  19. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert Clostridium difficile Epi assay for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection and typing of the NAP1 strain at a cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Babady, N Esther; Stiles, Jeffrey; Ruggiero, Phyllis; Khosa, Perminder; Huang, David; Shuptar, Susan; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E

    2010-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of health care-associated diarrhea. Accurate and rapid diagnosis is essential to improve patient outcome and prevent disease spread. We compared our two-step diagnostic algorithm, an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) followed by the cytotoxin neutralization test (CYT) with a turnaround time of 24 to 48 h, versus the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile Epi assay, a PCR-based assay with a turnaround time of <1 h. In the first phase of the study, only GDH-positive stool samples were tested by both CYT and Xpert PCR. Discordant results were resolved by toxigenic culture. In the second phase, all stool samples were tested by GDH and Xpert PCR. Only GDH-positive stools were further tested by CYT. Genotypic characterization of 45 Xpert PCR-positive stools was performed by sequencing of the tcdC gene and PCR ribotyping. In phase 1, the agreement between the GDH-CYT and the GDH-Xpert PCR was 72%. The sensitivities and specificities of GDH-CYT and GDH-Xpert PCR were 57% and 97% and 100% and 97%, respectively. In phase 2, the agreement between GDH-CYT and Xpert PCR alone was 95%. As in phase 1, sensitivity of the Xpert PCR was higher than that of the GDH-CYT. The correlation between PCR-ribotyping, sequencing, and Xpert PCR for detection of NAP1 strains was excellent (>90%). The excellent sensitivity and specificity and the rapid turnaround time of the Xpert PCR assay as well as its strain-typing capability make it an attractive option for diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:20943860

  20. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert Clostridium difficile Epi Assay for Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection and Typing of the NAP1 Strain at a Cancer Hospital ▿

    PubMed Central

    Babady, N. Esther; Stiles, Jeffrey; Ruggiero, Phyllis; Khosa, Perminder; Huang, David; Shuptar, Susan; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of health care-associated diarrhea. Accurate and rapid diagnosis is essential to improve patient outcome and prevent disease spread. We compared our two-step diagnostic algorithm, an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) followed by the cytotoxin neutralization test (CYT) with a turnaround time of 24 to 48 h, versus the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile Epi assay, a PCR-based assay with a turnaround time of <1 h. In the first phase of the study, only GDH-positive stool samples were tested by both CYT and Xpert PCR. Discordant results were resolved by toxigenic culture. In the second phase, all stool samples were tested by GDH and Xpert PCR. Only GDH-positive stools were further tested by CYT. Genotypic characterization of 45 Xpert PCR-positive stools was performed by sequencing of the tcdC gene and PCR ribotyping. In phase 1, the agreement between the GDH-CYT and the GDH-Xpert PCR was 72%. The sensitivities and specificities of GDH-CYT and GDH-Xpert PCR were 57% and 97% and 100% and 97%, respectively. In phase 2, the agreement between GDH-CYT and Xpert PCR alone was 95%. As in phase 1, sensitivity of the Xpert PCR was higher than that of the GDH-CYT. The correlation between PCR-ribotyping, sequencing, and Xpert PCR for detection of NAP1 strains was excellent (>90%). The excellent sensitivity and specificity and the rapid turnaround time of the Xpert PCR assay as well as its strain-typing capability make it an attractive option for diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:20943860

  1. Differentiation of group I and group II strains of Clostridium botulinum by focal plane array Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Jonah; Ghetler, Andrew; Sedman, Jacqueline; Leclair, Daniel; Pagotto, Franco; Austin, John W; Ismail, Ashraf A

    2006-10-01

    A method was developed for whole-organism fingerprinting of Clostridium botulinum isolates by focal plane array Fourier transform infrared (FPA-FTIR) spectroscopy. A database of 150,000 infrared spectra of 44 strains of C. botulinum was acquired using a FPA-FTIR imaging spectrometer equipped with a 16 x 16 array detector to evaluate the ability of FTIR spectroscopy to differentiate the 44 strains. The database contained strains from C. botulinum groups I and II producing botulinum neurotoxin of serotypes A, B, E, and F. All strains were grown on each of three agar media (brain heart infusion, McClung Toabe agar base, and universal) prior to spectral acquisition. Given the dependence of the infrared spectra of microorganisms on the composition of the growth medium, the spectra were initially separated into three subsets corresponding to the three growth media employed. However, the replicate spectra of all strains, regardless of growth medium, were properly clustered by hierarchical cluster analysis based on differences in their infrared spectral profiles in three narrow spectral regions (1,428 to 1,412, 1,296 to 1,284, and 1,112 to 1,100 cm(-1)). The dendrogram generated from the FTIR data revealed complete separation between group I and group II strains. The spectral differences between group I and group II strains allowed accurate classification of C. botulinum strains at the group level in two blind validation studies (n = 40). These results demonstrate that FPA-FTIR spectroscopy has the potential for rapid discrimination of group I and group II C. botulinum strains in less than 3 min per sample. PMID:17066916

  2. Deciphering Adaptation Strategies of the Epidemic Clostridium difficile 027 Strain during Infection through In Vivo Transcriptional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kansau, Imad; Barketi-Klai, Amira; Monot, Marc; Hoys, Sandra; Dupuy, Bruno; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for a wide spectrum of infection from asymptomatic carriage to severe, relapsing colitis. Since 2003, C. difficile infections have increased with a higher morbidity and mortality due to the emergence of epidemic and hypervirulent C. difficile strains such as those of the epidemic lineage 027/BI/NAP1. To decipher the hypervirulence and epidemicity of 027 strains, we analyzed gene expression profiles of the R20291 027 strain using a monoxenic mouse model during the first 38h of infection. A total of 741 genes were differentially expressed during the course of infection. They are mainly distributed in functional categories involved in host adaptation. Several genes of PTS and ABC transporters were significantly regulated during the infection, underlying the ability of strain R20291 to adapt its metabolism according to nutrient availability in the digestive tract. In this animal model, despite the early sporulation process, sporulation efficiency seems to indicate that growth of R20291 vegetative cells versus spores were favored during infection. The bacterial mechanisms associated to adaptability and flexibility within the gut environment, in addition to the virulence factor expression and antibiotic resistance, should contribute to the epidemicity and hypervirulence of the C. difficile 027 strains. PMID:27351947

  3. Acid phosphatase test proves superior to standard phenotypic identification procedure for Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from water

    PubMed Central

    Ryzinska-Paier, G.; Sommer, R.; Haider, J.M.; Knetsch, S.; Frick, C.; Kirschner, A.K.T.; Farnleitner, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is used as an indicator for persistent faecal pollution as well as to monitor the efficacy of water treatment processes. For these purposes, differentiation between C. perfringens and other Clostridia is essential and is routinely carried out by phenotypic standard tests as proposed in the ISO/CD 6461-2:2002 (ISO_LGMN: lactose fermentation, gelatine liquidation, motility and nitrate reduction). Because the ISO_LGMN procedure is time consuming and labour intensive, the acid phosphatase test was investigated as a possible and much more rapid alternative method for confirmation. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare confirmation results obtained by these two phenotypic methods using genotypically identified strains, what to our knowledge has not been accomplished before. For this purpose, a species specific PCR method was selected based on the results received for type strains and genotypically characterised environmental strains. For the comparative investigation type strains as well as presumptive C. perfringens isolates from water and faeces samples were used. The acid phosphatase test revealed higher percentage (92%) of correctly identified environmental strains (n = 127) than the ISO_LGMN procedure (83%) and proved to be a sensitive and reliable confirmation method. PMID:21872622

  4. Two-Component Systems Are Involved in the Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Synthesis in Clostridium botulinum Type A Strain Hall

    PubMed Central

    Connan, Chloé; Brueggemann, Holger; Mazuet, Christelle; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Cayet, Nadège; Popoff, Michel R.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum synthesizes a potent neurotoxin (BoNT) which associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes. The bont and antp genes are clustered in two operons. In C. botulinum type A, bont/A and antp genes are expressed during the end of the exponential growth phase and the beginning of the stationary phase under the control of an alternative sigma factor encoded by botR/A, which is located between the two operons. In the genome of C. botulinum type A strain Hall, 30 gene pairs predicted to encode two-component systems (TCSs) and 9 orphan regulatory genes have been identified. Therefore, 34 Hall isogenic antisense strains on predicted regulatory genes (29 TCSs and 5 orphan regulatory genes) have been obtained by a mRNA antisense procedure. Two TCS isogenic antisense strains showed more rapid growth kinetics and reduced BoNT/A production than the control strain, as well as increased bacterial lysis and impairment of the bacterial cell wall structure. Three other TCS isogenic antisense strains induced a low level of BoNT/A and ANTP production. Interestingly, reduced expression of bont/A and antp genes was shown to be independent of botR/A. These results indicate that BoNT/A synthesis is under the control of a complex network of regulation including directly at least three TCSs. PMID:22848632

  5. Global Phenotypic Characterization of Effects of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Selection on the Metabolic Activities and Drug Susceptibilities of Clostridium perfringens Strains

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miseon

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance affects toxin production of Clostridium perfringens strains differently. To investigate the effect of fluoroquinolone resistance selection on global changes in metabolic activities and drug susceptibilities, four C. perfringens strains and their norfloxacin-, ciprofloxacin-, and gatifloxacin-resistant mutants were compared in nearly 2000 assays, using phenotype microarray plates. Variations among mutant strains resulting from resistance selection were observed in all aspects of metabolism. Carbon utilization, pH range, osmotic tolerance, and chemical sensitivity of resistant strains were affected differently in the resistant mutants depending on both the bacterial genotype and the fluoroquinolone to which the bacterium was resistant. The susceptibilities to gentamicin and erythromycin of all resistant mutants except one increased, but some resistant strains were less susceptible to amoxicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole than their wild types. Sensitivity to ethidium bromide decreased in some resistant mutants and increased in others. Microarray analysis of two gatifloxacin-resistant mutants showed changes in metabolic activities that were correlated with altered expression of various genes. Both the chemical structures of fluoroquinolones and the genomic makeup of the wild types influenced the changes found in resistant mutants, which may explain some inconsistent reports of the effects of therapeutic use of fluoroquinolones on clinical isolates of bacteria. PMID:25587280

  6. Global Phenotypic Characterization of Effects of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Selection on the Metabolic Activities and Drug Susceptibilities of Clostridium perfringens Strains.

    PubMed

    Park, Miseon; Rafii, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance affects toxin production of Clostridium perfringens strains differently. To investigate the effect of fluoroquinolone resistance selection on global changes in metabolic activities and drug susceptibilities, four C. perfringens strains and their norfloxacin-, ciprofloxacin-, and gatifloxacin-resistant mutants were compared in nearly 2000 assays, using phenotype microarray plates. Variations among mutant strains resulting from resistance selection were observed in all aspects of metabolism. Carbon utilization, pH range, osmotic tolerance, and chemical sensitivity of resistant strains were affected differently in the resistant mutants depending on both the bacterial genotype and the fluoroquinolone to which the bacterium was resistant. The susceptibilities to gentamicin and erythromycin of all resistant mutants except one increased, but some resistant strains were less susceptible to amoxicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole than their wild types. Sensitivity to ethidium bromide decreased in some resistant mutants and increased in others. Microarray analysis of two gatifloxacin-resistant mutants showed changes in metabolic activities that were correlated with altered expression of various genes. Both the chemical structures of fluoroquinolones and the genomic makeup of the wild types influenced the changes found in resistant mutants, which may explain some inconsistent reports of the effects of therapeutic use of fluoroquinolones on clinical isolates of bacteria. PMID:25587280

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of an Oxalate-Degrading Strain of Clostridium sporogenes from the Gastrointestinal Tract of the White-Throated Woodrat (Neotoma albigula).

    PubMed

    Oakeson, Kelly F; Miller, Aaron; Dale, Colin; Dearing, Denise

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of the white-throated woodrat Neotoma albigula harbors a diverse microbial population that functions in the degradation of ingested plant secondary compounds. Here, we present the draft genome sequence and annotation of Clostridium sporogenes strain 8-O, a novel oxalate-degrading bacterium isolated from the feces of N. albigula. PMID:27198026

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of an Oxalate-Degrading Strain of Clostridium sporogenes from the Gastrointestinal Tract of the White-Throated Woodrat (Neotoma albigula)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron; Dale, Colin; Dearing, Denise

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of the white-throated woodrat Neotoma albigula harbors a diverse microbial population that functions in the degradation of ingested plant secondary compounds. Here, we present the draft genome sequence and annotation of Clostridium sporogenes strain 8-O, a novel oxalate-degrading bacterium isolated from the feces of N. albigula. PMID:27198026

  9. Regulation of Type IV Pili Contributes to Surface Behaviors of Historical and Epidemic Strains of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Erin B.; McKee, Robert W.; Bordeleau, Eric; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile is an urgent public health threat that causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is a leading cause of fatal nosocomial infections in the United States. C. difficile rates of recurrence and mortality have increased in recent years due to the emergence of so-called “hypervirulent” epidemic strains. A great deal of the basic biology of C. difficile has not been characterized. Recent findings that flagellar motility, toxin synthesis, and type IV pilus (TFP) formation are regulated by cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) reveal the importance of this second messenger for C. difficile gene regulation. However, the function(s) of TFP in C. difficile remains largely unknown. Here, we examine TFP-dependent phenotypes and the role of c-di-GMP in controlling TFP production in the historical 630 and epidemic R20291 strains of C. difficile. We demonstrate that TFP contribute to C. difficile biofilm formation in both strains, but with a more prominent role in R20291. Moreover, we report that R20291 is capable of TFP-dependent surface motility, which has not previously been described in C. difficile. The expression and regulation of the pilA1 pilin gene differs between R20291 and 630, which may underlie the observed differences in TFP-mediated phenotypes. The differences in pilA1 expression are attributable to greater promoter-driven transcription in R20291. In addition, R20291, but not 630, upregulates c-di-GMP levels during surface-associated growth, suggesting that the bacterium senses its substratum. The differential regulation of surface behaviors in historical and epidemic C. difficile strains may contribute to the different infection outcomes presented by these strains. IMPORTANCE How Clostridium difficile establishes and maintains colonization of the host bowel is poorly understood. Surface behaviors of C. difficile are likely relevant during infection, representing possible interactions between the bacterium and the

  10. Comparison of Whole-Genome Sequencing and Molecular-Epidemiological Techniques for Clostridium difficile Strain Typing.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Samuel R; Anderson, Lydia J; Kotter, Cassandra V; Littlehorn, Cynthia A; Arms, Lesley E; Dowell, Elaine; Todd, James K; Frank, Daniel N

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed in parallel 27 pediatric Clostridium difficile isolates by repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (RepPCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and whole-genome next-generation sequencing. Next-generation sequencing distinguished 3 groups of isolates that were indistinguishable by RepPCR and 1 isolate that clustered in the same PFGE group as other isolates. PMID:26407257

  11. Genome Sequence of a Clostridium neonatale Strain Isolated in a Canadian Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Benamar, Samia; Cassir, Nadim

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium neonatale is a Gram-positive endospore-forming obligate anaerobe first isolated from the feces of premature neonates during an intensive care unit outbreak of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in a Canadian neonatal intensive care unit. Here, we announce the genome draft sequence of this bacterium. It is composed of 4,710,818 bp and contains 4,169 protein-coding genes and 80 RNA genes, including 11 rRNA genes. PMID:26798088

  12. Perfrin, a novel bacteriocin associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens strains from broilers with necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Timbermont, Leen; De Smet, Lina; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Parreira, Valeria R; Van Driessche, Gonzalez; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Prescott, John; Deforce, Dieter; Devreese, Bart; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens is associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens type A strains. It is known that C. perfringens strains isolated from outbreaks of necrotic enteritis are more capable of secreting factors inhibiting growth of other C. perfringens strains than strains isolated from the gut of healthy chickens. This characteristic could lead to extensive and selective presence of a strain that contains the genetic make-up enabling to secrete toxins that cause gut lesions. This report describes the discovery, purification, characterization and recombinant expression of a novel bacteriocin, referred to as perfrin, produced by a necrotic enteritis-associated netB-positive C. perfringens strain. Perfrin is a 11.5 kDa C-terminal fragment of a 22.9 kDa protein and showed no sequence homology to any currently known bacteriocin. The 11.5 kDa fragment can be cloned into Escherichia coli, and expression yielded an active peptide. PCR detection of the gene showed its presence in 10 netB-positive C. perfringens strains of broiler origin, and not in other C. perfringens strains tested (isolated from broilers, cattle, sheep, pigs, and humans). Perfrin and NetB are not located on the same genetic element since NetB is plasmid-encoded and perfrin is not. The bacteriocin has bactericidal activity over a wide pH-range but is thermolabile and sensitive to proteolytic digestion (trypsin, proteinase K). C. perfringens bacteriocins, such as perfrin, can be considered as an additional factor involved in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. PMID:24708344

  13. Perfrin, a novel bacteriocin associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens strains from broilers with necrotic enteritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens is associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens type A strains. It is known that C. perfringens strains isolated from outbreaks of necrotic enteritis are more capable of secreting factors inhibiting growth of other C. perfringens strains than strains isolated from the gut of healthy chickens. This characteristic could lead to extensive and selective presence of a strain that contains the genetic make-up enabling to secrete toxins that cause gut lesions. This report describes the discovery, purification, characterization and recombinant expression of a novel bacteriocin, referred to as perfrin, produced by a necrotic enteritis-associated netB-positive C. perfringens strain. Perfrin is a 11.5 kDa C-terminal fragment of a 22.9 kDa protein and showed no sequence homology to any currently known bacteriocin. The 11.5 kDa fragment can be cloned into Escherichia coli, and expression yielded an active peptide. PCR detection of the gene showed its presence in 10 netB-positive C. perfringens strains of broiler origin, and not in other C. perfringens strains tested (isolated from broilers, cattle, sheep, pigs, and humans). Perfrin and NetB are not located on the same genetic element since NetB is plasmid-encoded and perfrin is not. The bacteriocin has bactericidal activity over a wide pH-range but is thermolabile and sensitive to proteolytic digestion (trypsin, proteinase K). C. perfringens bacteriocins, such as perfrin, can be considered as an additional factor involved in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. PMID:24708344

  14. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  15. Competitiveness of a Genetically Engineered Strain of Trichoderma virens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intraspecific competitiveness of a genetically engineered strain of Trichoderma virens was assessed relative to the non-transformed, progenitor strain and an isogenic, auxotrophic strain using a replacement series design. The transformed strain was less fit, but appeared more competitive than t...

  16. The Gene CBO0515 from Clostridium botulinum Strain Hall A Encodes the Rare Enzyme N5-(Carboxyethyl) Ornithine Synthase, EC 1.5.1.24▿

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John; Hill, Karen K.; Smith, Theresa J.; Pikis, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Sequencing of the genome of Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A revealed a gene (CBO0515), whose putative amino acid sequence was suggestive of the rare enzyme N5-(1-carboxyethyl) ornithine synthase. To test this hypothesis, CBO0515 has been cloned, and the encoded polypeptide was purified and characterized. This unusual gene appears to be confined to proteolytic strains assigned to group 1 of C. botulinum. PMID:19933367

  17. Multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Clostridium tyrobutyricum strains isolated from cheese production environment.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hajime; Sudo, Tomoko; Kyoi, Daisuke; Kawahara, Toshio; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Takashi; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon; Yanahira, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a gram-positive spore-forming anaerobe that is considered as the main causative agent for late blowing in cheese due to butyric acid fermentation. In this study, multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) for C. tyrobutyricum was developed to identify the source of contamination by C. tyrobutyricum spores in the cheese production environment. For each contig constructed from the results of a whole genome draft sequence of C. tyrobutyricum JCM11008(T) based on next-generation sequencing, VNTR loci that were effective for typing were searched using the Tandem Repeat Finder program. Five VNTR loci were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine their number of repeats by sequencing, and MLVA was conducted. 25 strains of C. tyrobutyricum isolated from the environment, raw milk, and silage were classified into 18 MLVA types (DI=0.963). Of the C. tyrobutyricum strains isolated from raw milk, natural cheese, and blown processed cheese, strains with identical MLVA type were detected, which suggested that these strains might have shifted from natural cheese to blown processed cheese. MLVA could be an effective tool for monitoring contamination of natural cheese with C. tyrobutyricum in the processed cheese production environment because of its high discriminability, thereby allowing the analyst to trace the source of contamination. PMID:25190602

  18. Characterization of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from immunosuppressed inpatients in a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Balassiano, Ilana T; Miranda, Karla R; Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Oliveira, Ivi Cristina M; Santos-Filho, Joaquim; Amorim, Efigênia L T; Caniné, Gerson A; Souza, Cristina F; Gomes, Mariza Z R; Ferreira, Eliane O; Brazier, Jon S; Domingues, Regina M C P

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to identify and characterize Clostridium difficile strains from fecal and hospital environmental samples. C. difficile toxins were detected by ELISA in 28.5% of the analyzed samples. Four strains were isolated from immunosuppressed inpatients presenting antibiotic-associated diarrhea. All strains possessed tcdA and tcdB genes and did not present neither the cdtA and cdtB genes nor any significant deletions in the tcdC gene. PFGE and PCR-ribotyping analysis showed that two strains belonged to the same clonal type (ribotype 014) and the other two were grouped into ribotype 106, in spite of presenting a similar, but not identical genetic fingerprint. This report shows that for the first time ribotype 106 was found outside the United Kingdom. All isolates were equally sensitive to metronidazole. The ribotype 014 isolates were highly resistant to clindamycin, while the ribotype 106 isolates were resistant to all fluoroquinolones tested. This work reveals the spread of C. difficile in the hospital unit studied and the presence of three genetically related types, two of them presenting resistance to fluoroquinolones. PMID:19154793

  19. Clostridium difficile in goats and sheep in Slovenia: characterisation of strains and evidence of age-related shedding.

    PubMed

    Avberšek, Jana; Pirš, Tina; Pate, Mateja; Rupnik, Maja; Ocepek, Matjaž

    2014-08-01

    Diversity of Clostridium difficile in different age groups of goats (n = 109) and sheep (n = 105) was investigated. C. difficile was detected in 9.2% of goats and 5.7% of sheep. None of the adult animals were positive. Isolates belonged to four toxinotypes (0, V, XIa, XII), six PCR-ribotypes (010, 014/020, 045, 056, SLO 061, SLO 151) and six pulsotypes. PCR-ribotypes 010, 014/020, 045 and 056 were found previously in other animal species and humans in Slovenia. Additionally, three pulsotypes were indistinguishable from restriction patterns in our PFGE database of animal isolates. All strains were susceptible to metronidazol, vancomycin, moxifloxacin, and with the exception of a single non-toxigenic strain also to clindamycin and erythromycin. While all strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, oxacillin-resistance was observed only in strains of PCR-ribotype 045. This first study on C. difficile in small ruminants in Slovenia revealed the evidence of age-related shedding as the highest was demonstrated in neonatal goats and sheep aged up to 16 days. PMID:24960532

  20. Sequence Similarity of Clostridium difficile Strains by Analysis of Conserved Genes and Genome Content Is Reflected by Their Ribotype Affiliation

    PubMed Central

    Kurka, Hedwig; Ehrenreich, Armin; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Monot, Marc; Rupnik, Maja; Barbut, Frederic; Indra, Alexander; Dupuy, Bruno; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    PCR-ribotyping is a broadly used method for the classification of isolates of Clostridium difficile, an emerging intestinal pathogen, causing infections with increased disease severity and incidence in several European and North American countries. We have now carried out clustering analysis with selected genes of numerous C. difficile strains as well as gene content comparisons of their genomes in order to broaden our view of the relatedness of strains assigned to different ribotypes. We analyzed the genomic content of 48 C. difficile strains representing 21 different ribotypes. The calculation of distance matrix-based dendrograms using the neighbor joining method for 14 conserved genes (standard phylogenetic marker genes) from the genomes of the C. difficile strains demonstrated that the genes from strains with the same ribotype generally clustered together. Further, certain ribotypes always clustered together and formed ribotype groups, i.e. ribotypes 078, 033 and 126, as well as ribotypes 002 and 017, indicating their relatedness. Comparisons of the gene contents of the genomes of ribotypes that clustered according to the conserved gene analysis revealed that the number of common genes of the ribotypes belonging to each of these three ribotype groups were very similar for the 078/033/126 group (at most 69 specific genes between the different strains with the same ribotype) but less similar for the 002/017 group (86 genes difference). It appears that the ribotype is indicative not only of a specific pattern of the amplified 16S–23S rRNA intergenic spacer but also reflects specific differences in the nucleotide sequences of the conserved genes studied here. It can be anticipated that the sequence deviations of more genes of C. difficile strains are correlated with their PCR-ribotype. In conclusion, the results of this study corroborate and extend the concept of clonal C. difficile lineages, which correlate with ribotypes affiliation. PMID:24482682

  1. Sequence similarity of Clostridium difficile strains by analysis of conserved genes and genome content is reflected by their ribotype affiliation.

    PubMed

    Kurka, Hedwig; Ehrenreich, Armin; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Monot, Marc; Rupnik, Maja; Barbut, Frederic; Indra, Alexander; Dupuy, Bruno; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    PCR-ribotyping is a broadly used method for the classification of isolates of Clostridium difficile, an emerging intestinal pathogen, causing infections with increased disease severity and incidence in several European and North American countries. We have now carried out clustering analysis with selected genes of numerous C. difficile strains as well as gene content comparisons of their genomes in order to broaden our view of the relatedness of strains assigned to different ribotypes. We analyzed the genomic content of 48 C. difficile strains representing 21 different ribotypes. The calculation of distance matrix-based dendrograms using the neighbor joining method for 14 conserved genes (standard phylogenetic marker genes) from the genomes of the C. difficile strains demonstrated that the genes from strains with the same ribotype generally clustered together. Further, certain ribotypes always clustered together and formed ribotype groups, i.e. ribotypes 078, 033 and 126, as well as ribotypes 002 and 017, indicating their relatedness. Comparisons of the gene contents of the genomes of ribotypes that clustered according to the conserved gene analysis revealed that the number of common genes of the ribotypes belonging to each of these three ribotype groups were very similar for the 078/033/126 group (at most 69 specific genes between the different strains with the same ribotype) but less similar for the 002/017 group (86 genes difference). It appears that the ribotype is indicative not only of a specific pattern of the amplified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer but also reflects specific differences in the nucleotide sequences of the conserved genes studied here. It can be anticipated that the sequence deviations of more genes of C. difficile strains are correlated with their PCR-ribotype. In conclusion, the results of this study corroborate and extend the concept of clonal C. difficile lineages, which correlate with ribotypes affiliation. PMID:24482682

  2. Thermal inactivation of ileal loop-reactive Clostridium perfringens type A strains in phosphate buffer and beef gravy.

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J G; Peeler, J T; Twedt, R M

    1977-01-01

    The thermal resistance of spore crops produced from each of two ileal loop-reactive strains of Clostridium perfringens type A was determined in two suspending vehicles consisting of 0.067 M (pH 7.0) phosphate buffer and a commercial beef gravy. D115.6 values obtained in buffer and enumerated after pretreatment with sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate and recovery in plating medium containing lysozyme were two- to threefold greater than those obtained without this treatment. D115.6 values obtained with beef gravy were less than those obtained in buffer with or without lysozyme; however, the D98.9 and D104.4 values were 1.3 to 2 times greater than those obtained in buffer with lysozyme. The z values were within the ranges reported by previous investigators. PMID:199113

  3. Strain Engineering of Phosphorene via Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepti; Dumitrica, Traian

    Phosphorene (PE) - the newly discovered 2D derivative of Phosphorus - has an inherent band gap and a high current on/off ratio. Manipulating strain in PE films - strain engineering (SE) - will offer the opportunity to further tailor its electronic properties. Using objective boundary conditions (OBC) coupled with density functional tight binding model (DFTB), we calculate bending rigidity of PE and its 2D allotropes by modeling bent PE as large diameter nanotubes (PNTs). OBCs not only allow for drastic reductions in the number of atoms in simulations but also enable simulations of chiral PNTs, which is impossible with periodic boundary conditions. At the same time, the method describes how bending influences the electronic structure. We establish a robust platform for achieving SE for anisotropic 2D films. Using results from our calculations and orthotropic thin shell model we develop equivalent continuum structure (ECS) for PE and its allotropes upon bending. The developed ECS can be used for performing finite element simulations of PE films on substrates.

  4. Clostridium botulinum group I strain genotyping by 15-locus multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Fillo, Silvia; Giordani, Francesco; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Gorgé, Olivier; Ramisse, Vincent; Vergnaud, Gilles; Riehm, Julia M; Scholz, Holger C; Splettstoesser, Wolf D; Kieboom, Jasper; Olsen, Jaran-Strand; Fenicia, Lucia; Lista, Florigio

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation that encompasses a broad variety of spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria producing the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). C. botulinum is the etiologic agent of botulism, a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease. Fine-resolution genetic characterization of C. botulinum isolates of any BoNT type is relevant for both epidemiological studies and forensic microbiology. A 10-locus multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was previously applied to isolates of C. botulinum type A. The present study includes five additional loci designed to better address proteolytic B and F serotypes. We investigated 79 C. botulinum group I strains isolated from human and food samples in several European countries, including types A (28), B (36), AB (4), and F (11) strains, and 5 nontoxic Clostridium sporogenes. Additional data were deduced from in silico analysis of 10 available fully sequenced genomes. This 15-locus MLVA (MLVA-15) scheme identified 86 distinct genotypes that clustered consistently with the results of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and MLVA genotyping in previous reports. An MLVA-7 scheme, a subset of the MLVA-15, performed on a lab-on-a-chip device using a nonfluorescent subset of primers, is also proposed as a first-line assay. The phylogenetic grouping obtained with the MLVA-7 does not differ significantly from that generated by the MLVA-15. To our knowledge, this report is the first to analyze genetic variability among all of the C. botulinum group I serotypes by MLVA. Our data provide new insights into the genetic variability of group I C. botulinum isolates worldwide and demonstrate that this group is genetically highly diverse. PMID:22012011

  5. Clostridium botulinum Group I Strain Genotyping by 15-Locus Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fillo, Silvia; Giordani, Francesco; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Gorgé, Olivier; Ramisse, Vincent; Vergnaud, Gilles; Riehm, Julia M.; Scholz, Holger C.; Splettstoesser, Wolf D.; Kieboom, Jasper; Olsen, Jaran-Strand; Fenicia, Lucia; Lista, Florigio

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation that encompasses a broad variety of spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria producing the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). C. botulinum is the etiologic agent of botulism, a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease. Fine-resolution genetic characterization of C. botulinum isolates of any BoNT type is relevant for both epidemiological studies and forensic microbiology. A 10-locus multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was previously applied to isolates of C. botulinum type A. The present study includes five additional loci designed to better address proteolytic B and F serotypes. We investigated 79 C. botulinum group I strains isolated from human and food samples in several European countries, including types A (28), B (36), AB (4), and F (11) strains, and 5 nontoxic Clostridium sporogenes. Additional data were deduced from in silico analysis of 10 available fully sequenced genomes. This 15-locus MLVA (MLVA-15) scheme identified 86 distinct genotypes that clustered consistently with the results of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and MLVA genotyping in previous reports. An MLVA-7 scheme, a subset of the MLVA-15, performed on a lab-on-a-chip device using a nonfluorescent subset of primers, is also proposed as a first-line assay. The phylogenetic grouping obtained with the MLVA-7 does not differ significantly from that generated by the MLVA-15. To our knowledge, this report is the first to analyze genetic variability among all of the C. botulinum group I serotypes by MLVA. Our data provide new insights into the genetic variability of group I C. botulinum isolates worldwide and demonstrate that this group is genetically highly diverse. PMID:22012011

  6. Feasibility of incorporating cotton seed extract in Clostridium strain P11 fermentation medium during synthesis gas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kundiyana, Dimple K; Huhnke, Raymond L; Maddipati, Prasanth; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R

    2010-12-01

    Biomass gasification followed by fermentation of syngas to ethanol is a potential process to produce bioenergy. To make this process more economical, the complexity of media should be reduced while using less costly components. In this study, the feasibility of incorporating cotton seed extract (CSE) as a media component for syngas fermentation to produce ethanol using Clostridium strain P11 was evaluated. A factorial experiment was conducted to screen and evaluate the effect of different media components, in relation to CSE, on ethanol production. Also, different CSE concentrations as well as the presence of MES buffer were tested to determine their effect on ethanol production. Bottle fermentations with media containing only 1.0 gL(-1) CSE produced more ethanol after 15 d (1.17 gL(-1)) than fermentation using any other media. Further bottle experiments showed that media containing only 0.5 gL(-1) CSE produced more ethanol after 15 days (2.67 gL(-1)) than a control media (0.6 gL(-1)) and media containing only 1.0 gL(-1) CSE (2.16 gL(-1)). Fermentations in 5- and 7.5-L stirred fermentors with 0.5 gL(-1) CSE media achieved ethanol concentrations similar to those observed in bottle studies. These results indicate that CSE can replace all the vitamin and mineral media components generally used for fermentation of syngas to ethanol by Clostridium strain P11, thereby improving the process economics. PMID:20696571

  7. Production of 1,3-propanediol by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 791 from crude glycerol and corn steep liquor: Process optimization and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Wischral, Daiana; Zhang, Jianzhi; Cheng, Chi; Lin, Meng; De Souza, Lucas Monteiro Galotti; Pessoa, Fernando L Pellegrini; Pereira, Nei; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-07-01

    1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PDO) production from crude glycerol, a byproduct from biodiesel manufacturing, by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 791 was studied with corn steep liquor as an inexpensive nitrogen source replacing yeast extract in the fermentation medium. A stable, long-term 1,3-PDO production from glycerol was demonstrated with cells immobilized in a fibrous bed bioreactor operated in a repeated batch mode, which partially circumvented the 1,3-PDO inhibition problem. The strain was then engineered to overexpress Escherichia coli gldA encoding glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) and dhaKLM encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase (DHAK), which increased 1,3-PDO productivity by 26.8-37.5% compared to the wild type, because of greatly increased specific growth rate (0.25-0.40h(-1) vs. 0.13-0.20h(-1) for the wild type). The engineered strain gave a high 1,3-PDO titer (26.1g/L), yield (0.55g/g) and productivity (0.99g/L·h) in fed-batch fermentation. Overexpressing GDH and DHAK was thus effective in increasing 1,3-PDO production from glycerol. PMID:27085150

  8. Lack of association between clinical outcome of Clostridium difficile infections, strain type, and virulence-associated phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sirard, Stéphanie; Valiquette, Louis; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium difficile strain NAP1/027 (North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] type 1 and PCR ribotype 027 [R027]) has been associated with recent outbreaks in North America and Europe. It has been associated with more severe disease symptoms, higher mortality rates, and greater risk of relapse. This strain is thought to produce more toxins and sporulate to higher levels. However, recent studies suggest that this may not always be the case. The objective of our study was to assess, in a nonoutbreak situation, whether specific strains, such as NAP1/027, were associated with more severe disease symptoms, higher toxin production, and/or greater sporulation in vitro. We isolated and characterized C. difficile strains from 21 patients with mild to moderate, severe, or complicated symptoms of C. difficile infection (CDI). The isolates were characterized by different molecular typing methods, including PCR ribotyping, tandem repeat sequence typing (TRST), and sequencing of the tcdC gene. Fourteen isolates were of PCR ribotype 027 with deletions in tcdC, but no association with severity or clinical outcome was found. We show by immunodot blot detection of toxins with monoclonal antibodies that all R027 isolates produced more TcdA and TcdB than other strains. On the other hand, they consistently produced fewer spores than non-R027 isolates. Taken together, our data suggest that NAP1/027 isolates are not always associated with more severe disease, even though they may produce larger amounts of toxins. Our study also suggests that current assertions regarding the NAP1/027 may not apply to all isolates and that other factors may come into play. PMID:21956985

  9. Evaluation of Engineered Pichia stipitis Strains for Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the fermentation capabilities of five strains of Pichia stipitis that had been engineered for xylose fermentation to ethanol by USDA, ARS, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research. The strains tested were P. stipitis WT-1-11, WT-1-2, 14-2-6, 22-1-1, and 22-1-12. Strains w...

  10. Characterization of Clostridium difficile Strains in British Columbia, Canada: A Shift from NAP1 Majority (2008) to Novel Strain Types (2013) in One Region

    PubMed Central

    Jassem, Agatha N.; Prystajecky, Natalie; Marra, Fawziah; Kibsey, Pamela; Tan, Kennard; Umlandt, Patricia; Janz, Loretta; Champagne, Sylvie; Gamage, Bruce; Golding, George R.; Mulvey, Michael R.; Henry, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile is a major cause of gastrointestinal illness. Epidemic NAP1 strains contain toxins A and B, a deletion in repressor tcdC, and a binary toxin. Objectives. To determine the molecular epidemiology of C. difficile in British Columbia and compare between two time points in one region. Methods. C. difficile isolates from hospital and community laboratories (2008) and one Island Health hospital laboratory (2013) were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, PCR-ribotyping, toxin possession, tcdC genotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Results. In 2008, 42.7% of isolates had NAP1 designation. Hospital-collected isolates were associated with older patients and more NAP1 types. Unlike other isolates, most NAP1 isolates possessed binary toxin and a 19 bp loss in tcdC. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. A 2013 follow-up revealed a 28.9% decrease in NAP1 isolates and 20.0% increase in isolates without NAP designation in one region. Then, community-associated cases were seen in younger patients, while NAP types were evenly distributed. Isolates without NAP designation did not cluster with a PFGE pattern or ribotype. Conclusions. Evaluation of C. difficile infections within British Columbia revealed demographic associations, epidemiological shifts, and characteristics of strain types. Continuous surveillance of C. difficile will enable detection of emerging strains. PMID:27366181

  11. Conversion of acids to alcohols by Clostridium ragsdalei strain P11: Process optimization and biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isom, Catherine E.

    Research focus was directed toward the development of a biocatalyst that can be used to produce commodity chemicals and transportation fuels from volatile fatty acids ubiquitous in waste biomass. Clostridium ragsdalei was introduced to serve as an exemplar carboxidotrophic acetogen that reduces VFAs to alcohols of the same carbon structure with only acetate and ethanol as by-products of the fermentation. This dissertation developed a better understanding of this process in C. ragsdalei and, in turn, other similar bacteria and to supported previous discoveries as they relate to carboxylate reduction in acetogens. Additionally, pure culture studies allowed for a more detailed understanding of the biochemical behavior response to different compounds without skewing the results due to the influence of other species.

  12. A penicillin- and metronidazole-resistant Clostridium botulinum strain responsible for an infant botulism case.

    PubMed

    Mazuet, C; Yoon, E-J; Boyer, S; Pignier, S; Blanc, T; Doehring, I; Meziane-Cherif, D; Dumant-Forest, C; Sautereau, J; Legeay, C; Bouvet, P; Bouchier, C; Quijano-Roy, S; Pestel-Caron, M; Courvalin, P; Popoff, M R

    2016-07-01

    The clinical course of a case of infant botulism was characterized by several relapses despite therapy with amoxicillin and metronidazole. Botulism was confirmed by identification of botulinum toxin and Clostridium botulinum in stools. A C. botulinum A2 strain resistant to penicillins and with heterogeneous resistance to metronidazole was isolated from stool samples up to 110 days after onset. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by disc agar diffusion and MICs were determined by Etest. Whole genome sequencing allowed detection of a gene cluster composed of blaCBP for a novel penicillinase, blaI for a regulator, and blaR1 for a membrane-bound penicillin receptor in the chromosome of the C. botulinum isolate. The purified recombinant penicillinase was assayed. Resistance to β-lactams was in agreement with the kinetic parameters of the enzyme. In addition, the β-lactamase gene cluster was found in three C. botulinum genomes in databanks and in two of 62 genomes of our collection, all the strains belonging to group I C. botulinum. This is the first report of a C. botulinum isolate resistant to penicillins. This stresses the importance of antibiotic susceptibility testing for adequate therapy of botulism. PMID:27108966

  13. Comparative analysis of extractable proteins from Clostridium perfringens type A and type C strains showing varying degree of virulence.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Pratistha; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Kumar, Om; Kumar, Ravi Bhushan

    2015-10-01

    The prevailing scenario of bioterrorism warrants development of medical countermeasures with expanded coverage of select agents. Clostridium perfringens is a pathogen of medical, veterinary and military importance, and has been listed as Validated Biological Agent. We employed 2DE-MS approach to identify a total of 134 unique proteins (529 protein spot features) from the extractable proteome of four type A and type C strains. Proteins showing altered expression under host-simulated conditions from virulent type A strain (ATCC13124) were also elucidated. Significant among the differentially expressed proteins were elongation factor, molecular chaperones, ribosomal proteins, carbamoyl phosphate synthase, clpB protein, choloylglycine hydrolase, phosphopyruvate hydratase, and trigger factor. Predictive elucidation, of putative virulence associated proteins and sequence conservation pattern of selected candidates, was carried out using homologous proteins from other bacterial select agents to screen for the commonality of putative antigenic determinants. Pathogens (17 select agents) were observed to form three discrete clusters; composition of I and II being consistent in most of the phylogenetic reconstructions. This work provides a basis for further validation of putative candidate proteins as prophylactic agents and for their ability to provide protection against clusters of pathogenic select bacterial agents; aimed at mitigating the shadows of biothreat. PMID:26238688

  14. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Beingesser, J; Fisher, D J; Sayeed, S; McClane, B A; Posthaus, H; Uzal, F A

    2012-06-15

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch's postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. PMID:22296994

  15. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. P.; Beingesser, J.; Fisher, D. J.; Sayeed, S.; McClane, B. A.; Posthaus, H.; Uzal, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch’s postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24 h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24 h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. PMID:22296994

  16. Strain Engineering of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadgar, Ali; Pasupathy, Abhay; Herman, Irving; Wang, Dennis; Kang, Kyungnam; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    The application of strain to materials can cause changes to bandwidth, effective masses, degeneracies and even structural phases. In the case of the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductors, small strain (around 1 percent) is expected to change band gaps and mobilities, while larger strains are expected to cause phase changes from the triangular 2H phase to orthorhombic 1T' phases. We will describe experimental techniques to apply small and large (around 10 percent) strains to one or few layer samples of the TMD semiconductors, and describe the effect of the strain using optical (Raman, photoluminescence) and cryogenic transport techniques.

  17. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile/Epi and Meridian Bioscience illumigene C. difficile Assays for Detecting Clostridium difficile Ribotype 033 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Androga, Grace O.; McGovern, Alan M.; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J.; Perkins, Timothy T.; Foster, Niki F.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 033 (RT033) is found in the gastrointestinal tracts of production animals and, occasionally, humans. The illumigene C. difficile assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) failed to detect any of 52 C. difficile RT033 isolates, while all strains signaled positive for the binary toxin genes but were reported as negative for C. difficile by the Xpert C. difficile/Epi assay (Cepheid). PMID:25520452

  18. Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Walter J.; Anellis, Abe

    1971-01-01

    A biphasic culture medium suitable for cultivation and sporulation of Clostridium perfringens, C. botulinum, and C. sporogenes was devised. The medium designed for use in a disposable, compartmented, plastic film container contained peptones, yeast extract, minerals, an anion exchange resin, and glucose in 4% agar as the solid phase and (NH4)2SO4 and 0.1% agar as the liquid phase. With the biphasic system, it was not necessary to use active cultures as inocula. Growth was at least equal to that obtained in conventional media, and spore production of 9 out of 12 strains of C. perfringens equalled or usually exceeded that of conventional media. Images PMID:4332043

  19. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  20. In vitro activity of cadazolid against Clostridium difficile strains isolated from primary and recurrent infections in Stockholm, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Lozano, Helena Martinez; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2013-04-01

    One hundred thirty-three Clostridium difficile strains were collected from 71 patients and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B by the cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped and analyzed for sporulation frequency. The MICs of the isolates were determined against cadazolid and seven other antimicrobial agents by the agar dilution method. All isolates were positive for toxin B by the cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay. One hundred fourteen isolates were positive for toxin A and B and 16 isolates were positive for toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin by PCR. Three isolates were negative for toxin A but positive for toxin B. Thirty-three different ribotypes were identified. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. No differences in sporulation were noticed between the primary and recurrent isolates. All 133 isolates were sensitive to cadazolid (0.064-0.5 mg/l), fidaxomicin (0.008-0.125 mg/l), metronidazole (0.125-2 mg/l), vancomycin (0.125-1 mg/l) and tigecycline (0.032-0.25 mg/l). Three isolates were resistant to linezolid (8 mg/l), 15 isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin (8-32 mg/l) and 103 isolates were resistant to clindamycin (8-256 mg/l). No association between toxins A, B and binary toxin, ribotypes or the sporulation and the sensitivity to cadazolid could be found. Cadazolid has a potent in vitro activity against C. difficile. PMID:23454525

  1. CodY Is a Global Regulator of Virulence-Associated Properties for Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Ma, Menglin; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT CodY is known to regulate various virulence properties in several Gram-positive bacteria but has not yet been studied in the important histotoxic and intestinal pathogen Clostridium perfringens. The present study prepared an isogenic codY-null mutant in C. perfringens type D strain CN3718 by insertional mutagenesis using the Targetron system. Western blot analysis indicated that, relative to wild-type CN3718 or a complementing strain, this isogenic codY mutant produces reduced levels of epsilon toxin (ETX). Using supernatants from cultures of the wild-type, codY-null mutant, and complementing strains, CodY regulation of ETX production was shown to have cytotoxic consequences for MDCK cells. The CodY regulatory effect on ETX production was specific, since the codY-null mutant still made wild-type levels of alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O. Sialidase activity measurements and sialidase Western blot analysis of supernatants from CN3718 and its isogenic derivatives showed that CodY represses overall exosialidase activity due to a reduced presence of NanH in culture supernatants. Inactivation of the codY gene significantly decreased the adherence of CN3718 vegetative cells or spores to host Caco-2 cells. Finally, the codY mutant showed increased spore formation under vegetative growth conditions, although germination of these spores was impaired. Overall, these results identify CodY as a global regulator of many C. perfringens virulence-associated properties. Furthermore, they establish that, via CodY, CN3718 coordinately regulates many virulence-associated properties likely needed for intestinal infection. PMID:24105766

  2. [Production of a vaccine against enterotoxemia from Clostridium perfringens strains isolated in the field].

    PubMed

    Cherfaoui, S; Kadra, B

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated eight strains of C. perfringens from cases of enterotoxaemia. Five of these strains have revealed themselves toxic with respective types (type "A":2, type "C":2, type "D":1). In order to produce anti-enterotoxaemia vaccine, we have proceeded at the cultivation in fermenter of isolated strains and reference strains CWA 35, CWC and CWD AF. At the end of fermentation, we have evaluated the two following parameters: obtained biomass, and toxin titers. With the two classes of strains we reached an important biomass but toxins titers relatively weak comparatively to that which is usually required. It will be necessary then, to demonstrate the immunogen value of the produced vaccines by testing their efficacity. PMID:1309137

  3. Emended descriptions of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii, and descriptions of Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sp. nov. and Clostridium saccharobutylicum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Keis, S; Shaheen, R; Jones, D T

    2001-11-01

    On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA-DNA reassociation, industrial solvent-producing clostridia have been assigned to four species. In this study, the phenotypic characteristics of Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, 'Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum', and an unnamed Clostridium sp. represented by the strains NCP 262T and NRRL B643 are compared. In addition, a further 40 strains of solvent-producing clostridia have been classified by biotyping, DNA fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These included 14 C. beijerinckii strains, two strains currently designated as 'Clostridium kaneboi' and 'Clostridium butanologenum', and 24 production strains used in the commercial acetone-butanol fermentation. All of the C. beijerinckii strains were confirmed to have been classified correctly. The 'C. kaneboi' and 'C. butanologenum' strains require reclassification as C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii, respectively. The commercial production strains were found to belong either to C. beijerinckii or to the unnamed Clostridium sp. For the comparative phenotypic studies of the four species, representative strains were selected from each of the DNA-fingerprint subgroups within each species. These strains were analysed for their ability to utilize different carbohydrates, hydrolyse gelatin or aesculin, and produce indole, and were tested for the presence of catalase and urease. On the basis of these results, several phenotypic traits were found to be useful for differentiating between the four species. The descriptions of C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii have been emended. The names Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sp. nov. [type strain = N1-4 (HMT) = ATCC 27021T] and Clostridium saccharobutylicum sp. nov. (type strain = DSM 13864T = ATCC BAA-117T) are proposed for the two new species. PMID:11760952

  4. Strain engineering in graphene by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Papasimakis, N.; Mailis, S.; Huang, C. C.; Al-Saab, F.; Hewak, D. W.; Luo, Z.; Shen, Z. X.

    2015-02-09

    We demonstrate that the Raman spectrum of graphene on lithium niobate can be controlled locally by continuous exposure to laser irradiation. We interpret our results in terms of changes to doping and mechanical strain and show that our observations are consistent with light-induced gradual strain relaxation in the graphene layer.

  5. Evaluation of Media, Time and Temperature of Incubation, and Method of Enumeration of Several Strains of Clostridium perfringens Spores

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Walter J.; Anellis, Abe; Ross, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Two basal media, containing the ingredients found in common in both SPS (BBL) and TSN (BBL) media and in the previously described media of Schaedler et al. (1965) and Starr et al (1971), but minus antibiotics, were selected as the most suitable for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens spores in a model system. These media were also used to study the influence of the presence of glucose, xylose, or ribose in various concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0%) on colony morphology and spore recovery. As the sugar concentration in the basal agar medium increased, the colonies of all the test organisms also increased in size, and more of the black colonies became white in color. At the 1.0% sugar level, glucose permitted only white colony development, whereas the pentoses were completely inhibitory. Both pour plates and most-probable-number tubes were inoculated with the spores of several strains of C. perfringens and incubated at 20, 30, 37, and 45 C for 24, 48, and 72 h. Statistical analyses of the enumeration data indicated, at the 99% confidence level, that a Trypticase(BBL)-yeast extract-glucose-sulfite-iron agar gave maximal population estimates at 37 C in 72 h. PMID:4363558

  6. Clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection and molecular characterization of the isolated strains in a cohort of Danish hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Søes, L M; Brock, I; Persson, S; Simonsen, J; Pribil Olsen, K E; Kemp, M

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) to toxin gene profiles of the strains isolated from Danish hospitalized patients. C. difficile isolates were characterized by PCR based molecular typing methods including toxin gene profiling and analysis of deletions and truncating mutations in the toxin regulating gene tcdC. Clinical features were obtained by questionnaire. Thirty percent of the CDI cases were classified as community-acquired. Infection by C. difficile with genes encoding both toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin was significantly associated with hospital-acquired/healthcare-associated CDI compared to community-acquired CDI. Significantly higher leukocyte counts and more severe clinical manifestations were observed in patients infected by C. difficile containing genes also encoding the binary toxin together with toxin A and B compared to patients infected by C. difficile harbouring only toxin A and B. In conclusion, infection by C. difficile harbouring genes encoding both toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin were associated with hospital acquisition, higher leukocyte counts and severe clinical disease. PMID:21744281

  7. Distribution of Clostridium botulinum Type E Strains in Nunavik, Northern Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Leclair, Daniel; Farber, Jeffrey M.; Doidge, Bill; Blanchfield, Burke; Suppa, Sandy; Pagotto, Franco

    2013-01-01

    The distribution and levels of Clostridium botulinum type E were determined from field sites used by Inuit hunters for butchering seals along the coast of Nunavik. The incidence rates of C. botulinum type E in shoreline soil along the coast were 0, 50, and 87.5% among samples tested for the Hudson Strait, Hudson Bay, and Ungava Bay regions, respectively. Spores were detected in seawater or coastal rock surfaces from 17.6% of butchering sites, almost all of which were located in southern Ungava Bay. Concentrations of C. botulinum type E along the Ungava Bay coast were significantly higher than on the coasts of Hudson Strait and Hudson Bay, with the highest concentrations (270 to 1,800/kg of sample) found near butchering sites located along the mouths of large rivers. The Koksoak River contained high levels of C. botulinum type E, with the highest median concentration (270/kg) found in sediments of the marine portion of the river. C. botulinum type E was found in the intestinal contents (4.4%) and skins (1.4%) of seals. A high genetic biodiversity of C. botulinum type E isolates was observed among the 21 butchering sites and their surroundings along the Nunavik coastline, with 83% of isolates (44/53) yielding distinct pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotypes. Multiple sources of C. botulinum type E may be involved in the contamination of seal meat during butchering in this region, but the risk of contamination appears to be much higher from environmental sources along the shoreline of southern Ungava Bay and the sediments of the Koksoak River. PMID:23160120

  8. Biaxial compressive strain engineering in graphene/boron nitride heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Xiao, Jianliang; Zhu, Junwei; Yu, Chenxi; Zhang, Gang; Ni, Zhenhua; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Shi, Yi; Wang, Xinran

    2012-01-01

    Strain engineered graphene has been predicted to show many interesting physics and device applications. Here we study biaxial compressive strain in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures after thermal cycling to high temperatures likely due to their thermal expansion coefficient mismatch. The appearance of sub-micron self-supporting bubbles indicates that the strain is spatially inhomogeneous. Finite element modeling suggests that the strain is concentrated on the edges with regular nano-scale wrinkles, which could be a playground for strain engineering in graphene. Raman spectroscopy and mapping is employed to quantitatively probe the magnitude and distribution of strain. From the temperature-dependent shifts of Raman G and 2D peaks, we estimate the TEC of graphene from room temperature to above 1000K for the first time. PMID:23189242

  9. Sialidases Affect the Host Cell Adherence and Epsilon Toxin-Induced Cytotoxicity of Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Sayeed, Sameera; Robertson, Susan; Chen, Jianming; McClane, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B or D isolates, which cause enterotoxemias or enteritis in livestock, produce epsilon toxin (ETX). ETX is exceptionally potent, earning it a listing as a CDC class B select toxin. Most C. perfringens strains also express up to three different sialidases, although the possible contributions of those enzymes to type B or D pathogenesis remain unclear. Type D isolate CN3718 was found to carry two genes (nanI and nanJ) encoding secreted sialidases and one gene (nanH) encoding a cytoplasmic sialidase. Construction in CN3718 of single nanI, nanJ and nanH null mutants, as well as a nanI/nanJ double null mutant and a triple sialidase null mutant, identified NanI as the major secreted sialidase of this strain. Pretreating MDCK cells with NanI sialidase, or with culture supernatants of BMC206 (an isogenic CN3718 etx null mutant that still produces sialidases) enhanced the subsequent binding and cytotoxic effects of purified ETX. Complementation of BMC207 (an etx/nanH/nanI/nanJ null mutant) showed this effect is mainly attributable to NanI production. Contact between BMC206 and certain mammalian cells (e.g., enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells) resulted in more rapid sialidase production and this effect involved increased transcription of BMC206 nanI gene. BMC206 was shown to adhere to some (e.g. Caco-2 cells), but not all mammalian cells, and this effect was dependent upon sialidase, particularly NanI, expression. Finally, the sialidase activity of NanI (but not NanJ or NanH) could be enhanced by trypsin. Collectively these in vitro findings suggest that, during type D disease originating in the intestines, trypsin may activate NanI, which (in turn) could contribute to intestinal colonization by C. perfringens type D isolates and also increase ETX action. PMID:22174687

  10. Co-culturing a novel Bacillus strain with Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 to produce butyric acid from sucrose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, the most promising microorganism used for the bio-production of butyric acid is Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T; however, it is unable to use sucrose as a sole carbon source. Consequently, a newly isolated strain, Bacillus sp. SGP1, that was found to produce a levansucrase enzyme, which hydrolyzes sucrose into fructose and glucose, was used in a co-culture with this strain, permitting C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T to ferment sucrose to butyric acid. Results B. sp. SGP1 alone did not show any butyric acid production and the main metabolite produced was lactic acid. This allowed C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T to utilize the monosaccharides resulting from the activity of levansucrase together with the lactic acid produced by B. sp. SGP1 to generate butyric acid, which was the main fermentative product within the co-culture. Furthermore, the final acetic acid concentration in the co-culture was significantly lower when compared with pure C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T cultures grown on glucose. In fed-batch fermentations, the optimum conditions for the production of butyric acid were around pH 5.50 and a temperature of 37°C. Under these conditions, the final butyrate concentration was 34.2±1.8 g/L with yields of 0.35±0.03 g butyrate/g sucrose and maximum productivity of 0.3±0.04 g/L/h. Conclusions Using this co-culture, sucrose can be utilized as a carbon source for butyric acid production at a relatively high yield. In addition, this co-culture offers also the benefit of a greater selectivity, with butyric acid constituting 92.8% of the acids when the fermentation was terminated. PMID:23452443

  11. Clostridium perfringens strains from bovine enterotoxemia cases are not superior in in vitro production of alpha toxin, perfringolysin O and proteolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine enterotoxemia is a major cause of mortality in veal calves. Predominantly veal calves of beef cattle breeds are affected and losses due to enterotoxemia may account for up to 20% of total mortality. Clostridium perfringens type A is considered to be the causative agent. Recently, alpha toxin and perfringolysin O have been proposed to play an essential role in the development of disease. However, other potential virulence factors also may play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine enterotoxemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether strains originating from bovine enterotoxemia cases were superior in in vitro production of virulence factors (alpha toxin, perfringolysin O, mucinase, collagenase) that are potentially involved in enterotoxemia. To approach this, a collection of strains originating from enterotoxemia cases was compared to bovine strains isolated from healthy animals and to strains isolated from other animal species. Results Strains originating from bovine enterotoxemia cases produced variable levels of alpha toxin and perfringolysin O that were not significantly different from levels produced by strains isolated from healthy calves and other animal species. All tested strains exhibited similar mucinolytic activity independent of the isolation source. A high variability in collagenase activity between strains could be observed, and no higher collagenase levels were produced in vitro by strains isolated from enterotoxemia cases. Conclusions Bovine enterotoxemia strains do not produce higher levels of alpha toxin, perfringolysin O, mucinase and collagenase, as compared to strains derived from healthy calves and other animal species in vitro. PMID:24479821

  12. Tuning Surface Properties of Low Dimensional Materials via Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengchun; Liu, Fuzhu; Wu, Chao; Yang, Sen

    2016-08-01

    The promising and versatile applications of low dimensional materials are largely due to their surface properties, which along with their underlying electronic structures have been well studied. However, these materials may not be directly useful for applications requiring properties other than their natal ones. In recent years, strain has been shown to be an additionally useful handle to tune the physical and chemical properties of materials by changing their geometric and electronic structures. The strategies for producing strain are summarized. Then, the electronic structure of quasi-two dimensional layered non-metallic materials (e.g., graphene, MX2, BP, Ge nanosheets) under strain are discussed. Later, the strain effects on catalytic properties of metal-catalyst loaded with strain are focused on. Both experimental and computational perspectives for dealing with strained systems are covered. Finally, an outlook on engineering surface properties utilizing strain is provided. PMID:27376498

  13. A MLST Clade 2 Clostridium difficile strain with a variant TcdB induces severe inflammatory and oxidative response associated with mucosal disruption.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cecília Leite; López-Ureña, Diana; de Oliveira Assis, Thiago; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Rupnik, Maja; Wilcox, Mark H; de Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; do Carmo, Anderson Oliveira; Dias, Adriana Abalen Martins; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Rodríguez, César; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne

    2016-08-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections is highly dynamic as new strains continue to emerge worldwide. Here we present a detailed analysis of a new C. difficile strain (ICC-45) recovered from a cancer patient in Brazil that died from severe diarrhea. A polyphasic approach assigned a new PCR-ribotype and PFGE macrorestriction pattern to strain ICC-45, which is toxigenic (tcdA(+), tcdB(+) and ctdB(+)) and classified as ST41 from MLST Clade 2 and toxinotype IXb. Strain ICC-45 encodes for a variant TcdB that induces a distinct CPE in agreement with its toxinotype. Unlike epidemic NAP1/027 strains, which are also classified to MLST Clade 2, strain ICC-45 is susceptible to fluoroquinolones and does not overproduce toxins TcdA and TcdB. However, supernatants from strain ICC-45 and a NAP1/027 strain produced similar expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, epithelial damage, and oxidative stress response in the mouse ileal loop model. These results highlight inflammation and oxidative stress as common features in the pathogenesis of C. difficile Clade 2 strains. Finally, this work contributes to the description of differences in virulence among various C. difficile strains. PMID:27311833

  14. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, N.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Teague, M. L.; Wang, J.-Q.; Boyd, D. A.; Chen, C.-C.

    2016-02-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simulations and nano-fabrication technology.

  15. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, N.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Teague, M. L.; Wang, J.-Q.; Boyd, D. A.; Chen, C.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simulations and nano-fabrication technology.

  16. Strain engineering of Dirac cones in graphyne

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoxue; Kumar, Ashok; Pandey, Ravindra; Si, Mingsu

    2014-05-26

    6,6,12-graphyne, one of the two-dimensional carbon allotropes with the rectangular lattice structure, has two kinds of non-equivalent anisotropic Dirac cones in the first Brillouin zone. We show that Dirac cones can be tuned independently by the uniaxial compressive strain applied to graphyne, which induces n-type and p-type self-doping effect, by shifting the energy of the Dirac cones in the opposite directions. On the other hand, application of the tensile strain results into a transition from gapless to finite gap system for the monolayer. For the AB-stacked bilayer, the results predict tunability of Dirac-cones by in-plane strains as well as the strain applied perpendicular to the plane. The group velocities of the Dirac cones show enhancement in the resistance anisotropy for bilayer relative to the case of monolayer. Such tunable and direction-dependent electronic properties predicted for 6,6,12-graphyne make it to be competitive for the next-generation electronic devices at nanoscale.

  17. The Sialidases of Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718 Differ in Their Properties and Sensitivities to Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes histotoxic infections and diseases originating in animal or human intestines. A prolific toxin producer, this bacterium also produces numerous enzymes, including sialidases, that may facilitate infection. C. perfringens type D strain CN3718 carries genes encoding three sialidases, including two large secreted sialidases (named NanI and NanJ) and one small sialidase (named NanH) that has an intracellular location in log-phase cultures but is present in supernatants of death phase cultures. Using isogenic mutants of CN3718 that are capable of expressing only NanJ, NanI, or NanH, the current study characterized the properties and activities of each sialidase. The optimal temperature determined for NanJ or NanH enzymatic activity was 37°C or 43°C, respectively, while NanI activity increased until temperature reached 48°C. NanI activity was also the most resistant against higher temperatures. All three sialidases showed optimal activities at pH 5.5. Compared to NanJ or NanH, NanI contributed most to the sialidase activity in CN3718 culture supernatants, regardless of the substrate sialic acid linkage; NanI also released the most sialic acid from Caco-2 cells. Only NanI activity was enhanced by trypsin pretreatment and then only for substrates with an α-2,3- or α-2,6-sialic acid linkage. NanJ and NanI activities were more sensitive than NanH activity to two sialidase inhibitors (N-acetyl-2,3-dehydro-2-deoxyneuraminic acid and siastatin B). The activities of the three sialidases were affected differently by several metal ions. These results indicated that each C. perfringens sialidase has distinct properties, which may allow these enzymes to play different roles depending upon environmental conditions. PMID:24375134

  18. Comparison of restriction endonuclease analysis, ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for molecular differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kristjánsson, M; Samore, M H; Gerding, D N; DeGirolami, P C; Bettin, K M; Karchmer, A W; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    A combined clinical and molecular epidemiologic analysis of 46 strains of Clostridium difficile, including 16 nosocomial isolates from one ward (outbreak ward) plus 17 other nosocomial isolates and 13 community-acquired isolates, was performed. HindIII digests of total cellular DNA were analyzed by restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and ribotyping; SmaI digests were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates were assigned to typing groups on the basis of the profiles detected; isolates with closely related profiles were assigned to subgroups. The 16 isolates from the outbreak ward were resolved by both REA and PFGE into five distinct groups; 13 isolates represented two REA groups and three PFGE groups and two isolates were resolved as distinct groups by both techniques. DNA obtained from one isolate was persistently partially degraded, precluding analysis by PFGE. Seventeen sporadic nosocomial isolates were resolved by REA and PFGE into comparable numbers of groups (i.e., nine groups) and subgroups (i.e., 15 and 14 subgroups, respectively), with two isolates not evaluable by PFGE. The 13 epidemiologically unrelated community-acquired isolates were assigned to 11 groups by REA and to 12 groups by PFGE. Overall, ribotyping identified only nine groups among the 46 isolates. We conclude that REA and PFGE have comparable discriminatory powers for epidemiologic typing of C. difficile isolates and that ribotyping is appreciably less discriminatory. For a few isolates, partial DNA degradation prevented analysis by PFGE but not by REA or ribotyping; the cause of the degradation is unknown. Images PMID:7989550

  19. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-06-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials.

  20. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials. PMID:27283872

  1. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P; Pint, Cary L

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials. PMID:27283872

  2. Contributions of NanI Sialidase to Caco-2 Cell Adherence by Clostridium perfringens Type A and C Strains Causing Human Intestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. PMID:25135687

  3. Engineering E. coli strain for conversion of short chain fatty acids to bioalcohols

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent progress in production of various biofuel precursors and molecules, such as fatty acids, alcohols and alka(e)nes, is a significant step forward for replacing the fossil fuels with renewable fuels. A two-step process, where fatty acids from sugars are produced in the first step and then converted to corresponding biofuel molecules in the second step, seems more viable and attractive at this stage. We have engineered an Escherichia coli strain to take care of the second step for converting short chain fatty acids into corresponding alcohols by using butyrate kinase (Buk), phosphotransbutyrylase (Ptb) and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE2) from Clostridium acetobutylicum. Results The engineered E. coli was able to convert butyric acid and other short chain fatty acids of chain length C3 to C7 into corresponding alcohols and the efficiency of conversion varied with different E. coli strain type. Glycerol proved to be a better donor of ATP and electron as compared to glucose for converting butyric acid to butanol. The engineered E. coli was able to tolerate up to 100 mM butyric acid and produced butanol with the conversion rate close to 100% under anaerobic condition. Deletion of native genes, such as fumarate reductase (frdA) and alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE), responsible for side products succinate and ethanol, which act as electron sink and could compete with butyric acid uptake, did not improve the butanol production efficiency. Indigenous acyl-CoA synthetase (fadD) was found to play no role in the conversion of butyric acid to butanol. Engineered E. coli was cultivated in a bioreactor under controlled condition where 60 mM butanol was produced within 24 h of cultivation. A continuous bioreactor with the provision of cell recycling allowed the continuous production of butanol at the average productivity of 7.6 mmol/l/h until 240 h. Conclusions E. coli engineered with the pathway from C. acetobutylicum could efficiently convert butyric acid

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. Results In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell

  5. Taxonomic identity of type E botulinum toxin-producing Clostridium butyricum strains by sequencing of a short 16S rDNA region.

    PubMed

    Pourshaban, Manoocheher; Franciosa, Giovanna; Fenicia, Lucia; Aureli, Paolo

    2002-08-27

    Several micro-organisms capable of producing botulinum neurotoxin type E, though phenotypically similar to Clostridium butyricum (a normally non-neurotoxigenic organism), have recently been isolated in Italy and China. Some of these micro-organisms had been implicated in food-borne botulism, a serious neuroparalytic disease. The taxonomic identity of the type E botulinum toxin-producing strains is confirmed here, through sequencing of a genus- and species-specific segment of the 16S rRNA gene. Confirmation leads to the conclusion that neurotoxigenic C. butyricum must be regarded as an emergent food-borne pathogen. PMID:12204382

  6. Biaxial Strain Engineering in Suspended MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David; Liu, Xinghui; Cantley, Lauren; Koch, Eric; Yang, Guang; Boddeti, Narasimha; Dunn, Martin L.; Bunch, J. Scott; Bunch Team

    2015-03-01

    Monolayer MoS2 is a direct gap semiconductor and has attracted significant interest for its potential uses in electronics and optoelectronics. It has also been shown to have a highly strain-sensitive bandgap and can sustain strains of up to 11 percent, making it ideally suited for using strain engineering to tune it's electrical and optical properties. Herein, we fabricate pressurized MoS2 blisters using single and few layer MoS2 membranes suspended over cylindrical microcavities. By applying a pressure difference across the membrane and measuring the changes to it's photoluminescence spectrumwe study the effect of elastic biaxial strain engineering on the bandgap of MoS2.

  7. Field Performance of a Genetically Engineered Strain of Pink Bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Gregory S.; McKemey, Andrew R.; Morrison, Neil I.; O'Connell, Sinead; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Claus, John; Fu, Guoliang; Tang, Guolei; Sledge, Mickey; Walker, Adam S.; Phillips, Caroline E.; Miller, Ernie D.; Rose, Robert I.; Staten, Robert T.; Donnelly, Christl A.; Alphey, Luke

    2011-01-01

    Pest insects harm crops, livestock and human health, either directly or by acting as vectors of disease. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) – mass-release of sterile insects to mate with, and thereby control, their wild counterparts – has been used successfully for decades to control several pest species, including pink bollworm, a lepidopteran pest of cotton. Although it has been suggested that genetic engineering of pest insects provides potential improvements, there is uncertainty regarding its impact on their field performance. Discrimination between released and wild moths caught in monitoring traps is essential for estimating wild population levels. To address concerns about the reliability of current marking methods, we developed a genetically engineered strain of pink bollworm with a heritable fluorescent marker, to improve discrimination of sterile from wild moths. Here, we report the results of field trials showing that this engineered strain performed well under field conditions. Our data show that attributes critical to SIT in the field – ability to find a mate and to initiate copulation, as well as dispersal and persistence in the release area – were comparable between the genetically engineered strain and a standard strain. To our knowledge, these represent the first open-field experiments with a genetically engineered insect. The results described here provide encouragement for the genetic control of insect pests. PMID:21931649

  8. Delay time and Hartman effect in strain engineered graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi Deng, Zhi-Yong; Ban, Yue

    2014-05-07

    Tunneling times, including group delay and dwell time, are studied for massless Dirac electrons transmitting through a one-dimensional barrier in strain-engineered graphene. The Hartman effect, the independence of group delay on barrier length, is induced by the strain effect, and associated with the transmission gap and the evanescent mode. The influence of barrier height/length and strain modulus/direction on the group delay is also discussed, which provides the flexibility to control the group delay with applications in graphene-based devices. The relationship between group delay and dwell time is finally derived to clarify the nature of the Hartman effect.

  9. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.; Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S.; Kalkur, T. S.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  10. Association of tcdA+/tcdB+ Clostridium difficile Genotype with Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Strains Conferring Metronidazole Resistant Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shayganmehr, Farahnaz-Sadat; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Azimirad, Masoumeh; Aslani, Mohammad Mehdi; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reduced susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to antibiotics is problematic in clinical settings. There is new evidence indicating the cotransfer of toxin-encoding genes and conjugative transposons encoding resistance to antibiotics among different C. difficile strains. To analyze this association, in the current study, we evaluated the frequency of toxigenic C. difficile among the strains with different multidrug-resistant (MDR) profiles in Iran. Methods: Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the isolates were determined against metronidazole, imipenem, ceftazidime, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin by agar dilution method. The association of the resistance profiles and toxigenicity of the strains were studied by PCR targeting tcdA and tcdB genes. Results: Among 86 characterized strains, the highest and lowest resistance rates were related to ciprofloxacin (97%) and metronidazole (5%), respectively. The frequency of resistance to other antibiotics was as follow: imipenem (48%), ceftazidime (76%), and amikacin (76.5%). Among the resistant strains, double drug resistance and MDR phenotypes were detected in the frequencies of 10.4% and 66.2%, respectively. All of the metronidazole-resistant strains belonged to tcdA +/tcdB + genotype with triple or quintuple drug resistance phenotypes. MIC50 and MIC90 for this antibiotic was equally ≤ 8 μg/ml. Conclusion: These results proposed the association of tcdA +/tcdB + genotype of C. difficile and the emergence of resistance strains to broad-spectrum antibiotics and metronidazole. PMID:26048022

  11. 12 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Clostridium group P, strain C 48-50. Production, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Braun, M; Lünsdorf, H; Bückmann, A F

    1991-03-14

    NADP(H)-dependent 12 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSDH) from Clostridium group P, strain C 48-50, is still expressed at unusual high level (approximately 1% of total protein) under cultivation conditions where the usual expensive brain/heart infusion complex medium is replaced by inexpensive technical grade yeast autolysate. An inexpensive anaerobic bioprocess for the production of HSDH was developed provisionally up to 900-1 scale (9000 U/l, 7 g HSDH, specific activity 1.0 U/mg crude protein, 55 U/g wet cells). By a simple two-step affinity chromatography procedure, easily adaptable to a large-scale operation, using columns of small dimensions of Sephacryl-S-400-Procion-orange-P-2R (5 cm x 28 cm) and Sephacryl-S-400-Procion-red-HE-7B (2.6 cm x 14 cm) approximately 140 mg (1.8 x 10(4) U), HSDH was purified to apparent homogeneity and concentrated directly from a crude cell extract (overall yield 53%, specific activity 128 U/mg). As confirmed by fast native and SDS/PAGE, isoelectric focussing and electron microscopy, HSDH has a molecular mass of approximately 105 kDa and consists of four flattened tetrahedrically arranged identical subunits (26 kDa). The enzyme exhibits a rather low isoelectric point of 4.6, a pH optimum of 8.5-9.5 and a temperature optimum of approximately 55 C for the oxidation of cholic acid. Inhibition by SH reagents and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate has been observed. Chelating agents have no inhibitory effect. The presence of NADP increases considerably the thermostability (t 1/2 4-10 d, 25 C; 2-5 d, 37 C). Steady-state kinetic analysis for both reaction directions indicated that the reaction proceeds through an ordered bi bi mechanism with NADP(H) binding first to the free enzyme. Km, Vmax [forward (Vf) and reverse reactions (Vr)] and the dissociation constants Kd for the binary complexes with NADP and NADPH were as follows. NADP, Km = 35 microns, Kd = 35 microns; cholic acid, Km = 72 microns, deoxycholic acid, Km = 45 microns, Vf = 160 U mg

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Strain IT1118, an Epidemic Isolate Belonging to the Emerging PCR Ribotype 018

    PubMed Central

    Wasels, François; Barbanti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 018 has emerged in Italy, South Korea, and Japan, causing severe infections and outbreaks. In this study, we sequenced the genome of IT1118, an Italian clinical isolate, to clarify the molecular features contributing to the success of this epidemic type. PMID:27445391

  13. Mechanical Control of Graphene on Engineered Pyramidal Strain Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gill, Stephen T; Hinnefeld, John H; Zhu, Shuze; Swanson, William J; Li, Teng; Mason, Nadya

    2015-06-23

    Strain can tune desirable electronic behavior in graphene, but there has been limited progress in controlling strain in graphene devices. In this paper, we study the mechanical response of graphene on substrates patterned with arrays of mesoscale pyramids. Using atomic force microscopy, we demonstrate that the morphology of graphene can be controlled from conformal to suspended depending on the arrangement of pyramids and the aspect ratio of the array. Nonuniform strains in graphene suspended across pyramids are revealed by Raman spectroscopy and supported by atomistic modeling, which also indicates strong pseudomagnetic fields in the graphene. Our results suggest that incorporating mesoscale pyramids in graphene devices is a viable route to achieving strain-engineering of graphene. PMID:25970764

  14. Characteristics of methionine production by an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Dong; Lee, Joo-Young; Sim, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Younhee; Lee, Heung-Shick

    2007-07-01

    A methionine-producing strain was derived from a lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum through a process of genetic manipulation in order to assess its potential to synthesize and accumulate methionine during growth. The strain carries a deregulated hom gene (hom(FBR)) to abolish feedback inhibition of homoserine dehydrogenase by threonine and a deletion of the thrB gene (delta thrB) to abolish threonine synthesis. The constructed C. glutamicum MH20-22B/hom(FBR)/delta thrB strain accumulated 2.9 g/l of methionine by batch fermentation and showed resistance to methionine analogue ethionine at concentrations up to 30 mM. The growth of the strain was apparently impaired as a result of the accumulation of methionine biosynthetic intermediate, homocysteine. Production assays also revealed that the accumulation of methionine in the growth medium was transient and declined as the carbon source was depleted. During the period of methionine disappearance, the methionine biosynthetic genes were completely repressed in the engineered strains but not in the parental strain. After all, we have not only successfully constructed a methionine-producing C. glutamicum strain by genetic manipulation, but also revealed cellular constraints in attaining high yield and productivity. PMID:17604670

  15. Engineering related neutron diffraction measurements probing strains, texture and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald W; Tome, Carlos N; Balogh, Levente; Vogel, Sven C

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used for engineering applications for nearly three decades. The basis of the technique is powder diffraction following Bragg's Law. From the measured diffraction patterns information about internal, or residual, strain can be deduced from the peak positions, texture information can be extracted from the peak intensities, and finally the peak widths can provide information about the microstructure, e.g. dislocation densities and grain sizes. The strains are measured directly from changes in lattice parameters, however, in many cases it is non-trivial to determine macroscopic values of stress or strain from the measured data. The effects of intergranular strains must be considered, and combining the neutron diffraction measurements with polycrystal deformation modeling has proven invaluable in determining the overall stress and strain values of interest in designing and dimensioning engineering components. Furthelmore, the combined use of measurements and modeling has provided a tool for elucidating basic material properties, such as critical resolved shear stresses for the active deformation modes and their evolution as a function of applied deformation.

  16. Understanding the Current State of Infection Prevention to Prevent Clostridium difficile Infection: A Human Factors and Systems Engineering Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yanke, Eric; Zellmer, Caroline; Van Hoof, Sarah; Moriarty, Helene; Carayon, Pascale; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    Background Achieving and sustaining high levels of healthcare worker (HCW) compliance with contact isolation precautions is challenging. The aim of this study was to determine HCW work system barriers to, and facilitators of, adherence to contact isolation for patients with suspected or confirmed Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) using a human factors and systems engineering approach. Methods Prospective cohort study from September 2013 to November 2013 at a large academic medical center (hospital A) and an affiliated Veterans Administration (VA) hospital (hospital B). A human factors engineering (HFE) model for patient safety – the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model – was used to guide work system analysis and direct observation data collection. 288 observations were conducted. HCWs and visitors were assessed for compliance with all components of contact isolation precautions (hand hygiene, gowning, and gloving) before and after patient contact. Time required to complete contact isolation precautions was measured and adequacy of contact isolation supplies was assessed. Results Full compliance with contact isolation precautions was low at both hospitals: hospital A, 7%; hospital B, 22%. Lack of appropriate hand hygiene prior to room entry (Compliance: hospital A, 18%; hospital B, 29%) was the most common reason for lack of full compliance. More time was required for full compliance as compared to compliance with no components of contact isolation precautions before patient room entry, inside patient room, and after patient room exit (59.9 sec vs. 3.2 sec; P < .001; 507.3 sec vs. 149.7 sec; P = .006; 15.2 sec vs. 1.3 sec; P < .001). Compliance was lower when contact isolation supplies were inadequate (4% vs. 16%; P = .005). Conclusions Adherence to contact isolation precautions for CDI is a complex, time-consuming process. HFE analysis indicates multiple work system components serve as barriers and facilitators to full compliance

  17. Rapid spread of Clostridium difficile NAP1/027/ST1 in Chile confirms the emergence of the epidemic strain in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, C; Flores, R; Lévesque, S; Araya, P; Ulloa, S; Lagos, J; Hormazabal, J C; Tognarelli, J; Ibáñez, D; Pidal, P; Duery, O; Olivares, B; Fernández, J

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection has gained importance in recent years as a result of the rapid spread of epidemic strains, including hypervirulent strains. This study reports the molecular epidemiology of C. difficile obtained from hospitalized patients in Chile. Seven hundred and nineteen isolates of toxigenic C. difficile from 45 hospitals across the country were characterized through toxin profile, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and sequencing of the tcdC gene. In addition, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed on a subset of selected strains. PFGE typing of 719 isolates of C. difficile produced 60 PFGE patterns (subtypes). Subtype 1 was predominant (79% of isolates) and related to the hypervirulent strain (NAP1). Subtype 1 showed 73% relatedness with nine other subtypes, which had a similar tcdC deletion. Subtype 1 corresponded to ribotype 027 and ST1. This report shows the wide dissemination of the hypervirulent strain NAP1/027/ST1 in Chile. PMID:25687254

  18. Enhanced expression of recombinant beta toxin of Clostridium perfringens type B using a commercially available Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Fatemah; Pilehchian Langroudi, Reza; Imani, Bahram Golestani

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta toxin is only produced by types B and C and plays an important role in many human and animal diseases, causing fatal conditions that originate in the intestines. We compared the expression of C. perfringens type B vaccine strain recombinant beta toxin gene in the Escherichia coli strains RosettaTM(DE3) and BL21(DE3). The beta toxin gene was extracted from pJETβ and ligated with pET22b(+). pET22β was transformed into E. coli strains BL21(DE3) and RosettaTM(DE3). Recombinant protein was expressed as a soluble protein after isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction in strain RosettaTM(DE3) but not in BL21(DE3). Expression was optimised by growing recombinant cells at 37 °C and at an induction of 0.5 mM, 1 mM, 1.5 mM IPTG. Expression was evaluated using sodium dodecyl sulfate Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The recombinant protein was purified via Ni-NTA and was analysed using western blot. We concluded that E. coli strain RosettaTM(DE3) can enhance the expression of C. perfringens recombinant beta toxin. PMID:27543150

  19. Complete genome analysis of Clostridium bornimense strain M2/40(T): A new acidogenic Clostridium species isolated from a mesophilic two-phase laboratory-scale biogas reactor.

    PubMed

    Tomazetto, Geizecler; Hahnke, Sarah; Koeck, Daniela E; Wibberg, Daniel; Maus, Irena; Pühler, Alfred; Klocke, Michael; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-08-20

    Taxonomic and functional profiling based on metagenome analyses frequently revealed that members of the class Clostridia dominate biogas reactor communities and perform different essential metabolic pathways in the biogas fermentation process. Clostridium bornimense strain M2/40(T) was recently isolated from a mesophilic two-phase lab-scale biogas reactor continuously fed with maize silage and wheat straw. The genome of the strain was completely sequenced and manually annotated to reconstruct its metabolic potential regarding carbohydrate active enzyme production and fermentation of organic compounds for consolidated biofuel production from biomass. The C. bornimense M2/40(T) genome consists of a chromosome (2,917,864bp in size) containing 2613 protein coding sequences, and a 699,161bp chromid (secondary replicon) harboring 680 coding sequences. Both replicons feature very similar GC-contents of approximately 29%. The complex genome comprises three prophage regions, two CRISPR-cas systems and a putative cellulosomal gene cluster that is located on the second replicon (chromid) of the strain. The overexpressed glycosyl hydrolases (GH) CelK (GH9) and CelA (GH48) encoded in the cellulosomal gene cluster were shown to be active on the substrates xylan and xyloglucan whereas XghA (GH74) is highly active on xyloglucan. Reconstruction of fermentation pathways from genome sequence data revealed that strain M2/40(T) encodes all enzymes for hydrogen, acetate, formate, lactate, butyrate, and ethanol production, leading to the classification of the isolate as acidogenic bacterium. Phylogenetic analyses uncovered that the closest characterized relative of C. bornimense is C. cellulovorans. Comparative analyses of the C. bornimense and C. cellulovorans genomes revealed considerable rearrangements within their chromosomes suggesting that both species evolved separately for a relatively long period of time and adapted to specific tasks within microbial consortia responsible for

  20. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 and its parent strain DSM 1731 revealed new understandings on butanol tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Guanhui; Dong, Hongjun; Zhu, Yan; Mao, Shaoming; Zhang, Tianrui; Zhang, Yanping; Chen, Zugen; Li, Yin

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Genomes of a butanol tolerant strain and its parent strain were deciphered. • Comparative genomic and proteomic was applied to understand butanol tolerance. • None differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. • Mutations in ribosome might be responsible for the global difference of proteomics. - Abstract: Clostridium acetobutylicum strain Rh8 is a butanol-tolerant mutant which can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, 46% higher than that of its parent strain DSM 1731. We previously performed comparative cytoplasm- and membrane-proteomic analyses to understand the mechanism underlying the improved butanol tolerance of strain Rh8. In this work, we further extended this comparison to the genomic level. Compared with the genome of the parent strain DSM 1731, two insertion sites, four deletion sites, and 67 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) are distributed throughout the genome of strain Rh8. Among the 67 SNVs, 16 SNVs are located in the predicted promoters and intergenic regions; while 29 SNVs are located in the coding sequence, affecting a total of 21 proteins involved in transport, cell structure, DNA replication, and protein translation. The remaining 22 SNVs are located in the ribosomal genes, affecting a total of 12 rRNA genes in different operons. Analysis of previous comparative proteomic data indicated that none of the differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. Rchange Algorithms analysis indicated that the mutations occurred in the ribosomal genes might change the ribosome RNA thermodynamic characteristics, thus affect the translation strength of these proteins. Take together, the improved butanol tolerance of C. acetobutylicum strain Rh8 might be acquired through regulating the translational process to achieve different expression strength of genes involved in butanol tolerance.

  1. Semiconductor nanomembranes: a platform for new properties via strain engineering

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    New phenomena arise in single-crystal semiconductors when these are fabricated in very thin sheets, with thickness at the nanometer scale. We review recent research on Si and Ge nanomembranes, including the use of elastic strain sharing, layer release, and transfer, that demonstrate new science and enable the fabrication of materials with unique properties. Strain engineering produces new strained forms of Si or Ge not possible in nature, new layered structures, defect-free SiGe sheets, and new electronic band structure and photonic properties. Through-membrane elastic interactions cause the double-sided ordering of epitaxially grown nanostressors on Si nanomembranes, resulting in a spatially and periodically varying strain field in the thin crystalline semiconductor sheet. The inherent influence of strain on the band structure creates band gap modulation, thereby creating effectively a single-element electronic superlattice. Conversely, large-enough externally applied strain can make Ge a direct-band gap semiconductor, giving promise for Group IV element light sources. PMID:23153167

  2. High temperature strain gage technology for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtel, Edward J.; McDaniel, Amos D.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a six month study that addressed specific issues to transfer the Pd-13Cr static strain sensor to a gas turbine engine environment. The application issues that were addressed include: (1) evaluation of a miniature, variable potentiometer for use as the ballast resistor, in conjunction with a conventional strain gage signal conditioning unit; (2) evaluation of a metal sheathed, platinum conductor leadwire assembly for use with the three-wire sensor; and (3) subjecting the sensor to dynamic strain cyclic testing to determine fatigue characteristics. Results indicate a useful static strain gage system at all temperature levels up to 1350 F. The fatigue characteristics also appear to be very promising, indicating a potential use in dynamic strain measurement applications. The procedure, set-up, and data for all tests are presented in this report. This report also discusses the specific strain gage installation technique for the Pd-13Cr gage because of its potential impact on the quality of the output data.

  3. High temperature strain gage technology for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Edward J.; Mcdaniel, Amos D.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a six month study that addressed specific issues to transfer the Pd-13Cr static strain sensor to a gas turbine engine environment. The application issues that were addressed include: (1) evaluation of a miniature, variable potentiometer for use as the ballast resistor, in conjunction with a conventional strain gage signal conditioning unit; (2) evaluation of a metal sheathed, platinum conductor leadwire assembly for use with the three-wire sensor; and (3) subjecting the sensor to dynamic strain cyclic testing to determine fatigue characteristics. Results indicate a useful static strain gage system at all temperature levels up to 1350 F. The fatigue characteristics also appear to be very promising, indicating a potential use in dynamic strain measurement applications. The procedure, set-up, and data for all tests are presented in this report. This report also discusses the specific strain gage installation technique for the Pd-13Cr gage because of its potential impact on the quality of the output data.

  4. MESSI: metabolic engineering target selection and best strain identification tool

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kang; Li, Jun; Lim, Boon Leong; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are synergistically related fields for manipulating target pathways and designing microorganisms that can act as chemical factories. Saccharomyces cerevisiae’s ideal bioprocessing traits make yeast a very attractive chemical factory for production of fuels, pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals as well as a wide range of chemicals. However, future attempts of engineering S. cerevisiae’s metabolism using synthetic biology need to move towards more integrative models that incorporate the high connectivity of metabolic pathways and regulatory processes and the interactions in genetic elements across those pathways and processes. To contribute in this direction, we have developed Metabolic Engineering target Selection and best Strain Identification tool (MESSI), a web server for predicting efficient chassis and regulatory components for yeast bio-based production. The server provides an integrative platform for users to analyse ready-to-use public high-throughput metabolomic data, which are transformed to metabolic pathway activities for identifying the most efficient S. cerevisiae strain for the production of a compound of interest. As input MESSI accepts metabolite KEGG IDs or pathway names. MESSI outputs a ranked list of S. cerevisiae strains based on aggregation algorithms. Furthermore, through a genome-wide association study of the metabolic pathway activities with the strains’ natural variation, MESSI prioritizes genes and small variants as potential regulatory points and promising metabolic engineering targets. Users can choose various parameters in the whole process such as (i) weight and expectation of each metabolic pathway activity in the final ranking of the strains, (ii) Weighted AddScore Fuse or Weighted Borda Fuse aggregation algorithm, (iii) type of variants to be included, (iv) variant sets in different biological levels. Database URL: http://sbb.hku.hk/MESSI/ PMID:26255308

  5. Acetone production with metabolically engineered strains of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Gerdom, Marzena; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Linder, Sonja; Flüchter, Sebastian; Öztürk, Hatice; Blümke, Wilfried; May, Antje; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; Dürre, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Expected depletion of oil and fossil resources urges the development of new alternative routes for the production of bulk chemicals and fuels beyond petroleum resources. In this study, the clostridial acetone pathway was used for the formation of acetone in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The acetone production operon (APO) containing the genes thlA (encoding thiolase A), ctfA/ctfB (encoding CoA transferase), and adc (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase) from Clostridium acetobutylicum were cloned under the control of the thlA promoter into four vectors having different replicons for Gram-positives (pIP404, pBP1, pCB102, and pCD6). Stable replication was observed for all constructs. A. woodii [pJIR_actthlA] achieved the maximal acetone concentration under autotrophic conditions (15.2±3.4mM). Promoter sequences of the genes ackA from A. woodii and pta-ack from C. ljungdahlii were determined by primer extension (PEX) and cloned upstream of the APO. The highest acetone production in recombinant A. woodii cells was achieved using the promoters PthlA and Ppta-ack. Batch fermentations using A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] in a bioreactor revealed that acetate concentration had an effect on the acetone production, due to the high Km value of the CoA transferase. In order to establish consistent acetate concentration within the bioreactor and to increase biomass, a continuous fermentation process for A. woodii was developed. Thus, acetone productivity of the strain A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] was increased from 1.2mgL(-1)h(-1) in bottle fermentation to 26.4mgL(-1)h(-1) in continuous gas fermentation. PMID:26971669

  6. Clostridium geopurificans strain MJ1 sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium that grows via fermentation and reduces the cyclic nitramine explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Man Jae; Wei, Na; Millerick, Kayleigh; Popovic, Jovan; Finneran, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    A fermentative, non-spore forming, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain MJ1(T), was isolated from an RDX contaminated aquifer at a live-fire training site in Northwest NJ, United States. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA base composition, strain MJ1(T) was assigned to the Firmicutes. The DNA G+C content was 42.8 mol%. Fermentative growth was supported by glucose and citrate in a defined basal medium. The bacterium is a strict anaerobe that grows between at pH 6.0 and pH 8.0 and 18 and 37 °C. The culture did not grow with hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) as the electron acceptor or mineralize RDX under these conditions. However, MJ1(T) transformed RDX into MNX, methylenedinitramine, formaldehyde, formate, ammonium, nitrous oxide, and nitrate. The nearest phylogenetic relative with a validly published name was Desulfotomaculum guttoideum (95 % similarity). However, MJ1(T) was also related to Clostridium celerecrescens DSM 5628 (95 %), Clostridium indolis DSM 755 (94 %), and Clostridium sphenoides DSM 632 (94 %). DNA:DNA hybridization with these strains was between 6.7 and 58.7 percent. The dominant cellular fatty acids (greater than 5 % of the total, which was 99.0 % recovery) were 16:0 fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) (32.12 %), 18:1cis 11 dimethyl acetal (DMA) (16.47 %), 16:1cis 9 DMA (10.28 %), 16:1cis 9 FAME (8.10 %), and 18:1cis 9 DMA (5.36 %). On the basis of morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic data, Clostridium geopurificans is proposed as a new species in genus Clostridium, with strain MJ1(T) as the type strain. PMID:24522483

  7. Tunable thermoelectric transport in nanomeshes via elastic strain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Piccione, Brian; Gianola, Daniel S.

    2015-03-16

    Recent experimental explorations of silicon nanomeshes have shown that the unique metastructures exhibit reduced thermal conductivity while preserving bulk electrical conductivity via feature sizes between relevant phonon and electron mean free paths, aiding in the continued promise that nanometer-scale engineering may further enhance thermoelectric behavior. Here, we introduce a strategy for tuning thermoelectric transport phenomena in semiconductor nanomeshes via heterogeneous elastic strain engineering, using silicon as a model material for demonstration of the concept. By combining analytical models for electron mobility in uniformly stressed silicon with finite element analysis of strained silicon nanomeshes in a lumped physical model, we show that the nonuniform and multiaxial strain fields defined by the nanomesh geometry give rise to spatially varying band shifts and warping, which in aggregate accelerate electron transport along directions of applied stress. This allows for global electrical conductivity and Seebeck enhancements beyond those of homogenous samples under equivalent far-field stresses, ultimately increasing thermoelectric power factor nearly 50% over unstrained samples. The proposed concept and structures—generic to a wide class of materials with large dynamic ranges of elastic strain in nanoscale volumes—may enable a new pathway for active and tunable control of transport properties relevant to waste heat scavenging and thermal management.

  8. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  9. Tunable thermoelectric transport in nanomeshes via elastic strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccione, Brian; Gianola, Daniel S.

    2015-03-01

    Recent experimental explorations of silicon nanomeshes have shown that the unique metastructures exhibit reduced thermal conductivity while preserving bulk electrical conductivity via feature sizes between relevant phonon and electron mean free paths, aiding in the continued promise that nanometer-scale engineering may further enhance thermoelectric behavior. Here, we introduce a strategy for tuning thermoelectric transport phenomena in semiconductor nanomeshes via heterogeneous elastic strain engineering, using silicon as a model material for demonstration of the concept. By combining analytical models for electron mobility in uniformly stressed silicon with finite element analysis of strained silicon nanomeshes in a lumped physical model, we show that the nonuniform and multiaxial strain fields defined by the nanomesh geometry give rise to spatially varying band shifts and warping, which in aggregate accelerate electron transport along directions of applied stress. This allows for global electrical conductivity and Seebeck enhancements beyond those of homogenous samples under equivalent far-field stresses, ultimately increasing thermoelectric power factor nearly 50% over unstrained samples. The proposed concept and structures—generic to a wide class of materials with large dynamic ranges of elastic strain in nanoscale volumes—may enable a new pathway for active and tunable control of transport properties relevant to waste heat scavenging and thermal management.

  10. Functional Characterization of an Extended Binding Component of the Actin-ADP-Ribosylating C2 Toxin Detected in Clostridium botulinum Strain (C) 2300 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sterthoff, Charlott; Lang, Alexander E.; Schwan, Carsten; Tauch, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of the binding component C2II and the enzyme component C2I, which ADP-ribosylates G-actin of eukaryotic cells. Trypsin-activated C2II (C2IIa) forms heptamers that mediate cell binding and translocation of C2I from acidic endosomes into the cytosol of target cells. By genome sequencing of C. botulinum strain (C) 2300, we found that C2II from this strain carries a C-terminal extension of 129 amino acids, unlike its homologous counterparts from strains (C) 203U28, (C) 468, and (D) 1873. This extension shows a high similarity to the C-terminal receptor-binding domain of C2II and is presumably the result of a duplication of this domain. The C2II extension facilitates the binding to cell surface receptors, which leads to an increased intoxication efficiency compared to that of C2II proteins from other C. botulinum strains. PMID:20145093

  11. Clostridium difficile infection among immunocompromised patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and detection of moxifloxacin resistance in a ribotype 014 strain.

    PubMed

    Secco, Danielle Angst; Balassiano, Ilana Teruszkin; Boente, Renata Ferreira; Miranda, Karla Rodrigues; Brazier, Jon; Hall, Val; dos Santos-Filho, Joaquim; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Domingues, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore forming anaerobic bacterium, often associated with nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. The acquisition of this organism occurs primarily in hospitals through accidental ingestion of spores, and its establishment and proliferation in the colon results from the removal of members of the normal intestinal flora during or after antibiotic therapy. In this study, stool samples from patients admitted to the University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCCF/UFRJ) were screened for C. difficile toxins with an ELISA test and cultured with standard techniques for C. difficile isolation. A total of 74 stool samples were collected from patients undergoing antibiotic therapy between August 2009 and November 2010, only two (2.7%) were positive in the ELISA test and culture. A third isolate was obtained from a negative ELISA test sample. All cases of CDI were identified in patients with acute lymphoid or myeloid leukemia. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization showed that all strains carried toxins A and B genes, and belonged to PCR-ribotypes 014, 043 and 046. The isolated strains were sensitive to metronidazole and vancomycin, and resistant to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. Resistance to moxifloxacin, was present in the strain from PCR-ribotype 014, that showed an amino acid substitution in gyrB gene (Asp 426 → Asn). This is the first time that this mutation in a PCR-ribotype 014 strain has been described in Brazil. PMID:24907488

  12. Insights into the Origin of Clostridium botulinum Strains: Evolution of Distinct Restriction Endonuclease Sites in rrs (16S rRNA gene).

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Ashish; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Joshi, Jayadev; Shankar, Pratap; Kalia, Vipin Chandra

    2015-06-01

    Diversity analysis of Clostridium botulinum strains is complicated by high microheterogeneity caused by the presence of 9-22 copies of rrs (16S rRNA gene). The need is to mine genetic markers to identify very closely related strains. Multiple alignments of the nucleotide sequences of the 212 rrs of 13 C. botulinum strains revealed intra- and inter-genomic heterogeneity. Low intragenomic heterogeneity in rrs was evident in strains 230613, Alaska E43, Okra, Eklund 17B, Langeland, 657, Kyoto, BKT015925, and Loch Maree. The most heterogenous rrs sequences were those of C. botulinum strains ATCC 19397, Hall, H04402065, and ATCC 3502. In silico restriction mapping of these rrs sequences was observable with 137 type II Restriction endonucleases (REs). Nucleotide changes (NC) at these RE sites resulted in appearance of distinct and additional sites, and loss in certain others. De novo appearances of RE sites due to NC were recorded at different positions in rrs gene. A nucleotide transition A>G in rrs of C. botulinum Loch Maree and 657 resulted in the generation of 4 and 10 distinct RE sites, respectively. Transitions A>G, G>A, and T>C led to the loss of RE sites. A perusal of the entire NC and in silico RE mapping of rrs of C. botulinum strains provided insights into their evolution. Segregation of strains on the basis of RE digestion patterns of rrs was validated by the cladistic analysis involving six house keeping genes: dnaN, gyrB, metG, prfA, pyrG, and Rho. PMID:25805900

  13. Role of the Agr-like quorum-sensing system in regulating toxin production by Clostridium perfringens type B strains CN1793 and CN1795.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianming; McClane, Bruce A

    2012-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B causes enteritis and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. By definition, these bacteria must produce alpha toxin (CPA), beta toxin (CPB) and epsilon toxin (ETX) although most type B strains also produce perfringolysin O (PFO) and beta2 toxin (CPB2). A recently identified Agr-like quorum-sensing (QS) system in C. perfringens controls all toxin production by surveyed type A, C, and D strains, but whether this QS is involved in regulating toxin production by type B strains has not been explored. Therefore, the current study introduced agrB null mutations into type B strains CN1795 and CN1793. Both type B agrB null mutants exhibited reduced levels of CPB, PFO, and CPA in their culture supernatants, and this effect was reversible by complementation. The reduced presence of CPB in culture supernatant involved decreased cpb transcription. In contrast, the agrB null mutants of both type B strains retained wild-type production levels of ETX and CPB2. In a Caco-2 cell model of enteritis, culture supernatants of the type B agrB null mutants were less cytotoxic than supernatants of their wild-type parents. However, in an MDCK cell in vitro model for enterotoxemic effects, supernatants from the agrB null mutants or wild-type parents were equally cytotoxic after trypsin activation. Coupling these and previous results, it is now evident that strain-dependent variations exist in Agr-like QS system regulation of C. perfringens toxin production. The cell culture results further support a role for trypsin in determining which toxins contribute to disease involving type B strains. PMID:22689820

  14. Role of the Agr-Like Quorum-Sensing System in Regulating Toxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type B Strains CN1793 and CN1795

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B causes enteritis and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. By definition, these bacteria must produce alpha toxin (CPA), beta toxin (CPB) and epsilon toxin (ETX) although most type B strains also produce perfringolysin O (PFO) and beta2 toxin (CPB2). A recently identified Agr-like quorum-sensing (QS) system in C. perfringens controls all toxin production by surveyed type A, C, and D strains, but whether this QS is involved in regulating toxin production by type B strains has not been explored. Therefore, the current study introduced agrB null mutations into type B strains CN1795 and CN1793. Both type B agrB null mutants exhibited reduced levels of CPB, PFO, and CPA in their culture supernatants, and this effect was reversible by complementation. The reduced presence of CPB in culture supernatant involved decreased cpb transcription. In contrast, the agrB null mutants of both type B strains retained wild-type production levels of ETX and CPB2. In a Caco-2 cell model of enteritis, culture supernatants of the type B agrB null mutants were less cytotoxic than supernatants of their wild-type parents. However, in an MDCK cell in vitro model for enterotoxemic effects, supernatants from the agrB null mutants or wild-type parents were equally cytotoxic after trypsin activation. Coupling these and previous results, it is now evident that strain-dependent variations exist in Agr-like QS system regulation of C. perfringens toxin production. The cell culture results further support a role for trypsin in determining which toxins contribute to disease involving type B strains. PMID:22689820

  15. Clostridium Difficile Colonization in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients: A Prospective Study of the Epidemiology and Outcomes Involving Toxigenic and Nontoxigenic Strains.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tania; Croswell, Christopher; Urday-Cornejo, Varinia; Awali, Reda; Cutright, Jessica; Salimnia, Hossein; Reddy Banavasi, Harsha Vardhan; Liubakka, Alyssa; Lephart, Paul; Chopra, Teena; Revankar, Sanjay G; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi; Alangaden, George

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of infectious diarrhea in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Asymptomatic colonization of the gastrointestinal tract occurs before development of C. difficile infection (CDI). This prospective study examines the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of colonization with toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile in HSCT patients. This 18-month study was conducted in the HSCT unit at the Karmanos Cancer Center and Wayne State University in Detroit. Stool samples from the patients who consented for the study were taken at admission and weekly until discharge. Anaerobic culture for C. difficile and identification of toxigenic strains by PCR were performed on the stool samples. Demographic information and clinical and laboratory data were collected. Of the 150 patients included in the study, 29% were colonized with C. difficile at admission; 12% with a toxigenic strain and 17% with a nontoxigenic strain. Over a 90-day follow-up, 12 of 44 (26%) patients colonized with any C. difficile strain at admission developed CDI compared with 13 of 106 (12%) of patients not colonized (odds ratio [OR], 2.70; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.11 to 6.48; P = .025). Eleven of 18 (61%) patients colonized with the toxigenic strain and 1 of 26 (4%) of those colonized with nontoxigenic strain developed CDI (OR, 39.30; 95% CI, 4.30 to 359.0; P < .001) at a median of 12 days. On univariate and multivariate analyses, none of the traditional factors associated with high risk for C. difficile colonization or CDI were found to be significant. Recurrent CDI occurred in 28% of cases. Asymptomatic colonization with C. difficile at admission was high in our HSCT population. Colonization with toxigenic C. difficile was predictive of CDI, whereas colonization with a nontoxigenic C. difficile appeared protective. These findings may have implications for infection control strategies and for novel approaches for the prevention and

  16. Influence of pH and temperature on the growth of and toxin production by neurotoxigenic strains of Clostridium butyricum type E.

    PubMed

    Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fenicia, Lucia; Franciosa, Giovanna; Aureli, Paolo

    2002-08-01

    Strains of Clostridium butyricum that produce botulinal toxin type E have been implicated in outbreaks of foodborne botulism in China, India, and Italy, yet the conditions that are favorable for the growth and toxinogenesis of these strains remain to be established. We attempted to determine the temperatures and pH levels that are most conducive to the growth of and toxin production by the six strains of neurotoxigenic C. butyricum that have been implicated in outbreaks of infective and foodborne botulism in Italy. The strains were cultured for 180 days on Trypticase-peptone-glucose-yeast extract broth at various pHs (4.6, 4.8, 5.0, 5.2, 5.4, 5.6, and 5.8) at 30 degrees C and at various temperatures (10, 12, and 15 degrees C) at pH 7.0. Growth was determined by checking for turbidity; toxin production was determined by the mouse bioassay. We also inoculated two foods: mascarpone cheese incubated at 25 and 15 degrees C and pesto sauce incubated at 25 degrees C. The lowest pH at which growth and toxin production occurred was 4.8 at 43 and 44 days of incubation, respectively. The lowest temperature at which growth and toxin production occurred was 12 degrees C, with growth and toxin production first being observed after 15 days. For both foods, toxin production was observed after 5 days at 25 degrees C. Since the strains did not show particularly psychrotrophic behavior, 4 degrees C can be considered a sufficiently low temperature for the inhibition of growth. However, the observation of toxin production in foods at room temperature and at abused refrigeration temperatures demands that these strains be considered a new risk for the food industry. PMID:12182478

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid containing the botulinum neurotoxin gene in Clostridium botulinum type B strain 111 isolated from an infant patient in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Koji; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Kohda, Tomoko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Umeda, Kaoru; Iida, Tetsuya; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent toxins that are produced by Clostridium botulinum. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid containing the botulinum neurotoxin gene in C. botulinum type B strain 111 in order to obtain an insight into the toxigenicity and evolution of the bont gene in C. botulinum. Group I C. botulinum type B strain 111 was isolated from the first case of infant botulism in Japan in 1995. In previous studies, botulinum neurotoxin subtype B2 (BoNT/B2) produced by strain 111 exhibited different antigenic properties from those of authentic BoNT/B1 produced by strain Okra. We have recently shown that the isolates of strain 111 that lost toxigenicity were cured of the plasmid containing the bont/B2 gene. In the present study, the plasmid (named pCB111) was circular 265,575 bp double-stranded DNA and contained 332 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). 85 gene products of these ORFs could be functionally assigned on the basis of sequence homology to known proteins. The bont/B2 complex genes were located on pCB111 and some gene products may be involved in the conjugative plasmid transfer and horizontal transfer of bont genes. pCB111 was similar to previously identified plasmids containing bont/B1, /B5, or/A3 complex genes in other group I C. botulinum strains. It was suggested that these plasmids had been derived from a common ancestor and had played important roles for the bont gene transfer between C. botulinum. PMID:25149145

  18. Strain engineered high reflectivity DBRs in the deep UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, A.; Hoffmann, M. P.; Hernandez-Balderrama, L.; Kaess, F.; Bryan, I.; Washiyama, S.; Bobea, M.; Tweedie, J.; Kirste, R.; Gerhold, M.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The maximum achievable reflectivity of current III-nitride Bragg reflectors in the UV-C spectral range is limited due to plastic relaxation of thick multilayer structures. Cracking due to a large mismatch of the thermal expansion and lattice constants between AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN alloys of different composition and the substrate at the heterointerface is the common failure mode. Strain engineering and strain relaxation concepts by the growth on a strain reduced Al0.85Ga0.15N template and the implementation of low temperature interlayers is demonstrated. A significant enhancement of the maximum reflectivity above 97% at a resonance wavelength of 270 nm due to an increase of the critical thickness of our AlN/Al0.65Ga0.35N DBRs to 1.45 μm (25.5 pairs) prove their potential. By comparing the growth of identical Bragg reflectors on different pseudo-templates, the accumulated mismatch strain energy in the DBR, not the dislocation density provided by the template/substrate, was identified to limit the critical thickness. To further enhance the reflectivity low temperature interlays were implemented into the DBR to partially relief the misfit strain. Relaxation is enabled by the nucleation of small surface domains facilitating misfit dislocation injection and glide. Detailed structural and optical investigations will be conducted to prove the influence of the LT-AlN interlayers on the strain state, structural integrity and reflectivity properties. Coherent growth and no structural and optical degradation of the Bragg mirror properties was observed proving the fully applicability of the relaxation concept to fabricate thick high reflectivity DBR and vertical cavity laser structures.

  19. Crystallization engineering as a route to epitaxial strain control

    SciTech Connect

    Akbashev, Andrew R.; Plokhikh, Aleksandr V.; Barbash, Dmitri; Lofland, Samuel E.; Spanier, Jonathan E.

    2015-10-01

    The controlled synthesis of epitaxial thin films offers opportunities for tuning their functional properties via enabling or suppressing strain relaxation. Examining differences in the epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxide films, we report on an alternate, low-temperature route for strain engineering. Thin films of amorphous Bi–Fe–O were grown on (001)SrTiO{sub 3} and (001)LaAlO{sub 3} substrates via atomic layer deposition. In situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the crystallization of the amorphous films into the epitaxial (001)BiFeO{sub 3} phase reveal distinct evolution profiles of crystallinity with temperature. While growth on (001)SrTiO{sub 3} results in a coherently strained film, the same films obtained on (001)LaAlO{sub 3} showed an unstrained, dislocation-rich interface, with an even lower temperature onset of the perovskite phase crystallization than in the case of (001)SrTiO{sub 3}. Our results demonstrate how the strain control in an epitaxial film can be accomplished via its crystallization from the amorphous state.

  20. Production of 1,3-PDO and butanol by a mutant strain of Clostridium pasteurianum with increased tolerance towards crude glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The production of biodiesel results in a concomitant production of crude glycerol (10% w/w). Clostridium pasteurianum can utilize glycerol as sole carbon source and converts it into 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, butanol, and CO2. Reduced growth and productivities on crude glycerol as compared to technical grade glycerol have previously been observed. In this study, we applied random mutagenesis mediated by ethane methyl sulfonate (EMS) to develop a mutant strain of C. pasteurianum tolerating high concentrations of crude glycerol. At an initial crude glycerol concentration of 25 g/l the amount of dry cell mass produced by the mutant strain was six times higher than the amount produced by the wild type. Growth of the mutant strain was even detected at an initial crude glycerol concentration of 105 g/l. A pH controlled reactor with in situ removal of butanol by gas-stripping was used to evaluate the performance of the mutant strain. Utilizing stored crude glycerol, the mutant strain showed significantly increased rates compared to the wild type. A maximum glycerol utilization rate of 7.59 g/l/h was observed along with productivities of 1.80 g/l/h and 1.21 g/l/h of butanol and 1,3-PDO, respectively. These rates are higher than what previously has been published for C. pasteurianum growing on technical grade glycerol in fed batch reactors. In addition, high yields of the main products (butanol and 1,3-PDO) were detected and these two products were efficiently separated in two steams using gas-stripping. PMID:22901717

  1. Bio-Engineering High Performance Microbial Strains for MEOR

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangdong Fang; Qinghong Wang; Patrick Shuler

    2007-12-30

    The main objectives of this three-year research project are: (1) to employ the latest advances in genetics and bioengineering, especially Directed Protein Evolution technology, to improve the effectiveness of the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process. (2) to improve the surfactant activity and the thermal stability of bio-surfactant systems for MEOR; and (3) to develop improved laboratory methods and tools that screen quickly candidate bio-systems for EOR. Biosurfactants have been receiving increasing attention as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) agents because of their unique properties (i.e., mild production conditions, lower toxicity, and higher biodegradability) compared to their synthetic chemical counterparts. Rhamnolipid as a potent natural biosurfactant has a wide range of potential applications, including EOR and bioremediation. During the three-year of the project period, we have successfully cloned the genes involved in the rhamnolipid bio-synthesis. And by using the Transposon containing Rhamnosyltransferase gene rhlAB, we engineered the new mutant strains P. aeruginosa PEER02 and E. coli TnERAB so they can produce rhamnolipid biosurfactans. We were able to produce rhamnolipds in both P. aeroginosa PAO1-RhlA- strain and P. fluorescens ATCC15453 strain, with the increase of 55 to 175 fold in rhamnolipid production comparing with wild type bacteria strain. We have also completed the first round direct evolution studies using Error-prone PCR technique and have constructed the library of RhlAB-containing Transposon to express mutant gene in heterologous hosts. Several methods, such as colorimetric agar plate assay, colorimetric spectrophotometer assay, bioactive assay and oil spreading assay have been established to detect and screen rhamnolipid production. Our engineered P. aeruginosa PEER02 strain can produce rhamnolipids with different carbon sources as substrate. Interfacial tension analysis (IFT) showed that different rhamnolipids from different

  2. Computational methods in metabolic engineering for strain design.

    PubMed

    Long, Matthew R; Ong, Wai Kit; Reed, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic engineering uses genetic approaches to control microbial metabolism to produce desired compounds. Computational tools can identify new biological routes to chemicals and the changes needed in host metabolism to improve chemical production. Recent computational efforts have focused on exploring what compounds can be made biologically using native, heterologous, and/or enzymes with broad specificity. Additionally, computational methods have been developed to suggest different types of genetic modifications (e.g. gene deletion/addition or up/down regulation), as well as suggest strategies meeting different criteria (e.g. high yield, high productivity, or substrate co-utilization). Strategies to improve the runtime performances have also been developed, which allow for more complex metabolic engineering strategies to be identified. Future incorporation of kinetic considerations will further improve strain design algorithms. PMID:25576846

  3. Strain-engineered manufacturing of freeform carbon nanotube microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Volder, M.; Park, S.; Tawfick, S.; Hart, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    The skins of many plants and animals have intricate microscale surface features that give rise to properties such as directed water repellency and adhesion, camouflage, and resistance to fouling. However, engineered mimicry of these designs has been restrained by the limited capabilities of top-down fabrication processes. Here we demonstrate a new technique for scalable manufacturing of freeform microstructures via strain-engineered growth of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Offset patterning of the CNT growth catalyst is used to locally modulate the CNT growth rate. This causes the CNTs to collectively bend during growth, with exceptional uniformity over large areas. The final shape of the curved CNT microstructures can be designed via finite element modeling, and compound catalyst shapes produce microstructures with multidirectional curvature and unusual self-organized patterns. Conformal coating of the CNTs enables tuning of the mechanical properties independently from the microstructure geometry, representing a versatile principle for design and manufacturing of complex microstructured surfaces.

  4. Engineering of Bacillus subtilis Strains To Allow Rapid Characterization of Heterologous Diguanylate Cyclases and Phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaohui; Dong, Xiao; Subramanian, Sundharraman; Matthews, Paige M.; Cooper, Caleb A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence, are often regulated by changes in the available concentration of cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Generally, high c-di-GMP concentrations are correlated with decreased motility and increased biofilm formation and low c-di-GMP concentrations are correlated with an increase in motility and activation of virulence pathways. The study of c-di-GMP is complicated, however, by the fact that organisms often encode dozens of redundant enzymes that synthesize and hydrolyze c-di-GMP, diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs); thus, determining the contribution of any one particular enzyme is challenging. In an effort to develop a facile system to study c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes, we have engineered a suite of Bacillus subtilis strains to assess the effect of individual heterologously expressed proteins on c-di-GMP levels. As a proof of principle, we characterized all 37 known genes encoding predicted DGCs and PDEs in Clostridium difficile using parallel readouts of swarming motility and fluorescence from green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed under the control of a c-di-GMP-controlled riboswitch. We found that 27 of the 37 putative C. difficile 630 c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes had either active cyclase or phosphodiesterase activity, with agreement between our motility phenotypes and fluorescence-based c-di-GMP reporter. Finally, we show that there appears to be a threshold level of c-di-GMP needed to inhibit motility in Bacillus subtilis. PMID:25085482

  5. Microbial conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol by an engineered strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xueming; Tan, Yongsong; Zhu, Hong; Zhao, Kai; Shen, Wei

    2009-03-01

    In an effort to improve industrial production of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD), we engineered a novel polycistronic operon under the control of the temperature-sensitive lambda phage P(L)P(R) promoter regulated by the cIts857 repressor and expressed it in Escherichia coli K-12 ER2925. The genes for the production of 1,3-PD in Clostridium butyricum, dhaB1 and dhaB2, which encode the vitamin B(12)-independent glycerol dehydratase DhaB1 and its activating factor, DhaB2, respectively, were tandemly arrayed with the E. coli yqhD gene, which encodes the 1,3-propanediol oxidoreductase isoenzyme YqhD, an NADP-dependent dehydrogenase that can directly convert glycerol to 1,3-PD. The microbial conversion of 1,3-PD from glycerol by this recombinant E. coli strain was studied in a two-stage fermentation process. During the first stage, a novel high-cell-density fermentation step, there was significant cell growth and the majority of the metabolites produced were organic acids, mainly acetate. During the second stage, glycerol from the fresh medium was rapidly converted to 1,3-PD following a temperature shift from 30 degrees C to 42 degrees C. The by-products were mainly pyruvate and acetate. During this two-stage process, the overall 1,3-PD yield and productivity reached 104.4 g/liter and 2.61 g/liter/h, respectively, and the conversion rate of glycerol to 1,3-PD reached 90.2% (g/g). To our knowledge, this is the highest reported yield and productivity efficiency of 1,3-PD with glycerol as the sole source of carbon. Furthermore, the overall fermentation time was only 40 h, shorter than that of any other reports. PMID:19139229

  6. Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, VK; Mallozzi, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the primary cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is a significant nosocomial disease. In the past ten years, variant toxin-producing strains of C. difficile have emerged, that have been associated with severe disease as well as outbreaks worldwide. This review summarizes current information on C. difficile pathogenesis and disease, and highlights interventions used to combat single and recurrent episodes of CDI. PMID:21327030

  7. The pattern of growth observed for Clostridium botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 19397 is influenced by nutritional status and quorum sensing: a modelling perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ihekwaba, Adaoha E. C.; Mura, Ivan; Peck, Michael W.; Barker, G. C.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the most poisonous substances known to mankind. However, toxin regulation and signals triggering synthesis as well as the regulatory network and actors controlling toxin production are unknown. Experiments show that the neurotoxin gene is growth phase dependent for C. botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 19397, and toxin production is influenced both by culture conditions and nutritional status of the medium. Building mathematical models to describe the genetic and molecular machinery that drives the synthesis and release of BoNT requires a simultaneous description of the growth of the bacterium in culture. Here, we show four plausible modelling options which could be considered when constructing models describing the pattern of growth observed in a botulinum growth medium. Commonly used bacterial growth models are unsuitable to fit the pattern of growth observed, since they only include monotonic growth behaviour. We find that a model that includes both the nutritional status and the ability of the cells to sense their surroundings in a quorum-sensing manner is most successful at explaining the pattern of growth obtained for C. botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 19397. PMID:26449712

  8. The pattern of growth observed for Clostridium botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 19397 is influenced by nutritional status and quorum sensing: a modelling perspective.

    PubMed

    Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C; Mura, Ivan; Peck, Michael W; Barker, G C

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the most poisonous substances known to mankind. However, toxin regulation and signals triggering synthesis as well as the regulatory network and actors controlling toxin production are unknown. Experiments show that the neurotoxin gene is growth phase dependent for C. botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 19397, and toxin production is influenced both by culture conditions and nutritional status of the medium. Building mathematical models to describe the genetic and molecular machinery that drives the synthesis and release of BoNT requires a simultaneous description of the growth of the bacterium in culture. Here, we show four plausible modelling options which could be considered when constructing models describing the pattern of growth observed in a botulinum growth medium. Commonly used bacterial growth models are unsuitable to fit the pattern of growth observed, since they only include monotonic growth behaviour. We find that a model that includes both the nutritional status and the ability of the cells to sense their surroundings in a quorum-sensing manner is most successful at explaining the pattern of growth obtained for C. botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 19397. PMID:26449712

  9. Comparative neuropathology of ovine enterotoxemia produced by Clostridium perfringens type D wild-type strain CN1020 and its genetically modified derivatives.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Giannitti, F; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Beingesser, J; Adams, V; Rood, J I; Uzal, F A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D causes enterotoxemia in sheep and goats. The disease is mediated by epsilon toxin (ETX), which affects the cerebrovascular endothelium, increasing vascular permeability and leading to cerebral edema. In the present study, we compared the distribution and severity of the cerebrovascular changes induced in lambs by C. perfringens type D strain CN1020, its isogenic etx null mutant, and the ETX-producing complemented mutant. We also applied histochemical and immunohistochemical markers to further characterize the brain lesions induced by ETX. Both ETX-producing strains induced extensive cerebrovascular damage that did not differ significantly between each other in nature, neuroanatomic distribution, or severity. By contrast, lambs inoculated with the etx mutant or sterile, nontoxic culture medium did not develop detectable brain lesions, confirming that the neuropathologic effects observed in these infections are dependent on ETX production. Lambs treated with the wild-type and complemented strains showed perivascular and mural vascular edema, as well as serum albumin extravasation, particularly severe in the cerebral white matter, midbrain, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum. Brains of animals inoculated with the ETX-producing strains showed decreased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and increased expression of aquaporin-4 in the end-feet processes of the astrocytes around blood vessels. Early axonal injury was demonstrated with anti-amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. Perivascular accumulation of macrophages/microglia with intracytoplasmic albumin globules was also observed in these animals. This study demonstrates that ETX is responsible for the major cerebrovascular changes in C. perfringens type D-induced disease. PMID:24964921

  10. Genetic relatedness and netB prevalence among environmental Clostridium perfringens strains associated with a broiler flock affected by mild necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Engström, Björn E; Johansson, Anders; Aspan, Anna; Kaldhusdal, Magne

    2012-09-14

    In a previous study we investigated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotype diversity and prevalence of the netB toxin gene in Clostridium perfringens (CP) isolates recovered from a broiler flock (flock 1) affected by necrotic enteritis (NE). In this follow-up work, we examined samples collected before placement of flock 1, to see if NE during rearing could be traced back to the cleaned and empty building or the day-old chicks. Litter from the next flock in the same building (flock 2) was also examined. We detected 25 different PFGE genotypes, five of which were found only in litter from flock 2. Six genotypes which had been found in flock 1 during rearing were detected in samples collected before placement. NetB positive isolates belonging to two of these genotypes had been recovered from NE lesions during rearing, suggesting that virulent strains were transmitted from the cleaned and disinfected broiler house. NetB frequency among isolates from the empty building was 45%, indicating that netB positive strains were prevalent in a building that previously had housed a healthy flock offered in-feed narasin (flock 0). NetB frequency among isolates from litter used by flock 2 was 22%, indicating that netB positive strains were present in the environment of a 14-days-old healthy flock offered in-feed narasin. Two prevalent genotypes were consistently either netB negative or netB positive. However, the presence of genotypes represented by both negative and positive isolates may suggest that the gene can spread horizontally among different CP strains. PMID:22516191

  11. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R.; Hecht, David W.; Gerding, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P < 0.001; OR for macrolides, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 24.0; P = 0.04)). In contrast, clindamycin use was less frequent among the BI cases than among the controls (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4; P = 0.001). High-level resistance to moxifloxacin and azithromycin was more frequent among BI strains (moxifloxacin, 49/102 [48%] BI versus 0/40 non-BI, P = 0.0001; azithromycin, 100/102 [98%] BI versus 22/40 [55%] non-BI, P = 0.0001). High-level resistance to clindamycin was more frequent among non-BI strains (22/40 [55%] non-BI versus 7/102 [7%] BI, P = 0.0001). Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain. PMID:26525793

  12. Comparative genomic analysis of single-molecule sequencing and hybrid approaches for finishing the Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1 strain DSM 10061 genome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Nagaraju, Shilpa; Utturkar, Sagar M; De Tissera, Sashini; Segovia, Simón; Mitchell, Wayne; Land, Miriam L; Dassanayake, Asela; Köpke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium autoethanogenum strain JA1-1 (DSM 10061) is an acetogen capable of fermenting CO, CO2 and H2 (e.g. from syngas or waste gases) into biofuel ethanol and commodity chemicals such as 2,3-butanediol. A draft genome sequence consisting of 100 contigs has been published. Results A closed, high-quality genome sequence for C. autoethanogenum DSM10061 was generated using only the latest single-molecule DNA sequencing technology and without the need for manual finishing. It is assigned to the most complex genome classification based upon genome features such as repeats, prophage, nine copies of the rRNA gene operons. It has a low G + C content of 31.1%. Illumina, 454, Illumina/454 hybrid assemblies were generated and then compared to the draft and PacBio assemblies using summary statistics, CGAL, QUAST and REAPR bioinformatics tools and comparative genomic approaches. Assemblies based upon shorter read DNA technologies were confounded by the large number repeats and their size, which in the case of the rRNA gene operons were ~5 kb. CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Paloindromic Repeats) systems among biotechnologically relevant Clostridia were classified and related to plasmid content and prophages. Potential associations between plasmid content and CRISPR systems may have implications for historical industrial scale Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation failures and future large scale bacterial fermentations. While C. autoethanogenum contains an active CRISPR system, no such system is present in the closely related Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528. A common prophage inserted into the Arg-tRNA shared between the strains suggests a common ancestor. However, C. ljungdahlii contains several additional putative prophages and it has more than double the amount of prophage DNA compared to C. autoethanogenum. Other differences include important metabolic genes for central metabolism (as an additional hydrogenase and the absence of a

  13. Predominance of PCR-ribotypes, 018 (smz) and 369 (trf) of Clostridium difficile in Japan: a potential relationship with other global circulating strains?

    PubMed

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Haru; Fukuda, Tadashi; Niikawa, Akiko; Hori, Yoshiko; Hagiya, Hideharu; Ito, Yoichiro; Miki, Hiroshi; Abe, Yoshifumi; Furuta, Kiyoshi; Takeuchi, Hideki; Tajima, Hirokazu; Tominaga, Harumi; Satomura, Hideyuki; Kato, Hideaki; Morita, Sayuri; Tanada, Ai; Hara, Toshinori; Kawada, Miki; Sato, Yuka; Takahashi, Masahiko; Higuchi, Akiko; Nakajima, Tomoko; Wakamatsu, Yukiko; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Akiko; Roberts, Paul; Miyajima, Fabio; Shibayama, Keigo

    2015-10-01

    Global spread and evolutionary links of an epidemic Clostridium difficile strain (PCR-ribotype 027) have been noted in recent decades. However, in Japan, no outbreaks caused by type 027 have been reported to date. A total of 120 C. difficile isolates from patients at 15 hospitals during non-outbreak seasons between 2011 and 2013 as well as 18 and 21 isolates collected from two hospitals in 2010 and 2009, respectively, in outbreak periods in Japan, were examined. Among these 120 isolates, Japan-ribotypes smz and ysmz (subtype variant of smz) were the most predominant (39.2 %) followed by Japan-ribotype trf (15.8 %). Types smz/ysmz and trf were also concurrently predominant at two hospitals in the outbreak settings. Out of the five binary toxin-positive isolates observed, only one was PCR-ribotype 027 and another PCR-ribotype 078. Type smz was later found to correspond to PCR-ribotype 018. High rates of resistance against gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, erythromycin and clindamycin were observed in the PCR-ribotype 018 isolates. Interestingly, all trf isolates were toxin A-negative, toxin B-positive, but they did not correspond to PCR-ribotype 017, thus being assigned a new ribotype (PCR-ribotype 369). In conclusion, PCR-ribotypes 018 (smz) and 369 (trf) were identified as major circulating strains in both outbreak and non-outbreak settings in Japan. Given their epidemiological relevance, molecular investigations are warranted to clarify potential evolutionary links with related strains found elsewhere, such as PCR-ribotypes 018 and 017 from Europe and North America. PMID:26238868

  14. Secreted Compounds of the Probiotic Bacillus clausii Strain O/C Inhibit the Cytotoxic Effects Induced by Clostridium difficile and Bacillus cereus Toxins.

    PubMed

    Ripert, Gabrielle; Racedo, Silvia M; Elie, Anne-Marie; Jacquot, Claudine; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, Maria C

    2016-06-01

    Although the use of probiotics based on Bacillus strains to fight off intestinal pathogens and antibiotic-associated diarrhea is widespread, the mechanisms involved in producing their beneficial effects remain unclear. Here, we studied the ability of compounds secreted by the probiotic Bacillus clausii strain O/C to counteract the cytotoxic effects induced by toxins of two pathogens, Clostridium difficile and Bacillus cereus, by evaluating eukaryotic cell viability and expression of selected genes. Coincubation of C. difficile and B. cereus toxic culture supernatants with the B. clausii supernatant completely prevented the damage induced by toxins in Vero and Caco-2 cells. The hemolytic effect of B. cereus was also avoided by the probiotic supernatant. Moreover, in these cells, the expression of rhoB, encoding a Rho GTPase target for C. difficile toxins, was normalized when C. difficile supernatant was pretreated using the B. clausii supernatant. All of the beneficial effects observed with the probiotic were abolished by the serine protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). Suspecting the involvement of a secreted protease in this protective effect, a protease was purified from the B. clausii supernatant and identified as a serine protease (M-protease; GenBank accession number Q99405). Experiments on Vero cells demonstrated the antitoxic activity of the purified protease against pathogen supernatants. This is the first report showing the capacity of a protease secreted by probiotic bacteria to inhibit the cytotoxic effects of toxinogenic C. difficile and B. cereus strains. This extracellular compound could be responsible, at least in part, for the protective effects observed for this human probiotic in antibiotic-associated diarrhea. PMID:27001810

  15. Environmental Factors Influencing the Prevalence of a Clostridium botulinum Type C/D Mosaic Strain in Nonpermanent Mediterranean Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Anza, Ibone; Taggart, Mark A.; Pérez-Ramírez, Elisa; Crespo, Elena; Hofle, Ursula; Mateo, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Between 1978 and 2008, 13 avian botulism outbreaks were recorded in the wetlands of Mancha Húmeda (central Spain). These outbreaks caused the deaths of around 20,000 birds from over 50 species, including globally endangered white-headed ducks (Oxyura leucoceophala). Here, a significant association was found between the number of dead birds recorded in each botulism outbreak and the mean temperature in July (always >26°C). The presence of Clostridium botulinum type C/D in wetland sediments was detected by real-time PCR (quantitative PCR [qPCR]) in 5.8% of 207 samples collected between 2005 and 2008. Low concentrations of Cl− and high organic matter content in sediments were significantly associated with the presence of C. botulinum. Seventy-five digestive tracts of birds found dead during botulism outbreaks were analyzed; C. botulinum was present in 38.7% of them. The prevalence of C. botulinum was 18.2% (n = 22 pools) in aquatic invertebrates (Chironomidae and Corixidae families) and 33.3% (n = 18 pools) in necrophagous invertebrates (Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae families), including two pools of adult necrophagous flies collected around bird carcasses. The presence of the bacteria in the adult fly form opens up new perspectives in the epidemiology of avian botulism, since these flies may be transporting C. botulinum from one carcass to another. PMID:23645197

  16. Construction of an environmental safe Bacillus thuringiensis engineered strain against Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yajun; Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2016-05-01

    Cloning of new toxic genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and construction of Bt engineered strains are two key strategies for bio-control of coleopteran pests in agriculture and forestry. In this study, we cloned a new cry3Aa-type gene, cry3Aa8, from wild Bt strain YC-03 against coleopteran, and constructed a Bt engineered strain, ACE-38, containing insecticidal protein-encoding gene cry3Aa8. The engineered strain, with almost four times of Cry3Aa yield compared with strain YC-03, was an antibiotic marker-free strain. Though no selective pressure was presented in the medium, cry3Aa8 in the engineered strain ACE-38 remained stable. The yield of Cry3Aa by strain ACE-38 reached 2.09 mg/ml in the optimized fermentation medium. The activity of strain ACE-38 against Plagiodera versicolora was tested, and the LC50 of ACE-38 cultures in the optimized fermentation medium was 1.13 μl/ml. Strain ACE-38 is a non-antibiotic Bt engineered strain with high Chrysomelidae toxicity and exhibits good fermentation property. The modified indigenous site-specific recombination system constructed in this study might be useful for the construction of Bt engineered strains containing genes that cannot be expressed in the indigenous site-specific recombination system using plasmid pBMB1205R. PMID:26767987

  17. NanI Sialidase, CcpA, and CodY Work Together To Regulate Epsilon Toxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Freedman, John C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens type D strains are usually associated with diseases of livestock, and their virulence requires the production of epsilon toxin (ETX). We previously showed (J. Li, S. Sayeed, S. Robertson, J. Chen, and B. A. McClane, PLoS Pathog 7:e1002429, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002429) that BMC202, a nanI null mutant of type D strain CN3718, produces less ETX than wild-type CN3718 does. The current study proved that the lower ETX production by strain BMC202 is due to nanI gene disruption, since both genetic and physical (NanI or sialic acid) complementation increased ETX production by BMC202. Furthermore, a sialidase inhibitor that interfered with NanI activity also reduced ETX production by wild-type CN3718. The NanI effect on ETX production was shown to involve reductions in codY and ccpA gene transcription levels in BMC202 versus wild-type CN3718. Similar to CodY, CcpA was found to positively control ETX production. A double codY ccpA null mutant produced even less ETX than a codY or ccpA single null mutant. CcpA bound directly to sequences upstream of the etx or codY start codon, and bioinformatics identified putative CcpA-binding cre sites immediately upstream of both the codY and etx start codons, suggesting possible direct CcpA regulatory effects. A ccpA mutation also decreased codY transcription, suggesting that CcpA effects on ETX production can be both direct and indirect, including effects on codY transcription. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI, CcpA, and CodY work together to regulate ETX production, with NanI-generated sialic acid from the intestines possibly signaling type D strains to upregulate their ETX production and induce disease. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens NanI was previously shown to increase ETX binding to, and cytotoxicity for, MDCK host cells. The current study demonstrates that NanI also regulates ETX production via increased transcription of genes encoding the CodY and Ccp

  18. Engineered biosealant strains producing inorganic and organic biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Bergdale, Terran E; Pinkelman, Rebecca J; Hughes, Stephen R; Zambelli, Barbara; Ciurli, Stefano; Bang, Sookie S

    2012-10-31

    Microbiologically induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process that has shown its potential in remediation of a wide range of structural damages including concrete cracks. In this study, genetically engineered microorganisms, capable of producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) as well as inducing MICCP, were developed based on the assumption that the complex of inorganic CaCO(3) and organic EPS would provide a stronger matrix than MICCP alone as biosealant. In order to develop a recombinant biosealant microorganism, the entire Sporosarcina pasteurii urease gene sequences including ureA, ureB, ureC, ureD, ureE, ureF, and ureG from plasmid pBU11 were sub-cloned into the shuttle vector, pUCP18. The newly constructed plasmid, pUBU1, was transformed into two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, 8821 and PAO1, to develop recombinants capable of inducing calcite precipitation in addition to their own ability to produce EPS. Nickel-dependent urease activities were expressed from the recombinant P. aeruginosa 8821 (pUBU1) and P. aeruginosa PAO1 (pUBU1), at 99.4% and 60.9% of the S. pasteurii urease activity, respectively, in a medium containing 2mM NiCl(2). No urease activities were detected from the wild type P. aeruginosa 8821 and P. aeruginosa PAO1 under the same growth conditions. Recombinant Pseudomonas strains induced CaCO(3) precipitation at a comparable rate as S. pasteurii and scanning electron microscopy evidenced the complex of CaCO(3) crystals and EPS layers surrounding the cells. The engineered strains produced in this study are expected to serve as a valuable reference to future biosealants that could be applied in the environment. However, the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa, used here only as a model system to show the proof of principle, prevents the use of this recombinant organism as a biosealant. In practical applications, other recombinant organisms should be used. PMID:22789480

  19. Multiple effects of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on growth, biofilm formation and inflammation cytokines profile of Clostridium perfringens type A strain CP4

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Wolf, Amanda; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for food poisoning, necrotic enteritis, gas gangrene, and even death. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a well-characterized probiotic strain with demonstrated benefits. In this study we evaluated the effects of EcN on growth, toxin production, biofilm formation and inflammatory cytokine responses of C. perfringens. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that EcN inhibited growth, gas production and toxin production (α-toxin and NetB) of C. perfringens in a dose dependent manner. The growth inhibition effect was not observed when C. perfringens was incubated with EcN cell free supernatants (CFSE), suggesting that growth inhibition was caused by nutrition competition during co-incubation. In vitro studies demonstrated that pre-incubation with EcN did not inhibit C. perfringens attachment to Caco-2 cells, but did reduce C. perfringens total number, toxin production and cytotoxicity after 24 h. The similar growth inhibition results were also observed during the formation of C. perfringens biofilm. Finally, pre-incubation of EcN with RAW264.7 cells significantly decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines caused by introduction of C. perfringens. Our results indicate that EcN can inhibit many of the pathological effects of C. perfringens in vitro conditions. PMID:24532573

  20. Multiple effects of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on growth, biofilm formation, and inflammation cytokines profile of Clostridium perfringens type A strain CP4.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L; Wolf, Amanda; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for food poisoning, necrotic enteritis, gas gangrene, and even death. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a well-characterized probiotic strain with demonstrated benefits. In this study, we evaluated the effects of EcN on growth, toxin production, biofilm formation, and inflammatory cytokine responses of C. perfringens. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that EcN inhibited growth, gas production, and toxin production (α-toxin and NetB) of C. perfringens in a dose-dependent manner. The growth inhibition effect was not observed when C. perfringens was incubated with EcN cell-free supernatants (CFSE), suggesting that growth inhibition was caused by nutrition competition during co-incubation. In vitro studies demonstrated that pre-incubation with EcN did not inhibit C. perfringens attachment to Caco-2 cells, but did reduce C. perfringens total number, toxin production, and cytotoxicity after 24 h. The similar growth inhibition results were also observed during the formation of C. perfringens biofilm. Finally, pre-incubation of EcN with RAW264.7 cells significantly decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines caused by the introduction of C. perfringens. Our results indicate that EcN can inhibit many of the pathological effects of C. perfringens in vitro conditions. PMID:24532573

  1. Ethanol and Acetic Acid Production from Carbon Monoxide in a Clostridium Strain in Batch and Continuous Gas-Fed Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Nalakath Abubackar, Haris; Veiga, María C.; Kennes, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different sources of nitrogen as well as their concentrations on the bioconversion of carbon monoxide to metabolic products such as acetic acid and ethanol by Clostridium autoethanogenum was studied. In a first set of assays, under batch conditions, either NH4Cl, trypticase soy broth or yeast extract (YE) were used as sources of nitrogen. The use of YE was found statistically significant (p < 0.05) on the product spectrum in such batch assays. In another set of experiments, three bioreactors were operated with continuous CO supply, in order to estimate the effect of running conditions on products and biomass formation. The bioreactors were operated under different conditions, i.e., EXP1 (pH = 5.75, YE 1g/L), EXP2 (pH = 4.75, YE 1 g/L) and EXP3 (pH = 5.75, YE 0.2 g/L). When compared to EXP2 and EXP3, it was found that EXP1 yielded the maximum biomass accumulation (302.4 mg/L) and products concentrations, i.e., acetic acid (2147.1 mg/L) and ethanol (352.6 mg/L). This can be attributed to the fact that the higher pH and higher YE concentration used in EXP1 stimulated cell growth and did, consequently, also enhance metabolite production. However, when ethanol is the desired end-product, as a biofuel, the lower pH used in EXP2 was more favourable for solventogenesis and yielded the highest ethanol/acetic acid ratio, reaching a value of 0.54. PMID:25608591

  2. Efficacy of avilamycin for the prevention of necrotic enteritis caused by a pathogenic strain of Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Marie Anne; McMillan, Ewen; Bagg, Randal; Vessie, Gord; Zocche, Alexandre; Thompson, Michelle

    2016-06-01

    The efficacy of avilamycin for the prevention of necrotic enteritis (NE) was investigated in a 35-day floor pen study of 2200 broiler cockerels using a Clostridium perfringens (Cp) feed inoculum challenge model. Treatments consisted of (1) nonmedicated, nonchallenged; (2) nonmedicated, challenged; (3) avilamycin at 15 ppm, challenged; (4) avilamycin at 30 ppm, challenged. Avilamycin was administered in the feed from day 7 to day 30 of the study. Challenge inoculum was administered on day 14 and delivered approximately 10(9) CFU Cp/bird. NE mortality rates from day 14-35 were significantly (P < 0.0001) lower in birds treated with avilamycin at 15 and 30 ppm when compared to nonmedicated, challenged birds. Treatment with avilamycin also resulted in a significant reduction in ileal Cp count on day 21 (P < 0.0001) and NE lesion scores on day 17 (P < 0.006) when compared to nonmedicated, challenged birds. The performance of birds treated with avilamycin was also improved when compared to nonmedicated, challenged birds. Cockerels that received either 15 or 30 ppm avilamycin had a significantly (P < 0.0001) increased body weight on day 35 and average daily gain from days 0-35 than nonmedicated, challenged birds. Furthermore, birds treated with avilamycin had an improved feed conversion rate from days 0-35 compared to both nonmedicated, nonchallenged birds and nonmedicated, challenged birds. This study confirms that avilamycin is effective at controlling mortality related to NE in growing broiler chickens. PMID:26981841

  3. Functional Heterologous Expression of an Engineered Full Length CipA from Clostridium thermocellum in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Devin; Herring, Christopher; Guss, Adam M; Olson, Daniel G.; Hogsett, David; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellulose is highly recalcitrant and thus requires a specialized suite of enzymes to solubilize it into fermentable sugars. In C. thermocellum, these extracellular enzymes are present as a highly active multi-component system known as the cellulosome. This study explores the expression of a critical C. thermocellum cellulosomal component in T. saccharolyticum as a step toward creating a thermophilic bacterium capable of consolidated bioprocessing by employing heterologously expressed cellulosomes. RESULTS: We developed an inducible promoter system based on the native T. saccharolyticum xynA promoter, which was shown to be induced by xylan and xylose. The promoter was used to express the cellulosomal component cipA*, an engineered form of the wild-type cipA from C. thermocellum. Expression and localization to the supernatant were both verified for CipA*. When a cipA mutant C. thermocellum strain was cultured with a CipA*-expressing T. saccharolyticum strain, hydrolysis and fermentation of 10 grams per liter SigmaCell 101, a highly crystalline cellulose, were observed. This trans-species complementation of a cipA deletion demonstrated the ability for CipA* to assemble a functional cellulosome. CONCLUSION: This study is the first example of an engineered thermophile heterologously expressing a structural component of a cellulosome. To achieve this goal we developed and tested an inducible promoter for controlled expression in T. saccharolyticum as well as a synthetic cipA. In addition, we demonstrate a high degree of hydrolysis (up to 93%) on microcrystalline cellulose.

  4. Glycerol Dehydratases: Biochemical Structures, Catalytic Mechanisms, and Industrial Applications in 1,3-Propanediol Production by Naturally Occurring and Genetically Engineered Bacterial Strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Zhong; Xu, Wu; Chistoserdov, Andrei; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2016-07-01

    To date, two types of glycerol dehydratases have been reported: coenzyme B12-dependent and coenzyme B12-independent glycerol dehydratases. The three-dimensional structure of the former is a dimer of αβγ heterotrimer, while that of the latter is a homodimer. Their mechanisms of reaction are typically enzymatic radical catalysis. Functional radical in both the glycerol dehydratases is the adenosyl radical. However, the adenosyl radical in the former originates from coenzyme B12 by homolytic cleavage, and that in the latter from S-adenosyl-methionine. Until some years ago, Clostridium butyricum VPI 1718 was the only microorganism known to possess B12-independent glycerol dehydratase, but since then, several other bacteria with this unique capability have been identified. This article focuses on the glycerol dehydratases and on 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol by naturally occurring and genetically engineered bacterial strains containing glycerol dehydratase. PMID:27033090

  5. Growth Patterns of Clostridium difficile - Correlations with Strains, Binary Toxin and Disease Severity: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Braissant, Olivier; Erb, Stefan; Stranden, Anne; Bonkat, Gernot; Frei, Reno; Widmer, Andreas F

    2016-01-01

    A broad spectrum of symptoms has been associated with C. difficile infection (CDI). Several studies indicate that toxin-production correlates with growth rates of C. difficile. This study aimed to correlate growth rates of C. difficile with disease severity and strain characteristics. From 01/2003 to 10/2011, strains from a prospective cohort of all inpatients with CDI at the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland were analyzed regarding binary toxin, presence of the tcdC deletion and ribotype. Isothermal microcalorimetry was performed to determine growth rates, quantified by the Gompertz function. Ordered logistic regression models were used to correlate disease severity with strain features and clinical characteristics. Among 199 patients, 31 (16%) were infected with binary toxin-producing strains, of which the tcdC gene-deletion nt117 was detected in 9 (4%). Disease severity was classified as mild in 130 patients (65.3%), as severe in 59 patients (29.7%) and as severe/complicated in 10 patients (5.0%). Growth rates were inversely associated with disease severity in univariable (OR 0.514, 95%CI 0.29-0.91, p = 0.023) and multivariable analyses (OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.26-0.97, p = 0.040). While none of the strain characteristics such as presence of the tcdC gene deletion or binary toxin predicted CDI severity, growth rates were inversely correlated with disease severity. Further investigations are needed to analyze growth-regulators and respective correlations with the level of toxin production in C. difficile, which may be important determinants of disease severity. PMID:27598309

  6. Strain engineering on silicon/germanium nanoscale heterostructures using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yumi

    Nanoscale architectures provide additional variables to engineer electronic/mechanical properties of material systems due to their high surface volume ratio and physics that arise from their extremely small size. To date, the device performance of microelectronics has been improved largely by miniaturization. However, with feature sizes below 100 nm, the fundamental challenges demand development of new architectures, new materials, and strain engineering. Strain engineering has been one of the most widely used techniques to achieve desired electronic properties of materials. For example, uniaxial compression and tension are desirable for high speed p-and n-MOSFET, respectively. However, accurate experimental characterization of strain in nanomaterials remains challenges such as resolving strain components and quantifying strain gradient which can affect electronic properties. Molecular dynamics (MD) describe materials with atomic resolution and it can provide invaluable information and insight into nanoscale strain engineering. MD simulations are used to study strain relaxation in Si/Ge heteroepitaxial structures of interest to nanoelectonic applications. Nanopatterning is considered as an avenue for strain engineering to achieve uniaxial strain state from epitaxially integrated Si/Ge heterostructures. Using MD, it is studied how size affect strain relaxation on strained Si/Ge/Si nanobars representing the structures obtained by patterning the films in nanoscale. The MD results demonstrate that Ge with a roughly square cross section has a uniaxial strain state desirable for hole mobility enhancement. Also, process-induced strain relaxation on Si/Ge heterostructures is discussed. The simulations suggest that, by engineering the aspect ratio of Si/Ge nanolaminates, local amorphization followed by recrystallization can be used for either preserving the engineered strain or achieving the desired strain state in crystalline region, showing a possibility as a new avenue

  7. Enhanced succinate production from glycerol by engineered Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, an engineered strain Escherichia coli MLB (ldhA(-)pflB(-)) was constructed for production of succinate from glycerol. The succinate yield was 0.37mol/mol in anaerobic culture, however, the growth and glycerol consumption rates were very slow, resulting in a low succinate level. Two-stage fermentation was performed in flasks, and the succinate yield reached 0.93mol/mol, but the succinate titer was still low. Hence, overexpression of malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase and PEP carboxykinase (PCK) from E. coli, and pyruvate carboxylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum in MLB was investigated for improving succinate production. Overexpression of PCK resulted in remarkable enhancement of glycerol consumption and succinate production. In flask experiments, the succinate concentration reached 118.1mM, and in a 1.5-L bioreactor the succinate concentration further increased to 360.2mM. The highest succinate yield achieved 0.93mol/mol, which was 93% of the theoretical yield, in the anaerobic stage. PMID:27371794

  8. Phonon bandgap engineering of strained monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2014-06-01

    The phonon band structure of monolayer MoS2 is characteristic of a large energy gap between acoustic and optical branches, which protects the vibration of acoustic modes from being scattered by optical phonon modes. Therefore, the phonon bandgap engineering is of practical significance for the manipulation of phonon-related mechanical or thermal properties in monolayer MoS2. We perform both phonon analysis and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the tension effect on the phonon bandgap and the compression induced instability of the monolayer MoS2. Our key finding is that the phonon bandgap can be narrowed by the uniaxial tension, and is completely closed at ε = 0.145; while the biaxial tension only has a limited effect on the phonon bandgap. We also demonstrate the compression induced buckling for the monolayer MoS2. The critical strain for buckling is extracted from the band structure analysis of the flexure mode in the monolayer MoS2 and is further verified by molecular dynamics simulations and the Euler buckling theory. Our study illustrates the uniaxial tension as an efficient method for manipulating the phonon bandgap of the monolayer MoS2, while the biaxial compression as a powerful tool to intrigue buckling in the monolayer MoS2.

  9. Phonon bandgap engineering of strained monolayer MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2014-07-21

    The phonon band structure of monolayer MoS₂ is characteristic of a large energy gap between acoustic and optical branches, which protects the vibration of acoustic modes from being scattered by optical phonon modes. Therefore, the phonon bandgap engineering is of practical significance for the manipulation of phonon-related mechanical or thermal properties in monolayer MoS₂. We perform both phonon analysis and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the tension effect on the phonon bandgap and the compression induced instability of the monolayer MoS₂. Our key finding is that the phonon bandgap can be narrowed by the uniaxial tension, and is completely closed at ε = 0.145; while the biaxial tension only has a limited effect on the phonon bandgap. We also demonstrate the compression induced buckling for the monolayer MoS₂. The critical strain for buckling is extracted from the band structure analysis of the flexure mode in the monolayer MoS₂ and is further verified by molecular dynamics simulations and the Euler buckling theory. Our study illustrates the uniaxial tension as an efficient method for manipulating the phonon bandgap of the monolayer MoS₂, while the biaxial compression as a powerful tool to intrigue buckling in the monolayer MoS₂. PMID:24932612

  10. New promoters for strain engineering of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Polli, Fabiola; Meijrink, Ben; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus and Penicillium are widely used as hosts for the industrial products such as proteins and secondary metabolites. Although filamentous fungi are versatile in recognizing transcriptional and translational elements present in genes from other filamentous fungal species, only few promoters have been applied and compared in performance so far in Penicillium chrysogenum. Therefore, a set of homologous and heterologous promoters were tested in a reporter system to obtain a set of potential different strengths. Through in vivo homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, twelve Aspergillus niger and P. chrysogenum promoter-reporter pathways were constructed that drive the expression of green fluorescent protein while concurrent expression of the red fluorescent protein was used as an internal standard and placed under control of the PcPAF promoter. The pathways were integrated into the genome of P. chrysogenum and tested using the BioLector system for fermentation. Reporter gene expression was monitored during growth and classified according to promoter strength and expression profile. A set of novel promoters was obtained that can be used to tune the expression of target genes in future strain engineering programs. PMID:26701309

  11. Isolation of Clostridium thermocellum auxotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, B.S.; Gomez, R.F.

    1982-02-01

    The conversion of biomass of fuels and chemical feedstocks by microbial fermentation offers the potential of solving two of today's important problems: waste accumulation and exhaustion of fossil fuels. Microorganisms with the capabilities of converting biomass components such as cellulos and hemicellulose to chemicals and fuels in a single step are of particular interest. One such microorganism is Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe which degrades cellulose to ethanol and organic acids. For efficient industrial use, the cellulolytic capacity of this strain must be improved by genetic means. Spontaneous and UV irradiation-induced auxotrophic mutants of Clostridium thermocellum, an anaerobic cellulolytic thermophile, were isolated after penicillin enrichment in a chemically defined medium.

  12. A New Type of Toxin A-Negative, Toxin B-Positive Clostridium difficile Strain Lacking a Complete tcdA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Mercedes; Martín, Adoración; Rupnik, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Toxins A and B are the main virulence factors of Clostridium difficile and are the targets for molecular diagnostic tests. Here, we describe a new toxin A-negative, toxin B-positive, binary toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase)-negative (A− B+ CDT−) toxinotype (XXXII) characterized by a variant type of pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) without tcdA and with atypical organization of the PaLoc integration site. PMID:25428159

  13. Clostridium thermocellum DSM 1313 transcriptional responses to redox perturbation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sander, Kyle B.; Wilson, Charlotte M.; M. Rodriquez, Jr.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Davison, Brian H.; Brown, Steven D.; Rydzak, T.

    2015-12-12

    Clostridium thermocellum is a promising consolidated bioprocessing candidate organism capable of directly converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Current ethanol yields, productivities, and growth inhibitions are industrial deployment impediments for commodity fuel production by this bacterium. Redox imbalance under certain conditions and in engineered strains may contribute to incomplete substrate utilization and may direct fermentation products to undesirable overflow metabolites. As a result, towards a better understanding of redox metabolism in C. thermocellum, we established continuous growth conditions and analyzed global gene expression during addition of two stress chemicals (methyl viologen and hydrogen peroxide) which changed the fermentation redox potential.

  14. tcdC genotypes associated with severe TcdC truncation in an epidemic clone and other strains of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Curry, Scott R; Marsh, Jane W; Muto, Carlene A; O'Leary, Mary M; Pasculle, A William; Harrison, Lee H

    2007-01-01

    Severe Clostridium difficile associated disease is associated with outbreaks of the recently described BI/NAP1 epidemic clone. This clone is characterized by an 18-bp deletion in the tcdC gene and increased production of toxins A and B in vitro. TcdC is a putative negative regulator of toxin A&B production. We characterized tcdC genotypes from a collection of C. difficile isolates from a hospital that experienced an outbreak caused by the BI/NAP1 epidemic clone. Sequence analysis of tcdC was performed on DNA samples isolated from 199 toxigenic C. difficile isolates (31% BI/NAP1) from 2001 and 2005. Sequences obtained from 36 (18.6%) isolates predicted wild-type TcdC (232 amino acid residues), whereas 12 (6.1%) isolates had tcdC genotypes with previously described 18- or 39-bp deletions. The remaining isolates comprised 15 unique genotypes. Of these, 5 genotypes contain 18- or 36-bp deletions. Of these five genotypes, one is characterized by a single nucleotide deletion at position 117 resulting in a frameshift that introduces a stop codon at position 196, truncating the predicted TcdC to 65 amino acid residues. All 62 of the isolates in this collection comprising the epidemic clone are characterized by this genotype. This result suggests that severe truncation of TcdC is responsible for the increased toxin production observed in strains belonging to the BI/NAP1 clone and that the 18-bp deletion is probably irrelevant to TcdC function. Further investigations are required to determine the effect of this and other tcdC genotypes on toxin production and clinical disease. PMID:17035492

  15. Reducing β-glucosidase supplementation during cellulase recovery using engineered strain for successive lignocellulose bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Zou, Shaolan; Liu, Boshi; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Zhang, Minhua; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme recycling by re-adsorption is one of the primary methods for reducing enzyme usage in lignocellulose conversion. This work proposes the combination of an engineered yeast strain that expresses β-glucosidase with enzyme recycling to reduce the amount of supplemented β-glucosidase in enzyme recycling experiments. Using the engineered strain, a slight increase in ethanol concentration was obtained after a 96-h fermentation of pretreated corncobs. Ethanol concentrations increased by 34.7% and 62.7% in the following two recycle rounds using the engineered strain compared with those using its parental strain without β-glucosidase addition. Furthermore, with the addition of β-glucosidase at 30CBU/g cellulose, the ethanol concentration after two recycle rounds exceeded 90% of that observed in the first SSF round with the engineered strain at a high initial cellulase loading of 45FPU/g cellulose. PMID:25863900

  16. Strain engineering of diamond silicon vacancy centers in MEMS cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesala, Srujan; Sohn, Young-Ik; Atikian, Haig; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Zhang, Mian; Burek, Michael; Loncar, Marko

    2016-05-01

    The silicon vacancy (SiV) center in diamond has recently attracted attention as a solid state quantum emitter due to its attractive optical properties. We fabricate diamond MEMS cantilevers, and use electrostatic actuation to apply controlled strain fields to single SiV centers implanted in these devices. The strain response of the four electronic transitions of the SiV at 737 nm is measured via cryogenic (4 K) photoluminescence excitation. We demonstrate over 300 GHz of tuning for the mean transition frequency between the ground and excited states, and over 100 GHz of tuning for the orbital splittings within the ground and excited states. The interaction Hamiltonian for strain fields is inferred, and large strain susceptibilities of the order 1 PHz/strain are measured. We discuss prospects to utilize our device to reduce phonon-induced decoherence in SiV spin qubits, and to exploit the large strain susceptibilities for hybrid quantum systems based on nanomechanical resonators.

  17. Strain engineering of electronic properties of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniadaki, Aristea E.; Kopidakis, Georgios; Remediakis, Ioannis N.

    2016-02-01

    We present Density Functional Theory (DFT) results for the electronic and dielectric properties of single-layer (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M=Mo, W; X=S, Se, Te) under isotropic, uniaxial (along the zigzag and armchair directions), and shear strain. Electronic band gaps decrease while dielectric constants increase for heavier chalcogens X. The direct gaps of equilibrium structures often become indirect under certain types of strain, depending on the material. The effects of strain and of broken symmetry on the band structure are discussed. Gaps reach maximum values at small compressive strains or in equilibrium, and decrease with larger strains. In-plane dielectric constants generally increase with strain, reaching a minimum value at small compressive strains. The out-of-plane constants exhibit a similar behavior under shear strain but under isotropic and uniaxial strain they increase with compression and decrease with tension, thus exhibiting a monotonic behavior. These DFT results are theoretically explained using only structural parameters and equilibrium dielectric constants. Our findings are consistent with available experimental data.

  18. A Simple and Effective Method for Construction of Escherichia coli Strains Proficient for Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kwangsu; Parisutham, Vinuselvi; Kim, Suk Min; Lee, Sung Kuk

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex genome engineering is a standalone recombineering tool for large-scale programming and accelerated evolution of cells. However, this advanced genome engineering technique has been limited to use in selected bacterial strains. We developed a simple and effective strain-independent method for effective genome engineering in Escherichia coli. The method involves introducing a suicide plasmid carrying the λ Red recombination system into the mutS gene. The suicide plasmid can be excised from the chromosome via selection in the absence of antibiotics, thus allowing transient inactivation of the mismatch repair system during genome engineering. In addition, we developed another suicide plasmid that enables integration of large DNA fragments into the lacZ genomic locus. These features enable this system to be applied in the exploitation of the benefits of genome engineering in synthetic biology, as well as the metabolic engineering of different strains of E. coli. PMID:24747264

  19. Butanol Production from Crystalline Cellulose by Cocultured Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shunichi; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated butanol production from crystalline cellulose by cocultured cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and the butanol-producing strain, Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum (strain N1-4). Butanol was produced from Avicel cellulose after it was incubated with C. thermocellum for at least 24 h at 60°C before the addition of strain N1-4. Butanol produced by strain N1-4 on 4% Avicel cellulose peaked (7.9 g/liter) after 9 days of incubation at 30°C, and acetone was undetectable in this coculture system. Less butanol was produced by cocultured Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii than by strain N1-4, indicating that strain N1-4 was the optimal strain for producing butanol from crystalline cellulose in this coculture system. PMID:21764954

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Davenport, Karen W.; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  1. Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling.

    PubMed

    Gérando, H Máté de; Fayolle-Guichard, F; Rudant, L; Millah, S K; Monot, F; Ferreira, Nicolas Lopes; López-Contreras, A M

    2016-06-01

    Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of putatively improved strains was done by submitting the mutants to toxic levels of inhibitory chemicals or by screening for their tolerance to isopropanol (>35 g/L). Suicide substrates, such as ethyl or methyl bromobutyrate or alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors like allyl alcohol, were tested and, finally, 36 mutants were isolated. The fermentation profiles of these NTG mutant strains were characterized, and the best performing mutants were used for consecutive rounds of genome shuffling. Screening of strains with further enhancement in isopropanol tolerance at each recursive shuffling step was then used to spot additionally improved strains. Three highly tolerant strains were finally isolated and able to withstand up to 50 g/L isopropanol on plates. Even if increased tolerance to the desired end product was not always accompanied by higher production capabilities, some shuffled strains showed increased solvent titers compared to the parental strains and the original C. beijerinckii DSM 6423. This study confirms the efficiency of genome shuffling to generate improved strains toward a desired phenotype such as alcohol tolerance. This tool also offers the possibility of obtaining improved strains of Clostridium species for which targeted genetic engineering approaches have not been described yet. PMID:26852409

  2. 36. PHOTOGRAPHY OF W.P.A. PROJECT (MINNEAPOLIS CITY ENGINEER) STRAIN SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. PHOTOGRAPHY OF W.P.A. PROJECT (MINNEAPOLIS CITY ENGINEER) STRAIN SHEET (4 x 5 negative) - Steel Arch Bridge, Hennepin Avenue spanning west channel of Mississippi River, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  3. Strain Engineering of the Electronic Properties in -doped Oxide Superlattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jun Hee; Okamoto, Satoshi; Cooper, Valentino R; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-01-01

    Strain effects on the electronic properties of (LaTiO3)1/(SrTiO3)N superlattices were investigated using density functional theory. Under biaxial in-plane strain within the range of 5% // 5%, the dxy orbital electrons are highly localized at the interfaces whereas the dyz and dxz orbital electrons are more distributed in the SrTiO3 (STO) spacer layers. For STO thickness N 3 unit cells (u.c.), the dxy orbital electrons form two-dimensional (2D) electron gases (2DEGs). The quantized energy levels of the 2DEG are insensitive to the STO spacer thickness, but are strongly dependent on the applied biaxial in-plane strain. As the in-plane strain changes frommore » compressive to tensile, the quantized energy levels of the dxy orbitals decrease thereby creating more states with 2D character. In contrast to the dxy orbital, the dyz and dxz orbitals always have three-dimensional (3D) transport characteristics and their energy levels increase as the strain changes from compressive to tensile. Since the charge densities in the dxy orbital and the dyz and dxz orbitals respond to biaxial in-plane strain in an opposite way, the transport dimensionality of the majority carriers can be controlled between 2D and 3D by applying biaxial in-plane strain.« less

  4. Engineering industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for xylose fermentation and comparison for switchgrass conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces physiology and fermentation related properties vary broadly among industrial strains. In this study, six industrial strains of varied genetic background were engineered to ferment xylose. Aerobic growth rates on xylose were 0.040 h**-1 to 0.167 h**-1. Fermentation of xylose, glucose/xy...

  5. Strain-displacement relations for strain engineering in single-layer 2d materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midtvedt, Daniel; Lewenkopf, Caio H.; Croy, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the electromechanical coupling in single-layer 2d materials. For non-Bravais lattices, we find important corrections to the standard macroscopic strain-microscopic atomic-displacement theory. We put forward a general and systematic approach to calculate strain-displacement relations for several classes of 2d materials. We apply our findings to graphene as a study case, by combining a tight binding and a valence force-field model to calculate electronic and mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons under strain. The results show good agreement with the predictions of the Dirac equation coupled to continuum mechanics. For this long wave-limit effective theory, we find that the strain-displacement relations lead to a renormalization correction to the strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields. A similar renormalization is found for the strain-induced band-gap of black phosphorous. Implications for nanomechanical properties and electromechanical coupling in 2d materials are discussed.

  6. Strain Engineering for Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Based Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tingting; Penumatcha, Ashish V; Appenzeller, Joerg

    2016-04-26

    Using electrical characteristics from three-terminal field-effect transistors (FETs), we demonstrate substantial strain induced band gap tunability in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) in line with theoretical predictions and optical experiments. Devices were fabricated on flexible substrates, and a cantilever sample holder was used to apply uniaxial tensile strain to the various multilayer TMD FETs. Analyzing in particular transfer characteristics, we argue that the modified device characteristics under strain are clear evidence of a band gap reduction of 100 meV in WSe2 under 1.35% uniaxial tensile strain at room temperature. Furthermore, the obtained device characteristics imply that the band gap does not shrink uniformly under strain relative to a reference potential defined by the source/drain contacts. Instead, the band gap change is only related to a change of the conduction band edge of WSe2, resulting in a decrease in the Schottky barrier (SB) for electrons without any change for hole injection into the valence band. Simulations of SB device characteristics are employed to explain this point and to quantify our findings. Last, our experimental results are compared with DFT calculations under strain showing excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and the experimental data presented here. PMID:27043387

  7. Strain engineered optoelectronic properties of transition metal dichalcogenides lateral heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaekwang; Yoon, Mina

    2015-03-01

    Most three-dimensional bulk-scale materials rarely survive beyond 1% strain, while recently spotlighted two-dimensional (2-D) materials can sustain a high elastic strain (up to 10%) to optimize optical quantities such as band gaps and absorption spectra governing optoelectronic device performance. Despite the enormous interest in strained 2-D materials, most researches are focused on single materials or vertical heterostructures where precise control of stacking orientation is challenging. Here, using first-principles density-functional calculations, we explore how uniaxial tensile strains modify overall electronic and optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenides lateral heterostructures, such as MoX2/WX2 (X =S, Se). Based on the detailed optoelectronic information, we predict the optimal strain condition for maximal power efficiency. Furthermore, we find that uniaxial tensile strain readily develops a continuously varying direct-bandgap across the lateral heterojunctions, which results in the broad range absorption of solar spectrum useful for future optoelectronic devices. This research was conducted at the CNMS, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy; a portion of theory work was supported by the LDRD Program of ORNL.

  8. An integrated approach: advances in the use of Clostridium for biofuel.

    PubMed

    Kök, M Samil

    2015-01-01

    Almost 90% of our energy comes from fossil fuels, which are both limited and polluting, hence the need to find alternative sources. Biofuels can provide a sustainable and renewable source of energy for the future. Recent significant advances in genetic engineering and fermentation technology have made microbial bio-based production of chemicals from renewable resources more viable. Clostridium species are considered as promising micro-organisms for the production of a wide range of chemicals for industrial use. However, a number of scientific challenges still need to be overcome to facilitate an economically viable production system. These include the use of cheap non-food-based substrates, a better understanding of the metabolic processes involved, improvement of strains through genetic engineering and innovation in process technology. This paper reviews recent developments in these areas, advancing the use of Clostridium within an industrial context especially for the production of biofuels. PMID:27160660

  9. Development of a D-xylose fermenting and inhibitor tolerant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with high performance in lignocellulose hydrolysates using metabolic and evolutionary engineering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The production of bioethanol from lignocellulose hydrolysates requires a robust, D-xylose-fermenting and inhibitor-tolerant microorganism as catalyst. The purpose of the present work was to develop such a strain from a prime industrial yeast strain, Ethanol Red, used for bioethanol production. Results An expression cassette containing 13 genes including Clostridium phytofermentans XylA, encoding D-xylose isomerase (XI), and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway was inserted in two copies in the genome of Ethanol Red. Subsequent EMS mutagenesis, genome shuffling and selection in D-xylose-enriched lignocellulose hydrolysate, followed by multiple rounds of evolutionary engineering in complex medium with D-xylose, gradually established efficient D-xylose fermentation. The best-performing strain, GS1.11-26, showed a maximum specific D-xylose consumption rate of 1.1 g/g DW/h in synthetic medium, with complete attenuation of 35 g/L D-xylose in about 17 h. In separate hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates of Arundo donax (giant reed), spruce and a wheat straw/hay mixture, the maximum specific D-xylose consumption rate was 0.36, 0.23 and 1.1 g/g DW inoculum/h, and the final ethanol titer was 4.2, 3.9 and 5.8% (v/v), respectively. In simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Arundo hydrolysate, GS1.11-26 produced 32% more ethanol than the parent strain Ethanol Red, due to efficient D-xylose utilization. The high D-xylose fermentation capacity was stable after extended growth in glucose. Cell extracts of strain GS1.11-26 displayed 17-fold higher XI activity compared to the parent strain, but overexpression of XI alone was not enough to establish D-xylose fermentation. The high D-xylose consumption rate was due to synergistic interaction between the high XI activity and one or more mutations in the genome. The GS1.11-26 had a partial respiratory defect causing a reduced aerobic growth rate. Conclusions An industrial yeast strain for

  10. Alignment of the diamond nitrogen vacancy center by strain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Karin, Todd; Dunham, Scott; Fu, Kai-Mei

    2014-08-04

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a sensitive probe of magnetic field and a promising qubit candidate for quantum information processing. The performance of many NV-based devices improves by aligning the NV(s) parallel to a single crystallographic direction. Using ab initio theoretical techniques, we show that NV orientation can be controlled by high-temperature annealing in the presence of strain under currently accessible experimental conditions. We find that (89 ± 7)% of NVs align along the [111] crystallographic direction under 2% compressive biaxial strain (perpendicular to [111]) and an annealing temperature of 970 °C.

  11. Strain Engineering of Octahedral Rotations and Physical Properties of SrRuO3 Films

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenlai; Song, Wendong; Yang, Ping; Ding, Jun; Chow, Gan Moog; Chen, Jingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Strain engineering is an effective way to modify functional properties of thin films. Recently, the importance of octahedral rotations in pervoskite films has been recognized in discovering and designing new functional phases. Octahedral behavior of SrRuO3 film as a popular electrode in heterostructured devices is of particular interest for its probable interfacial coupling of octahedra with the functional overlayers. Here we report the strain engineering of octahedral rotations and physical properties that has been achieved in SrRuO3 films in response to the substrate-induced misfit strains of almost the same amplitude but of opposite signs. It shows that the compressively strained film on NdGaO3 substrate displays a rotation pattern of a tetragonal phase whilst the tensilely strained film on KTaO3 substrate has the rotation pattern of the bulk orthorhombic SrRuO3 phase. In addition, the compressively strained film displays a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy while the tensilely strained film has the magnetic easy axis lying in the film plane. The results show the prospect of strain engineered octahedral architecture in producing desired property and novel functionality in the class of perovskite material. PMID:26018639

  12. Characterization of a high-affinity sialic acid-specific CBM40 from Clostridium perfringens and engineering of a divalent form.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, João P; Pau, William; Pifferi, Carlo; Renaudet, Olivier; Varrot, Annabelle; Mahal, Lara K; Imberty, Anne

    2016-07-15

    CBMs (carbohydrate-binding modules) are a class of polypeptides usually associated with carbohydrate-active enzymatic sites. We have characterized a new member of the CBM40 family, coded from a section of the gene NanI from Clostridium perfringens Glycan arrays revealed its preference towards α(2,3)-linked sialosides, which was confirmed and quantified by calorimetric studies. The CBM40 binds to α(2,3)-sialyl-lactose with a Kd of ∼30 μM, the highest affinity value for this class of proteins. Inspired by lectins' structure and their arrangement as multimeric proteins, we have engineered a dimeric form of the CBM, and using SPR (surface plasmon resonance) we have observed 6-11-fold binding increases due to the avidity affect. The structures of the CBM, resolved by X-ray crystallography, in complex with α(2,3)- or α(2,6)-sialyl-lactose explain its binding specificity and unusually strong binding. PMID:27208171

  13. Application of Lactobacillus johnsonii expressing phage endolysin for control of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, T; Lo Curto, R; Minniti, E; Narbad, A; Mayer, M J

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens is frequently found in food and the environment and produces potent toxins that have a negative impact on both human and animal health and particularly on the poultry industry. Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785, isolated from the chicken gastrointestinal tract, has been demonstrated to exclude Cl. perfringens in poultry. We have investigated the interaction of wild-type Lact. johnsonii FI9785 or an engineered strain expressing a cell wall-hydrolysing endolysin with Cl. perfringens in vitro, using a batch culture designed to simulate human gastrointestinal tract conditions. Co-culture experiments indicated that acid production by Lact. johnsonii is important in pathogen control. The co-culture of the endolysin-secreting Lact. johnsonii with Cl. perfringens showed that the engineered strain had the potential to control the pathogen, but the ability to reduce Cl. perfringens numbers was not consistent. Results obtained indicate that survival of high numbers of Lact. johnsonii will be essential for effective pathogen control. Significance and impact of the study: The bacterium Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 reduces numbers of the pathogen Clostridium perfringens in vitro. Biocontrol was improved by engineering the strain to produce and export a cell wall-hydrolysing endolysin, but good survival of the producer strain is essential. The production of bacteriophage endolysins by commensal bacteria has the potential to improve competitive exclusion of pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24961379

  14. Direct Conversion of Xylan to Ethanol by Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Displaying an Engineered Minihemicellulosome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Wen, Fei; Si, Tong; Xu, Jian-He

    2012-01-01

    Arabinoxylan is a heteropolymeric chain of a β-1,4-linked xylose backbone substituted with arabinose residues, representing a principal component of plant cell walls. Here we developed recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as whole-cell biocatalysts capable of combining hemicellulase production, xylan hydrolysis, and hydrolysate fermentation into a single step. These strains displayed a series of uni-, bi-, and trifunctional minihemicellulosomes that consisted of a miniscaffoldin (CipA3/CipA1) and up to three chimeric enzymes. The miniscaffoldin derived from Clostridium thermocellum contained one or three cohesin modules and was tethered to the cell surface through the S. cerevisiae a-agglutinin adhesion receptor. Up to three types of hemicellulases, an endoxylanase (XynII), an arabinofuranosidase (AbfB), and a β-xylosidase (XlnD), each bearing a C-terminal dockerin, were assembled onto the miniscaffoldin by high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interactions. Compared to uni- and bifunctional minihemicellulosomes, the resulting quaternary trifunctional complexes exhibited an enhanced rate of hydrolysis of arabinoxylan. Furthermore, with an integrated d-xylose-utilizing pathway, the recombinant yeast displaying the bifunctional minihemicellulosome CipA3-XynII-XlnD could simultaneously hydrolyze and ferment birchwood xylan to ethanol with a yield of 0.31 g per g of sugar consumed. PMID:22447594

  15. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens. PMID:24637887

  16. Tunable gaps and enhanced mobilities in strain-engineered silicane

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, Oscar D.; Mishra, Rohan; Windl, Wolfgang; Goldberger, Joshua E.

    2014-01-21

    The recent demonstration of single-atom thick, sp{sup 3}-hybridized group 14 analogues of graphene enables the creation of materials with electronic structures that are manipulated by the nature of the covalently bound substituents above and below the sheet. These analogues can be electronically derived from isolated (111) layers of the bulk diamond lattice. Here, we perform systematic Density Functional Theory calculations to understand how the band dispersions, effective masses, and band gaps change as the bulk silicon (111) layers are continuously separated from each other until they are electronically isolated, and then passivated with hydrogen. High-level calculations based on HSE06 hybrid functionals were performed on each endpoint to compare directly with experimental values. We find that the change in the electronic structure due to variations in the Si-H bond length, Si-Si-Si bond angle, and most significantly the Si-Si bond length can tune the nature of the band gap from indirect to direct with dramatic effects on the transport properties. First-principles calculations of the phonon-limited electron mobility predict a value of 464 cm{sup 2}/Vs for relaxed indirect band gap Si-H monolayers at room temperature. However, for 1.6% tensile strain, the band gap becomes direct, which increases the mobility significantly (8 551 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 4% tensile strain). In total, this analysis of Si-based monolayers suggests that strain can change the nature of the band gap from indirect to direct and increase the electron mobility more than 18-fold.

  17. Quantum pumping of valley current in strain engineered graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Chan, K. S. E-mail: zjlin@ustc.edu.cn; Lin, Zijing E-mail: zjlin@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-01-06

    We studied the generation of valley dependent current by adiabatic quantum pumping in monolayer graphene in the presence of electric potential barriers, ferromagnetic field and strain. The pumped currents in the two valleys have same magnitudes and opposite directions; thus, a pure valley current is generated. The oscillation of the pumped pure valley current is determined by the Fabry-Perot resonances formed in the structure. In our calculation, the pumped pure valley current can be as high as 50 nA, which is measurable using present technologies. The proposed device is useful for the development of graphene valleytronic devices.

  18. Strain- and twist-engineered optical absorption of few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qian; Kong, XiangHua; Qiao, JingSi; Ji, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Density functional and many-body perturbation theories calculations were carried out to investigate fundamental and optical bandgap, exciton binding energy and optical absorption property of normal and strain- and twist-engineered few-layer black phosphorus (BP). We found that the fundamental bandgaps of few layer BP can be engineered by layer stacking and in-plane strain, with linear relationships to their associated exciton binding energies. The strain-dependent optical absorption behaviors are also anisotropic that the position of the first absorption peak monotonically blue-shifts as the strain applies to either direction for incident light polarized along the armchair direction, but this is not the case for that along the zigzag direction. Given those striking properties, we proposed two prototype devices for building potentially more balanced light absorbers and light filter passes, which promotes further applications and investigations of BP in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics.

  19. Impact of strain engineering on nanoscale strained InGaAs MOSFET devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Chun; Chang, Shu-Tong; Sun, P-H; Huang, C-X

    2011-07-01

    The strain distributions in the In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As channel regions of the In(0.4)Ga(0.6)As source/drain (S/D) with various lengths and widths were studied via 3D process simulations. The resulting mobility improvement was analyzed. The tensile strain along the transport direction was found to dominate the mobility improvement. The strain along the vertical direction perpendicular to the gate oxide was found to affect the mobility the least, while the strain along the width direction was slightly degraded. The impact of the channel width and length on the performance improvement, such as on the mobility gain, was analyzed via TCAD simulations. The novelty of this paper stems from its study of the impact of the channel width and length on the performance of InGaAs NMOSFETs, such as on their mobility gain, and from its exploration of physical insights for scaling the future III-V MOS devices. PMID:22121581

  20. RETSCP: A computer program for analysis of rocket engine thermal strains with cyclic plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program, designated RETSCP, for the analysis of Rocket Engine Thermal Strain with Cyclic Plasticity is described. RETSCP is a finite element program which employs a three dimensional isoparametric element. The program treats elasto-plastic strain cycling including the effects of thermal and pressure loads and temperature dependent material properties. Theoretical aspects of the finite element method are discussed and the program logic is described. A RETSCP User's Manual is presented including sample case results.

  1. Enhanced xylose fermentation and ethanol production by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Leonardo de Figueiredo; de Araujo, Verônica Parente Gomes; Paredes, Raquel de Sousa; Bon, Elba Pinto da Silva; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves; Neves, Bianca Cruz; Eleutherio, Elis Cristina Araújo

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that heterologous expression of a bacterial xylose isomerase gene (xylA) of Burkholderia cenocepacia enabled a laboratorial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain to ferment xylose anaerobically, without xylitol accumulation. However, the recombinant yeast fermented xylose slowly. In this study, an evolutionary engineering strategy was applied to improve xylose fermentation by the xylA-expressing yeast strain, which involved sequential batch cultivation on xylose. The resulting yeast strain co-fermented glucose and xylose rapidly and almost simultaneously, exhibiting improved ethanol production and productivity. It was also observed that when cells were grown in a medium containing higher glucose concentrations before being transferred to fermentation medium, higher rates of xylose consumption and ethanol production were obtained, demonstrating that xylose utilization was not regulated by catabolic repression. Results obtained by qPCR demonstrate that the efficiency in xylose fermentation showed by the evolved strain is associated, to the increase in the expression of genes HXT2 and TAL1, which code for a low-affinity hexose transporter and transaldolase, respectively. The ethanol productivity obtained after the introduction of only one genetic modification and the submission to a one-stage process of evolutionary engineering was equivalent to those of strains submitted to extensive metabolic and evolutionary engineering, providing solid basis for future applications of this strategy in industrial strains. PMID:25852993

  2. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies. PMID:25638019

  3. Analysis of strain gage reliability in F-100 jet engine testing at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1983-01-01

    A reliability analysis was performed on 64 strain gage systems mounted on the 3 rotor stages of the fan of a YF-100 engine. The strain gages were used in a 65 hour fan flutter research program which included about 5 hours of blade flutter. The analysis was part of a reliability improvement program. Eighty-four percent of the strain gages survived the test and performed satisfactorily. A post test analysis determined most failure causes. Five failures were caused by open circuits, three failed gages showed elevated circuit resistance, and one gage circuit was grounded. One failure was undetermined.

  4. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R.

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Electrostatic engineering of strained ferroelectric perovskites from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Stengel, Massimiliano

    2015-12-01

    Design of novel artificial materials based on ferroelectric perovskites relies on the basic principles of electrostatic coupling and in-plane lattice matching. These rules state that the out-of-plane component of the electric displacement field and the in-plane components of the strain are preserved across a layered superlattice, provided that certain growth conditions are respected. Intense research is currently directed at optimizing materials functionalities based on these guidelines, often with remarkable success. Such principles, however, are of limited practical use unless one disposes of reliable data on how a given material behaves under arbitrary electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. Here we demonstrate, by focusing on the prototypical ferroelectrics PbTiO3 and BiFeO3 as test cases, how such information can be calculated from first principles in a systematic and efficient way. In particular, we construct a series of two-dimensional maps that describe the behavior of either compound (e.g., concerning the ferroelectric polarization and antiferrodistortive instabilities) at any conceivable choice of the in-plane lattice parameter, a , and out-of-plane electric displacement, D . In addition to being of immediate practical applicability to superlattice design, our results bring new insight into the complex interplay of competing degrees of freedom in perovskite materials and reveal some notable instances where the behavior of these materials depart from what naively is expected.

  6. Elimination of formate production in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rydzak, Thomas; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-07-11

    We study the ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly degrade cellulose and ferment resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol makes it a promising platform organism for cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Currently, however, ethanol yield are far below theoretical maximum due to branched product pathways that divert carbon and electrons towards formate, H2, lactate, acetate, and secreted amino acids. To redirect carbon and electron flux away from formate, pyruvate:formate lyase (pfl) and respective PFL-activating enzyme were deleted. Formate production in the resulting Δpfl strain was eliminated and acetate production decreased by 50% on both complex and defined medium. Growth ratemore » of Δpfl decreased by 2.9-fold on defined medium and diauxic growth was observed on complex medium. Supplementation of defined medium with 2 mM formate restored Δpfl growth rate to 80% of the parent strain. Finally, we discuss the role of pfl in metabolic engineering strategies and C1 metabolism.« less

  7. Improvement of ClosTron for successive gene disruption in Clostridium cellulolyticum using a pyrF-based screening system.

    PubMed

    Cui, Gu-Zhen; Zhang, Jie; Hong, Wei; Xu, Chenggang; Feng, Yingang; Cui, Qiu; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium includes a number of species, such as thermophilic Clostridium thermocellum and mesophilic Clostridium cellulolyticum, producing biofuels and chemicals from lignocellulose, while genetic engineering is necessary to improve wild-type strains to fulfill the requirement of industrialization. ClosTron system is widely used in the gene targeting of Clostridium because of its high efficiency and operability. However, the targetron plasmid present in cell hinders the successive gene disruption. To solve this problem, a pyrF-based screening system was developed and implemented in C. cellulolyticum strain H10 in this study for efficient targetron plasmid curing. The screening system was composed of a pyrF-deleted cell chassis (H10ΔpyrF) constructed via homologous recombination and a PyrF expression cassette located in a targetron plasmid containing an erythromycin resistance gene. With the screening system, the gene targeting could be achieved following a two-step procedure, including the first step of gene disruption through targetron transformation and erythromycin selection and the second step of plasmid curing by screening with 5-fluoroorotic acid. To test the developed screening system, successive inactivation of the major cellulosomal exocellulase Cel48F and the scaffoldin protein CipC was achieved in C. cellulolyticum, and the efficient plasmid curing was confirmed. With the assistance of the pyrF-based screening system, the targetron plasmid-cured colonies can be rapidly selected by one-plate screening instead of traditional days' unguaranteed screening, and the successive gene disruption becomes accomplishable with ClosTron system with improved stability and efficiency, which may promote the metabolic engineering of Clostridium species aiming at enhanced production of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:24190496

  8. Metabolic Adaption of Ethanol-Tolerant Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinshu; Cui, Jiatao; Feng, Yingang; Fa, Yun; Zhang, Jingtao; Cui, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a major candidate for bioethanol production via consolidated bioprocessing. However, the low ethanol tolerance of the organism dramatically impedes its usage in industry. To explore the mechanism of ethanol tolerance in this microorganism, systematic metabolomics was adopted to analyse the metabolic phenotypes of a C. thermocellum wild-type (WT) strain and an ethanol-tolerant strain cultivated without (ET0) or with (ET3) 3% (v/v) exogenous ethanol. Metabolomics analysis elucidated that the levels of numerous metabolites in different pathways were changed for the metabolic adaption of ethanol-tolerant C. thermocellum. The most interesting phenomenon was that cellodextrin was significantly more accumulated in the ethanol-tolerant strain compared with the WT strain, although cellobiose was completely consumed in both the ethanol-tolerant and wild-type strains. These results suggest that the cellodextrin synthesis was active, which might be a potential mechanism for stress resistance. Moreover, the overflow of many intermediate metabolites, which indicates the metabolic imbalance, in the ET0 cultivation was more significant than in the WT and ET3 cultivations. This indicates that the metabolic balance of the ethanol-tolerant strain was adapted better to the condition of ethanol stress. This study provides additional insight into the mechanism of ethanol tolerance and is valuable for further metabolic engineering aimed at higher bioethanol production. PMID:23936233

  9. Metabolic adaption of ethanol-tolerant Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinshu; Cui, Jiatao; Feng, Yingang; Fa, Yun; Zhang, Jingtao; Cui, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a major candidate for bioethanol production via consolidated bioprocessing. However, the low ethanol tolerance of the organism dramatically impedes its usage in industry. To explore the mechanism of ethanol tolerance in this microorganism, systematic metabolomics was adopted to analyse the metabolic phenotypes of a C. thermocellum wild-type (WT) strain and an ethanol-tolerant strain cultivated without (ET0) or with (ET3) 3% (v/v) exogenous ethanol. Metabolomics analysis elucidated that the levels of numerous metabolites in different pathways were changed for the metabolic adaption of ethanol-tolerant C. thermocellum. The most interesting phenomenon was that cellodextrin was significantly more accumulated in the ethanol-tolerant strain compared with the WT strain, although cellobiose was completely consumed in both the ethanol-tolerant and wild-type strains. These results suggest that the cellodextrin synthesis was active, which might be a potential mechanism for stress resistance. Moreover, the overflow of many intermediate metabolites, which indicates the metabolic imbalance, in the ET0 cultivation was more significant than in the WT and ET3 cultivations. This indicates that the metabolic balance of the ethanol-tolerant strain was adapted better to the condition of ethanol stress. This study provides additional insight into the mechanism of ethanol tolerance and is valuable for further metabolic engineering aimed at higher bioethanol production. PMID:23936233

  10. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  11. Height control of self-assembled quantum dots by strain engineering during capping

    SciTech Connect

    Grossi, D. F. Koenraad, P. M.; Smereka, P.; Keizer, J. G.; Ulloa, J. M.

    2014-10-06

    Strain engineering during the capping of III-V quantum dots has been explored as a means to control the height of strained self-assembled quantum dots. Results of Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are confronted with cross-sectional Scanning Tunnel Microscopy (STM) measurements performed on InAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We studied InAs quantum dots that are capped by In{sub x}Ga{sub (1−x)}As layers of different indium compositions. Both from our realistic 3D kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and the X-STM measurements on real samples, a trend in the height of the capped quantum dot is found as a function of the lattice mismatch between the quantum dot material and the capping layer. Results obtained on additional material combinations show a generic role of the elastic energy in the control of the quantum dot morphology by strain engineering during capping.

  12. Characterizing Strain Variation in Engineered E. coli Using a Multi-Omics-Based Workflow.

    PubMed

    Brunk, Elizabeth; George, Kevin W; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Thompson, Mitchell; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Petzold, Christopher J; McCloskey, Douglas; Monk, Jonathan; Yang, Laurence; O'Brien, Edward J; Batth, Tanveer S; Martin, Hector Garcia; Feist, Adam; Adams, Paul D; Keasling, Jay D; Palsson, Bernhard O; Lee, Taek Soon

    2016-05-25

    Understanding the complex interactions that occur between heterologous and native biochemical pathways represents a major challenge in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. We present a workflow that integrates metabolomics, proteomics, and genome-scale models of Escherichia coli metabolism to study the effects of introducing a heterologous pathway into a microbial host. This workflow incorporates complementary approaches from computational systems biology, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology; provides molecular insight into how the host organism microenvironment changes due to pathway engineering; and demonstrates how biological mechanisms underlying strain variation can be exploited as an engineering strategy to increase product yield. As a proof of concept, we present the analysis of eight engineered strains producing three biofuels: isopentenol, limonene, and bisabolene. Application of this workflow identified the roles of candidate genes, pathways, and biochemical reactions in observed experimental phenomena and facilitated the construction of a mutant strain with improved productivity. The contributed workflow is available as an open-source tool in the form of iPython notebooks. PMID:27211860

  13. Physical map of the Clostridium beijerinckii (formerly Clostridium acetobutylicum) NCIMB 8052 chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, S R; Young, M

    1995-01-01

    A combined physical and genetic map of the single, circular, 6.7-Mbp chromosome of the NCIMB 8052 strain of Clostridium beijerinckii (formerly Clostridium acetobutylicum) has been constructed by using a combination of cloned DNA fragments as hybridization probes and a bank of strains harboring insertions of the conjugative transposon Tn1545. The positions of 81 restriction endonuclease cleavage sites and 32 genes have been determined. Eight genes concerned with solventogenic fermentation are found at three different locations. The chromosome contains at least 13 rrn operons, 11 of which have been located on the map. Their transcriptional orientation diverges from the presumed location of the replication origin. PMID:7814334

  14. Mechanical Self-Assembly of a Strain-Engineered Flexible Layer: Wrinkling, Rolling, and Twisting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi; Huang, Gaoshan; Trase, Ian; Han, Xiaomin; Mei, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Self-shaping of curved structures, especially those involving flexible thin layers, is attracting increasing attention because of their broad potential applications in, e.g., nanoelectromechanical andmicroelectromechanical systems, sensors, artificial skins, stretchable electronics, robotics, and drug delivery. Here, we provide an overview of recent experimental, theoretical, and computational studies on the mechanical self-assembly of strain-engineered thin layers, with an emphasis on systems in which the competition between bending and stretching energy gives rise to a variety of deformations, such as wrinkling, rolling, and twisting. We address the principle of mechanical instabilities, which is often manifested in wrinkling or multistability of strain-engineered thin layers. The principles of shape selection and transition in helical ribbons are also systematically examined. We hope that a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanical principles underlying these rich phenomena can foster the development of techniques for manufacturing functional three-dimensional structures on demand for a broad spectrum of engineering applications.

  15. Clostridium difficile in mixed populations of animals and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Since 2003, there has been an emergence of BI/NAP1 strain of Clostridium difficile (Cd) in North American hospitals. The origins of this epidemic strain have yet to be determined. However, PFGE analysis has shown ~80% similarity between this strain and some swine isolates. The objecti...

  16. Electrotransformation of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael V; Desai, Sunil G; Lynd, Lee R

    2004-02-01

    Electrotransformation of several strains of Clostridium thermocellum was achieved using plasmid pIKm1 with selection based on resistance to erythromycin and lincomycin. A custom-built pulse generator was used to apply a square 10-ms pulse to an electrotransformation cuvette consisting of a modified centrifuge tube. Transformation was verified by recovery of the shuttle plasmid pIKm1 from presumptive transformants of C. thermocellum with subsequent PCR specific to the mls gene on the plasmid, as well as by retransformation of Escherichia coli. Optimization carried out with strain DSM 1313 increased transformation efficiencies from <1 to (2.2 +/- 0.5) x 10(5) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA. Factors conducive to achieving high transformation efficiencies included optimized periods of incubation both before and after electric pulse application, chilling during cell collection and washing, subculture in the presence of isoniacin prior to electric pulse application, a custom-built cuvette embedded in an ice block during pulse application, use of a high (25-kV/cm) field strength, and induction of the mls gene before plating the cells on selective medium. The protocol and preferred conditions developed for strain DSM 1313 resulted in transformation efficiencies of (5.0 +/- 1.8) x 10(4) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA for strain ATCC 27405 and approximately 1 x 10(3) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA for strains DSM 4150 and 7072. Cell viability under optimal conditions was approximately 50% of that of controls not exposed to an electrical pulse. Dam methylation had a beneficial but modest (7-fold for strain ATCC 27405; 40-fold for strain DSM 1313) effect on transformation efficiency. The effect of isoniacin was also strain specific. The results reported here provide for the first time a gene transfer method functional in C. thermocellum that is suitable for molecular manipulations involving either the introduction of genes associated with foreign

  17. Production of cellobionate from cellulose using an engineered Neurospora crassa strain with laccase and redox mediator addition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a novel production process for cellobionic acid from cellulose using an engineered fungal strain with the exogenous addition of laccase and a redox mediator. A previously engineered strain of Neurospora crassa (F5'ace-1'cre-1'ndvB) was shown to produce cellobionate directly from cellulose ...

  18. Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Smits, Wiep Klaas; Lyras, Dena; Lacy, D Borden; Wilcox, Mark H; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-01-01

    Infection of the colon with the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile is potentially life threatening, especially in elderly people and in patients who have dysbiosis of the gut microbiota following antimicrobial drug exposure. C. difficile is the leading cause of health-care-associated infective diarrhoea. The life cycle of C. difficile is influenced by antimicrobial agents, the host immune system, and the host microbiota and its associated metabolites. The primary mediators of inflammation in C. difficile infection (CDI) are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), and, in some bacterial strains, the binary toxin CDT. The toxins trigger a complex cascade of host cellular responses to cause diarrhoea, inflammation and tissue necrosis - the major symptoms of CDI. The factors responsible for the epidemic of some C. difficile strains are poorly understood. Recurrent infections are common and can be debilitating. Toxin detection for diagnosis is important for accurate epidemiological study, and for optimal management and prevention strategies. Infections are commonly treated with specific antimicrobial agents, but faecal microbiota transplants have shown promise for recurrent infections. Future biotherapies for C. difficile infections are likely to involve defined combinations of key gut microbiota. PMID:27158839

  19. Space mutagenesis of genetically engineered bacteria expressing recombinant human interferon α1b and screening of higher yielding strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Changting; Liu, Jinyi; Fang, Xiangqun; Xu, Chen; Guo, Yinghua; Chang, De; Su, Longxiang

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the space mutagenesis of genetically engineered bacteria expressing recombinant human interferon α1b. The genetically engineered bacteria expressing the recombinant interferon α1b were sent into outer space on the Chinese Shenzhou VIII spacecraft. After the 17 day space flight, mutant strains that highly expressed the target gene were identified. After a series of screening of spaceflight-treated bacteria and the quantitative comparison of the mutant strains and original strain, we found five strains that showed a significantly higher production of target proteins, compared with the original strain. Our results support the notion that the outer space environment has unique effects on the mutation breeding of microorganisms, including genetically engineered strains. Mutant strains that highly express the target protein could be obtained through spaceflight-induced mutagenesis. PMID:24096450

  20. Electrostatic actuated strain engineering in monolithically integrated VLS grown silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagesreither, Stefan; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Kawase, Shinya; Isono, Yoshitada; Lugstein, Alois

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication and application of an electrostatic actuated tensile straining test (EATEST) device enabling strain engineering in individual suspended nanowires (NWs). Contrary to previously reported approaches, this special setup guarantees the application of pure uniaxial tensile strain with no shear component of the stress while e.g. simultaneously measuring the resistance change of the NW. To demonstrate the potential of this approach we investigated the piezoresistivity of about 3 μm long and 100 nm thick SiNWs but in the same way one can think about the application of such a device on other geometries, other materials beyond Si as well as the use of other characterization techniques beyond electrical measurements. Therefore single-crystal SiNWs were monolithically integrated in a comb drive actuated MEMS device based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer using the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technique. Strain values were verified by a precise measurement of the NW elongation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further we employed confocal μ-Raman microscopy for in situ, high spatial resolution measurements of the strain in individual SiNWs during electrical characterization. A giant piezoresistive effect was observed, resulting in a fivefold increase in conductivity for 3% uniaxially strained SiNWs. As the EATEST approach can be easily integrated into an existing Si technology platform this architecture may pave the way toward a new generation of nonconventional devices by leveraging the strain degree of freedom.

  1. Electrostatic actuated strain engineering in monolithically integrated VLS grown silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wagesreither, Stefan; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Kawase, Shinya; Isono, Yoshitada; Lugstein, Alois

    2014-11-14

    In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication and application of an electrostatic actuated tensile straining test (EATEST) device enabling strain engineering in individual suspended nanowires (NWs). Contrary to previously reported approaches, this special setup guarantees the application of pure uniaxial tensile strain with no shear component of the stress while e.g. simultaneously measuring the resistance change of the NW. To demonstrate the potential of this approach we investigated the piezoresistivity of about 3 μm long and 100 nm thick SiNWs but in the same way one can think about the application of such a device on other geometries, other materials beyond Si as well as the use of other characterization techniques beyond electrical measurements. Therefore single-crystal SiNWs were monolithically integrated in a comb drive actuated MEMS device based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer using the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technique. Strain values were verified by a precise measurement of the NW elongation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further we employed confocal μ-Raman microscopy for in situ, high spatial resolution measurements of the strain in individual SiNWs during electrical characterization. A giant piezoresistive effect was observed, resulting in a fivefold increase in conductivity for 3% uniaxially strained SiNWs. As the EATEST approach can be easily integrated into an existing Si technology platform this architecture may pave the way toward a new generation of nonconventional devices by leveraging the strain degree of freedom. PMID:25337772

  2. Strain-engineered band parameters of graphene-like SiC monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Behera, Harihar; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2014-10-06

    Using full-potential density functional theory (DFT) calculations we show that the band gap and effective masses of charge carriers in SiC monolayer (ML-SiC) in graphene-like two-dimensional honeycomb structure are tunable by strain engineering. ML-SiC was found to preserve its flat 2D graphene-like structure under compressive strain up to 7%. A transition from indirect-to-direct gap-phase is predicted to occur for a strain value lying within the interval (1.11 %, 1.76%). In both gap-phases band gap decreases with increasing strain, although the rate of decrease is different in the two gap-phases. Effective mass of electrons show a non-linearly decreasing trend with increasing tensile strain in the direct gap-phase. The strain-sensitive properties of ML-SiC, may find applications in future strain-sensors, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS) and other nano-devices.

  3. Engineering and Analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain That Uses Formaldehyde as an Auxiliary Substrate▿

    PubMed Central

    Baerends, Richard J. S.; de Hulster, Erik; Geertman, Jan-Maarten A.; Daran, Jean-Marc; van Maris, Antonius J. A.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrated that formaldehyde can be efficiently coutilized by an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that expresses Hansenula polymorpha genes encoding formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FLD1) and formate dehydrogenase (FMD), in contrast to wild-type strains. Initial chemostat experiments showed that the engineered strain coutilized formaldehyde with glucose, but these mixed-substrate cultures failed to reach steady-state conditions and did not exhibit an increased biomass yield on glucose. Subsequent transcriptome analyses of chemostat cultures of the engineered strain, grown on glucose-formaldehyde mixtures, indicated that the presence of formaldehyde in the feed caused biotin limitations. Further transcriptome analysis demonstrated that this biotin inactivation was prevented by using separate formaldehyde and vitamin feeds. Using this approach, steady-state glucose-limited chemostat cultures were obtained that coutilized glucose and formaldehyde. Coutilization of formaldehyde under these conditions resulted in an enhanced biomass yield of the glucose-limited cultures. The biomass yield was quantitatively consistent with the use of formaldehyde as an auxiliary substrate that generates NADH and subsequently, via oxidative phosphorylation, ATP. On an electron pair basis, the biomass yield increase observed with formaldehyde was larger than that observed previously for formate, which is tentatively explained by different modes of formate and formaldehyde transport in S. cerevisiae. PMID:18378663

  4. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen) on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD). Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins. PMID:25973613

  5. Clostridium thermocellum DSM 1313 transcriptional responses to redox perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, Kyle B.; Wilson, Charlotte M.; M. Rodriquez, Jr.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Davison, Brian H.; Brown, Steven D.; Rydzak, T.

    2015-12-12

    Clostridium thermocellum is a promising consolidated bioprocessing candidate organism capable of directly converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Current ethanol yields, productivities, and growth inhibitions are industrial deployment impediments for commodity fuel production by this bacterium. Redox imbalance under certain conditions and in engineered strains may contribute to incomplete substrate utilization and may direct fermentation products to undesirable overflow metabolites. As a result, towards a better understanding of redox metabolism in C. thermocellum, we established continuous growth conditions and analyzed global gene expression during addition of two stress chemicals (methyl viologen and hydrogen peroxide) which changed the fermentation redox potential.

  6. Enhanced isopropanol and n-butanol production by supplying exogenous acetic acid via co-culturing two clostridium strains from cassava bagasse hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaozhi; Qu, Chunyun; Huang, Xiaoyan; Suo, Yukai; Liao, Zhengping; Wang, Jufang

    2016-07-01

    The focus of this study was to produce isopropanol and butanol (IB) from dilute sulfuric acid treated cassava bagasse hydrolysate (SACBH), and improve IB production by co-culturing Clostridium beijerinckii (C. beijerinckii) with Clostridium tyrobutyricum (C. tyrobutyricum) in an immobilized-cell fermentation system. Concentrated SACBH could be converted to solvents efficiently by immobilized pure culture of C. beijerinckii. Considerable solvent concentrations of 6.19 g/L isopropanol and 12.32 g/L butanol were obtained from batch fermentation, and the total solvent yield and volumetric productivity were 0.42 g/g and 0.30 g/L/h, respectively. Furthermore, the concentrations of isopropanol and butanol increased to 7.63 and 13.26 g/L, respectively, under the immobilized co-culture conditions when concentrated SACBH was used as the carbon source. The concentrations of isopropanol and butanol from the immobilized co-culture fermentation were, respectively, 42.62 and 25.45 % higher than the production resulting from pure culture fermentation. The total solvent yield and volumetric productivity increased to 0.51 g/g and 0.44 g/L/h when co-culture conditions were utilized. Our results indicated that SACBH could be used as an economically favorable carbon source or substrate for IB production using immobilized fermentation. Additionally, IB production could be significantly improved by co-culture immobilization, which provides extracellular acetic acid to C. beijerinckii from C. tyrobutyricum. This study provided a technically feasible and cost-efficient way for IB production using cassava bagasse, which may be suitable for industrial solvent production. PMID:27116556

  7. Strain engineering for mechanical properties in graphene nanoribbons revisited: The warping edge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the strain engineering and the edge effect for mechanical properties in graphene nanoribbons. The free edges of the graphene nanoribbons are warped due to compressive edge stresses. There is a structural transformation for the free edges from the three-dimensional warping configuration to the two-dimensional planar structure at the critical strain ɛc = 0.7%, at which the applied mechanical stress is equal to the intrinsic compressive edge stress. This structural transformation leads to step-like changes in several mechanical properties studied in the present work, including the Young's modulus, the Poisson's ratio, the quality factor of nanomechanical resonators, and the phonon edge mode.

  8. FT-IR spectroscopic analysis for studying Clostridium cell response to conversion of enzymatically hydrolyzed hay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Nescerecka, Alina; Tihomirova, Kristina; Mezule, Linda; Juhna, Talis

    2013-07-01

    Grass hay is one of assailable cellulose containing non-food agricultural wastes that can be used as a carbohydrate source by microorganisms producing biofuels. In this study three Clostridium strains Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tetanomorphum, capable of producing acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) were adapted to convert enzymatically hydrolyzed hay used as a growth media additive. The results of growth curves, substrate degradation kinetics and FT-IR analyses of bacterial biomass macromolecular composition showed diverse strain-specific cell response to the growth medium composition.

  9. Biofuels and bio-based chemicals from lignocellulose: metabolic engineering strategies in strain development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rachel; Dou, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Interest in developing a sustainable technology for fuels and chemicals has unleashed tremendous creativity in metabolic engineering for strain development over the last few years. This is driven by the exceptionally recalcitrant substrate, lignocellulose, and the necessity to keep the costs down for commodity products. Traditional methods of gene expression and evolutionary engineering are more effectively used with the help of synthetic biology and -omics techniques. Compared to the last biomass research peak during the 1980s oil crisis, a more diverse range of microorganisms are being engineered for a greater variety of products, reflecting the broad applicability and effectiveness of today's gene technology. We review here several prominent and successful metabolic engineering strategies with emphasis on the following four areas: xylose catabolism, inhibitor tolerance, synthetic microbial consortium, and cellulosic oligomer assimilation. PMID:26466596

  10. Epsilon-Toxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718 Is Dependent upon the agr Operon but Not the VirS/VirR Two-Component Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens type B and D strains cause enterotoxemias and enteritis in livestock after proliferating in the intestines and producing epsilon-toxin (ETX), alpha-toxin (CPA), and, usually, perfringolysin O (PFO). Although ETX is one of the most potent bacterial toxins, the regulation of ETX production by type B or D strains remains poorly understood. The present work determined that the type D strain CN3718 upregulates production of ETX upon close contact with enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This host cell-induced upregulation of ETX expression was mediated at the transcriptional level. Using an isogenic agrB null mutant and complemented strain, the agr operon was shown to be required when CN3718 produces ETX in broth culture or, via a secreted signal consistent with a quorum-sensing (QS) effect, upregulates ETX production upon contact with host cells. These findings provide the first insights into the regulation of ETX production, as well as additional evidence that the Agr-like QS system functions as a global regulator of C. perfringens toxin production. Since it was proposed previously that the Agr-like QS system regulates C. perfringens gene expression via the VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system, an isogenic virR null mutant of CN3718 was constructed to evaluate the importance of VirS/VirR for CN3718 toxin production. This mutation affected production of CPA and PFO, but not ETX, by CN3718. These results provide the first indication that C. perfringens toxin expression regulation by the Agr-like quorum-sensing system may not always act via the VirS/VirR two-component system. PMID:22167225

  11. Combining Protein and Strain Engineering for the Production of Glyco-Engineered Horseradish Peroxidase C1A in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Simona; Ćorajević, Lejla; Bonifert, Günther; Murth, Patrick; Maresch, Daniel; Altmann, Friedrich; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP), conjugated to antibodies and lectins, is widely used in medical diagnostics. Since recombinant production of the enzyme is difficult, HRP isolated from plant is used for these applications. Production in the yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris), the most promising recombinant production platform to date, causes hyperglycosylation of HRP, which in turn complicates conjugation to antibodies and lectins. In this study we combined protein and strain engineering to obtain an active and stable HRP variant with reduced surface glycosylation. We combined four mutations, each being beneficial for either catalytic activity or thermal stability, and expressed this enzyme variant as well as the unmutated wildtype enzyme in both a P. pastoris benchmark strain and a strain where the native α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1) was knocked out. Considering productivity in the bioreactor as well as enzyme activity and thermal stability, the mutated HRP variant produced in the P. pastoris benchmark strain turned out to be interesting for medical diagnostics. This variant shows considerable catalytic activity and thermal stability and is less glycosylated, which might allow more controlled and efficient conjugation to antibodies and lectins. PMID:26404235

  12. Environmental and high strain rate effects on composites for engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1982-01-01

    The complex environmental and loading conditions experienced by many turbine engine components impose severe durability and damage tolerance requirements for component materials. Programs are being conducted to establish the structural performance of composite materials under anticipated engine operating environments. A description is presented of the results obtained in connection with several of these programs. A comparison of predicted and measured hygrothermal effects is considered along with hygrothermal effects on defect growth, high strain rate effects on composite mechanical properties, dynamic stress intensity factors for composites, and the indentation laws for composite impact analysis.

  13. Strain engineering band gap, effective mass and anisotropic Dirac-like cone in monolayer arsenene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Xia, Qinglin; Nie, Yaozhuang; Rahman, Mavlanjan; Guo, Guanghua

    2016-03-01

    The electronic properties of two-dimensional puckered arsenene have been investigated using first-principles calculations. The effective mass of electrons exhibits highly anisotropic dispersion in intrinsic puckered arsenene. Futhermore, we find that out-of-plane strain is effective in tuning the band gap, as the material undergoes the transition into a metal from an indirect gap semiconductor. Remarkably, we observe the emergence of Dirac-like cone with in-plane strain. Strain modulates not only the band gap of monolayer arsenene, but also the effective mass. Our results present possibilities for engineering the electronic properties of two-dimensional puckered arsenene and pave a way for tuning carrier mobility of future electronic devices.

  14. Luminescence enhancement of nanocrystal quantum wells by bandgap and strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xian-An; Lu, Yifei

    2015-01-01

    CdSe-based nanocrystal quantum wells (QWs) were synthesized around CdS nanocrystal quantum dots and were bandgap- and strain-engineered to achieve high-efficiency short-wavelength luminescence. Tuning the CdSe QW width in the range of 1.05 to 1.58 nm has led to blue-green light emission, whose quantum yield was improved up to 48% through strain compensation by an optimized ZnS outer shell. The luminescence spectrum can be modified by adding a ZnS inner barrier layer to block charge and exciton transfer between the QW and CdS core. Strain management by adjusting the well and barrier thickness has proven critical in such a complex multilayer quantum system for obtaining high-quality nanocrystals and light emission.

  15. Synthesis and accumulation of aromatic aldehydes in an engineered strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kunjapur, Aditya M; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Prather, Kristala L J

    2014-08-20

    Aromatic aldehydes are useful in numerous applications, especially as flavors, fragrances, and pharmaceutical precursors. However, microbial synthesis of aldehydes is hindered by rapid, endogenous, and redundant conversion of aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. We report the construction of an Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 strain with reduced aromatic aldehyde reduction (RARE) that serves as a platform for aromatic aldehyde biosynthesis. Six genes with reported activity on the model substrate benzaldehyde were rationally targeted for deletion: three genes that encode aldo-keto reductases and three genes that encode alcohol dehydrogenases. Upon expression of a recombinant carboxylic acid reductase in the RARE strain and addition of benzoate during growth, benzaldehyde remained in the culture after 24 h, with less than 12% conversion of benzaldehyde to benzyl alcohol. Although individual overexpression results demonstrated that all six genes could contribute to benzaldehyde reduction in vivo, additional experiments featuring subset deletion strains revealed that two of the gene deletions were dispensable under the conditions tested. The engineered strain was next investigated for the production of vanillin from vanillate and succeeded in preventing formation of the byproduct vanillyl alcohol. A pathway for the biosynthesis of vanillin directly from glucose was introduced and resulted in a 55-fold improvement in vanillin titer when using the RARE strain versus the wild-type strain. Finally, synthesis of the chiral pharmaceutical intermediate L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) was demonstrated from benzaldehyde and glucose upon expression of a recombinant mutant pyruvate decarboxylase in the RARE strain. Beyond allowing accumulation of aromatic aldehydes as end products in E. coli, the RARE strain expands the classes of chemicals that can be produced microbially via aldehyde intermediates. PMID:25076127

  16. Monolithically Integrated Microelectromechanical Systems for On-Chip Strain Engineering of Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yan; Mietschke, Michael; Zhang, Long; Yuan, Feifei; Abel, Stefan; Hühne, Ruben; Nielsch, Kornelius; Fompeyrine, Jean; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-09-14

    Elastic strain fields based on single crystal piezoelectric elements represent an effective way for engineering the quantum dot (QD) emission with unrivaled precision and technological relevance. However, pioneering researches in this direction were mainly based on bulk piezoelectric substrates, which prevent the development of chip-scale devices. Here, we present a monolithically integrated Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device with great potential for on-chip quantum photonic applications. High-quality epitaxial PMN-PT thin films have been grown on SrTiO3 buffered Si and show excellent piezoelectric responses. Dense arrays of MEMS with small footprints are then fabricated based on these films, forming an on-chip strain tuning platform. After transferring the QD-containing nanomembranes onto these MEMS, the nonclassical emissions (e.g., single photons) from single QDs can be engineered by the strain fields. We envision that the strain tunable QD sources on the individually addressable and monolithically integrated MEMS pave the way toward complex quantum photonic applications on chip. PMID:27574953

  17. Memory B Cells Encode Neutralizing Antibody Specific for Toxin B from the Clostridium difficile Strains VPI 10463 and NAP1/BI/027 but with Superior Neutralization of VPI 10463 Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Devera, T. Scott; Lang, Gillian A.; Lanis, Jordi M.; Rampuria, Pragya; Gilmore, Casey L.; James, Judith A.; Ballard, Jimmy D.

    2015-01-01

    Secreted toxin B (TcdB) substantially contributes to the pathology observed during Clostridium difficile infection. To be successfully incorporated into a vaccine, TcdB-based immunogens must stimulate the production of neutralizing antibody (Ab)-encoding memory B cells (Bmem cells). Despite numerous investigations, a clear analysis of Bmem cellular responses following vaccination against TcdB is lacking. B6 mice were therefore used to test the ability of a nontoxigenic C-terminal domain (CTD) fragment of TcdB to induce Bmem cells that encode TcdB-neutralizing antibody. CTD was produced from the historical VPI 10463 strain (CTD1) and from the hypervirulent strain NAP1/BI/027 (CTD2). It was then demonstrated that CTD1 induced strong recall IgG antibody titers, and this led to the development of functional Bmem cells that could be adoptively transferred to naive recipients. Bmem cell-driven neutralizing Ab responses conferred protection against lethal challenge with TcdB1. Further experiments revealed that an experimental adjuvant (Imject) and a clinical adjuvant (Alhydrogel) were compatible with Bmem cell induction. Reactivity of human Bmem cells to CTD1 was also evident in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), suggesting that CTD1 could be a good vaccine immunogen. However, CTD2 induced strong Bmem cell-driven antibody titers, and the CTD2 antibody was neutralizing in vitro, but its protection against lethal challenge with TcdB2 was limited to delaying time to death. Therefore, CTD from different C. difficile strains may be a good immunogen for stimulating B cell memory that encodes in vitro neutralizing Ab but may be limited by variable protection against intoxication in vivo. PMID:26502913

  18. New multiplex PCR method for the detection of Clostridium difficile toxin A (tcdA) and toxin B (tcdB) and the binary toxin (cdtA/cdtB) genes applied to a Danish strain collection.

    PubMed

    Persson, S; Torpdahl, M; Olsen, K E P

    2008-11-01

    Isolates of Clostridium difficile from 159 hospitalized Danish patients (2005) were analysed by a new 5-plex PCR method targeting the toxin genes tcdA, tcdB, cdtA and cdtB, and 16S rDNA as an internal positive control. Additionally, the toxin-regulating gene tcdC was partially sequenced by a new sequencing-based method that revealed genetic changes that may render the gene product inactive. Finally tcdA was analysed using a previously published method for the detection of internal deletions. The 5-plex PCR revealed four different toxin gene profiles: 36 tcdA+, tcdB+, cdtA+/cdtB+; one tcdA+, tcdB-, cdtA+/cdtB+; 98 tcdA+, tcdB+, cdtA-/cdtB-; and 24 non-toxigenic tcdA-, tcdB-, cdtA-/cdtB-. Deletion studies revealed that 26 strains contained a c. 700-bp deletion in tcdA, and 39 strains contained at least one possible inactivation feature in tcdC. The prevalence of the binary toxin genes was 23%. All strains with the tcdA+, tcdB+, cdtA+/cdtB+ profile were investigated by PCR ribotyping, and this revealed eight different ribotypes, none of which were 027. The 5-plex PCR method offers a one-step, rapid and specific screening method for C. difficile toxin genes. This toxin gene profiling, together with deletion studies in tcdA and tcdC, may allow an evaluation of the pathogenic potential of C. difficile. PMID:19040478

  19. Engineering Escherichia coli Cell Factories for n-Butanol Production.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Tianrui; Lin, Zhao; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    The production of n-butanol, as a widely applied solvent and potential fuel, is attracting much attention. The fermentative production of butanol coupled with the production of acetone and ethanol by Clostridium (ABE fermentation) was once one of the oldest biotechnological processes, ranking second in scale behind ethanol fermentation. However, there remain problems with butanol production by Clostridium, especially the difficulty in genetically manipulating clostridial strains. In recent years, many efforts have been made to produce butanol using non-native strains. Until now, the most advanced effort was the engineering of the user-friendly and widely studied Escherichia coli for butanol production. This paper reviews the current progress and problems relating to butanol production by engineered E. coli in terms of prediction using mathematical models, pathway construction, novel enzyme replacement, butanol toxicity, and tolerance engineering strategies. PMID:25662903

  20. A multiplex, internally controlled real-time PCR assay for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and identification of hypervirulent strain 027/ST-1.

    PubMed

    Hoegh, A M; Nielsen, J B; Lester, A; Friis-Møller, A; Schønning, K

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile and simultaneously identifying C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1 by targeting the toxin genes tcdA, tcdB and cdtA in one reaction and in a separate reaction identifying the Δ117 deletion in tcdC associated with ribotype 027/ST-1. PCR was done prospectively on 704 samples routinely submitted to our department and results were compared to results of toxigenic culture. Sequencing of tcdC, multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and PCR ribotyping were done on cultured isolates to confirm the correct identification of the Δ117 deletion in tcdC and C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1, respectively. The PCR assay displayed a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 99.0%, 97.4%, 87.4% and 99.8%, respectively, compared to toxigenic culture on 665 samples evaluable both by PCR and culture. Sequencing of tcdC, ribotyping and MLST of cultured isolates validated the genotyping assay and confirmed the ability of the assay to correctly identify C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1 in our current epidemiological setting. We describe the use of a combination of two separate PCR assays for sensitive and specific detection of toxigenic C. difficile and presumptive identification of C. difficile 027/ST-1. PMID:21938539

  1. Multicenter clinical evaluation of the portrait toxigenic C. difficile assay for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains in clinical stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Blake W; Mackey, Tami-Lea A; Daly, Judy A; Alger, Garrison; Denys, Gerald A; Peterson, Lance R; Kehl, Sue C; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2012-12-01

    We compared the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay, a new semiautomated sample-to-result molecular test, to a toxigenic bacterial culture/cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (TBC/CCNA) for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in 549 stool specimens. Stool specimens were also tested by one of three alternative FDA-cleared molecular tests for toxigenic C. difficile (Xpert C. difficile, Illumigene C. difficile, or GeneOhm Cdiff). The sensitivities and specificities of the molecular tests compared to TBC/CCNA were as follows: 98.2% and 92.8% for the Portrait assay, 100% and 91.7% for the Xpert assay, 93.3% and 95.1% for the Illumigene assay, and 97.4% and 98.5% for the GeneOhm assay, respectively. The majority of Portrait false-positive results (20/31; 64.5%) were also positive for C. difficile by an alternative molecular test, suggesting an increased sensitivity compared to the culture-based "gold standard" method. The Portrait test detected an assay input of 30 CFU in 100% of spiked samples and detected an input of 10 CFU in 96.7% of samples tested. PMID:23015667

  2. Multicenter Clinical Evaluation of the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay for Detection of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Strains in Clinical Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Blake W.; Mackey, Tami-Lea A.; Daly, Judy A.; Alger, Garrison; Denys, Gerald A.; Peterson, Lance R.; Kehl, Sue C.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay, a new semiautomated sample-to-result molecular test, to a toxigenic bacterial culture/cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (TBC/CCNA) for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in 549 stool specimens. Stool specimens were also tested by one of three alternative FDA-cleared molecular tests for toxigenic C. difficile (Xpert C. difficile, Illumigene C. difficile, or GeneOhm Cdiff). The sensitivities and specificities of the molecular tests compared to TBC/CCNA were as follows: 98.2% and 92.8% for the Portrait assay, 100% and 91.7% for the Xpert assay, 93.3% and 95.1% for the Illumigene assay, and 97.4% and 98.5% for the GeneOhm assay, respectively. The majority of Portrait false-positive results (20/31; 64.5%) were also positive for C. difficile by an alternative molecular test, suggesting an increased sensitivity compared to the culture-based “gold standard” method. The Portrait test detected an assay input of 30 CFU in 100% of spiked samples and detected an input of 10 CFU in 96.7% of samples tested. PMID:23015667

  3. High strain rate and high temperature behaviour of metallic materials for jet engine turbine containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, F.; Cendón, D.; Enfedaque, A.; Sánchez-Gálvez, V.

    2006-08-01

    This work presents a study on the mechanical characterisation of the materials involved in air jet engine turbines. The final objective is to analyse the phenomenon of a turbine blade off failure, to verify the requirements of the case containment. The materials in the turbine are under high temperatures, ranging from 400circC to 800circC and when the fail of the blade occurs if impacts against the case, reaching strain rates up to 103 s - 1. To obtain the behaviour of the materials, testing at high strain rate and high temperature at one time is necessary. The experimental set-up used was a split Hopkinson pressure bar, with a high temperature furnace adapted. The bars used on the device were high strength nickel alloys with a cooling system to decrease the temperature of the measurement devices. The effect of wave dispersion due to the temperature gradient has been also studied to correct the measurements if necessary. The material tested has been the FV535 stainless steel used on the case. The full stress-strain curves at different temperatures and at strain rates up to 103 s-1 have been obtained. The experimental results show a marked influence of the strain rate and the temperature that cannot be neglected. The Johnson-Cook material model has been used to fit the results of the material tests.

  4. Strain Engineering of Graphene: Atomistic Simulation of Y-junctions and Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zenan; Bahamon, Dario; Park, Harold; Pereira, Vitor; Campbell, David; Castro Neto, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the effects of two and three-dimensional states of strain on electronic transport in monolayer graphene. Using a combined atomistic simulation approach with molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, tight binding exact diagonalization and Landauer-Büttiker formulism, we have explored how various deformation patterns induce tunable pseudomagnetic field (PMF) distributions and furthermore how the Landau levels arising from PMF affect the quantum transport properties. Specifically, graphene Y-junction structures are found, under triaxial strains, to behave like pseudomagnetic quantum dots that selectively guide electron movement; valley degeneracy is broken when both strain-induced PMF and external real magnetic fields are present. Furthermore, graphene nano-bubbles with different geometries obtained by gas pressure can also be controlled as functional blocks due to PMF-restricted quantum transport by manipulation of strain. The simulation results show the promising potential to utilize graphene as a tunable building block for electronic NEMS/MEMS devices by strain engineering. Authors acknowledge supports of NRF-CRP award, NSF and Banco Santander.

  5. Biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate- co-3-hydroxyalkanoates) by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Jae; Lee, Sang Yup

    2004-01-01

    Biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) consisting of 3-hydroxy-alkanoates (3HAs) of 4 to 10 carbon atoms was examined in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli strains. When the fadA and/or fadB mutant E. coli strains harboring the plasmid containing the Pseudomonas sp. 61-3 phaC2 gene and the Ralstonia eutropha phaAB genes were cultured in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium supplemented with 2 g/L of sodium decanoate, all the recombinant E. coli strains synthesized PHAs consisting of C4, C6, C8, and C10 monomer units. The monomer composition of PHA was dependent on the E. coli strain used. When the fadA mutant E. coli was employed, PHA containing up to 63 mol% of 3-hydroyhexanoate was produced. In fadB and fadAB mutant E. coli strains, 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) was efficiently incorporated into PHA up to 86 mol%. Cultivation of recombinant fadA and/or fadB mutant E. coli strains in LB medium containing 10 g/L of sodium gluconate and 2 g/L of sodium decanoate resulted in the production of PHA copolymer containing a very high fraction of 3HB up to 95 mol%. Since the material properties of PHA copolymer consisting of a large fraction of 3HB and a small fraction of medium-chain-length 3HA are similar to those of low-density polyethylene, recombinant E. coli strains constructed in this study should be useful for the production of PHAs suitable for various commercial applications. PMID:15054261

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Engineered Escherichia coli SHuffle Strains and Their Wild-Type Parents

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Brian P.; Fomenkov, Alexey; Raleigh, Elisabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    SHuffle strains are genetically engineered Escherichia coli strains that are capable of oxidizing cysteines within proteins to form disulfide bonds. Here we present the complete genome of both the K-12 and B versions of SHuffle strains along with their parental ancestors. These strains have been of significant use to both the general scientific community and the biotech industry, interested in producing novel disulfide-bonded proteins that were hitherto unable to be expressed in standard E. coli expression strains. PMID:27034504

  7. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P-E; Levy, P-Y; Million, M; Croce, O; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain. PMID:25356334

  8. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, P-E; Levy, P-Y; Million, M; Croce, O; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain. PMID:25356334

  9. Clostridium difficile prevalence in an integrated swine operation in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently there has been an epidemic of human disease in North America caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile (Cd). It appears to be a new strain that is more virulent than previous strains, produces more toxins, and causes more severe disease (McDonald et al., 2005). The origin of the new s...

  10. Ultrasound Elastography for Estimation of Regional Strain of Multilayered Hydrogels and Tissue-Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Baskaran, Harihara; Welter, Jean F; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage constructs tend to develop inhomogeneously, thus, to predict the mechanical performance of the tissue, conventional biomechanical testing, which yields average material properties, is of limited value. Rather, techniques for evaluating regional and depth-dependent properties of TE cartilage, preferably non-destructively, are required. The purpose of this study was to build upon our previous results and to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound elastography to non-destructively assess the depth-dependent biomechanical characteristics of TE cartilage while in a sterile bioreactor. As a proof-of-concept, and to standardize an assessment protocol, a well-characterized three-layered hydrogel construct was used as a surrogate for TE cartilage, and was studied under controlled incremental compressions. The strain field of the construct predicted by elastography was then validated by comparison with a poroelastic finite-element analysis (FEA). On average, the differences between the strains predicted by elastography and the FEA were within 10%. Subsequently engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated in the same test fixture. Results from these examinations showed internal regions where the local strain was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that near the surface. These studies document the feasibility of using ultrasound to evaluate the mechanical behaviors of maturing TE constructs in a sterile environment. PMID:26077987

  11. Band structure engineering via piezoelectric fields in strained anisotropic CdSe/CdS nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Sotirios; Rajadell, Fernando; Casu, Alberto; Vaccaro, Gianfranco; Grim, Joel Q.; Genovese, Alessandro; Manna, Liberato; Climente, Juan I.; Meinardi, Francesco; Rainò, Gabriele; Stöferle, Thilo; Mahrt, Rainer F.; Planelles, Josep; Brovelli, Sergio; Moreels, Iwan

    2015-01-01

    Strain in colloidal heteronanocrystals with non-centrosymmetric lattices presents a unique opportunity for controlling optoelectronic properties and adds a new degree of freedom to existing wavefunction engineering and doping paradigms. We synthesized wurtzite CdSe nanorods embedded in a thick CdS shell, hereby exploiting the large lattice mismatch between the two domains to generate a compressive strain of the CdSe core and a strong piezoelectric potential along its c-axis. Efficient charge separation results in an indirect ground-state transition with a lifetime of several microseconds, almost one order of magnitude longer than any other CdSe/CdS nanocrystal. Higher excited states recombine radiatively in the nanosecond time range, due to increasingly overlapping excited-state orbitals. k̇p calculations confirm the importance of the anisotropic shape and crystal structure in the buildup of the piezoelectric potential. Strain engineering thus presents an efficient approach to highly tunable single- and multiexciton interactions, driven by a dedicated core/shell nanocrystal design. PMID:26219691

  12. Clinical testing of engineered oncolytic measles virus strains in the treatment of cancer: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Msaouel, Pavlos; Dispenzieri, Angela; Galanis, Evanthia

    2009-01-01

    Viruses have adapted through millennia of evolution to effectively invade and lyse cells through diverse mechanisms. Strains of the attenuated measles virus Edmonston (MV-Edm) vaccine lineage can preferentially infect and destroy cancerous cells while sparing the surrounding tissues. This specificity is predominantly due to overexpression of the measles virus receptor CD46 in tumor cells. To facilitate in vivo monitoring of viral gene expression and replication, these oncolytic strains have been engineered to either express soluble marker peptides, such as the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; MV-CEA virus), or genes that facilitate imaging and therapy, such as the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene (MV-NIS). Preclinical efficacy and safety data for engineered oncolytic MV-Edm derivatives that led to their clinical translation are discussed in this review, and an overview of the early experience in three ongoing clinical trials of patients with ovarian cancer, glioblastoma multiforme and multiple myeloma is provided. The information obtained from these ongoing trials will guide the future clinical application and further development of MV strains as anticancer agents. PMID:19169959

  13. A Pseudomonas putida Strain Genetically Engineered for 1,2,3-Trichloropropane Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M. Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P.; Damborsky, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. PMID:24973068

  14. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. PMID:24973068

  15. [Construction and evaluation of an engineered bacterial strain for producing lipopeptide under anoxic conditions].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-long; Zhao, Feng; Shi, Rong-jiu; Ban, Yun-he; Zhou, Ji-dong; Han, Si-qin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Biosurfactant-facilitated oil recovery is one of the most important aspects of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, the biosurfactant production by biosurfactant-producing microorganisms, most of which are aerobes, is severely suppressed due to the in-situ anoxic conditions within oil reservoirs. In this research, we successfully engineered a strain JD-3, which could grow rapidly and produce lipopeptide under anoxic conditions, by protoplast confusion using a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain BQ-2 which produces biosurfactant aerobically, and a facultative anaerobic Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DQ-1 as parent strains. The alignment of 16S rDNA sequence (99% similarity) and comparisons of cell colony morphology showed that fusant JD-3 was closer to the parental strain B. amyloliquefaciens BQ-2. The surface tension of culture broth of fusant JD-3, after 36-hour cultivation under anaerobic conditions, decreased from initially 63.0 to 32.5 mN · m(-1). The results of thin layer chromatography and infrared spectrum analysis demonstrated that the biosurfactant produced by JD-3 was lipopeptide. The surface-active lipopeptide had a low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 90 mg · L(-1) and presented a good ability to emulsify various hydrocarbons such as crude oil, liquid paraffin, and kerosene. Strain JD-3 could utilize peptone as nitrogen source and sucrose, glucose, glycerin or other common organics as carbon sources for anaerobic lipopeptide synthesis. The subculture of fusant JD-3 showed a stable lipopeptide-producing ability even after ten serial passages. All these results indicated that fusant JD-3 holds a great potential to microbially enhance oil recovery under anoxic conditions. PMID:26685621

  16. Evaluation results of the 700 deg C Chinese strain gauges. [for gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobart, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Gauges fabricated from specially developed Fe-Cr-Al-V-Ti-Y alloy wire in the Republic of China were evaluated for use in static strain measurement of hot gas turbine engines. Gauge factor variation with temperature, apparent strain, and drift were included. Results of gauge factor versus temperature tests show gauge factor decreasing with increasing temperature. The average slope is -3-1/2 percent/100 K, with an uncertainty band of + or - 8 percent. Values of room temperature gauge factor for the Chinese and Kanthal A-1 gauges averaged 2.73 and 2.12, respectively. The room temperature gauge factor of the Chinese gauges was specified to be 2.62. The apparent strain data for both the Chinese alloy and Kanthal A-1 showed large cycle to cycle nonrepeatability. All apparent strain curves had a similar S-shape, first going negative and then rising to positive value with increasing temperatures. The mean curve for the Chinese gauges between room temperature and 100 K had a total apparent strain of 1500 microstrain. The equivalent value for Kanthal A-1 was about 9000 microstrain. Drift tests at 950 K for 50 hr show an average drift rate of about -9 microstrain/hr. Short-term (1 hr) rates are higher, averaging about -40 microstrain for the first hour. In the temperature range 700 to 870 K, however, short-term drift rates can be as high as 1700 microstrain for the first hour. Therefore, static strain measurements in this temperature range should be avoided.

  17. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB) Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongyu; Cassan, Robyn; Johnstone, Darrell; Han, Xiaobing; Joyee, Antony George; McQuoid, Monica; Masi, Andrea; Merluza, John; Hrehorak, Bryce; Reid, Ross; Kennedy, Kieron; Tighe, Bonnie; Rak, Carla; Leonhardt, Melanie; Dupas, Brian; Saward, Laura; Berry, Jody D.; Nykiforuk, Cory L.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA), and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB), which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4) and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1) antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail) provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively) in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI) model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI. PMID:27336843

  18. A Combination of Three Fully Human Toxin A- and Toxin B-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies Protects against Challenge with Highly Virulent Epidemic Strains of Clostridium difficile in the Hamster Model

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Leah E.; Li, Lu; Zhang, Jinrong; Brown, Anna M.; Mundle, Sophia; Zhang, Jianxin; Ray, Satyajit; Ma, Fuqin; Garrone, Pierre; Bertraminelli, Nicola; Kleanthous, Harry; Anderson, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the principal cause of nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis associated with antibiotic therapy. Recent increases in the number of outbreaks attributed to highly virulent antibiotic-resistant strains underscore the importance of identifying efficacious alternatives to antibiotics to control this infection. CDI is mediated by two large exotoxins, toxins A and B. Strong humoral toxin-specific immune responses are associated with recovery and a lack of disease recurrence, whereas insufficient humoral responses are associated with recurrent CDI. Multiple approaches targeting these toxins, including intravenous immunoglobulin, neutralizing polymers, active vaccines, and, most recently, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), have been explored, with various degrees of success. In this study, we describe the characterization of the first MAbs isolated from healthy human donors using a high-throughput B-cell cloning strategy. The MAbs were selected based on their ability to inhibit the actions of toxins A and B in vitro and because of their in vivo efficacy in a hamster challenge model. A potent 2-MAb cocktail was identified and then further potentiated by the addition of a second anti-toxin B MAb. This 3-MAb combination protected animals against mortality and also reduced the severity and duration of diarrhea associated with challenge with highly virulent strains of C. difficile toxinotypes 0 and III. This highly efficacious cocktail consists of one MAb specific to the receptor binding domain of toxin A and two MAbs specific to nonoverlapping regions of the glucosyltransferase domain of toxin B. This MAb combination offers great potential as a nonantibiotic treatment for the prevention of recurrent CDI. PMID:25924765

  19. A novel insecticidal serotype of Clostridium bifermentans.

    PubMed

    Seleena, P; Lee, H L; Lecadet, M M

    1997-12-01

    A novel Clostridium bifermentans strain toxic to mosquito larvae on ingestion was isolated from a soil sample collected from secondary forest floor. This strain was designated as serovar paraiba (C. b. paraiba) according to its specific H antigen. Clostridium bifermentans paraiba is most toxic to Anopheles maculatus Theobald larvae (LC50 = 0.038 mg/liter), whereas toxicity to Aedes aegypti (Linn.) (LC50 = 0.74 mg/liter) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (LC50 = 0.11 mg/liter) larvae was 20 and 3 times lower, respectively. The toxicity to An. maculatus larvae is as high as that of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis. C. b. paraiba was also found to exhibit significant per os insecticidal activity toward adult Musca domestica (Linn.). PMID:9474569

  20. Engineering Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration: A novel chassis strain for whole-cell catalysis.

    PubMed

    Geier, Martina; Brandner, Christoph; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Hall, Mélanie; Hartner, Franz S; Glieder, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Many synthetically useful reactions are catalyzed by cofactor-dependent enzymes. As cofactors represent a major cost factor, methods for efficient cofactor regeneration are required especially for large-scale synthetic applications. In order to generate a novel and efficient host chassis for bioreductions, we engineered the methanol utilization pathway of Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration. By deleting the genes coding for dihydroxyacetone synthase isoform 1 and 2 (DAS1 and DAS2), NADH regeneration via methanol oxidation (dissimilation) was increased significantly. The resulting Δdas1 Δdas2 strain performed better in butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH1) based whole-cell conversions. While the BDH1 catalyzed acetoin reduction stopped after 2 h reaching ~50% substrate conversion when performed in the wild type strain, full conversion after 6 h was obtained by employing the knock-out strain. These results suggest that the P. pastoris Δdas1 Δdas2 strain is capable of supplying the actual biocatalyst with the cofactor over a longer reaction period without the over-expression of an additional cofactor regeneration system. Thus, focusing the intrinsic carbon flux of this methylotrophic yeast on methanol oxidation to CO2 represents an efficient and easy-to-use strategy for NADH-dependent whole-cell conversions. At the same time methanol serves as co-solvent, inductor for catalyst and cofactor regeneration pathway expression and source of energy. PMID:26664594

  1. Strain-engineered diffusive atomic switching in two-dimensional crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kalikka, Janne; Zhou, Xilin; Dilcher, Eric; Wall, Simon; Li, Ju; Simpson, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering is an emerging route for tuning the bandgap, carrier mobility, chemical reactivity and diffusivity of materials. Here we show how strain can be used to control atomic diffusion in van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional (2D) crystals. We use strain to increase the diffusivity of Ge and Te atoms that are confined to 5 Å thick 2D planes within an Sb2Te3–GeTe van der Waals superlattice. The number of quintuple Sb2Te3 2D crystal layers dictates the strain in the GeTe layers and consequently its diffusive atomic disordering. By identifying four critical rules for the superlattice configuration we lay the foundation for a generalizable approach to the design of switchable van der Waals heterostructures. As Sb2Te3–GeTe is a topological insulator, we envision these rules enabling methods to control spin and topological properties of materials in reversible and energy efficient ways. PMID:27329563

  2. Understanding and strain-engineering wrinkle networks in supported graphene through simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuan; Arroyo, Marino

    2014-12-01

    Wrinkle networks are ubiquitous buckle-induced delaminations in supported graphene, which locally modify the electronic structure and degrade device performance. Although the strong property-deformation coupling of graphene can be potentially harnessed by strain engineering, it has not been possible to precisely control the geometry of wrinkle networks. Through numerical simulations based on an atomistically informed continuum theory, we understand how strain anisotropy, adhesion and friction govern spontaneous wrinkling. We then propose a strategy to control the location of wrinkles through patterns of weaker adhesion. This strategy is deceptively simple, and can in fact fail in several ways, particularly under biaxial compression. However, within bounds set by the physics of wrinkling, it is possible to robustly create by strain a variety of wrinkle network geometries and junction configurations. Graphene is nearly unstrained in the planar regions bounded by wrinkles, highly curved along wrinkles, and highly stretched and curved at junctions, which can either locally attenuate or amplify the applied strain depending on their configuration. These mechanically self-assembled networks are stable under the pressure produced by an enclosed fluid and form continuous channels, opening the door to nano-fluidic applications.

  3. Engineering Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration: A novel chassis strain for whole-cell catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Martina; Brandner, Christoph; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Hall, Mélanie; Hartner, Franz S

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many synthetically useful reactions are catalyzed by cofactor-dependent enzymes. As cofactors represent a major cost factor, methods for efficient cofactor regeneration are required especially for large-scale synthetic applications. In order to generate a novel and efficient host chassis for bioreductions, we engineered the methanol utilization pathway of Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration. By deleting the genes coding for dihydroxyacetone synthase isoform 1 and 2 (DAS1 and DAS2), NADH regeneration via methanol oxidation (dissimilation) was increased significantly. The resulting Δdas1 Δdas2 strain performed better in butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH1) based whole-cell conversions. While the BDH1 catalyzed acetoin reduction stopped after 2 h reaching ~50% substrate conversion when performed in the wild type strain, full conversion after 6 h was obtained by employing the knock-out strain. These results suggest that the P. pastoris Δdas1 Δdas2 strain is capable of supplying the actual biocatalyst with the cofactor over a longer reaction period without the over-expression of an additional cofactor regeneration system. Thus, focusing the intrinsic carbon flux of this methylotrophic yeast on methanol oxidation to CO2 represents an efficient and easy-to-use strategy for NADH-dependent whole-cell conversions. At the same time methanol serves as co-solvent, inductor for catalyst and cofactor regeneration pathway expression and source of energy. PMID:26664594

  4. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  5. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  6. Single photons on-demand from light-hole excitons in strain-engineered quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Huo, Yongheng; Rastelli, Armando; Zopf, Michael; Höfer, Bianca; Chen, Yan; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate for the first time on-demand and wavelength-tunable single-photon emission from light-hole (LH) excitons in strain engineered GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The LH photon emission from tensile-strained GaAs QDs is systematically investigated with polarization-resolved, power-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy, and photon-correlation measurements. By integrating QD-containing nanomembranes onto a piezo-actuator and driving single QDs with picosecond laser pulses, we achieve triggered and wavelength-tunable LH single-photon emission. Fourier transform spectroscopy is also performed, from which the coherence time of the LH single-photon emission is studied. We envision that this new type of LH exciton-based single-photon source (SPS) can be applied to realize an all-semiconductor based quantum interface in distributed quantum networks [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 096602]. PMID:25471544

  7. Exopolysaccharide production by a genetically engineered Enterobacter cloacae strain for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Luo, Yijing; Zhong, Weizhang; Xiao, Meng; Yi, Wenjing; Yu, Li; Fu, Pengcheng

    2011-05-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a petroleum biotechnology for manipulating function and/or structure of microbial environments existing in oil reservoirs for prolonged exploitation of the largest source of energy. In this study, an Enterobacter cloacae which is capable of producing water-insoluble biopolymers at 37°C and a thermophilic Geobacillus strain were used to construct an engineered strain for exopolysaccharide production at higher temperature. The resultant transformants, GW3-3.0, could produce exopolysaccharide up to 8.83 g l(-1) in molasses medium at 54°C. This elevated temperature was within the same temperature range as that for many oil reservoirs. The transformants had stable genetic phenotype which was genetically fingerprinted by RAPD analysis. Core flooding experiments were carried out to ensure effective controlled profile for the simulation of oil recovery. The results have demonstrated that this approach has a promising application potential in MEOR. PMID:21444201

  8. MALDI-TOF MS is more accurate than VITEK II ANC card and API Rapid ID 32 A system for the identification of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Hae-Geun; Park, Dongchul; Song, Sae Am; Lee, Hee Joo; Yong, Dongeun; Choi, Jun Yong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Hye Ran; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-08-01

    All 50 Clostridium difficile strains were definitely identified by Vitek2 system, Rapid ID 32A system, and MALDI-TOF. For 18 non-difficile Clostridium strains, the identification results were correct in 0, 2, and 17 strains by Vitek2, Rapid ID 32A, and MALDI-TOF, respectively. MALDI-TOF could be used as the primary tool for identification of Clostridium species. PMID:27296834

  9. Foot infection by Clostridium sordellii: case report and review of 15 cases in France.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. PMID:25609723

  10. Foot Infection by Clostridium sordellii: Case Report and Review of 15 Cases in France

    PubMed Central

    Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. PMID:25609723

  11. Cultures of "Clostridium acetobutylicum" from various collections comprise Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, and two other distinct types based on DNA-DNA reassociation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J L; Toth, J; Santiwatanakul, S; Chen, J S

    1997-04-01

    The best-known acetone-butanol (solvent)-producing bacterium is the Weizmann organism, Clostridium acetobutylicum, which was used for starch-based industrial fermentation. In the past two decades, cultures of "C. acetobutylicum" from various culture collections have included organisms that were isolated for sugar (molasses)-based industrial solvent production. Recent biochemical and genetic studies have revealed significant differences among some of these "C. acetobutylicum" strains. We used DNA-DNA reassociation to analyze 39 cultures of "C. acetobutylicum" and phenotypically similar organisms from major collections. The results of this study clearly identified four groups intergroup reassociation values of less than 30%. All of the intragroup values except the value for one strain were 68% or more, which supported species status for each group. The C. acetobutylicum group (with ATCC 824 as the type strain) consisted of 17 cultures and had average reassociation values of 10% with the other three groups. All strains of C. acetobutylicum produced riboflavin in milk, and the cultures were bright yellow, which is useful for differentiating this species from the other three groups. The Clostridium beijerinckii group (with VPI 5481 [= ATCC 25752] as the type strain) consisted of 16 cultures and included strains NCIMB 8052 and NCP 270. Strains NCP 262 and NRRL B643 constituted the third group, whereas strain N1-4 ("Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum") and its derivative, strain N1-4081, formed the fourth group. At present, the last two groups are each represented by only one independent strain; definitive descriptions of these two groups as two new or revived species will require further phenotypic characterization, as well as identification of additional strains. C. beijerinckii NCP 270, Clostridium sp. strain NRRL B643, and "C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum" were used in industrial solvent production from molasses, which confirms that the new organisms used for the

  12. Systematic analysis of intracellular mechanisms of propanol production in the engineered Thermobifida fusca B6 strain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Fisher, Adam B; Fong, Stephen S

    2015-10-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a moderately thermophilic actinobacterium naturally capable of utilizing lignocellulosic biomass. The B6 strain of T. fusca was previously engineered to produce 1-propanol directly on lignocellulosic biomass by expressing a bifunctional butyraldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2). To characterize the intracellular mechanisms related to the accumulation of 1-propanol, the engineered B6 and wild-type (WT) strains were systematically compared by analysis of the transcriptome and intracellular metabolome during exponential growth on glucose, cellobiose, and Avicel. Of the 18 known cellulases in T. fusca, 10 cellulase genes were transcriptionally expressed on all three substrates along with three hemicellulases. Transcriptomic analysis of cellodextrin and cellulose transport revealed that Tfu_0936 (multiple sugar transport system permease) was the key enzyme regulating the uptake of sugars in T. fusca. For both WT and B6 strains, it was found that growth in oxygen-limited conditions resulted in a blocked tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle caused by repressed expression of Tfu_1925 (aconitate hydratase). Further, the transcriptome suggested a pathway for synthesizing succinyl-CoA: oxaloacetate to malate (by malate dehydrogenase), malate to fumarate (by fumarate hydratase), and fumarate to succinate (by succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase) which was ultimately converted to succinyl-CoA by succinyl-CoA synthetase. Both the transcriptome and the intracellular metabolome confirmed that 1-propanol was produced through succinyl-CoA, L-methylmalonyl-CoA, D-methylmalonyl-CoA, and propionyl-CoA in the B6 strain. PMID:26227414

  13. [Genetic modification systems for Clostridium acetobutylicum].

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2010-10-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum, a biofuel-butanol producer, has attracted worldwide interests. Strain improvement is important for the process of biobutanol industrialization where efficient genetic modification systems are essential. In this review, the history of genetic modification systems of C. acetobutylicum was introduced, and the types and principles of these systems and their disadvantages are summarized and analysed. The development of updated genetic modification systems for C. acetobutylicum is also proposed. PMID:21218624

  14. Strain engineering of selective chemical adsorption on monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Liangzhi; Du, Aijun; Chen, Changfeng; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Nanomaterials are prone to influence by chemical adsorption because of their large surface to volume ratios. This enables sensitive detection of adsorbed chemical species which, in turn, can tune the properties of the host material. Recent studies discovered that single and multi-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films are ultra-sensitive to several important environmental molecules. Here we report new findings from ab inito calculations that reveal substantially enhanced adsorption of NO and NH3 on strained monolayer MoS2 with significant impact on the properties of the adsorbates and the MoS2 layer. The magnetic moment of adsorbed NO can be tuned between 0 and 1 μB strain also induces an electronic phase transition between the half-metal and the metal. Adsorption of NH3 weakens the MoS2 layer considerably, which explains the large discrepancy between the experimentally measured strength and breaking strain of MoS2 films and previous theoretical predictions. On the other hand, adsorption of NO2, CO, and CO2 is insensitive to the strain conditions in the MoS2 layer. This contrasting behavior allows sensitive strain engineering of selective chemical adsorption on MoS2 with effective tuning of mechanical, electronic, and magnetic properties. These results suggest new design strategies for constructing MoS2-based ultrahigh-sensitivity nanoscale sensors and electromechanical devices.Nanomaterials are prone to influence by chemical adsorption because of their large surface to volume ratios. This enables sensitive detection of adsorbed chemical species which, in turn, can tune the properties of the host material. Recent studies discovered that single and multi-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films are ultra-sensitive to several important environmental molecules. Here we report new findings from ab inito calculations that reveal substantially enhanced adsorption of NO and NH3 on strained monolayer MoS2 with significant impact on the properties of the adsorbates and the

  15. Stable and enhanced gene expression in Clostridium acetobutylicum using synthetic untranslated regions with a stem-loop.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-07-20

    Gene overexpression is one of the most basic strategies in metabolic engineering, but the factors determining gene expression levels have been poorly studied in Clostridium species. In this study, we found that a short single-stranded 5' untranslated region (UTR) sequence led to decreased gene expression in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Using an in vitro enzyme assay and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, we found that addition of a small stem-loop at the 5' end of mRNA increased mRNA levels and thereby protein expression levels up to 4.6-fold, possibly protecting mRNA from exonuclease attack. Gene-expression levels were apparently independent of the stability of the added stem-loop; the existence of a stem-loop itself appears to be more important. Our results indicate that efficient expression cassettes can be designed by taking the 5' UTR into consideration, as the expression levels can vary even though the same promoter and RBS are used. These findings will be useful for developing a more reliable gene expression system for metabolic engineering of Clostridium strains. PMID:27188957

  16. Strain response of thermal barrier coatings captured under extreme engine environments through synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Siddiqui, Sanna F.; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M.; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings in operation holds the key to understanding durability of jet engine turbine blades. Here we report the results from experiments that monitor strains in the layers of a coating subjected to thermal gradients and mechanical loads representing extreme engine environments. Hollow cylindrical specimens, with electron beam physical vapour deposited coatings, were tested with internal cooling and external heating under various controlled conditions. High-energy synchrotron X-ray measurements captured the in situ strain response through the depth of each layer, revealing the link between these conditions and the evolution of local strains. Results of this study demonstrate that variations in these conditions create corresponding trends in depth-resolved strains with the largest effects displayed at or near the interface with the bond coat. With larger temperature drops across the coating, significant strain gradients are seen, which can contribute to failure modes occurring within the layer adjacent to the interface.

  17. Strain response of thermal barrier coatings captured under extreme engine environments through synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Siddiqui, Sanna F; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings in operation holds the key to understanding durability of jet engine turbine blades. Here we report the results from experiments that monitor strains in the layers of a coating subjected to thermal gradients and mechanical loads representing extreme engine environments. Hollow cylindrical specimens, with electron beam physical vapour deposited coatings, were tested with internal cooling and external heating under various controlled conditions. High-energy synchrotron X-ray measurements captured the in situ strain response through the depth of each layer, revealing the link between these conditions and the evolution of local strains. Results of this study demonstrate that variations in these conditions create corresponding trends in depth-resolved strains with the largest effects displayed at or near the interface with the bond coat. With larger temperature drops across the coating, significant strain gradients are seen, which can contribute to failure modes occurring within the layer adjacent to the interface. PMID:25078347

  18. Improving the reproducibility of the NAP1/B1/027 epidemic strain R20291 in the hamster model of infection.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle L; Ng, Yen Kuan; Cartman, Stephen T; Collery, Mark M; Cockayne, Alan; Minton, Nigel P

    2016-06-01

    Comparative analysis of the Clostridium difficile BI/NAP1/027 strain R20291 and ClosTron-derived ermB mutants in the hamster infection model are compromised by the clindamycin susceptibility of the parent. Mutants can appear more virulent. We have rectified this anomaly by genome engineering. The variant created (CRG20291) represents an ideal control strain for virulence assays of ClosTron mutants. PMID:26946361

  19. Capturing the response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to chemical stressors using a regulated genome-scale metabolic model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dash, Satyakam; Mueller, Thomas J.; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-14

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive Firmicutes containing broad and flexible systems for substrate utilization, which have been used successfully to produce a range of industrial compounds. Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol on an industrial scale through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. A genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model is a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic capacities of an organism and developing metabolic engineering strategies for strain development. The integration of stress related specific transcriptomics information with the GSM model provides opportunities for elucidating the focal points of regulation.

  20. Toxin plasmids of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  1. Strong Modulation of Optical Properties in Black Phosphorus through Strain-Engineered Rippling.

    PubMed

    Quereda, Jorge; San-Jose, Pablo; Parente, Vincenzo; Vaquero-Garzon, Luis; Molina-Mendoza, Aday J; Agraït, Nicolás; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Guinea, Francisco; Roldán, Rafael; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-05-11

    Controlling the bandgap through local-strain engineering is an exciting avenue for tailoring optoelectronic materials. Two-dimensional crystals are particularly suited for this purpose because they can withstand unprecedented nonhomogeneous deformations before rupture; one can literally bend them and fold them up almost like a piece of paper. Here, we study multilayer black phosphorus sheets subjected to periodic stress to modulate their optoelectronic properties. We find a remarkable shift of the optical absorption band-edge of up to ∼0.7 eV between the regions under tensile and compressive stress, greatly exceeding the strain tunability reported for transition metal dichalcogenides. This observation is supported by theoretical models that also predict that this periodic stress modulation can yield to quantum confinement of carriers at low temperatures. The possibility of generating large strain-induced variations in the local density of charge carriers opens the door for a variety of applications including photovoltaics, quantum optics, and two-dimensional optoelectronic devices. PMID:27042865

  2. Strong Modulation of Optical Properties in Black Phosphorus through Strain-Engineered Rippling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quereda, Jorge; San-Jose, Pablo; Parente, Vincenzo; Vaquero-Garzon, Luis; Molina-Mendoza, Aday J.; Agraït, Nicolás; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Guinea, Francisco; Roldán, Rafael; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the bandgap through local-strain engineering is an exciting avenue for tailoring optoelectronic materials. Two-dimensional crystals are particularly suited for this purpose because they can withstand unprecedented non-homogeneous deformations before rupture: one can literally bend them and fold them up almost like a piece of paper. Here, we study multi-layer black phosphorus sheets subjected to periodic stress to modulate their optoelectronic properties. We find a remarkable shift of the optical absorption band-edge of up to ~0.7 eV between the regions under tensile and compressive stress, greatly exceeding the strain tunability reported for transition metal dichalcogenides. This observation is supported by theoretical models which also predict that this periodic stress modulation can yield to quantum confinement of carriers at low temperatures. The possibility of generating large strain-induced variations in the local density of charge carriers opens the door for a variety of applications including photovoltaics, quantum optics and two-dimensional optoelectronic devices.

  3. Proteomic analysis of Bacillus subtilis strains engineered for improved production of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Susanne; Bhavsar, Gaurav; Hulme, Joanne; Bloor, Alexandra E; Misirli, Goksel; Leckenby, Matthew W; Radford, David S; Smith, Wendy; Wipat, Anil; Williamson, E Diane; Harwood, Colin R; Cranenburgh, Rocky M

    2013-11-01

    The use of bacterial systems for recombinant protein production has advantages of simplicity, time and cost over competing systems. However, widely used bacterial expression systems (e.g. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens) are not able to secrete soluble proteins directly into the culture medium. This limits yields and increases downstream processing time and costs. In contrast, Bacillus spp. secrete native enzymes directly into the culture medium at grams-per-litre quantities, although the yields of some recombinant proteins are severely limited. We have engineered the Bacillus subtilis genome to generate novel strains with precise deletions in the genes encoding ten extracytoplasmic proteases that affect recombinant protein secretion, which lack chromosomal antibiotic resistance genes. The deletion sites and presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms were confirmed by sequencing. The strains are stable and were used in industrial-scale fermenters for the production of the Bacillus anthracis vaccine protein, protective antigen, the productivity of which is extremely low in the unmodified strain. We also show that the deletion of so-called quality control proteases appears to influence cell-wall synthesis, resulting in the induction of the cell-wall stress regulon that encodes another quality control protease. PMID:24115457

  4. [The Engineering of a Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast Strain Capable of Homologous Recombination of the Mitochondrial Genome].

    PubMed

    Isakova, E P; Epova, E Yu; Sekova, V Yu; Trubnikova, E V; Kudykina, Yu K; Zylkova, M V; Guseva, M A; Deryabina, Yu I

    2015-01-01

    None of the studied eukaryotic species has a natural system for homologous recombination of the mitochondrial genome. We propose an integrated genetic construct pQ-SRUS, which allows introduction of the recA gene from Bacillus subtilis into the nuclear genome of an extremophilic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica. The targeting of recombinant RecA to the yeast mitochondria is provided by leader sequences (5'-UTR and 3'-UTR) derived from the SOD2 gene mRNA, which exhibits affinity to the outer mitochondrial membrane and thus provides cotranslational transport of RecA to the inner space of the mitochondria. The Y. lipolytica strain bearing the pQ-SRUS construct has the unique ability to integrate DNA constructs into the mitochondrial genome. This fact was confirmed using a tester construct, pQ-NIHN, intended for the introduction of the EYFP gene into the translation initiation region of the Y. lipolytica ND1 mitochondrial gene. The Y. lipolytica strain bearing pQ-SRUS makes it possible to engineer recombinant producers based on Y. lipolytica bearing transgenes in the mitochondrial genome. They are promising for the construction of a genetic system for in vivo replication and modification of the human mitochondrial genome. These strains may be used as a tool for the treatment of human mitochondrial diseases (including genetically inherited ones). PMID:26204776

  5. Controlling the thermal conductance of graphene/h -BN lateral interface with strain and structure engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-02-01

    Although phonon-mediated thermal conduction in pristine graphene and hexagonal boron nitride is well understood, less is known about phonon transport in single-sheet graphene-hexagonal boron nitride (Gr /h -BN ) lateral heterostructures, where the thermal resistance of the interfaces plays an important role in the overall thermal conductivity. We apply the newly developed extended atomistic Green's function method to analyze with detail the effect of strain and structure engineering on the thermal conductance Gint of the Gr /h -BN interface. Our calculations show that longitudinal tensile strain leads to significant Gint enhancement (up to 25 % at 300 K) primarily through the improved alignment of the flexural acoustic phonon bands, despite the reduction in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) and transverse acoustic phonon velocities. In addition, we find that alternating C-N zigzag bonds along the zigzag interface lead to a greater Gint than C-B bonds through more effective transmission of high-frequency LA and transverse optical phonons, especially at high strain levels. We also demonstrate how the interfacial structure dramatically affects the orientation of the transmitted optical phonons, a phenomenon that is neither seen for acoustic phonons nor predictable from conventional acoustic wave scattering theory. Insights from our paper can provide the basis for manipulating the interfacial thermal conductance in other two-dimensional heterostructures.

  6. Novel molecular type of Clostridium difficile in neonatal pigs, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Squire, Michele M; Carter, Glen P; Mackin, Kate E; Chakravorty, Anjana; Norén, Torbjörn; Elliott, Briony; Lyras, Dena; Riley, Thomas V

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain. PMID:23697508

  7. Novel Molecular Type of Clostridium difficile in Neonatal Pigs, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Squire, Michele M.; Carter, Glen P.; Mackin, Kate E.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Norén, Torbjörn; Elliott, Briony; Lyras, Dena

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain. PMID:23697508

  8. Bacillus subtilis Strain Engineered for Treatment of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Miller, Melanie M.; Derman, Alan I.; Ellis, Brian L.; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Pogliano, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminths (hookworms, whipworms, and large roundworms) are agents of intestinal roundworm diseases of poverty that infect upwards of 2 billion people worldwide. A great challenge in treating these diseases is the development of anthelmintic therapeutics that are inexpensive, can be produced in great quantity, and are capable of delivery under varied and adverse environmental conditions. A potential solution to this challenge is the use of live bacteria that are acceptable for human consumption, e.g., Bacillus subtilis, and that can be engineered with therapeutic properties. In this study, we expressed the Bacillus thuringiensis anthelmintic protein Cry5B in a bacterial strain that has been used as a model for live bacterial therapy, Bacillus subtilis PY79. PY79 transformed with a Cry5B expression plasmid (PY79-Cry5B) is able to express Cry5B from the endogenous B. thuringiensis cry5B promoter. During sporulation of PY79-Cry5B, Cry5B is packaged as a crystal. Furthermore, Cry5B produced in PY79 is bioactive, with a 50% lethal concentration (LC50) of 4.3 μg/ml against the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. PY79-Cry5B was a significantly effective therapeutic in experimental Ancylostoma ceylanicum hookworm infections of hamsters. A single 10-mg/kg (0.071 μmol/kg of body weight) dose of Cry5B administered as a Cry5B-PY79 spore crystal lysate achieved a 93% reduction in hookworm burdens, which is superior on a molar level to reductions seen with clinically used anthelmintics. Given that a bacterial strain such as this one can be produced cheaply in massive quantities, our results demonstrate that the engineering and delivery of live bacterial strains have great potential to treat a significant contributor to poverty worldwide, namely, hookworm disease and other soil-transmitted helminthiasis. PMID:23835175

  9. Efficient free fatty acid production in engineered Escherichia coli strains using soybean oligosaccharides as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wu, Hui; Thakker, Chandresh; Beyersdorf, Jared; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-01-01

    To be competitive with current petrochemicals, microbial synthesis of free fatty acids can be made to rely on a variety of renewable resources rather than on food carbon sources, which increase its attraction for governments and companies. Industrial waste soybean meal is an inexpensive feedstock, which contains soluble sugars such as stachyose, raffinose, sucrose, glucose, galactose, and fructose. Free fatty acids were produced in this report by introducing an acyl-ACP carrier protein thioesterase and (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase into E. coli. Plasmid pRU600 bearing genes involved in raffinose and sucrose metabolism was also transformed into engineered E. coli strains, which allowed more efficient utilization of these two kinds of specific oligosaccharide present in the soybean meal extract. Strain ML103 (pRU600, pXZ18Z) produced ~1.60 and 2.66 g/L of free fatty acids on sucrose and raffinose, respectively. A higher level of 2.92 g/L fatty acids was obtained on sugar mixture. The fatty acid production using hydrolysate obtained from acid or enzyme based hydrolysis was evaluated. Engineered strains just produced ~0.21 g/L of free fatty acids with soybean meal acid hydrolysate. However, a fatty acid production of 2.61 g/L with a high yield of 0.19 g/g total sugar was observed on an enzymatic hydrolysate. The results suggest that complex mixtures of oligosaccharides derived from soybean meal can serve as viable feedstock to produce free fatty acids. Enzymatic hydrolysis acts as a much more efficient treatment than acid hydrolysis to facilitate the transformation of industrial waste from soybean processing to high value added chemicals. PMID:25919701

  10. Clostridium difficile in paediatric populations

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Upton D

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Clostridium difficile infection incidence has been observed among hospitalized children in the United States. The present statement, targeted at clinicians caring for infants and children in community and institutional settings, summarizes the relevant information relating to the role of C difficile in childhood diarrhea and provides recommendations for diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Significant differences between adult and paediatric risk factors and disease are discussed, along with emerging therapies. The relationship between age and disease severity in children with a newly emergent and more fluoroqinolone-resistant strain of C difficile (North American Pulse-field type-1 [NAP1]) remains unknown. The importance of antimicrobial stewardship as a preventive strategy is highlighted. This statement replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement on C difficile published in 2000. PMID:24627655

  11. Genetically engineered immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus strains producing antioxidant enzymes exhibit enhanced anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; LeBlanc, Jean Guy

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  12. Genetically Engineered Immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Producing Antioxidant Enzymes Exhibit Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  13. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping

    PubMed Central

    Janezic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature. PMID:26511734

  14. Mechanisms of enhanced cellulosic bioethanol fermentation by co-cultivation of Clostridium and Thermoanaerobacter spp.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Hemme, Christopher L; Jiang, Helong; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2011-10-01

    Engineering microbial consortia capable of efficient ethanolic fermentation of cellulose is a strategy for the development of consolidated bioprocessing for bioethanol production. Co-cultures of cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum with non-cellulolytic Thermoanaerobacter strains (X514 and 39E) significantly improved ethanol production by 194-440%. Strain X514 enhanced ethanolic fermentation much more effectively than strain 39E in co-cultivation, with ethanol production in X514 co-cultures at least 62% higher than that of 39E co-cultures. Comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that the higher ethanolic fermentation efficiency in strain X514 was associated with the presence of a complete vitamin B(12) biosynthesis pathway, which is incomplete in strain 39E. The significance of the vitamin B(12)de novo biosynthesis capacity was further supported by the observation of improved ethanol production in strain 39E by 203% following the addition of exogenous vitamin B(12). The vitamin B(12) biosynthesis pathway provides a valuable biomarker for selecting metabolically robust strains for bioethanol production. PMID:21868218

  15. Effect of Lysozyme on Ionic Forms of Spores of Clostridium perfringens Type A

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Yoshiaki

    1975-01-01

    H spores of Clostridium perfringens type A (two strains) were more sensitive to germination by lysozyme than native spores. Resistance to lysozyme of H spores was restored by calcium loading. PMID:236284

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598, a Potential Butanol or Hydrogen Producer.

    PubMed

    Kolek, Jan; Sedlár, Karel; Provazník, Ivo; Patáková, Petra

    2014-01-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598. This strain ferments saccharides by two-stage acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation, is oxygen tolerant, and has high hydrogen yields. PMID:24652980

  17. 'Clostridium massiliodielmoense', a new species isolated from the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Tidjani Alou, Maryam; Sokhna, Cheikh; Bittar, Fadi; Khelaifia, Saber; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report the main characteristics of 'Clostridium massiliodielmoense' strain mt26 (= CSUR P2255), representative of a new species isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of a healthy 28-month-old Senegalese boy. PMID:27366325

  18. Cofactor modification analysis: a computational framework to identify cofactor specificity engineering targets for strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Liu, Chengcheng; Kim, Seon-Won; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2013-12-01

    Cofactors, such as NAD(H) and NADP(H), play important roles in energy transfer within the cells by providing the necessary redox carriers for a myriad of metabolic reactions, both anabolic and catabolic. Thus, it is crucial to establish the overall cellular redox balance for achieving the desired cellular physiology. Of several methods to manipulate the intracellular cofactor regeneration rates, altering the cofactor specificity of a particular enzyme is a promising one. However, the identification of relevant enzyme targets for such cofactor specificity engineering (CSE) is often very difficult and labor intensive. Therefore, it is necessary to develop more systematic approaches to find the cofactor engineering targets for strain improvement. Presented herein is a novel mathematical framework, cofactor modification analysis (CMA), developed based on the well-established constraints-based flux analysis, for the systematic identification of suitable CSE targets while exploring the global metabolic effects. The CMA algorithm was applied to E. coli using its genome-scale metabolic model, iJO1366, thereby identifying the growth-coupled cofactor engineering targets for overproducing four of its native products: acetate, formate, ethanol, and lactate, and three non-native products: 1-butanol, 1,4-butanediol, and 1,3-propanediol. Notably, among several target candidates for cofactor engineering, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) is the most promising enzyme; its cofactor modification enhanced both the desired product and biomass yields significantly. Finally, given the identified target, we further discussed potential mutational strategies for modifying cofactor specificity of GAPD in E. coli as suggested by in silico protein docking experiments. PMID:24372035

  19. Strain improvement by metabolic engineering: lysine production as a case study for systems biology.

    PubMed

    Koffas, Mattheos; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2005-06-01

    A central goal of systems biology is the elucidation of cell function and physiology through the integrated use of broad based genomic and physiological data. Such systemic approaches have been employed extensively in the past, as they are a central element of metabolic flux analysis, the distribution of kinetic control in pathways, and the key differentiating characteristic of metabolic engineering. In one case study, these tools have been applied to the improvement of lysine-producing strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The systematic study of the physiology of this organism allowed the identification of specific metabolic targets and subsequently led to significant improvements in product yield and productivity. This case study can serve as a guide for the development of systems biology tools for the utilization of large volumes of cell- and genome-wide transcriptional and physiological data. PMID:15961038

  20. Three new 16-membered macrolide compounds from a genetically engineered strain S. avermitilis MHJ1011.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jun-Jie; Wan, Xu; Zhang, Shao-Yong; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Chen, An-Liang; Wang, Ji-Dong

    2016-07-15

    Three new 16-membered macrolide compounds, 13α-O-α-l-oleandrosyl milbemycin β3 (1), 13α-O-α-l-oleandrosyl-25-ethyl milbemycin β3 (2), 13α-O-α-l-oleandrosyl-25-isopropyl milbemycin β3 (3), were isolated from the genetically engineered strains Streptomyces avermitilis MHJ1011. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques as well as ESI-MS and comparison with data from the literature. Both compounds 1-3 displayed impressive acaricidal activity against larval mites with the IC50 values of 0.0327, 0.0276 and 0.0235mg/L, respectively, which are higher than those of 13α-hydroxy milbemycin β3 and 13α-hydroxy-25-ethyl milbemycin β3. PMID:27246617

  1. Strain-induced band-gap engineering of graphene monoxide and its effect on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, H. H.; Rhim, S. H.; Hirschmugl, C. J.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, M.; Weinert, M.; Chen, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations we demonstrate the feasibility of band-gap engineering in two-dimensional crystalline graphene monoxide (GMO), a recently reported graphene-based material with a 1:1 carbon/oxygen ratio. The band gap of GMO, which can be switched between direct and indirect, is tunable over a large range (0-1.35 eV) for accessible strains. Electron and hole transport occurs predominantly along the zigzag and armchair directions (armchair for both) when GMO is a direct- (indirect-) gap semiconductor. A band gap of ˜0.5 eV is also induced in graphene at the K' points for GMO/graphene hybrid systems.

  2. Band gap engineering in polymers through chemical doping and applied mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A; Breneman, Curt M

    2016-08-17

    We report simulations based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory exploring the band gaps of common crystalline polymers including polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene. Our reported band gaps of 8.6 eV for single-chain polyethylene and 9.1 eV for bulk crystalline polyethylene are in excellent agreement with experiment. The effects of chemical doping along the polymer backbone and side-groups are explored, and the use mechanical strain as a means to modify the band gaps of these polymers over a range of several eV while leaving the dielectric constant unchanged is discussed. This work highlights some of the opportunities available to engineer the electronic properties of polymers with wide-reaching implications for polymeric dielectric materials used for capacitive energy storage. PMID:27324304

  3. Band gap engineering in polymers through chemical doping and applied mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Breneman, Curt M.

    2016-08-01

    We report simulations based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory exploring the band gaps of common crystalline polymers including polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene. Our reported band gaps of 8.6 eV for single-chain polyethylene and 9.1 eV for bulk crystalline polyethylene are in excellent agreement with experiment. The effects of chemical doping along the polymer backbone and side-groups are explored, and the use mechanical strain as a means to modify the band gaps of these polymers over a range of several eV while leaving the dielectric constant unchanged is discussed. This work highlights some of the opportunities available to engineer the electronic properties of polymers with wide-reaching implications for polymeric dielectric materials used for capacitive energy storage.

  4. Immune Competency of a Hairless Mouse Strain for Improved Preclinical Studies in Genetically-Engineered Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Beverly S.; Grayson, Marcia H.; Wortham, Joy M.; Kubicek, Courtney B.; McCleish, Amanda T.; Prajapati, Suresh I.; Nelon, Laura D.; Brady, Michelle M.; Jung, Inkyung; Hosoyama, Tohru; Sarro, Leslea M.; Hanes, Martha A.; Rubin, Brian P.; Michalek, Joel E.; Clifford, Charles B.; Infante, Anthony J.; Keller, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Genetically-engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are of increasing value to preclinical therapeutics. Optical imaging is a cost-effective method of assessing deep-seated tumor growth in GEMMs whose tumors can be encoded to express luminescent or fluorescent reporters, although reporter signal attenuation would be improved if animals were fur-free. In this study, we sought to determine whether hereditable furlessness resulting from a hypomorphic mutation in the Hairless gene would or would not also affect immune competence. By assessment of humoral and cellular immunity of the SKH1 mouse line bearing the hypomorphic Hairless mutation, we determined that blood counts, immunoglobulin levels, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were comparable between SKH1 and the C57Bl/6 strain. On examination of T cell subsets, statistically significant differences in naïve T cells (1.7 vs. 3.4 × 105 cells/spleen in SKH1 vs. C57Bl/6, p=0.008) and memory T cells (1.4 vs. 0.13 × 106 cells/spleen in SKH1 vs. C57Bl/6, p=0.008) were detected. However, the numerical differences did not result in altered T cell functional response to antigen re-challenge (keyhole limpet hemocyanin) in a lymph node cell in vitro proliferative assay. Furthermore, interbreeding the SKH1 mouse line to a rhabdomyosarcoma GEMM demonstrated preserved anti-tumor responses of CD56+ Natural Killer cells and CD163+ macrophages, without any differences in tumor pathology. The fur-free GEMM was also especially amenable to multiplex optical imaging. Thus, SKH1 represents an immune competent, fur-free mouse strain which may be of use for interbreeding to other genetically-engineered mouse models of cancer for improved preclinical studies. PMID:20663932

  5. Enhanced production of arginine and urea by genetically engineered Escherichia coli K-12 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, M; Rajagopal, B S; McCann, M T; Malamy, M H

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains capable of enhanced synthesis of arginine and urea were produced by derepression of the arginine regulon and simultaneous overexpression of the E. coli carAB and argI genes and the Bacillus subtilis rocF gene. Plasmids expressing carAB driven by their natural promoters were unstable. Therefore, E. coli carAB and argI genes with and without the B. subtilis rocF gene were constructed as a single operon under the regulation of the inducible promoter ptrc. Arginine operator sequences (Arg boxes) from argI were also cloned into the same plasmids for titration of the arginine repressor. Upon overexpression of these genes in E. coli strains, very high carbamyl phosphate synthetase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and arginase catalytic activities were achieved. The biosynthetic capacity of these engineered bacteria when overexpressing the arginine biosynthetic enzymes was 6- to 16-fold higher than that of controls but only if exogenous ornithine was present (ornithine was rate limiting). Overexpression of arginase in bacteria with a derepressed arginine biosynthetic pathway resulted in a 13- to 20-fold increase in urea production over that of controls with the parent vector alone; in this situation, the availability of carbamyl phosphate was rate limiting. PMID:8979336

  6. Doping, strain engineering, and interlayer interaction in bilayer hexagonal boron nitride sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Susumu; Fujimoto, Yoshitaka

    We study electronic properties of bilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets with different stacking sequences in the framework of the density-functional theory. The bulk h-BN material usually takes the so-called AA (or AA') stacking, corresponding to the ''non-polar'' bilayer h-BN sheet. On the other hand, the rhombohedral BN takes the ABC stacking, and the corresponding bilayer sheet has ''upper'' and ''lower'' layers which are not equivalent with each other. Interestingly, the energetics of stacking sequences for bilayer h-BN sheets is found to be different from that for bulk h-BN materials. We report that strain engineering for bilayer h-BN sheets can possess much wider possibilities than that for monolayer h-BN due to the modification of the interlayer interaction. We also study the substitutional C doping into bilayer h-BN sheets, and report the energetics and the strain effect for these C-doped sheets. Finally we discuss the similarities and differences between bilayer h-BN sheets and double-wall h-BN nanotubes. This work was partly supported by the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center, Grant in Aid for Scientific Research, MEXT Japan, ``Science of Atomic Layers'', and JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 26390062.

  7. Biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxypropionate) from glycerol using engineered Klebsiella pneumoniae strain without vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinjun; Xian, Mo; Liu, Wei; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Haibo; Zhao, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxypropionate) (P3HP) is a biodegradable and biocompatible thermoplastic. Previous studies demonstrated that engineered Escherichia coli strains can produce P3HP with supplementation of expensive vitamin B12. The present study examined the production of P3HP from glycerol in the recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain, which naturally synthesizes vitamin B12. The genes glycerol dehydratase and its reactivation factor (dhaB123, gdrA, and gdrB from K. pneumoniae), aldehyde dehydrogenase (aldH from E. coli) were cloned and expressed in K. pneumoniae to produce 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), with 2 genes (dhaT and yqhD) for biosynthesis of 1,3-propanediol were deleted. To obtain P3HP production, propionyl-CoA synthetase (prpE from E. coli) and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (phaC from Ralstonia eutropha) were introduced. Under the appropriate aeration condition, the cell yield and P3HP content were 0.24 g/L and 12.7% (wt/wt [cell dry weight]) respectively along with 2.03 g/L 3HP after 48 h cultivation. Although the yield is relatively low, this study shows the feasibility of producing P3HP in K. pneumoniae from glycerol without vitamin B12 for the first time. The results also suggest that the aeration conditions should be optimized carefully for the efficient production of P3HP. PMID:25621933

  8. Biomass, strain engineering, and fermentation processes for butanol production by solventogenic clostridia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Jungyeon; Lee, Sang Jun; Um, Youngsoon; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-10-01

    Butanol is considered an attractive biofuel and a commercially important bulk chemical. However, economical production of butanol by solventogenic clostridia, e.g., via fermentative production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE), is hampered by low fermentation performance, mainly as a result of toxicity of butanol to microorganisms and high substrate costs. Recently, sugars from marine macroalgae and syngas were recognized as potent carbon sources in biomass feedstocks that are abundant and do not compete for arable land with edible crops. With the aid of systems metabolic engineering, many researchers have developed clostridial strains with improved performance on fermentation of these substrates. Alternatively, fermentation strategies integrated with butanol recovery processes such as adsorption, gas stripping, liquid-liquid extraction, and pervaporation have been designed to increase the overall titer of butanol and volumetric productivity. Nevertheless, for economically feasible production of butanol, innovative strategies based on recent research should be implemented. This review describes and discusses recent advances in the development of biomass feedstocks, microbial strains, and fermentation processes for butanol production. PMID:27531513

  9. Biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxypropionate) from glycerol using engineered Klebsiella pneumoniae strain without vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinjun; Xian, Mo; Liu, Wei; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Haibo; Zhao, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxypropionate) (P3HP) is a biodegradable and biocompatible thermoplastic. Previous studies demonstrated that engineered Escherichia coli strains can produce P3HP with supplementation of expensive vitamin B12. The present study examined the production of P3HP from glycerol in the recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain, which naturally synthesizes vitamin B12. The genes glycerol dehydratase and its reactivation factor (dhaB123, gdrA, and gdrB from K. pneumoniae), aldehyde dehydrogenase (aldH from E. coli) were cloned and expressed in K. pneumoniae to produce 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), with 2 genes (dhaT and yqhD) for biosynthesis of 1,3-propanediol were deleted. To obtain P3HP production, propionyl-CoA synthetase (prpE from E. coli) and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (phaC from Ralstonia eutropha) were introduced. Under the appropriate aeration condition, the cell yield and P3HP content were 0.24 g/L and 12.7% (wt/wt [cell dry weight]) respectively along with 2.03 g/L 3HP after 48 h cultivation. Although the yield is relatively low, this study shows the feasibility of producing P3HP in K. pneumoniae from glycerol without vitamin B12 for the first time. The results also suggest that the aeration conditions should be optimized carefully for the efficient production of P3HP. PMID:25621933

  10. Strain Engineered CaBi2Nb2O9 Thin Films with Enhanced Electrical Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunxiang; Ouyang, Jun; Zhang, Jincan; Li, Yao; Cheng, Hongbo; Xu, Huiwen; Liu, Menglin; Cao, Zhao-Peng; Wang, Chun-Ming

    2016-07-01

    In this work, strain engineered polycrystalline thin films (∼250 nm) of bismuth layer-structured ferroelectric (BLSF) CaBi2Nb2O9 (CBNO) were prepared by using a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique. XRD analysis revealed that the films were (200)/(020) and (00l) textured with a large in-plane tensile stress. Cross-sectional TEM analyses confirmed the bismuth layered-structure, as well as crystalline orientations and a strain-controlled growth mode of the grains. Result of a quantitative XPS analysis revealed that the composition of the film is close to the chemical stoichiometry. Excellent electrical properties were achieved in the CBNO films, including a high dielectric constant (∼280 @5 kHz), a small dielectric loss (tgδ ≤ 1.6% up to an applied electric field of ∼1200 kV/cm) and a large polarization (Pr ≈ 14 μC/cm(2) @ 1 kHz). PMID:27294811

  11. Ordered quantum dot molecules and single quantum dots formed by self-organized anisotropic strain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lippen, T. van; Noetzel, R.; Hamhuis, G.J.; Wolter, J.H.

    2005-02-15

    An ordered lattice of lateral InAs quantum dot (QD) molecules is created by self-organized anisotropic strain engineering of an (In,Ga)As/GaAs superlattice (SL) template on GaAs(311)B by molecular-beam epitaxy, constituting a Turing pattern in solid state. The SL template and InAs QD growth conditions, such as the number of SL periods, growth temperatures, amount and composition of deposited (In,Ga)As, and insertion of Al-containing layers, are studied in detail for an optimized QD ordering within and among the InAs QD molecules on the SL template nodes, which is evaluated by atomic force microscopy. The average number of InAs QDs within the molecules is controlled by the thickness of the upper GaAs separation layer on the SL template and the (In,Ga)As growth temperature in the SL. The strain-correlated growth in SL template formation and QD ordering is directly confirmed by high-resolution x-ray diffraction. Ordered arrays of single InAs QDs on the SL template nodes are realized for elevated SL template and InAs QD growth temperatures together with the insertion of a second InAs QD layer. The InAs QD molecules exhibit strong photoluminescence (PL) emission up to room temperature. Temperature-dependent PL measurements exhibit an unusual behavior of the full width at half maximum, indicating carrier redistribution solely within the QD molecules.

  12. Predictive Synthesis of Freeform Carbon Nanotube Microarchitectures by Strain-Engineered Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Sei Jin; Zhao, Hangbo; Kim, Sanha; De Volder, Michael; John Hart, A

    2016-08-01

    High-throughput fabrication of microstructured surfaces with multi-directional, re-entrant, or otherwise curved features is becoming increasingly important for applications such as phase change heat transfer, adhesive gripping, and control of electromagnetic waves. Toward this goal, curved microstructures of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be fabricated by engineered variation of the CNT growth rate within each microstructure, for example by patterning of the CNT growth catalyst partially upon a layer which retards the CNT growth rate. This study develops a finite-element simulation framework for predictive synthesis of complex CNT microarchitectures by this strain-engineered growth process. The simulation is informed by parametric measurements of the CNT growth kinetics, and the anisotropic mechanical properties of the CNTs, and predicts the shape of CNT microstructures with impressive fidelity. Moreover, the simulation calculates the internal stress distribution that results from extreme deformation of the CNT structures during growth, and shows that delamination of the interface between the differentially growing segments occurs at a critical shear stress. Guided by these insights, experiments are performed to study the time- and geometry-depended stress development, and it is demonstrated that corrugating the interface between the segments of each microstructure mitigates the interface failure. This study presents a methodology for 3D microstructure design based on "pixels" that prescribe directionality to the resulting microstructure, and show that this framework enables the predictive synthesis of more complex architectures including twisted and truss-like forms. PMID:27378165

  13. Heterologous production of α-farnesene in metabolically engineered strains of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Nambou, Komi; Wei, Liujing; Hua, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we studied the heterologous production of α-farnesene, a valuable sesquiterpene with various biotechnological applications, by metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica. Different overexpression vectors harboring combinations of tHMG1, IDI, ERG20 and codon-optimized α-farnesene synthase (OptFS) genes were constructed and integrated into the genome of Y. lipolytica Po1h. The engineered strain produced 57.08±1.43mg/L of α-farnesene corresponding to 20.8-fold increase over the initial production of 2.75±0.29mg/L in the YPD medium in shake flasks. Bioreactor scale-up in PM medium led to α-farnesene concentration of 259.98±2.15mg/L with α-farnesene to biomass ratio of 33.98±1.51mg/g, which was a 94.5-fold increase over the initial production. This first report on α-farnesene synthesis in Y. lipolytica lays a foundation for future research on production of sesquitepenes in Y. lipolytica and other closest yeast species and will potentially contribute in its industrial production. PMID:27347651

  14. Clostridium difficile recurrences in Stockholm.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Staffan; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Jorup-Rönström, Christina; Ellström, Kristina; Nord, Carl Erik; Weintraub, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    Sixty-eight hospital-admitted patients with a first episode of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) were included and followed up during 1 year. Faeces samples were collected at 1, 2, 6 and 12 months after inclusion and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped and the MICs of the isolates were determined against eight antimicrobial agents. In 68 patients initially included, antibiotics, clinical signs and co-morbidities were analyzed and 56 were evaluable for recurrences. The mean number of different antibiotics given during 3 months prior to inclusion was 2.6 (range 0-6). Six patients had not received any antibiotics and three of them had diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease. Thirty-two patients (57%) had either a microbiological or clinical recurrence, 16 of whom had clinical recurrences that were confirmed microbiologically (13, 23%) or unconfirmed by culture (3, 5%). Twenty-nine patients were positive in at least one of the follow-up tests, 16 had the same ribotype in follow-up tests, i.e. relapse, and 13 a different ribotype, i.e., reinfection. Most common ribotypes were 078/126, 020, 023, 026, 014/077, 001 and 005. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. Strains ribotype 078/126 and 023 were positive for binary toxin and were the strains most prone to cause recurrence. All strains were sensitive to vancomycin and metronidazole. Patients with recurrences were significantly older (p = 0.02) and all patients had a high burden of comorbidities, which could explain the high fatality rate, 26 (38%) patients died during the 1-year follow-up. PMID:26802875

  15. Cellulolytic Activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song F.; Forsberg, Cecil W.; Gibbins, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B527 and ATCC 824 exhibited extracellular and cell-bound endoglucanase and cellobiase activities during growth in a chemically defined medium with cellobiose as the sole source of carbohydrate. For both strains, the endoglucanase was found to be mainly extracellular (70 to 90%) during growth in continuous or batch cultures with the pH maintained at 5.2, whereas the cellobiase was mainly cell associated (60 to 90%). During continuous cultivation of strain B527 with cellobiose as the limiting nutrient, maximum production of the endoglucanase and cellobiase occurred at pH values of 5.2 and 4.8, respectively. In the carbon-limited continuous cultures, strain 824 produced similar levels of endoglucanase, cellobiosidase, and cellobiase activities regardless of the carbon source used. However, in ammonium- or phosphate-limited cultures, with an excess of glucose, only 1/10 of the endoglucanase was produced, and neither cellobiosidase nor cellobiase activities were detectable. A crude extracellular enzyme preparation from strain B527 hydrolyzed carboxymethylcellulose and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose readily and microcrystalline cellulose (A vicel) to a lesser extent. Glucose accounted for more than 90% of the reducing sugar produced by the hydrolysis of acid-swollen cellulose and Avicel. Strain B527 did not grow in medium with acid-swollen cellulose as the sole source of carbohydrate, although it grew readily on the products obtained by hydrolyzing the cellulose in vitro with a preparation of extracellular cellulase derived from the same organism. PMID:16346847

  16. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstrated in vitro. The cp25l gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product demonstrated lytic activity against all 25 C. perfringens strains tested. The probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 was engineered to deliver the endolysin to the gastrointestinal tract. The integration of the nisRK two-component regulatory system from the Lactococcus lactis nisin A biosynthesis operon into the chromosome of L. johnsonii allowed constitutive expression of the endolysin under the control of the nisA promoter (P nisA ), while the use of a signal peptide (SLPmod) led to successful secretion of the active endolysin to the surrounding media. The high specificity and activity of the endolysin suggest that it may be developed as an effective tool to enhance the control of C. perfringens by L. johnsonii in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23942878

  17. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  18. Clostridium tetani bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Hallit, Rabih Riad; Afridi, Muhammad; Sison, Raymund; Salem, Elie; Boghossian, Jack; Slim, Jihad

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is a neuromuscular disease in which Clostridium tetani exotoxin (tetanospasmin) produces muscle spasms, incapacitating its host. To our knowledge, C. tetani bacteraemia has never been reported in the literature. The ideal management of this entity remains unresolved given that there is no literature to guide the therapy. PMID:22977074

  19. Clostridium kogasensis sp. nov., a novel member of the genus Clostridium, isolated from soil under a corroded gas pipeline.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yeseul; Kang, Seok-Seong; Paek, Jayoung; Jin, Tae Eun; Song, Hong Seok; Kim, Hongik; Park, Hee-Moon; Chang, Young-Hyo

    2016-06-01

    Two bacterial strains, YHK0403(T) and YHK0508, isolated from soil under a corroded gas pipe line, were revealed as Gram-negative, obligately anaerobic, spore-forming and mesophilic bacteria. The cells were rod-shaped and motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolates were members of the genus Clostridium and were the most closely related to Clostridium scatologenes KCTC 5588(T) (95.8% sequence similarity), followed by Clostridium magnum KCTC 15177(T) (95.8%), Clostridium drakei KCTC 5440(T) (95.7%) and Clostridium tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387(T) (94.9%). The G + C contents of the isolates were 29.6 mol%. Peptidoglycan in the cell wall was of the A1γ type with meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major polar lipid was diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), and other minor lipids were revealed as phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), two unknown glycolipids (GL1 and GL2), an unknown aminoglycolipid (NGL), two unknown aminophospholipids (PN1 and PN2) and four unknown phospholipids (PL1 to PL4). Predominant fatty acids were C16:0 and C16:1cis9 DMA. The major end products from glucose fermentation were identified as butyrate (12.2 mmol) and acetate (9.8 mmol). Collectively, the results from a wide range of phenotypic tests, chemotaxonomic tests, and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two isolates represent novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium kogasensis sp. nov. (type strain, YHK0403(T) = KCTC 15258(T) = JCM 18719(T)) is proposed. PMID:26899448

  20. Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027, Toxinotype III, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Renate J.; Debast, Sylvia; Visser, Caroline E.; Veenendaal, Dick; Troelstra, Annet; van der Kooi, Tjallie; van den Hof, Susan; Notermans, Daan W.

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks due to Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027, toxinotype III, were detected in 7 hospitals in the Netherlands from April 2005 to February 2006. One hospital experienced at the same time a second outbreak due to a toxin A–negative C. difficile PCR ribotype 017 toxinotype VIII strain. The outbreaks are difficult to control. PMID:16704846

  1. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  2. Genome Sequence of the Autotrophic Acetogen Clostridium magnum DSM 2767

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, Ronny; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome sequence (6.6 Mbp) of the type strain Clostridium magnum, an acetogen with two operons coding for two separate Rnf complexes. C. magnum grows on a broad range of organic substrates and converts CO2 and H2 to acetate using the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. PMID:27284147

  3. Retaining large and adjustable elastic strains of kilogram-scale Nb nanowires [Better Superconductor by Elastic Strain Engineering: Kilogram-scale Free-Standing Niobium Metal Composite with Large Retained Elastic Strains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Yan, Jiaqiang; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Brown, Dennis E.; Li, Ju

    2016-02-10

    Crystals held at ultrahigh elastic strains and stresses may exhibit exceptional physical and chemical properties. Individual metallic nanowires can sustain ultra-large elastic strains of 4-7%. However, retaining elastic strains of such magnitude in kilogram-scale nanowires is challenging. Here, we find that under active load, ~5.6% elastic strain can be achieved in Nb nanowires in a composite material. Moreover, large tensile (2.8%) and compressive (-2.4%) elastic strains can be retained in kilogram-scale Nb nanowires when the composite is unloaded to a free-standing condition. It is then demonstrated that the retained tensile elastic strains of Nb nanowires significantly increase their superconducting transitionmore » temperature and critical magnetic fields, corroborating ab initio calculations based on BCS theory. This free-standing nanocomposite design paradigm opens new avenues for retaining ultra-large elastic strains in great quantities of nanowires and elastic-strain-engineering at industrial scale.« less

  4. Mitotic stability and nuclear inheritance of integrated viral cDNA in engineered hypovirulent strains of the chestnut blight fungus.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B; Choi, G H; Nuss, D L

    1993-01-01

    Transmissible hypovirulence is a novel form of biological control in which virulence of a fungal pathogen is attenuated by an endogenous RNA virus. The feasibility of engineering hypovirulence was recently demonstrated by transformation of the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, with a full-length cDNA copy of a hypovirulence-associated viral RNA. Engineered hypovirulent transformants were found to contain both a chromsomally integrated cDNA copy of the viral genome and a resurrected cytoplasmically replicating double-stranded RNA form. We now report stable maintenance of integrated viral cDNA through repeated rounds of asexual sporulation and passages on host plant tissue. We also demonstrate stable nuclear inheritance of the integrated viral cDNA and resurrection of the cytoplasmic viral double-stranded RNA form in progeny resulting from the mating of an engineered hypovirulent C. parasitica strain and a vegetatively incompatible virulent strain. Mitotic stability of the viral cDNA ensures highly efficient transmission of the hypovirulence phenotype through conidia. Meiotic transmission, a mode not observed for natural hypovirulent strains, introduces virus into ascospore progeny representing a spectrum of vegetative compatibility groups, thereby circumventing barriers to anastomosis-mediated transmission imposed by the fungal vegetative incompatibility system. These transmission properties significantly enhance the potential of engineered hypovirulent C. parasitica strains as effective biocontrol agents. Images PMID:8344241

  5. Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strain Engineered to Convert Glucose, Mannose, Arabinose, and Xylose (GMAX) to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technology for engineering an industrial yeast strain for production of ethanol from glucose, mannose, arabinose, and xylose (GMAX-yeast) using both corn starch and cellulosic feedstocks with simultaneous production of valuable coproducts, including biodiesel, will be discussed. A stable industrial...

  6. Deciphering Clostridium tyrobutyricum Metabolism Based on the Whole-Genome Sequence and Proteome Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Han, Mee-Jung; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that efficiently produces butyric acid and is considered a promising host for anaerobic production of bulk chemicals. Due to limited knowledge on the genetic and metabolic characteristics of this strain, however, little progress has been made in metabolic engineering of this strain. Here we report the complete genome sequence of C. tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387 (ATCC 25755), which consists of a 3.07-Mbp chromosome and a 63-kbp plasmid. The results of genomic analyses suggested that C. tyrobutyricum produces butyrate from butyryl-coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) through acetate reassimilation by CoA transferase, differently from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which uses the phosphotransbutyrylase-butyrate kinase pathway; this was validated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of related genes, protein expression levels, in vitro CoA transferase assay, and fed-batch fermentation. In addition, the changes in protein expression levels during the course of batch fermentations on glucose were examined by shotgun proteomics. Unlike C. acetobutylicum, the expression levels of proteins involved in glycolytic and fermentative pathways in C. tyrobutyricum did not decrease even at the stationary phase. Proteins related to energy conservation mechanisms, including Rnf complex, NfnAB, and pyruvate-phosphate dikinase that are absent in C. acetobutylicum, were identified. Such features explain why this organism can produce butyric acid to a much higher titer and better tolerate toxic metabolites. This study presenting the complete genome sequence, global protein expression profiles, and genome-based metabolic characteristics during the batch fermentation of C. tyrobutyricum will be valuable in designing strategies for metabolic engineering of this strain. PMID:27302759

  7. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  8. Electrospun polycaprolactone scaffolds under strain and their application in cartilage tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jin

    Electrospinning is a promising fabrication method for three dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds due to its ability to produce a nano-/micro-sized non-woven fibrous structure which resembles the natural extracellular matrix. We investigated the mechanical behavior of two different electrospun microstructures. Polycaprolactone (PCL) fibers with or without "point-bonding" exhibited different deformation behaviors having significant biomedical consequences. While fibers with point-bonded structure failed due to the generation of voids by the fracture of fiber interconnections under strain, fibers without point-bonds produced a 'bamboo' structure with fiber joining visible at higher levels of strain. In addition, gelatin and PCL were electrospun and the residual solvent contents were systematically investigated. A simple and effective means of reducing residual solvent content was developed. The interaction between these electrospun matrices and chondrocytic cells were compared to other topographies having the same chemistry. Electrospun polycaprolactone fibers supported better proliferation and extracellular matrix production than the corresponding semi-porous and dense surfaces and even, at some time points, glass surfaces. The intrinsic capability of electrospinning to produce high porosity appears to offset the relative hydrophobicity of polycaprolactone resulting in a more uniform cell seeding. Electrospun fibers induced a higher level of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) production by providing a 'dynamic scaffold' in which chondrocytes are able to maintain a morphology associated with the appropriate phenotype. Finally, based on this study, a method producing macro-pores within an electrospun scaffold was developed. With this method, not only can cellular infiltration into a thick electrospun scaffold be facilitated, but scaffolds having designed, anisotropic structures can be produced that better approximate the final tissue.

  9. Metabolic process engineering of Clostridium tyrobutyricum Δack-adhE2 for enhanced n-butanol production from glucose: effects of methyl viologen on NADH availability, flux distribution, and fermentation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Yu, Mingrui; Tang, I-Ching; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-04-01

    Butanol biosynthesis through aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2) is usually limited by NADH availability, resulting in low butanol titer, yield, and productivity. To alleviate this limitation and improve n-butanol production by Clostridium tyrobutyricum Δack-adhE2 overexpressing adhE2, the NADH availability was increased by using methyl viologen (MV) as an artificial electron carrier to divert electrons from ferredoxin normally used for H2 production. In the batch fermentation with the addition of 500 μM MV, H2 , acetate, and butyrate production was reduced by more than 80-90%, while butanol production increased more than 40% to 14.5 g/L. Metabolic flux analysis revealed that butanol production increased in the fermentation with MV because of increased NADH availability as a result of reduced H2 production. Furthermore, continuous butanol production of ∼55 g/L with a high yield of ∼0.33 g/g glucose and extremely low ethanol, acetate, and butyrate production was obtained in fed-batch fermentation with gas stripping for in situ butanol recovery. This study demonstrated a stable and reliable process for high-yield and high-titer n-butanol production by metabolically engineered C. tyrobutyricum by applying MV as an electron carrier to increase butanol biosynthesis. PMID:25363722

  10. Clostridium difficile Cell Attachment Is Modified by Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Waligora, Anne-Judith; Barc, Marie-Claude; Bourlioux, Pierre; Collignon, Anne; Karjalainen, Tuomo

    1999-01-01

    Adherence of Clostridium difficile to Vero cells under anaerobic conditions was increased by a high sodium concentration, calcium-rich medium, an acidic pH, and iron starvation. The level of adhesion of nontoxigenic strains was comparable to that of toxigenic strains. Depending on the bacterial culture conditions, Vero cells could bind to one, two, or three bacterial surface proteins with molecular masses of 70, 50, and 40 kDa. PMID:10473442

  11. Metabolic engineering of bacteria for environmental applications: construction of Pseudomonas strains for biodegradation of 2-chlorotoluene.

    PubMed

    Haro, M A; de Lorenzo, V

    2001-02-13

    In this article, we illustrate the challenges and bottlenecks in the metabolic engineering of bacteria destined for environmental bioremediation, by reporting current efforts to construct Pseudomonas strains genetically designed for degradation of the recalcitrant compound 2-chlorotoluene. The assembled pathway includes one catabolic segment encoding the toluene dioxygenase of the TOD system of Pseudomonas putida F1 (todC1C2BA), which affords the bioconversion of 2-chlorotoluene into 2-chlorobenzaldehyde by virtue of its residual methyl-monooxygenase activity on o-substituted substrates. A second catabolic segment encoded the entire upper TOL pathway from pWW0 plasmid of P. putida mt-2. The enzymes, benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase (encoded by xylB) and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (xylC) of this segment accept o-chloro-substituted substrates all the way down to 2-chlorobenzoate. These TOL and TOD segments were assembled in separate mini-Tn5 transposon vectors, such that expression of the encoded genes was dependent on the toluene-responsive Pu promoter of the TOL plasmid and the cognate XylR regulator. Such gene cassettes (mini-Tn5 [UPP2] and mini-Tn5 [TOD2]) were inserted in the chromosome of the 2-chlorobenzoate degraders Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA142 and P. aeruginosa JB2. GC-MS analysis of the metabolic intermediates present in the culture media of the resulting strains verified that these possessed, not only the genetic information, but also the functional ability to mineralise 2-chlorotoluene. However, although these strains did convert the substrate into 2-chlorobenzoate, they failed to grow on 2-chlorotoluene as the only carbon source. These results pinpoint the rate of the metabolic fluxes, the non-productive spill of side-metabolites and the physiological control of degradative pathways as the real bottlenecks for degradation of certain pollutants, rather than the theoretical enzymatic and genetic fitness of the recombinant bacteria to the process. Choices to

  12. Electronic structure and magnetism in g-C{sub 4}N{sub 3} controlled by strain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L. Z.; Liu, X. X.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-03-30

    Regulation of magnetism and half-metallicity has attracted much attention because of its potential in spintronics. The magnetic properties and electronic structure of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 4}N{sub 3}) with external strain are determined theoretically based on the density function theory and many-body perturbation theory (G{sub 0}W{sub 0}). Asymmetric deformation induced by uniaxial strain not only regulates the magnetic characteristics but also leads to a transformation from half-metallicity to metallicity. However, this transition cannot occur in the structure with symmetric deformation induced by biaxial strain. Our results suggest the use of strain engineering in metal-free spintronics applications.

  13. Construction and evaluation of an exopolysaccharide-producing engineered bacterial strain by protoplast fusion for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shanshan; Luo, Yijing; Cao, Siyuan; Li, Wenhong; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Jiang, Lingxi; Dong, Hanping; Yu, Li; Wu, Wei-Min

    2013-09-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain JD, which produces water-insoluble biopolymers at optimal temperature of 30°C, and a thermophilic Geobacillus strain were used to construct an engineered strain for exopolysaccharide production at high temperatures by protoplast fusion. The obtained fusant strain ZR3 produced exopolysaccharides at up to 45°C with optimal growth temperature at 35°C. The fusant produced exopolysaccharides of approximately 7.5 g/L or more at pH between 7.0 and 9.0. The feasibility of the enhancement of crude oil recovery with the fusant was tested in a sand-packed column at 40°C. The results demonstrated that bioaugmentation of the fusant was promising approach for MEOR. Mass growth of the fusant was confirmed in fermentor tests. PMID:23856587

  14. Transcription factors and genetic circuits orchestrating the complex, multilayered response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to butanol and butyrate stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Organisms of the genus Clostridium are Gram-positive endospore formers of great importance to the carbon cycle, human normo- and pathophysiology, but also in biofuel and biorefinery applications. Exposure of Clostridium organisms to chemical and in particular toxic metabolite stress is ubiquitous in both natural (such as in the human microbiome) and engineered environments, engaging both the general stress response as well as specialized programs. Yet, despite its fundamental and applied significance, it remains largely unexplored at the systems level. Results We generated a total of 96 individual sets of microarray data examining the transcriptional changes in C. acetobutylicum, a model Clostridium organism, in response to three levels of chemical stress from the native metabolites, butanol and butyrate. We identified 164 significantly differentially expressed transcriptional regulators and detailed the cellular programs associated with general and stressor-specific responses, many previously unexplored. Pattern-based, comparative genomic analyses enabled us, for the first time, to construct a detailed picture of the genetic circuitry underlying the stress response. Notably, a list of the regulons and DNA binding motifs of the stress-related transcription factors were identified: two heat-shock response regulators, HrcA and CtsR; the SOS response regulator LexA; the redox sensor Rex; and the peroxide sensor PerR. Moreover, several transcriptional regulators controlling stress-responsive amino acid and purine metabolism and their regulons were also identified, including ArgR (arginine biosynthesis and catabolism regulator), HisR (histidine biosynthesis regulator), CymR (cysteine metabolism repressor) and PurR (purine metabolism repressor). Conclusions Using an exceptionally large set of temporal transcriptional data and regulon analyses, we successfully built a STRING-based stress response network model integrating important players for the general and

  15. Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

  16. Alternative medium for Clostridium perfringens sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Tórtora, J C

    1984-01-01

    A medium containing 0.50 g of thiotone peptone, 0.30 g of soluble starch, 0.02 g of MgSO4 X 7H2O, 0.90 g of Na2HPO4 X 2H2O, 100.00 ml of distilled water, and optionally , 166 micrograms of dichloridric thiamine supported sporulation of 138 out of 141 Clostridium perfringens strains. Comparatively this medium gave a greater percentage of sporulation than five other media described previously. PMID:6331307

  17. Inducing and Quantifying Clostridium difficile Spore Formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aimee; Fimlaid, Kelly A; Pishdadian, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile induces sporulation during growth in the gastrointestinal tract. Sporulation is necessary for this obligate anaerobe to form metabolically dormant spores that can resist antibiotic treatment, survive exit from the mammalian host, and transmit C. difficile infections. In this chapter, we describe a method for inducing C. difficile sporulation in vitro. This method can be used to study sporulation and maximize spore purification yields for a number of C. difficile strain backgrounds. We also describe procedures for visualizing spore formation using phase-contrast microscopy and for quantifying the efficiency of sporulation using heat resistance as a measure of functional spore formation. PMID:27507338

  18. III-V strain layer superlattice based band engineered avalanche photodiodes (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sid

    2015-08-01

    Laser detection and ranging (LADAR)-based systems operating in the Near Infrared (NIR) and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) have become popular optical sensors for remote sensing, medical, and environmental applications. Sophisticated laser-based radar and weapon systems used for long-range military and astronomical applications need to detect, recognize, and track a variety of targets under a wide spectrum of atmospheric conditions. Infrared APDs play an important role in LADAR systems by integrating the detection and gain stages in a single device. Robust silicon-APDs are limited to visible and very near infrared region (< 1 um), while InGaAs works well up to wavelengths of about 1.5um. Si APDs have low multiplication or excess noise but are limited to below 1um due very poor quantum efficiency above 0.8um. InGaAs and Ge APDs operate up to wavelengths of 1.5um but have poor multiplication or excess noise due to a low impact ionization coefficient ratio between electrons and holes. For the past several decades HgCdTe has been traditionally used in longer wavelength (> 3um) infrared photon detection applications. Recently, various research groups (including Ghosh et. al.) have reported SWIR and MWIR HgCdTe APDs on CdZnTe and Si substrates. However, HgCdTe APDs suffer from low breakdown fields due to material defects, and excess noise increases significantly at high electric fields. During the past decade, InAs/GaSb Strain Layer Superlattice (SLS) material system has emerged as a potential material for the entire infrared spectrum because of relatively easier growth, comparable absorption coefficients, lower tunneling currents and longer Auger lifetimes resulting in enhanced detectivities (D*). Band engineering in type II SLS allows us to engineer avalanche properties of electrons and holes. This is a great advantage over bulk InGaAs and HgCdTe APDs where engineering avalanche properties is not possible. The talk will discuss the evolution of superlattice based avalanche

  19. Band gap engineering via electrostatic chemical strain in cation ordered LaSrAlO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Rondinelli, James M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we employ density functional theory to examine a novel design route that employs A-site cation ordering to engineer the band gaps of (A,A')BO4 Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) oxides. Using LaSrAlO4 as a model material, we show that the band gap is highly sensitive to the A-site cation ordering ranging from 3-4.5 eV. When the [AlO2]-1 layers are interleaved between two chemically equivalent [LaO]1+ or [SrO]0+ layers, we obtain the smallest band gap with a reduction of ~1 eV determined from the Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid exchange-correlation functional. We relate the observed band gap reduction to the local bond distortions arising from electrostatic chemical strain induced changes to the O 2 p and La 5 d states in the valence and conduction bands, respectively. The project was supported by The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (grant no. N66001-12-4224). The views, opinions, and/or findings reported here are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views of DARPA or DOD.

  20. Capturing the response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to chemical stressors using a regulated genome-scale metabolic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Satyakam; Mueller, Thomas J.; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-14

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive Firmicutes containing broad and flexible systems for substrate utilization, which have been used successfully to produce a range of industrial compounds. Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol on an industrial scale through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. A genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model is a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic capacities of an organism and developing metabolic engineering strategies for strain development. The integration of stress related specific transcriptomics information with the GSM model provides opportunities for elucidating the focal points of regulation.

  1. Clostridium perfringens and other anaerobes isolated from bile.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Y; Murata, K; Kimura, M

    1983-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens was isolated from bile in 13 cases of 150 patients examined. The serotypes of C perfringens strains isolated from bile and faeces were investigated using antisera to Hobbs' type 1-17. Two or more serological types were often found in a single specimen, but in the same patient the serotypes of C perfringens strains isolated from the bile were identical with those from the faeces. Beta-glucuronidase production in these C perfringens serotypes was tested with the API-Strep system. Strains agglutinated with Hobbs' antisera produced beta-glucuronidase, but non-agglutinated strains did not. PMID:6298284

  2. Band gap tuning of epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3-δ}/Si(001) thin films through strain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Cottier, Ryan J.; Steinle, Nathan A.; Currie, Daniel A.; Theodoropoulou, Nikoleta

    2015-11-30

    We investigate the effect of strain and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) on the crystal and optical properties of oxygen deficient, ultra-thin (4–30 nm) films of SrTiO{sub 3-δ} (STO) grown heteroepitaxially on p-Si(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. We demonstrate that STO band gap tuning can be achieved through strain engineering and show that the energy shift of the direct energy gap transition of SrTiO{sub 3-δ}/Si films has a quantifiable dimensional and doping dependence that correlates well with the changes in crystal structure.

  3. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Parks, Jerry M; Smolin, Nikolai; Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Bhandiwad, Ashwini; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Raman, Babu; Shao, Xiongjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Smith, Jeremy C; Keller, Martin; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  4. Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Rusk, Anthony W.; Tung, David; Miller, Maria; Roix, Jeffrey; Khanna, Kristen V.; Murthy, Ravi; Benjamin, Robert S.; Helgason, Thorunn; Szvalb, Ariel D.; Bird, Justin E.; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Zhang, Halle H.; Qiao, Yuan; Karim, Baktiar; McDaniel, Jennifer; Elpiner, Amanda; Sahora, Alexandra; Lachowicz, Joshua; Phillips, Brenda; Turner, Avenelle; Klein, Mary K.; Post, Gerald; Diaz, Luis A.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Bettegowda, Chetan; Huso, David L.; Varterasian, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Species of Clostridium bacteria are notable for their ability to lyse tumor cells growing in hypoxic environments. We show that an attenuated strain of Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) induces a microscopically precise, tumor-localized response in a rat orthotopic brain tumor model after intratumoral injection. It is well known, however, that experimental models often do not reliably predict the responses of human patients to therapeutic agents. We therefore used naturally occurring canine tumors as a translational bridge to human trials. Canine tumors are more like those of humans because they occur in animals with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds, are of host origin, and are due to spontaneous rather than engineered mutations. We found that intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores was well tolerated in companion dogs bearing spontaneous solid tumors, with the most common toxicities being the expected symptoms associated with bacterial infections. Objective responses were observed in 6 of 16 dogs (37.5%), with three complete and three partial responses. On the basis of these encouraging results, we treated a human patient who had an advanced leiomyosarcoma with an intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores. This treatment reduced the tumor within and surrounding the bone. Together, these results show that C. novyi-NT can precisely eradicate neoplastic tissues and suggest that further clinical trials of this agent in selected patients are warranted. PMID:25122639

  5. Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Nicholas J; Zhang, Linping; Janku, Filip; Collins, Amanda; Bai, Ren-Yuan; Staedtke, Verena; Rusk, Anthony W; Tung, David; Miller, Maria; Roix, Jeffrey; Khanna, Kristen V; Murthy, Ravi; Benjamin, Robert S; Helgason, Thorunn; Szvalb, Ariel D; Bird, Justin E; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Zhang, Halle H; Qiao, Yuan; Karim, Baktiar; McDaniel, Jennifer; Elpiner, Amanda; Sahora, Alexandra; Lachowicz, Joshua; Phillips, Brenda; Turner, Avenelle; Klein, Mary K; Post, Gerald; Diaz, Luis A; Riggins, Gregory J; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Bettegowda, Chetan; Huso, David L; Varterasian, Mary; Saha, Saurabh; Zhou, Shibin

    2014-08-13

    Species of Clostridium bacteria are notable for their ability to lyse tumor cells growing in hypoxic environments. We show that an attenuated strain of Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) induces a microscopically precise, tumor-localized response in a rat orthotopic brain tumor model after intratumoral injection. It is well known, however, that experimental models often do not reliably predict the responses of human patients to therapeutic agents. We therefore used naturally occurring canine tumors as a translational bridge to human trials. Canine tumors are more like those of humans because they occur in animals with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds, are of host origin, and are due to spontaneous rather than engineered mutations. We found that intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores was well tolerated in companion dogs bearing spontaneous solid tumors, with the most common toxicities being the expected symptoms associated with bacterial infections. Objective responses were observed in 6 of 16 dogs (37.5%), with three complete and three partial responses. On the basis of these encouraging results, we treated a human patient who had an advanced leiomyosarcoma with an intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores. This treatment reduced the tumor within and surrounding the bone. Together, these results show that C. novyi-NT can precisely eradicate neoplastic tissues and suggest that further clinical trials of this agent in selected patients are warranted. PMID:25122639

  6. Characterization of an acetoin reductase/2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase from Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Liu, Zi-Yong; Liu, Zhen; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-11-01

    Acetoin reductase catalyzes the formation of 2,3-butanediol from acetoin. In Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528, the gene CLJU_c23220 encoding the putative Zn(2+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme, CLAR, can catalyze the conversion of acetoin to 2,3-butanediol with NADPH as the cofactor. Furthermore, the gene CLJU_c23220 was introduced into Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and the transformant was conferred the capacity of 2,3-butanediol production. In batch fermentation the transformant produced up to 3.1g/L of 2,3-butanediol, as well as acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE, 17.8 g/L) in amounts similar to those produced by the wild type strain. This study provides conclusive evidence at the protein level that CLJU_c23220 is the key gene responsible for the conversion of acetoin to 2,3-butanediol in C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528. Moreover, the C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was modified via one-step metabolic engineering to produce 2,3-butanediol without influencing the ABE production. PMID:26320708

  7. [Oncologic aspects of Clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    Telekes, András

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most frequent among cancer patients. Its diagnosis is complicated by the fact that the symptoms of the infection and the side effects of the anticancer treatments could be similar. Chemotherapy itself might facilitate Clostridium difficile infection. Several risk factors are known but Clostridium difficile infection can develop in the absence of these. Neutreopenia is a risk factor for fatal Clostridium difficile infection and also the side effect of chemotherapy. Therefore, if symptoms of the potential infection develop (eg. diarrhoea more than three times a day, fever above 38.5 °C, colitis, rapid increase of serum creatinin) Clostridium difficile infection should be excluded. If the infection is confirmed it should be managed in the most efficient way. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1110-1116. PMID:27397423

  8. Engineering the Transformation Strain in LiMnyFe1-yPO4 Olivines for Ultrahigh Rate Battery Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Xiang, Kai; Xing, Wenting; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Gionet, Paul; Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Tang, Ming; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2016-04-13

    Alkali ion intercalation compounds used as battery electrodes often exhibit first-order phase transitions during electrochemical cycling, accompanied by significant transformation strains. Despite ∼30 years of research into the behavior of such compounds, the relationship between transformation strain and electrode performance, especially the rate at which working ions (e.g., Li) can be intercalated and deintercalated, is still absent. In this work, we use the LiMnyFe1-yPO4 system for a systematic study, and measure using operando synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) the dynamic strain behavior as a function of the Mn content (y) in powders of ∼50 nm average diameter. The dynamically produced strain deviates significantly from what is expected from the equilibrium phase diagrams and demonstrates metastability but nonetheless spans a wide range from 0 to 8 vol % with y. For the first time, we show that the discharge capacity at high C-rates (20-50C rate) varies in inverse proportion to the transformation strain, implying that engineering electrode materials for reduced strain can be used to maximize the power capability of batteries. PMID:26930492

  9. Engineering the quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene with uniaxial strains

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, G. S. Guassi, M. R.; Qu, F.

    2013-12-28

    We theoretically investigate the manipulation of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in graphene by means of the uniaxial strain. The values of Chern number and Hall conductance demonstrate that the strained graphene in presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and exchange field, for vanishing intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, possesses non-trivial topological phase, which is robust against the direction and modulus of the strain. Besides, we also find that the interplay between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit couplings results in a topological phase transition in the strained graphene. Remarkably, as the strain strength is increased beyond approximately 7%, the critical parameters of the exchange field for triggering the quantum anomalous Hall phase transition show distinct behaviors—decrease (increase) for strains along zigzag (armchair) direction. Our findings open up a new platform for manipulation of the QAHE by an experimentally accessible strain deformation of the graphene structure, with promising application on novel quantum electronic devices with high efficiency.

  10. Electrostatic Chemical Strain: An Approach to Electronic Structure Engineering in Layered Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondinelli, James

    2015-03-01

    Traditional approaches to create and control functional electronic materials have focused on new phases in previously unknown bulk minerals. More recently, interlayer physics has spawned interest in known materials in unexplored atomic scale geometries, especially in complex transition metal oxides (TMO), where heterostructures and superlattices with abrupt interfaces can be created on demand. The interfaces between TMO overs a handle to direct the electrostatic field exerted on the transition metal centers via the coordinating oxygen ligands, which alter the M cation's d-orbital occupancies and spin state, thereby imparting desirable electronic functionality. In this talk, I describe an atomistic engineering approach that makes use of long-range electrostatic interactions between atomic metal-monoxide planes (AO and A'O) in naturally occurring superlattices, e.g., Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), phases, to tune interlayer atomic structure, orbital degeneracies, and magnetic properties. Using first-principles electronic structure calculations, I show how this electrostatic chemical strain (ECS) effect can be used to tune both crystal field energies and the frontier orbital structure in correlated (La, A)NiO4 RP phases at fixed stoichiometry. I describe how to enhance the Ni eg orbital polarization, resulting in NiO6 units that exhibit a single d (x2 -y2) band at the Fermi level--electronic features similar to the layered superconducting cuprates. This approach is generic in construction, making it applicable to any layered topology supporting heterovalent cation substitutions. I conclude by showing it is a realistic strategy to tailor the electronic properties of known materials, and discover yet-to-be realized novel functional oxides without resorting to complex assembly of multi-component heterostructures. Funding for this work is provided by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Grant No. N66001-12-4224 and performed in collaboration with P

  11. Genetic and biochemical analysis of solvent formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-05-01

    The anaerobic organism Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for commercial production of important organic solvents due to its ability to convert a wide variety of crude substrates to acids and alcohols. Current knowledge concerning the molecular genetics, cell regulation and metabolic engineering of this organism is still rather limited. The objectives are to improve the knowledge of the molecular genetics and enzymology of Clostridia in order to make genetic alterations which will more effectively channel cell metabolism toward production of desired products. Two factors that limit butanol production in continuous cultures are: (1) The degeneration of the culture, with an increase in the proportion of cells which are incapable of solvent production. Currently isolated degenerate strains are being evaluated to analyze the molecular mechanism of degeneration to determine if it is due to a genetic loss of solvent related genes, loss of a regulatory element, or an increase in general mutagenesis. Recent studies show two general types of degenerates, one which seems to have lost essential solvent pathway genes and another which has not completely lost all solvent production capability and retains the DNA bearing solvent pathway genes. (2) The production of hydrogen which uses up reducing equivalents in the cell. If the reducing power were more fully directed to the reduction reactions involved in butanol production, the process would be more efficient. The authors have studied oxidation reduction systems related to this process. These studies focus on ferredoxin and rubredoxin and their oxidoreductases.

  12. Strain properties analysis and wireless collection system of PVDF for structural local health monitoring of civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Wang, Yang; Dong, Weijie; Jin, Yajing; Ou, Jinping

    2009-07-01

    For large civil engineering structures and base establishments, for example, bridges, super-high buildings, long-span space structures, offshore platforms and pipe systems of water & gas supply, their lives are up to a few decades or centuries. Damaged by environmental loads, fatigue effects, corrosion effects and material aging, these structures experience inevitably such side effects as damage accumulation, resistance reduction and even accidents. The traditional civil structure is a kind of passive one, whose performance and status are unpredictable to a great extent, but the informatics' introduction breaks a new path to obtain the status of the structure, thus it is an important research direction to evaluate and improve reliability of civil structures by the use of monitoring and health diagnosis technique, and this also assures the security of service for civil engineering structures. Smart material structure, originated from the aerospace sector, has been a research hotspot in civil engineering, medicine, shipping, and so on. For structural health monitoring of civil engineering, the research about high-performance sensing unit of smart material structure is very important, and this will possibly push further the development and application of monitoring and health diagnosis techniques. At present, piezoelectric materials are one of the most widely used sensing materials among the research of smart material structures. As one of the piezoelectric materials, PVDF(Polyvinylidene Fluoride)film is widely considered for the advantages of low cost, good mechanical ability, high sensibility, the ability of being easily placed and resistance of corrosion. However, only a few studies exit about building a mature monitoring system using PVDF. In this paper, for the sake of using PVDF for sensing unit for structural local monitoring of civil engineering, the strain sensing properties of PVDF are studied in detail. Firstly, the operating mechanism of PVDF is analyzed

  13. Elimination of metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products increases ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Papanek, Beth A.; Biswas, Ranjita; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-09-12

    Clostridium thermocellum has the natural ability to convert cellulose to ethanol, making it a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. To further improve its CBP capabilities, we study a mutant strain of C. thermocellum that was constructed (strain AG553; C. thermocellum Δhpt ΔhydG Δldh Δpfl Δpta-ack) to increase flux to ethanol by removing side product formation. Strain AG553 showed a two- to threefold increase in ethanol yield relative to the wild type on all substrates tested. On defined medium, strain AG553 exceeded 70% of theoretical ethanol yield on lower loadings of the model crystalline cellulosemore » Avicel, effectively eliminating formate, acetate, and lactate production and reducing H2 production by fivefold. On 5 g/L Avicel, strain AG553 reached an ethanol yield of 63.5% of the theoretical maximum compared with 19.9% by the wild type, and it showed similar yields on pretreated switchgrass and poplar. The elimination of organic acid production suggested that the strain might be capable of growth under higher substrate loadings in the absence of pH control. Final ethanol titer peaked at 73.4 mM in mutant AG553 on 20 g/L Avicel, at which point the pH decreased to a level that does not allow growth of C. thermocellum, likely due to CO2 accumulation. In comparison, the maximum titer of wild type C. thermocellum was 14.1 mM ethanol on 10 g/L Avicel. In conclusion, with the elimination of the metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products other than ethanol, AG553 is the best ethanol-yielding CBP strain to date and will serve as a platform strain for further metabolic engineering for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.« less

  14. Elimination of metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products increases ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Papanek, Beth; Biswas, Ranjita; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum has the natural ability to convert cellulose to ethanol, making it a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. To further improve its CBP capabilities, a mutant strain of C. thermocellum was constructed (strain AG553; C. thermocellum Δhpt ΔhydG Δldh Δpfl Δpta-ack) to increase flux to ethanol by removing side product formation. Strain AG553 showed a two- to threefold increase in ethanol yield relative to the wild type on all substrates tested. On defined medium, strain AG553 exceeded 70% of theoretical ethanol yield on lower loadings of the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, effectively eliminating formate, acetate, and lactate production and reducing H2 production by fivefold. On 5 g/L Avicel, strain AG553 reached an ethanol yield of 63.5% of the theoretical maximum compared with 19.9% by the wild type, and it showed similar yields on pretreated switchgrass and poplar. The elimination of organic acid production suggested that the strain might be capable of growth under higher substrate loadings in the absence of pH control. Final ethanol titer peaked at 73.4mM in mutant AG553 on 20 g/L Avicel, at which point the pH decreased to a level that does not allow growth of C. thermocellum, likely due to CO2 accumulation. In comparison, the maximum titer of wild type C. thermocellum was 14.1mM ethanol on 10 g/L Avicel. With the elimination of the metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products other than ethanol, AG553 is the best ethanol-yielding CBP strain to date and will serve as a platform strain for further metabolic engineering for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:26369438

  15. Design of an enhanced sensitivity FBG strain sensor and application in highway bridge engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Litong; Zhang, Dongsheng; Liu, Hui; Guo, Yongxing; Zhu, Fangdong

    2014-06-01

    The theoretical design method of enhanced sensitivity fiber grating (FBG) strain sensors was given, and moreover high qualified strain sensors were developed and fabricated, whose sensing properties were good for practical applications. The strain sensor with cylindrical shell encapsulation contained three tubular structures, due to the uneven surface structure, in the area of the strain concentration, improving the sensitivity. It could achieve the embedment strain measurement and surface measurement and had the advantages of the easy installation. The good agreement was obtained between the measurements and theoretical simulation results. After each calibration test, twenty-four FBG strain sensors and six FBG temperature compensation sensors have been installed on the undersurface of the box girder of Diaoshuiyan bridge in Yongtaiwen highway. Finally, we built up a long-term structure health system for the highway bridge.

  16. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Clostridium dakarense sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Cheikh Ibrahima; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Padhmanabhan, Roshan; Samb, Bissoume; Sow, Amy Gassama; Robert, Catherine; Couderc, Carine; Faye, Ngor; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Fenollar, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium dakarense strain FF1T, is the type strain of Clostridium dakarense sp. nov., a new species within the genus Clostridium. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from the fecal flora of a 4-month-old Senegalese child suffering from gastroenteritis. C. dakarense sp. nov. strain FF1T is an obligate anaerobic Gram-positive bacillus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,735,762 bp long genome (1 chromosome but no plasmid) exhibits a G+C content of 27.98% and contains 3,843 protein-coding and 73 RNA genes, including 8 rRNA genes. PMID:24501642

  17. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Clostridium senegalense sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium senegalense strain JC122T, is the type strain of Clostridium senegalense sp. nov., a new species within the genus Clostridium. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from the fecal flora of a healthy patient. C. senegalense strain JC122T is an obligate anaerobic Gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,893,008 bp long genome (1 chromosome but no plasmid) exhibits a G+C content of 26.8% and contains 3,704 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes, including 6 rRNA genes. PMID:23408737

  18. Glycerol Overproduction by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast Strains Leads to Substantial Changes in By-Product Formation and to a Stimulation of Fermentation Rate in Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Remize, F.; Roustan, J. L.; Sablayrolles, J. M.; Barre, P.; Dequin, S.

    1999-01-01

    Six commercial wine yeast strains and three nonindustrial strains (two laboratory strains and one haploid strain derived from a wine yeast strain) were engineered to produce large amounts of glycerol with a lower ethanol yield. Overexpression of the GPD1 gene, encoding a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, resulted in a 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in glycerol production and a slight decrease in ethanol formation under conditions simulating wine fermentation. All the strains overexpressing GPD1 produced a larger amount of succinate and acetate, with marked differences in the level of these compounds between industrial and nonindustrial engineered strains. Acetoin and 2,3-butanediol formation was enhanced with significant variation between strains and in relation to the level of glycerol produced. Wine strains overproducing glycerol at moderate levels (12 to 18 g/liter) reduced acetoin almost completely to 2,3-butanediol. A lower biomass concentration was attained by GPD1-overexpressing strains, probably due to high acetaldehyde production during the growth phase. Despite the reduction in cell numbers, complete sugar exhaustion was achieved during fermentation in a sugar-rich medium. Surprisingly, the engineered wine yeast strains exhibited a significant increase in the fermentation rate in the stationary phase, which reduced the time of fermentation. PMID:9872772

  19. Complex quantum dot arrays formed by combination of self-organized anisotropic strain engineering and step engineering on shallow patterned substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mano, T.; Noetzel, R.; Zhou, D.; Hamhuis, G.J.; Eijkemans, T.J.; Wolter, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    One-dimensional (In,Ga)As quantum dot (QD) arrays are created on planar singular, vicinal, and shallow mesa-patterned GaAs (100) substrates by self-organized anisotropic strain engineering of an (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum wire (QWR) superlattice template in molecular beam epitaxy. On planar singular substrates, highly uniform single QD arrays along [0-11] are formed. On shallow [0-11] and [011] stripe-patterned substrates, the generated type-A and -B steps distinctly affect the surface migration processes which are crucial for QWR template development, i.e., strain-gradient-driven In adatom migration along [011] and surface-reconstruction-induced Ga/In adatom migration along [0-11]. In the presence of both type-A and -B steps on vicinal substrates misoriented towards [101], the direction of adatom migration is altered to rotate the QD arrays. This establishes the relationship between self-organized anisotropic strain and step engineering, which is exploited on shallow zigzag-patterned substrates for the realization of complex QD arrays and networks with well-positioned bends and branches, exhibiting high structural and optical quality.

  20. Roles of human sulfotransferases in genotoxicity of carcinogens using genetically engineered umu test strains.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshimitsu; Zhang, Yu; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Yang, Min

    2012-03-01

    Human sulfotransferase (SULT) 1A1, 1A2, and 1A3 cDNA genes were subcloned separately into the pTrc99A(KM) vector. The generated plasmids were introduced into the Salmonella typhimurium O-acetyltransferase-deficient strain NM6000 (TA1538/1,8-DNP/pSK1002), resulting in the new strains NM7001, NM7002, and NM7003. We compared the sensitivities of these three strains with the parental strain NM7000 against 51 chemicals including aromatic amines, nitroarenes, alkenylbenzenes, estrogens-like chemicals, and other compounds with and without S9 mix by making use of the umu test system that is based on the bacterial SOS induction. 2-Amino-6-methyl-dipyrido[1,2-α:3',2'-d]imidazole, 3-methoxy-4-aminoazobenzene, 3-nitrobenzanthrone, 5-nitroacenaphthene, and 3,9-dinitrofluoranthene caused high genotoxicity in the NM7001 strain. The genotoxic effects of 2-aminofluorene, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, 2-nitrofluorene, 1-nitropyrene, and 2-nitropropane were stronger in the NM7002 strain compared with the NM7001 and NM7003 strains. Among the tested benzylic and allylic compounds, 1-hydroxymethylpyrene was detected in the NM7001 strain with the highest sensitivity. Estragole and 1'-hydroxysafrole exhibited strong genotoxicity in the NM7003 strain. The estrogen-like chemicals such as bisphenol A, genistein, p,n-nonylphenol, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen were not detected as genotoxins in any strain used. Collectively, the present results suggest that the generated test strains are valuable tools in order to elucidate the role of SULT enzymes in the bioactivation of chemicals to environmental carcinogens. PMID:22072630

  1. Genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida X3 strain and its potential ability to bioremediate soil microcosms contaminated with methyl parathion and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Xu, Xingjian; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-02-01

    A multifunctional Pseudomonas putida X3 strain was successfully engineered by introducing methyl parathion (MP)-degrading gene and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in P. putida X4 (CCTCC: 209319). In liquid cultures, the engineered X3 strain utilized MP as sole carbon source for growth and degraded 100 mg L(-1) of MP within 24 h; however, this strain did not further metabolize p-nitrophenol (PNP), an intermediate metabolite of MP. No discrepancy in minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cobalt (Co) was observed between the engineered X3 strain and its host strain. The inoculated X3 strain accelerated MP degradation in different polluted soil microcosms with 100 mg MP kg(-1) dry soil and/or 5 mg Cd kg(-1) dry soil; MP was completely eliminated within 40 h. However, the presence of Cd in the early stage of remediation slightly delayed MP degradation. The application of X3 strain in Cd-contaminated soil strongly affected the distribution of Cd fractions and immobilized Cd by reducing bioavailable Cd concentrations with lower soluble/exchangeable Cd and organic-bound Cd. The inoculated X3 strain also colonized and proliferated in various contaminated microcosms. Our results suggested that the engineered X3 strain is a potential bioremediation agent showing competitive advantage in complex contaminated environments. PMID:26521245

  2. Band gap engineering of FeS2 under biaxial strain: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Pin; Fan, Xiao-Li; Liu, Li-Min; Lau, Woon-Ming

    2014-11-28

    The promising photovoltaic activity of pyrite (FeS2) is attributed to its excellent optical absorptivity and earth abundance, but its band gap, 0.95 eV, is slightly lower than the optimum value of 1.3 eV. Here we report the first investigation of strained FeS2, whose band gap can be increased by ∼0.3 eV. The influence of uniaxial and biaxial strains on the atomic structure as well as the electronic and optical properties of bulk FeS2 is systematically examined by the first principles calculations. We found that the biaxial strain can effectively increase the band gap with respect to uniaxial strain. Our results indicate that the band gap increases with increasing tensile strain to its maximum value at 6% strain, but under the increasing compressive strain, the band gap decreases almost linearly. Moreover, the low intensity states at the bottom of the conduction band disappear and a sharp increase in the intensity appears at the lower energy level under the tensile strain, which causes the red shift of the absorption edge and enhances the overall optical absorption. With the increase of the band gap and enhanced optical absorption, FeS2 will make a better photovoltaic material. PMID:25308322

  3. Differential Immunodetection of Toxin B from Highly Virulent Clostridium difficile BI/NAP-1/027

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linan; Zhao, Mingwei; Duffy, David C.; Chen, Xinhua; Sambol, Susan P.; Gerding, Dale N.; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a simple immunoassay capable of differentially detecting toxin B from highly virulent strains of Clostridium difficile (BI/NAP-1/027) in stool. This assay can simultaneously confirm the presence of in vivo toxin production and provide strain-related information relevant to infection control epidemiology and disease prognosis. PMID:25716449

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Novel Clostridium Isolates from Northern Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Srwa R. J.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Three Clostridium sp. strains were isolated from soil and sediment collected from the Kurdistan region of Iraq. All three isolates were found to harbor putative prophages, with a CRISPR-Cas system found in strains C105KSO13 and C105KSO14. PMID:26950326

  5. Local strain effect on the band gap engineering of graphene by a first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, Gui; Booske, John; Ma, Zhenqiang E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu; Morgan, Dane; Zhong, Jianxin E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu

    2015-02-02

    We have systematically investigated the effect of local strain on electronic properties of graphene by first-principles calculations. Two major types of local strain, oriented along the zigzag and the armchair directions, have been studied. We find that local strain with a proper range and strength along the zigzag direction results in opening of significant band gaps in graphene, on the order of 10{sup −1 }eV; whereas, local strain along the armchair direction cannot open a significant band gap in graphene. Our results show that appropriate local strain can effectively open and tune the band gap in graphene; therefore, the electronic and transport properties of graphene can also be modified.

  6. Bandgap engineering of monolayer MoS2 under strain: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Can; Fan, Bowen; Li, Weiyi; Wen, Luowei; Liu, Yan; Wang, Tao; Sheng, Kuang; Yin, You

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the monolayer MoS2 in terms of the strain by analyzing the structure parameters: the bandgap, the density of states (DOS) and the Milliken charges. The calculations indicate that an increasing external stain tends to depress the ripple structure with a shorter S-S interlayer spacing and to enlarge the length of the Mo-S bond. Tensile strain dramatically alteres the bandgap; however, compressive strain almost does not. The change in the bandgap is explained by an analysis of the DOS, the partial density of states (PDOS), the structure parameters and the Mulliken charge distribution. The effects of strain on the Mulliken charge and the length of the Mo-S band cause bandgap differences under tensile and compressive strain.

  7. Citrate, a specific substrate for the isolation of Clostridium sphenoides.

    PubMed Central

    Walther, R; Hippe, H; Gottschalk, G

    1977-01-01

    With a medium containing citrate as the carbon and energy source, 10 clostridial strains were isolated from various mud samples. Characterization of these strains revealed that they all belonged to the same species, Clostridium sphenoides. Strains of this organism obtained from culture collections were also able to grow citrate, whereas 15 other clostridial species tested were not. Citrate was fermented by C. sphenoides to acetate, ethanol, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen. Experiments with stereospecifically 14C-labeled citrate indicated that citrate lyase was involved in citrate degradation. Images PMID:869540

  8. Small RNAs in the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yili; Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Jones, Shawn W.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Clostridium includes major human pathogens and species important to cellulose degradation, the carbon cycle, and biotechnology. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulatory molecules in all organisms, but they have not been investigated in clostridia. Research on sRNAs in clostridia is hindered by the absence of a systematic method to identify sRNA candidates, thus delegating clostridial sRNA research to a hit-and-miss process. Thus, we wanted to develop a method to identify potential sRNAs in the Clostridium genus to open up the field of sRNA research in clostridia. Using comparative genomics analyses combined with predictions of rho-independent terminators and promoters, we predicted sRNAs in 21 clostridial genomes: Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. botulinum (eight strains), C. cellulolyticum, C. difficile, C. kluyveri (two strains), C. novyi, C. perfringens (three strains), C. phytofermentans, C. tetani, and C. thermocellum. Although more than one-third of predicted sRNAs have Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, only one-sixth have a start codon downstream of SD sequences; thus, most of the predicted sRNAs are noncoding RNAs. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and Northern analysis were employed to test the presence of a randomly chosen set of sRNAs in C. acetobutylicum and several C. botulinum strains, leading to the confirmation of a large fraction of the tested sRNAs. We identified a conserved, novel sRNA which, together with the downstream gene coding for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, responds to the antibiotic clindamycin. The number of predicted sRNAs correlated with the physiological function of the species (high for pathogens, low for cellulolytic, and intermediate for solventogenic), but not with 16S rRNA-based phylogeny. PMID:21264064

  9. Flux Balance Analysis Inspired Bioprocess Upgrading for Lycopene Production by a Metabolically Engineered Strain of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Nambou, Komi; Jian, Xingxing; Zhang, Xinkai; Wei, Liujing; Lou, Jiajia; Madzak, Catherine; Hua, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models embody a significant advantage of systems biology since their applications as metabolic flux simulation models enable predictions for the production of industrially-interesting metabolites. The biotechnological production of lycopene from Yarrowia lipolytica is an emerging scope that has not been fully scrutinized, especially for what concerns cultivation conditions of newly generated engineered strains. In this study, by combining flux balance analysis (FBA) and Plackett-Burman design, we screened chemicals for lycopene production from a metabolically engineered strain of Y. lipolytica. Lycopene concentrations of 126 and 242 mg/L were achieved correspondingly from the FBA-independent and the FBA-assisted designed media in fed-batch cultivation mode. Transcriptional studies revealed upregulations of heterologous genes in media designed according to FBA, thus implying the efficiency of model predictions. Our study will potentially support upgraded lycopene and other terpenoids production from existing or prospect bioengineered strains of Y. lipolytica and/or closely related yeast species. PMID:26703753

  10. Flux Balance Analysis Inspired Bioprocess Upgrading for Lycopene Production by a Metabolically Engineered Strain of Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Nambou, Komi; Jian, Xingxing; Zhang, Xinkai; Wei, Liujing; Lou, Jiajia; Madzak, Catherine; Hua, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models embody a significant advantage of systems biology since their applications as metabolic flux simulation models enable predictions for the production of industrially-interesting metabolites. The biotechnological production of lycopene from Yarrowia lipolytica is an emerging scope that has not been fully scrutinized, especially for what concerns cultivation conditions of newly generated engineered strains. In this study, by combining flux balance analysis (FBA) and Plackett-Burman design, we screened chemicals for lycopene production from a metabolically engineered strain of Y. lipolytica. Lycopene concentrations of 126 and 242 mg/L were achieved correspondingly from the FBA-independent and the FBA-assisted designed media in fed-batch cultivation mode. Transcriptional studies revealed upregulations of heterologous genes in media designed according to FBA, thus implying the efficiency of model predictions. Our study will potentially support upgraded lycopene and other terpenoids production from existing or prospect bioengineered strains of Y. lipolytica and/or closely related yeast species. PMID:26703753

  11. Studies on the growth metabolism of Bacillus thuringiensis and its vegetative insecticidal protein engineered strains by microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Yao, J; Liu, Y; Tuo, Y; Zhu, J; Qin, X; Dong, J; Qu, S; Yu, Z

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic power-times curves of Bacillus thuringiensis and its vegetative insecticidal protein engineered strains were determined at 30 degrees C by using a thermal activity monitor air Isothermal Microcalorimeter, ampoule method. From the power-times curves, the maximum power (Pmax) in the log phase, the growth rate constant (k), the generation times (tG), the time of the maximum power (tmax), the heat effects (Qlog) for log phase, and the total heat effect in 45 h (Qtotal) of B. thuringiensis strains can be obtained. The results indicate that their power-times curves are different. The relationship between their metabolic power-times curves and character of bacteria metabolism, and thermokinetics and gene expression were analyzed and discussed. The character of the bacteria power-times curves reflected the physiologic character of gene expression. The microcalorimetric method proved to be a reliable and sensitive tool for the assessment of the growth metabolism, the heat output in bacteria and its engineered strains. The determination of the thermokinetic character is beneficial to the control of fermentation. PMID:16878547

  12. Linking Genotype and Phenotype of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Reveals Metabolic Engineering Targets and Leads to Triterpene Hyper-Producers

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Jose M.; Koetter, Peter; Nielsen, Jens; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Kushiro, Tetsuo; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2011-01-01

    Background Metabolic engineering is an attractive approach in order to improve the microbial production of drugs. Triterpenes is a chemically diverse class of compounds and many among them are of interest from a human health perspective. A systematic experimental or computational survey of all feasible gene modifications to determine the genotype yielding the optimal triterpene production phenotype is a laborious and time-consuming process. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on the recent genome-wide sequencing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D and its phenotypic differences with the S288C strain, we implemented a strategy for the construction of a β-amyrin production platform. The genes Erg8, Erg9 and HFA1 contained non-silent SNPs that were computationally analyzed to evaluate the changes that cause in the respective protein structures. Subsequently, Erg8, Erg9 and HFA1 were correlated with the increased levels of ergosterol and fatty acids in CEN.PK 113-7D and single, double, and triple gene over-expression strains were constructed. Conclusions The six out of seven gene over-expression constructs had a considerable impact on both ergosterol and β-amyrin production. In the case of β-amyrin formation the triple over-expression construct exhibited a nearly 500% increase over the control strain making our metabolic engineering strategy the most successful design of triterpene microbial producers. PMID:21445244

  13. [Construction of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata strains with high riboflavin kinase activity using gene engineering].

    PubMed

    Ishchuk, O P; Iatsyshyn, V Iu; Dmytruk, K V; Voronovs'kyĭ, A Ia; Fedorovych, D V; Sybirnyĭ, A A

    2006-01-01

    The recombinant strains of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata, which contain the DNA fragment consisting of the FMN1 gene (encoding the riboflavin kinase, enzyme that converts riboflavin to flavinmononucleotide) driven by the strong promoters (the regulated RIB1 or constitutive TEF1 promoter) were isolated. Riboflavin kinase activity in the isolated transformants was tested. The 6-8-fold increase of the riboflavin kinase activity was shown in the recombinant strains containing the integrated Debaryomyces hansenii FMN1 gene under the strong constitutive TEF1 promoter. The recombinant strains can be used for the following construction of flavinmononucleotide overproducers. PMID:17290783

  14. The ClosTron: Mutagenesis in Clostridium refined and streamlined.

    PubMed

    Heap, John T; Kuehne, Sarah A; Ehsaan, Muhammad; Cartman, Stephen T; Cooksley, Clare M; Scott, Jamie C; Minton, Nigel P

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of the ClosTron Group II intron directed mutagenesis tool for Clostridium has advanced genetics in this genus, and here we present several significant improvements. We have shown how marker re-cycling can be used to construct strains with multiple mutations, demonstrated using FLP/FRT in Clostridium acetobutylicum; tested the capacity of the system for the delivery of transgenes to the chromosome of Clostridium sporogenes, which proved feasible for 1.0kbp transgenes in addition to a marker; and extended the host range of the system, constructing mutants in Clostridium beijerinckii and, for the first time, in a B1/NAP1/027 'epidemic' strain of Clostridium difficile. Automated intron design bioinformatics are now available free-of-charge at our website http://clostron.com; the out-sourced construction of re-targeted intron plasmids has become cost-effective as well as rapid; and the combination of constitutive intron expression with direct selection for intron insertions has made mutant isolation trivial. These developments mean mutants can now be constructed with very little time and effort for the researcher. Those who prefer to construct plasmids in-house are no longer reliant on a commercial kit, as a mixture of two new plasmids provides unlimited template for intron re-targeting by Splicing by Overlap Extension (SOE) PCR. The new ClosTron plasmids also offer blue-white screening and other options for identification of recombinant plasmids. The improved ClosTron system supersedes the prototype plasmid pMTL007 and the original method, and exploits the potential of Group II introns more fully. PMID:19891996

  15. Expression of a Heterologous Xylose Transporter in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Engineered to Utilize Xylose Improves Aerobic Xylose Co-consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered to utilize xylose by expression of the genes for xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, or xylose isomerase. These strains are still limited in their ability to efficiently use xylose. Unlike native xylose assimilating yeasts such as Pi...

  16. Expression of a heterologous xylose transporter in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain engineered to utilize xylose increases xylose uptake and improves xylose/glucose co-consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered to utilize xylose by expressing either the genes for xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, or for xylose isomerase. These strains still use xylose at sub-optimal rates for industrial fermentation. Unlike natural xylose fermenting yeast...

  17. Strain Engineered Direct-indirect Band Gap Transition and its Mechanism in 2D Phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xihong; Wei, Qun; Copple, Andrew

    Phosphorene, a two-dimensional puckered honeycomb structure of black phosphorus, showed promising properties for applications in nano-electronics. In this work, we report strain effect on the electronic band structure of phosphorene, using first principles density-functional theory (DFT) including standard DFT and hybrid functional methods. It was found that phosphorene can withstand a tensile strain up to 30%. The band gap of phosphorene experiences a direct-indirect-direct transition when axial strain is applied. The origin of the gap transition was revealed and a general mechanism was developed to explain energy shifts with strain according to the bond nature of near-band-edge electronic orbitals. Effective masses of carriers in the armchair direction are an order of magnitude smaller than that of the zigzag axis indicating the armchair direction is favored for carrier transport. Ref: X.-H. Peng, Qun Wei, A. Copple, Phys. Rev. B 90, 085402 (2014).

  18. Band Gap Engineering with Ultralarge Biaxial Strains in Suspended Monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David; Liu, Xinghui; Christopher, Jason W; Cantley, Lauren; Wadehra, Anubhav; Kim, Brian L; Goldberg, Bennett B; Swan, Anna K; Bunch, J Scott

    2016-09-14

    We demonstrate the continuous and reversible tuning of the optical band gap of suspended monolayer MoS2 membranes by as much as 500 meV by applying very large biaxial strains. By using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to grow crystals that are highly impermeable to gas, we are able to apply a pressure difference across suspended membranes to induce biaxial strains. We observe the effect of strain on the energy and intensity of the peaks in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum and find a linear tuning rate of the optical band gap of 99 meV/%. This method is then used to study the PL spectra of bilayer and trilayer devices under strain and to find the shift rates and Grüneisen parameters of two Raman modes in monolayer MoS2. Finally, we use this result to show that we can apply biaxial strains as large as 5.6% across micron-sized areas and report evidence for the strain tuning of higher level optical transitions. PMID:27509768

  19. Strain-engineering the anisotropic electrical conductance in ReS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng; Zhu, Hao; Eshun, Kwesi; Shi, Chen; Zeng, Min; Li, Qiliang

    2016-05-01

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1 T (Re in octahedral coordination) phase. The reduced symmetry in ReS2 leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. In this work, we performed a comprehensive first-principle computational study of strain effect on the anisotropic mechanical and electronic properties of ReS2 monolayers. We found that the anisotropic ratio in electron mobility along two principle axes is 2.36 while the ratio in hole mobility reaches 7.76. The study of strain applied along different directions shows that the elastic modulus is largest for out-of-plane direction, and the strain along a-direction induces indirect bandgap while strain along b- or c-direction does not. In addition, the carrier mobility can be significantly improved by the c-direction tensile strain. This study indicates that the ReS2 monolayer has promising applications in nanoscale strain sensor and conductance-switch FETs.

  20. Interface Schottky barrier engineering via strain in metal-semiconductor composites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiangchao; Dai, Ying; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2016-01-21

    The interfacial carrier transfer property, which is dominated by the interface Schottky barrier height (SBH), plays a crucial role in determining the performance of metal-semiconductor heterostructures in a variety of applications. Therefore, artificially controlling the interface SBH is of great importance for their industrial applications. As a model system, the Au/TiO2 (001) heterostructure is studied using first-principles calculations and the tight-binding method in the present study. Our investigation demonstrates that strain can be an effective way to decrease the interface SBH and that the n-type SBH can be more effectively decreased than the p-type SBH. Astonishingly,