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Sample records for engineering structures iii

  1. Molecular beam epitaxy engineered III-V semiconductor structures for low-power optically addressed spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, Anders G.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Device approaches are investigated for optically addressed SLMs based on molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) engineered III-V materials and structures. Strong photooptic effects can be achieved in periodically delta-doped multiple-quantum-well structures, but are still insufficient for high-contrast modulation with only single- or double-pass absorption through active layers of practical thickness. The asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity approach is employed to permit extinction of light due to interference of light reflected from the front and back surfaces of the cavity. This approach is realized with an all-MBE-grown structure consisting of GaAs/AlAs quarter-wave stack reflector grown over the GaAs substrate as the high reflectance mirror and the GaAs surface as the low reflectance mirror. High-contrast modulation is achieved using a low-power InGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser for the control signal.

  2. Aircraft engines. III

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelson, D.C.; Reck, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Prospective powerplant configuration advancements for tilt-rotor subsonic flight, supersonic commercial flight, and hypersonic flight are speculated upon, with a view to possibilities for the exploitation of novel materials and of such advanced fuels as liquid methane and hydrogen. Attention is given to the foldable tilt-rotor concept, which employs a hydraulic torque converter to engage the fan stage of the high-bypass turbofan engine used in forward flight after the tilt-rotor blades have been stowed, and several advanced cycles and turbomechanical configurations for cruise in the high supersonic regime and beyond, through the hypersonic regime, and into orbital velocity.

  3. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  4. Structural Engineering: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation presents the work of the Structural Engineering Division of the Engineering Directorate. The work includes: providing technical expertise and leadership for the development, evaluation, and operation of structural, mechanical, and thermal spaceflight systems.

  5. Engineering design of ARIES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.; Cheng, E.

    1993-07-01

    An efficient organic cooled low activation ferritic steel first wall and shield has been designed for the D-{sup 3}He power reactor ARIES-III. The design allows removal of the large surface heat load without exceeding temperature and stress design limits. The structure is expected to last for the whole reactor life. The major concerns regarding using the organic coolant in fusion reactors have been greatly alleviated.

  6. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  7. Computer Education for Engineers, Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Earl S.; Lofy, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    Reports the results of the third survey of computer use in engineering education conducted in the fall of 1987 in comparing with 1981 and 1984 results. Summarizes survey data on computer course credits, languages, equipment use, CAD/CAM instruction, faculty access, and computer graphics. (YP)

  8. Factor structure of the MCMI-III.

    PubMed

    Craig, R J; Bivens, A

    1998-02-01

    The factor structure of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (Millon, 1994; MCMI-III) was assessed among 444 African American inpatient substance abusers and constitutes the first factor analysis of the MCMI-III. We found 3 main factors: General Maladjustment, Paranoid Behavior/Thinking With Detached Emotionality, and Antisocial Acting Out. These factors were essentially similar to previous findings of factor studies with the MCMI and MCMI-II across diverse populations. This factor invariance should lend credibility to the revised test and spur additional research into its psychometric properties. PMID:9615431

  9. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  10. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  11. Computational structural mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The computational structural mechanics (CSM) program at Lewis encompasses: (1) fundamental aspects for formulating and solving structural mechanics problems, and (2) development of integrated software systems to computationally simulate the performance/durability/life of engine structures. It is structured to mainly supplement, complement, and whenever possible replace, costly experimental efforts which are unavoidable during engineering research and development programs. Specific objectives include: investigate unique advantages of parallel and multiprocesses for: reformulating/solving structural mechanics and formulating/solving multidisciplinary mechanics and develop integrated structural system computational simulators for: predicting structural performances, evaluating newly developed methods, and for identifying and prioritizing improved/missing methods needed. Herein the CSM program is summarized with emphasis on the Engine Structures Computational Simulator (ESCS). Typical results obtained using ESCS are described to illustrate its versatility.

  12. Structural Characterization of Sm(III)(EDTMP).

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Pushie, M J; Cooper, D M L; Doschak, M R

    2015-11-01

    Samarium-153 ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(methylenephosphonic acid) ((153)Sm-EDTMP, or samarium lexidronam), also known by its registered trademark name Quadramet, is an approved therapeutic radiopharmaceutical used in the palliative treatment of painful bone metastases. Typically, patients with prostate, breast, or lung cancer are most likely to go on to require bone pain palliation treatment due to bone metastases. Sm(EDTMP) is a bone-seeking drug which accumulates on rapidly growing bone, thereby delivering a highly region-specific dose of radiation, chiefly through β particle emission. Even with its widespread clinical use, the structure of Sm(EDTMP) has not yet been characterized at atomic resolution, despite attempts to crystallize the complex. Herein, we prepared a 1:1 complex of the cold (stable isotope) of Sm(EDTMP) under alkaline conditions and then isolated and characterized the complex using conventional spectroscopic techniques, as well as with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional structure calculations, using natural abundance Sm. We present the atomic resolution structure of [Sm(III)(EDTMP)-8H](5-) for the first time, supported by the EXAFS data and complementary spectroscopic techniques, which demonstrate that the samarium coordination environment in solution is in agreement with the structure that has long been conjectured. PMID:26437889

  13. Engine Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKnight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schrantz, S.; Hartle, M. S.; Bechtel, G. S.; Lewis, K.; Ridgway, M.; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the technical effort to develop: (1) geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts in finite element form, (2) component design tools for nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts which utilize the recipes and (3) an integrated design tool which combines the simulations of the nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts with the previously developed combustor, turbine blade, and turbine vane models for a total engine representation. These developments will be accomplished in cooperation and in conjunction with comparable efforts of NASA Glenn Research Center.

  14. Computational structural mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    The computational structural mechanics (CSM) program at Lewis encompasses the formulation and solution of structural mechanics problems and the development of integrated software systems to computationally simulate the performance, durability, and life of engine structures. It is structured to supplement, complement, and, whenever possible, replace costly experimental efforts. Specific objectives are to investigate unique advantages of parallel and multiprocessing for reformulating and solving structural mechanics and formulating and solving multidisciplinary mechanics and to develop integrated structural system computational simulators for predicting structural performance, evaluating newly developed methods, and identifying and prioritizing improved or missing methods.

  15. Computational structural mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    The computational structural mechanics (CSM) program at Lewis encompasses the formulation and solution of structural mechanics problems and the development of integrated software systems to computationally simulate the performance, durability, and life of engine structures. It is structured to supplement, complement, and, whenever possible, replace costly experimental efforts. Specific objectives are to investigate unique advantages of parallel and multiprocessing for reformulating and solving structural mechanics and formulating and solving multidisciplinary mechanics and to develop integrated structural system computational simulators for predicting structural performance, evaluating newly developed methods, and identifying and prioritizing improved or missing methods.

  16. Military engine computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Daniel E.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative (IHPTET) goals require a strong analytical base. Effective analysis of composite materials is critical to life analysis and structural optimization. Accurate life prediction for all material systems is critical. User friendly systems are also desirable. Post processing of results is very important. The IHPTET goal is to double turbine engine propulsion capability by the year 2003. Fifty percent of the goal will come from advanced materials and structures, the other 50 percent will come from increasing performance. Computer programs are listed.

  17. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  18. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  19. Automotive Stirling Engine Mod I design review report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This volume, No. 3, of the Automotive Stirling Engine Mod 1 Design Review Report contains a preliminary parts list and detailed drawings of equipment for the basic Stirling engine and for the following systems: vehicular Stirling Engine System; external heat system; hot and cold engine systems; engine drive; controls and auxiliaries; and vehicle integration. (LCL)

  20. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H; Cai, T; Tagle, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  1. Molecular structures of unbound and transcribing RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Niklas A.; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Moreno-Morcillo, Maria; Glatt, Sebastian; Kosinski, Jan; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Sachse, Carsten; Müller, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of genes encoding small structured RNAs such as tRNAs, spliceosomal U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA is carried out by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), the largest yet structurally least characterized eukaryotic RNA polymerase. The cryo-EM structures of the S. cerevisiae Pol III elongating complex at 3.9 Å resolution and the apo Pol III enzyme in two different conformations at 4.6 and 4.7 Å resolution, respectively, allow for the first time to build a 17-subunit atomic model of Pol III. The reconstructions reveal the precise orientation of the C82/C34/C31 heterotrimer in close proximity to the stalk. The C53/C37 heterodimer positions residues involved in transcription termination close to the non-template DNA strand. In the apo Pol III structures, the stalk adopts different orientations coupled with closed and open conformations of the clamp. Our results provide novel insights into Pol III-specific transcription and the adaptation of Pol III towards its small transcriptional targets. PMID:26605533

  2. Energy band engineering using polarization induced interface charges in MOCVD grown III-nitride heterojunction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Characteristics of III-nitride based heterojunction devices are greatly influenced by the presence of high density of polarization induced interface charges. Research undertaken in the current doctoral thesis demonstrates the effect of presence of one, three and six sheets of polarization induced charges in three different III-nitride based devices, namely in a photocathode, a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) and a hyperspectral detector structure. Through a systematic set of experiments and theoretical modeling an in-depth study of the interaction between multiple sheets of polarization induced charges and their impact on energy band profile was undertaken. Various device designs were studied and optimized using device simulations. Subsequently device structures were grown using metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Growth conditions for III-nitride epilayers were optimized for pressure, temperature and V/III ratio. Devices were fabricated using photolithography and e-beam evaporation. Novel GaN and GaN/AlGaN photocathode structures were developed. First demonstration of effective negative electron affinity (ENEA) in a GaN photocathode without the use of Cs was made. Effect of polarization induced surface charges on photoemission characteristics was successfully explained using simulated energy band diagrams. AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN/SiO2 based back barrier HEMT structures were developed in which bandgap, thin film thicknesses and polarization induced charge density were engineered to demonstrate Normally OFF operation along with the ability to engineer turn ON voltage of the device. Further, AlGaN based tunable hyperspectral detector pixel with 6-heterojunctions, for application in wavelength spectrometry from UV to IR part of the spectrum, was developed. The novel device design used in the hyperspectral detector utilized voltage tunable internal photoemission (IPE) barriers to measure the energy of the incident photon. Detailed IPE measurements were

  3. Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS) is the development of a specialized software system for the construction of geometric descriptive and discrete analytical models of engine parts, components, and substructures which can be transferred to finite element analysis programs such as NASTRAN. The NASA Lewis Engine Structures Program is concerned with the development of technology for the rational structural design and analysis of advanced gas turbine engines with emphasis on advanced structural analysis, structural dynamics, structural aspects of aeroelasticity, and life prediction. Fundamental and common to all of these developments is the need for geometric and analytical model descriptions at various engine assembly levels which are generated using ESMOSS.

  4. Harrier III-AV8B with a modern engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. B., III; Wurts, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper examines the application of a 26, 156-lb thrust engine (which is 30 percent more thrust than the short-lift dry rating on the F402-RR-406 Pegasus engine) to an AV-8B aircraft. This modern engine has 30 percent more thrust than the F402-RR-406 Pegasus engine with no increase in engine weight; the weight is assumed to be constant for both engines. The paper focuses on the benefit to the AV-8B in increasing short takeoff gross weight and vertical landing weight. A second comparison is made between the bigger engine with the existing thrust-versus-SFC curve, and a 10 percent lower SFC curve. The notion of a modern engine with 10 percent lower SFC and 30 percent more thrust for the same size and weight is presented as a hypothesis, and is not supported by discussing engine technology. There are no engine data or technical discussion as to how the modern engine is constructed or which manufacturer could build it. The performance estimates are generated by ACSYNT, a NASA developed computer code that is available to U.S. industry and has been reported on in a number of other publications.

  5. The Mathematical Disposition of Structural Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsburg, Julie

    2007-01-01

    This ethnographic study investigated the mathematical disposition of engineers. Structural engineers in two firms were observed in everyday practice. Observation and interview data were analyzed to elucidate the role of mathematics in solving engineering problems and the engineers' perceptions of the status of mathematics relative to other…

  6. Structural and electronic properties of III-V bismuth compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferhat, M.; Zaoui, A.

    2006-03-01

    We have performed ab initio self-consistent calculations based on the full potential linear augmented plane-wave method with the generalized gradient approximation to investigate the structural and the electronic properties of the less known bismuth III-V compounds: BBi, AlBi, GaBi, and InBi. Ground state parameters are computed and compared with available theoretical and experimental works. The zinc-blende phase is found to be the most stable for BBi, AlBi, and GaBi, while InBi prefers the tetragonal PbO structure. The relativistic contraction of the 6s orbital of Bi has strong effect on the band structure of III-Bi compounds, which exhibits some features that differ considerably from those of typical III-V semiconductors. In particular, we found an inverted band gap, which reflects a semimetallic character of these systems. Their bonding nature is analyzed in terms of valence charge density transfer, showing three different natures of the bond. Besides, the calculated valence charge density for BBi shows an anomalous behavior characterized by a charge transfer toward the cation B atom, while the others III-Bi behave as the typical III-V compounds with a small charge transfer to the anion bismuth atom.

  7. Structure of internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, N.; Endo, H.; Oshio, S.; Ebisudani, T.; Ito, M.; Mizukami, T.; Kishimoto, M.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes a structure of internal combustion engine, comprising a cylinder member formed with a cylinder which demarcates a combustion chamber in cooperation with a piston connected with a crankshaft, a crankcase provided in succession with the lower end of the cylinder member to accommodate the crankshaft, a valve actuating mechanism actuating valves provided in the combustion chamber in response to rotation of the crankshaft, at least a part of the valve actuating mechanism being accommodated in a rocker case provided on the upper end of the cylinder member, an oil return passage constituting means opening at one end into the rocker case, the other end being open into the crankcase at one side which is partitioned by a plane containing the cylinder axis of the cylinder member and the axis of the crankshaft and is occupied by a crank pin of the crankshaft when the piston rises, thereby constituting a passage for leading oil in the rocker case into the crankcase, and a restraining means provided in relation to the oil return passage constituting means so that an air flow around the axis of the crankshaft within the crankcase owing to the rotation of the crankshaft is restrained from entering into the passage through the opening of the other end.

  8. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  9. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  10. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  11. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  12. Engineered Magnetic Core-Shell Structures.

    PubMed

    Alavi Nikje, Mir Mohammad; Vakili, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, engineered magnetic core-shell structures are playing an important role in the wide range of various applications. These magnetic core-shell structures have attracted considerable attention because of their unique properties and various applications. Also, the synthesis of engineered magnetic core-shell structures has attracted practical interest because of potential applications in areas such as ferrofluids, medical imaging, drug targeting and delivery, cancer therapy, separations, and catalysis. So far a large number of engineered magnetic core-shell structures have been successfully synthesized. This review article focuses on the recent progress in synthesis and characterization of engineered magnetic core-shell structures. Also, this review gives a brief description of the various application of these structures. It is hoped that this review will play some small part in helping future developments in important field. PMID:26377655

  13. Synthesis and structural characterization of new dithiocarbamate complexes from Sb(III) and Bi(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, Nur Amirah; Baba, Ibrahim

    2013-11-27

    Twenty new antimony and bismuth dithiocarbamate complexes which employed ten different type of amines have been successfully synthesized. The synthesized complexes with metal to dithiocarbamate ratio at 1:3. Elemental analysis of the complexes gave the general formula of MCl[S{sub 2}CNR’R”]{sub 2} where M = Sb(III), Bi(III); R’ = methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, sec-butyl, benzyl; R” = ethanol, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, benzyl. The complexes were analysed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of five-coordinated antimony (III) complex have been determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on SbCl[S{sub 2}CN(C{sub 4}H{sub 9})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 2} adopted a triclinic system with a space group P1 with a = 10.0141(8) Å, b = 10.1394(7) Å, c = 11.8665(9) Å, α = 67.960°, β =87.616°, γ = 80.172°.

  14. Synthesis and structural characterization of new dithiocarbamate complexes from Sb(III) and Bi(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaluddin, Nur Amirah; Baba, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    Twenty new antimony and bismuth dithiocarbamate complexes which employed ten different type of amines have been successfully synthesized. The synthesized complexes with metal to dithiocarbamate ratio at 1:3. Elemental analysis of the complexes gave the general formula of MCl[S2CNR'R"]2 where M = Sb(III), Bi(III); R' = methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, sec-butyl, benzyl; R" = ethanol, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, benzyl. The complexes were analysed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of five-coordinated antimony (III) complex have been determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on SbCl[S2CN(C4H9)(C2H5)]2 adopted a triclinic system with a space group P1 with a = 10.0141(8) Å, b = 10.1394(7) Å, c = 11.8665(9) Å, α = 67.960°, β =87.616°, γ = 80.172°.

  15. Structural tailoring of engine blades (STAEBL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. E.; Pratt, T. K.; Brown, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical optimization procedure was developed for the structural tailoring of engine blades and was used to structurally tailor two engine fan blades constructed of composite materials without midspan shrouds. The first was a solid blade made from superhybrid composites, and the second was a hollow blade with metal matrix composite inlays. Three major computerized functions were needed to complete the procedure: approximate analysis with the established input variables, optimization of an objective function, and refined analysis for design verification.

  16. Interface engineering and chemistry of Hf-based high-k dielectrics on III-V substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Sun, Zhaoqi

    2013-03-01

    Recently, III-V materials have been extensively studied as potential candidates for post-Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) channel materials. The main obstacle to implement III-V compound semiconductors for CMOS applications is the lack of high quality and thermodynamically stable insulators with low interface trap densities. Due to their excellent thermal stability and relatively high dielectric constants, Hf-based high-k gate dielectrics have been recently highlighted as the most promising high-k dielectrics for III-V-based devices. This paper provides an overview of interface engineering and chemistry of Hf-based high-k dielectrics on III-V substrates. We begin with a survey of methods developed for generating Hf-based high-k gate dielectrics. To address the impact of these hafnium based materials, their interfaces with GaAs as well as a variety of semiconductors are discussed. After that, the integration issues are highlighted, including the development of high-k deposition without Fermi level pinning, surface passivation and interface state, and integration of novel device structure with Si technology. Finally, we conclude this review with the perspectives and outlook on the future developments in this area. This review explores the possible influences of research breakthroughs of Hf-based gate dielectrics on the current and future applications for nano-MOSFET devices.

  17. Structure of Yellow Fever Virus Envelope Protein Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Volk, David E.; May, Fiona J.; Gandham, Sai H. A.; Anderson, Anjenique; Von Lindern, Jana J.; Beasley, David W. C.; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Gorenstein, David G.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of recombinant domain III of the envelope protein (rED3) of yellow fever virus (YFV), containing the major neutralization site, was determined using NMR spectroscopy. The amino acid sequence and structure of the YFV-rED3 shows differences from ED3s of other mosquito-borne flaviviruses; in particular, the partially surface-exposed BC loop where methionine-304 and valine-324 were identified as being critical for the structure of the loop. Variations in the structure and surface chemistry of ED3 between flaviviruses affect neutralization sites and may affect host cell receptor interactions and play a role in the observed variations in viral pathogenesis and tissue tropism. PMID:19818466

  18. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures at Lewis Research Center is presented. Three elements of the research program are: (1) composite load spectra methodology; (2) probabilistic structural analysis methodology; and (3) probabilistic structural analysis application. Recent progress includes: (1) quantification of the effects of uncertainties for several variables on high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFT) turbine blade temperature, pressure, and torque of the space shuttle main engine (SSME); (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function for various structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties in primitive structural variables; and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the structural durability of hot engine structural components can be effectively evaluated in a formal probabilistic/reliability framework.

  19. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural

  20. Circular structure of the MCMI-III personality disorder scales.

    PubMed

    Strack, S; Choca, J P; Gurtman, M B

    2001-06-01

    Millon's (1987) circular model of personality disorders was examined in a large sample of psychiatric patients (N = 2,366) who completed the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III; Millon, 1997) as part of routine assessment after presentation for treatment. Principal components analyses were conducted to identify the first two dimensions in MCMI-III base rate scores, weighted and unweighted raw scores, and nonoverlapping scale scores. Similar analyses were made on these scores when acquiescence was partialled out. Circular plots of the scales were examined against Millon's hypothesized arrangement and the model was tested using confirmatory factor analysis. Results replicated those of Strack, Lorr, and Campbell (1990) with the MCMI-II. Millon's horizontal Impassive-Expressive dimension was recovered in both regular and residual scores but the vertical axis appeared to represent an Impulsivity-Compulsivity dimension rather than the Autonomous-Enmeshed continuum envisioned by Millon. Although scale order followed Millon's predictions for the most part, a number of departures from theoretical expectations were noted and none of the score sets yielded a good fit to the hypothetical structure. Millon's model appears to have promise as a circumplex that can encompass all of the personality disorders but changes are needed to rectify discrepancies between the theory and empirical findings. PMID:11406998

  1. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  2. Designing, engineering, and testing wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce basic structural engineering concepts in a clear, simple manner while actively involving students. This project emphasizes the fact that a good design uses materials efficiently. The test structure in this experiment can easily be built and has various design options. Even when the structure is loaded to collapsing, only one or two pieces usually break, leaving the remaining pieces intact and reusable.

  3. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of yttrium(iii), dysprosium(iii), erbium(iii), and europium(ii,iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and EPR analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongli; Guo, Wenzhen; Liu, Dongling; Yang, Ying; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    Several structurally characterized heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metal ate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide Y(iii), Dy(iii), Er(iii), Eu(iii), and Eu(ii) were prepared via the reaction of MCl3 and K[3,5-R2dp] in varied ratios at 200-220 °C (M = Y, Dy, Er, Eu; R = tBu, Ph). PMID:26666366

  4. The flexible pocketome engine for structural chemogenomics.

    PubMed

    Abagyan, Ruben; Kufareva, Irina

    2009-01-01

    Biological metabolites, substrates, cofactors, chemical probes, and drugs bind to flexible pockets in multiple biological macromolecules to exert their biological effect. The rapid growth of the structural databases and sequence data, including SNPs and disease-related genome modifications, complemented by the new cutting-edge 3D docking, scoring, and profiling methods has created a unique opportunity to develop a comprehensive structural map of interactions between any small molecule and biopolymers. Here we demonstrate that a comprehensive structural genomics engine can be built using multiple pocket conformations, experimentally determined or generated with a variety of modeling methods, and new efficient ensemble docking algorithms. In contrast to traditional ligand-activity-based engines trained on known chemical structures and their activities, the structural pocketome and docking engine will allow prediction of poses and activities for new, previously unknown, protein binding sites, and new, previously uncharacterized, chemical scaffolds. This de novo structure-based activity prediction engine may dramatically accelerate the discovery of potent and specific therapeutics with reduced side effects. PMID:19727619

  5. Large Hexadecametallic {Mn(III) -Ln(III) } Wheels: Synthesis, Structural, Magnetic, and Theoretical Characterization.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Kuduva R; Langley, Stuart K; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis, gas sorption studies, magnetic properties, and theoretical studies of new molecular wheels of core type {Mn(III) 8 Ln(III) 8 } (Ln=Dy, Ho, Er, Y and Yb), using the ligand mdeaH2 , in the presence of ortho-toluic or benzoic acid are reported. From the seven wheels studied the {Mn8 Dy8 } and {Mn8 Y8 } analogues exhibit SMM behavior as determined from ac susceptibility experiments in a zero static magnetic field. From DFT calculations a S=16 ground state was determined for the {Mn8 Y8 } complex due to weak ferromagnetic Mn(III) -Mn(III) interactions. Ab initio CASSCF+RASSI-SO calculations on the {Mn8 Dy8 } wheel estimated the Mn(III) -Dy(III) exchange interaction as -0.1 cm(-1) . This weak exchange along with unfavorable single-ion anisotropy of Dy(III) /Mn(III) ions, however, led to the observation of SMM behavior with fast magnetic relaxation. The orientation of the g-anisotropy of the Dy(III) ions is found to be perpendicular to the plane of the wheel and this suggests the possibility of toroidal magnetic moments in the cluster. The {Mn8 Ln8 } clusters reported here are the largest heterometallic Mn(III) Ln(III) wheels and the largest {3d-4f} wheels to exhibit SMM behavior reported to date. PMID:26403264

  6. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures is a major activity at Lewis Research Center. Recent activities have focused on extending the methods to include the combined uncertainties in several factors on structural response. This paper briefly describes recent progress on composite load spectra models, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic strength degradation modeling. Progress is described in terms of fundamental concepts, computer code development, and representative numerical results.

  7. Engineered biosynthesis of plant polyketides: chain length control in an octaketide-producing plant type III polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ikuro; Oguro, Satoshi; Utsumi, Yoriko; Sano, Yukie; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2005-09-14

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily of type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) produces a variety of plant secondary metabolites with remarkable structural diversity and biological activities (e.g., chalcones, stilbenes, benzophenones, acrydones, phloroglucinols, resorcinols, pyrones, and chromones). Here we describe an octaketide-producing novel plant-specific type III PKS from aloe (Aloe arborescens) sharing 50-60% amino acid sequence identity with other plant CHS-superfamily enzymes. A recombinant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzed seven successive decarboxylative condensations of malonyl-CoA to yield aromatic octaketides SEK4 and SEK4b, the longest polyketides known to be synthesized by the structurally simple type III PKS. Surprisingly, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a single residue Gly207 (corresponding to the CHS's active site Thr197) determines the polyketide chain length and product specificity. Small-to-large substitutions (G207A, G207T, G207M, G207L, G207F, and G207W) resulted in loss of the octaketide-forming activity and concomitant formation of shorter chain length polyketides (from triketide to heptaketide) including a pentaketide chromone, 2,7-dihydroxy-5-methylchromone, and a hexaketide pyrone, 6-(2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylphenyl)-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone, depending on the size of the side chain. Notably, the functional diversity of the type III PKS was shown to evolve from simple steric modulation of the chemically inert single residue lining the active-site cavity accompanied by conservation of the Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad. This provided novel strategies for the engineered biosynthesis of pharmaceutically important plant polyketides. PMID:16144421

  8. Teaching Structural Design in Civil Engineering Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metwally, Ashraf

    This paper is a description of a college course in structural design, which in this case serves as the capstone of the program in Civil Engineering Technology at the College of Staten Island (New York). Fourteen weeks of class lecture topics, activities, and assignments are delineated. Coverage includes building codes, loads calculation,…

  9. 46 CFR 11.505 - Engineer officer structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Engineer officer structure. 11.505 Section 11.505... OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.505 Engineer officer structure. The following diagram illustrates the engineering endorsement structure including cross over...

  10. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Li, Pangpang; Ma, Jianping; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-01

    A few heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metalate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii) were simply prepared via the metathesis reaction of MCl3 (THF)m (m = 1-2) and K[3,5-R2dp] ([3,5-R2dp](-) = 3,5-di-substituent-1,2,4-diazaphospholide; R = tBu, Ph) in a varied ratio (1 : 3, 1 : 4, and 1 : 5, respectively) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran. All the complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H}, IR, and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis despite their paramagnetism (excluding La(iii) complexes). The structures of the complexes were found to feature varied coordination modes. The magnetic properties of several compounds were studied by magnetic susceptibility, and the complexes presented the magnetic moments close to or lower than the theoretical values for the free ions in the trivalent oxidation states (Pr(3+), Nd(3+)). PMID:27326667

  11. Oscillator Strengths for Fine-Structure Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3), 3s(sup 2)3p3d, 3s(sup 2)3p4s, 3s(sup 2)3p4p, and 3s(sup 2)3p4d configurations of S III are calculated using extensive configuration-interaction wave functions. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices have been made so that the energy splittings are as close as possible to the experimental values. The present results are compared with other available calculations and experiments.

  12. Soy-Based, Water-Cooled, TC W-III Two Cycle Engine Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Curtis R.; Miller, Mark E.

    2003-08-30

    The objective of this project was to achieve technical approval and commercial launch for a biodegradable soy oil-based, environmentally safe, TC W-III performance, water-cooled, two cycle engine oil. To do so would: (1) develop a new use for RBD soybean oil; (2) increase soybean utilization in North America in the range of 500 K-3.0 MM bushels; and (3) open up supply opportunities of 1.5-5.0 MM bushels worldwide. These goals have been successfully obtained.

  13. The Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-01-01

    ARTICLE SUMMARY Type III secretion systems (T3SS) afford gram-negative bacteria a most intimate means of altering the biology of their eukaryotic hosts — the direct delivery of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to that of the eukaryote. This incredible biophysical feat is accomplished by nanosyringe “injectisomes,” which form a conduit across the three plasma membranes, peptidoglycan layer and extracellular space that form a barrier to the direct delivery of proteins from bacterium to host. The focus of this chapter is T3SS function at the structural level; we will summarize the core findings that have shaped our understanding of the structure and function of these systems and highlight recent developments in the field. In turn, we describe the T3SS secretory apparatus, consider its engagement with secretion substrates, and discuss the post-translational regulation of secretory function. Lastly, we close with a discussion of the future prospects for the interrogation of structure-function relationships in the T3SS. PMID:26999392

  14. Structural and functional characterization of two unusual endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Hall, David R; Smalås, Arne O; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna; Moe, Elin

    2015-08-01

    While most bacteria possess a single gene encoding the bifunctional DNA glycosylase Endonuclease III (EndoIII) in their genomes, Deinococcus radiodurans possesses three: DR2438 (DrEndoIII1), DR0289 (DrEndoIII2) and DR0982 (DrEndoIII3). Here we have determined the crystal structures of DrEndoIII1 and an N-terminally truncated form of DrEndoIII3 (DrEndoIII3Δ76). We have also generated a homology model of DrEndoIII2 and measured activity of the three enzymes. All three structures consist of two all α-helical domains, one of which exhibits a [4Fe-4S] cluster and the other a HhH-motif, separated by a DNA binding cleft, similar to previously determined structures of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, both DrEndoIII1 and DrEndoIII3 possess an extended HhH motif with extra helical features and an altered electrostatic surface potential. In addition, the DNA binding cleft of DrEndoIII3 seems to be less accessible for DNA interactions, while in DrEndoIII1 it seems to be more open. Analysis of the enzyme activities shows that DrEndoIII2 is most similar to the previously studied enzymes, while DrEndoIII1 seems to be more distant with a weaker activity towards substrate DNA containing either thymine glycol or an abasic site. DrEndoIII3 is the most distantly related enzyme and displays no detectable activity towards these substrates even though the suggested catalytic residues are conserved. Based on a comparative structural analysis, we suggest that the altered surface potential, shape of the substrate-binding pockets and specific amino acid substitutions close to the active site and in the DNA interacting loops may underlie the unexpected differences in activity. PMID:26172070

  15. Balancer structure for three-cylinder engines

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.

    1986-01-21

    This patent describes a balancer structure for a three-cylinder in-line engine. The in-line engine is indicated in the patent as having a crankshaft having crank arms configured at angles of 120/sup 0/ with respect to each other and operatively connected to a piston assembly within each of the cylinders. This crankshaft and assembly, which serves as a balancer structure as one of its applications, is further characterized in the patent as consisting of a number of component parts. The first component described is a single countershaft adjacent and parallel to the crankshaft. It is specified in the patent that this countershaft must rotate at the same speed as the crankshaft but in an opposite direction in order to fulfill its role in the balancer structure. The patent also details an element of the balancer structure which consists of a means utilizing counterweights mounted on the crankshaft at the first and third cylinder positions. These weights are indicated as partially balancing the inertia forces of reciprocating masses and the entire inertia forces of rotating masses present in the described engine. The required position of these counterweights is indicated as being a location more than 90/sup 0/ from the crank arm for the corresponding cylinder and perpendicular to the second cylinder crank arm. The last component described consists of two balancers mounted on both ends of the countershaft which balance the remainder of the inertia forces of reciprocating masses and the inertia of the crankshaft about axes perpendicular to itself.

  16. Gallium(III) Tetraphenylporphyrinates Containing Hydrosulfide and Thiolate Ligands: Structural Models for Sulfur-Bound Iron(III) Hemes.

    PubMed

    Meininger, Daniel J; Chee-Garza, Max; Arman, Hadi D; Tonzetich, Zachary J

    2016-03-01

    Gallium(III) tetraphenylporphyrinates (TPP) containing anionic sulfur ligands have been prepared and characterized in the solid state and solution. The complexes serve as structural models for iron(III) heme sites containing sulfur coordination that otherwise prove challenging to synthesize due to the propensity for reduction to iron(II). The compounds prepared include the first well-characterized example of a trivalent metalloporphyrinate containing a terminal hydrosulfide ligand, [Ga(SH)(TPP)], as well as [Ga(SEt)(TPP)], [Ga(SPh)(TPP)], and [Ga(SSi(i)Pr3)(TPP)]. The stability of these compounds toward reduction has permitted an investigation of their solid-state structures and electrochemistry. The structural features and reaction chemistry of the complexes in relation to their iron(III) analogs is discussed. PMID:26872092

  17. Electronic structure calculations of group III nitride clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandalam, Anil Kumar

    2002-04-01

    Group III nitrides have become materials of choice in the manufacturing of devices used in opto-electronic and high-temperature high-power electronic industries. Hence, these materials received wide attention and have become the focus of several theoretical and experimental studies. Though these materials are studied in bulk and thin film forms, research at the cluster level is still lacking. Hence, a first principles calculation, based on the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) to Density Functional Theory (DFT) was initiated to study the structural and electronic properties of AlnN n, GanNn, and InnNn, (n = 1--6) clusters. The calculated results show that the small polyatomic nitride clusters (monomer, triatomic and dimer) have a strong tendency to form N-N multiple bonds leading to the weakening of any existent metal-N or metal-metal bonds. In the absence of the N-N bonds, the metal-nitrogen bond dominates, forming short bond-lengths and large force constants. However, the strength of these heteronuclear bonds decreases in going from Al to Ga and In, whereas the weak metal-metal bond increases its strength from Al to Ga to In in the nitride clusters. Starting from the trimers M3N3, a distinct structural difference between the lowest energy configurations of AlnNn and that of GanNn, and In nNn, clusters has been observed. For AlnNn, clusters, the metal-nitrogen bond is found to dominate the lowest energy configurations. As the cluster size is increased from Al3N3 to Al 6N6, a transition from planar ring structures towards a bulk-like three dimensional configurations is seen. However, in GanN n, and InnNn clusters, no such trend is observed and the lowest energy configurations are dominated either by N2 or (N3)- sub-units. The segregation of N atoms within the stoichiometric clusters indicates the possibility of N2 and N3 based defects in the thin-film deposition process which may affect the quality of the thin-film devices based on Group III nitrides.

  18. Chemistry Characterization of Jet Aircraft Engine Particulate by XPS: Results from APEX III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports XPS analysis of jet exhaust particulate from a B737, Lear, ERJ, and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and platforms. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20 percent or more. By lower resolution survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N, and O in the form of oxides. Burning additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their presence can be used as a tracer for identifying soots from aircraft engines as well as diagnostic for monitoring engine performance and wear.

  19. Chemistry characterization of jet aircraft engine particulate matter by XPS: Results from APEX III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.; Huang, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of jet exhaust particulate matter (PM) from a B737, Lear, ERJ and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and powers. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20% or more. By survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N and O in the form of oxides. Additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their collective presence could serve as an environmental tracer for identifying PM originating from aircraft engines and serving as a diagnostic for engine performance and wear.

  20. Ion mixing of III-V compound semiconductor layered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, W.; Pappert, S.A.; Zhu, B.; Clawson, A.R.; Yu, P.K.L.; Lau, S.S. ); Poker, D.B.; White, C.W. ); Schwarz, S.A. )

    1992-03-15

    Compositional disordering of III-V compound superlattice structures has received considerable attention recently due to its potential application for photonic devices. The conventional method to induce compositional disorder in a layered structure is to implant a moderate dose of impurity ions ({similar to}10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}) into the structure at room temperature, followed by a high-temperature annealing step (this process is referred to as IA here). Ion irradiation at room temperature alone does not cause any significant intermixing of layers. The subsequent high-temperature annealing step tends to restrict device processing flexibility. Ion mixing (IM) is capable of enhancing compositional disordering of layers at a rate which increases exponentially with the ion irradiation temperature. As a processing technique to planarize devices, ion mixing appears to be an attractive technology. In this work, we investigate compositional disordering in the AlGaAs/GaAs and the InGaAs/InP systems using ion mixing. We found that the ion mixing behavior of these two systems shows a thermally activated regime as well as an athermal regime, similar to that observed for metal-metal and metal-semiconductor systems. Ion mixing is observed to induce compositional disordering at significantly lower temperatures than that for the IA process. We have compared the two processes in terms of five parameters: (1) irradiation temperature, (2) dose dependence, (3) dose rate dependence, (4) annealing, and (5) ion dependence (including electrical effects and mass dependence). We found that the IM process is more efficient in utilizing the defects generated by ion irradiation to cause disordering. Both the physical mechanism of ion mixing and possible device implications will be discussed.

  1. Molecular structure, photophysical and thermal properties of samarium (III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Singh, Udai P.

    2008-03-01

    Some 8-coordinated samarium (III) complexes ( 1- 4) having bipy (2,2'-bipyridine), terpy (2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), phen (1,10-phenanthroline) and tp [hydrotris (pyrazol-1-yl) borate] as supporting ligands have been synthesized and structurally characterized by different techniques including X-ray crystallography. The X-ray studies demonstrated that the complexes 1, 2 and 4 crystallized in triclinic space group P1¯ with cell dimensions a = 8.5640(2) Å, b = 8.8696(2) Å, c = 15.8608(4) Å for 1; a = 7.2113(9) Å, b = 11.0737(14) Å, c = 13.6289(18) Å for 2; a = 12.440(3) Å, b = 12.874(3) Å, c = 17.822(4) Å for 4, whereas the complex 3 crystallized in the monoclinic space group P2 1/ c with cell dimensions a = 9.472(3) Å, b = 17.092(5) Å, c = 14.516(5) Å. The IR study suggested that the azide is coordinated in 1, 3-bridging mode in complex 4. The photophysical properties of above complexes have been studied with ultraviolet absorption and emission spectral studies. Thermogravimetric analyses suggested that all these complexes undergo the complete decomposition to form the thermally stable samarium oxide (Sm 2O 3).

  2. Fatigue Reliability of Gas Turbine Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of an investigation are described for fatigue reliability in engine structures. The description consists of two parts. Part 1 is for method development. Part 2 is a specific case study. In Part 1, the essential concepts and practical approaches to damage tolerance design in the gas turbine industry are summarized. These have evolved over the years in response to flight safety certification requirements. The effect of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods on these methods is also reviewed. Assessment methods based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, with regard to both crack initiation and crack growth, are outlined. Limit state modeling techniques from structural reliability theory are shown to be appropriate for application to this problem, for both individual failure mode and system-level assessment. In Part 2, the results of a case study for the high pressure turbine of a turboprop engine are described. The response surface approach is used to construct a fatigue performance function. This performance function is used with the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to determine the probability of failure and the sensitivity of the fatigue life to the engine parameters for the first stage disk rim of the two stage turbine. A hybrid combination of regression and Monte Carlo simulation is to use incorporate time dependent random variables. System reliability is used to determine the system probability of failure, and the sensitivity of the system fatigue life to the engine parameters of the high pressure turbine. 'ne variation in the primary hot gas and secondary cooling air, the uncertainty of the complex mission loading, and the scatter in the material data are considered.

  3. Engineering and building RF structures - the works

    SciTech Connect

    Schrage, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    The translation of the physics designs of linear accelerators into engineering and manufacturing requirements is discussed. The stages of conceptual design, prototyping, final design, construction, and installation are described for both superconducting (LANL {beta} = 0.175 Spoke Cavity) and normal-conducting (APT/LEDA 6.7 MeV RFQ) accelerators. An overview of codes which have linked accelerator cavity and thermal/structural analysis modules is provided. The linked RF/thermal/CFD/structural codes do work. Workers at laboratories throughout the world have been successful in predicting the thermal and structural performance of accelerator cavities using these codes. Use of these codes allows accurate prediction of resonant frequencies, Lorentz force de-tuning, tuning sensitivities and mechanical resonant frequencies. Most important, these codes allow cost-effective optimization of the cavity geometry and, for superconducting cavities, the location and shape of external stiffeners.

  4. Dynamic and Structural Gas Turbine Engine Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Model the interactions between the structural dynamics and the performance dynamics of a gas turbine engine. Generally these two aspects are considered separate, unrelated phenomena and are studied independently. For diagnostic purposes, it is desirable to bring together as much information as possible, and that involves understanding how performance is affected by structural dynamics (if it is) and vice versa. This can involve the relationship between thrust response and the excitation of structural modes, for instance. The job will involve investigating and characterizing these dynamical relationships, generating a model that incorporates them, and suggesting and/or developing diagnostic and prognostic techniques that can be incorporated in a data fusion system. If no coupling is found, at the least a vibration model should be generated that can be used for diagnostics and prognostics related to blade loss, for instance.

  5. Structure and magnetic properties of an unusual homoleptic iron(III) thiocyanate dimer.

    PubMed

    Dinsdale, D R; Lough, A J; Lemaire, M T

    2015-06-28

    We describe the structural and variable temperature magnetic susceptibility properties of an unusual homoleptic bimetallic iron(III) thiocyanate tetraanion. This work represents the first structurally characterized bis(μ-1,3-thiocyanato) dimer of iron(III). A weak antiferromagnetic exchange interaction is observed between the two iron(III) ions, which is supported by broken symmetry density functional theory (DFT) calculations. PMID:25996241

  6. Solvation structure and thermodynamics for Pr(III), Nd(III) and Dy(III) complexes in ionic liquids evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribara, Keita; Matsumiya, Masahiko; Tsunashima, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    package. The bonding energy, ΔEb, was calculated as ΔEb = Etot(cluster) - Etot(RE3+) - nEtot([TFSA]-), and ΔEb ([Pr(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2-), ΔEb([Nd(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2-), and ΔEb([Dy(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2-) were calculated to be -4238.6 ± 6.8, -4362.3 ± 8.2, and -4284.2 ± 7.4 kJ mol-1, respectively. This series of structural results allows us to conclude that [Dy(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2- clusters are more stable state than the [Pr(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2- clusters in [P2225][TFSA]. Furthermore, the average atomic charges and the bond distances of these clusters were consistent with the thermodynamic properties.

  7. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-17

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors. PMID:27313043

  8. 14 CFR 33.23 - Engine mounting attachments and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.23 Engine mounting attachments and structure. (a) The maximum allowable limit and ultimate loads for engine mounting... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine mounting attachments and...

  9. Structural Engineering Managers - Innovation Challenges for their Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkeschová, D.; Tichá, A.

    2015-11-01

    The profession of a structural engineer is highly responsible, because the consequences of a structural engineer's errors result not only in economic damage to the property and often irreversible damage to the environment, they can also lead to direct loss of lives. In the current turbulent, dynamically developing society the managerial methods of structural engineers should not stagnate at the level of the last century applications. This paper deals with the challenges which the ongoing century poses to structural engineers and managers. It compares the results of research regarding the current state of managerial skills of structural engineers in Czech building companies to the defined skills of the 21st century's managers according to the global research programme ITL Research and according to the Vision for the Future of Structural Engineering, drawn up by Structural Engineering Institute - SEI ASCE.

  10. IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM -- PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Chase; Daniel Olsen; Ted Bestor

    2005-03-01

    This report documents the third year's effort towards a 3-year program conducted by the Engines & Energy Conversion Laboratory (EECL) at Colorado State University (CSU) to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. Research activities for the overall program were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. Commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. Two earlier phases of development precede this report. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of retrofit micropilot ignition (RMI) systems for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios under laboratory conditions at the EECL. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system at the EECL for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. These laboratory results were enhanced, then verified via a field demonstration project during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program. An Implementation Team of qualified engine retrofit service providers was assembled to install the retrofit micropilot ignition system for an engine operated by El Paso Pipeline Group at a compressor station near Window Rock, Arizona. Testing of this demonstration unit showed that the same benefits identified by laboratory testing at CSU, i.e., reduced fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (NOx, THC, CO, and CH2O). Installation efforts at Window Rock were completed towards the end of the budget period, which did not leave sufficient time to complete the durability testing. These efforts are ongoing, with funding provided by El Paso Pipeline Group, and the results will be documented in a report

  11. Crystal structures of two engineered thiol trypsins.

    PubMed

    McGrath, M E; Wilke, M E; Higaki, J N; Craik, C S; Fletterick, R J

    1989-11-28

    We have determined the three-dimensional structures of engineered rat trypsins which mimic the active sites of two classes of cysteine proteases. The catalytic serine was replaced with cysteine (S195C) to test the ability of sulfur to function as a nucleophile in a serine protease environment. This variant mimics the cysteine trypsin class of thiol proteases. An additional mutation of the active site aspartate to an asparagine (D102N) created the catalytic triad of the papain-type cysteine proteases. Rat trypsins S195C and D102N,S195C were solved to 2.5 and 2.0 A, respectively. The refined structures were analyzed to determine the structural basis for the 10(6)-fold loss of activity of trypsin S195C and the 10(8)-fold loss of activity of trypsin D102N,S195C, relative to rat trypsin. The active site thiols were found in a reduced state in contrast to the oxidized thiols found in previous thiol protease structures. These are the first reported structures of serine proteases with the catalytic centers of sulfhydryl proteases. Structure analysis revealed only subtle global changes in enzyme conformation. The substrate binding pocket is unaltered, and active site amino acid 102 forms hydrogen bonds to H57 and S214 as well as to the backbone amides of A56 and H57. In trypsin S195C, D102 is a hydrogen-bond acceptor for H57 which allows the other imidazole nitrogen to function as a base during catalysis. In trypsin D102N,S195C, the asparagine at position 102 is a hydrogen-bond donor to H57 which places a proton on the imidazole nitrogen proximal to the nucleophile. This tautomer of H57 is unable to act as a base in catalysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2611228

  12. Synthesis, structure and luminescence studies of Eu(III), Tb(III), Sm(III), Dy(III) cationic complexes with acetylacetone and bis(5-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)propane☆

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexey N.; Hasegawa, Miki; Shimizu, Tomohito; Fukawa, Tomonori; Sakurai, Shoya; Nishchymenko, Galyna A.; Shul’gin, Victor F.; Meshkova, Svetlana B.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Studies concerning synthesis, structure and luminescence of eight-coordinate Eu, Tb, Sm and Dy complexes of the type [Ln(acac)2(L)]Cl (Hacac = pentanedione-2,4 and L = bis(5-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)propane) are reported in detail. The obtained complexes were investigated by various means including elemental- and thermogravimetric analysis, IR- and electron transition spectroscopy. The structure of the Tb complex was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography: Tb is eight-coordinate, and L acting only as a tetradentate chelate together with two bidentate acac ligands. Photophysical studies of the complexes were carried out. The Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes show strong emissions both in solid state and solution. The intensity of the luminescence of Dy(III) and Sm(III) are relatively weak. The factors determining the intensity of the photoluminescence are discussed. PMID:24068839

  13. Investigating the Structure of the WJ-III Cognitive at School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.

    2013-01-01

    During its development, the Woodcock-Johnson, Third Edition Cognitive (WJ-III Cognitive; McGrew & Woodcock, 2001) was never subjected to structural analysis using exploratory and higher order factor analyses. Instead, confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on separate sets of WJ-III correlation matrices, yielding a seven-factor model across…

  14. Crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride and its copper(II) and cobalt(III) chloride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M. Tsapkov, V. I.; Bocelli, G.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Shova, S. G.; Gulea, A. P.

    2006-01-15

    The crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride hydrate hemiethanol solvate (I), salicylideneguanylhydrazinium trichloroaquacuprate(II) (II), and bis(salicylideneguanylhydrazino)cobalt(III) chloride trihydrate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. The structures of compounds I, II, and III are solved by direct methods and refined using the least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms to the final factors R = 0.0597, 0.0212, and 0.0283, respectively. In the structure of compound I, the monoprotonated molecules and chlorine ions linked by hydrogen bonds form layers aligned parallel to the (010) plane. In the structure of compound II, the salicylaldehyde guanylhydrazone cations and polymer chains consisting of trichloroaquacuprate(II) anions are joined by an extended three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds. In the structure of compound III, the [Co(LH){sub 2}]{sup +} cations, chloride ions, and molecules of crystallization water are linked together by a similar network.

  15. Effect of III-V on insulator structure on quantum well intermixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Seiya; Ikku, Yuki; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    To achieve the monolithic active/passive integration on the III-V CMOS photonics platform, quantum well intermixing (QWI) on III-V on insulator (III-V-OI) is studied for fabricating multi-bandgap III-V-OI wafers. By optimizing the QWI condition for a 250-nm-thick III-V layer, which contains a five-layer InGaAsP-based multi-quantum well (MQW) with 80-nm-thick indium phosphide (InP) cladding layers, we have successfully achieved a photoluminescence (PL) peak shift of over 100 nm on the III-V-OI wafer. We have also found that the progress of QWI on the III-V-OI wafer is slower than that on the InP bulk wafer regardless of the buried oxide (BOX) thickness, bonding interface materials, and handle wafers. We have also found that the progress of QWI on the III-V-OI wafer is slower than that on the InP bulk wafer regardless of the buried oxide (BOX) thickness, bonding interface materials, and bulk support wafers on which the III-V-OI structure is formed (handle wafers). By comparing between the measured PL shift and simulated diffusions of phosphorus vacancies and interstitials during QWI, we have found that the slow QWI progress in the III-V-OI wafer is probably attributed to the enhanced recombination of vacancies and interstitials by the diffusion blocking of vacancies and interstitials at the BOX interface.

  16. Using Images To Teach the Beginnings of Structural Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindenberg, Henrique; Arevalo, Luis Alberto Tello

    Aiming at turning theory of structures into a captivating subject to civil engineering students and at helping them understand the link between the mathematical models and the real structures, a new experience is underway at the Department of Structural and Foundation Engineering of Excola Politecnica da Universidada de Sao Paulo: transparencies…

  17. Structural Basis for Substrate Binding and the Catalytic Mechanism of Type III Pantothenate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Kun; Strauss, Erick; Huerta, Carlos; Zhang, Hong

    2008-07-15

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the first step of the universal five-step coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway. The recently characterized type III PanK (PanK-III, encoded by the coaX gene) is distinct in sequence, structure and enzymatic properties from both the long-known bacterial type I PanK (PanK-I, exemplified by the Escherichia coli CoaA protein) and the predominantly eukaryotic type II PanK (PanK-II). PanK-III enzymes have an unusually high K{sub m} for ATP, are resistant to feedback inhibition by CoA, and are unable to utilize the N-alkylpantothenamide family of pantothenate analogues as alternative substrates, thus making type III PanK ineffective in generating CoA analogues as antimetabolites in vivo. Previously, we reported the crystal structure of the PanK-III from Thermotoga maritima and identified it as a member of the 'acetate and sugar kinase/heat shock protein 70/actin' (ASKHA) superfamily. Here we report the crystal structures of the same PanK-III in complex with one of its substrates (pantothenate), its product (phosphopantothenate) as well as a ternary complex structure of PanK-III with pantothenate and ADP. These results are combined with isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to present a detailed structural and thermodynamic characterization of the interactions between PanK-III and its substrates ATP and pantothenate. Comparison of substrate binding and catalytic sites of PanK-III with that of eukaryotic PanK-II revealed drastic differences in the binding modes for both ATP and pantothenate substrates, and suggests that these differences may be exploited in the development of new inhibitors specifically targeting PanK-III.

  18. Balancer structure for three-cylinder engines

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.

    1986-02-11

    This patent describes a balancer structure for a three-cylinder in-line engine having aligned three cylinders, a crankshaft having crank arms disposed at angles of 120/sup 0/ with respect to each other and operatively connected to the cylinders, respectively. This structure consists of: 1.) a single countershaft adjacent and parallel to and rotated at the same speed as the crankshaft but in the opposite direction; 2.) a counterweight is securely mounted on the crankshaft only at positions corresponding to the first and third cylinders for balancing a part of inertia force of reciprocating mases and the entire inertia force of rotating masses; 3.) at least one second counterweight securely mounted on the crankshaft substantially opposite to the crank arm corresponding to the second cylinder for balancing another part of the inertia force of the reciprocating masses; 4.) at least two balancers securely mounted on the countershaft at both ends for the balancing of the remainder of the inertia force of the reciprocating masses and a couple of inertia of the crankshaft about an axis perpendicular to the crankshaft.

  19. Effects of Humidity on Non-Hermetically Packaged III-V Structures and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Martin, S.; Lee, T.; Okuno, J.; Ruiz, R.; Gauldin, R.; Gaidis, M.; Smith, R.

    1999-01-01

    High humidity and temperature test (known as 85/85 tests) were performed on various III-V devices and structures to determine environmental effects in non-hermetically packaged GaAs membrane mixer diodes.

  20. Hard magnetism in structurally engineered silica nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyon-Min; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2016-09-21

    Creation of structural complexity by simple experimental control will be an attractive approach for the preparation of nanomaterials, as a classical bottom-up method is supplemented by a more efficient and more direct artificial engineering method. In this study, structural manipulation of MCM-41 type mesoporous silica is investigated by generating and imbedding hard magnetic CoFe2O4 nanoparticles into mesoporous silica. Depending on the heating rate and target temperature, mesoporous silica undergoes a transformation in shape to form hollow silica, framed silica with interior voids, or melted silica with intact mesostructures. Magnetism is governed by the major CoFe2O4 phase, and it is affected by antiferromagnetic hematite (α-Fe2O3) and olivine-type cobalt silicate (Co2SiO4), as seen in its paramagnetic behavior at the annealing temperature of 430 °C. The early formation of Co2SiO4 than what is usually observed implies the effect of the partial substitution of Fe in the sites of Co. Under slow heating (2.5 °C min(-1)) mesostructures are preserved, but with significantly smaller mesopores (d100 = 1.5 nm). In addition, nonstoichiometric CoxFe1-xO with metal vacancies at 600 °C, and spinel Co3O4 at 700 °C accompany major CoFe2O4. The amorphous nature of silica matrix is thought to contribute significantly to these structurally diverse and rich phases, enabled by off-stoichiometry between Si and O, and accelerated by the diffusion of metal cations into SiO4 polyhedra at an elevated temperature. PMID:27537252

  1. 46 CFR 11.505 - Engineer officer structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Engineer officer structure. 11.505 Section 11.505 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.505 Engineer officer...

  2. 46 CFR 11.505 - Engineer officer structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Engineer officer structure. 11.505 Section 11.505 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.505 Engineer officer...

  3. 46 CFR 11.505 - Engineer officer structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engineer officer structure. 11.505 Section 11.505 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.505 Engineer officer...

  4. Electrical properties of nanofibers and structural characterization of DNA-Au(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Wan; Lee, Chang Hoon; Jin, Jung-Il; Hwang, Jong Seung; Hwang, Sung Woo

    2014-05-23

    In order to realize deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based molecular electronics, chemical modifications of DNA are needed to improve electrical conductivity. We developed a novel method utilizing the incorporation of Au(III) ions into DNA bases to alter their electronic properties. When Au(III) ions were incorporated proportionally into DNA bases, conductance increased up to an Au(III) content of 0.42 Au(III) ion/nucleotide. Surprisingly, electron paramagnetic resonance signals of Au(II) ions were detected at g ∼1.98, and the calculated spin number of Au(II) ions ranged from ∼10(13) to ∼10(15). The structural deformation of the DNA helix occurred when complexed with Au(III); simultaneously, the conductance of DNA-Au(III) complexes decreased when the content of Au(III) was higher than 0.42 atom/nucleotide. This observation implies that the maintenance of helical structure in the Au(III) doped state of DNA molecules is very important to the enhancement of the carrier mobility of DNA. PMID:24786616

  5. Balancer structure for three-cylinder engines

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.

    1987-04-21

    This patent describes a balancer structure for a three-cylinder in-line engine having three cylinders, the latter comprising a first and third cylinder and a second cylinder disposed between the first and third cylinders, a crankshaft having crank arms disposed at angles of 120/sup 0/ with respect to each other and operatively connected to a piston assembly within each of the cylinders, respectively, consisting of: a single crankshaft adjacent and parallel to and rotated at the same speed as the crankshaft but in the opposite direction, means comprising first counterweights securely mounted on the crankshaft only at positions thereof corresponding to the first and third cylinders for balancing of a part of inertia forces of rotating masses and a part of inertia forces of reciprocating masses; means comprising at least one second counterweight securely mounted on the crankshaft substantially opposite to the crank arm corresponding to the second cylinder for balancing of the remainder of the inertia forces of rotating masses; at least two balancers respectively securely mounted on the countershaft at both ends respectively thereof for the balancing of the remainder of the inertia forces of reciprocating masses, and of the couple of inertia of the crankshaft about axes perpendicular to the crankshaft.

  6. Insight into the flagella type III export revealed by the complex structure of the type III ATPase and its regulator.

    PubMed

    Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru; Uchida, Yumiko; Kinoshita, Miki; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-03-29

    FliI and FliJ form the FliI6FliJ ATPase complex of the bacterial flagellar export apparatus, a member of the type III secretion system. The FliI6FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α3β3γ complex of F1-ATPase. The FliH homodimer binds to FliI to connect the ATPase complex to the flagellar base, but the details are unknown. Here we report the structure of the homodimer of a C-terminal fragment of FliH (FliHC2) in complex with FliI. FliHC2 shows an unusually asymmetric homodimeric structure that markedly resembles the peripheral stalk of the A/V-type ATPases. The FliHC2-FliI hexamer model reveals that the C-terminal domains of the FliI ATPase face the cell membrane in a way similar to the F/A/V-type ATPases. We discuss the mechanism of flagellar ATPase complex formation and a common origin shared by the type III secretion system and the F/A/V-type ATPases. PMID:26984495

  7. Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Foss, Peter; Wyzgoski, Michael; Trantina, Gerry; Kunc, Vlastimil; Schutte, Carol; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-23

    This report summarizes our FY 2009 research activities for the project titled:"Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures." These activities include (i) the completion of the development of a fiber length attrition model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs), (ii) development of the a fatigue damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iii) development of an impact damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iv) development of characterization methods for fatigue testing, (v) characterization of creep and fatigue responses of glass-fiber/polyamide (PA6,6) and glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP), (vi) characterization of fiber length distribution along the flow length of glass/PA6,6 and glass-fiber/PP, and (vii) characterization of impact responses of glass-fiber/PA6,6. The fiber length attrition model accurately captures the fiber length distribution along the flow length of the studied glass-fiber/PP material. The fatigue damage model is able to predict the S-N and stiffness reduction data which are valuable to the fatigue design of LFTs. The impact damage model correctly captures damage accumulation observed in experiments of glass-fiber/PA6,6 plaques.Further work includes validations of these models for representative LFT materials and a complex LFT part.

  8. 1. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing structure of Test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing structure of Test Stand 'B' (4215/E-16), also known as the 'Short Snorter.' California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering 'Structural Addition - Bldg. E-12, Edwards Test Station,' drawing no. E12/1-1, 8 August 1957. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand B, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. The role of a metastable RNA secondary structure in hepatitis delta virus genotype III RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Linnstaedt, Sarah D.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Casey, John L.

    2006-01-01

    RNA editing plays a critical role in the life cycle of hepatitis delta virus (HDV). The host editing enzyme ADAR1 recognizes specific RNA secondary structure features around the amber/W site in the HDV antigenome and deaminates the amber/W adenosine. A previous report suggested that a branched secondary structure is necessary for editing in HDV genotype III. This branched structure, which is distinct from the characteristic unbranched rod structure required for HDV replication, was only partially characterized, and knowledge concerning its formation and stability was limited. Here, we examine the secondary structures, conformational dynamics, and amber/W site editing of HDV genotype III RNA using a miniaturized HDV genotype III RNA in vitro. Computational analysis of this RNA using the MPGAfold algorithm indicated that the RNA has a tendency to form both metastable and stable unbranched secondary structures. Moreover, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that this RNA forms both branched and unbranched rod structures when transcribed in vitro. As predicted, the branched structure is a metastable structure that converts readily to the unbranched rod structure. Only branched RNA was edited at the amber/W site by ADAR1 in vitro. The structural heterogeneity of HDV genotype III RNA is significant because not only are both conformations of the RNA functionally important for viral replication, but the ratio of the two forms could modulate editing by determining the amount of substrate RNA available for modification. PMID:16790843

  10. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Pryor, Craig E.

    2010-04-15

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zinc-blende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier ab initio calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs, and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may facilitate the development of spin-based devices.

  11. Novel Fe (III) heterochelates: Synthesis, structural features and fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, C. K.; Jani, D. H.; Patel, H. S.; Pandya, H. M.

    2010-04-01

    Fluorescence properties of five 4-acyl pyrazolone based hydrazides (H 2SB n) and their Fe (III) heterochelates of the type [Fe(SB n)(L)(H 2O)]· mH 2O [H 2SB n = nicotinic acid [1-(3-methyl-5-oxo-1-phenyl-4,5-di hydro-1H-pyrazol-4yl)-acylidene]-hydrazide; where acyl = -CH 3, m = 4 ( H2SB1); -C 6H 5, m = 2 ( H2SB2); -CH 2-CH 3, m = 3 ( H2SB3); -CH 2-CH 2-CH 3, m = 1.5 ( H2SB4); -CH 2-C 6H 5, m = 1.5 ( H2SB5) and HL = 1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-7-(piperazin-1-yl)-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid] were studied at room temperature. The fluorescence spectra of heterochelates show red shift, which may be due to the chelation by the ligands to the metal ion. It enhances ligand ability to accept electrons and decreases the electron transition energy. The kinetic parameters such as order of reaction ( n), energy of activation ( Ea), entropy ( S*), pre-exponential factor ( A), enthalpy ( H*) and Gibbs free energy ( G*) have been reported.

  12. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive

  13. High-performance computing in structural mechanics and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Adeli, H.; Kamat, M.P.; Kulkarni, G.; Vanluchene, R.D. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta Montana State Univ., Bozeman )

    1993-07-01

    Recent advances in computer hardware and software have made multiprocessing a viable and attractive technology. This paper reviews high-performance computing methods in structural mechanics and engineering through the use of a new generation of multiprocessor computers. The paper presents an overview of vector pipelining, performance metrics for parallel and vector computers, programming languages, and general programming considerations. Recent developments in the application of concurrent processing techniques to the solution of structural mechanics and engineering problems are reviewed, with special emphasis on linear structural analysis, nonlinear structural analysis, transient structural analysis, dynamics of multibody flexible systems, and structural optimization. 64 refs.

  14. (Porphyrinato)bis(phthalocyaninato)dilanthanide(III) complexes presenting a sandwich triple-decker-like structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi, M.; De Cian, A.; Fischer, J.; Weiss, R.

    1986-06-18

    Bis(phthalocyaninato)lanthanide(III) derivatives presenting a sandwich-type structure have been known for many years. These complexes are still intensively studied due to their semi-conductor and electrochromic properties. The synthesis and properties of bis(porphyrinato) and tris(porphyrinato)lanthanide(III) derivatives have also been reported. X-ray structural studies have shown that bis(porphyrinato) complexes have geometries that are similar to those displayed by the LnPc/sub 2/ complexes (Ln = lanthanide; Pc = phthalocyanine) whereas the tris(porphyrinato) derivatives present structures in which two lanthanide(III) metal cations are sandwiched between three macrocyclic rings in triple-decker-like geometry. Structural, magnetic, and spectroscopic properties of the green form of lutetium(III) bis(phthalocyanate) have shown that this complex is in a nonprotonated, one-electron-oxidized ligand form, Ln (Pc/sup 2 -/) (Pc..pi..). In such a molecule, the unpaired spin could be either located on one phthalocyanine ring or delocalized over both rings. In order to force the localization of the unpaired spin on one ring, the authors have tried to synthesize a dissymmetric mixed-ligand, porphyrin (Por) phthalocyanine (Pc), lanthanide sandwich Ln(Por)(Pc). However, under the conditions used, the authors obtained dilanthanide sandwich-triple-decker-like complexes. (Por(Ln)Pc(Ln)Pc) in which the two metal cations are sandwiched between three macrocyclic rings. They report the synthesis and spectral properties of such derivatives obtained with Ln = Nd(III), Eu(III), and Gd(III) and with meso-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl) porphyrin (H/sub 2/T(4-OCH/sub 3/)PP) and phthalocyanine (H/sub 2/Pc). The X-ray structure of the neodymim complex is also reported.

  15. Flight Investigation of the Cooling Characteristics of a Two-row Radial Engine Installation III : Engine Temperature Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennak, Robert M; Messing, Wesley E; Morgan, James E

    1946-01-01

    The temperature distribution of a two-row radial engine in a twin-engine airplane has been investigated in a series of flight tests. The test engine was operated over a wide range of conditions at density altitudes of 5000 and 20,000 feet; quantitative results are presented showing the effects of flight and engine variables upon average engine temperature and over-all temperature spread. Discussions of the effect of the variables on the shape of the temperature patterns and on the temperature distribution of individual cylinders are also included. The results indicate that, for the tests conducted, the temperature distribution patterns were chiefly determined by the fuel-air ratio and cooling-air distributions. It was possible to calculate individual cylinder temperature, on the assumption of equal power distribution among cylinders, to within an average of plus or minus 14 degrees F. of the actual temperature. A considerable change occurred in either the spread or the thrust axis, the average engine fuel-air ratio, the engine speed, the power, or the blower ratio. Smaller effects on the temperature pattern were noticed with a change in cowl-flap opening and altitude. In most of the tests, a change in conditions affected the temperature of the barrels less than that of the heads. The variation of flight and engine variables had a negligible effect on the temperature distributions of the individual cylinders. (author)

  16. RNA structure-dependent uncoupling of substrate recognition and cleavage by Escherichia coli ribonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Calin-Jageman, Irina; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ribonuclease III superfamily of double-strand-specific endoribonucleases participate in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. Ribonuclease III of the gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli processes rRNA and mRNA precursors, and its catalytic action can regulate gene expression by controlling mRNA translation and stability. It has been proposed that E.coli RNase III can function in a non-catalytic manner, by binding RNA without cleaving phosphodiesters. However, there has been no direct evidence for this mode of action. We describe here an RNA, derived from the T7 phage R1.1 RNase III substrate, that is resistant to cleavage in vitro by E.coli RNase III but retains comparable binding affinity. R1.1[CL3B] RNA is recognized by RNase III in the same manner as R1.1 RNA, as revealed by the similar inhibitory effects of a specific mutation in both substrates. Structure-probing assays and Mfold analysis indicate that R1.1[CL3B] RNA possesses a bulge– helix–bulge motif in place of the R1.1 asymmetric internal loop. The presence of both bulges is required for uncoupling. The bulge–helix–bulge motif acts as a ‘catalytic’ antideterminant, which is distinct from recognition antideterminants, which inhibit RNase III binding. PMID:12711683

  17. Theoretical discovery of stable structures of group III-V monolayers: The materials for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2015-11-23

    Group III-V compounds are very important as the materials of semiconductor devices. Stable structures of the monolayers of group III-V binary compounds have been discovered by using first-principles calculations. The primitive unit cell of the discovered structures is a rectangle, which includes four group-III atoms and four group-V atoms. A group-III atom and its three nearest-neighbor group-V atoms are placed on the same plane; however, these connections are not the sp{sup 2} hybridization. The bond angles around the group-V atoms are less than the bond angle of sp{sup 3} hybridization. The discovered structure of GaP is an indirect transition semiconductor, while the discovered structures of GaAs, InP, and InAs are direct transition semiconductors. Therefore, the discovered structures of these compounds have the potential of the materials for semiconductor devices, for example, water splitting photocatalysts. The discovered structures may become the most stable structures of monolayers which consist of other materials.

  18. Structure and activity of the anticaking agent iron(iii) meso-tartrate.

    PubMed

    Bode, Arno A C; Granneman, Sanne J C; Feiters, Martin C; Verwer, Paul; Jiang, Shanfeng; Meijer, Jan A M; van Enckevort, Willem J P; Vlieg, Elias

    2016-04-12

    Iron(iii) meso-tartrate, a metal-organic complex, is a new anticaking agent for sodium chloride. A molecular structure in solution is proposed, based on a combination of experimental and molecular modelling results. We show that the active complex is a binuclear iron(iii) complex with two bridging meso-tartrate ligands. The iron atoms are antiferromagnetically coupled, resulting in a reduced paramagnetic nature of the solution. In solution, a water molecule coordinates to each iron atom as a sixth ligand, resulting in an octahedral symmetry around each iron atom. When the water molecule is removed, a flat and charged site is exposed, matching the charge distribution of the {100} sodium chloride crystal surface. This charge distribution is also found in the iron(iii) citrate complex, another anticaking agent. This gives a possible adsorption geometry on the crystal surface, which in turn explains the anticaking activity of the iron(iii) meso-tartrate complex. PMID:26974191

  19. Structure of complexes of nickel(III) with dithioligands

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, G.M.; Zvereva, G.A.

    1987-03-01

    The authors investigated the interaction of tetraethylthiuram disulfide (TETD) with nickel(II) bis-diethyldithio-phosphate Ni(dtp)/sub 2/, which, like Ni(dtc)/sub 2/, is a low-spin planoquadratic bis-dithiocomplex. However, in the oxidation of Ni(dtp)/sub 2/, they might expect the appearance of a supplementary hyperfine structure (SHFS) in the ESR spectra from the phosphorus atoms contained in the NiS/sub 2/P metallocycle, which substantially facilitates the interpretation of the observed spectra and, as a result, gives a clear idea of the composition and structure of the compounds studied. The interaction of Ni(dtp)/sub 2/ with TETD was investigated by the ESR method in dry redistilled toluene in air and in an inert atmosphere.

  20. Effects of reactive Mn(III)-oxalate complexes on structurally intact plant cell walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summering, J. A.; Keiluweit, M.; Goni, M. A.; Nico, P. S.; Kleber, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lignin components in the in plant litter are commonly assumed to have longer residence times in soil than many other compounds, which are supposedly, more easily degradable. The supposed resistance of lignin compounds to decomposition is generally attributed to the complex chain of biochemical steps required to create footholds in the non-porous structure of ligno-cellulose in cell walls. Interestingly, Mn(III) complexes have shown the ability to degrade ligno-cellulose. Mn(III) chelated by ligands such as oxalate are soluble oxidizers with a high affinity for lignin structures. Here we determined (i) the formation and decay kinetics of the Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in aqueous solution and (ii) the effects that these complexes have on intact ligno-cellulose. UV/vis spectroscopy and iodometric titrations confirmed the transient nature of Mn(III)-oxalate complexes with decay rates being in the order of hours. Zinnia elegans tracheary elements - a model ligno-cellulose substrate - were treated with Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in a newly developed flow-through reactor. Soluble decomposition products released during the treatment were analyzed by GC/MS and the degree of cell integrity was measured by cell counts, pre- and post-treatment counts indicate a decrease in intact Zinnia elegans as a result of Mn(III)-treatment. GC/MS results showed the release of a multitude of solubilized lignin breakdown products from plant cell walls. We conclude that Mn(III)-oxalate complexes have the ability to lyse intact plant cells and solubilize lignin. Lignin decomposition may thus be seen as resource dependent, with Mn(III) a powerful resource that should be abundant in terrestrial characterized by frequent redox fluctuations.

  1. Elucidation of the Fe(III) Gallate Structure in Historical Iron Gall Ink.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Aldo; Brostoff, Lynn B; Gibbons, Sarah K; Zavalij, Peter; Viragh, Carol; Hooper, Joseph; Alnemrat, Sufian; Gaskell, Karen J; Eichhorn, Bryan

    2016-05-17

    Synthetic, structural, spectroscopic and aging studies conclusively show that the main colorant of historical iron gall ink (IGI) is an amorphous form of Fe(III) gallate·xH2O (x = ∼1.5-3.2). Comparisons between experimental samples and historical documents, including an 18th century hand-written manuscript by George Washington, by IR and Raman spectroscopy, XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy confirm the relationship between the model and authentic samples. These studies settle controversy in the cultural heritage field, where an alternative structure for Fe(III) gallate has been commonly cited. PMID:27058399

  2. Electronic structure of III-V zinc-blende semiconductors from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Yin, Haitao; Cao, Ronggen; Zahid, Ferdows; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2013-06-01

    For analyzing quantum transport in semiconductor devices, accurate electronic structures are critical for quantitative predictions. Here we report theoretical analysis of electronic structures of all III-V zinc-blende semiconductor compounds. Our calculations are from density functional theory with the semilocal exchange proposed recently [Tran and Blaha, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.226401 102, 226401 (2009)], within the linear muffin tin orbital scheme. The calculated band gaps and effective masses are compared to experimental data and good quantitative agreement is obtained. Using the theoretical scheme presented here, quantum transport in nanostructures of III-V compounds can be confidently predicted.

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties of a novel heterobimetallic rhenium(IV)-dysprosium(III) chain.

    PubMed

    Pejo, Carolina; Guedes, Guilherme P; Novak, Miguel A; Speziali, Nivaldo L; Chiozzone, Raúl; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Vaz, Maria G F; González, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The use of the mononuclear rhenium(IV) precursor [ReBr5 (H2 pydc)](-) (H2 pydc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) as a metalloligand towards dysprosium(III) afforded the first heterobimetallic Re(IV) -Dy(III) complex. Crystal structures and static and dynamic magnetic properties of both rhenium-containing species are reported herein. The 5d-4f compound shows an extended 1D structure and the AC magnetic measurements reveal frequency dependence at low temperature suggesting slow relaxation of the magnetization. PMID:25916407

  4. System structural test results - Six PODS III supports. [Passive Orbital Disconnect Struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, Richard T.; Kittel, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Passive orbital disconnect struts can potentially reduce the support conductance a factor of 10 over state-of-the-art tension band nondisconnect supports and cut helium dewar weights in half for the same lifetime. A series of thermal and structural tests were performed to verify that this performance improvement is real. Structural tests on a PODS-III support system (consisting of six struts) is reported here. The results show the predicted performance improvements can be achieved and the PODS-III supports are ready for flight applications. For large tankage systems requiring higher side load capability, a PODS-IV version is currently being developed.

  5. Information and telecommunication system for monitoring of hydraulic engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlycheva, Nadezhda K.; Akhmetgaleeva, Railia R.; Muslimov, Eduard R.; Murav'eva, Elena V.; Peplov, Artem A.; Sibgatulina, Dina S.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present the information and telecommunications system that allows to carry out real-time monitoring of the quality and quantity of hydraulic engineering structures in order to reduce the risk of emergencies caused by environmental damage.

  6. Type III polyketide synthase repertoire in Zingiberaceae: computational insights into the sequence, structure and evolution.

    PubMed

    Mallika, Vijayanathan; Aiswarya, Girija; Gincy, Paily Thottathil; Remakanthan, Appukuttan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2016-07-01

    Zingiberaceae or 'ginger family' is the largest family in the order 'Zingiberales' with more than 1300 species in 52 genera, which are mostly distributed throughout Asia, tropical Africa and the native regions of America with their maximum diversity in Southeast Asia. Many of the members are important spice, medicinal or ornamental plants including ginger, turmeric, cardamom and kaempferia. These plants are distinguished for the highly valuable metabolic products, which are synthesised through phenylpropanoid pathway, where type III polyketide synthase is the key enzyme. In our present study, we used sequence, structural and evolutionary approaches to scrutinise the type III polyketide synthase (PKS) repertoire encoded in the Zingiberaceae family. Highly conserved amino acid residues in the sequence alignment and phylogram suggested strong relationships between the type III PKS members of Zingiberaceae. Sequence and structural level investigation of type III PKSs showed a small number of variations in the substrate binding pocket, leading to functional divergence among these PKS members. Molecular evolutionary studies indicate that type III PKSs within Zingiberaceae evolved under strong purifying selection pressure, and positive selections were rarely detected in the family. Structural modelling and protein-small molecule interaction studies on Zingiber officinale PKS 'a representative from Zingiberaceae' suggested that the protein is comparatively stable without much disorder and exhibited wide substrate acceptance. PMID:27138283

  7. Effective band structure of random III-V alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Voicu; Zunger, Alex

    2010-03-01

    Random substitutional alloys have no long range order (LRO) or translational symmetry so rigorously speaking they have no E(k) band structure or manifestations thereof. Yet, many experiments on alloys are interpreted using the language of band theory, e.g. inferring Van Hove singularities, band dispersion and effective masses. Many standard alloy theories (VCA- or CPA-based) have the LRO imposed on the alloy Hamiltonian, assuming only on-site disorder, so they can not be used to judge the extent of LRO that really exists. We adopt the opposite way, by using large (thousand atom) randomly generated supercells in which chemically identical alloy atoms are allowed to have different local environments (a polymorphous representation). This then drives site-dependent atomic relaxation as well as potential fluctuations. The eigenstates from such supercells are then mapped onto the Brillouin zone (BZ) of the primitive cell, producing effective band dispersion. Results for (In,Ga)X show band-like behaviour only near the centre and faces of the BZ but rapidly lose such characteristics away from γ or for higher bands. We further analyse the effects of stoichiometry variation, internal relaxation, and short-range order on the alloy band structure.

  8. Aero/structural tailoring of engine blades (AERO/STAEBL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the Aero/Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (AERO/STAEBL) program, which is a computer code used to perform engine fan and compressor blade aero/structural numerical optimizations. These optimizations seek a blade design of minimum operating cost that satisfies realistic blade design constraints. This report documents the overall program (i.e., input, optimization procedures, approximate analyses) and also provides a detailed description of the validation test cases.

  9. Parameter identification of civil engineering structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J. N.; Sun, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of an identification method required in determining structural parameter variations for systems subjected to an extended exposure to the environment. The concept of structural identifiability of a large scale structural system in the absence of damping is presented. Three criteria are established indicating that a large number of system parameters (the coefficient parameters of the differential equations) can be identified by a few actuators and sensors. An eight-bay-fifteen-story frame structure is used as example. A simple model is employed for analyzing the dynamic response of the frame structure.

  10. Structural dynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, L. P.; Jamison, G. T.; Mccutcheon, W. A.; Price, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    This structural dynamic analysis supports development of the SSME by evaluating components subjected to critical dynamic loads, identifying significant parameters, and evaluating solution methods. Engine operating parameters at both rated and full power levels are considered. Detailed structural dynamic analyses of operationally critical and life limited components support the assessment of engine design modifications and environmental changes. Engine system test results are utilized to verify analytic model simulations. The SSME main chamber injector assembly is an assembly of 600 injector elements which are called LOX posts. The overall LOX post analysis procedure is shown.

  11. Structure and electrical characterization of gallium arsenide nanowires with different V/III ratio growth parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Muhammad, R.; Ahamad, R.; Ibrahim, Z.; Othaman, Z.

    2014-03-05

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires were grown vertically on GaAs(111)B substrate by gold-assisted using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and conductivity atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis were carried out to investigate the effects of V/III ratio on structural properties and current-voltage changes in the wires. Results show that GaAs NWs grow preferably in the wurtzite crystal structure than zinc blende crystal structure with increasing V/III ratio. Additionally, CAFM studies have revealed that zincblende nanowires indicate ohmic characteristic compared to oscillation current occurred for wurtzite structures. The GaAs NWs with high quality structures are needed in solar cells technology for trapping energy that directly converts of sunlight into electricity with maximum capacity.

  12. Spectroscopic and structural investigations of iron(III) isothiocyanates. A comparative theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Elijošiutė, Erika; Eicher-Lorka, Olegas; Griškonis, Egidijus; Kuodis, Zenonas; Jankūnaitė, Dalia; Denafas, Gintaras

    2014-08-14

    A combined experimental and theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of [Fe(NCS)](2+) complex in the aqueous solution at the pH∼2 ± 0.1 have been performed. Experimental Raman spectra of the iron(III) isothiocyanate with higher coordination number in the acidic aqueous solution have been analyzed. Molecular modeling of the iron(III) monoisothiocyanate complex was accomplished by the density functional theory (DFT) method using B3LYP and PBE1PBE functionals. Theoretical vibrational spectra of the iron(III) monoisothiocyanate were interpreted by means of the potential energy distributions (PEDs). The influence of different solvation models and position of SO4(2)(-) ligand vs. NCS(-) ligand upon its geometry and vibrational frequencies have been evaluated. The effect of H2O/D2O isotopic substitution on the experimental and calculated Raman spectra of iron(III) isothiocyanates has been examined. Procedures of Raman spectra subtraction have been applied for the extractions of weak and/or obscured Raman signals. As a result, the presence of bound SO4(2)(-) ion and water molecules in the first coordination sphere in the acidic aqueous iron(III) isothiocyanate solution was confirmed. The vibrational assignments for the investigated iron(III) isothiocyanates were proposed here for the first time. PMID:24721282

  13. A NdIII enantiomeric pair: Synthesis, crystal structures and near-infrared luminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Cai; Li, Xi-Li; Hu, Ming; Zhang, Xue-Li; Chen, Conghui; Zhu, Cancan

    2016-08-01

    Based on enantiopure bis-bidentate N-donor ligands (-)/(+)-2,5-bis(4,5-pinene- 2-pyridyl)pyrazine (LR/LS), a new pair of NdIII enantiomers with the formula Nd(dbm)3LR/S·2H2O (R-1 and S-1 being the isomers containing the LR and LS ligands, respectively, and dbm = dibenzoylmethanate) have been isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and spectroscopic methods. Notably, unlike our previously reported homodinuclear EuIII and DyIII complexes based on the identical ligands (LR and LS), the dinuclear NdIII congener have not been obtained by controlling the ligand-to-metal ratio as expected, the reason of which was elucidated in this work. The crystal structure analyses of R-1 and S-1 reveal that they are mononuclear NdIII complexes and crystallize in chiral space group P212121 of the orthorhombic system. Circular dichroic (CD) spectra confirmed their chiroptical activities and enantiomeric nature. The photoluminescence investigations showed that they display characteristic near-infrared (NIR) emissions of the NdIII ions with notable emitting lifetime value.

  14. Structural Probability Concepts Adapted to Electrical Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Eric P.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    Through the use of equivalent variable analogies, the authors demonstrate how an electrical subsystem can be modeled by an equivalent structural subsystem. This allows the electrical subsystem to be probabilistically analyzed by using available structural reliability computer codes such as NESSUS. With the ability to analyze the electrical subsystem probabilistically, we can evaluate the reliability of systems that include both structural and electrical subsystems. Common examples of such systems are a structural subsystem integrated with a health-monitoring subsystem, and smart structures. Since these systems have electrical subsystems that directly affect the operation of the overall system, probabilistically analyzing them could lead to improved reliability and reduced costs. The direct effect of the electrical subsystem on the structural subsystem is of secondary order and is not considered in the scope of this work.

  15. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III) phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine

    PubMed Central

    David, Renald

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine)(μ4-phosphato)iron(III)], [Fe(PO4)(N2H4)]n, was prepared under hydro­thermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one FeIII atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The FeIII atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetra­hedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octa­hedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetra­hedron bridges four FeIII atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two FeIII atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N—H⋯O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4)(N2H4)] and [Mn(SO4)(N2H4)]. PMID:26870399

  16. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the SPERT-II and SPERT-III reactors at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hine, R.E.

    1981-02-01

    This report describes the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the SPERT-II and SPERT-III reactor facilities performed during the period June through September 1980 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It includes a detailed description of the D and D accomplished and the post-D and D condition of the reactor facilities. The report also serves to document the radiological condition of the facilities after D and D, the waste volume generated and its disposition, and the project cost and schedule.

  17. Structure elucidation of fungal beauveriolide III, a novel inhibitor of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, I; Tomoda, H; Tabata, N; Si, S; Omura, S

    1999-01-01

    The structure of fungal beauveriolide III, an inhibitor of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages, was elucidated to be cyclo-[(3S,4S)-3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanyl- D-allo-isoleucyl] by spectral analyses and chemical degradation. PMID:10092190

  18. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequences of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  19. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S. K.

    1991-10-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequence of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  20. Synthesis and Structure of Hexatungstochromate(III), [H3Cr(III)W6O24]6-.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Lin, Zhengguo; Bassil, Bassem S; Al-Oweini, Rami; Kortz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The hexatungstochromate(III) [H(3)Cr(III)W(6)O(24)](6-) (1) was synthesized in aqueous, basic medium by simple reaction of chromium(III) nitrate nonahydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate in a 1:6 ratio. Polyanion 1 represents the first Anderson-Evans type heteropolytungstate with a trivalent hetero element. The sodium salt of 1 with the formula Na(6)[H(3)Cr(III)W(6)O(24)]·22H(2)O (1a) was fully characterized in the solid state by single crystal XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. PMID:26507761

  1. Developing a "highway code" to steer the structural and electronic properties of Fe(III)/Dy(III) coordination clusters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sihuai; Mereacre, Valeriu; Prodius, Denis; Kostakis, George E; Powell, Annie K

    2015-04-01

    In the recently established field of 3d/4f coordination cluster (CC) chemistry several burning questions still need to be addressed. It is clear that combining 3d and 4f metal ions within a coordination cluster core has the potential to lead to electronic structures that will be very difficult to describe but can also be extremely interesting. Furthermore, understanding why certain core topologies seem to be favored is difficult to predict. Here we show that the secondary coordination sphere provided by the ligands influences the favored product, as demonstrated for the compound [Fe4Dy2(μ3-OH)2(n-bdea)4(C6H5CO2)8]·MeCN (1), which has a 2Fe:2Dy:2Fe core and was made using [Fe(III)3O(C6H5)CO2)(L)3](+) as starting material plus Dy(NO3)3 and N-n-butyl-diethanolamine (n-bdeaH2), compared with the compound made using a methyl meta-substituent (R) on the phenyl ring of the benzoate, [Fe(III)3O(C6H4Me)CO2)(L)3](+) as starting material, which resulted in the "square-in-square" compound [Fe4Dy4(μ3-OH)4(n-bdea)4(O2CC6H4CH3)12]·MeCN (2) when using ambient conditions. Changing reaction conditions from ambient to solvothermal leads to "double-propeller" compounds [Fe4Dy4(μ4-O)3(n-bdea)3(C6H5CO2)12]·13MeCN (3) and [Fe4Dy4(μ4-O)3(n-bdea)3(O2CC6H4CH3)12]·MeCN (4) forming with this core, resulting irrespective of the substitution on the iron benzoate starting material. Furthermore, compounds 1 and 2 can be transformed into compounds 3 and 4, respectively, using a solvothermal method. Thus, compounds 3 and 4 appear to be the thermodynamically most stable species. The factors steering the reactions toward these products are discussed. The electronic structures have been investigated using magnetic and Mössbauer studies. All compounds are cooperatively coupled 3d/4f systems, with compound 1 showing single-molecule magnet behavior. PMID:25748725

  2. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III

    SciTech Connect

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J.

    2012-03-27

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 {angstrom}. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies.

  3. Enhanced non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid III-nitride structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. M.; Athanasiou, M.; Bai, J.; Liu, B.; Wang, T.

    2015-09-21

    The effect of surface states has been investigated in hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures that employ high efficiency, nearfield non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) coupling. The structures utilize blue emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays to minimize the separation with a yellow emitting F8BT coating. Surface states due to the exposed III-nitride surfaces of the nanostructures are found to reduce the NRET coupling rate. The surface states are passivated by deposition of a silicon nitride layer on the III-nitride nanorod surface leading to reduced surface recombination. A low thickness surface passivation is shown to increase the NRET coupling rate by 4 times compared to an un-passivated hybrid structure. A model is proposed to explain the increased NRET rate for the passivated hybrid structures based on the reduction in surface electron depletion of the passivated InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods surfaces.

  4. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Leila M; Kang, You Na; Matzger, Adam J

    2011-09-01

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies. PMID:21904028

  5. Density Functional Theory of Structural and Electronic Properties of III-N Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Guerel, H. Hakan; Akinci, Oezden; Uenlue, Hilmi

    2010-11-01

    In this wok, we present the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of cubic III-N based semiconductors by using the full potential linear augmented plane-wave method plus local orbitals as implemented in the WIEN2k code. Our aim is to predict the pressure effect on structural and electronic properties of III-N binaries and ternaries. Results are given for structural properties (e.g., lattice constant, elastic constants, bulk modulus, and its pressure derivative) and electronic properties (e.g., band structure, density of states, band gaps and band widths) of GaAs, GaN, AlN, and InN binaries and GaAsN ternaries. The proposed model uses GGA exchange-correlation potential to determine band gaps of semiconductors at {Gamma}, L and X high symmetry points of Brillouin zone. The results are found in good agreement with available experimental data for structural and electronic properties of these semiconductors.

  6. Simultaneous analysis and design. [in structural engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optimization techniques are increasingly being used for performing nonlinear structural analysis. The development of element by element (EBE) preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) techniques is expected to extend this trend to linear analysis. Under these circumstances the structural design problem can be viewed as a nested optimization problem. There are computational benefits to treating this nested problem as a large single optimization problem. The response variables (such as displacements) and the structural parameters are all treated as design variables in a unified formulation which performs simultaneously the design and analysis. Two examples are used for demonstration. A seventy-two bar truss is optimized subject to linear stress constraints and a wing box structure is optimized subject to nonlinear collapse constraints. Both examples show substantial computational savings with the unified approach as compared to the traditional nested approach.

  7. Iron Isotope Fractionations Reveal a Finite Bioavailable Fe Pool for Structural Fe(III) Reduction in Nontronite.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingjie; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Smeaton, Christina M; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Roden, Eric E; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2016-08-16

    We report on stable Fe isotope fractionation during microbial and chemical reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1. (56)Fe/(54)Fe fractionation factors between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) ranged from -1.2 to +0.8‰. Microbial (Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens) and chemical (dithionite) reduction experiments revealed a two-stage process. Stage 1 was characterized by rapid reduction of a finite Fe(III) pool along the edges of the clay particles, accompanied by a limited release to solution of Fe(II), which partially adsorbed onto basal planes. Stable Fe isotope compositions revealed that electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) occurred between edge-bound Fe(II) and octahedral (structural) Fe(III) within the clay lattice, as well as between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) via a transient sorbed phase. The isotopic fractionation factors decreased with increasing extent of reduction as a result of the depletion of the finite bioavailable Fe(III) pool. During stage 2, microbial reduction was inhibited while chemical reduction continued. However, further ETAE between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) was not observed. Our results imply that the pool of bioavailable Fe(III) is restricted to structural Fe sites located near the edges of the clay particles. Blockage of ETAE distinguishes Fe(III) reduction of layered clay minerals from that of Fe oxyhydroxides, where accumulation of structural Fe(II) is much more limited. PMID:27291525

  8. First structurally characterized mixed-halogen nickel(III) NCN-pincer complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhanov, Konstantin A.; Bubnov, Michael P.; Cherkasov, Vladimir K.; Fukin, Georgy K.; Vavilina, Nina N.; Efremova, Larisa Yu.; Abakumov, Gleb A.

    2009-03-01

    A square-pyramidal mixed-halogen nickel(III) NCN-pincer complex (PipeNCN)NiClBr (where PipeNCN = 2,6-bis(piperidinomethyl)phenyl) was structurally characterized. Bromine occupies apical position; pincer ligand and chlorine atom are in the basal plane. EPR detects that complex in solution exists as a mixture of two structural isomers with bromine or chlorine atoms in the top of pyramid.

  9. Crystal structure of the Yersinia type III secretion protein YscE

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Jason; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.

    2010-12-06

    The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis utilizes a contact-dependent (type III) secretion system (T3SS) to transport virulence factors from the bacterial cytosol directly into the interior of mammalian cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways that mediate phagocytosis and the inflammatory response. The type III secretion apparatus is composed of 20-25 different Yersinia secretion (Ysc) proteins. We report here the structure of YscE, the smallest Ysc protein, which is a dimer in solution. The probable mode of oligomerization is discussed.

  10. Density functional theory studies of actinide(III) motexafins (An-Motex2+, An = Ac, Cm, Lr). Structure, stability, and comparison with lanthanide(III) motexafins.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Li, Quansong; Moritz, Anna; Xie, Zhizhong; Dolg, Michael; Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai

    2006-04-17

    Newly developed relativistic energy-consistent 5f-in-core actinide pseudopotentials and corresponding (7s6p5d1f)/[5s4p3d1f] basis sets in the segmented contraction scheme, combined with density functional theory methods, have been used to study the molecular structure and chemical properties of selected actinide(III) motexafins (An-Motex2+, An = Ac, Cm, Lr). Structure and stability are discussed, and a comparison to the lanthanide(III) motexafins (Ln-Motex2+, Ln = La, Gd, Lu) is made. The actinide element is found to reside above the mean N5 motexafin plane, and the larger the cation, the greater the observed out-of-plane displacement. It is concluded that the actinium(III), curium(III), and lawrencium(III) cations are tightly bound to the macrocyclic skeleton, yielding stable structures. However, the calculated metal-ligand gas-phase binding energy for An-Motex2+ is about 1-2 eV lower than that of Ln-Motex2+, implying a lower stability of An-Motex2+ compared to Ln-Motex2+. Results including solvent effects imply that Ac-Motex2+ is the most stable complex in aqueous solution and should be the best candidate for experimentalists to get stable actinide(III) motexafin complexes. PMID:16602805

  11. Coil-winding fixture for SLAC's Mark III detector (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The two drawings listed provide the construction information for the modification to a previously-used coil form. The second drawing provides the information for construction of the form's drive sprocket. This basic form and drive mechanism with appropriate modifications was used to wind coils for the Mark II, Mark III and TPC experiment magnets as used at SLAC.

  12. Structural Requirements for the Space Propulsion Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin K.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2004, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was given a vision for Space Exploration by President Bush, setting our sight on a bold new path to go back to the Moon, then to Mars and beyond. As NASA gets ready to meet the vision set by President Bush, failures are not an option. Reliability of the propulsion engine systems will play an important role in establishing an overall safe and reliable operation of these new space systems. A new standard, NASA-STD-5012, Strength and Life Assessment for Space Propulsion System Engines, has been developed to provide structural requirements for assessment of the propulsion systems engine. This standard is a complement to the current NASA-wide standard NASA-STD-5001, Structural Design and Test Factors of Safety for Spaceflight Hardware, which excluded the requirement for the engine systems (rotatory structures) along with pressure vessels. As developed, this document builds on the heritage of the multiple industrial standards related to strength and life assessment of the structures. For assuring a safe and reliable operation of a product and/or mission, establishing a set of structural assessment requirements is a key ingredient. Hence, a concentrated effort was made to improve the requirements where there are known lessons learned during the design, test, and operation phases of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and other engine development programs. Requirements delineated in this standard are also applicable for the reusable and/or human missions. It shall be noted that "reliability of a system cannot be tested and inspected but can only be achieved if it is first designed into a system." Hence, these strength and life assessment requirements for the space propulsion system engines shall be used along with other good engineering practices, requirements, and policies.

  13. The Structure-Mapping Engine: Algorithm and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkenhainer, Brian; And Others

    This description of the Structure-Mapping Engine (SME), a flexible, cognitive simulation program for studying analogical processing which is based on Gentner's Structure-Mapping theory of analogy, points out that the SME provides a "tool kit" for constructing matching algorithms consistent with this theory. This report provides: (1) a review of…

  14. Reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite by methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deng; Dong, Hailiang; Bishop, Michael E.; Wang, Hongmei; Agrawal, Abinash; Tritschler, Sarah; Eberl, Dennis D.; Xie, Shucheng

    2011-02-01

    Clay minerals and methanogens are ubiquitous and co-exist in anoxic environments, yet it is unclear whether methanogens are able to reduce structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. In this study, the ability of methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri to reduce structural Fe(III) in iron-rich smectite (nontronite NAu-2) and the relationship between iron reduction and methanogenesis were investigated. Bioreduction experiments were conducted in growth medium using three types of substrate: H 2/CO 2, methanol, and acetate. Time course methane production and hydrogen consumption were measured by gas chromatography. M. barkeri was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 with H 2/CO 2 and methanol as substrate, but not with acetate. The extent of bioreduction, as measured by the 1,10-phenanthroline method, was 7-13% with H 2/CO 2 as substrate, depending on nontronite concentration (5-10 g/L). The extent was higher when methanol was used as a substrate, reaching 25-33%. Methanogenesis was inhibited by Fe(III) reduction in the H 2/CO 2 culture, but enhanced when methanol was used. High charge smectite and biogenic silica formed as a result of bioreduction. Our results suggest that methanogens may play an important role in biogeochemical cycling of iron in clay minerals and may have important implications for the global methane budget.

  15. Dynamic response of heavy duty diesel engine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderton, D.; Ghazy, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes an investigation to identify the sources of forces which cause the vibration of different parts of the engine structure in a turbocharged heavy duty diesel engine of 2 litres/cylinder capacity. The differences in vibration response at the main bearings and on the engine outer surfaces is shown. Results of overall dynamic stiffness measurements at the main bearings indicate that the oil film has a negligible effect on the behaviour of the major vibration response. A model is put forward for an absolute prediction of the engine outer surface vibration. The model can be seen as an alternative or complement to current F.E. techniques. A comparison between predicted and measured vibration on the crankcase is presented. Predicted vibration response spectra are used to show the relative contribution of liner and bearing forces to the overall crankcase and cylinder block vibration of the engine.

  16. Structure determination by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) at the Pr L III edge

    PubMed Central

    Puehringer, Sandra; Hellmig, Michael; Liu, Sunbin; Weiss, Manfred S.; Wahl, Markus C.; Mueller, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The use of longer X-ray wavelengths in macromolecular crystallography has grown significantly over the past few years. The main reason for this increased use of longer wavelengths has been to utilize the anomalous signal from sulfur, providing a means for the experimental phasing of native proteins. Here, another possible application of longer X-ray wavelengths is presented: MAD at the L III edges of various lanthanide compounds. A first experiment at the L III edge of Pr was conducted on HZB MX beamline BL14.2 and resulted in the successful structure determination of the C-terminal domain of a spliceosomal protein. This experiment demonstrates that L III edges of lanthanides constitute potentially attractive targets for long-wavelength MAD experiments. PMID:22869138

  17. RNA Polymerase III Advances: Structural and tRNA Functional Views.

    PubMed

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Maraia, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    RNA synthesis in eukaryotes is divided among three RNA polymerases (RNAPs). RNAP III transcribes hundreds of tRNA genes and fewer additional short RNA genes. We survey recent work on transcription by RNAP III including an atomic structure, mechanisms of action, interactions with chromatin and retroposons, and a conserved link between its activity and a tRNA modification that enhances mRNA decoding. Other new work suggests important mechanistic connections to oxidative stress, autoimmunity and cancer, embryonic stem cell pluripotency, and tissue-specific developmental effects. We consider that, for some of its complex functions, variation in RNAP III activity levels lead to nonuniform changes in tRNAs that can shift the translation profiles of key codon-biased mRNAs with resultant phenotypes or disease states. PMID:27068803

  18. Situated learning methodologies and assessment in civil engineering structures education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertz, Michael Davis

    This thesis describes an overarching study of civil engineering undergraduate structural education through student performance in recalling and applying basic structural engineering knowledge, and the viability of alternative situated learning environments for more effectively supporting the learning of this knowledge. To properly ground this study, a thorough investigation of related work in assessment, cognitive science, educational technology, and design education was completed, with connections and applications to civil engineering education highlighted. The experimental work of the thesis is organized into three parts: an assessment of civil engineering undergraduates' fundamental structural engineering knowledge and abilities; the development and testing of a software support environment for situated learning, the Civil Engineering Learning Library (CELL); and, the implementation and evaluation of the design studio, a pedagogical model for situated learning in the classroom. The results of the assessment study indicate that civil engineering seniors (and also students earlier in the curriculum) have difficulty retaining and applying basic knowledge of structural behavior, especially doing so in a flexible fashion in design situations. The survey also suggests that visualization plays an important role in understanding structural behavior. Tests with the CELL system show that a cognitively-flexible multimedia environment can support structural learning, but were inconclusive about whether the computer-based system helped the students to learn better than conventional classroom lecture. Two trial implementations of the design studio indicate that the studio model can serve as a powerful situated learning environment, and that it can be scaled up to reasonable class sizes. Significant requirements are associated with this model, however, primarily in faculty involvement, but also in physical resources and student time. In addition to these conclusions about the

  19. Geometric and Electronic Structure of a Peroxomanganese(III) Complex Supported by a Scorpionate Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Colmer, Hannah E.; Geiger, Robert A.; Leto, Domenick F.; Wijeratne, Gayan B.; Day, Victor W.; Jackson, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    A monomeric MnII complex has been prepared with the facially-coordinating TpPh2 ligand, (TpPh2 = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)borate). The X-ray crystal structure shows three coordinating solvent molecules resulting in a six-coordinate complex with Mn-ligand bond lengths that are consistent with a high-spin MnII ion. Treatment of this MnII complex with excess KO2 at room temperature resulted in the formation of a MnIII-O2 complex that is stable for several days at ambient conditions, allowing for the determination of the X-ray crystal structure of this intermediate. The electronic structure of this peroxomanganese(III) adduct was examined by using electronic absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature variable-field (VTVH) MCD spectroscopies. Density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent (TD)-DFT, and multireference ab initio CASSCF/NEVPT2 calculations were used to assign the electronic transitions and further investigate the electronic structure of the peroxomanganese(III) species. The lowest ligand-field transition in the electronic absorption spectrum of the MnIII-O2 complex exhibits a blue shift in energy compared to other previously characterized peroxomanganese(III) complexes that results from a large axial bond elongation, reducing the metal-ligand covalency and stabilizing the σ-antibonding Mn dz2 MO that is the donor MO for this transition. PMID:25312785

  20. Structure and efficient luminescence upconversion of Ln(iii) aromatic N-oxide coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Chong, Bowie S K; Moore, Evan G

    2016-08-14

    A series of lanthanide-based coordination polymers {[Yb1-xErx(4,4'-bpdo)3(H2O)2](CF3SO3)3}∞ were synthesised by solvent diffusion techniques, where 4,4'-bpdo = 4,4'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide, and using differing mole fractions of Yb(iii) and Er(iii) which were systematically varied (x = 0, 0.05, 0.20, 0.50 and 1). All of the materials obtained were characterised using elemental analyses, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and solid-state photoluminescence studies. Structurally, the coordination polymers crystallise as an isomorphous series of infinite 2D sheets, which contain two inner sphere water molecules, and are isostructural with a previously characterised homometallic Yb(iii) compound. In addition to the normal Near Infra-Red (NIR) luminescence, these compounds also demonstrate upconversion emission upon 980 nm excitation. Upconversion luminescence measurements reveal visible emission in the red, green, and blue regions corresponding to the (2)H11/2→(4)I15/2, (4)F9/2→(4)I15/2 and (2)H9/2→(4)I15/2 transitions of the Er(iii) cation upon two and three-photon excitation. We also observed weak emission from the Er(iii) cation in the UV region for the first time in a Ln-MOF based material. PMID:27411484

  1. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency f{sub p} to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both f{sub p} and 2 f{sub p} radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in f{sub p} than 2 f{sub p} emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  2. Structures, performance, benefit, cost study. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feder, E.

    1981-01-01

    Aircraft engine structures were studied to identify the advanced structural technologies that would provide the most benefits to future aircraft operations. A series of studies identified engine systems with the greatest potential for improvements. Based on these studies, six advanced generic structural concepts were selected and conceptually designed. The benefits of each concept were quantitatively assessed in terms of thrust specific fuel consumption, weight, cost, maintenance cost, fuel burned and direct operating cost plus interest. The probability of success of each concept was also determined. The concepts were ranked and the three most promising were selected for further study which consisted of identifying and comprehensively outlining the advanced technologies required to develop these concepts for aircraft engine application. Analytic, fabrication, and test technology developments are required. The technology programs outlined emphasize the need to provide basic, fundamental understanding of technology to obtain the benefit goals.

  3. Structural characterization of CFA/III and Longus type IVb pili from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Roos, Justin; Yuen, Alex S W; Pierce, Owen M; Craig, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    The type IV pili are helical filaments found on many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, with multiple diverse roles in pathogenesis, including microcolony formation, adhesion, and twitching motility. Many pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates express one of two type IV pili belonging to the type IVb subclass: CFA/III or Longus. Here we show a direct correlation between CFA/III expression and ETEC aggregation, suggesting that these pili, like the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), mediate microcolony formation. We report a 1.26-Å resolution crystal structure of CofA, the major pilin subunit from CFA/III. CofA is very similar in structure to V. cholerae TcpA but possesses a 10-amino-acid insertion that replaces part of the α2-helix with an irregular loop containing a 3(10)-helix. Homology modeling suggests a very similar structure for the Longus LngA pilin. A model for the CFA/III pilus filament was generated using the TCP electron microscopy reconstruction as a template. The unique 3(10)-helix insert fits perfectly within the gap between CofA globular domains. This insert, together with differences in surface-exposed residues, produces a filament that is smoother and more negatively charged than TCP. To explore the specificity of the type IV pilus assembly apparatus, CofA was expressed heterologously in V. cholerae by replacing the tcpA gene with that of cofA within the tcp operon. Although CofA was synthesized and processed by V. cholerae, no CFA/III filaments were detected, suggesting that the components of the type IVb pilus assembly system are highly specific to their pilin substrates. PMID:22447901

  4. Polarization engineering and approaches for high-performance III-nitride light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Ronald A.

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been increasingly integrated into mainstream lighting. In all applications requiring single-colored light, LEDs have outperformed filtered incandescent lamps. However, there are two major challenges. First is the issue of cost. High-performance nitride-based white LEDs cost roughly two orders of magnitude more expensive than incandescent lamps. The second challenge is color rendering---quantified by Color Rendering Index (CRI). Today's nitride white light LEDs still rely on the mixing of blue light from blue InGaN LEDs and yellow phosphor, and the CRI is relatively low. The best white LEDs to date have a CRI of 70--80, in comparison to traditional lamps, which generally have a CRI close to 100, and able to represent the true color of an object. An ideal way to improve the CRI is by mixing the luminescence of primary color LEDs. However, in order to make this approach viable, all the LEDs have to be based on a single materials platform. AlInGaN is the only materials system to date with the potential to fulfill this, since the bandgap of this nitride compound (with varying amount of Al, In, and Ga) can be varied from UV to IR range. There is still a lot of room for improvement in the efficiencies of nitride blue and green LEDs, while nitride-based active region emitting in the red wavelength (lambda ˜ 650-nm) regime is not realizable yet. In this dissertation, methods to increase internal quantum efficiency by polarization field engineering have been proposed. Two novel structures based on (1) staggered InGaN QW and (2) type-II InGaN-GaNAs QW have been investigated. Staggered InGaN QWs have shown improvement in the photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, and LED output power, which agree well with numerical model prediction. All materials and devices in this work have been designed, grown and fabricated in-house. For the LED fabrication, a method based on selective area epitaxy---which bypasses dry-etching---has been utilized. In

  5. Asymmetric ring structure of Vps4 required for ESCRT-III disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillat, Christophe; Macheboeuf, Pauline; Wu, Yuanfei; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Effantin, Gregory; Göttlinger, Heinrich G.; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Renesto, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    The vacuolar protein sorting 4 AAA-ATPase (Vps4) recycles endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-III) polymers from cellular membranes. Here we present a 3.6-Å X-ray structure of ring-shaped Vps4 from Metallosphera sedula (MsVps4), seen as an asymmetric pseudohexamer. Conserved key interface residues are shown to be important for MsVps4 assembly, ATPase activity in vitro, ESCRT-III disassembly in vitro and HIV-1 budding. ADP binding leads to conformational changes within the protomer, which might propagate within the ring structure. All ATP-binding sites are accessible and the pseudohexamer binds six ATP with micromolar affinity in vitro. In contrast, ADP occupies one high-affinity and five low-affinity binding sites in vitro, consistent with conformational asymmetry induced on ATP hydrolysis. The structure represents a snapshot of an assembled Vps4 conformation and provides insight into the molecular motions the ring structure undergoes in a concerted action to couple ATP hydrolysis to ESCRT-III substrate disassembly.

  6. Use of proline mutants to help solve the NMR solution structure of type III antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, H.; Davies, P. L.; Sykes, B. D.; Sönnichsen, F. D.

    1993-01-01

    To help understand the structure/function relationships in antifreeze proteins (AFP), and to define the motifs required for ice binding, a Type III AFP suitable for two-dimensional (2D) NMR studies was produced in Escherichia coli. A synthetic gene for one of the Type III AFP isoforms was assembled in a T7 polymerase-directed expression vector. The 67-amino acid-long gene product differed from the natural AFP by inclusion of an N-terminal methionine but was indistinguishable in activity. The NMR spectra of this AFP were complicated by cis-trans proline isomerization from the C-terminal sequence YPPA. Substitution of this sequence by YAA eliminated isomer signals without altering the activity or structure of the mutant AFP. This variant (rQAE m1.1) was selected for sequential assignment and the secondary structure determination using 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy. Nine beta-strands are paired to form two triple-stranded antiparallel sheets and one double-stranded antiparallel sheet. Two further proline replacements, P29A and P33A, were made to delineate the role of conserved prolines in Type III AFP. These mutants were valuable in clarifying ambiguous NMR spectral assignments amongst the remaining six prolines of rQAE m1.1. In contrast to the replacement of the C-terminal prolyl residues, the exchange of P29 and P33 caused some structural changes and significantly decreased protein solubility and antifreeze activity. PMID:8401227

  7. Asymmetric ring structure of Vps4 required for ESCRT-III disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Caillat, Christophe; Macheboeuf, Pauline; Wu, Yuanfei; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Effantin, Gregory; Göttlinger, Heinrich G.; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Renesto, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The vacuolar protein sorting 4 AAA–ATPase (Vps4) recycles endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-III) polymers from cellular membranes. Here we present a 3.6-Å X-ray structure of ring-shaped Vps4 from Metallosphera sedula (MsVps4), seen as an asymmetric pseudohexamer. Conserved key interface residues are shown to be important for MsVps4 assembly, ATPase activity in vitro, ESCRT-III disassembly in vitro and HIV-1 budding. ADP binding leads to conformational changes within the protomer, which might propagate within the ring structure. All ATP-binding sites are accessible and the pseudohexamer binds six ATP with micromolar affinity in vitro. In contrast, ADP occupies one high-affinity and five low-affinity binding sites in vitro, consistent with conformational asymmetry induced on ATP hydrolysis. The structure represents a snapshot of an assembled Vps4 conformation and provides insight into the molecular motions the ring structure undergoes in a concerted action to couple ATP hydrolysis to ESCRT-III substrate disassembly. PMID:26632262

  8. Electronic Band Structures of the Highly Desirable III-V Semiconductors: TB-mBJ DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Gul; Shafiq, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Rashid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Maqbool, M.; Khan, Imad; Rahnamaye-Aliabad, H.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-05-01

    The correct band gaps of semiconductors are highly desirable for their effective use in optoelectronic and other photonic devices. However, the experimental and theoretical results of the exact band gaps are quite challenging and sometimes tricky. In this article, we explore the electronic band structures of the highly desirable optical materials, III-V semiconductors. The main reason of the ineffectiveness of the theoretical band gaps of these compounds is their mixed bonding character, where large proportions of electrons reside outside atomic spheres in the intestinal regions, which are challenging for proper theoretical treatment. In this article, the band gaps of the compounds are revisited and successfully reproduced by properly treating the density of electrons using the recently developed non-regular Tran and Blaha's modified Becke-Johnson (nTB-mBJ) approach. This study additionally suggests that this theoretical scheme could also be useful for the band gap engineering of the III-V semiconductors. Furthermore, the optical properties of these compounds are also calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  9. Electronic Band Structures of the Highly Desirable III-V Semiconductors: TB-mBJ DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Gul; Shafiq, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Rashid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Maqbool, M.; Khan, Imad; Rahnamaye-Aliabad, H.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-07-01

    The correct band gaps of semiconductors are highly desirable for their effective use in optoelectronic and other photonic devices. However, the experimental and theoretical results of the exact band gaps are quite challenging and sometimes tricky. In this article, we explore the electronic band structures of the highly desirable optical materials, III-V semiconductors. The main reason of the ineffectiveness of the theoretical band gaps of these compounds is their mixed bonding character, where large proportions of electrons reside outside atomic spheres in the intestinal regions, which are challenging for proper theoretical treatment. In this article, the band gaps of the compounds are revisited and successfully reproduced by properly treating the density of electrons using the recently developed non-regular Tran and Blaha's modified Becke-Johnson (nTB-mBJ) approach. This study additionally suggests that this theoretical scheme could also be useful for the band gap engineering of the III-V semiconductors. Furthermore, the optical properties of these compounds are also calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  10. Reverse engineering chemical structures from molecular descriptors : how many solutions?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-06-01

    Physical, chemical and biological properties are the ultimate information of interest for chemical compounds. Molecular descriptors that map structural information to activities and properties are obvious candidates for information sharing. In this paper, we consider the feasibility of using molecular descriptors to safely exchange chemical information in such a way that the original chemical structures cannot be reverse engineered. To investigate the safety of sharing such descriptors, we compute the degeneracy (the number of structure matching a descriptor value) of several 2D descriptors, and use various methods to search for and reverse engineer structures. We examine degeneracy in the entire chemical space taking descriptors values from the alkane isomer series and the PubChem database. We further use a stochastic search to retrieve structures matching specific topological index values. Finally, we investigate the safety of exchanging of fragmental descriptors using deterministic enumeration.

  11. Nontronite (NAu-1) Structure Associated with Microbial Fe(III) Reduction in Various Redox Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, T.; Kim, S.; Kim, J.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires the structural Fe(III) of smectite and promotes illite formation in O2-free environment (Kostka et al., 1996, Kim et al., 2004). Since S. oneidensis is a facultative iron reducing bacterium, it is crucial to understand the structural changes induced by bio-reduction of structural Fe(III) in various redox conditions. Furthermore, the changes in cation exchange capacity (CEC) of bio-reduced nontronite upon the modification of mineral structure has not been extensively studied in terms of Fe-cycling. In this present study, we reported the evolution of nontronite structure at various time points in various redox conditions and corresponding CEC upon reduction and re-oxidation. S. oneidensis MR-1 was incubated in M1 medium with Na-lactate as the electron donor and Fe in nontronite (NAu-1) as the sole electron acceptor at pH 7 in anaerobic chamber for 3 hrs, 12 hrs, 1 day, 2 days, 4 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days. O2 gas bubbling was then applied to the sample at each time point for 24 hours for re-oxidation. The triplet samples at each time point for both reduction and re-oxidation experiments were prepared. The extent of Fe(III) reduction measured by 1,10-phenanthroline method (Stucki and Anderson, 1981) indicated that the structural Fe(III) was reduced up to 8.8% of total Fe(III) within 21 days. XRD data with various treatments such as air dried, glycolated and lithium-saturated showed that K-nontronite may be formed because no discrete 10-Å illite peak was observed in Li-saturated sample upon glycolation. The CEC increased from 747 meg/kg to 1145 meg/kg during Fe(III) reduction and decreased to 954 meg/kg upon re-oxidation, supporting the possible formation of K-nontronite. The direct observation by electron microscopy verified the structural changes in nontonite in various redox conditions. The long-term experiment for 6 months, is in progress in anaerobic chamber, and results will be discussed. Kim, J. W., Dong, H., Seabaugh

  12. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT III, MAINTAINING THE FUEL SYSTEM--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE FUEL SYSTEM. TOPICS ARE (1) PURPOSE OF THE FUEL SYSTEM, (2) TRACING THE FUEL FLOW, (3) MINOR COMPONENTS OF THE FUEL SYSTEM, (4) MAINTENANCE TIPS, (5) CONSTRUCTION AND FUNCTION OF THE FUEL INJECTORS, AND (6)…

  13. ADVANCED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR STATIONARY GAS TURBINE ENGINES: VOLUME III. COMBUSTOR VERIFICATION TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reports describe an exploratory development program to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate dry techniques for significantly reducing NOx from stationary gas turbine engines. Volume 3 describes the scaleup of the rich-burn/quick-quench (RB/QQ) model to a full-scale (25 MW) gas...

  14. Structural and phylogenetic basis for the classification of group III phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Singh, Reema

    2013-09-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyses the hydrolysis of the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids to liberate arachidonic acid, a precursor of eicosanoids, that are known mediators of inflammation. The group III PLA2 enzymes are present in a wide array of organisms across many species with completely different functions. A detailed understanding of the structure and evolutionary proximity amongst the enzymes was carried out for a meaningful classification of this group. Fifty protein sequences from different species of the group were considered for a detailed sequence, structural and phylogenetic studies. In addition to the conservation of calcium binding motif and the catalytic histidine, the sequences exhibit specific 'amino acid signatures'. Structural analysis reveals that these enzymes have a conserved globular structure with species specific variations seen at the active site, calcium binding loop, hydrophobic channel, the C-terminal domain and the quaternary conformational state. Character and distance based phylogenetic analysis of these sequences are in accordance with the structural features. The outcomes of the structural and phylogenetic analysis lays a convincing platform for the classification the group III PLA2s into (1A) venomous insects; (IB) non-venomous insects; (II) mammals; (IIIA) gila monsters; (IIIB) reptiles, amphibians, fishes, sea anemones and liver fluke, and (IV) scorpions. This classification also helps to understand structure-function relationship, enzyme-substrate specificity and designing of potent inhibitors against the drug target isoforms. PMID:23793742

  15. Structural Optimization Methodology for Rotating Disks of Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.

    1995-01-01

    In support of the preliminary evaluation of various engine technologies, a methodology has been developed for structurally designing the rotating disks of an aircraft engine. The structural design methodology, along with a previously derived methodology for predicting low-cycle fatigue life, was implemented in a computer program. An interface computer program was also developed that gathers the required data from a flowpath analysis program (WATE) being used at NASA Lewis. The computer program developed for this study requires minimum interaction with the user, thus allowing engineers with varying backgrounds in aeropropulsion to successfully execute it. The stress analysis portion of the methodology and the computer program were verified by employing the finite element analysis method. The 10th- stage, high-pressure-compressor disk of the Energy Efficient Engine Program (E3) engine was used to verify the stress analysis; the differences between the stresses and displacements obtained from the computer program developed for this study and from the finite element analysis were all below 3 percent for the problem solved. The computer program developed for this study was employed to structurally optimize the rotating disks of the E3 high-pressure compressor. The rotating disks designed by the computer program in this study were approximately 26 percent lighter than calculated from the E3 drawings. The methodology is presented herein.

  16. Structural and pharmacological characterization of the crotamine isoforms III-4 (MYX4_CROCu) and III-7 (MYX7_CROCu) isolated from the Crotalus durissus cumanensis venom.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Soto, Luis Alberto; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Marangoni, Sergio

    2010-07-01

    Two major crotamine isoforms (III-4 and III-7) were obtained combining two chromatographic steps on molecular exclusion chromatography (Sephadex G-75) and ion-exchange column (Protein Pack SP 5PW) of the rattlesnake Crotalus durissus cumanensis venom. The "in vivo" myotoxic effect of the venom, its "in vitro" cytotoxicity in myoblasts and myotubes (C2C12) and the neurotoxic and edema-forming activity were characterized. The molecular masses of the crotamine isoforms were 4907.94 Da (III-4) and 4985.02 Da (III-7) and, as determined by mass spectrometry, both contained six Cys residues. Enzymatic hydrolysis followed by de novo sequencing through tandem mass spectrometry was used to determine the primary structure of both isoforms. III-4 and III-7 isoforms presented a 42-amino acid residues sequence and showed high molecular amino acid sequence identity with other crotamine-like proteins from Crotalus durissus terrificus. In vivo, both crotamine isoforms induced myotoxicty and a systemic interleukin-6 response upon intramuscular injection. These new crotamine isoforms induced low cytotoxicity in skeletal muscle myoblasts and myotubes (C2C12) and both induced a facilitatory effect on neuromuscular transmission in young chick biventer cervicis preparation. Edema-forming activity was also analyzed by injection of the crotamine isoforms into the right paw, since both crotamine isoforms exert a strong pro-inflammatory effect. PMID:20206199

  17. STAEBL: Structural tailoring of engine blades, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, M. S.; Brown, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    The Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (STAEBL) program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center in 1980 to introduce optimal structural tailoring into the design process for aircraft gas turbine engine blades. The standard procedure for blade design is highly iterative with the engineer directly providing most of the decisions that control the design process. The goal of the STAEBL program has been to develop an automated approach to generate structurally optimal blade designs. The program has evolved as a three-phase effort with the developmental work being performed contractually by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. Phase 1 was intended as a proof of concept in which two fan blades were structurally tailored to meet a full set of structural design constraints while minimizing DOC+I (direct operating cost plus interest) for a representative aircraft. This phase was successfully completed and was reported in reference 1 and 2. Phase 2 has recently been completed and is the basis for this discussion. During this phase, three tasks were accomplished: (1) a nonproprietary structural tailoring computer code was developed; (2) a dedicated approximate finite-element analysis was developed; and (3) an approximate large-deflection analysis was developed to assess local foreign object damage. Phase 3 is just beginning and is designed to incorporated aerodynamic analyses directly into the structural tailoring system in order to relax current geometric constraints.

  18. Lutetium(iii) aqua ion: On the dynamical structure of the heaviest lanthanoid hydration complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessa, Francesco; Spezia, Riccardo; D'Angelo, Paola

    2016-05-01

    The structure and dynamics of the lutetium(iii) ion in aqueous solution have been investigated by means of a polarizable force field molecular dynamics (MD). An 8-fold square antiprism (SAP) geometry has been found to be the dominant configuration of the lutetium(iii) aqua ion. Nevertheless, a low percentage of 9-fold complexes arranged in a tricapped trigonal prism (TTP) geometry has been also detected. Dynamic properties have been explored by carrying out six independent MD simulations for each of four different temperatures: 277 K, 298 K, 423 K, 632 K. The mean residence time of water molecules in the first hydration shell at room temperature has been found to increase as compared to the central elements of the lanthanoid series in agreement with previous experimental findings. Water exchange kinetic rate constants at each temperature and activation parameters of the process have been determined from the MD simulations. The obtained structural and dynamical results suggest that the water exchange process for the lutetium(iii) aqua ion proceeds with an associative mechanism, in which the SAP hydration complex undergoes temporary structural changes passing through a 9-fold TTP intermediate. Such results are consistent with the water exchange mechanism proposed for heavy lanthanoid atoms.

  19. Lutetium(iii) aqua ion: On the dynamical structure of the heaviest lanthanoid hydration complex.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Francesco; Spezia, Riccardo; D'Angelo, Paola

    2016-05-28

    The structure and dynamics of the lutetium(iii) ion in aqueous solution have been investigated by means of a polarizable force field molecular dynamics (MD). An 8-fold square antiprism (SAP) geometry has been found to be the dominant configuration of the lutetium(iii) aqua ion. Nevertheless, a low percentage of 9-fold complexes arranged in a tricapped trigonal prism (TTP) geometry has been also detected. Dynamic properties have been explored by carrying out six independent MD simulations for each of four different temperatures: 277 K, 298 K, 423 K, 632 K. The mean residence time of water molecules in the first hydration shell at room temperature has been found to increase as compared to the central elements of the lanthanoid series in agreement with previous experimental findings. Water exchange kinetic rate constants at each temperature and activation parameters of the process have been determined from the MD simulations. The obtained structural and dynamical results suggest that the water exchange process for the lutetium(iii) aqua ion proceeds with an associative mechanism, in which the SAP hydration complex undergoes temporary structural changes passing through a 9-fold TTP intermediate. Such results are consistent with the water exchange mechanism proposed for heavy lanthanoid atoms. PMID:27250314

  20. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12548.001 PMID:26670543

  1. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  2. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing.

    PubMed

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  3. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    PubMed Central

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  4. Appurtenance Influence on Type III Hanford Single-Shell Tank Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, Scott E.; Larsen, Brian M.; Julyk, Larry J.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-02-26

    The interim stabilized Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs) are currently undergoing a state of the art analysis to assess the structural integrity of the waste storage tanks, for cleanup and closure operations, considering their adverse thermal histories and an updated seismic hazard for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The SSTs contain a variety of ancillary pits, piping, piping supports, risers, equipment, and penetrations known as appurtenances. These appurtenances may alter the structural response and ultimately could affect the structural integrity of the SSTs. An important challenge to the structural analysis of the SSTs is determining the impact of these appurtenances on structural integrity. To achieve this, the various appurtenances were reviewed and bounding appurtenance configurations for SST Types II and III tank designs were analyzed using finite element software. The bounding configurations for the Type II tanks considered four heavy offset pits with a central pit with and without a 36-inch diameter central post-construction penetration and four 42-inch diameter offset penetrations. The bounding configuration for the Type III tanks is a tank with two heavy offset pits and one heavy central pit. For each bounding configuration two finite element models are developed: a seismic analysis model and a thermal and operating loads analysis (TOLA) model. The TOLA models include a Type II or III thermal history, concrete cracking and thermal degradation, reinforcement yielding, and soil plasticity. Additionally, operating loads such as internal waste pressure and concentrated and distributed soil surface loads are applied to the TOLA model. The seismic model treats the tank concrete as linear elastic based on the present day degraded concrete properties. Also, in the seismic model the soil is treated as linear elastic while special techniques are used in the soil above the tank dome and along the tank wall to avoid soil arching and achieve the proper

  5. Optical Engineering for Children--A Structured Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, John; Moore, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the application of a structured template, maximum impact flow (MIF), in order to encourage young students in the area of optics and optical engineering. MIF introduces a template in terms of individual steps and linked functionality and is shown to fuse separate learning tools together into a cohesive unit.…

  6. A New Degree Programme in Structural Engineering and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, J. B.; Popovic, O.; Tyas, A.

    Structural engineers and architects are educated completely independently. Although both play a major part in designing and building a nation's infrastructure, they are not encouraged to fully understand the work of each other which can result in a lack of collaboration and co-operation, often to the detriment of a project. This divide between the…

  7. Engineering extracellular matrix structure in 3D multiphase tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Brian M.; Rossen, Ninna S.; Das, Nikkan; Leong, Debra; Wang, Meixin; Dugar, Arushi; Sia, Samuel K.

    2011-01-01

    In native tissues, microscale variations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) structure can drive different cellular behaviors. Although control over ECM structure could prove useful in tissue engineering and in studies of cellular behavior, isotropic 3D matrices poorly replicate variations in local microenvironments. In this paper, we demonstrate a method to engineer local variations in the density and size of collagen fibers throughout 3D tissues. The results showed that, in engineered multiphase tissues, the structures of collagen fibers in both the bulk ECM phases (as measured by mesh size and width of fibers) as well as at tissue interfaces (as measured by density of fibers and thickness of tissue interfaces) could be modulated by varying the collagen concentrations and gelling temperatures. As the method makes use of a previously published technique for tissue bonding, we also confirmed that significant adhesion strength at tissue interfaces was achieved under all conditions tested. Hence, this study demonstrates how collagen fiber structures can be engineered within all regions of a tightly integrated multiphase tissue scaffold by exploiting knowledge of collagen assembly. PMID:21840047

  8. CAL Packages for Civil Engineering Hydraulics and Structural Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, W. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes computer assisted learning (CAL) packages written in FORTRAN IV and developed for use in a degree course in civil engineering dealing with hydraulics and structures. All are used in the interactive mode through a terminal with a keyboard and visual display unit. (Author/CMV)

  9. Abstraction and Concreteness in the Everyday Mathematics of Structural Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsburg, Julie

    The everyday mathematics processes of structural engineers were studied and analyzed in terms of abstraction. A main purpose of the study was to explore the degree to which the notion of a gap between school and everyday mathematics holds when the scope of practices considered "everyday" is extended. J. Lave (1988) promoted a methodology that…

  10. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices. PMID:27334095

  11. Synthesis, structure, luminescent, and magnetic properties of carbonato-bridged Zn(II)2Ln(III)2 complexes [(μ4-CO3)2{Zn(II)L(n)Ln(III)(NO3)}2] (Ln(III) = Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III); L(1) = N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato, L(2) = N,N'-bis(3-ethoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato).

    PubMed

    Ehama, Kiyomi; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Soichiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Naohide; Mochida, Naotaka; Ishida, Takayuki; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Tsuchimoto, Masanobu; Re, Nazzareno

    2013-11-01

    Carbonato-bridged Zn(II)2Ln(III)2 complexes [(μ4-CO3)2{Zn(II)L(n)Ln(III)(NO3)}2]·solvent were synthesized through atmospheric CO2 fixation reaction of [Zn(II)L(n)(H2O)2]·xH2O, Ln(III)(NO3)3·6H2O, and triethylamine, where Ln(III) = Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III); L(1) = N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato, L(2) = N,N'-bis(3-ethoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato. Each Zn(II)2Ln(III)2 structure possessing an inversion center can be described as two di-μ-phenoxo-bridged {Zn(II)L(n)Ln(III)(NO3)} binuclear units bridged by two carbonato CO3(2-) ions. The Zn(II) ion has square pyramidal coordination geometry with N2O2 donor atoms of L(n) and one oxygen atom of a bridging carbonato ion at the axial site. Ln(III) ion is coordinated by nine oxygen atoms consisting of four from the deprotonated Schiff-base L(n), two from a chelating nitrate, and three from two carbonate groups. The temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities in the range 1.9-300 K, field-dependent magnetization from 0 to 5 T at 1.9 K, and alternating current magnetic susceptibilities under the direct current bias fields of 0 and 1000 Oe were measured. The magnetic properties of the Zn(II)2Ln(III)2 complexes are analyzed on the basis of the dicarbonato-bridged binuclear Ln(III)-Ln(III) structure, as the Zn(II) ion with d(10) electronic configuration is diamagnetic. ZnGd1 (L(1)) and ZnGd2 (L(2)) show a ferromagnetic Gd(III)-Gd(III) interaction with J(Gd-Gd) = +0.042 and +0.028 cm(-1), respectively, on the basis of the Hamiltonian H = -2J(Gd-Gd)ŜGd1·ŜGd2. The magnetic data of the Zn(II)2Ln(III)2 complexes (Ln(III) = Tb(III), Dy(III)) were analyzed by a spin Hamiltonian including the crystal field effect on the Ln(III) ions and the Ln(III)-Ln(III) magnetic interaction. The Stark splitting of the ground state was so evaluated, and the energy pattern indicates a strong easy axis (Ising type) anisotropy. Luminescence spectra of Zn(II)2Tb(III)2 complexes were observed, while those

  12. Hydrogen effects in dilute III-N-V alloys: From defect engineering to nanostructuring

    SciTech Connect

    Pettinari, G.; Felici, M.; Capizzi, M.; Polimeni, A.; Trotta, R.

    2014-01-07

    The variation of the band gap energy of III-N-V semiconductors induced by hydrogen incorporation is the most striking effect that H produces in these materials. A special emphasis is given here to the combination of N-activity passivation by hydrogen with H diffusion kinetics in dilute nitrides. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows an extremely steep (smaller than 5 nm/decade) forefront of the H diffusion profile in Ga(AsN) under appropriate hydrogenation conditions. This discovery prompts the opportunity for an in-plane nanostructuring of hydrogen incorporation and, hence, for a modulation of the material band gap energy at the nanoscale. The properties of quantum dots fabricated by a lithographically defined hydrogenation are presented, showing the zero-dimensional character of these novel nanostructures. Applicative prospects of this nanofabrication method are finally outlined.

  13. Achirality in the low temperature structure and lattice modes of tris(acetylacetonate)iron(iii).

    PubMed

    Ellis, Thomas K; Kearley, Gordon J; Piltz, Ross O; Jayasooriya, Upali A; Stride, John A

    2016-05-10

    Tris(acetylacteonate) iron(iii) is a relatively ubiquitous mononuclear inorganic coordination complex. The bidentate nature of the three acetylacteonate ligands coordinating around a single centre inevitably leads to structural isomeric forms, however whether or not this relates to chirality in the solid state has been questioned in the literature. Variable temperature neutron diffraction data down to T = 3 K, highlights the dynamic nature of the ligand environment, including the motions of the hydrogen atoms. The Fourier transform of the molecular dynamics simulation based on the experimentally determined structure was shown to closely reproduce the low temperature vibrational density of states obtained using inelastic neutron scattering. PMID:27109447

  14. Engineering smooth muscle tissue with a predefined structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, B S; Mooney, D J

    1998-08-01

    Nonwoven meshes of polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers are attractive synthetic extracellular matrices (ECMs) for tissue engineering and have been used to engineer many types of tissues. However, these synthetic ECMs lack structural stability and often cannot maintain their original structure during tissue development. This makes it difficult to design an engineered tissue with a predefined configuration and dimensions. In this study, we investigated the ability of PGA fiber-based matrices bonded at their fiber crosspoints with a secondary polymer, poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), to resist cellular contractile forces and maintain their predefined structure during the process of smooth muscle (SM) tissue development in vitro. Physically bonded PGA matrices exhibited a 10- to 35-fold increase in the compressive modulus over unbonded PGA matrices, depending on the mass of PLLA utilized to bond the PGA matrices. In addition, the bonded PGA matrices degraded much more slowly than the unbonded matrices. The PLLA bonding of PGA matrices had no effect on the ability of cells to adhere to the matrices. After 7 weeks in culture, the bonded matrices maintained 101 +/- 4% of their initial volume and an approximate original shape while the unbonded matrices contracted to 5 +/- 1% of their initial volume with an extreme change in their shape. At this time the bonded PGA matrices had a high cellularity, with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and ECM proteins produced by these cells (e.g., elastin) filling the pores between PGA fibers. This study demonstrated that physically bonded PGA fiber-based matrices allow the maintenance of the configuration and dimensions of the original matrices and the development of a new tissue in a predefined three-dimensional structure. This approach may be useful for engineering a variety of tissues of various structures and shapes, and our study demonstrates the importance of matching both the initial mechanical properties and the degradation rate of a matrix to

  15. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+–protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration. PMID:26943926

  16. Investigating the Structure of the WJ-III Cognitive in Early School Age through Two Exploratory Bifactor Analysis Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.

    2014-01-01

    Two exploratory bifactor methods (e.g., Schmid-Leiman [SL] and exploratory bifactor analysis [EBFA]) were used to investigate the structure of the Woodcock-Johnson III (WJ-III) Cognitive in early school age (age 6-8). The SL procedure is recognized by factor analysts as a preferred method for EBFA. Jennrich and Bentler recently developed an…

  17. Three-Coordinate Terminal Imidoiron(III) Complexes: Structure, Spectroscopy, and Mechanism of Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Ryan E.; DeYonker, Nathan J.; Eckert, Nathan A.; Cundari, Thomas R.; DeBeer, Serena; Bill, Eckhard; Ottenwaelder, Xavier; Flaschenriem, Christine; Holland, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction of 1-adamantyl azide with iron(I) diketiminate precursors gives metastable but isolable imidoiron(III) complexes LFe=NAd (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand; Ad = 1-adamantyl). This paper addresses: (1) the spectroscopic and structural characterization of the Fe=N multiple bond in these interesting three-coordinate iron imido complexes, and (2) the mechanism through which the imido complexes form. The iron(III) imido complexes have been examined by 1H NMR and EPR spectroscopies and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility (SQUID), and structurally characterized by crystallography and/or X-ray absorption (EXAFS) measurements. These data show that the imido complexes have quartet ground states and short (1.68 ± 0.01 Å) iron-nitrogen bonds. The formation of the imido complexes proceeds through unobserved iron–RN3 intermediates, which are indicated by QM/MM computations to be best described as iron(II) with an RN3 radical anion. The radical character on the organoazide bends its NNN linkage to enable easy N2 loss and imido complex formation. The product distribution between imidoiron(III) products and hexazene-bridged diiron(II) products is solvent-dependent, and the solvent dependence can be explained by coordination of certain solvents to the iron(I) precursor prior to interaction with the organoazide. PMID:20524625

  18. Structural basis for ESCRT-III CHMP3 recruitment of AMSH.

    PubMed

    Solomons, Julianna; Sabin, Charles; Poudevigne, Emilie; Usami, Yoshiko; Hulsik, David Lutje; Macheboeuf, Pauline; Hartlieb, Bettina; Göttlinger, Heinrich; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2011-08-10

    Endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) recognize ubiquitinated cargo and catalyze diverse budding processes including multivesicular body biogenesis, enveloped virus egress, and cytokinesis. We present the crystal structure of an N-terminal fragment of the deubiquitinating enzyme AMSH (AMSHΔC) in complex with the C-terminal region of ESCRT-III CHMP3 (CHMP3ΔN). AMSHΔC folds into an elongated 90 Å long helical assembly that includes an unusual MIT domain. CHMP3ΔN is unstructured in solution and helical in complex with AMSHΔC, revealing a novel MIT domain interacting motif (MIM) that does not overlap with the CHMP1-AMSH binding site. ITC and SPR measurements demonstrate an unusual high-affinity MIM-MIT interaction. Structural analysis suggests a regulatory role for the N-terminal helical segment of AMSHΔC and its destabilization leads to a loss of function during HIV-1 budding. Our results indicate a tight coupling of ESCRT-III CHMP3 and AMSH functions and provide insight into the regulation of ESCRT-III. PMID:21827950

  19. Solution structure of monomeric BsaL, the type III secretion needle protein of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Yu; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2006-06-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria that are important human pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. During the establishment of infection, these pathogens coordinately assemble greater than 20 different proteins into a macromolecular structure that spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and, in many respects, resembles and functions like a syringe. This type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) is used to inject proteins into a host cell's membrane and cytoplasm to subvert normal cellular processes. The external portion of the TTSA is a needle that is composed of a single type of protein that is polymerized in a helical fashion to form an elongated tube with a central channel of 2-3 nm in diameter. TTSA needle proteins from a variety of bacterial pathogens share sequence conservation; however, no atomic structure for any TTSA needle protein is yet available. Here, we report the structure of a TTSA needle protein called BsaL from Burkholderia pseudomallei determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The central part of the protein assumes a helix-turn-helix core domain with two well-defined alpha-helices that are joined by an ordered, four-residue linker. This forms a two-helix bundle that is stabilized by interhelix hydrophobic contacts. Residues that flank this presumably exposed core region are not completely disordered, but adopt a partial helical conformation. The atomic structure of BsaL and its sequence homology with other TTSA needle proteins suggest potentially unique structural dynamics that could be linked with a universal mechanism for control of type III secretion in diverse gram-negative bacterial pathogens. PMID:16631790

  20. Interdisciplinary and multilevel optimum design. [in aerospace structural engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1987-01-01

    Interactions among engineering disciplines and subsystems in engineering system design are surveyed and specific instances of such interactions are described. Examination of the interactions that a traditional design process in which the numerical values of major design variables are decided consecutively is likely to lead to a suboptimal design. Supporting numerical examples are a glider and a space antenna. Under an alternative approach introduced, the design and its sensitivity data from the subsystems and disciplines are generated concurrently and then made available to the system designer enabling him to modify the system design so as to improve its performance. Examples of a framework structure and an airliner wing illustrate that approach.

  1. Structural tailoring of engine blades (STAEBL) theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    This Theoretical Manual includes the theories included in the Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (STAEBL) computer program which was developed to perform engine fan and compressor blade numerical optimizations. These blade optimizations seek a minimum weight or cost design that satisfies practical blade design constraints, by controlling one to twenty design variables. The STAEBL constraint analyses include blade stresses, vibratory response, flutter, and foreign object damage. Blade design variables include airfoil thickness at several locations, blade chord, and construction variables: hole size for hollow blades, and composite material layup for composite blades.

  2. Structural tailoring of engine blades (STAEBL) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    This User's Manual contains instructions and demonstration case to prepare input data, run, and modify the Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (STAEBL) computer code. STAEBL was developed to perform engine fan and compressor blade numerical optimizations. This blade optimization seeks a minimum weight or cost design that satisfies realistic blade design constraints, by tuning one to twenty design variables. The STAEBL constraint analyses include blade stresses, vibratory response, flutter, and foreign object damage. Blade design variables include airfoil thickness at several locations, blade chord, and construction variables: hole size for hollow blades, and composite material layup for composite blades.

  3. Structural and functional characterization of a novel type-III dockerin from Ruminococcus flavefaciens.

    PubMed

    Karpol, Alon; Jobby, Maroor K; Slutzki, Michal; Noach, Ilit; Chitayat, Seth; Smith, Steven P; Bayer, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of known dockerins in Ruminococcus flavefaciens revealed a novel subtype, type-III, in the scaffoldin proteins, ScaA, ScaB, ScaC and ScaE. In this study, we explored the Ca²⁺-binding properties of the type-III dockerin from the ScaA scaffoldin (ScaADoc) using a battery of structural and biophysical approaches including circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite the lack of a second canonical Ca²⁺-binding loop, the behaviour of ScaADoc is similar with respect to other dockerin protein modules in terms of its responsiveness to Ca²⁺ and affinity for the cohesin from the ScaB scaffoldin. Our results highlight the robustness of dockerin modules and how their Ca²⁺-binding properties can be exploited in the construction of designer cellulosomes. PMID:23195689

  4. Correlational structure of the MCMI-III personality disorder scales and comparisons with other data sets.

    PubMed

    Dyce, J A; O'Connor, B P; Parkins, S Y; Janzen, H L

    1997-12-01

    We examine the correlational structure of the personality disorder (PD) scales from the MCMI-III (Millon, 1994) among 614 college students. The correlation matrix from our nonclinical sample was highly similar to the clinical sample matrices reported by Millon (1994). Further analyses revealed that the correlation matrices from a variety of MCMI data sets are generally similar to one another, but are only moderately similar to PD correlation matrices based on other assessment techniques. PD correlation matrices based on different assessment techniques are generally not very similar to one another. Two-, 3-, and 4-factor solutions for the MCMI-III PD scales are reported and provide a framework for integrating apparently conflicting findings from previous work. The 4-factor solution was most meaningful and was consistent with the 5-factor model of PD. PMID:9501485

  5. Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sandra; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, Robert J.; Hagenmüller, Henri; Nuss, Katja; Arras, Margarete; Müller, Ralph; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, David L.; Merkle, Hans P.; Meinel, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106 – 212 μm), medium (212 – 300 μm) and large pore diameter ranges (300 – 425 μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced and, bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation. PMID:23958323

  6. Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sandra; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, Robert J; Hagenmüller, Henri; Nuss, Katja; Arras, Margarete; Müller, Ralph; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, David L; Merkle, Hans P; Meinel, Lorenz

    2013-09-01

    Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106-212 μm), medium (212-300 μm), and large pore diameter ranges (300-425 μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter, all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced, and bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation. PMID:23958323

  7. Ice Protection of Turbojet Engines by Inertia Separation of Water III : Annular Submerged Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Glahn, Uwe

    1948-01-01

    Aerodynamic and icing studies were conducted on a one-half-scale model of an annular submerged inlet for use with axial-flow turbojet engines. Pressure recoveries, screen radial-velocity profiles, circumferential mass-flow variations, and icing characteristics were determined at the compressor inlet. In order to be effective in maintaining water-free induction air, the inlet gap must be extremely small and ram-pressure recoveries consequently are low, the highest achieved being 65 percent at inlet-velocity ratio of 0.86. All inlets exhibited considerable screen icing. Severe mass-flow shifts occurred at angles of attack.

  8. Making the CHARA Array, Part III: engineering decisions. to build or not to build

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; McAlister, Harold A.; Ridgway, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    The CHARA Array has been a PI led, low budget, and low manpower operation, and has followed a fairly unconventional path in its development. In this, the third paper of a series of three, we discuss some of the engineering and design decisions made along the way, some right and some wrong, with a focus on the choice between in-house development and the purchase of pre-built, or sub-contracted, subsystems. Along with these issues we will also address a few parts of the system that we might have done differently given our current knowledge, and those that somehow turned out very well.

  9. Interaction of curcumin with Al(III) and its complex structures based on experiments and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Teng; Wang, Long; Zhang, Sui; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Ding, Chuan-Fan; Chu, Yan-Qiu; Zhou, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Curcumin has been recognized as a potential natural drug to treat the Alzheimer's disease (AD) by chelating baleful metal ions, scavenging radicals and preventing the amyloid β (Aβ) peptides from the aggregation. In this paper, Al(III)-curcumin complexes with Al(III) were synthesized and characterized by liquid-state 1H, 13C and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopy (MS), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV) and generalized 2D UV-UV correlation spectroscopy. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT)-based UV and chemical shift calculations were also performed to view insight into the structures and properties of curcumin and its complexes. It was revealed that curcumin could interact strongly with Al(III) ion, and form three types of complexes under different molar ratios of [Al(III)]/[curcumin], which would restrain the interaction of Al(III) with the Aβ peptide, reducing the toxicity effect of Al(III) on the peptide.

  10. Multiscale structural characterizations of mixed U(iv)-An(iii) oxalates (An(iii) = Pu or Am) combining XAS and XRD measurements.

    PubMed

    Arab-Chapelet, B; Martin, P M; Costenoble, S; Delahaye, T; Scheinost, A C; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-04-28

    Mixed actinide(III,IV) oxalates of the general formula M2.2UAn(C2O4)5·nH2O (An = Pu or Am and M = H3O(+) and N2H5(+)) have been quantitatively precipitated by oxalic precipitation in nitric acid medium (yield >99%). Thorough multiscale structural characterization using XRD and XAS measurements confirmed the existence of mixed actinide oxalate solid solutions. The XANES analysis confirmed that the oxidation states of the metallic cations, tetravalent for uranium and trivalent for plutonium and americium, are maintained during the precipitation step. EXAFS measurements show that the local environments around U(+IV), Pu(+III) and Am(+III) are comparable, and the actinides are surrounded by ten oxygen atoms from five bidentate oxalate anions. The mean metal-oxygen distances obtained by XAS measurements are in agreement with those calculated from XRD lattice parameters. PMID:26979820

  11. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  12. Metal transformable-volume structures for space engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, Boris E.; Lobanov, Leonid M.; Volkov, Valentin S.

    2015-05-01

    The brief review of design solutions for existing transformable-volume structures (TVS) is given and main approaches are formulated for optimizing the metal transformable shell structures, allowing widening the sphere of their application in space engineering. Characterized are the methods, used for theoretical description of process of change in TVS shape, and also geometric parameters and properties of structural materials of thin shells allowing realization of their volume deforming at the maximum approach to the selected theoretical model. Technological aspects are described which are typical of the process of multi-sectional conical TVS design as applied to the conditions of its service under the effect of space environment factors (SEF).

  13. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  14. Performance of J33 turbojet engine with shaft-power extraction III : turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppert, M C; Nettles, J C

    1949-01-01

    The performance of the turbine component of a J33 turbojet engine was determined over a range of turbine speeds from 8000 to 11,500 rpm.Turbine-inlet temperature was varied from the minimum required to drive the compressor to a maximum of approximately 2000 degrees R at each of several intermediate turbine speeds. Data are presented that show the horsepower developed by the turbine per pound of gas flow. The relation between turbine-inlet stagnation pressure, turbine-outlet stagnation pressure, and turbine-outlet static pressure was established. The turbine-weight-flow parameter varied from 39.2 to 43.6. The maximum turbine efficiency measured was 0.86 at a pressure ratio of 3.5 and a ratio of blade speed to theoretical nozzle velocity of 0.39. A generalized performance map of the turbine-horsepower parameter plotted against the turbine-speed parameter indicated that the best turbine efficiency is obtained when the turbine power is 10 percent greater than the compressor horsepower. The variation of efficiency with the ratio of blade speed to nozzle velocity indicated that the turbine operates at a speed above that for maximum efficiency when the engine is operated normally with the 19-inch-diameter jet nozzle.

  15. New cyanide-bridged Mn(III)-M(III) heterometallic dinuclear complexes constructed from [M(III)(AA)(CN)4]- building blocks (M = Cr and Fe): synthesis, crystal structures and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Nastase, Silviu; Maxim, Catalin; Andruh, Marius; Cano, Joan; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; Faus, Juan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2011-05-14

    interactions observed and also to analyze the dependence of the magnetic coupling on the structural parameters within the Mn(III)-N-C-M(III) motif in 1-3. PMID:21442115

  16. Cabin-fuselage-wing structural design concept with engine installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariotti, Scott; Garner, M.; Cepeda, A.; Vieira, J.; Bolton, D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a fuselage structural assembly and wing structural design that will be able to withstand the given operational parameters and loads provided by Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23 (FAR 23) and the Statement of Work (SOW). The goal is to provide a durable lightweight structure that will transfer the applied loads through the most efficient load path. Areas of producibility and maintainability of the structure will also be addressed. All of the structural members will also meet or exceed the desired loading criteria, along with providing adequate stiffness, reliability, and fatigue life as stated in the SOW. Considerations need to be made for control system routing and cabin heating/ventilation. The goal of the wing structure and carry through structure is also to provide a simple, lightweight structure that will transfer the aerodynamic forces produced by the wing, tailboom, and landing gear. These forces will be channeled through various internal structures sized for the pre-determined loading criteria. Other considerations were to include space for flaps, ailerons, fuel tanks, and electrical and control system routing. The difficulties encountered in the fuselage design include expanding the fuselage cabin to accept a third occupant in a staggered configuration and providing ample volume for their safety. By adding a third person the CG of aircraft will move forward so the engine needs to be moved aft to compensate for the difference in the moment. This required the provisions of a ring frame structure for the new position of the engine mount. The difficulties encountered in the wing structural design include resizing the wing for the increased capacity and weight, and compensating for a large torsion produced by the tail boom by placing a great number of stiffeners inside the boom, which will result in the relocation of the fuel tank. Finally, an adequate carry through structure for the wing and fuselage interface will be

  17. III-V strain layer superlattice based band engineered avalanche photodiodes (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sid

    2015-08-01

    Laser detection and ranging (LADAR)-based systems operating in the Near Infrared (NIR) and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) have become popular optical sensors for remote sensing, medical, and environmental applications. Sophisticated laser-based radar and weapon systems used for long-range military and astronomical applications need to detect, recognize, and track a variety of targets under a wide spectrum of atmospheric conditions. Infrared APDs play an important role in LADAR systems by integrating the detection and gain stages in a single device. Robust silicon-APDs are limited to visible and very near infrared region (< 1 um), while InGaAs works well up to wavelengths of about 1.5um. Si APDs have low multiplication or excess noise but are limited to below 1um due very poor quantum efficiency above 0.8um. InGaAs and Ge APDs operate up to wavelengths of 1.5um but have poor multiplication or excess noise due to a low impact ionization coefficient ratio between electrons and holes. For the past several decades HgCdTe has been traditionally used in longer wavelength (> 3um) infrared photon detection applications. Recently, various research groups (including Ghosh et. al.) have reported SWIR and MWIR HgCdTe APDs on CdZnTe and Si substrates. However, HgCdTe APDs suffer from low breakdown fields due to material defects, and excess noise increases significantly at high electric fields. During the past decade, InAs/GaSb Strain Layer Superlattice (SLS) material system has emerged as a potential material for the entire infrared spectrum because of relatively easier growth, comparable absorption coefficients, lower tunneling currents and longer Auger lifetimes resulting in enhanced detectivities (D*). Band engineering in type II SLS allows us to engineer avalanche properties of electrons and holes. This is a great advantage over bulk InGaAs and HgCdTe APDs where engineering avalanche properties is not possible. The talk will discuss the evolution of superlattice based avalanche

  18. Electronic structure and v alence of Mn imputiries in III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulthess, T. C.; Temmerman, W.; Szotek, Z.; Stocks, G. M.; Butler, W. H.

    2004-03-01

    Substitutional Mn impurities in III-V semiconductors can acquire either a divalent or a trivalent configuration. For example, it is generally accepted that Mn in GaAs is in a (d^5+h) configuration with five occupied Mn d-orbitals and a delocalized hole in the valence band. In contrast, Mn in GaN is believed to be in a d^4 configuration with a deep impurity state that has d-character. But there have recently been some discussions about the possibility of having some Mn ion in GaN assuming a divalent (d^5+h) type configuration. In order to achieve carrier induced ferromagnetism, the desired state of the Mn ions in III-V semiconductors is the (d^5+h) configuration. We have therefore performed ab-initio calculations of the Mn valence when it substitutes Ga in various III-V semiconductor hosts. We use the self-interaction corrected local spin density (SIC-LSD) method which is able to treat localized impurity orbitals properly. In particular we find that the method is capable of predicting the (d^5+h) state of Mn in GaAs. For Mn in GaP and GaN the calculations predict a trivalent d^4 state in the idealized system. The energy differences between d^4 and (d^5+h) configurations in GaP are, however, very small. Introduction of defects or donors doe change the valence of Mn in GaP, favoring the divalent state under certain circumstances. Work supported by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency and by the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle LLC.

  19. Synthesis, reaction and structure of a series of chromium(III) complexes containing oxalate ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xu-Fang; Liu, Li; Ma, Jian-Gong; Yi, Long; Cheng, Peng; Liao, Dai-Zheng; Yan, Shi-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Hui

    2005-08-01

    A series of chromium(III) complexes [Cr(bipy)(HC2O4)2]Cl·3H2O (1), [Cr(phen)(HC2O4)2]Cl·3H2O (2), [Cr(phen)2(C2O4)]ClO4 (3), [Cr2(bipy)4(C2O4)](SO4)·(bipy)0.5·H2O (4) and [Mn(phen)2(H2O)2]2[Cr(phen)(C2O4)2]3ClO4·14H2O (5) were synthesized (bipy=4,4‧-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), while the crystal structures of 1 and 3-5 have been determined by X-ray analysis. 1 and 3 are mononuclear complexes, 4 contains binuclear chromium(III) ions and 5 is a 3D supromolecule formed by complicated hydrogen bonding. 1-3 are potential molecular bricks of chromium(III) building blocks for synthesis heterometallic complexes. When we use these molecular bricks as ligands to react with other metal salts, unexpected complexes 4 and 5 are isolated in water solution. The synthesis conditions and reaction results are also discussed.

  20. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  1. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  2. Biodegradable polymeric microcarriers with controllable porous structure for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xudong; Sun, Lei; Jiang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ding, Wenjun; Gan, Zhihua

    2009-12-01

    Porous microspheres fabricated by biodegradable polymers show great potential as microcarriers for cell cultivation in tissue engineering. Herein biodegradable poly(DL-lactide) (PLA) was used to fabricate porous microspheres through a modified double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The influence of fabrication parameters, such as the stirring speed of the primary and secondary emulsion, the polymer concentration of the oil phase, and solvent type, as well as the post-hydrolysis treatment of the porous structure of the PLA microspheres are discussed. Good attachment and an active spread of MG-63 cells on the microspheres is observed, which indicates that the PLA microspheres with controllable porous structure are of great potential as cell delivery carriers for tissue engineering. PMID:19821453

  3. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  4. Electrical Characteristics and Interface Properties of III Nitride-Based Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mahyuddin, A.; Hassan, Z.; Yusof, Y.; Cheong, K. Y.

    2010-07-07

    In this work, III-Nitride based metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure has been studied using AlN/GaN heterostructures on Si (111) with AlN buffer layer grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The structural and electrical characteristics of the films were studied through high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The value of flat-band voltage was -0.7 V. A total fixed oxide charge density of 2.73x10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} was estimated. Terman's method was used to obtain the density of interface state in the MIS structure. The analysis showed low interface state density values of 3.66x10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}.

  5. Nitroxylcob(III)Alamin: Synthesis And X-Ray Structural Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Hannibal, L.; Smith, C.A.; Jacobsen, D.W.; Brasch, N.E.

    2009-06-01

    The long-elusive crystal structure of nitrosylcobalamin (NOCbl) reveals that the Co-N-O angle is 117.4-121.4{sup o}; hence, NOCbl is best described as nitroxylcob(III)alamin in the solid state (see picture: Co purple, N blue, O red, P orange, C gray, H white). The length of the Co-N bond trans to the NO ligand is typical of those seen when strong {beta}-axial ligands are positioned trans to the 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole group.

  6. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  7. Synthesis and crystal structure of Ru III-supported tungstoantimonate [Sb 2W 20Ru III2(H 2O) 2(dmso) 6O 68] 4-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Li-Hua; Li, Bao; Bi, Shuai; Wu, Li-Xin

    2009-06-01

    The first Ru III-supported tungstoantimonate [Ru II(bpy) 3] 2[Sb 2W 20Ru III2(H 2O) 2(dmso) 6O 68]·3dmso (bpy=bi-pyridine) ( 1a) has been successfully isolated as [Ru(bpy) 3] 2+ (Rubpy) salt by routine synthetic reaction in mixed solutions with dmso and water. Single-crystal X-ray analysis was carried out on 1a, which crystallizes in the triclinic system space group P-1 with a=16.804 (6), b=16.988 (6), c=17.666 (6) Å, α=107.397 (13)°, β=106.883 (13)°, γ=103.616 (12)°. V=4309 (3) Å 3, Z=1 with R1=0.0773. The compound 1a reveals the following features: (1) Rubpy is firstly used as an alternative ruthenium-source for the synthesis of Ru-substituted heteropolytungstate; (2) the structure of 1a consists of four Ru III-O-S(CH 3) 2 and two W-O-S(CH 3) 2 bonds resulting in an assembly with C2 symmetry; (3) the Ru III ions are linked to two dmso groups via two Ru III-O-S(CH 3) 2 bonds, which represents the other dmso-coordination mode to Ru III in POM chemistry. The cyclic voltammetry studies of 1a in dmso/H 2SO 4 (3/1 v/v) at pH 2.5 medium using the glassy carbon electrode as a working electrode show the respective electrochemical behaviors of the W-centers and the Ru-centers within 1a, which could be separated clearly. In addition, the compound 1a exhibits photoluminescence arising from π*- t2g ligand-to-metal transition of Rubpy.

  8. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  9. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign, and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  10. Engineered Biosynthesis of Plant Polyketides: Structure-Based and Precursor-Directed Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Ikuro

    Pentaketide chromone synthase (PCS) and octaketide synthase (OKS) are novel plant-specific type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) obtained from Aloe arborescens. Recombinant PCS expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzes iterative condensations of five molecules of malonyl-CoA to produce a pentaketide 5,7-dihydroxy-2-methylchromone, while recombinant OKS carries out sequential condensations of eight molecules of malonyl-CoA to yield octaketides SEK4 and SEK4b, the longest polyketides produced by the structurally simple type III PKS. The amino acid sequences of PCS and OKS are 91% identical, sharing 50-60% identity with those of other chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily type III PKSs of plant origin. One of the most characteristic features is that the conserved active-site Thr197 of CHS (numbering in Medicago sativa CHS) is uniquely replaced with Met207 in PCS and with Gly207 in OKS, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis and X-ray crystallographic analyses demonstrated that the chemically inert single residue lining the active-site cavity controls the polyketide chain length and the product specificity depending on the steric bulk of the side chain. On the basis of the crystal structures, an F80A/Y82A/M207G triple mutant of the pentaketide-producing PCS was constructed and shown to catalyze condensations of nine molecules of malonyl-CoA to produce an unnatural novel nonaketide naphthopyrone, whereas an N222G mutant of the octaketides-producing OKS yielded a decaketide benzophenone SEK15 from ten molecules of malonyl-CoA. On the other hand, the type III PKSs exhibited broad substrate specificities and catalytic potential. OKS accepted p-coumaroyl-CoA as a starter substrate to produce an unnatural novel C19 hexaketide stilbene and a C21 heptaketide chalcone. Remarkably, the C21 chalcone-forming activity was dramatically increased in the structure-guided OKS N222G mutant. In addition, OKS N222G mutant also yielded unnatural novel polyketides from phenylacetyl-CoA and

  11. Turbine blade structural dynamic analysis. [for space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents structural dynamic analysis and test results for the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine blades. Athough these blades are designed to avoid coincidence of natural frequencies with harmonic excitation forces, the complexity of the turbine hardware, its nonlinearities and lack of information regarding the forcing function have led to fatigue failures. A comparison of single-blade analysis and test modal frequencies, shapes, and stresses is given; analysis techniques to describe the forcing function, compute dynamic responses, and incorporate the nonlinearities of Coulomb-friction dampers are presented. Recommendations are made for new research to improve forcing function computations and structural damping estimates used in the analysis.

  12. Harnessing natural product assembly lines: structure, promiscuity, and engineering.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Christopher C; Williams, Gavin J

    2016-03-01

    Many therapeutically relevant natural products are biosynthesized by the action of giant mega-enzyme assembly lines. By leveraging the specificity, promiscuity, and modularity of assembly lines, a variety of strategies has been developed that enables the biosynthesis of modified natural products. This review briefly summarizes recent structural advances related to natural product assembly lines, discusses chemical approaches to probing assembly line structures in the absence of traditional biophysical data, and surveys efforts that harness the inherent or engineered promiscuity of assembly lines for the synthesis of non-natural polyketides and non-ribosomal peptide analogues. PMID:26527577

  13. Structural dynamic testing of the Engineering Test Satellite-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, K.; Mitsuma, H.; Matsushita, T.; Izumi, H.

    The Engineering Test Satellite-IV (ETS-IV) was the first large scale spacecraft developed and launched successfully in Japan on a new N-II launch vehicle. This paper presents an approach taken for the structural development of the ETS-IV. Extensive structural tests were performed to demonstrate that the ETS-IV spacecraft meets all design requirements and will survive all critical environments. Details of the static load test, vibration tests, acoustic test, and pyrotechnic shock test were described. The test results were compared with analyses and measured flight data.

  14. Note: Comparison of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering of a titania sponge structure at the beamlines BW4 (DORIS III) and P03 (PETRA III)

    SciTech Connect

    Rawolle, M.; Koerstgens, V.; Ruderer, M. A.; Metwalli, E.; Guo, S.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Herzog, G.; Benecke, G.; Schwartzkopf, M.; Buffet, A.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.

    2012-10-15

    Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is a powerful technique for morphology investigation of nanostructured thin films. GISAXS measurements at the newly installed P03 beamline at the storage ring PETRA III in Hamburg, Germany, are compared to the GISAXS data from the beamline BW4 at the storage ring DORIS III, which had been used extensively for GISAXS investigations in the past. As an example, a titania thin film sponge structure is investigated. Compared to BW4, at beamline P03 the resolution of larger structures is slightly improved and a higher incident flux leads to a factor of 750 in scattered intensity. Therefore, the acquisition time in GISAXS geometry is reduced significantly at beamline P03.

  15. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242293

  16. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a ‘fracture safe design’ is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242293

  17. Crystal engineering with thioureas: A structure-based inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisner, Kathryn A.

    2011-12-01

    Structural trends applicable to crystal engineering were studied in three classes of thiourea-based compounds. The aim of the study was to identify, predict, and ultimately design reliable single-molecule structural features, which could then be used to engineer crystals with desirable properties. In one class of compounds, this goal was achieved: N-alkyl and N-aryl derivatives of N,N'-bis(3-thioureidopropyl)piperazine adopted an identical conformation in the solid state, which resulted in near-identical crystal packing. A second class of closely related compounds, N-substituted tris(2-thioureidoethyl)amines, showed no such reliability in the solid state, likely because the parent structure lacked hydrogen-bonding functionalities sufficient to control intramolecular structure. In the third class of compounds that we studied, 1-benzoyl-3-(2-pyridyl)thioureas, substitution patterns were often predictive of molecular conformation; however, these intramolecular trends did not lead to recognizable crystal packing motifs. Nevertheless, certain physical properties observed in this last class of compounds---color, solubility, and often crystallinity---were conformer-specific, interestingly without any apparent relevance to crystal lattice structure. Solution-state and solid-state conformational trends in these 1-benzoyl-3-(2-pyridyl)thioureas have been documented, and speculations as to the source of color in one of the two observed conformations have been noted.

  18. From Geometry to Diagnosis: Experiences of Geomatics in Structural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.; Armesto, J.; Caamaño, J. C.; Solla, M.

    2012-07-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry and laser scanning are technologies that have been successfully used for metric surveying and 3D modelling in many different fields (archaeological and architectural documentation, industrial retrofitting, mining, structural monitoring, road surveying, etc.). In the case of structural applications, these techniques have been successfully applied to 3D modelling and sometimes monitoring; but they have not been sufficiently implemented to date, as routine tools in infrastructure management systems, in terms of automation of data processing and integration in the condition assessment procedures. In this context, this paper presents a series of experiences in the usage of terrestrial photogrammetry and laser scanning in the context of dimensional and structural evaluation of structures. These experiences are particularly focused on historical masonry structures, but modern prestressed concrete bridges are also investigated. The development of methodological procedures for data collection, and data integration in some cases, is tackled for each particular structure (with access limitations, geometrical configuration, range of measurement, etc.). The accurate geometrical information provided by both terrestrial techniques motivates the implementation of such results in the complex, and sometimes slightly approximated, geometric scene that is frequently used in structural analysis. In this sense, quantitative evaluating of the influence of real and accurate geometry in structural analysis results must be carried out. As main result in this paper, a series of experiences based on the usage of photogrammetric and laser scanning to structural engineering are presented.

  19. Synthesis, structural characterization and photoluminescence properties of a novel La(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köse, Muhammet; Ceyhan, Gökhan; Atcı, Emine; McKee, Vickie; Tümer, Mehmet

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a novel La(III) complex [La(H2L)2(NO3)3(MeOH)] of a Schiff base ligand was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods. Single crystals of the complex suitable for X-ray diffraction study were obtained by slow diffusion of diethyl ether into a MeOH solution of the complex which was found to crystallise as [La(H2L)2(NO3)3(MeOH)]ṡ2MeOHṡH2O. The structure was solved in monoclinic crystal system, P21/n space group with unit cell parameters a = 10.5641(11), b = 12.6661(16), c = 16.0022(17) Å, α = 67.364(2), β = 83.794(2)°, γ = 70.541(2)°, V = 1862.9(4) Å3 and Z = 2 with R final value of 0.526. In the complex, the La(III) ion is ten-coordinated by O atoms, five of which come from three nitrate ions, four from the two Schiff base ligands and one from MeOH oxygen atom. The Schiff base ligands in the structure are in a zwitter ion form with the phenolic H transferred to the imine N atom. Thermal properties of the La(III) complex were examined by thermogravimetric analysis and the complex was found to be thermally stable up to 310 °C. The Schiff base ligand and its La(II) complex were screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against Bacillus megaterium, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus (Gram positive bacteria), Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram negative bacteria), Candida albicans,Yarrowia lipolytica (fungus) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). The complex shows more antimicrobial activity than the free ligand.

  20. Microfabrication of hierarchical structures for engineered mechanical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Canudas, Marc

    Materials found in nature present, in some cases, unique properties from their constituents that are of great interest in engineered materials for applications ranging from structural materials for the construction of bridges, canals and buildings to the fabrication of new lightweight composites for airplane and automotive bodies, to protective thin film coatings, amongst other fields. Research in the growing field of biomimetic materials indicates that the micro-architectures present in natural materials are critical to their macroscopic mechanical properties. A better understanding of the effect that structure and hierarchy across scales have on the material properties will enable engineered materials with enhanced properties. At the moment, very few theoretical models predict mechanical properties of simple materials based on their microstructures. Moreover these models are based on observations from complex biological systems. One way to overcome this challenge is through the use of microfabrication techniques to design and fabricate simple materials, more appropriate for the study of hierarchical organizations and microstructured materials. Arrays of structures with controlled geometry and dimension can be designed and fabricated at different length scales, ranging from a few hundred nanometers to centimeters, in order to mimic similar systems found in nature. In this thesis, materials have been fabricated in order to gain fundamental insight into the complex hierarchical materials found in nature and to engineer novel materials with enhanced mechanical properties. The materials fabricated here were mechanically characterized and compared to simple mechanics models to describe their behavior with the goal of applying the knowledge acquired to the design and synthesis of future engineered materials with novel properties.

  1. Synthesis and structural characterization of new bismuth (III) nano coordination polymer: A precursor to produce pure phase nano-sized bismuth (III) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifehpour, Younes; Mirtamizdoust, Babak; Hatami, Masoud; Khomami, Bamin; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-07-01

    A novel bismuth (III) nano coordination polymer, {[Bi (pcih)(NO3)2]ṡMeOH}n (1), ("pcih" is the abbreviations of 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazoneate) were synthesized by a sonochemical method. The new nano-structure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analyses and IR spectroscopy. Single crystalline material was obtained using a heat gradient applied to a solution of the reagents. Compound 1 was structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The determination of the structure by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the complex forms a zig-zag one dimensional polymer in the solid state and the coordination number of BiIII ions is seven, (BiN3O4), with three N-donor and one O-donor atoms from two "pcih" and three O-donors from nitrate anions. It has a hemidirected coordination sphere. The supramolecular features in these complexes are guided and controlled by weak directional intermolecular interactions. The chains interact with each other through π-π stacking interactions creating a 3D framework. After thermolysis of 1 at 230 °C with oleic acid, pure phase nano-sized bismuth (III) oxide was produced. The morphology and size of the prepared Bi2O3 samples were further observed using SEM.

  2. Structural, electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical study on the geometric and electronic structures of [(corrolato)Au(III)](n) (n = 0, +1, -1) complexes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Woormileela; Sommer, Michael G; van der Meer, Margarethe; Plebst, Sebastian; Sarkar, Biprajit; Kar, Sanjib

    2016-02-21

    Synthesis of two new Au(III) corrole complexes with unsymmetrically substituted corrole ligands is presented here. The newly synthesized Au-compounds have been characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. The structural characterization of a representative Au(III) corrole has also been possible. Electrochemical, UV-vis-NIR/EPR spectroelectrochemical and DFT studies have been used to decipher the electronic structures of various electro-generated species. These are the first UV-vis-NIR/EPR spectroelectrochemical investigations on Au(III) corroles. Assignment of redox states of electro-generated Au(III) corroles is supported by DFT analysis. In contrast to the metal centered reduction reported in Au(III) porphyrins, one electron reduction in Au(III) corroles has been assigned to corrole centered on the basis of experimental and theoretical studies. Thus, the Au(III) corroles (not the analogous Au(III) porphyrin derivatives!) bear a truly redox inactive Au(III) center. Additionally, these Au-corrole complexes display NIR electrochromism, the origin of which is all on corrole-centered processes. PMID:26750146

  3. Structure and Management of an Engineering Senior Design Course.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Martin L; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2016-07-01

    The design of products and processes is an important area in engineering. Students in engineering schools learn fundamental principles in their courses but often lack an opportunity to apply these methods to real-world problems until their senior year. This article describes important elements that should be incorporated into a senior capstone design course. It includes a description of the general principles used in engineering design and a discussion of why students often have difficulty with application and revert to trial and error methods. The structure of a properly designed capstone course is dissected and its individual components are evaluated. Major components include assessing resources, identifying projects, establishing teams, understanding requirements, developing conceptual designs, creating detailed designs, building prototypes, testing performance, and final presentations. In addition to the course design, team management and effective mentoring are critical to success. This article includes suggested guidelines and tips for effective design team leadership, attention to detail, investment of time, and managing project scope. Furthermore, the importance of understanding business culture, displaying professionalism, and considerations of different types of senior projects is discussed. Through a well-designed course and proper mentoring, students will learn to apply their engineering skills and gain basic business knowledge that will prepare them for entry-level positions in industry. PMID:27168053

  4. Controlling the Structural and Functional Anisotropy of Engineered Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bursac, N

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control the degree of structural and functional anisotropy in 3D engineered cardiac tissues would have high utility for both in vitro studies of cardiac muscle physiology and pathology as well as potential tissue engineering therapies for myocardial infarction. Here, we applied a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique to generate network-like tissue patches seeded with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Fabricating longer elliptical pores within the patch networks increased the overall cardiomyocyte and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment within the patch. Improved uniformity of cell and matrix alignment yielded an increase in anisotropy of action potential propagation and faster longitudinal conduction velocity (LCV). Cardiac tissue patches with a higher degree of cardiomyocyte alignment and electrical anisotropy also demonstrated greater isometric twitch forces. After two weeks of culture, specific measures of electrical and contractile function (LCV = 26.8 ± 0.8 cm/s, specific twitch force = 8.9 ± 1.1 mN/mm2 for the longest pores studied) were comparable to those of neonatal rat myocardium. We have thus described methodology for engineering of highly functional 3D engineered cardiac tissues with controllable degree of anisotropy. PMID:24717534

  5. Intrinsic acidity of aluminum, chromium (III) and iron (III) μ 3-hydroxo functional groups from ab initio electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Dixon, David A.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2000-05-01

    Density functional calculations are performed on M 3(OH) 7(H 2O) 62+ and M 3O(OH) 6(H 2O) 6+ clusters for MAl, Cr(III), and Fe(III), allowing determination of the relative acidities of the μ 3-hydroxo and aquo functional groups. Contrary to previous predictions and rationalizations, Fe 3OH and Al 3OH groups have nearly the same intrinsic acidity, while Cr 3OH groups are significantly more acidic. The gas-phase acidity of the Fe 3OH site is in good agreement with the value predicted by the molecular mechanics model previously used to estimate the relative acidities of surface sites on iron oxides. [ J. R. Rustad et al. (1996)Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1563]. Acidities of aquo functional groups were also computed for Al and Cr. The AlOH 2 site is more acidic than the Al 3OH site, whereas the Cr 3OH site is more acidic than the CrOH 2 site. These findings predict that the surface charging behavior of chromium oxides/oxyhydroxides should be distinguishable from their Fe, Al counterparts. The calculations also provide insight into why the lepidocrocite/boehmite polymorph is not observed for CrOOH.

  6. New insights into structure and luminescence of Eu(III) and Sm(III) complexes of the 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) ligand.

    PubMed

    Daumann, Lena J; Tatum, David S; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Ni, Chengbao; Law, Ga-lai; Solomon, Edward I; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2015-03-01

    We report the preparation and new insight into photophysical properties of luminescent hydroxypyridonate complexes [M(III)L](-) (M = Eu or Sm) of the versatile 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) ligand (L). We report the crystal structure of this ligand with Eu(III) as well as insights into the coordination behavior and geometry in solution by using magnetic circular dichroism. In addition TD-DFT calculations were used to examine the excited states of the two different chromophores present in the 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) ligand. We find that the Eu(III) and Sm(III) complexes of this ligand undergo a transformation after in situ preparation to yield complexes with higher quantum yield (QY) over time. It is proposed that the lower QY in the in situ complexes is not only due to water quenching but could also be due to a lower degree of f-orbital overlap (in a kinetic isomer) as indicated by magnetic circular dichroism measurements. PMID:25607882

  7. Syntheses and structural characterization of two new nanostructured Bi(III) supramolecular polymers via sonochemical method.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Wei; Haji-Hasani, Ensieh; Morsali, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Two new bismuth(III) coordination supramolecular polymers, {[Bi2(Hbpp)(bpp)(μ-I)2I6](Hbpp)·MeOH}n (1) and [Bi(Hbpp)(Br4)] (2), (bpp=1,3-di(pyridin-4-yl)propane) were prepared and were structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Single crystalline one-dimensional materials were prepared using a heat gradient applied a solution of the reagents using the branched tube method. The structural determination by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that compounds 1 and 2 form monoclinic polymers with symmetry space group P21 in the solid state. These new nanostructured Bi(III) supramolecular compounds, {[Bi2(Hbpp)(bpp)(μ-I)2I6](Hbpp)·MeOH} (1) and [Bi(Hbpp)(Br4)] (2), were also synthesized by sonochemical method. The nanostructures were characterized by Field Emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and IR spectroscopy. PMID:26964932

  8. Effects of strain on the band structure of group-III nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qimin; Rinke, Patrick; Janotti, Anderson; Scheffler, Matthias; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2014-09-01

    We present a systematic study of strain effects on the electronic band structure of the group-III-nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN) in the wurtzite phase. The calculations are based on density functional theory with band-gap-corrected approaches including the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional (HSE) and quasiparticle G0W0 methods. We study strain effects under realistic strain conditions, hydrostatic pressure, and biaxial stress. The strain-induced modification of the band structures is found to be nonlinear; transition energies and crystal-field splittings show a strong nonlinear behavior under biaxial stress. For the linear regime around the experimental lattice parameters, we present a complete set of deformation potentials (acz, act, D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6) that allows us to predict the band positions of group-III nitrides and their alloys (InGaN and AlGaN) under realistic strain conditions. The benchmarking G0W0 results for GaN agree well with the HSE data and indicate that HSE provides an appropriate description for the band structures of nitrides. We present a systematic study of strain effects on the electronic band structure of the group-III nitrides (AlN, GaN, and InN). We quantify the nonlinearity of strain effects by introducing a set of bowing parameters. We apply the calculated deformation potentials to the prediction of strain effects on transition energies and valence-band structures of InGaN alloys and quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN, in various orientations (including c-plane, m-plane, and semipolar). The calculated band gap bowing parameters, including the strain effect for c-plane InGaN, agree well with the results obtained by hybrid functional alloy calculations. For semipolar InGaN QWs grown in (202¯1), (303¯1), and (303¯1¯) orientations, our calculated deformation potentials have provided results for polarization ratios in good agreement with the experimental observations, providing further confidence in the accuracy of our values.

  9. Distinct Structural Elements Dictate the Specificity of the Type III Pentaketide Synthase from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin-Pitel, Sheryl B.; Zhang, Houjin; Vu, Trang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2009-01-15

    The fungal type III polyketide synthase 2'-oxoalkylresorcyclic acid synthase (ORAS) primes with a range of acyl-Coenzyme A thioesters (C{sub 4}--C{sub 20}) and extends using malonyl-Coenzyme A to produce pyrones, resorcinols, and resorcylic acids. To gain insight into this unusual substrate specificity and product profile, we have determined the crystal structures of ORAS to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution, the Phe-252{yields}Gly site-directed mutant to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, and a binary conplex of ORAS with eicosanoic acid to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structures reveal a distinct rearrangement of structural elements near the active site that allows accomodation of long-chain fatty acid esters and a reorientation of the gating mechanism that controls cyclization and polyketide chain length. The roles of these structural elements are further elucidated by characterization of various structure-based site-directed variants. These studies establish an unexpected plasticity to the PKS fold, unanticipated from structural studies of other members of this enzyme family.

  10. Structural engineering of three-dimensional phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpero, Tommaso; Schoenwald, Stefan; Zemp, Armin; Bergamini, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Artificially-structured materials are attracting the research interest of a growing community of scientists for the possibility to develop novel materials with advantageous properties that arise from the ability to tailor the propagation of elastic waves, and thus energy, through them. In this work, we propose a three-dimensional phononic crystal whose unit cell has been engineered to obtain a strong wave-attenuation band in the middle of the acoustic frequency range. The combination of its acoustic properties with the dimensions of the unit cell and its static mechanical properties makes it an interesting material for possibly several applications in civil and mechanical engineering, for instance as the core of an acoustically insulating sandwich panel. A sample of this crystal has been manufactured and experimentally tested with respect to its acoustic transmissibility. The performance of the phononic crystal core is remarkable both in terms of amplitude reduction in the transmissibility and width of the attenuation band. A parametric study has been finally conducted on selected geometrical parameters of the unit cell and on their effect on the macroscopic properties of the crystal. This work represents an application-oriented example of how the macroscopic properties of an artificially-structured material can be designed, according to specific needs, by a conventional engineering of its unit cell.

  11. Simulation of Aircraft Engine Blade-Out Structural Dynamics. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly; Gallardo, Vicente

    2001-01-01

    A primary concern of aircraft structure designers is the accurate simulation of the blade-out event and the subsequent windmilling of the engine. Reliable simulations of the blade-out event are required to insure structural integrity during flight as well as to guarantee successful blade-out certification testing. The system simulation includes the lost blade loadings and the interactions between the rotating turbomachinery and the remaining aircraft structural components. General-purpose finite element structural analysis codes such as MSC NASTRAN are typically used and special provisions are made to include transient effects from the blade loss and rotational effects resulting from the engine's turbomachinery. The present study provides the equations of motion for rotordynamic response including the effect of spooldown speed and rotor unbalance and examines the effects of these terms on a cantilevered rotor. The effect of spooldown speed is found to be greater with increasing spooldown rate. The parametric term resulting from the mass unbalance has a more significant effect on the rotordynamic response than does the spooldown term. The parametric term affects both the peak amplitudes as well as the resonant frequencies of the rotor.

  12. Simulation of Aircraft Engine Blade-Out Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly; Gallardo, Vicente

    2001-01-01

    A primary concern of aircraft structure designers is the accurate simulation of the blade-out event and the subsequent windmilling of the engine. Reliable simulations of the blade-out event are required to insure structural integrity during flight as well as to guarantee successful blade-out certification testing. The system simulation includes the lost blade loadings and the interactions between the rotating turbomachinery and the remaining aircraft structural components. General-purpose finite element structural analysis codes such as MSC NASTRAN are typically used and special provisions are made to include transient effects from the blade loss and rotational effects resulting from the engine's turbomachinery. The present study provides the equations of motion for rotordynamic response including the effect of spooldown speed and rotor unbalance and examines the effects of these terms on a cantilevered rotor. The effect of spooldown speed is found to be greater with increasing spooldown rate. The parametric term resulting from the mass unbalance has a more significant effect on the rotordynamic response than does the spooldown term. The parametric term affects both the peak amplitudes as well as the resonant frequencies of the rotor.

  13. Crystal Structures and Coordination Behavior of Aqua- and Cyano-Co(III) Tetradehydrocorrins in the Heme Pocket of Myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yoshitsugu; Oohora, Koji; Mizohata, Eiichi; Sawada, Akiyoshi; Kamachi, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Myoglobins reconstituted with aqua- and cyano-Co(III) tetradehydrocorrins, rMb(Co(III)(OH2)(TDHC)) and rMb(Co(III)(CN)(TDHC)), respectively, were prepared and investigated as models of a cobalamin-dependent enzyme. The former protein was obtained by oxidation of rMb(Co(II)(TDHC)) with K3[Fe(CN)6]. The cyanide-coordinated Co(III) species in the latter protein was prepared by ligand exchange of rMb(Co(III)(OH2)(TDHC)) with exogenous cyanide upon addition of KCN. The X-ray crystallographic study reveals the hexacoordinated structures of rMb(Co(III)(OH)(TDHC)) and rMb(Co(III)(CN)(TDHC)) at 1.20 and 1.40 Å resolution, respectively. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the cyanide in rMb(Co(III)(CN)(TDHC)) were determined to be 108.6 and 110.6 ppm. IR measurements show that the cyanide of rMb(Co(III)(CN)(TDHC)) has a stretching frequency peak at 2151 cm(-1) which is higher than that of cyanocobalamin. The (13)C NMR and IR measurements indicate weaker coordination of the cyanide to Co(III)(TDHC) relative to cobalamin, a vitamin B12 derivative. Thus, the extent of π-back-donation from the cobalt ion to the cyanide ion is lower in rMb(Co(III)(CN)(TDHC)). Furthermore, the pK(1/2) values of rMb(Co(III)(OH2)(TDHC)) and rMb(Co(III)(CN)(TDHC)) were determined by a pH titration experiment to be 3.2 and 5.5, respectively, indicating that the cyanide ligation weakens the Co-N(His93) bond. Theoretical calculations also demonstrate that the axial ligand exchange from water to cyanide elongates the Co-N(axial) bond with a decrease in the bond dissociation energy. Taken together, the cyano-Co(III) tetradehydrocorrin in myoglobin is appropriate for investigation as a structural analogue of methylcobalamin, a key intermediate in methionine synthase reaction. PMID:26760442

  14. Structure-Based Functional Analyses of Domains II and III of Pseudorabies Virus Glycoprotein H

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Sebastian W.; Eckroth, Elisa; Backovic, Marija; Klupp, Barbara G.; Rey, Felix A.; Fuchs, Walter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enveloped viruses utilize membrane fusion for entry into, and release from, host cells. For entry, members of the Herpesviridae require at least three envelope glycoproteins: the homotrimeric gB and a heterodimer of gH and gL. The crystal structures of three gH homologues, including pseudorabies virus (PrV) gH, revealed four conserved domains. Domain II contains a planar β-sheet (“fence”) and a syntaxin-like bundle of three α-helices (SLB), similar to those found in eukaryotic fusion proteins, potentially executing an important role in gH function. To test this hypothesis, we introduced targeted mutations into the PrV gH gene, which either disrupt the helices of the SLB by introduction of proline residues or covalently join them by artificial intramolecular disulfide bonds between themselves, to the adjacent fence region, or to domain III. Disruption of either of the three α-helices of the SLB (A250P, V275P, V298P) severely affected gH function in in vitro fusion assays and replication of corresponding PrV mutants. Considerable defects in fusion activity of gH, as well as in penetration kinetics and cell-to-cell spread of PrV mutants, were also observed after disulfide linkage of two α-helices within the SLB (A284C-S291C) or between SLB and domain III (H251C-L432C), as well as by insertions of additional cysteine pairs linking fence, SLB, and domain III. In vitro fusion activity of mutated gH could be partly restored by reduction of the artificial disulfide bonds. Our results indicate that the structure and flexibility of the SLB are relevant for the function of PrV gH in membrane fusion. IMPORTANCE Mutational analysis based on crystal structures of proteins is a powerful tool to understand protein function. Here, we continued our study of pseudorabies virus gH, a part of the core fusion machinery of herpesviruses. We previously showed that the “flap” region in domain IV of PrV gH is important for its function. We now demonstrate that mutations

  15. Structural and phase transformation of A{sup III}B{sup V}(100) semiconductor surface in interaction with selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Bezryadin, N. N.; Kotov, G. I. Kuzubov, S. V.

    2015-03-15

    Surfaces of GaAs(100), InAs(100), and GaP(100) substrates thermally treated in selenium vapor have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Some specific features and regularities of the formation of A{sub 3}{sup III}B{sub 4}{sup VI} (100)c(2 × 2) surface phases and thin layers of gallium or indium selenides A{sub 2}{sup III}B{sub 3}{sup VI} (100) on surfaces of different A{sup III}B{sup V}(100) semiconductors are discussed within the vacancy model of surface atomic structure.

  16. Engineering hybrid Co-picene structures with variable spin coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunsheng; Shan, Huan; Li, Bin; Zhao, Aidi; Wang, Bing

    2016-04-01

    We report on the in situ engineering of hybrid Co-picene magnetic structures with variable spin coupling using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. Single picene molecules adsorbed on Au(111) are manipulated to accommodate individual Co atoms one by one, forming stable artificial hybrid structures with magnetism introduced by the Co atoms. By monitoring the evolution of the Kondo effect at each site of Co atom, we found that the picene molecule plays an important role in tuning the spin coupling between individual Co atoms, which is confirmed by theoretical calculations based on the density-functional theory. Our findings indicate that the hybrid metal-molecule structures with variable spin coupling on surfaces can be artificially constructed in a controlled manner.

  17. Structural Evaluation of Exo-Skeletal Engine Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuguoglu, Latife; Abumeri, Galib; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    The available computational simulation capability is used to demonstrate the structural viability of composite fan blades of innovative Exo-Skeletal Engine (ESE) developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for a subsonic mission. Full structural analysis and progressive damage evaluation of ESE composite fan blade is conducted through the NASA in-house computational simulation software system EST/BEST. The results of structural assessment indicate that longitudinal stresses acting on the blade are in compression. At a design speed of 2000 rpm, pressure and suction surface outer most ply stresses in longitudinal, transverse and shear direction are much lower than the corresponding composite ply strengths. Damage is initiated at 4870 rpm and blade fracture takes place at rotor speed of 7735 rpm. Damage volume is 51 percent. The progressive damage, buckling, stress and strength results indicate that the design at hand is very sound because of the factor of safety, damage tolerance, and buckling load of 6811 rpm.

  18. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  19. Perturbing the Copper(III)-Hydroxide Unit through Ligand Structural Variation.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Debanjan; Yee, Gereon M; Spaeth, Andrew D; Boyce, David W; Zhang, Hongtu; Dereli, Büsra; Cramer, Christopher J; Tolman, William B

    2016-01-13

    Two new ligand sets, (pipMe)LH2 and (NO2)LH2 ((pipMe)L = N,N'-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1-methylpiperidine-2,6-dicarboxamide, (NO2)L = N,N'-bis(2,6-diisopropyl-4-nitrophenyl)pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide), are reported which are designed to perturb the overall electronics of the copper(III)-hydroxide core and the resulting effects on the thermodynamics and kinetics of its hydrogen-atom abstraction (HAT) reactions. Bond dissociation energies (BDEs) for the O-H bonds of the corresponding Cu(II)-OH2 complexes were measured that reveal that changes in the redox potential for the Cu(III)/Cu(II) couple are only partially offset by opposite changes in the pKa, leading to modest differences in BDE among the three compounds. The effects of these changes were further probed by evaluating the rates of HAT by the corresponding Cu(III)-hydroxide complexes from substrates with C-H bonds of variable strength. These studies revealed an overarching linear trend in the relationship between the log k (where k is the second-order rate constant) and the ΔH of reaction. Additional subtleties in measured rates arise, however, that are associated with variations in hydrogen-atom abstraction barrier heights and tunneling efficiencies over the temperature range from -80 to -20 °C, as inferred from measured kinetic isotope effects and corresponding electronic-structure-based transition-state theory calculations. PMID:26693733

  20. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  1. Sub-band structure engineering for advanced CMOS channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, T.; Tezuka, T.; Sugiyama, N.; Nakaharai, S.; Numata, T.; Koga, J.; Uchida, K.

    2005-05-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies of novel CMOS channels based on the concept of sub-band structure engineering. This device design concept can be realized as strained-Si channel MOSFETs, ultra-thin SOI MOSFETs and Ge-on-Insulator (GOI) MOSFETs. An important factor for the electron mobility enhancement is the introduction of larger sub-band energy splitting between the 2- and 4-fold valleys on a (1 0 0) surface, which can be obtained in strained-Si and ultra-thin body channels. The electrical properties of strained-Si MOSFETs are summarized with an emphasis on strained-SOI structures. Also, the importance of the precise control of ultra-thin SOI thickness is pointed out from the experimental results of the SOI thickness dependence of mobility. Furthermore, it is shown that the increase in the sub-band energy splitting can also be effective in obtaining higher current drive of n-channel MOSFETs under ballistic transport regime. This suggests that the current drive enhancement based on MOS channel engineering utilizing strain and ultra-thin body structures can be extended to ultra-short channel MOSFETs dominated by ballistic transport.

  2. Structural diversity and transcription of class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Karen G; Justesen, Annemarie F; Kjaersgård, Inger V H; Jensen, Rikke B; Rasmussen, Søren K; Jespersen, Hans M; Duroux, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Understanding peroxidase function in plants is complicated by the lack of substrate specificity, the high number of genes, their diversity in structure and our limited knowledge of peroxidase gene transcription and translation. In the present study we sequenced expressed sequence tags (ESTs) encoding novel heme-containing class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana and annotated 73 full-length genes identified in the genome. In total, transcripts of 58 of these genes have now been observed. The expression of individual peroxidase genes was assessed in organ-specific EST libraries and compared to the expression of 33 peroxidase genes which we analyzed in whole plants 3, 6, 15, 35 and 59 days after sowing. Expression was assessed in root, rosette leaf, stem, cauline leaf, flower bud and cell culture tissues using the gene-specific and highly sensitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We predicted that 71 genes could yield stable proteins folded similarly to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The putative mature peroxidases derived from these genes showed 28-94% amino acid sequence identity and were all targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum by N-terminal signal peptides. In 20 peroxidases these signal peptides were followed by various N-terminal extensions of unknown function which are not present in HRP. Ten peroxidases showed a C-terminal extension indicating vacuolar targeting. We found that the majority of peroxidase genes were expressed in root. In total, class III peroxidases accounted for an impressive 2.2% of root ESTs. Rather few peroxidases showed organ specificity. Most importantly, genes expressed constitutively in all organs and genes with a preference for root represented structurally diverse peroxidases (< 70% sequence identity). Furthermore, genes appearing in tandem showed distinct expression profiles. The alignment of 73 Arabidopsis peroxidase sequences provides an easy access to the identification of orthologous peroxidases

  3. STRUCTURE OF THE TYPE III PANTOTHENATE KINASE FROM Bacillus anthracis AT 2.0 Å RESOLUTION

    PubMed Central

    Nicely, Nathan I.; Parsonage, Derek; Paige, Carleitta; Newton, Gerald L.; Fahey, Robert C.; Leonardi, Roberta; Jackowski, Suzanne; Mallett, T. Conn; Claiborne, Al

    2008-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoASH) is the major low-molecular weight thiol in Staphylococcus aureus and a number of other bacteria; the crystal structure of the S. aureus coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR), which maintains the reduced intracellular state of CoASH, has recently been reported [Mallett, T.C., Wallen, J.R., Karplus, P.A., Sakai, H., Tsukihara, T., and Claiborne, A. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 11278-11289]. In this report we demonstrate that CoASH is the major thiol in Bacillus anthracis; a bioinformatics analysis indicates that three of the four proteins responsible for the conversion of pantothenate (Pan) to CoASH in Escherichia coli are conserved in B. anthracis. In contrast, a novel type III pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthetic pathway in B. anthracis; unlike the E. coli type I PanK, this enzyme is not subject to feedback inhibition by CoASH. The crystal structure of B. anthracis PanK (BaPanK), solved using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at a resolution of 2.0 Å, demonstrates that BaPanK is a new member of the Acetate and Sugar Kinase/Hsc70/Actin (ASKHA) superfamily. The Pan and ATP substrates have been modeled into the active-site cleft; in addition to providing a clear rationale for the absence of CoASH inhibition, analysis of the Pan-binding pocket has led to the development of two new structure-based motifs (the PAN and INTERFACE motifs). Our analyses also suggest that the type III PanK in the spore-forming B. anthracis plays an essential role in the novel thiol/disulfide redox biology of this category A biodefense pathogen. PMID:17323930

  4. Structural and Machine Design Using Piezoceramic Materials: A Guide for Structural Design Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Cudney, Harley H.

    2000-01-01

    Using piezoceramic materials is one way the design engineer can create structures which have an ability to both sense and respond to their environment. Piezoceramic materials can be used to create structural sensors and structural actuators. Because piezoceramic materials have transduction as a material property, their sensing or actuation functions are a result of what happens to the material. This is different than discrete devices we might attach to the structure. For example, attaching an accelerometer to a structure will yield an electrical signal proportional to the acceleration at the attachment point on the structure. Using a electromagnetic shaker as an actuator will create an applied force at the attachment point. Active material elements in a structural design are not easily modeled as providing transduction at a point, but rather they change the physics of the structure in the areas where they are used. Hence, a designer must not think of adding discrete devices to a structure to obtain an effect, but rather must design a structural system which accounts for the physical principles of all the elements in the structure. The purpose of this manual is to provide practicing engineers the information necessary to incorporate piezoelectric materials in structural design and machine design. First, we will review the solid-state physics of piezoelectric materials. Then we will discuss the physical characteristics of the electrical-active material-structural system. We will present the elements of this system which must be considered as part of the design task for a structural engineer. We will cover simple modeling techniques and review the features and capabilities of commercial design tools that are available. We will then cover practical how-to elements of working with piezoceramic materials. We will review sources of piezoceramic materials and built-up devices, and their characteristics. Finally, we will provide two design examples using piezoceramic

  5. Structure and luminescent property of complexes of aryl carboxylic acid-functionalized polystyrene with Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Baojiao; Shi, Nan; Qiao, Zongwen

    2015-11-01

    Via polymer reactions, naphthoic acid (NA) and benzoic acid (BA) were bonded onto the side chains of polystyrene (PS), respectively, and two aryl carboxylic acid-functionalized polystyrenes, PSNA and PSBA, were obtained. Using PSNA and PSBA as macromolecule ligands and Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions as central ions, various luminescent binary polymer-rare earth complexes were prepared. At the same time, with 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) and 4,4'-bipyridine (Bipy) as small-molecule co-ligands, various ternary polymer-rare earth complexes were also prepared. On the basis of characterizing PSNA, PSBA and complexes, the relationship between structure and luminescent property for these prepared complexes were mainly investigated. The study results show that the macromolecule ligands PSNA and PSBA, or the bonded NA and BA ligands, can strongly sensitize the fluorescence emissions of Eu(3+) ion or Tb(3+) ion, but the sensitization effect is strongly dependent on the structure of the ligands and the property of the central ions, namely it is strongly dependent on the matching degree of energy levels. The fluorescence emission of the binary complex PS-(NA)3-Eu(III) is stronger than that PS-(BA)3-Eu(III), indicating ligand NA has stronger sensitization action for Eu(3+) ion than ligand BA; the binary complex PS-(BA)3-Tb(III) emit strong characteristic fluorescence of Tb(3+) ion, displaying that ligand BA can strongly sensitize Tb(3+) ion, whereas the binary complex PS-(NA)3-Tb(III) nearly does not emit the characteristic fluorescence of Tb(3+) ion, showing that ligand NA does not sensitize Tb(3+) ion. The fluorescence intensity of the ternary complexes is much stronger than that of the binary complexes in the same series. PMID:26086996

  6. Direct synthesis of a {Co₆(III)Fe₆(III)} dodecanuclear complex, revealing an unprecedented molecular structure type.

    PubMed

    Chygorin, Eduard N; Kokozay, Vladimir N; Omelchenko, Irina V; Shishkin, Oleg V; Titiš, Ján; Boča, Roman; Nesterov, Dmytro S

    2015-06-28

    A novel heterometallic Co6Fe6 Schiff base complex, possessing an unprecedented {M12(μ-X)22} branched structure (according to the search via the Cambridge Structural Database), has been prepared using the "direct synthesis" approach and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. PMID:25992842

  7. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-15

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  8. Structural homology between lymphocyte receptors for high endothelium and class III extracellular matrix receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gallatin, W M; Wayner, E A; Hoffman, P A; St John, T; Butcher, E C; Carter, W G

    1989-01-01

    We have identified extensive structural homology between one type of heterotypic adhesion receptor (HAR) involved in lymphocyte interactions with high endothelium in lymphoid organs and a collagen-binding protein, termed class III extracellular matrix receptor (ECMRIII), expressed on most nucleated cell types. Both receptors have been described as heterogeneous 90-kDa transmembrane glycoproteins, referred to here as gp90. Monoclonal anti-HAR antibodies, Hermes-1 and Hutch-1, and monoclonal anti-ECMRIII antibodies, P1G12 and P3H9, were utilized to compare the two receptors. (i) All these monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated major gp90 components as well as uncharacterized additional higher molecular mass antigens of 120-200 kDa in human and macaque fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (ii) Competitive binding analyses with the antibodies identified distinct epitopes present on gp90. (iii) Enzymatic and chemical digestions generated identical peptide fragments from all the antigens in human and macaque fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (iv) Sequential immunoprecipitation with P1G12 followed by the other monoclonal antibodies indicated that all gp90 species reactive with Hermes-1 and Hutch-1 also expressed the P1G12 defined epitope. In reciprocal experiments, Hermes-1 and Hutch-1 immunoprecipitation did not completely remove all P1G12-reactive gp90 from cellular extracts. One inference from these data would be that gp90 is serologically heterogeneous, encompassing HARs as a major subset of this broadly expressed class of molecules. Images PMID:2471973

  9. The synthesis, structure, magnetic and luminescent properties of a new tetranuclear dysprosium (III) cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yen-Han; Tsai, Yun-Fan; Lee, Gene-Hsian; Yang, En-Che

    2012-01-15

    The synthesis and characterization of [Dy{sub 4}(dhampH{sub 3}){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), a new tetranuclear dysprosium (III) complex, is described. The compound was characterized by its X-ray structure, magnetic properties as well as the luminescent spectra. The compound crystallizes in a P1-bar space group with a zig-zag linear form of geometry. The ac magnetic susceptibilities of the molecule indicate that it is a magnetic molecule with a slow magnetization relaxation. The molecule also exhibits an emission spectrum that was confirmed to be ligand based. These results indicate that this molecule has both a slow magnetization relaxation (that could be potentially a SMM) and luminescent properties. - Graphical Abstract: A new tetranuclear dysprosium (III) complex [Dy{sub 4}(dhampH{sub 3}){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} is synthesized and reported in this paper. This molecule has luminescence and can potentially act as a SMM. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new designed ligand (dhampH{sub 5}) was syntheisized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new tetra-dysprosium cluster [Dy{sub 4}(dhampH{sub 3}){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was made. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slow magnetization relaxation phenomenon was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand-based luminescence was observed.

  10. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu; Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-01

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.