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Sample records for enhance bead-based bioassays

  1. Use of a Novel Fluidics Microbead Trap/Flow-cell Enhances Speed and Sensitivity of Bead-Based Bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Rich M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Easterday, Ashton N.; Edberg, Heather C.; Grate, Jay W.; Iyer, Sujata; Johnson, Laura H.; Straub, Tim M.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2007-09-15

    Automated devices and methods for biological sample preparation often utilize surface functionalized microbeads (superparamagnetic or non-magnetic) to allow capture, purification and pre-concentration of trace amounts of proteins, cells, or nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) from complex samples. We have developed unique methods and hardware for trapping either magnetic or non-magnetic functionalized beads that allow samples and reagents to be efficiently perfused over a micro-column of beads. This approach yields enhanced mass transport and up to 5-fold improvements in assay sensitivity or speed, dramatically improving assay capability relative to assays conducted in more traditional “batch modes” (i.e., in tubes or microplate wells). Summary results are given that highlight the analytical performance improvements obtained for automated microbead processing systems utilizing novel microbead trap/flow-cells for various applications, including: 1) simultaneous capture of multiple cytokines using an antibody-coupled polystyrene bead assay with subsequent flow cytometry detection; 2) capture of nucleic acids using oligonucleotide coupled polystyrene beads with flow cytometry detection; and 3) capture of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 (E. coli) from 50 mL sample volumes using antibody-coupled superparamagnetic microbeads with subsequent culturing to assess capture efficiency.

  2. An optoelectrokinetic technique for programmable particle manipulation and bead-based biosignal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuan-Chih; Kumar, Aloke; Williams, Stuart J; Green, Nicolas G; Kim, Kyung Chun; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2014-10-21

    Technologies that can enable concentration of low-abundance biomarkers are essential for early diagnosis of diseases. In this study, an optoelectrokinetic technique, termed Rapid Electrokinetic Patterning (REP), was used to enable dynamic particle manipulation in bead-based bioassays. Various manipulation capabilities, such as micro/nanoparticle aggregation, translation, sorting and patterning, were developed. The technique allows for versatile multi-parameter (voltage, light intensity and frequency) based modulation and dynamically addressable manipulation with simple device fabrication. Signal enhancement of a bead-based bioassay was demonstrated using dilute biotin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) solutions mixed with streptavidin-conjugated particles and rapidly concentrated with the technique. As compared with a conventional ELISA reader, the REP-enabled detection achieved a minimal readout of 3.87 nM, which was a 100-fold improvement in sensitivity. The multi-functional platform provides an effective measure to enhance detection levels in more bead-based bioassays. PMID:25109364

  3. Enhancement of performance in porous bead-based microchip sensors: Effects of chip geometry on bio-agent capture

    PubMed Central

    Kulla, Eliona; Chou, Jie; Simmons, Glennon; Wong, Jorge; McRae, Michael P.; Patel, Rushi; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Leach, Robin J.; Thompson, Ian M.; McDevitt, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring low concentrations of clinically-important biomarkers using porous bead-based lab-on-a-chip (LOC) platforms is critical for the successful implementation of point-of-care (POC) devices. One way to meet this objective is to optimize the geometry of the bead holder, referred to here as a micro-container. In this work, two geometric micro-containers were explored, the inverted pyramid frustum (PF) and the inverted clipped pyramid frustum (CPF). Finite element models of this bead array assay system were developed to optimize the micro-container and bead geometries for increased pressure, to increase analyte capture in porous bead-based fluorescence immunoassays. Custom micro-milled micro-container structures containing an inverted CPF geometry resulted in a 28% reduction in flow-through regions from traditional anisotropically-etched pyramidal geometry derived from Si-111 termination layers. This novel “reduced flow-through” design resulted in a 33% increase in analyte penetration into the bead and twofold increase in fluorescence signal intensity as demonstrated with C-Reactive Protein (CRP) antigen, an important biomarker of inflammation. A consequent twofold decrease in the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) of a proof-of-concept assay for the free isoform of Prostate-Specific Antigen (free PSA), an important biomarker for prostate cancer detection, is also presented. Furthermore, a 53% decrease in the bead diameter is shown to result in a 160% increase in pressure and 2.5-fold increase in signal, as estimated by COMSOL models and confirmed experimentally by epi-fluorescence microscopy. Such optimizations of the bead micro-container and bead geometries have the potential to significantly reduce the LODs and reagent costs for spatially programmed bead-based assay systems of this type. PMID:26097696

  4. Sensitivity Enhancement of Bead-based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (BEIS) biosensor by electric field-focusing in microwells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Ji, Jae Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Jun, Seong Chan; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-11-15

    This paper reports a novel electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) biosensors that uses magnetic beads trapped in a microwell array to improve the sensitivity of conventional bead-based EIS (BEIS) biosensors. Unloading the previously measured beads by removing the magnetic bar enables the BEIS sensor to be used repeatedly by reloading it with new beads. Despite its recyclability, the sensitivity of conventional BEIS biosensors is so low that it has not attracted much attentions from the biosensor industry. We significantly improved the sensitivity of the BEIS system by introducing of a microwell array that contains two electrodes (a working electrode and a counter electrode) to concentrate the electric field on the surfaces of the beads. We confirmed that the performance of the BEIS sensor in a microwell array using an immunoassay of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in PBS buffer and human plasma. The experimental results showed that a low concentration of PSA (a few tens or hundreds of fg/mL) were detectable as a ratio of the changes in the impedance of the PBS buffer or in human plasma. Therefore, our BEIS sensor with a microwell array could be a promising platform for low cost, high-performance biosensors for applications that require high sensitivity and recyclability. PMID:27152445

  5. Encapsulation of Adenovirus Serotype 5 in Anionic Lecithin Liposomes using a Bead-Based Immunoprecipitation Technique Enhances Transfection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, N.; Herrera, V.; Zhang, L.; Hedjran, F.; Feuer, R.; Blair, S.; Trogler, W.; Reid, T.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) constitute a promising class of cancer therapeutics which exploit validated genetic pathways known to be deregulated in many cancers. To overcome an immune response and to enhance its potential use to treat primary and metastatic tumors, a method for liposomal encapsulation of adenovirus has been developed. The encapsulation of adenovirus in non-toxic anionic lecithin-cholesterol-PEG liposomes ranging from 140–180nm in diameter have been prepared by self-assembly around the viral capsid. The encapsulated viruses retain their ability to infect cancer cells. Furthermore, an immunoprecipitation (IP) technique has shown to be a fast and effective method to extract non-encapsulated viruses and homogenize the liposomes remaining in solution. 78% of adenovirus plaque forming units were encapsulated and retained infectivity after IP processing. Additionally, encapsulated viruses have shown enhanced transfection efficiency up to 4× higher compared to non-encapsulated Ads. Extracting non-encapsulated viruses from solution may prevent an adverse in vivo immune response and may enhance treatment for multiple administrations. PMID:25154663

  6. Microfluidic, Bead-Based Assay: Theory and Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jason A.; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    Microbeads are frequently used as a solid support for biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids in heterogeneous microfluidic assays. However, relatively few studies investigate the binding kinetics on modified bead surfaces in a microfluidics context. In this study, a customized hot embossing technique is used to stamp microwells in a thin plastic substrate where streptavidin-coated agarose beads are selectively placed and subsequently immobilized within a conduit. Biotinylated quantum dots are used as a label to monitor target analyte binding to the bead's surface. Three-dimensional finite element simulations are carried out to model the binding kinetics on the bead's surface. The model accounts for surface exclusion effects resulting from a single quantum dot occluding multiple receptor sites. The theoretical predictions are compared and favorably agree with experimental observations. The theoretical simulations provide a useful tool to predict how varying parameters affect microbead reaction kinetics and sensor performance. This study enhances our understanding of bead-based microfluidic assays and provides a design tool for developers of point-of-care, lab-on-chip devices for medical diagnosis, food and water quality inspection, and environmental monitoring. PMID:19766545

  7. Enhanced fluorescence of proteins and label-free bioassays using aluminum nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ray, Krishanu; Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2009-08-01

    We report the enhanced intrinsic fluorescence from several proteins in proximity to aluminum nanostructured surfaces. Intrinsic fluorescence in proteins is dominated by the tryptophan residues. Intensities and lifetimes of several proteins with different numbers of tryptophan residues assembled on the surfaces of quartz or aluminum nanostructured films were measured. Immobilized protein molecules on the surface of an aluminum nanostructured film resulted in a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement (up to 14-fold) and lifetime decrease (up to 6-fold) compared to the quartz substrates. These large spectroscopic changes allow design of label-free bioassays where detection of binding interactions between proteins can be observed in the presence of a bulk sample solution. Binding of streptavidin to the biotinylated aluminum surface was demonstrated in the presence of 100 microg/mL bovine serum albumin in the sample solution by measurements of tryptophan intensity and lifetime changes. PMID:19594133

  8. High performance wash-free magnetic bioassays through microfluidically enhanced particle specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bechstein, Daniel J.B.; Lee, Jung-Rok; Ooi, Chin Chun; Gani, Adi W.; Kim, Kyunglok; Wilson, Robert J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors have emerged as a sensitive and versatile platform for high performance medical diagnostics. These magnetic biosensors require well-tailored magnetic particles as detection probes, which need to give rise to a large and specific biological signal while showing very low nonspecific binding. This is especially important in wash-free bioassay protocols, which do not require removal of particles before measurement, often a necessity in point of care diagnostics. Here we show that magnetic interactions between magnetic particles and magnetized sensors dramatically impact particle transport and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surfaces. We investigate the dynamics of magnetic particles’ biomolecular binding and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surface using microfluidic experiments. We elucidate how flow forces can inhibit magnetic adhesion, greatly diminishing or even eliminating nonspecific signals in wash-free magnetic bioassays, and enhancing signal to noise ratios by several orders of magnitude. Our method is useful for selecting and optimizing magnetic particles for a wide range of magnetic sensor platforms. PMID:26123868

  9. High performance wash-free magnetic bioassays through microfluidically enhanced particle specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstein, Daniel J. B.; Lee, Jung-Rok; Ooi, Chin Chun; Gani, Adi W.; Kim, Kyunglok; Wilson, Robert J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic biosensors have emerged as a sensitive and versatile platform for high performance medical diagnostics. These magnetic biosensors require well-tailored magnetic particles as detection probes, which need to give rise to a large and specific biological signal while showing very low nonspecific binding. This is especially important in wash-free bioassay protocols, which do not require removal of particles before measurement, often a necessity in point of care diagnostics. Here we show that magnetic interactions between magnetic particles and magnetized sensors dramatically impact particle transport and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surfaces. We investigate the dynamics of magnetic particles’ biomolecular binding and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surface using microfluidic experiments. We elucidate how flow forces can inhibit magnetic adhesion, greatly diminishing or even eliminating nonspecific signals in wash-free magnetic bioassays, and enhancing signal to noise ratios by several orders of magnitude. Our method is useful for selecting and optimizing magnetic particles for a wide range of magnetic sensor platforms.

  10. High performance wash-free magnetic bioassays through microfluidically enhanced particle specificity.

    PubMed

    Bechstein, Daniel J B; Lee, Jung-Rok; Ooi, Chin Chun; Gani, Adi W; Kim, Kyunglok; Wilson, Robert J; Wang, Shan X

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors have emerged as a sensitive and versatile platform for high performance medical diagnostics. These magnetic biosensors require well-tailored magnetic particles as detection probes, which need to give rise to a large and specific biological signal while showing very low nonspecific binding. This is especially important in wash-free bioassay protocols, which do not require removal of particles before measurement, often a necessity in point of care diagnostics. Here we show that magnetic interactions between magnetic particles and magnetized sensors dramatically impact particle transport and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surfaces. We investigate the dynamics of magnetic particles' biomolecular binding and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surface using microfluidic experiments. We elucidate how flow forces can inhibit magnetic adhesion, greatly diminishing or even eliminating nonspecific signals in wash-free magnetic bioassays, and enhancing signal to noise ratios by several orders of magnitude. Our method is useful for selecting and optimizing magnetic particles for a wide range of magnetic sensor platforms. PMID:26123868

  11. Properties of coatings on RFID p-Chips that support plasmonic fluorescence enhancement in bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Ryan; Li, Ji; Fudala, Rafal; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Mandecki, Wlodek

    2012-01-01

    Microtransponders (RFID p-Chips) derivatized with silver island film (SIF) have previously seen success as a platform for the quantification of low-abundance biomolecules in nucleic acid-based assays and immunoassays. In this study, we further characterized the morphology of the SIF as well as the polymer matrix enveloping it by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The polymer was a two-layer silane-based matrix engulfing the p-Chip and SIF. Through a series of SEM and confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments we found the depth of the polymer matrix to be 1–2 µm. The radiative effects of the SIF/polymer layer were assessed by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of p-Chips coated with the polymer to which a fluorophore (Alexa Fluor 555) was conjugated. FLIM images showed an 8.7-fold increase in fluorescence intensity and an increased rate of radiative decay, the latter of which is associated with improved photostability and both of which are linked to plasmonic enhancement by the SIF. Plasmonic enhancement was found to extend uniformly across the p-Chip and, interestingly, to a depth of about 1.2 µm. The substantial depth of enhancement suggests that the SIF/polymer layer constitutes a three-dimensional matrix that is accessible to solvent and small molecules such as fluorescent dyes. Finally, we confirmed that no surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is seen from the SIF/polymer combination. The analysis provides a possible mechanism by which the SIF/polymer-coated p-Chips allow a highly sensitive immunoassay and, as a result, leads to an improved bioassay platform. PMID:22960796

  12. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hye-Young Park

    2005-12-17

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed

  13. Bead-based microfluidic immunoassay for diagnosis of Johne's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Foote, Robert; Shaw, Robert W; Eda, Shigetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidics technology offers a platform for development of point-of-care diagnostic devices for various infectious diseases. In this study, we examined whether serodiagnosis of Johne s disease (JD) can be conducted in a bead-based microfluidic assay system. Magnetic micro-beads were coated with antigens of the causative agent of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The antigen-coated beads were incubated with serum samples of JD-positive or negative serum samples and then with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody (SAB). To confirm binding of serum antibodies to the antigen, the beads were subjected to flow cytometric analysis. Different conditions (dilutions of serum and SAB, types of SAB, and types of magnetic beads) were optimized for a great degree of differentiation between the JD-negative and JD-positive samples. Using the optimized conditions, we tested a well-classified set of 155 serum samples from JD negative and JD-positive cattle by using the bead-based flow cytometric assay. Of 105 JD-positive samples, 63 samples (60%) showed higher antibody binding levels than a cut-off value determined by using antibody binding levels of JD-negative samples. In contrast, only 43-49 JD-positive samples showed higher antibody binding levels than the cut-off value when the samples were tested by commercially-available immunoassays. Microfluidic assays were performed by magnetically immobilizing a number of beads within a microchannel of a glass microchip and detecting antibody on the collected beads by laser-induced fluorescence. Antigen-coated magnetic beads treated with bovine serum sample and fluorescently-labeled SAB were loaded into a microchannel to measure the fluorescence (reflecting level of antibody binding) on the beads in the microfluidic system. When the results of five bovine serum samples obtained with the system were compared to those obtained with the flow cytometer, a high level of correlation (linear regression, r2 = 0.994) was

  14. A dynamic bead-based microarray for parallel DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochol, R. D.; Casavant, B. P.; Dueck, M. E.; Lee, L. P.; Lin, L.

    2011-05-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic bead-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening.

  15. Rapid Bead-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing by Optical Diffusometry

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chih-Yao; Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    This study combined optical diffusometry and bead-based immunoassays to develop a novel technique for quantifying the growth of specific microorganisms and achieving rapid AST. Diffusivity rises when live bacteria attach to particles, resulting in additional energy from motile microorganisms. However, when UV-sterilized (dead) bacteria attach to particles, diffusivity declines. The experimental data are consistent with the theoretical model predicted according to the equivalent volume diameter. Using this diffusometric platform, the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the antibiotic gentamicin was tested. The result suggests that the proliferation of bacteria is effectively controlled by gentamicin. This study demonstrated a sensitive (one bacterium on single particles) and time-saving (within 2 h) platform with a small sample volume (~0.5 μL) and a low initial bacteria count (50 CFU per droplet ~ 105 CFU/mL) for quantifying the growth of microorganisms depending on Brownian motion. The technique can be applied further to other bacterial strains and increase the success of treatments against infectious diseases in the near future. PMID:26863001

  16. Rapid Bead-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing by Optical Diffusometry.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chih-Yao; Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    This study combined optical diffusometry and bead-based immunoassays to develop a novel technique for quantifying the growth of specific microorganisms and achieving rapid AST. Diffusivity rises when live bacteria attach to particles, resulting in additional energy from motile microorganisms. However, when UV-sterilized (dead) bacteria attach to particles, diffusivity declines. The experimental data are consistent with the theoretical model predicted according to the equivalent volume diameter. Using this diffusometric platform, the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the antibiotic gentamicin was tested. The result suggests that the proliferation of bacteria is effectively controlled by gentamicin. This study demonstrated a sensitive (one bacterium on single particles) and time-saving (within 2 h) platform with a small sample volume (~0.5 μL) and a low initial bacteria count (50 CFU per droplet ~ 105 CFU/mL) for quantifying the growth of microorganisms depending on Brownian motion. The technique can be applied further to other bacterial strains and increase the success of treatments against infectious diseases in the near future. PMID:26863001

  17. Identification of serum biomarkers for lung cancer using magnetic bead-based SELDI-TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi-bin; Hu, Wei-guo; Wang, Peng; Yao, Yi; Zeng, Hua-zong

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To identify novel serum biomarkers for lung cancer diagnosis using magnetic bead-based surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrum (SELDI-TOF-MS). Methods: The protein fractions of 121 serum specimens from 30 lung cancer patients, 30 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 33 healthy controls were enriched using WCX magnetic beads and subjected to SELDI-TOF-MS. The spectra were analyzed using Bio-marker Wizard version 3.1.0 and Biomarker Patterns Software version 5.0. A diagnostic model was constructed with the marker proteins using a linear discrimination analysis method. The validity of this model was tested in a blind test set consisted of 8 randomly selected lung cancer patients, 10 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Results: Seventeen m/z peaks were identified, which were significantly different between the lung cancer group and the control (tuberculosis and healthy control) groups. Among these peaks, the 6445, 9725, 11705, and 15126 m/z peaks were selected by the Biomarker Pattern Software to construct a diagnostic model for lung cancer. This four-peak model established in the training set could discriminate lung cancer patients from non-cancer patients with a sensitivity of 93.3% (28/30) and a specificity of 90.5% (57/63). The diagnostic model showed a high sensitivity (75.0%) and a high specificity (95%) in the blind test validation. Database searching and literature mining indicated that the featured 4 peaks represented chaperonin (M9725), hemoglobin subunit beta (M15335), serum amyloid A (M11548), and an unknown protein. Conclusion: A lung cancer diagnostic model based on bead-based SELDI-TOF-MS has been established for the early diagnosis or differential diagnosis of lung cancers. PMID:22019958

  18. Assessment of direct versus indirect magnetic bead-based T-cell isolation procedures followed by magnetic bead-based DNA isolation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Anna; Bleck, Ellen; Schneider, Matthias; Pongratz, Georg; Vordenbäumen, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare direct and indirect bead-based T-cell isolation followed by magnetic bead-based DNA isolation. Methods T-cells were isolated by direct or indirect selection with magnetic bead coated antbiodies followed by magnetic bead-based automated DNA isolation in 10 healthy subjects. Purity of T-cells, purity of DNA (by A260/A280 ratio measurement) and DNA concentration were assessed. Results Direct and indirect labelling resulted in comparable T-cell purity (93.11±1.47% vs. 94.99±1.54%, p= 0.125) and DNA concentration per cell (50.97±14.15 ng/(mlxcell) vs. 49.53±13.62 ng/(mlxcell), p=0.492), while DNA purity was significantly higher after direct labelling (1.82±0.05 vs. 1.78±0.03, p=0.0488). Conclusions Both direct and indirect magnetic bead-based T-cell selection may be used prior to magnetic bead-based DNA isolation procedures. PMID:27547441

  19. Nanovehicles based Bioassay Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Lin, Ying-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we review recent advances of our group in nanoparticle labels based bioassay. Apoferritin and silica nanoparticles have been used as nanovehicles to load large amount of markers for highly sensitive bioassay. Markers loaded apoferritin, apoferritin-templated metallic phosphate nanoparticles, and poly [guanine] coated silica nanoparticles have been prepared, characterized and used as labels for highly sensitive bioassay of protein and DNA. Dissociation and reconstitution characteristics at different pH as well as the special cavity structure of apoferritin nanovehicle provides a simple and convenient route to prepare versatile nanoparticle labels and avoid the complicated and tedious synthesis process of conventional nanoparticle labels. The optical and electrochemical characteristics of the prepared nanoparticle labels are easily controlled by loading different optical or electrochemical markers. Additionally, the use of apoferritin nanovehicle as template for synthesis of metallic phosphate nanoparticle labels offers fast route to prepare uniform-size metallic nanoparticle labels for electrochemical bioassay and avoids the traditional harsh dissolution conditions to dissolve metallic nanoparticle tags (that is, the strong-acid dissolution of quantum dots and gold nanoparticles) during the stripping analysis step. Silica nanoparticle has also been used as nanovehicle to carry thousands of poly [guanine] tracers, which was used to enhance the oxidation current of Ru(bpy)32+, resulting in enhanced sensitivity of electrochemical immunoassay. The new nanovehicle-based labels have been used for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and protein biomarkers, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). The high sensitivity and selectivity make these labels a useful addition to the armory of nanoparticle-based bioassay. The new nanovehicles based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity

  20. Magnetic Beads-based Bioelectrochemical Immunoassay of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Guodong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive bioelectrochemical immunoassay method based on magnetic beads (MBs) has been developed to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The principle of this bioassay is based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using PAH-antibody-coated MBs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled PAH (HRP-PAH). A magnetic process platform was used to mix and shake the samples during the immunoreactions and to separate free and unbound reagents after the liquid-phase competitive immunoreaction among PAH-antibody-coated MBs, PAH analyte, and HRP-PAH. After a complete immunoassay, the HRP tracers attached to MBs were transferred to a substrate solution containing 3, 3´, 5, 5´- tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for electrochemical detection. The voltammetric characteristics of the substrate were investigated, and the reduction peak current of TMB was used to quantify the concentration of PAH. The different parameters, including the amount of HRP-PAH conjugates, the enzyme catalytic reaction time, and the pH of the supporting electrolyte that governs the analytical performance of the immunoassay have been studied in detail and optimized. The detection limit of 50 pg mL-1 was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The performance of this bioelectrochemical magnetic immunoassay was successfully evaluated with tap water spiked with PAHs, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for decentralized environmental applications.

  1. Development of a multiplex bead-based assay to monitor dengue virus seroconversion.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kaiting; Connolly, John E

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) envelope protein is responsible for viral attachment to host cells and as such is a target of neutralizing antibody responses. However, the presence of envelope-specific antibodies against a given serotype may contribute to enhanced disease during secondary infection with another serotype. There is a need therefore for a standardized, high-throughput low-volume assay which permits the simultaneous screening of reactivity to multiple DENV serotypes. Here, we describe a method of identifying DENV serotype-specific response in exposed individuals using a multiplexed bead-based immunoassay. The ED3 domain of a specific DENV serotype is cloned into pQEAM containing 6xHIS, TEV protease, and AviTag biotinylation sites. Biotinylated ED3 proteins are expressed in E. coli CVB101 and purified by sequential column fractionation followed by coupling onto fluorescent avidin-coated microspheres. Methods for determining the optimum amount of biotinylated ED3 protein coupled onto the microsphere are described. The assay demonstrates both a high degree of sensitivity and specificity using well-characterized patient plasma samples. The nature of the assay permits further development to include a variety of DENV serotypes and regionally important sub-serotypes. PMID:24696331

  2. A large-area hemispherical perforated bead microarray for monitoring bead based aptamer and target protein interaction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Seob; Bae, Sunwoong; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Seo, Tae Seok

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we present a large-area 3D hemispherical perforated microwell structure for a bead based bioassay. Such a unique microstructure enables us to perform the rapid and stable localization of the beads at the single bead level and the facile manipulation of the bead capture and retrieval with high speed and efficiency. The fabrication process mainly consisted of three steps: the convex micropatterned nickel (Ni) mold production from the concave micropatterned silicon (Si) wafer, hot embossing on the polymer matrix to generate the concave micropattened acrylate sheet, and reactive ion etching to make the bottom holes. The large-area hemispherical perforated micropatterned acrylate sheet was sandwiched between two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel layers. The bead solution was injected and recovered in the top PDMS microchannel, while the bottom PDMS microchannel was connected with control lines to exert the hydrodynamic force in order to alter the flow direction of the bead solution for the bead capture and release operation. The streptavidin-coated microbead capture was achieved with almost 100% yield within 1 min, and all the beads were retrieved in 10 s. Lysozyme or thrombin binding aptamer labelled microbeads were trapped on the proposed bead microarray, and the in situ fluorescence signal of the bead array was monitored after aptamer-target protein interaction. The protein-aptamer conjugated microbeads were recovered, and the aptamer was isolated for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis to confirm the identity of the aptamer. PMID:25587373

  3. Fine-tuning of magnetic and microfluidic viscous forces for specific magnetic bead-based immunocomplex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, M.; Tekin, H. C.; Lehnert, T.; Gijs, M. A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the working principle of a novel type of microfluidic sandwich immunoassay, as used for the detection of biomarkers. The heterogeneous assay is based on the specific interactions between an array of functionalized superparamagnetic beads and a flow of secondary superparamagnetic beads that carry the antigens and are simultaneously used as detection labels. We identify the main forces governing the immunoassay performance and develop a combined finite element method/analytical model to predict and control these forces. The clue for the improved assay specificity is in the fine-tuning of inter-bead magnetic dipolar and microfluidic viscous forces, which allows strongly reducing non-specific interactions, while enhancing the specific formation of immunocomplexes. We exploit our theoretical model to explain the enhanced sensitivity of magnetic bead-based immunoassay experiments performed in microfluidic chips.

  4. Opportunities for bead-based multiplex assays in veterinary diagnostic laboratories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bead based multiplex assays (BBMA) also referred to as Luminex, MultiAnalyte Profiling or cytometric bead array (CBA) assays, are applicable for high throughput, simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in solution (from several, up to 50-500 analytes within a single, small sample volume). Curren...

  5. A bead-based fluorescence immunosensing technique enabled by the integration of Förster resonance energy transfer and optoelectrokinetic concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Ku, Hu-Yao; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Bead-based immunosensing has been growing as a promising technology in the point-of-care diagnostics due to great flexibility. For dilute samples, functionalized particles can be used to collect dispersed analytes and act as carriers for particle manipulation. To realize rapid and visual immunosensing, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used herein to ensure only the diabetic biomarker, lipocalin 1, to be detected. The measurement was made in an aqueous droplet sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes. With an electric field and a focused laser beam applying on the microchip simultaneously, the immunocomplexes in the droplet were further concentrated to enhance the FRET fluorescent signal. The optoelectrokinetic technique, termed rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP), has been proven to be excellent in dynamic and programmable particle manipulation. Therefore, the detection can be complete within several tens of seconds. The lower detection limit of the REP-enabled bead-based diagnosis reached nearly 5 nM. The combinative use of FRET and the optoelectrokinetic technique for the bead-based immunosensing enables a rapid measure to diagnose early stage diseases and dilute analytes. PMID:26865906

  6. Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Joseph

    2007-10-11

    In this book chapter, we review the recent advances in nanoparticles based bioassay. The nanoparticles include quantum dots, silica nanoparticles and apoferritin nanoparticles. The new nanoparticles-based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity of other bioassays.

  7. A Fully Automatic Method for Gridding Bright Field Images of Bead-Based Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Datta, Abhik; Wai-Kin Kong, Adams; Yow, Kin-Choong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic method for gridding bright field images of bead-based microarrays is proposed. There have been numerous techniques developed for gridding fluorescence images of traditional spotted microarrays but to our best knowledge, no algorithm has yet been developed for gridding bright field images of bead-based microarrays. The proposed gridding method is designed for automatic quality control during fabrication and assembly of bead-based microarrays. The method begins by estimating the grid parameters using an evolutionary algorithm. This is followed by a grid-fitting step that rigidly aligns an ideal grid with the image. Finally, a grid refinement step deforms the ideal grid to better fit the image. The grid fitting and refinement are performed locally and the final grid is a nonlinear (piecewise affine) grid. To deal with extreme corruptions in the image, the initial grid parameter estimation and grid-fitting steps employ robust search techniques. The proposed method does not have any free parameters that need tuning. The method is capable of identifying the grid structure even in the presence of extreme amounts of artifacts and distortions. Evaluation results on a variety of images are presented. PMID:26011899

  8. Microfluidic bead-based multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification for detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood using quantum dots labels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, He; Fu, Xin; Hu, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhenjun

    2013-05-24

    This study reports the development of a microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dot labels. In this method, the microbeads functionalized with the capture probes and modified electron rich proteins were arrayed within a microfluidic channel as sensing elements, and the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the horseradish peroxidases (HRP) and DNA probes were used as labels. Hence, two signal amplification approaches are integrated for enhancing the detection sensitivity of circulating tumor cells. First, the large surface area of Au nanoparticle carrier allows several binding events of HRP on each nanosphere. Second, enhanced mass transport capability inherent from microfluidics leads to higher capture efficiency of targets because continuous flow within micro-channel delivers fresh analyte solution to the reaction site which maintains a high concentration gradient differential to enhance mass transport. Based on the dual signal amplification strategy, the developed microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor could discriminate as low as 5 fM (signal-to-noise (S/N)3) of synthesized carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene fragments and showed a 1000-fold increase in detection limit compared to the off-chip test. In addition, using spiked colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29) in the blood as a model system, the detection limit of this chip-based approach was found to be as low as 1 HT29 in 1 mL blood sample. This microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor is a promising platform for disease-related nucleic acid molecules at the lowest level at their earliest incidence. PMID:23663673

  9. Enhancement of preneoplastic lesion yield by Chios Mastic Gum in a rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Kenichiro Wei, Min; Kitano, Mitsuaki; Uematsu, Naomi; Inoue, Masayo; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    The mastic (Pistacia lentiscus var. chia) tree is native throughout the Mediterranean region and has long proved a source of food additives and medical treatments. To investigate the modifying effects of Chios Mastic Gum on rat liver carcinogenesis, 6-week-old male F344 rats were subjected to the established rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay (Ito-test). At the commencement, rats (groups 1-4) were intraperitoneally injected with 200 mg/kg body weight of diethylnitrosamine (DEN). After two weeks, mastic was added to CRF (Charles River Formula)-1 powdered basal diet at doses of 0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1% in groups 1-4, respectively. At week 3, all rats were underwent two-thirds partial hepatectomy. The experiment was terminated at week 8. As results show, liver weights were significantly increased in a mastic dose-dependent manner among groups 1-4. The numbers (/cm{sup 2}) and the areas (mm{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}) of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive cell foci ({>=} 0.2 mm in diameter) were significantly increased in the DEN-1% group compared to the DEN-alone group, along with the average areas per foci and larger-sized foci ({>=} 0.4 mm). 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) + GST-P double-immunohistochemistry showed the highest BrdU-labeling indices within GST-P foci in the DEN-1% group. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in liver DNA did not vary, while real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of livers revealed many up- or down-regulated genes in the DEN-1% group. In conclusion, this is the first report to display a promotion potential of Chios Mastic Gum on the formation of preneoplastic lesions in the established rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay.

  10. Development of a bead-based suspension array for the detection of pathogens in acute respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ru; Zhang, Wei; Hua, Zhi-Dan; Lin, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Meng-Qing; Huang, Wen-Sen; Huang, Li-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Neng-Luan; Lin, Ming; Xie, Bao-Song; Shen, Xiao-Na; Xie, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yi; Huang, Meng; Wu, Yan-An; Hu, Xin-Lan

    2016-08-01

    We developed a high-throughput bead-based suspension array for simultaneous detection of 20 respiratory tract pathogens in clinical specimens. Pathogen-specific genes were amplified and hybridized to probes coupled to carboxyl-encoded microspheres. Fluorescence intensities generated via the binding of phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin with biotin-labeled targets were measured by the Luminex 100 bead-based suspension array system. The bead-based suspension array detected bacteria in a significantly higher number of samples compared to the conventional culture. There was no significant difference in the detection rate of atypical pathogensatypical pathogens or viruses between the bead-based suspension array and real-time PCR. This technology can play a significant role in screening patients with pneumonia. PMID:27190247

  11. Confirming Pseudomonas putida as a reliable bioassay for demonstrating biocompatibility enhancement by solar photo-oxidative processes of a biorecalcitrant effluent.

    PubMed

    García-Ripoll, A; Amat, A M; Arques, A; Vicente, R; Ballesteros Martín, M M; Pérez, J A Sánchez; Oller, I; Malato, S

    2009-03-15

    Experiments based on Vibrio fischeri, activated sludge and Pseudomonas putida have been employed to check variation in the biocompatibility of an aqueous solution of a commercial pesticide, along solar photo-oxidative process (TiO(2) and Fenton reagent). Activated sludge-based experiments have demonstrated a complete detoxification of the solution, although important toxicity is still detected according to the more sensitive V. fischeri assays. In parallel, the biodegradability of organic matter is strongly enhanced, with BOD(5)/COD ratio above 0.8. Bioassays run with P. putida have given similar trends, remarking the convenience of using P. putida culture as a reliable and reproducible method for assessing both toxicity and biodegradability, as a substitute to other more time consuming methods. PMID:18639379

  12. Bead-based suspension array for simultaneous differential detection of five major swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Xue, Cun-Yi; Song, Chang-Xu; Li, Yan; Cao, Yong-Chang

    2015-01-01

    A novel multiplex detection array based on Luminex xMAP technology was developed and validated for simultaneous detection of five major viruses causing swine reproductive diseases. By combining one-step asymmetric multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with xMAP bead-based hybridization and flow cytometry analysis, the resulting multiplex assay was capable of detecting single and mixed infections of PRRSV, PCV-2, PRV, CSFV, and PPV in a single reaction. The assay accurately detected and differentiated 23 viral strains used in this study. The low detection limit was determined as 2.2-22 copies/μL (corresponding to 0.5-6.8 fg/μL DNA template) on plasmid constructs containing viral fragments. The intra-assay and inter-assay variances (CV%) were low that ranged from 2.5 to 5.4 % and 4.1 to 7.6 %, respectively. The assay was applied to test field samples and detected single and mixed viral infections. The detection rate was higher than that of uniplex conventional PCR and RT-PCR methods. The detection of PRRSV by the bead-based multiplex assay was comparable with a commercially available real time RT-PCR kit. The test procedure on purified DNA or RNA samples could be completed within 2 h. In conclusion, the bead-based suspension array presented here proved to be a high-throughput practical tool that provided highly specific and sensitive identification of single and multiple infections of five major viruses in pigs and boar semen. PMID:25557628

  13. An integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for protein analysis with magnetic bead-based sampling capabilities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Woo; Oh, Kwang W; Thomas, Jennifer H; Heineman, William R; Halsall, H Brian; Nevin, Joseph H; Helmicki, Arthur J; Henderson, H Thurman; Ahn, Chong H

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents the development and characterization of an integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for fast and low-volume immunoassays using magnetic beads, which are used as both immobilization surfaces and bio-molecule carriers. Microfluidic components have been developed and integrated to construct a microfluidic biochemical detection system. Magnetic bead-based immunoassay, as a typical example of biochemical detection and analysis, has been successfully performed on the integrated microfluidic biochemical analysis system that includes a surface-mounted biofilter and electrochemical sensor on a glass microfluidic motherboard. Total time required for an immunoassay was less than 20 min including sample incubation time, and sample volume wasted was less than 50 microl during five repeated assays. Fast and low-volume biochemical analysis has been successfully achieved with the developed biofilter and immunosensor, which is integrated to the microfluidic system. Such a magnetic bead-based biochemical detection system, described in this paper, can be applied to protein analysis systems. PMID:15100857

  14. Serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis with bead based immunoassays using multiplex technology.

    PubMed

    Gerritzen, Andreas; Brandt, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    The serological diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis is accomplished by the detection of IgG and IgM antibodies specific for relevant antigens of the spirochetal pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. Instead of the usual enzyme immune assay for screening and the Western blot technique for confirmation, bead based multiplex assays with multiple simultaneously performed distinct reactions can provide quick, automatically derived and reliable results in a single run by flow cytometer technology. The broad analytical dynamic range of assay signals and the high sensitivity and specificity of the multiplex formats allow even for a reliable use in CSF based analyses for antibody specificity index in supposed neuroborreliosis. Fluorescence intensity of the bead based reactions can be transformed into quantified values as U/ml, either for each single antigen or summed up for a group of relevant key antigens. Additionally or alternatively distinct reactions of single bead populations can be transformed to Western blot band equivalents. Internal and external quality controls with the multiplex systems show characteristic data equivalent to the conventional assay formats, so that the advantages of the multiplex assays are ready for use in the routine diagnostic laboratory. PMID:22406491

  15. Comparison of non-magnetic and magnetic beads in bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hansenová Maňásková, Silvie; van Belkum, Alex; Endtz, Hubert P; Bikker, Floris J; Veerman, Enno C I; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2016-09-01

    Multiplex bead-based flow cytometry is an attractive way for simultaneous, rapid and cost-effective analysis of multiple analytes in a single sample. Previously, we developed various bead-based assays using non-magnetic beads coated with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens for the detection of antibodies. Here, we compared the performance of the assay using non-magnetic beads with one based on the newly developed magnetic beads. We optimized the magnetic beads' coupling procedure and antibody detection assays for S. aureus and S. pneumoniae antigens and we measured IgG in human pooled serum against a series of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae-derived antigens in a singleplex and in a multiplex assay, respectively. For the multiplex assay, the comparison between magnetic and non-magnetic beads showed: i) in the majority of the cases (13 of the 17 tested S. pneumoniae antigens) significantly higher Median Fluorescence Intensity (MFI) values, ii) lower detection limits, iii) lower coefficient of variation (CV: 12% vs. 7% for non-magnetic vs. magnetic beads), so lower inter-assay variation and hence higher reproducibility. Magnetic bead coupling is cost effective, as we used 25% of the normal amount of antigen and only 50% of the beads in comparison to the non-magnetic beads. This optimized magnetic-based assay, which combines ease of use with an improved assay performance, allows detection of antibodies with a low titer that are potentially missed with the non-magnetic-based assay. PMID:27296810

  16. Five-Antigen Fluorescent Bead-Based Assay for Diagnosis of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Embers, Monica E; Hasenkampf, Nicole R; Barnes, Mary B; Didier, Elizabeth S; Philipp, Mario T; Tardo, Amanda C

    2016-04-01

    The systematically difficult task of diagnosing Lyme disease can be simplified by sensitive and specific laboratory tests. The currently recommended two-tier test for serology is highly specific but falls short in sensitivity, especially in the early acute phase. We previously examined serially collected serum samples fromBorrelia burgdorferi-infected rhesus macaques and defined a combination of antigens that could be utilized for detection of infection at all phases of disease in humans. The fiveB. burgdorferiantigens, consisting of OspC, OspA, DbpA, OppA2, and the C6 peptide, were combined into a fluorescent cytometric bead-based assay for the detection ofB. burgdorferiantigen-specific IgG antibodies. Samples from Lyme disease patients and controls were used to determine the diagnostic value of this assay. Using this sample set, we found that our five-antigen multiplex IgG assay exhibited higher sensitivity (79.5%) than the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (76.1%), the two-tier test (61.4%), and the C6 peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (77.2%) while maintaining specificity over 90%. When detection of IgM was added to the bead-based assay, the sensitivity improved to 91%, but at a cost of reduced specificity (78%). These results indicate that the rational combination of antigens in our multiplex assay may offer an improved serodiagnostic test for Lyme disease. PMID:26843487

  17. Development of a novel multiplex beads-based assay for autoantibody detection for colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Villar-Vázquez, Roi; Padilla, Guillermo; Fernández-Aceñero, María Jesús; Suárez, Adolfo; Fuente, Eduardo; Pastor, Carlos; Calero, Miguel; Barderas, Rodrigo; Casal, J Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    Humoral response in cancer patients can be used for early cancer detection. By screening high-density protein microarrays with sera from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and controls, we identified 16 tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) exhibiting high diagnostic value. This high number of TAAs requires the development of multiplex assays combining different antigens for a faster and more accurate prediction of CRC. Here, we have developed and optimized a bead-based assay using nine selected TAAs and two controls to provide a multiplex test for early CRC diagnosis. We screened a collection of 307 CRC patients' and control sera with the beads assay to identify and validate the best TAA combination for CRC detection. The multiplex bead-based assay exhibited a similar diagnostic performance to detect the humoral response in comparison to multiple ELISA analyses. After multivariate analysis, a panel composed of GTF2B, EDIL3, HCK, PIM1, STK4, and p53, together with gender and age, was identified as the best combination of TAAs for CRC diagnosis, achieving an AUC of 89.7%, with 66% sensitivity at 90.0% fixed specificity. The model was validated using bootstrapping analysis. In summary, we have developed a novel multiplex bead assay that after validation with a larger independent cohort of sera could be utilized in a high-throughput manner for population screening to facilitate the detection of early CRC patients. PMID:26915739

  18. Porous Bead-Based Diagnostic Platforms: Bridging the Gaps in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jie; Wong, Jorge; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Floriano, Pierre N.; Sanchez, Ximena; McDevitt, John

    2012-01-01

    Advances in lab-on-a-chip systems have strong potential for multiplexed detection of a wide range of analytes with reduced sample and reagent volume; lower costs and shorter analysis times. The completion of high-fidelity multiplexed and multiclass assays remains a challenge for the medical microdevice field; as it struggles to achieve and expand upon at the point-of-care the quality of results that are achieved now routinely in remote laboratory settings. This review article serves to explore for the first time the key intersection of multiplexed bead-based detection systems with integrated microfluidic structures alongside porous capture elements together with biomarker validation studies. These strategically important elements are evaluated here in the context of platform generation as suitable for near-patient testing. Essential issues related to the scalability of these modular sensor ensembles are explored as are attempts to move such multiplexed and multiclass platforms into large-scale clinical trials. Recent efforts in these bead sensors have shown advantages over planar microarrays in terms of their capacity to generate multiplexed test results with shorter analysis times. Through high surface-to-volume ratios and encoding capabilities; porous bead-based ensembles; when combined with microfluidic elements; allow for high-throughput testing for enzymatic assays; general chemistries; protein; antibody and oligonucleotide applications. PMID:23202219

  19. A bead-based cleavage method for large-scale identification of protease substrates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunli; Ye, Mingliang; Wei, Xiaoluan; Bian, Yangyang; Cheng, Kai; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-01-01

    Proteolysis is a major form of post translational modification which occurs when a protease cleaves peptide bonds in a target protein to modify its activity. Tracking protease substrates is indispensable for understanding its cellular functions. However, it is difficult to directly identify protease substrates because the end products of proteolysis, the cleaved protein fragments, must be identified among the pool of cellular proteins. Here we present a bead-based cleavage approach using immobilized proteome as the screening library to identify protease substrates. This method enables efficient separation of proteolyzed proteins from background protein mixture. Using caspase-3 as the model protease, we have identified 1159 high confident substrates, among which, strikingly, 43.9% of substrates undergo degradation during apoptosis. The huge number of substrates and positive support of in vivo evidence indicate that the BBC method is a powerful tool for protease substrates identification. PMID:26935269

  20. Magnetic bead-based nucleic acid purification kit: Clinical application and performance evaluation in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihoon G; Kang, Jin Seok; Hwang, Seung Yong; Song, Jaewoo; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Two different methods - the semi-automated magnetic bead-based kit (SK, Stool DNA/RNA Purification kit®) and the manual membrane column-based kit (QS, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini kit) - for purifying nucleic acids from clinical stool samples were compared and evaluated. The SK kit was more user-friendly than QS due to the reduced manual processing, partial automation, and short turnaround time with half cost. Furthermore, SK produced high yields in both DNA and RNA extractions but poor purity in RNA extraction. In the assessment of rotavirus and Clostridium difficile infection, both kits had equivalent or more sensitive performance compared with the standard method. Although SK showed some interference and inhibition in nucleic acid extraction, the performance, including the repeatability, linearity, analytical sensitivity, and matrix effect, was sufficient for routine clinical use. PMID:27030641

  1. Ultrasensitive protein detection: a case for microfluidic magnetic bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Tekin, H Cumhur; Gijs, Martin A M

    2013-12-21

    We review the use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles ('magnetic beads') in microfluidic systems for ultrasensitive protein detection. During recent years magnetic beads have been used frequently in immunoassays, either as mobile substrates on which the target antigen is captured, as detection labels, or simultaneously as substrates and labels. The major part of the reviewed work has as application the detection of antibodies or disease biomarkers in serum or of biotoxins from food samples. Several of the most sensitive assays allow protein detection down to fg mL(-1) concentrations. We benchmark the performance of these microfluidic magnetic bead-based assays with the most promising earlier work and with alternative solutions. PMID:24145920

  2. Directed Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells Using a Bead-Based Combinatorial Screening Method

    PubMed Central

    Tarunina, Marina; Hernandez, Diana; Johnson, Christopher J.; Rybtsov, Stanislav; Ramathas, Vidya; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Watson, Thomas; Hook, Lilian; Medvinsky, Alexander; Mason, Chris; Choo, Yen

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a rapid, bead-based combinatorial screening method to determine optimal combinations of variables that direct stem cell differentiation to produce known or novel cell types having pre-determined characteristics. Here we describe three experiments comprising stepwise exposure of mouse or human embryonic cells to 10,000 combinations of serum-free differentiation media, through which we discovered multiple novel, efficient and robust protocols to generate a number of specific hematopoietic and neural lineages. We further demonstrate that the technology can be used to optimize existing protocols in order to substitute costly growth factors with bioactive small molecules and/or increase cell yield, and to identify in vitro conditions for the production of rare developmental intermediates such as an embryonic lymphoid progenitor cell that has not previously been reported. PMID:25251366

  3. High Throughput Flow Cytometry Bead-based Multiplex Assay for Identification of Rho GTPase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Surviladze, Zurab; Young, Susan M; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rho family GTPases and their effector proteins regulate a wide range of cell signaling pathways. In normal physiological conditions their activity is tightly controlled and it is not surprising that their aberrant activation contributes to tumorigenesis or other diseases. For this reason, the identification of small, cell permeable molecules capable of inhibition of Rho GTPases can be extraordinarily useful, particularly if they are specific and act reversibly. Herein we describe a flow cytometric assay, which allows us to measure the activity of six small GTPases simultaneously. GST-tagged small GTPases are bound to six glutathione bead sets each set having a different intensity of red fluorescence at a fixed wavelength. The coated bead sets were washed, combined, and dispensed into 384-well plates with test compounds, and fluorescent-GTP binding was used as the read-out. This multiplex bead-based assay was successfully used for to identify both general and selective inhibitors of Rho family GTPases. PMID:22144280

  4. A novel multiplex bead-based platform highlights the diversity of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Koliha, Nina; Wiencek, Yvonne; Heider, Ute; Jüngst, Christian; Kladt, Nikolay; Krauthäuser, Susanne; Johnston, Ian C D; Bosio, Andreas; Schauss, Astrid; Wild, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The surface protein composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is related to the originating cell and may play a role in vesicle function. Knowledge of the protein content of individual EVs is still limited because of the technical challenges to analyse small vesicles. Here, we introduce a novel multiplex bead-based platform to investigate up to 39 different surface markers in one sample. The combination of capture antibody beads with fluorescently labelled detection antibodies allows the analysis of EVs that carry surface markers recognized by both antibodies. This new method enables an easy screening of surface markers on populations of EVs. By combining different capture and detection antibodies, additional information on relative expression levels and potential vesicle subpopulations is gained. We also established a protocol to visualize individual EVs by stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. Thereby, markers on single EVs can be detected by fluorophore-conjugated antibodies. We used the multiplex platform and STED microscopy to show for the first time that NK cell-derived EVs and platelet-derived EVs are devoid of CD9 or CD81, respectively, and that EVs isolated from activated B cells comprise different EV subpopulations. We speculate that, according to our STED data, tetraspanins might not be homogenously distributed but may mostly appear as clusters on EV subpopulations. Finally, we demonstrate that EV mixtures can be separated by magnetic beads and analysed subsequently with the multiplex platform. Both the multiplex bead-based platform and STED microscopy revealed subpopulations of EVs that have been indistinguishable by most analysis tools used so far. We expect that an in-depth view on EV heterogeneity will contribute to our understanding of different EVs and functions. PMID:26901056

  5. New miRNA labeling method for bead-based quantification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded non-coding RNAs that act as crucial regulators of gene expression. Different methods have been developed for miRNA expression profiling in order to better understand gene regulation in normal and pathological conditions. miRNAs expression values obtained from large scale methodologies such as microarrays still need a validation step with alternative technologies. Results Here we have applied with an innovative approach, the Luminex® xMAP™ technology validate expression data of differentially expressed miRNAs obtained from high throughput arrays. We have developed a novel labeling system of small RNA molecules (below 200 nt), optimizing the sensitive cloning method for miRNAs, termed miRNA amplification profiling (mRAP). The Luminex expression patterns of three miRNAs (miR-23a, miR-27a and miR-199a) in seven different cell lines have been validated by TaqMan miRNA assay. In all cases, bead-based meas were confirmed by the data obtained by TaqMan and microarray technologies. Conclusions We demonstrate that the measure of individual miRNA by the bead-based method is feasible, high speed, sensitive and low cost. The Luminex® xMAP™ technology also provides flexibility, since the central reaction can be scaled up with additional miRNA capturing beads, allowing validation of many differentially expressed miRNAs obtained from microarrays in a single experiment. We propose this technology as an alternative method to qRT-PCR for validating miRNAs expression data obtained with high-throughput technologies. PMID:20553585

  6. A novel multiplex bead-based platform highlights the diversity of extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Koliha, Nina; Wiencek, Yvonne; Heider, Ute; Jüngst, Christian; Kladt, Nikolay; Krauthäuser, Susanne; Johnston, Ian C. D.; Bosio, Andreas; Schauss, Astrid; Wild, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The surface protein composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is related to the originating cell and may play a role in vesicle function. Knowledge of the protein content of individual EVs is still limited because of the technical challenges to analyse small vesicles. Here, we introduce a novel multiplex bead-based platform to investigate up to 39 different surface markers in one sample. The combination of capture antibody beads with fluorescently labelled detection antibodies allows the analysis of EVs that carry surface markers recognized by both antibodies. This new method enables an easy screening of surface markers on populations of EVs. By combining different capture and detection antibodies, additional information on relative expression levels and potential vesicle subpopulations is gained. We also established a protocol to visualize individual EVs by stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. Thereby, markers on single EVs can be detected by fluorophore-conjugated antibodies. We used the multiplex platform and STED microscopy to show for the first time that NK cell–derived EVs and platelet-derived EVs are devoid of CD9 or CD81, respectively, and that EVs isolated from activated B cells comprise different EV subpopulations. We speculate that, according to our STED data, tetraspanins might not be homogenously distributed but may mostly appear as clusters on EV subpopulations. Finally, we demonstrate that EV mixtures can be separated by magnetic beads and analysed subsequently with the multiplex platform. Both the multiplex bead-based platform and STED microscopy revealed subpopulations of EVs that have been indistinguishable by most analysis tools used so far. We expect that an in-depth view on EV heterogeneity will contribute to our understanding of different EVs and functions. PMID:26901056

  7. Magnetic bead-based reverse colorimetric immunoassay strategy for sensing biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhuangqiang; Xu, Mingdi; Hou, Li; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2013-07-16

    A novel reverse colorimetric immunoassay (RCIA) strategy was for the first time designed and utilized for sensitive detection of low-abundance protein (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, used in this case) in biological fluids by coupling highly catalytic efficient catalase with magnetic bead-based peroxidase mimics. To construct such a RCIA system, two nanostructures including magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles were first synthesized and functionalized with anti-PSA capture antibody and catalase/anti-PSA detection antibody, respectively. Thereafter, a specific sandwich-type immunoassay format was employed for determination of PSA by using functional gold nanoparticles as enzymatic bioreactors and anti-PSA-conjugated magnetic beads as a colorimetric developer. The carried catalase, followed by the sandwiched immunocomplex, partially consumed the added hydrogen peroxide in the detection solution, which slowed down the catalytic efficiency of magnetic bead-based peroxidase mimics toward TMB/H2O2, thereby weakening the visible color and decreasing the colorimetric density. Different from conventional colorimetric immunoassay, the RCIA method determined the residual hydrogen peroxide in the substrate after consumption. Under the optimal conditions, the developed RCIA exhibited a wide dynamic range of 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) toward PSA with a detection limit of 0.03 ng mL(-1) at the 3Sblank level. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were below 6.1% and 9.3%, respectively. Additionally, the methodology was further validated for the analysis of 12 PSA clinical serum specimens, giving results in good accordance with those obtained by the commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. PMID:23806145

  8. Viral RNA testing and automation on the bead-based CBNE detection microsystem.

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul C.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Farrell, Cara M.; Rossito, Paul; McClain, Jaime L.; Derzon, Mark Steven; Cullor, James Sterling; Rahimian, Kamayar

    2008-09-01

    We developed prototype chemistry for nucleic acid hybridization on our bead-based diagnostics platform and we established an automatable bead handling protocol capable of 50 part-per-billion (ppb) sensitivity. We are working towards a platform capable of parallel, rapid (10 minute), raw sample testing for orthogonal (in this case nucleic acid and immunoassays) identification of biological (and other) threats in a single sensor microsystem. In this LDRD we developed the nucleic acid chemistry required for nucleic acid hybridization. Our goal is to place a non-cell associated RNA virus (Bovine Viral Diarrhea, BVD) on the beads for raw sample testing. This key pre-requisite to showing orthogonality (nucleic acid measurements can be performed in parallel with immunoassay measurements). Orthogonal detection dramatically reduces false positives. We chose BVD because our collaborators (UC-Davis) can supply samples from persistently infected animals; and because proof-of-concept field testing can be performed with modification of the current technology platform at the UC Davis research station. Since BVD is a cattle-prone disease this research dovetails with earlier immunoassay work on Botulinum toxin simulant testing in raw milk samples. Demonstration of BVD RNA detection expands the repertoire of biological macromolecules that can be adapted to our bead-based detection. The resources of this late start LDRD were adequate to partially demonstrate the conjugation of the beads to the nucleic acids. It was never expected to be adequate for a full live virus test but to motivate that additional investment. In addition, we were able to reduce the LOD (Limit of Detection) for the botulinum toxin stimulant to 50 ppb from the earlier LOD of 1 ppm. A low LOD combined with orthogonal detection provides both low false negatives and low false positives. The logical follow-on steps to this LDRD research are to perform live virus identification as well as concurrent nucleic acid and

  9. A cell-based fascin bioassay identifies compounds with potential anti-metastasis or cognition-enhancing functions

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Kahn, Allon; Medina-Franco, José L.; Orlowski, Mikayla L.; Baynes, Cayla; López-Vallejo, Fabian; Barnard, Kobus; Maggiora, Gerald M.; Restifo, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The actin-bundling protein fascin is a key mediator of tumor invasion and metastasis and its activity drives filopodia formation, cell-shape changes and cell migration. Small-molecule inhibitors of fascin block tumor metastasis in animal models. Conversely, fascin deficiency might underlie the pathogenesis of some developmental brain disorders. To identify fascin-pathway modulators we devised a cell-based assay for fascin function and used it in a bidirectional drug screen. The screen utilized cultured fascin-deficient mutant Drosophila neurons, whose neurite arbors manifest the ‘filagree’ phenotype. Taking a repurposing approach, we screened a library of 1040 known compounds, many of them FDA-approved drugs, for filagree modifiers. Based on scaffold distribution, molecular-fingerprint similarities, and chemical-space distribution, this library has high structural diversity, supporting its utility as a screening tool. We identified 34 fascin-pathway blockers (with potential anti-metastasis activity) and 48 fascin-pathway enhancers (with potential cognitive-enhancer activity). The structural diversity of the active compounds suggests multiple molecular targets. Comparisons of active and inactive compounds provided preliminary structure-activity relationship information. The screen also revealed diverse neurotoxic effects of other drugs, notably the ‘beads-on-a-string’ defect, which is induced solely by statins. Statin-induced neurotoxicity is enhanced by fascin deficiency. In summary, we provide evidence that primary neuron culture using a genetic model organism can be valuable for early-stage drug discovery and developmental neurotoxicity testing. Furthermore, we propose that, given an appropriate assay for target-pathway function, bidirectional screening for brain-development disorders and invasive cancers represents an efficient, multipurpose strategy for drug discovery. PMID:22917928

  10. Effect of enhanced pCO2 levels on the production of DOC and TEP in short-term bioassay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGilchrist, G. A.; Shi, T.; Tyrrell, T.; Richier, S.; Moore, C. M.; Dumousseaud, C.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2014-03-01

    It has been proposed that increasing levels of pCO2 in the surface ocean will lead to more partitioning of the organic carbon fixed by marine primary production into the dissolved rather than the particulate fraction. This process may result in enhanced accumulation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the surface ocean and/or concurrent accumulation of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), with important implications for the functioning of the marine carbon cycle. We investigated this in shipboard bioassay experiments that considered the effect of four different pCO2 scenarios (ambient, 550, 750 and 1000 μatm) on unamended natural phytoplankton communities from a range of locations in the northwest European shelf seas. The environmental settings, in terms of nutrient availability, phytoplankton community structure and growth conditions, varied considerably between locations. We did not observe any strong or consistent effect of pCO2 on DOC production. There was a significant but highly variable effect of pCO2 on the production of TEP. In three of the five experiments, variation of TEP production between pCO2 treatments was caused by the effect of pCO2 on phytoplankton growth rather than a direct effect on TEP production. In one of the five experiments, there was evidence of enhanced TEP production at high pCO2 (twice as much production over the 96 h incubation period in the 750 μatm treatment compared with the ambient treatment) independent of indirect effects, as hypothesised by previous studies. Our results suggest that the environmental setting of experiments (community structure, nutrient availability and occurrence of phytoplankton growth) is a key factor determining the TEP response to pCO2 perturbations.

  11. Effect of enhanced pCO2 levels on the production of dissolved organic carbon and transparent exopolymer particles in short-term bioassay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGilchrist, G. A.; Shi, T.; Tyrrell, T.; Richier, S.; Moore, C. M.; Dumousseaud, C.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2014-07-01

    It has been proposed that increasing levels of pCO2 in the surface ocean will lead to more partitioning of the organic carbon fixed by marine primary production into the dissolved rather than the particulate fraction. This process may result in enhanced accumulation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the surface ocean and/or concurrent accumulation of transparent exopolymer particles (TEPs), with important implications for the functioning of the marine carbon cycle. We investigated this in shipboard bioassay experiments that considered the effect of four different pCO2 scenarios (ambient, 550, 750 and 1000 μatm) on unamended natural phytoplankton communities from a range of locations in the northwest European shelf seas. The environmental settings, in terms of nutrient availability, phytoplankton community structure and growth conditions, varied considerably between locations. We did not observe any strong or consistent effect of pCO2 on DOC production. There was a significant but highly variable effect of pCO2 on the production of TEPs. In three of the five experiments, variation of TEP production between pCO2 treatments was caused by the effect of pCO2 on phytoplankton growth rather than a direct effect on TEP production. In one of the five experiments, there was evidence of enhanced TEP production at high pCO2 (twice as much production over the 96 h incubation period in the 750 μatm treatment compared with the ambient treatment) independent of indirect effects, as hypothesised by previous studies. Our results suggest that the environmental setting of experiments (community structure, nutrient availability and occurrence of phytoplankton growth) is a key factor determining the TEP response to pCO2 perturbations.

  12. Bead-Based Assays for Biodetection: From Flow-Cytometry to Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby J.

    2009-05-04

    ABSTRACT The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for detection of biological species will be described: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. The methods and automated fluidic systems used for trapping functionalized microbeads will be described. This approach allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive assays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in assay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical assays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based assays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (> 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100’s of picomolar range (10’s of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach. Video taping magnetic nanoparticle capture and release was used to improve understanding of the process and revealed interesting behavior.

  13. Magnetic beads-based electrochemical immunosensor for monitoring allergenic food proteins.

    PubMed

    Čadková, Michaela; Metelka, Radovan; Holubová, Lucie; Horák, Daniel; Dvořáková, Veronika; Bílková, Zuzana; Korecká, Lucie

    2015-09-01

    Screen-printed platinum electrodes as transducer and magnetic beads as solid phase were combined to develop a particle-based electrochemical immunosensor for monitoring the serious food allergen ovalbumin. The standard arrangement of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay became the basis for designing the immunosensor. A sandwich-type immunocomplex was formed between magnetic particles functionalized with specific anti-ovalbumin immunoglobulin G and captured ovalbumin molecules, and secondary anti-ovalbumin antibodies conjugated with the enzyme horseradish peroxidase were subsequently added as label tag. The electrochemical signal proportional to the enzymatic reaction of horseradish peroxidase during the reduction of hydrogen peroxide with thionine as electron mediator was measured by linear sweep voltammetry. The newly established method of ovalbumin detection exhibits high sensitivity suitable for quantification in the range of 11 to 222nM and a detection limit of 5nM. Magnetic beads-based assay format using external magnets for rapid and simple separation has been proven to be an excellent basis for electrochemical detection and quantification of food allergens in highly complex sample matrices. PMID:25963896

  14. A magnetic bead-based ligand binding assay to facilitate human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kris; Mole, Damian J; Homer, Natalie Z M; Iredale, John P; Auer, Manfred; Webster, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    Human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is emerging as an important drug target enzyme in a number of inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease states. Recombinant protein production of KMO, and therefore discovery of KMO ligands, is challenging due to a large membrane targeting domain at the C-terminus of the enzyme that causes stability, solubility, and purification difficulties. The purpose of our investigation was to develop a suitable screening method for targeting human KMO and other similarly challenging drug targets. Here, we report the development of a magnetic bead-based binding assay using mass spectrometry detection for human KMO protein. The assay incorporates isolation of FLAG-tagged KMO enzyme on protein A magnetic beads. The protein-bound beads are incubated with potential binding compounds before specific cleavage of the protein-compound complexes from the beads. Mass spectrometry analysis is used to identify the compounds that demonstrate specific binding affinity for the target protein. The technique was validated using known inhibitors of KMO. This assay is a robust alternative to traditional ligand-binding assays for challenging protein targets, and it overcomes specific difficulties associated with isolating human KMO. PMID:25296660

  15. A Bead-Based Method for Multiplexed Identification and Quantitation of DNA Sequences Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Alexander; Lowe, Mary; Brown, Drew

    2000-01-01

    A new multiplexed, bead-based method which utilizes nucleic acid hybridizations on the surface of microscopic polystyrene spheres to identify specific sequences in heterogeneous mixtures of DNA sequences is described. The method consists of three elements: beads (5.6-μm diameter) with oligomer capture probes attached to the surface, three fluorophores for multiplexed detection, and flow cytometry instrumentation. Two fluorophores are impregnated within each bead in varying amounts to create different bead types, each associated with a unique probe. The third fluorophore is a reporter. Following capture of fluorescent cDNA sequences from environmental samples, the beads are analyzed by flow cytometric techniques which yield a signal intensity for each capture probe proportional to the amount of target sequences in the analyte. In this study, a direct hybrid capture assay was developed and evaluated with regard to sequence discrimination and quantitation of abundances. The target sequences (628 to 728 bp in length) were obtained from the 16S/23S intergenic spacer region of microorganisms collected from polluted groundwater at the nuclear waste site in Hanford, Wash. A fluorescence standard consisting of beads with a known number of fluorescent DNA molecules on the surface was developed, and the resolution, sensitivity, and lower detection limit for measuring abundances were determined. The results were compared with those of a DNA microarray using the same sequences. The bead method exhibited far superior sequence discrimination and possesses features which facilitate accurate quantitation. PMID:11010868

  16. Bead-based assays for biodetection: from flow-cytometry to microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozanich, Richard M., Jr.; Antolick, Kathryn; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2009-05-01

    The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for antibody-based detection of biological species are described in this paper: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. These approaches both involve the use of automated fluidic systems for trapping antibody-functionalized microbeads, which allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive immunoassays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in immunoassay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical immunoassays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based immunoassays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (>= 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100's of picomolar range (10's of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach.

  17. Bead-based microarray immunoassay for lung cancer biomarkers using quantum dots as labels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifen; Wu, Simin; Jing, Fengxiang; Zhou, Hongbo; Jia, Chunping; Li, Gang; Cong, Hui; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we developed a multiplex immunoassay system that combines the suspension and planar microarray formats within a single layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using soft lithography technology. The suspension format was based on the target proteins forming a sandwich structure between the magnetic beads and the quantum dot (QD) probes through specific antibody-antigen interactions. The planar microarray format was produced by fabricating an array of micro-wells in PDMS. Each micro-well was designed to trap a single microbead and eventually generated a microbead array within the PDMS chamber. The resultant bead-based on-chip assay could be used for simultaneously detecting three lung cancer biomarkers-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), fragments of cytokeratin 19 (CYFRA21-1) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-in 10 μl of human serum, with a wide linear dynamic range (1.03-111 ng/mL for CEA and CYFRA21-1; 9.26-1000 ng/ml for NSE) and a low detection limit (CEA: 0.19 ng/ml; CYFRA21-1: 0.97 ng/ml; NSE: 0.37 ng/ml; S/N=3). Our micro-well chip does not require complex e-beam lithography or the reactive ion etching process as with existing micro-well systems, which rely on expensive focused ion beam (FIB) milling or optical fiber bundles. Furthermore, the current approach is easy to operate without extra driving equipment such as pumps, and can make parallel detection for multiplexing with rapid binding kinetics, small reagent consumption and low cost. This work has demonstrated the importance of the successful application of on-chip multiplexing sandwich assays for the detection of biomarker proteins. PMID:26852198

  18. Quantitative Determination of the Probability of Multiple-Motor Transport in Bead-Based Assays.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaochu; King, Stephen J; Gopinathan, Ajay; Xu, Jing

    2016-06-21

    With their longest dimension typically being less than 100 nm, molecular motors are significantly below the optical-resolution limit. Despite substantial advances in fluorescence-based imaging methodologies, labeling with beads remains critical for optical-trapping-based investigations of molecular motors. A key experimental challenge in bead-based assays is that the number of motors on a bead is not well defined. Particularly for single-molecule investigations, the probability of single- versus multiple-motor events has not been experimentally investigated. Here, we used bead travel distance as an indicator of multiple-motor transport and determined the lower-bound probability of bead transport by two or more motors. We limited the ATP concentration to increase our detection sensitivity for multiple- versus single-kinesin transport. Surprisingly, for all but the lowest motor number examined, our measurements exceeded estimations of a previous model by ≥2-fold. To bridge this apparent gap between theory and experiment, we derived a closed-form expression for the probability of bead transport by multiple motors, and constrained the only free parameter in this model using our experimental measurements. Our data indicate that kinesin extends to ∼57 nm during bead transport, suggesting that kinesin exploits its conformational flexibility to interact with microtubules at highly curved interfaces such as those present for vesicle transport in cells. To our knowledge, our findings provide the first experimentally constrained guide for estimating the probability of multiple-motor transport in optical trapping studies. The experimental approach utilized here (limiting ATP concentration) may be generally applicable to studies in which molecular motors are labeled with cargos that are artificial or are purified from cellular extracts. PMID:27332130

  19. A multiplex, bead-based array for profiling plant-derived components in complex food matrixes.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Elena; Breviario, Diego; Mautino, Alessandro; Gianì, Silvia; Morello, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Authentication of processed food ingredients is becoming an important issue for customers, and some DNA-based analytical methods have been developed, especially for animal products. As food products typically contain several different ingredients, a current challenge is to increase the multiplexing capacity of DNA-based methods, to develop "all-in-one" assays. Oligonucleotide-coupled, bead-based suspension arrays are sensitive and reproducible multiplex analytical tools. We applied the Multi-Analyte Profile (xMAP™) technology to develop an assay able to concurrently detect five different plant components in mixed flours and in processed feed and food. Capture probes were targeted to species-specific DNA polymorphisms present within the first intron of plant β-tubulin genes, which can be amplified by the tubulin-based polymorphism-amplification method (TBP-PCR). The workflow is very simple and straightforward, consisting of a PCR amplification step with universal primers, followed by the direct hybridization assay. Results are highly reproducible. For each single plant species, the absolute detection limit was as low as one target DNA copy. In complex mixtures of flours derived from seeds or from commercial dry "pasta," relative limits of detection ranged, in weight, from 2% for soybean to less than 0.5% for wheat. The specificity of the capture probes and the high sensitivity of the method allowed the successful determination of the analytical composition of three feeds as well as eleven food samples, such as snacks, biscuits, and pasta. The multiplexing ability of the assay (up to 100 different analytes) provides scalability and flexibility, in response to specific needs. PMID:24190615

  20. Effects of metals in in vitro bioassays.

    PubMed Central

    Sirover, M A

    1981-01-01

    The capacity of in vitro bioassays to detect the potential carcinogenicity of metal compounds is reviewed. The in vitro bioassays discussed include: bacterial reversion analysis to determine the capacity of metal salts to revert Salmonella typhimurium histidine auxotrophs or to revert Escherichia coli WP 2 tryp- to tryptophan prototrophy; examination of the ability of metal salts to preferentially inhibit cell growth in Bacillus subtilis cells deficient in DNA repair pathways; determination of the ability of metal salts to induce resistance to base analogs in mammalian cells; the capacity of metal salts to enhance viral transformation of mammalian cells or to transform cells in the absence of virus; and the ability of metal salts to induce chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. Using each of these in vitro bioassays, diverse metal compounds have been identified as potential carcinogens. Furthermore, the use of different compounds of a specific metal may allow a determination of the valence which may be required for carcinogenesis. PMID:7023930

  1. Interlaboratory Comparison of Three Multiplexed Bead-Based Immunoassays for Measuring Serum Antibodies to Pneumococcal Polysaccharides ▿

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Melissa J.; Rose, Charles; Martinez, Joseph; Laher, Gouri; Sammons, Deborah L.; Smith, Jerry P.; Snawder, John E.; Borrow, Ray; Biagini, Raymond E.; Plikaytis, Brian; Carlone, George M.; Romero-Steiner, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Serotype-specific IgG, as quantified by a standardized WHO enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), is a serologic end point used to evaluate pneumococcal polysaccharide-based vaccine immunogenicity. Antibodies to each vaccine polysaccharide in licensed multivalent vaccines are quantified separately; this is laborious and consumes serum. We compared three bead-based immunoassays: a commercial assay (xMAP Pneumo14; Luminex) and two in-house assays (of the Health Protection Agency [HPA] and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]), using the WHO-recommended standard reference and reference sera (n = 11) from vaccinated adults. Multiple comparisons of the IgG concentrations for seven conjugate vaccine serotypes were performed by sample (percent error), serotype (equivalency testing), and laboratory (concordance correlation coefficient [CCC]). When comparing concentrations by sample, bead-based immunoassays generally yielded higher antibody concentrations than the ELISA and had higher variability for serotypes 6B, 18C, and 23F. None of the three assays met the current WHO recommendation of 75% of sera falling within 40% of the assigned antibody concentrations for all seven serotypes. When compared by serotype, the CDC and HPA tests were equivalent for five of seven serotypes, whereas the Luminex assay was equivalent for four of seven serotypes. When overall mean IgG concentrations were compared by laboratory, a higher level of agreement (CCC close to 1) was found among bead-based immunoassays than between the assays and WHO assignments. When compared to WHO assignments, the HPA assay outperformed the other assays (r = 0.920; CCC = 0.894; coefficient of accuracy = 0.972). Additional testing with sera from immunogenicity studies should demonstrate the applicability of this methodology for vaccine evaluation. PMID:20335434

  2. A novel bead-based assay to detect specific antibody responses against Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis simultaneously in sera of experimentally infected swine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A novel, bead-based flow cytometric assay was developed for simultaneous determination of antibody responses against Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis in pig serum. This high throughput screening assay could be an alternative for well known indirect tests like ELISA. One of the advantages of a bead-based assay over ELISA is the possibility to determine multiple specific antibody responses per single sample run facilitated by a series of antigens coupled to identifiable bead-levels. Furthermore, inclusion of a non-coupled bead-level in the same run facilitates the determination of, and correction for non-specific binding. The performance of this bead-based assay was compared to one T. spiralis and three T. gondii ELISAs. For this purpose, sera from T. gondii and T. spiralis experimentally infected pigs were used. With the experimental infection status as gold standard, the area under the curve, Youden Index, sensitivity and specificity were determined through receiver operator curve analysis. Marginal homogeneity and inter-rater agreement between bead-based assay and ELISAs were evaluated using McNemar's Test and Cohen's kappa, respectively. Results Results indicated that the areas under the curve of the bead-based assay were 0.911 and 0.885 for T. gondii and T. spiralis, respectively, while that of the T. gondii ELISAs ranged between 0.837 and 0.930 and the T. spiralis ELISA was 0.879. Bead-based T. gondii assay had a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 96%, while the ELISAs ranged between 64-84% and 93-99%, respectively. The bead-based T. spiralis assay had a sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 100% while the ELISA scored 72% and 95%, respectively. Marginal homogeneity was found between the T. gondii bead-based test and one of the T. gondii ELISAs. Moreover, in this test combination and between T. spiralis bead-based assay and respective ELISA, an excellent inter-rater agreement was found. When results of samples before expected

  3. Peptidomic analysis of Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis) hemolymph by magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOF MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baojie; Liu, Mei; Jiang, Keyong; Zhang, Guofan; Wang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    Peptides in shrimp hemolymph play an important role in the innate immune response. Analysis of hemolymph will help to detect and identify potential novel biomarkers of microbial infection. We used magnetic bead-based purification (ClinProt system) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to characterize shrimp hemolymph peptides. Shrimp serum and plasma were used as the source of samples for comparative analysis, and it was found that serum was more suitable for shrimp hemolymph peptidomic analysis. To screen potential specific biomarkers in serum of immune-challenged shrimps, we applied magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOF MS to serum samples from 10 immune-challenged and 10 healthy shrimps. The spectra were analyzed using FlexAnalysis 3.0 and ClinProTools 2.1 software. Thirteen peptide peaks significantly different between the two groups were selected as candidate biomarkers of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-infection. The diagnostic model established by genetic algorithm using five of these peaks was able to discriminate LPS-challenged shrimps from healthy control shrimps with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 100%. Our approach in MALDITOF MS-based peptidomics is a powerful tool for screening bioactive peptides or biomarkers derived from hemolymph, and will help to enable a better understanding of the innate immune response of shrimps.

  4. Bioassay for assessing marine contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Lapota, D.; Copeland, H.; Mastny, G.; Rosenberger, D.; Duckworth, D.

    1996-03-01

    The Qwiklite bioassay, developed by the laboratory at NCCOSC, is used as a biological tool to gauge the extent of environmental contamination. Some species of marine phytoplankton produce bioluminescence. The Qwiklite bioassay determines acute response and chronic effects of a wide variety of toxicants upon bioluminescent dinotlagellates by measuring their light output after exposure.

  5. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  6. Highly Stable Lyophilized Homogeneous Bead-Based Immunoassays for On-Site Detection of Bio Warfare Agents from Complex Matrices.

    PubMed

    Mechaly, Adva; Marx, Sharon; Levy, Orly; Yitzhaki, Shmuel; Fisher, Morly

    2016-06-21

    This study shows the development of dry, highly stable immunoassays for the detection of bio warfare agents in complex matrices. Thermal stability was achieved by the lyophilization of the complete, homogeneous, bead-based immunoassay in a special stabilizing buffer, resulting in a ready-to-use, simple assay, which exhibited long shelf and high-temperature endurance (up to 1 week at 100 °C). The developed methodology was successfully implemented for the preservation of time-resolved fluorescence, Alexa-fluorophores, and horse radish peroxidase-based bead assays, enabling multiplexed detection. The multiplexed assay was successfully implemented for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, botulinum B, and tularemia in complex matrices. PMID:27253489

  7. Development of a novel bead-based 96-well filtration plate competitive immunoassay for the detection of Gentamycin.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tien Yu Jessica; Chan, Chia-Chung; Chan, KinGho; Wang, Yu Chieh; Lin, Jing-Tang; Chang, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2013-11-15

    We developed a sensitive, simple, inexpensive and rapid bead-based immunoassay platform, composed of liposomal nanovesicle amplification system, Gentamycin sulfate beads and 96-well filtration plates. In the beginning of the assay, Gentamycin sulfate beads, Gentamycin sulfate and Gentamycin specific antibody were incubated in a bottom-sealed 96-well filtration plate. After incubation, washing was done by running washing buffer through the unsealed filtration plate with only gravity and the antibody-Gentamycin bead complexes were retained in the plate. Fluorescent dye-loaded protein G-liposomal nanovesicles were then added to specifically bind to antibodies on the retained beads. After washing unbound nanovesicles, millions of fluorescent dye molecules were released by adding a detergent solution to lyse liposomal nanovesicles. The limit of detection (LOD) of this novel detection platform in TBS and in skim milk were 52.65 ng/mL and 14.16 ng/mL, which are both sufficient for detecting the 200 ng/mL Codex maximum residual level (MRL). The dynamic ranges were both from each of their LODs to 100 μg/mL. The 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) in TBS and skim milk were 199.66 ng/mL and 360.81 ng/mL, respectively. We also demonstrated the good specificity of this platform by comparing detection results between pure Gentamycin solution and a mixture solution of 6 different antibiotics including Gentamycin in skim milk. The entire assay with 60 samples was conducted within 2h. In sum, this novel biosensing platform not only fulfilled most benefits of magnetic bead-based assays, but also was inexpensive and convenient by replacing the magnetic separation with filtration plate separation. PMID:23728198

  8. Magnetic-bead-based sub-femtomolar immunoassay using resonant Raman scattering signals of ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yadan; Cong, Tie; Chu, Xueying; Jia, Yan; Hong, Xia; Liu, Yichun

    2016-07-01

    Highly sensitive, specific, and selective immunoassays are of great significance for not only clinical diagnostics but also food safety, environmental monitoring, and so on. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and fluorescence-based and electrochemical immunoassays are important intensively investigated immunoassay techniques. However, they might suffer from low sensitivity or false-positive results. In this work, a simple, reliable, and ultrasensitive magnetic-bead-based immunoassay was performed using biofunctionalized ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals as resonant Raman probes. The resonant Raman scattering of ZnS nanocrystals displays evenly spaced multi-phonon resonant Raman lines with narrow bandwidths and has strong resistance to environmental variation due to the nature of the electron-phonon interaction, thus rendering reliable signal readout in the immunoassays. The superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles facilitated greatly the separation, purification, and concentration processes. It is beneficial for both reducing the labor intensity and amplifying the detection signals. The immobilization of antibodies on the surface of magnetic beads, the preparation of resonant Raman probes, and the immunological recognition between the antibody and analyte all occurred in the liquid phase, which minimized the diffusion barriers and boundary layer constraints. All these factors contributed to the ultralow detection limit of human IgG, which was determined to be about 0.5 fM (∼0.08 pg/ml). It is nearly the highest sensitivity obtained for IgG detection. This work shall facilitate the design of nanoplatforms for ultrasensitive detections of proteins, DNAs, bacteria, explosives, and so on. Graphical abstract An ultrasensitive magnetic-bead-based immunoassay was performed using multi-phonon resonant Raman lines of ZnS nanoparticles as detection signals. PMID:27173389

  9. Development of a Multiplexed, Bead-Based Assessment Tool for Rapid Identification and Quantitation of Microorganisms in Field Samples. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, M.; Halden, R.

    2002-10-09

    This was the final report for DOE NABIR grant DE-FG02-01ER63264 (PI Mary Lowe). The grant was entitled ''Development of a Multiplexed Bead-Based Assessment Tool for Rapid Identification and Quantitation of Microorganisms in Field Samples.'' The grant duration was one year. The purpose was to develop a bead-based assay for measuring analyte DNAs in environmental PCR products and to apply the method to a field experiment. The primary experiment was located at the UMTRA Old Rifle site.

  10. Bioassay Labels Based on Apoferritin Nanovehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Lea, Alan S.; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-09-04

    Here we report a nanoparticle label based on apoferritin nanovehicle loaded internally with markers for sensitive electrochemical DNA detection. The central cavity structure, the dissociation and reconstitute properties at different pHs of apoferritin provide a facile method to load and release markers. Hexacynoferrate(III) was used as model marker to load into the cavity of apoferritin protein cage. The loaded nanoparticle surface was functionalized with amino-modified DNA probe. Electrochemical DNA hybridization assay based on the hexacynoferrate loaded apoferritin nanovehicle could detect 23 atmol DNA targets in 50 ul sample solution. The concept could be readily extended to load other redox and fluorescence markers for bioassay applications. The new nanoparticle labels hold great promise for multi-target detection (in connection to nanoparticles loaded with different markers) and for enhancing the sensitivity of other bioassays.

  11. Prostaglandins, bioassay and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Flower, R J

    2006-01-01

    The formation of the British Pharmacological Society coincided almost exactly with a series of ground-breaking studies that ushered in an entirely new field of research – that of lipid mediator pharmacology. For many years following their chemical characterisation, lipids were considered only to be of dietary or structural importance. From the 1930s, all this changed – slowly at first and then more dramatically in the 1970s and 1980s with the emergence of the prostaglandins (PGs), the first intercellular mediators to be clearly derived from lipids, in a dynamic on-demand system. The PGs exhibit a wide range of biological activities that are still being evaluated and their properties underlie the action of one of the world's all-time favourite medicines, aspirin, as well as its more modern congeners. This paper traces the development of the PG field, with particular emphasis on the skilful utilisation of the twin techniques of bioassay and analytical chemistry by U.K. and Swedish scientists, and the intellectual interplay between them that led to the award of a joint Nobel Prize to the principal researchers in the PG field, half a century after the first discovery of these astonishingly versatile mediators. PMID:16402103

  12. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT REGIONS OF AMPLIFIED 16S RDNA ON A PERFORMANCE OF A MULTIPLEXED, BEAD-BASED METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF DNA SEQUENCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a bead-based method for multiplexed analysis of community DNA, the dynamics of aquatic microbial communities can be assessed. Capture probes, specific for a genus or species of bacteria, are attached to the surface of uniquely labeled, microscopic polystyrene beads. Primers...

  13. Development of an automated on-chip bead-based ELISA platform

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jennifer; Pollock, Nira; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a lab-on-a-chip and associated instrument for heterogeneous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based detection of proteins from liquid samples. The system performs all necessary ELISA steps (starting from antigen incubation) in a quarter of the time required for corresponding plate-based protocols. We have previously described the instrument, which automates fluidic control via remote valve switching and detects fluorescence from reacted substrate, for use in a molecular diagnostics application. The ELISA chip reported here utilizes a high surface area bead bed to enhance capture efficiency and increase the dynamic range of the assay as compared to a standard plate-based ELISA. Its functionality is demonstrated using human IL-10 as a model antigen, but theoretically any sandwich ELISA could be ported onto this “open source platform.” We show that our automated on-chip assays have greater sensitivities than the corresponding standard manual plate-based ELISAs, and that single samples can be assayed in a fraction of the time. PMID:26523155

  14. Dose-response curve of a microfluidic magnetic bead-based surface coverage sandwich assay.

    PubMed

    Cornaglia, Matteo; Trouillon, Raphaël; Tekin, H Cumhur; Lehnert, Thomas; Gijs, Martin A M

    2015-09-25

    Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles ('magnetic beads') have been used to advantage in many microfluidic devices for sensitive antigen (Ag) detection. Today, assays that use as read-out of the signal the number count of immobilized beads on a surface for quantification of a sample's analyte concentration have been among the most sensitive and have allowed protein detection lower than the fgmL(-1) concentration range. Recently, we have proposed in this category a magnetic bead surface coverage assay (Tekin et al., 2013 [1]), in which 'large' (2.8μm) antibody (Ab)-functionalized magnetic beads captured their Ag from a serum and these Ag-carrying beads were subsequently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0μm) Ab-coated magnetic beads. When the system was exposed to a magnetic induction field, the magnet dipole attractive interactions between the two bead types were used as a handle to approach both bead surfaces and assist with Ag-Ab immunocomplex formation, while unspecific binding (in absence of an Ag) of a large bead was reduced by exploiting viscous drag flow. The dose-response curve of this type of assay had two remarkable features: (i) its ability to detect an output signal (i.e. bead number count) for very low Ag concentrations, and (ii) an output signal of the assay that was non-linear with respect to Ag concentration. We explain here the observed dose-response curves and show that the type of interactions and the concept of our assay are in favour of detecting the lowest analyte concentrations (where typically either zero or one Ag is carried per large bead), while higher concentrations are less efficiently detected. We propose a random walk process for the Ag-carrying bead over the magnetic landscape of small beads and this model description explains the enhanced overall capture probability of this assay and its particular non-linear dose response curves. PMID:25817550

  15. Development of a multiplexed bead-based immunoassay for the simultaneous detection of antibodies to 17 pneumococcal proteins.

    PubMed

    Shoma, S; Verkaik, N J; de Vogel, C P; Hermans, P W M; van Selm, S; Mitchell, T J; van Roosmalen, M; Hossain, S; Rahman, M; Endtz, H Ph; van Wamel, W J B; van Belkum, A

    2011-04-01

    Presently, several pneumococcal proteins are being evaluated as potential vaccine candidates. Here, we gather novel insights in the immunogenicity of PLY, PsaA, PspA, PspC, NanA, Hyl, PpmA, SlrA, Eno, IgA1-protease, PdBD, BVH-3, SP1003, SP1633, SP1651, SP0189 and SP0376. We developed a multiplex bead-based immunoassay (xMAP(®) Technology, Luminex Corporation) to simultaneously quantify antibodies against these 17 pneumococcal proteins in serum. The median fluorescence intensity (MFI) values obtained for human pooled serum with the multiplex assay were between 82% and 111% (median 94%) of those obtained with the singleplex assays. For IgG, the coefficient of variation (CV) in serum ranged from 2% to 9%, for IgA, the CV ranged from 3% to 14% and for IgM, the CV ranged from 11% to 15%. Using this immunoassay, we showed that anti-pneumococcal antibody levels exhibited extensive inter-individual variability in young children suffering from invasive pneumococcal disease. All proteins, including the proteins with, as yet, unknown function, were immunogenic. In conclusion, the multiplex Streptococcus pneumoniae immunoassay based on proteins is reproducible. This assay can be used to monitor anti-S. pneumoniae antibody responses in a material- and time-saving manner. PMID:21086008

  16. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips. PMID:27098564

  17. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips. PMID:27098564

  18. Rapid magnetic bead based sample preparation for automated and high throughput N-glycan analysis of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Váradi, Csaba; Lew, Clarence; Guttman, András

    2014-06-17

    Full automation to enable high throughput N-glycosylation profiling and sequencing with good reproducibility is vital to fulfill the contemporary needs of the biopharmaceutical industry and requirements of national regulatory agencies. The most prevalently used glycoanalytical methods of capillary electrophoresis and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, while very efficient, both necessitate extensive sample preparation and cleanup, including glycoprotein capture, N-glycan release, fluorescent derivatization, purification, and preconcentration steps during the process. Currently used protocols to fulfill these tasks require multiple centrifugation and vacuum-centrifugation steps, making liquid handling robot mediated automated sample preparation difficult and expensive. In this paper we report on a rapid magnetic bead based sample preparation approach that enables full automation including all the process phases just in a couple of hours without requiring any centrifugation and/or vacuum centrifugation steps. This novel protocol has been compared to conventional glycan sample preparation strategies using standard glycoproteins (IgG, fetuin, and RNase B) and featured rapid processing time, high release and labeling efficiency, good reproducibility, and the potential of easy automation. PMID:24909945

  19. Development of a Multiplexed Bead-Based Suspension Array for the Detection and Discrimination of Pospiviroid Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    van Brunschot, Sharon L.; Bergervoet, Jan H. W.; Pagendam, Daniel E.; de Weerdt, Marjanne; Geering, Andrew D. W.; Drenth, André; van der Vlugt, René A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and reliable diagnostic tools for the routine indexing and certification of clean propagating material are essential for the management of pospiviroid diseases in horticultural crops. This study describes the development of a true multiplexed diagnostic method for the detection and identification of all nine currently recognized pospiviroid species in one assay using Luminex bead-based suspension array technology. In addition, a new data-driven, statistical method is presented for establishing thresholds for positivity for individual assays within multiplexed arrays. When applied to the multiplexed array data generated in this study, the new method was shown to have better control of false positives and false negative results than two other commonly used approaches for setting thresholds. The 11-plex Luminex MagPlex-TAG pospiviroid array described here has a unique hierarchical assay design, incorporating a near-universal assay in addition to nine species-specific assays, and a co-amplified plant internal control assay for quality assurance purposes. All assays of the multiplexed array were shown to be 100% specific, sensitive and reproducible. The multiplexed array described herein is robust, easy to use, displays unambiguous results and has strong potential for use in routine pospiviroid indexing to improve disease management strategies. PMID:24404188

  20. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips.

  1. Facile Fabrication of a Silver Nanoparticle Immersed, Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Imposed Paper Platform through Successive Ionic Layer Absorption and Reaction for On-Site Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wansun; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2015-12-23

    We introduce a novel, facile, rapid, low-cost, highly reproducible, and power-free synthesizable fabrication method of paper-based silver nanoparticle (AgNP) immersed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform, known as the successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The rough and porous properties of the paper led to direct synthesis of AgNPs on the surface as well as in the paper due to capillary effects, resulting in improved plasmon coupling with interparticles and interlayers. The proposed SERS platform showed an enhancement factor of 1.1 × 10(9), high reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 4.2%), and 10(-12) M rhodamine B highly sensitive detection limit by optimizing the SILAR conditions including the concentration of the reactive solution (20/20 mM/mM AgNO3/NaBH4) and the number of SILAR cycles (six). The applicability of the SERS platform was evaluated using two samples including human cervical fluid for clinical diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, associated with cervical cancer, and a malachite green (MG) solution for fungicide and parasiticide in aquaculture, associated with human carcinogenesis. The AgNP-immersed SERS-functionalized platform using the SILAR technique allowed for high chemical structure sensitivity without additional tagging or chemical modification, making it a good alternative for early clinical diagnosis of HPV infection and detection of MG-activated human carcinogenesis. PMID:26619139

  2. An automated microfluidic system for single-stranded DNA preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuaiqin; Sun, Yujia; Gan, Wupeng; Liu, Yan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Dong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-03-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device capable of performing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis with a white-light detection for detecting mutations that account for hereditary hearing loss. The entire operation process, which includes loading of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and biotin-labeled polymerase chain reaction products, active dispersion of the MBs with DNA for binding, alkaline denaturation of DNA, dynamic hybridization of the bead-labeled ssDNA to a tag array, and white-light detection, can all be automatically accomplished in a single chamber of the microchip, which was operated on a self-contained instrument with all the necessary components for thermal control, fluidic control, and detection. Two novel mixing valves with embedded polydimethylsiloxane membranes, which can alternately generate a 3-μl pulse flow at a peak rate of around 160 mm/s, were integrated into the chip for thoroughly dispersing magnetic beads in 2 min. The binding efficiency of biotinylated oligonucleotides to beads was measured to be 80.6% of that obtained in a tube with the conventional method. To critically test the performance of this automated microsystem, we employed a commercial microarray-based detection kit for detecting nine mutation loci that account for hereditary hearing loss. The limit of detection of the microsystem was determined as 2.5 ng of input K562 standard genomic DNA using this kit. In addition, four blood samples obtained from persons with mutations were all correctly typed by our system in less than 45 min per run. The fully automated, "amplicon-in-answer-out" operation, together with the white-light detection, makes our system an excellent platform for low-cost, rapid genotyping in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25825617

  3. Novel multiplex bead-based assay for detection of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shivarov, Velizar; Ivanova, Milena; Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH) mutations are frequently found in various cancer types such as gliomas, chondrosarcomas and myeloid malignancies. Their molecular detection has recently gained wide recognition in the diagnosis and prognosis of these neoplasms. For that purpose various molecular approaches have been used but a universally accepted method is still lacking. In this study we aimed to develop a novel bead-based liquid assay using Locked nucleic acids (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probes for multiplexed detection of the most frequent IDH1 (p.R132C, p.R132G, p.R132H, p.R132L, p.R132S) and IDH2 (p.R140Q, p.R172K) mutations. The method includes four steps: 1) PCR amplification of the targeted fragments with biotinylated primers; 2) Direct hybridization to barcoded microbeads with specific LNA-modified oligonucleotide probes; 3) Incubation with phycoerythrin coupled streptavidin; 4) Acquisition of fluorescent intensities of each set of beads on a flow platform (LuminexCorp., USA). We tested the performance of the assay on both artificial plasmid constructs and on clinical samples from 114 patients with known or suspected myeloid malignancies. The method appeared to be superior to direct sequencing having a much higher sensitivity of 2.5% mutant alleles. Applying this method to patients' samples we identified a total of 9 mutations (one IDH1 p.R132C, seven IDH2 p.R140Q and one IDH2 p.R172K). In conclusion, this method could be successfully implemented in the diagnostic work-up for various tumors known to harbor IDH1/2 mutations (e.g. myeloid malignancies, gliomas, etc.). International initiatives are needed to validate the different existing methods for detection of IDH1/2 mutations in clinical settings. PMID:24098815

  4. Novel Multiplex Bead-Based Assay for Detection of IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations in Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH) mutations are frequently found in various cancer types such as gliomas, chondrosarcomas and myeloid malignancies. Their molecular detection has recently gained wide recognition in the diagnosis and prognosis of these neoplasms. For that purpose various molecular approaches have been used but a universally accepted method is still lacking. In this study we aimed to develop a novel bead-based liquid assay using Locked nucleic acids (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probes for multiplexed detection of the most frequent IDH1 (p.R132C, p.R132G, p.R132H, p.R132L, p.R132S) and IDH2 (p.R140Q, p.R172K) mutations. The method includes four steps: 1) PCR amplification of the targeted fragments with biotinylated primers; 2) Direct hybridization to barcoded microbeads with specific LNA-modified oligonucleotide probes; 3) Incubation with phycoerythrin coupled streptavidin; 4) Acquisition of fluorescent intensities of each set of beads on a flow platform (LuminexCorp., USA). We tested the performance of the assay on both artificial plasmid constructs and on clinical samples from 114 patients with known or suspected myeloid malignancies. The method appeared to be superior to direct sequencing having a much higher sensitivity of 2.5% mutant alleles. Applying this method to patients' samples we identified a total of 9 mutations (one IDH1 p.R132C, seven IDH2 p.R140Q and one IDH2 p.R172K). In conclusion, this method could be successfully implemented in the diagnostic work-up for various tumors known to harbor IDH1/2 mutations (e.g. myeloid malignancies, gliomas, etc.). International initiatives are needed to validate the different existing methods for detection of IDH1/2 mutations in clinical settings. PMID:24098815

  5. An automated microfluidic system for single-stranded DNA preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiqin; Sun, Yujia; Liu, Yan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device capable of performing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis with a white-light detection for detecting mutations that account for hereditary hearing loss. The entire operation process, which includes loading of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and biotin-labeled polymerase chain reaction products, active dispersion of the MBs with DNA for binding, alkaline denaturation of DNA, dynamic hybridization of the bead-labeled ssDNA to a tag array, and white-light detection, can all be automatically accomplished in a single chamber of the microchip, which was operated on a self-contained instrument with all the necessary components for thermal control, fluidic control, and detection. Two novel mixing valves with embedded polydimethylsiloxane membranes, which can alternately generate a 3-μl pulse flow at a peak rate of around 160 mm/s, were integrated into the chip for thoroughly dispersing magnetic beads in 2 min. The binding efficiency of biotinylated oligonucleotides to beads was measured to be 80.6% of that obtained in a tube with the conventional method. To critically test the performance of this automated microsystem, we employed a commercial microarray-based detection kit for detecting nine mutation loci that account for hereditary hearing loss. The limit of detection of the microsystem was determined as 2.5 ng of input K562 standard genomic DNA using this kit. In addition, four blood samples obtained from persons with mutations were all correctly typed by our system in less than 45 min per run. The fully automated, “amplicon-in-answer-out” operation, together with the white-light detection, makes our system an excellent platform for low-cost, rapid genotyping in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25825617

  6. Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.M.; Morgan, J.D.

    1983-10-01

    Tests with naturally-occurring sediments are rare and sediment testing methodology is not standardized. The authors present a simple methodology for undertaking sediment bioassays with oyster larvae, and present data from a recent study to prove the utility of this method.

  7. UNIFYING SCALER FOR BIOASSAY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An extensive set of interlaboratory root bioassay data was unified using centroids of individual tests as scalers. It is shown that the dose response obeys a first order differential equation with the constant of the equation related to the sensitivity of the dose response relati...

  8. Environmental monitoring using genetic bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Lewtas, J.

    1989-01-01

    Environmental monitoring has evolved over the last ten years toward providing data more useful for exposure and risk assessment. The objective of many monitoring studies in the 1960s and 1970s was to monitor concentrations of pollutants including environmental mutagens at ambient locations, such as roof tops and in large bodies of water, where the pollutants would be well mixed and represent a homogeneous sample. In the 1980s, a number of studies focused on assessing the emission of mutagens from various sources. Now the emphasis has shifted to monitoring human exposure to environmental mutagens and to understanding which sources and factors lead to increased exposure and potential cancer risk. The chapter briefly reviews advances in genetic bioassay methods for environmental monitoring and focuses on approaches to integrating genetic bioassay methods with environmental-monitoring studies.

  9. Soil bioassays as tools for sludge compost quality assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Domene, Xavier; Sola, Laura; Ramirez, Wilson; Alcaniz, Josep M.; Andres, Pilar

    2011-03-15

    Composting is a waste management technology that is becoming more widespread as a response to the increasing production of sewage sludge and the pressure for its reuse in soil. In this study, different bioassays (plant germination, earthworm survival, biomass and reproduction, and collembolan survival and reproduction) were assessed for their usefulness in the compost quality assessment. Compost samples, from two different composting plants, were taken along the composting process, which were characterized and submitted to bioassays (plant germination and collembolan and earthworm performance). Results from our study indicate that the noxious effects of some of the compost samples observed in bioassays are related to the low organic matter stability of composts and the enhanced release of decomposition endproducts, with the exception of earthworms, which are favored. Plant germination and collembolan reproduction inhibition was generally associated with uncomposted sludge, while earthworm total biomass and reproduction were enhanced by these materials. On the other hand, earthworm and collembolan survival were unaffected by the degree of composting of the wastes. However, this pattern was clear in one of the composting procedures assessed, but less in the other, where the release of decomposition endproducts was lower due to its higher stability, indicating the sensitivity and usefulness of bioassays for the quality assessment of composts.

  10. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  11. Medium-term bioassays for carcinogenicity of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, N; Imaida, K; Hirose, M; Shirai, T

    1998-01-01

    Carcinogenic effects of chemical mixtures were examined with a medium-term liver bioassay for carcinogens or a multiorgan medium-term bioassay using male F344 rats. In the medium-term liver bioassay, rats were initially treated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) at 200 mg/kg body weight, i.p.; after 2 weeks they received chemical mixtures such as 10 different heterocyclic amines at one-tenth or one-hundredth the dose levels used in carcinogenicity studies and the mixtures of 20 different pesticides, each at acceptable daily intake (ADI) levels or a mixture of 100 times ADI levels. All animals were subjected to two-thirds partial hepatectomy at week 3 and were sacrificed at week 8. The number and areas of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci (preneoplastic lesions in the liver) were compared between respective groups. When 10 heterocyclic amines were mixed in the diet at one-tenth dose level, clear synergism was observed, but no combined effects were evident with the one-hundredth dose levels. In the pesticide experiment, treatment of rats with the 20-pesticide mixture at the ADI dose level did not enhance GST-P-positive foci. In contrast, a mixture of 100 times the ADI significantly increased those values. In a multiorgan bioassay of 28 weeks, mixtures of 40 high-volume compounds and 20 pesticides (suspected carcinogens) added together at their respective ADI levels did not enhance carcinogenesis in any organs initiated by five different carcinogens (DEN, N-methylnitrosourea, dimethylhydrazine, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine, and dihydroxy-di-n-propylnitrosamine) in combination. The combination effect of low dietary levels of five antioxidants, butylated hydroxyanisole, caffeic acid, sesamol, 4-methoxyphenol, and catechol, were also examined using the multiorgan bioassay. The incidence of forestomach papillomas was significantly increased only in the combination group and the results indicate that combination of the five antioxidants can

  12. Comparison of autoantibody specificities between traditional and bead-based assays in a large, diverse collection of SLE patients and family members

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Benjamin F.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Lu, Rufei; Vidal, Gabriel; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Robertson, Julie M.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Neas, Barbara R.; Reichlin, Morris; Scofield, R. Hal; Harley, John B.; James, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The replacement of standard immunofluorescence anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) methods with bead-based assays is a new clinical option. A large, multi-racial cohort of SLE patients, blood relatives and unaffected control individuals was evaluated for familial aggregation and subset clustering of autoantibodies by high-throughput serum screening technology and traditional methods. Methods Serum samples (1,540 SLE patients, 1,127 unaffected relatives, and 906 healthy, population-based controls) were analyzed for SLE autoantibodies using a bead-based assay, immunofluorescence, and immunodiffusion. Autoantibody prevalence, disease sensitivity, clustering, and association with standard immunodiffusion results were evaluated. Results ANA frequency in SLE patient sera were 89%, 73%, and 67% by BioPlex 2200 and 94%, 84%, and 86% by immunofluorescence in African-American, Hispanic, and European-American patients respectively. 60kD Ro, La, Sm, nRNP A, and ribosomal P prevalence were compared across assays, with sensitivities ranging from 0.92 to 0.83 and specificities ranging from 0.90 to 0.79. Cluster autoantibody analysis showed association of three subsets: 1) 60kD Ro, 52kD Ro and La, 2) spliceosomal proteins, and 3) dsDNA, chromatin, and ribosomal P. Familial aggregation of Sm/RNP, ribosomal P, and 60kD Ro in SLE patient sibling pairs was observed (p ≤ 0.004). Simplex pedigree patients had a greater prevalence for dsDNA (p=0.0003) and chromatin (p=0.005) autoantibodies than multiplex patients. Conclusion ANA frequencies detected by a bead-based assay are lower in European-American SLE patients compared to immunofluorescence. These assays have strong positive predictive values across racial groups, provide useful information for clinical care, and provide unique insights to familial aggregation and autoantibody clustering. PMID:23112091

  13. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors and Bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Mao, Xun; Gurung, Anant; Baloda, Meenu; Lin, Yuehe; He, Yuqing

    2010-08-31

    This book chapter summarizes the recent advance in nanomaterials for electrochemical biosensors and bioassays. Biofunctionalization of nanomaterials for biosensors fabrication and their biomedical applications are discussed.

  14. A protein-protein binding assay using coated microtitre plates: increased throughput, reproducibility and speed compared to bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Craig, Tim J; Ciufo, Leonora F; Morgan, Alan

    2004-07-30

    Protein-protein interactions, and the factors affecting them, are of fundamental importance to all biological systems. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITR) are powerful methods for assaying such interactions, but are expensive to implement. In contrast, bead-based pull-down assays using affinity tags such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), require no specialist equipment. As a result, such assays are the most popular method for analysing protein-protein interactions, despite being time-consuming and prone to variability. In respect of these problems, we have modified this form of binding assay, using glutathione-coated 96-well plates rather than glutathione-Sepharose beads to bind the primary bait protein. Quantitation of bound protein utilises ELISA for purified proteins and scintillation counting for in vitro translated proteins, rather than the SDS-PAGE-based detection methods used in traditional bead-based assays. These modifications result in an approximately 10-fold increase in the number of samples that can be assayed daily, and allow results to be obtained within hours as opposed to days. We validate the modified assay by analysing the equilibrium binding of Munc18 and syntaxin, and also demonstrate that association and dissociation kinetics may be measured using this approach. The method we describe is generally applicable to any protein-protein interaction assay based on affinity tags and is amenable to automation, and so should benefit a wide range of biochemical research. PMID:15236910

  15. Low-Cost Nanoribbon Sensors for Protein Analysis in Human Serum Using a Miniature Bead-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunxiao; Zeimpekis, Ioannis; Sun, Kai; Anderson, Sally; Ashburn, Peter; Morgan, Hywel

    2016-05-01

    We describe a low cost thin-film transistor (TFT) nanoribbon sensor for detection of the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum via a miniature bead-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The TFT nanoribbon sensor measures the reaction products from the ELISA via pH changes. The bead-based ELISA decouples the protein functionalization steps from the sensor surface, increasing the signal and simplifying the assay. The ability to directly sense proteins in human serum in this way overcomes the Debye length limitation associated with nanowire and nanoribbon biosensors. Compared to classically fabricated nanowires, the TFT nanoribbon sensors are simple, extremely easy to fabricate, and should therefore be much cheaper to manufacture. TFT nanoribbon sensors, configured to measure pH, were used for quantitative detection of CRP spiked into human serum at concentrations as low as 0.2 ng/mL, which is 10 000 times lower than needed for diagnostic purposes, providing the potential for applications that require very high sensitivity. PMID:27035411

  16. Early diagnosis of Irkut virus infection using magnetic bead-based serum peptide profiling by MALDI-TOF MS in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Liu, Ye; Hao, Zhuo; Zhang, Shoufeng; Hu, Rongliang; Li, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis is important for the prompt post-exposure prophylaxis of lyssavirus infections. To diagnose Irkut virus (IRKV) infection during incubation in mice, a novel method using magnetic bead-based serum peptide profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been established. For this test, serum peptides were concentrated by adsorption to and elution from the magnetic bead-based weak cation ion exchanger. Mass spectrograms obtained by MALDI-TOF MS were analyzed using ClinProTools bioinformatics software. Construction of the diagnostic model was performed using serum samples from mice infected with IRKV and rabies virus (RABV) BD06, Flury-LEP, and SRV9 (as controls). The method accurately diagnosed sera 2, 4 and 8 days after IRKV and RABV infections. The sensitivity, specificity, and total accuracy of diagnosis were 86.7%, 95.2%, and 92.9%, respectively. However, IRKV could not be differentiated from RABV 1 day after infection. The results of the present study indicate that serum peptide profiling by MALDI-TOF MS is a promising technique for the early clinical diagnosis of lyssavirus infections and needs to be further tested in humans and farm animals. PMID:24670473

  17. Bioassays Based on Molecular Nanomechanics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Majumdar, Arun

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when specific biomolecular interactions are confined to one surface of a microcantilever beam, changes in intermolecular nanomechanical forces provide sufficient differential torque to bend the cantilever beam. This has been used to detect single base pair mismatches during DNA hybridization, as well as prostate specific antigen (PSA) at concentrations and conditions that are clinically relevant for prostate cancer diagnosis. Since cantilever motion originates from free energy change induced by specific biomolecular binding, this technique is now offering a common platform for label-free quantitative analysis of protein-protein binding, DNA hybridization DNA-protein interactions, and in general receptor-ligandmore » interactions. Current work is focused on developing “universal microarrays” of microcantilever beams for high-throughput multiplexed bioassays.« less

  18. In Vitro Biologic Activities of the Antimicrobials Triclocarban, Its Analogs, and Triclosan in Bioassay Screens: Receptor-Based Bioassay Screens

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Jiangang; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Sanmarti, Enio; Denison, Michael S.; Lasley, Bill; Pessah, Isaac N.; Kültz, Dietmar; Chang, Daniel P.Y.; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised about the biological and toxicologic effects of the antimicrobials triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) in personal care products. Few studies have evaluated their biological activities in mammalian cells to assess their potential for adverse effects. Objectives In this study, we assessed the activity of TCC, its analogs, and TCS in in vitro nuclear-receptor–responsive and calcium signaling bioassays. Materials and methods We determined the biological activities of the compounds in in vitro, cell-based, and nuclear-receptor–responsive bioassays for receptors for aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), estrogen (ER), androgen (AR), and ryanodine (RyR1). Results Some carbanilide compounds, including TCC (1–10 μM), enhanced estradiol (E2)-dependent or testosterone-dependent activation of ER- and AR-responsive gene expression up to 2.5-fold but exhibited little or no agonistic activity alone. Some carbanilides and TCS exhibited weak agonistic and/or antagonistic activity in the AhR-responsive bioassay. TCS exhibited antagonistic activity in both ER- and AR-responsive bioassays. TCS (0.1–10 μM) significantly enhanced the binding of [3H]ryanodine to RyR1 and caused elevation of resting cytosolic [Ca2+] in primary skeletal myotubes, but carbanilides had no effect. Conclusions Carbanilides, including TCC, enhanced hormone-dependent induction of ER- and AR-dependent gene expression but had little agonist activity, suggesting a new mechanism of action of endocrine-disrupting compounds. TCS, structurally similar to noncoplanar ortho-substituted poly-chlorinated biphenyls, exhibited weak AhR activity but interacted with RyR1 and stimulated Ca2+ mobilization. These observations have potential implications for human and animal health. Further investigations are needed into the biological and toxicologic effects of TCC, its analogs, and TCS. PMID:18795164

  19. Bioassay studies to determine OTEC's effect on phytoplankton activity

    SciTech Connect

    Carmiggelt, C.J.W.; Hartwig, E.O.; Commins, M.L.; Horne, A.J.

    1982-09-01

    The effect of artificially upwelled water (800m) on phytoplankton from 25m and 100m was simulated using five day bioassays. The results show that some enhancement of the phytoplankton populations in the receiving waters due to upwelling is likely to occur. The very small phytoplankton (< 5 um) are most important in this response. The magnitude of the biostimulation cannot be predicted from this study. Ammonia leaks, spills, and venting are probable in an operating OTEC plant. The bioassays show that additions of ammonia will produce biostimulaton only when the P/N ratio indicates nitrogen limitation. In the Hawaiian waters sampled N-limitation was not always present and varied with depth. No nitrogen fixation was detected. The magnitude of stimulation due to ammonia alone was generally less than the addition of upwelled water which is a more complete nutrient mixture.

  20. Isolation of prostate cancer cell subpopulations of functional interest by use of an on-chip magnetic bead-based cell separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, Matthew D.; Ouyang, Bin; Ho, Shuk-mei; Ahn, Chong H.

    2009-09-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication and characterization of a modular magnetic bead-based cell separation device developed for the sequential sorting of a heterogeneous prostate cancer (CaP) cell population. The chief aim is cell sorting carried out on the basis of surface marker expression, serially selecting cellular subpopulations for capture by the use of antibody-coated magnetic beads. The markers of interest, prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and CD10 were selected for their relevance to ongoing CaP development research. The separation device was fabricated out of plastic, by the use of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) injection molding, nickel-iron electroplating and thermoplastic fusion bonding. Effective depletion and enrichment of cell subsets based on multiple surface markers was achieved. Various flow rates and incubation times were tested for optimizing the sorting procedure.

  1. Comparison of three magnetic-bead-based RNA extraction methods for detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Lijie; Yan, Wenlong; Sun, Ning; Liang, Xinmiao; Deng, Congliang

    2015-07-01

    To determine the efficiency of RNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads, three different bead-based methods (one using silica-coated magnetic beads [SMNP], one using immunomagnetic beads conjugated to a specific antibody [IMB], and one using magnetic beads to nonspecifically adsorb virions [MNP]) were compared with the TRIzol method for the extraction of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) RNA from cucumber leaves by real-time RT-PCR. The results indicated that the extraction efficiency of the SMNP method was 10 times higher than those of the IMB and MNP methods and 100 times higher than that of the TRIzol method. Therefore, the SMNP method could be considered for use in quarantine measures for the prevention and control of the disease caused by CGMMV. PMID:25951973

  2. A flexible multiplex bead-based assay for detecting germline CDKN2A and CDK4 variants in melanoma-prone kindreds.

    PubMed

    Lang, Julie M; Shennan, Michael; Njauw, Jenny C-N; Luo, Su; Bishop, Julia N; Harland, Mark; Hayward, Nicholas K; Tucker, Margaret A; Goldstein, Alisa M; Landi, Maria T; Puig, Susana; Gruis, Nelleke A; Bergman, Wilma; Bianchi-Scarra, Giovanna; Ghiorzo, Paola; Hogg, David; Tsao, Hensin

    2011-02-01

    The presence of recurrent high-risk mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDKN2A/CDK4) among melanoma-prone families suggests that a high-throughput, multiplex assay could serve as an effective initial screening tool. To this end, we have developed a multiplex bead-based assay for high-throughput CDKN2A/CDK4 genotyping in the context of familial melanoma. Genomic DNA from 1,603 subjects (1,005 in training set and 598 in validation set) were amplified by multiplex PCR using five CDKN2A/CDK4 primer sets followed by multiplex allele-specific primer extension for 39 distinct germline variants. The products were then sorted and analyzed using the Luminex xMAP system. Genotypes were compared with previously determined sequence data. In the Toronto training cohort, all 145 samples with known variants were detected by the bead assay (100% concordance). Analysis of the 598 samples from the GenoMEL validation set led to identification of 150/155 expected variants (96.77%). Overall, the bead assay correctly genotyped 1,540/1,603 (96.07%) of all individuals in the study and 1,540/1,545 (99.68%) of individuals whose variants were represented in the probe set. Out of a total of 62,517 allelic calls, 62,512 (99.99%) were correctly assigned. The multiplex bead-based assay is an accurate method for genotyping CDKN2A/CDK4 variants and is potentially useful in genotyping low-to-moderate melanoma risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:21085193

  3. A bioaccumulation bioassay for freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Noguchi, George E.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Edsall, Carol C.; Shoesmith, John A.; Bowker, James D.

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for determining the bioavailability of contaminants from freshwater sediments. The bioassay consists of 10-d exposures to whole sediments under flow-through conditions. After testing five species, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the earthworm (Lubricus terrestris) were recommended for use in the test. When the availability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Hg and Zn from Great Lakes sediments was examined in laboratory exposures, only the PCBs were accumulated. A field validation study demonstrated that the magnitude of accumulation in laboratory exposures was similar to that in organisms caged in the field. A protocol is recommended for using the test as a standardized bioaccumulation bioassay.

  4. Two-generation saccharin bioassays.

    PubMed

    Arnold, D L

    1983-04-01

    The controversy regarding the safety of saccharin for human consumption started shortly after its discovery over 100 years ago and has yet to subside appreciably. The consumption of saccharin, particularly in North America, began to escalate when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration set new standards of identity which allowed foods containing artificial sweeteners to be promoted as "nonnutritive" or "noncaloric" sweeteners for use by the general public. In 1969, when cyclamates were banned, at least 10 single-generation feeding studies were undertaken with saccharin to more accurately assess the potential toxicological consequences resulting from the anticipated increase in its consumption. None of these studies resulted in any overt regulatory action. Subsequently, the introduction of the two-generation chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity bioassay added a new tool to the toxicologist's arsenal. Three two-generation studies using saccharin have since been conducted. The results from these studies clearly show that when rats were exposed to diets containing 5 or 7.5% sodium saccharin from the time of conception to death, an increased frequency of urinary bladder cancers was found, predominantly in the males. While some study results suggested that impurities in commercial saccharin or the presence of urinary tract calculi may have been responsible for the observed bladder tumors, it now appears that these possibilities are highly unlikely. The mechanism by which saccharin elicited the bladder tumors using the two-generation experiment has not been ascertained. PMID:6347682

  5. Bioassays for Monitoring Insecticide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Audra L.E.; Tindall, Kelly; Leonard, B. Rogers

    2010-01-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is an increasing problem because pesticides are an integral part of high-yielding production agriculture. When few products are labeled for an individual pest within a particular crop system, chemical control options are limited. Therefore, the same product(s) are used repeatedly and continual selection pressure is placed on the target pest. There are both financial and environmental costs associated with the development of resistant populations. The cost of pesticide resistance has been estimated at approximately $ 1.5 billion annually in the United States. This paper will describe protocols, currently used to monitor arthropod (specifically insects) populations for the development of resistance. The adult vial test is used to measure the toxicity to contact insecticides and a modification of this test is used for plant-systemic insecticides. In these bioassays, insects are exposed to technical grade insecticide and responses (mortality) recorded at a specific post-exposure interval. The mortality data are subjected to Log Dose probit analysis to generate estimates of a lethal concentration that provides mortality to 50% (LC50) of the target populations and a series of confidence limits (CL's) as estimates of data variability. When these data are collected for a range of insecticide-susceptible populations, the LC50 can be used as baseline data for future monitoring purposes. After populations have been exposed to products, the results can be compared to a previously determined LC50 using the same methodology. PMID:21248689

  6. PHOXOCEPHALID AMPHIPOD BIOASSAY FOR MARINE SEDIMENT TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative toxicity of marine sediment can be accurately determined through acute, static bioassays with the phoxocepalid amphipod Repoxynius abronius. Mortality and sublethal effects on emergence from sediment and reburial behavior are determined after ten day exposure in 1-L ...

  7. Bioassay criteria for environmental restoration workers

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) work at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site posed questions concerning when to perform bioassay monitoring of workers for potential intakes of radioactivity. Application of criteria originally developed for use inside radionuclide processing facilities to ER work resulted in overly restrictive bioassay requirements. ER work typically involves site characterization or, excavating large quantities of potentially contaminated soil, rather than working with concentrated quantities of radioactivity as in a processing facility. An improved approach, tailored to ER work, provided soil contamination concentrations above which worker bioassay would be required. Soil concentrations were derived assuming acute or chronic intakes of 2% of an Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), or a potential committed effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem, and conservative dust loading of air from the work. When planning ER work, the anticipated soil concentration and corresponding need for bioassay could be estimated from work-site historical records. Once site work commenced, soil sampling and work-place surveys could be used to determine bioassay needs. This approach substantially reduced the required number of bioassay samples with corresponding reductions in analytical costs, schedules, and more flexible work-force management. (Work supported by the US Department of Energy under contract DOE-AC06-76RLO 1830.)

  8. A Colorimetric Bioassay for Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinnickel, M. L.; Smith, S.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of perchlorate (ClO4-) as a widespread contaminant across the United States and its potential adverse affects towards human health has motivated the EPA to place ClO4- on its contaminant candidate list for drinking water supplies. While a federal MCL has not yet been set, a recommended public health goal of 1 ppb (μg.L-1) was established by the US EPA in 2002. To date, methods of detection require use of sensitive ion chromatographic equipment that are expensive, time consuming, and require highly trained personnel for use. Our studies are focused on the development of a highly sensitive, simple, and robust colorimetric bioassay based on the primary enzyme involved in microbial ClO4- reduction, the perchlorate reductase (Pcr). A previously published assay used reduced methyl viologen (MV, the dye is reduced with sodium hydrosulfite) as an electron donor to demonstrate Pcr activity. The assay directly correlates the amount of MV oxidized with the amount of ClO4- reduced by assuming a transfer of four electrons. To test this assumption, we compared actual concentrations of MV oxidized to ClO4- reduced in this assay. ClO4- concentrations were determined using a Dionex ICS-500 ion chromatography system, while MV concentrations were determined using a standard curve generated at 578 nm. Comparisons between the two revealed that twelve molecules of MV were oxidized for each molecule of ClO4- reduced. The oxidation of these additional eight MV molecules is explained by the interaction of the dye with chlorite (the product of the Pcr reaction) and other contaminants that could be present in the enzyme prep. This unsettling result indicated this assay would be problematic for the detection of ClO4- in soil, which has many chemicals that could react with MV. To improve upon this assay, we have tried to reduce ClO4- using less reactive dyes and reductants. The reductants ascorbic acid, NADH, and dithiothreitol drive Pcr catalyzed ClO4- reduction, however, they

  9. The Limits of Two-Year Bioassay Exposure Regimens for Identifying Chemical Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Huff, James; Jacobson, Michael F.; Davis, Devra Lee

    2008-01-01

    Background Chemical carcinogenesis bioassays in animals have long been recognized and accepted as valid predictors of potential cancer hazards to humans. Most rodent bioassays begin several weeks after birth and expose animals to chemicals or other substances, including workplace and environmental pollutants, for 2 years. New findings indicate the need to extend the timing and duration of exposures used in the rodent bioassay. Objectives In this Commentary, we propose that the sensitivity of chemical carcinogenesis bio-assays would be enhanced by exposing rodents beginning in utero and continuing for 30 months (130 weeks) or until their natural deaths at up to about 3 years. Discussion Studies of three chemicals of different structures and uses—aspartame, cadmium, and toluene—suggest that exposing experimental animals in utero and continuing exposure for 30 months or until their natural deaths increase the sensitivity of bioassays, avoid false-negative results, and strengthen the value and validity of results for regulatory agencies. Conclusions Government agencies, drug companies, and the chemical industry should conduct and compare the results of 2-year bioassays of known carcinogens or chemicals for which there is equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity with longer-term studies, with and without in utero exposure. If studies longer than 2 years and/or with in utero exposure are found to better identify potential human carcinogens, then regulatory agencies should promptly revise their testing guidelines, which were established in the 1960s and early 1970s. Changing the timing and dosing of the animal bioassay would enhance protection of workers and consumers who are exposed to potentially dangerous workplace or home contaminants, pollutants, drugs, food additives, and other chemicals throughout their lives. PMID:19057693

  10. Facile synthesis of magnetic-/pH-responsive hydrogel beads based on Fe3O4 nanoparticles and chitosan hydrogel as MTX carriers for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Renbing; Shen, Yewen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, methotrexate (MTX)-encapsulated magnetic-/pH-responsive hydrogel beads based on Fe3O4 nanoparticles and chitosan were successfully prepared through a one-step gelation process, which is a very facile, economic and environmentally friendly route. The developed hydrogel beads exhibited homogeneous porous structure and super-paramagnetic responsibility. MTX can be successfully encapsulated into magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads, and the drug encapsulation efficiency (%) and encapsulation content (%) were 93.8 and 6.28%, respectively. In addition, the drug release studies in vitro indicated that the MTX-encapsulated magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads had excellent pH-sensitivity, 90.6% MTX was released from the magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads within 48 h at pH 4.0. WST-1 assays in human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) demonstrated that the MTX-encapsulated magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads had good cytocompatibility and high anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our results revealed that the MTX-encapsulated magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads would be a competitive candidate for controlled drug release in the area of targeted cancer therapy in the near future. PMID:27464586

  11. Liquid carry-over in an injection moulded all-polymer chip system for immiscible phase magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Skotte Sørensen, Karen; Wolff, Anders; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    We present an all-polymer, single-use microfluidic chip system produced by injection moulding and bonded by ultrasonic welding. Both techniques are compatible with low-cost industrial mass-production. The chip is produced for magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction facilitated by immiscible phase filtration and features passive liquid filling and magnetic bead manipulation using an external magnet. In this work, we determine the system compatibility with various surfactants. Moreover, we quantify the volume of liquid co-transported with magnetic bead clusters from Milli-Q water or a lysis-binding buffer for nucleic acid extraction (0.1 (v/v)% Triton X-100 in 5 M guanidine hydrochloride). A linear relationship was found between the liquid carry-over and mass of magnetic beads used. Interestingly, similar average carry-overs of 1.74(8) nL/μg and 1.72(14) nL/μg were found for Milli-Q water and lysis-binding buffer, respectively.

  12. Acarine attractants: Chemoreception, bioassay, chemistry and control.

    PubMed

    Carr, Ann L; Roe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Acari are of significant economic importance in crop production and human and animal health. Acaricides are essential for the control of these pests, but at the same time, the number of available pesticides is limited, especially for applications in animal production. The Acari consist of two major groups, the mites that demonstrate a wide variety of life strategies, i.e., herbivory, predation and ectoparasitism, and ticks which have evolved obligatory hematophagy. The major sites of chemoreception in the acarines are the chelicerae, palps and tarsi on the forelegs. A unifying name, the "foretarsal sensory organ" (FSO), is proposed for the first time in this review for the sensory site on the forelegs of all acarines. The FSO has multiple sensory functions including olfaction, gustation, and heat detection. Preliminary transcriptomic data in ticks suggest that chemoreception in the FSO is achieved by a different mechanism from insects. There are a variety of laboratory and field bioassay methods that have been developed for the identification and characterization of attractants but minimal techniques for electrophysiology studies. Over the past three to four decades, significant progress has been made in the chemistry and analysis of function for acarine attractants in mites and ticks. In mites, attractants include aggregation, immature female, female sex and alarm pheromones; in ticks, the attraction-aggregation-attachment, assembly and sex pheromones; in mites and ticks host kairomones and plant allomones; and in mites, fungal allomones. There are still large gaps in our knowledge of chemical communication in the acarines compared to insects, especially relative to acarine pheromones, and more so for mites than ticks. However, the use of lure-and-kill and lure-enhanced biocontrol strategies has been investigated for tick and mite control, respectively, with significant environmental advantages which warrant further study. PMID:27265828

  13. Poultry litter toxicity comparison from various bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Kelly, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Poultry litter contains many toxic chemicals including Cu, As, Pb, Cd, Hg, Se and PCBs. Poultry litter leachate has been shown to be more toxic to marine luminescent organisms (Photobacterium phosphoreum) than other farm animal manures. A comparison of toxicity of the poultry litter leachate was undertaken using various bioassays. The EC{sub 50} (or LC{sub 50}) value for the leachate with the Microtox and Daphnia bioassays was 2.9 g/L/ Nitrobacter and Pseudomonas bioassays were not useful in determining the leachate toxicity because of the nutritional properties of the litter. Poultry litter leachate was found to be mutagenic to strains TA 97, TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102 using the Ames Test.

  14. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR UO3 PLANT BIOASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2010-07-12

    Alternative urine bioassay programs are described for application with decontamination and decommissioning activities at the Hanford UO3 Plant. The alternatives are based on quarterly or monthly urine bioassay for recycled uranium, assuming multiple acute inhalation intakes of recycled uranium occurring over a year. The inhalations are assumed to be 5µm AMAD particles of 80% absorption type F and 20% absorption type M. Screening levels, expressed as daily uranium mass excretion rates in urine, and the actions associated with these levels are provided for both quarterly and monthly sampling frequencies.

  15. Experiences with Non-traditional Bioassay Methods in a Plutonium Processing Line

    SciTech Connect

    La Bone, T.R.

    2003-10-17

    An incident in an Savannah River Site (SRS) plutonium processing line (FB-Line) in 1999 highlighted the fact insoluble forms of plutonium exist at SRS that may not be readily monitored with the routine bioassay programs traditionally used at this site. To address this issue, a study was conducted in FB-Line with 21 participants for a year ending in July 2002. The purpose of the study was to examine the use of three non-traditional monitoring methods and, based on this experience, recommend a routine bioassay program that is capable of monitoring workers potentially exposed to insoluble plutonium. These non-traditional monitoring methods are personal air sampling (PAS), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of urine samples, and routine fecal bioassay. The main conclusions and recommendations of the study are: (1) A routine TIMS urine bioassay program, which is called the enhanced bioassay program (EBP), is recommended for workers in SRS facilities that have a reasonable potential for exposure to insoluble forms of plutonium. (2) Under certain conditions the EBP could result in onerous work restrictions. A contingency plan involving the use of PAS is recommended in this case. PAS is also recommended for workers who have had historic intakes of plutonium that interfere with the detection and interpretation of future intakes of insoluble plutonium. (3) For the EBP to be successful it must be used only for those workers who have a reasonable potential for exposure to insoluble plutonium, and these workers must take all necessary precautions to avoid cross-contamination of the urine (and follow-up fecal) samples. (4) Fecal bioassay is an important tool for follow-up to abnormal events, but routine fecal bioassay is not recommended. (5) The PAS data clearly shows that workers are exposed to low levels of airborne plutonium, but the participants appear to be unlikely to exceed a committed effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem from these exposures.

  16. BIOASSAY-DIRECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS IN ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of short-term bioassay tests in conjunction with analytical measurements, constitute a powerful tool for identifying important environmental contaminants. The authors have coined the terminology 'bioassay directed chemical analysis' to best describe this marriage of analy...

  17. Semiconductor sensor embedded microfluidic chip for protein biomarker detection using a bead-based immunoassay combined with deoxyribonucleic acid strand labeling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Peng, Po-Yu

    2015-04-15

    Two major issues need to be addressed in applying semiconductor biosensors to detecting proteins in immunoassays. First, the length of the antibody on the sensor surface surpasses the Debye lengths (approximately 1 nm, in normal ionic strength solution), preventing certain specifically bound proteins from being tightly attached to the sensor surface. Therefore, these proteins do not contribute to the sensor's surface potential change. Second, these proteins carry a small charge and can be easily affected by the pH of the surrounding solution. This study proposes a magnetic bead-based immunoassay using a secondary antibody to label negatively charged DNA fragments for signal amplification. An externally imposed magnetic force attaches the analyte tightly to the sensor surface, thereby effectively solving the problem of the analyte protein's distance to the sensor surface surpassing the Debye lengths. In addition, a normal ion intensity buffer can be used without dilution for the proposed method. Experiments revealed that the sensitivity can be improved by using a longer DNA fragment for labeling and smaller magnetic beads as solid support for the antibody. By using a 90 base pair DNA label, the signal was 15 times greater than that without labeling. In addition, by using a 120 nm magnetic bead, a minimum detection limit of 12.5 ng mL(-1) apolipoprotein A1 can be measured. Furthermore, this study integrates a semiconductor sensor with a microfluidic chip. With the help of microvalves and micromixers in the chip, the length of the mixing step for each immunoassay has been reduced from 1h to 20 min, and the sample volume has been reduced from 80 μL to 10 μL. In practice, a protein biomarker in a urinary bladder cancer patient's urine was successfully measured using this technique. This study provides a convenient and effective method to measure protein using a semiconductor sensor. PMID:25818137

  18. Adoptive transfer of pTRP2-specific CTLs expanding by bead-based artificial antigen-presenting cells mediates anti-melanoma response.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoling; Jiang, Xiaobing; Liu, Ruen; Zhao, Hongyang; Liang, Zhihui

    2008-11-18

    Cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells are key effectors in the immunotherapy of malignant and viral diseases. However, the lack of efficient methods for their in vitro priming and expansion has become a bottleneck to the development of vaccines and adoptive transfer strategies. Synthetic artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) are now emerging as an attractive tool for eliciting and expanding CTL responses. This study reported a novel approach for targeting malignant melanoma with pTRP2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expanded from the C57BL/6 splenocytes by multiple stimulations with aAPCs made by coating H-2K(b)-Ig/pTRP2 dimeric complexes, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL molecules and CD83 molecules to cell-sized latex beads. The induced CTLs exhibited specific lysis against RMA-S cells pulsed with the peptide pTRP2 and H-2K(b+) melanoma cells expressing TRP2, while a murine Lewis lung carcinoma cell line 3LL could not be recognized by the CTLs. The peptide-specific activity was inhibited by anti-H-2K(b) monoclonal antibody Y3. Adoptive Transfer of CTLs specific for malignant melanoma expanding by the aAPCs can mediate effective anti-melanoma response. These results suggested the bead-based aAPCs coated with an MHC-Ig/peptide complex, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL and CD83 could provide a useful tool for the reproducible expansion of specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:18621475

  19. Micro-organism distribution sampling for bioassays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Purpose of sampling distribution is to characterize sample-to-sample variation so statistical tests may be applied, to estimate error due to sampling (confidence limits) and to evaluate observed differences between samples. Distribution could be used for bioassays taken in hospitals, breweries, food-processing plants, and pharmaceutical plants.

  20. EDC BIOASSAYS FOR RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Overall goal for this research is to develop 3 bioassays for use in EDC projects across NRMRL (estrogenic, androgenic and thyroid assays). Currently, research is focused on estrogenic assays. A literature search was conducted to identify potential assays. The Yeast Estrogen Sc...

  1. Brine Shrimp Bioassays: A Useful Technique in Biological Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Stanley A.; Maness, Ian B.

    2004-01-01

    A technique to measure the potency of leaf compounds against herbivores with the use of a bioassay is described. Bioassays are useful in classes where students have career plans like medicine in which bioassays can be used as tools for screening plants for possible medicinal potency.

  2. BIOASSAY-DIRECTED FRACTIONATION OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN AN ESTUARINE SEDIMENT USING THE NEW MUTAGENIC BIOASSAY, MUTATOX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of organic compounds was performed on an organic solvent extract of a contaminated estuarine sediment from Black Rock Harbor, Connecticut, using the new mutagenic bioassay, Mutatox-. hemical fractionation methods of the sediment extract included si...

  3. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Year-round pollen producion can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilities without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality.

  4. Perspectives in avoidance-preference bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, C.W.; Taylor, D.H.; Strickler-Shaw, S.

    1996-12-31

    Although behavioral endpoints are used in hazard assessment, establishment of water quality criteria and assessment of a contaminant`s hazard to aquatic life rely primarily on standard acute and chronic toxicity tests. Sublethal effects of pollutants should, however, be of major concern because more organisms experience sublethal rather than acutely or chronically lethal exposures of contaminants. The avoidance-preference approach to behavioral bioassays is very useful in screening pollutants for which the mechanisms of perception or response are largely unknown. The underlying philosophy of these studies is that an animal which perceives a chemical can be attracted or repulsed by it. No response is frequently assumed to indicate lack of perception. All three responses have broad ecological implications. The authors discuss the conditions required for performing avoidance-preference bioassays, as well as their sensitivities, advantages, and limitations. In this regard, a comparative approach is used in examining the results of avoidance-preference bioassays with zebrafish in two different apparatuses. Finally, they compare the results of avoidance-preference studies with other measures of the behavioral toxicity of lead to tadpoles.

  5. A versatile electrowetting-based digital microfluidic platform for quantitative homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergauwe, Nicolas; Witters, Daan; Ceyssens, Frederik; Vermeir, Steven; Verbruggen, Bert; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) lab-on-a-chip systems have already proven their potential within a broad range of bio-assays. Nevertheless, research on the analytical performance of those systems is limited, yet crucial for a further breakthrough in the diagnostic field. Therefore, this paper presents the intrinsic possibilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip as a versatile platform for homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays with high analytical performance. Both droplet dispensing and splitting cause variations in droplet size, thereby directly influencing the assay's performance. The extent to which they influence the performance is assessed by a theoretical sensitivity analysis, which allows the definition of a basic framework for the reduction of droplet size variability. Taking advantage of the optimized droplet manipulations, both homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays are implemented in the EWOD lab-on-a-chip to demonstrate the analytical capabilities and versatility of the device. A fully on-chip enzymatic assay is realized with high analytical performance. It demonstrates the promising capabilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip in food-related and medical applications, such as nutritional and blood analyses. Further, a magnetic bio-assay for IgE detection using superparamagnetic nanoparticles is presented whereby the nanoparticles are used as solid carriers during the bio-assay. Crucial elements are the precise manipulation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with respect to dispensing and separation. Although the principle of using nano-carriers is demonstrated for protein detection, it can be easily extended to a broader range of bio-related applications like DNA sensing. In heterogeneous bio-assays the chip surface is actively involved during the execution of the bio-assay. Through immobilization of specific biological compounds like DNA, proteins and cells a reactive chip surface is realized, which enhances the bio-assay performance. To demonstrate

  6. An in vitro rainbow trout cell bioassay for aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.A.; Tieber, V.L.; Giesy, J.P.; Denison, M.S.

    1997-03-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) and other chemicals that act as aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor (AhR) agonists cause a variety of toxicity effects. In sac fry of many fish species, these effects include blue-sac disease and mortality. Because HAHs occur in complex mixtures, their toxicity in the environment is difficult to predict. A bioassay useful in predicting AhR-mediated toxicity to fish was developed using the RTH-149 rainbow trout hepatoma cell line. Stable transfection of this cell line with the pGudLuc 1.1 plasmid, which contains a firefly luciferase reporter gene under the transcriptional regulation of dioxin responsive enhancers, has produced a recombinant cell line designated Remodulated Lightning Trout (RLT 2.0). The RLT 2.0 bioassay method detection limit for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is 4 pM. The responses of the RLT 2.0 bioassay to TCDD and several HAH congeners closely matched the responses observed in vivo in fish. The RLT 2.0 bioassay can provide an integrative measure of the total AhR-mediated toxic activity of complex mixtures to fish. The assay will be useful in screening environmental extracts, guiding chemical analysis, and interpreting the AhR-mediated mechanism of toxicity.

  7. In-situ bioassays using caged bivalves

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is important to make the distinction between chemical measurements to assess bioaccumulation potential versus biological measurements to assess potential bioeffects because bioaccumulation is not a bioeffect. Caging provides a unique opportunity to make synoptic measurements of each and facilitates making these measurements over space and time. Measuring bioaccumulation in resident and transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay because bivalves concentrate chemicals in their tissues. They are also easy to collect, cage, and measure. The authors have refined bivalve bioassay methods by minimizing the size range of test animals, making repetitive measurements of the same individuals, and standardizing test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Growth measurements can serve two purposes in this assessment strategy: (1) An integrated biological response endpoint that is easily quantifiable and with significance to the population, and (2) A means of calibrating bioaccumulation by assessing the relative health and physiological state of tissues that have accumulated the chemicals. In general, the authors have found the highest bioconcentration factors associated with the highest growth rates, the highest concentrations ({micro}g/g) of chemicals in juvenile mussels, and the highest chemical content ({micro}g/animal) in adult mussels. Without accounting for possible dilution of chemical concentrations by tissue growth or magnification through degrowth, contaminant concentrations can be misleading. Examples are provided for the Sudbury River in Massachusetts (Elliptio complanata), San Diego Bay (Mytilus galloprovincialis), and the Harbor Island Superfund Site in Puget Sound (Mytilus trossulus).

  8. A Multichannel Bioluminescence Determination Platform for Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a multichannel bioluminescence determination platform allowing a high sample throughput determination of weak bioluminescence with reduced standard deviations. The platform is designed to carry a multichannel conveyer, an optical filter, and a mirror cap. The platform enables us to near-simultaneously determine ligands in multiple samples without the replacement of the sample tubes. Furthermore, the optical filters beneath the multichannel conveyer are designed to easily discriminate colors during assays. This optical system provides excellent time- and labor-efficiency to users during bioassays. PMID:27424912

  9. Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and

  10. Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications.

    PubMed

    Abeyruwan, Saminda; Vempati, Uma D; Küçük-McGinty, Hande; Visser, Ubbo; Koleti, Amar; Mir, Ahsan; Sakurai, Kunie; Chung, Caty; Bittker, Joshua A; Clemons, Paul A; Brudz, Steve; Siripala, Anosha; Morales, Arturo J; Romacker, Martin; Twomey, David; Bureeva, Svetlana; Lemmon, Vance; Schürer, Stephan C

    2014-01-01

    The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and

  11. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject`s body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  12. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject's body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  13. Bioassay vs. Air Sampling: Practical Guidance and Experience at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Carlson, Eric W.; Hill, Robin L.

    2004-02-08

    The Hanford Site has implemented a policy to guide in determining whether air sampling data or special fecal bioassay data are more appropriate for determining doses of record for low-level plutonium exposures. The basis for the policy and four years of experience in comparing DAC-hours exposure with bioassay-based dosimetry is discussed.

  14. Aspirator Gun for High-Throughput Mosquito Bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe an innovative aspirator gun designed to transfer anaesthetized mosquitoes directly into glass bioassay tubes. The gun has been used for thousands of transfers with extremely low associated mortality and is the central component of a high-throughput bioassay system. The gun is constructed...

  15. COLLECTION, CHEMICAL FRACTIONATION, AND MUTAGENICITY BIOASSAY OF AMBIENT AIR PARTICULATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of industrialization and consequent increased concentration of urban particulate matter on the incidence of cancer has long been a concern. The first bioassays used to evaluate complex ambient air samples were whole-animal carcinogenesis bioassays. In these studies,...

  16. Aspirator gun for high-throughput mosquito bioassays.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Robert L; Wynn, W Wayne; Britch, Seth C; Linthicum, Kenneth J

    2012-03-01

    We describe an innovative aspirator gun designed to transfer individual anesthetized mosquitoes directly into glass bioassay tubes. The gun has been used for thousands of transfers with extremely low associated mortality and is the central component of a high-throughput bioassay system. The gun is constructed using readily obtainable materials and can be modified for a range of insects. PMID:22533090

  17. Signal Amplification of Bioassay Using Zinc Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Chad L.

    An emerging trend in the analytical detection sciences is the employment of nanomaterials for bioassay signal transduction to identify analytes critical to public health. These nanomaterials have been specifically investigated for applications which require identification of trace levels of cells, proteins, or other molecules that can have broad ranging impacts to human health in fields such as clinical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, food and drink control, and the prevention of bioterrorism. Oftentimes these nanoparticle-based signal transduction or amplification approaches offer distinct advantages over conventional methods such as increased sensitivity, rapidity, or stability. The biological application of nanoparticles however, does suffer from drawbacks that have limited more widespread adoption of these techniques. Some of these drawbacks are, high cost and toxicity, arduous synthesis methods, functionalization and bioconjugation challenges, and laboratory disposal and environmental hazard issues, all of which have impeded the progression of this technology in some way or another. This work aims at developing novel techniques that offer solutions to a number of these hurdles through the development of new nanoparticle-based signal transduction approaches and the description of a previously undescribed nanomaterial. Zinc-based nanomaterials offer the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations that are encountered when other nanomaterials are employed for bioassay signal transduction. On the other hand, the biological application of zinc nanomaterials has been difficult because in general their fluorescence is in the blue range and the reported quantum yields are usually too low for highly sensitive applications. The advantages of using zinc nanomaterials for biological applications, such as reduced toxicity, simple synthesis, low cost, and straightforward functionalization strategies contribute to the research interest in their application as

  18. Circular Bioassay Platforms for Applications in Microwave-Accelerated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Clement, Travis C.; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of four different circular bioassay platforms, which are suitable for homogeneous microwave heating, using theoretical calculations (i.e., COMSOL™ multiphysics software). Circular bioassay platforms are constructed from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for optical transparency between 400–800 nm, has multiple sample capacity (12, 16, 19 and 21 wells) and modified with silver nanoparticle films (SNFs) to be used in microwave-accelerated bioassays (MABs). In addition, a small monomode microwave cavity, which can be operated with an external microwave generator (100 W), for use with the bioassay platforms in MABs is also developed. Our design parameters for the circular bioassay platforms and monomode microwave cavity during microwave heating were: (i) temperature profiles, (ii) electric field distributions, (iii) location of the circular bioassay platforms inside the microwave cavity, and (iv) design and number of wells on the circular bioassay platforms. We have also carried out additional simulations to assess the use of circular bioassay platforms in a conventional kitchen microwave oven (e.g., 900 W). Our results show that the location of the circular bioassay platforms in the microwave cavity was predicted to have a significant effect on the homogeneous heating of these platforms. The 21-well circular bioassay platform design in our monomode microwave cavity was predicted to offer a homogeneous heating pattern, where inter-well temperature was observed to be in between 23.72–24.13°C and intra-well temperature difference was less than 0.21°C for 60 seconds of microwave heating, which was also verified experimentally. PMID:25568813

  19. Modelling larval movement data from individual bioassays.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Chris R; Worton, Bruce J; Deasy, William; Birch, A Nicholas E

    2015-05-01

    We consider modelling the movements of larvae using individual bioassays in which data are collected at a high-frequency rate of five observations per second. The aim is to characterize the behaviour of the larvae when exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. Mixtures of diffusion processes, as well as Hidden Markov models, are proposed as models of larval movement. These models account for directed and localized movements, and successfully distinguish between the behaviour of larvae exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. A simulation study illustrates the advantage of using a Hidden Markov model rather than a simpler mixture model. Practical aspects of model estimation and inference are considered on extensive data collected in a study of novel approaches for the management of cabbage root fly. PMID:25764283

  20. Cell-based bioassays in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itle, Laura J.; Zguris, Jeanna C.; Pishko, Michael V.

    2004-12-01

    The development of cell-based bioassays for high throughput drug screening or the sensing of biotoxins is contingent on the development of whole cell sensors for specific changes in intracellular conditions and the integration of those systems into sample delivery devices. Here we show the feasibility of using a 5-(and-6)-carboxy SNARF-1, acetoxymethyl ester, acetate, a fluorescent dye capable of responding to changes in intracellular pH, as a detection method for the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. We used photolithography to entrap cells with this dye within poly(ethylene) glyocol diacrylate hydrogels in microfluidic channels. After 18 hours of exposure to lipopolysaccharide, we were able to see visible changes in the fluorescent pattern. This work shows the feasibility of using whole cell based biosensors within microfluidic networks to detect cellular changes in response to exogenous agents.

  1. Superluminescent variants of marine luciferases for bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sato, Moritoshi; Tao, Hiroaki

    2011-11-15

    In this study, a rational synthesis of superluminescent variants from marine luciferases with prolonged bioluminescence has been demonstrated. A putative active site of a model marine luciferase, Gaussia princeps Luciferase (GLuc), was assigned and modified by a site-directed mutagenesis. The potent variants were found to generate up to 10 times stronger bioluminescence, emitting red shifts of up to 33 nm with natural coelenterazine than native GLuc, rendering an efficient optical signature in bioassays. The advantageous properties were demonstrated with mammalian two-hybrid assays, single-chain probes, and metastases of murine B16 melanoma in BALB/c nude mice. The unique ideas for engineering GLuc are proved to be valid even for other marine luciferases. PMID:21951281

  2. Genotoxicity of SPL (spent pot lining) as measured by Tradescantia bioassays.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Vieira, L F; Davide, L C; Gedraite, L S; Campos, J M S; Azevedo, H

    2011-10-01

    Spent Pot Liner (SPL) is a solid waste product generated in the process of aluminum production. Tradescantia micronuclei (Trad-MN) and stamen hair mutation (Trad-SHM) bioassays are very useful tests to assess genotoxicity of environmental pollutants. In the present study, we intended to investigate the genotoxicity of this waste with Tradescantia bioassays using leachates of SPL simulating the natural leachability of SPL in soil. The formation of micronuclei (MN) was found to be concentration dependent. MN frequency enhanced significantly with SPL treatment. In addition, SPL also appeared to increase the percentage of dyads and triads. Trad-SHM assay showed that SPL increases pink mutation events as SPL concentration increases. These results demonstrated that SPL is a cytogenotoxic agent that affects different genetic end-points (induction of micronuclei and point mutations) even at low concentration (2% and 3%). PMID:21802142

  3. Plasmonically amplified bioassay - Total internal reflection fluorescence vs. epifluorescence geometry.

    PubMed

    Hageneder, Simone; Bauch, Martin; Dostalek, Jakub

    2016-08-15

    This paper investigates plasmonic amplification in two commonly used optical configurations for fluorescence readout of bioassays - epifluorescence (EPF) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). The plasmonic amplification in the EPF configuration was implemented by using crossed gold diffraction grating and Kretschmann geometry of attenuated total reflection method (ATR) was employed in the TIRF configuration. Identical assay, surface architecture for analyte capture, and optics for the excitation, collection and detection of emitted fluorescence light intensity were used in both TIRF and EPF configurations. Simulations predict that the crossed gold diffraction grating (EPF) can amplify the fluorescence signal by a factor of 10(2) by the combination of surface plasmon-enhanced excitation and directional surface plasmon-coupled emission in the red part of spectrum. This factor is about order of magnitude higher than that predicted for the Kretschmann geometry (TIRF) which only took advantage of the surface plasmon-enhanced excitation. When applied for the readout of sandwich interleukin 6 (IL-6) immunoassay, the plasmonically amplified EPF geometry designed for Alexa Fluor 647 labels offered 4-times higher fluorescence signal intensity compared to TIRF. Interestingly, both geometries allowed reaching the same detection limit of 0.4pM despite of the difference in the fluorescence signal enhancement. This is attributed to inherently lower background of fluorescence signal for TIRF geometry compared to that for EPF which compensates for the weaker fluorescence signal enhancement. The analysis of the inflammation biomarker IL-6 in serum at medically relevant concentrations and the utilization of plasmonic amplification for the fluorescence measurement of kinetics of surface affinity reactions are demonstrated for both EPF and TIRF readout. PMID:27260457

  4. PubChem BioAssay: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Suzek, Tugba; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jiyao; He, Siqian; Cheng, Tiejun; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Gindulyte, Asta; Bryant, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    PubChem's BioAssay database (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) is a public repository for archiving biological tests of small molecules generated through high-throughput screening experiments, medicinal chemistry studies, chemical biology research and drug discovery programs. In addition, the BioAssay database contains data from high-throughput RNA interference screening aimed at identifying critical genes responsible for a biological process or disease condition. The mission of PubChem is to serve the community by providing free and easy access to all deposited data. To this end, PubChem BioAssay is integrated into the National Center for Biotechnology Information retrieval system, making them searchable by Entrez queries and cross-linked to other biomedical information archived at National Center for Biotechnology Information. Moreover, PubChem BioAssay provides web-based and programmatic tools allowing users to search, access and analyze bioassay test results and metadata. In this work, we provide an update for the PubChem BioAssay resource, such as information content growth, new developments supporting data integration and search, and the recently deployed PubChem Upload to streamline chemical structure and bioassay submissions. PMID:24198245

  5. PubChem BioAssay: 2014 update

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanli; Suzek, Tugba; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jiyao; He, Siqian; Cheng, Tiejun; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Gindulyte, Asta; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    PubChem’s BioAssay database (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) is a public repository for archiving biological tests of small molecules generated through high-throughput screening experiments, medicinal chemistry studies, chemical biology research and drug discovery programs. In addition, the BioAssay database contains data from high-throughput RNA interference screening aimed at identifying critical genes responsible for a biological process or disease condition. The mission of PubChem is to serve the community by providing free and easy access to all deposited data. To this end, PubChem BioAssay is integrated into the National Center for Biotechnology Information retrieval system, making them searchable by Entrez queries and cross-linked to other biomedical information archived at National Center for Biotechnology Information. Moreover, PubChem BioAssay provides web-based and programmatic tools allowing users to search, access and analyze bioassay test results and metadata. In this work, we provide an update for the PubChem BioAssay resource, such as information content growth, new developments supporting data integration and search, and the recently deployed PubChem Upload to streamline chemical structure and bioassay submissions. PMID:24198245

  6. Collection and control of tritium bioassay samples at Pantex

    SciTech Connect

    Fairrow, N.L.; Ivie, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Pantex is the final assembly/disassembly point for US nuclear weapons. The Pantex internal dosimetry section monitors radiation workers once a month for tritium exposure. In order to manage collection and control of the bioassay specimens efficiently, a bar code system for collection of samples was developed and implemented to speed up the process and decrease the number of errors probable when transferring data. In the past, all the bioassay data from samples were entered manually into a computer database. Transferring the bioassay data from the liquid scintillation counter to each individual's dosimetry record required as much as two weeks of concentrated effort.

  7. Collection and control of tritium bioassay samples at Pantex

    SciTech Connect

    Fairrow, N.L.; Ivie, W.E.

    1992-12-31

    Pantex is the final assembly/disassembly point for US nuclear weapons. The Pantex internal dosimetry section monitors radiation workers once a month for tritium exposure. In order to manage collection and control of the bioassay specimens efficiently, a bar code system for collection of samples was developed and implemented to speed up the process and decrease the number of errors probable when transferring data. In the past, all the bioassay data from samples were entered manually into a computer database. Transferring the bioassay data from the liquid scintillation counter to each individual`s dosimetry record required as much as two weeks of concentrated effort.

  8. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  9. Evaluation of a feline-specific multiplex, bead-based assay for detection of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and other immunologically active proteins in serum and plasma samples from cats.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Rachel E; Saunders, Rebecca S; Thompson, Beverly J; Rohde Newgent, Allison S; Amorim, Juliana; Melillo, Gabrielle N; DeClue, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate a feline-specific multiplex, bead-based assay system for detection of recombinant and native proteins in serum samples and in EDTA-treated and heparinized plasma samples. SAMPLE Serum samples and EDTA-treated and heparinized plasma samples from 30 sick cats and 9 healthy client-owned cats and heparinized whole blood samples from 5 healthy purpose-bred cats. PROCEDURES Ability of the assay system to detect 19 recombinant and native immunologically active proteins in plasma and serum samples from healthy and purpose-bred cats was evaluated via spike-and-recovery tests, assessments of inter- and intra-assay variation, linearity results, and leukocyte stimulation. Effects of various concentrations of heparin and serum matrix solution on percentages of analytes recovered were also evaluated. Analyte concentrations in samples from healthy and sick cats were measured and compared between groups. RESULTS Percentages of analytes recovered were unsatisfactory for most assays. Serum and heparinized plasma samples yielded better recovery results than did EDTA-treated plasma samples. Use of serum matrix solution did not improve results. Use of heparin concentrations greater than the recommended range affected the results. Linearity of results was difficult to assess because of the poor recovery. For the analytes that were recovered sufficiently for assessment, linearity appeared to be reasonable despite the limited detection. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Poor percentages of analytes recovered and adverse effects of sample protein matrix limited the usefulness of the multiplex, bead-based assay system for measurement of immunologically active proteins in solutions with high protein content; however, recovery results were fairly linear, potentially allowing evaluation of feline plasma or serum samples with high analyte concentrations. PMID:27111017

  10. Long-wavelength-emitting nanocrystals for bioassay applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppert, Valerie J.; Harvey, Ashley S.; McCool, Geoff D.; Quinlan, Forest T.; Feng, Jun; Shan, Guomin; Stroeve, Pieter; Risbud, Subhash H.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2002-11-01

    New fluorophores that can be excited using visible or near-infrared radiation are of considerable interest for application in environmental and complex bioassays, where background fluorescence is exacerbated by ultra-violet or blue excitation. Useful labels for biomolecules include infrared emitting semiconductor nanoparticles that can be blue-shifted into the near-infrared and visible through quantum confinement effects, oxides of iron, and rare earth oxides. In this work, the synthesis of 6 nm average diameter lead selenide nanocrystals (well below the Bohr exciton diameter of 92 nm) through a reverse micelle technique; and the synthesis of iron and europium oxides with particles less than 5 nm in diameter by pulsed laser ablation is reported. The europium oxide nanoparticles' emission showed a large Stokes shift (144 nm or 216 nm, depending on excitation wavelength); a narrow, symmetric emission line at 610 nm (FWHM of 8 nm); and long lifetime (300 μs). The Eu2O3 nanoparticles, which were coated with silica for functionalization, displayed a greatly enhanced sensitivity over a conventional ELISA (0.025 ng ml-1 vs. 0.1 ng ml-1) when run in an atrazine immunoassay.

  11. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays.

    SciTech Connect

    Anstey, Mitchell; Fruetel, Julia A.; Foster, Michael E.; Hayden, Carl C.; Buckley, Heather L.; Arnold, John

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves %22Click%22 chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  12. Evaporation-Driven Bioassays in Suspended Droplets.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Perez, Ruth; Fan, Z Hugh; Garcia-Cordero, Jose L

    2016-07-19

    The microtiter plate has been an essential tool for diagnostics, high-throughput screening, and biological assays. We present an alternative platform to perform bioassays in a microplate format that exploits evaporation to drive assay reactions. Our method consists of droplets suspended on plastic pillars; reactions occur in these droplets instead of the wells. The pillars are fabricated by milling, and the rough surface created by this fabrication method pins the droplet to a constant contact line during the assay and also acts as a hydrophobic surface. Upon evaporation, natural convection arising from Marangoni currents mixes solutions in the droplet, which speeds up assay reactions, decreases assay times, and increases limits of detection. As a proof of concept we implemented two colorimetric assays to detect glucose and proteins in only 1.5 μL, without any external devices for mixing and with a digital microscope as a readout mechanism. Our platform is an ideal alternative to the microtiter plate, works with different volumes, is compatible with commercially available reagent dispensers and plate-readers, and could have broad applications in diagnostics and high-throughput screening. PMID:27331825

  13. Annotating Human P-Glycoprotein Bioassay Data

    PubMed Central

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Pinto, Marta; Vasanthanathan, Poongavanam; Williams, Antony J; Balderud, Linda Zander; Engkvist, Ola; Chichester, Christine; Hersey, Anne; Overington, John P; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Huge amounts of small compound bioactivity data have been entering the public domain as a consequence of open innovation initiatives. It is now the time to carefully analyse existing bioassay data and give it a systematic structure. Our study aims to annotate prominent in vitro assays used for the determination of bioactivities of human P-glycoprotein inhibitors and substrates as they are represented in the ChEMBL and TP-search open source databases. Furthermore, the ability of data, determined in different assays, to be combined with each other is explored. As a result of this study, it is suggested that for inhibitors of human P-glycoprotein it is possible to combine data coming from the same assay type, if the cell lines used are also identical and the fluorescent or radiolabeled substrate have overlapping binding sites. In addition, it demonstrates that there is a need for larger chemical diverse datasets that have been measured in a panel of different assays. This would certainly alleviate the search for other inter-correlations between bioactivity data yielded by different assay setups. PMID:23293680

  14. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. X. Geroge Xu

    2011-01-28

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  15. A CONTROLLED BIOASSAY SYSTEM FOR MEASURING TOXICITY OF HEAVY METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological availability of metal micronutrients and metal toxicity are believed to be dependent on metal oxidation state, complexation, and solubility as well as the physicochemical characteristics of the aqueous phase. Basic design criteria for fish bioassays which are capable o...

  16. Bioassay-Directed Fractionation of Diesel and Biodiesel Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofuels are being developed as alternatives to petroleum-derived products, but published research is contradictory regarding the mutagenic activity of such emissions relative to those from petroleum diesel. We performed bioassay-directed fractionation and analyzed the polycyclic...

  17. A wind tunnel bioassay system for screening mosquito repellents.

    PubMed

    Sharpington, P J; Healy, T P; Copland, M J

    2000-09-01

    A wind tunnel bioassay system to screen mosquito repellents is described. A wind tunnel is utilized to exploit the upwind flight response of host-seeking mosquitoes. Mosquitoes within the wind tunnel are activated with human breath, fly upwind, and land on heated chick skins. This behavioral sequence results in a consistently high percentage of the test population approaching repellent or control stimuli. The bioassay system is calibrated with diethyl methylbenzamide against Aedes aegypti and demonstrates a reproducible dose-response relationship. The persistence of diethyl methyl benzamide after a 1-h period is also recorded. The design of the bioassay system permits simultaneous, independent testing of 3 candidate repellents. The wind tunnel bioassay system is compared to other techniques for evaluating mosquito repellents. PMID:11081652

  18. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Elliot R.; McGrath, Kristine C. Y.; Heather, Alison K.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping. PMID:23389345

  19. A novel bronchial ring bioassay for the evaluation of small airway smooth muscle function in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, John Q; Yang, Dennis; Folz, Rodney J

    2006-08-01

    Advances in our understanding of murine airway physiology have been hindered by the lack of suitable, ex vivo, small airway bioassay systems. In this study, we introduce a novel small murine airway bioassay system that permits the physiological and pharmacological study of intrapulmonary bronchial smooth muscle via a bronchial ring (BR) preparation utilizing BR segments as small as 200 microm in diameter. Using this ex vivo BR bioassay, we characterized small airway smooth muscle contraction and relaxation in the presence and absence of bronchial epithelium. In control BRs, the application of mechanical stretch is followed by spontaneous bronchial smooth muscle relaxation. BRs pretreated with methacholine (MCh) partially attenuate this stretch-induced relaxation by as much as 42% compared with control. MCh elicited a dose-dependent bronchial constriction with a maximal tension (E(max)) of 8.7 +/- 0.2 mN at an EC(50) of 0.33 +/- 0.02 microM. In the presence of nifedipine, ryanodine, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, and SKF-96365, E(max) to MCh was significantly reduced. In epithelium-denuded BRs, MCh-induced contraction was significantly enhanced to 11.4 +/- 1.0 mN with an EC(50) of 0.16 +/- 0.04 microM (P < 0.01). Substance P relaxed MCh-precontracted BR by 62.1%; however, this bronchial relaxation effect was completely lost in epithelium-denuded BRs. Papaverine virtually abolished MCh-induced constriction in both epithelium-intact and epithelium-denuded bronchial smooth muscle. In conclusion, this study introduces a novel murine small airway BR bioassay that allows for the physiological study of smooth muscle airway contractile responses that may aid in our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma. PMID:16648239

  20. Comparison of laboratory batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays.

    PubMed

    Clément, Bernard J P; Delhaye, Hélène L; Triffault-Bouchet, Gaëlle G

    2014-10-01

    Since 1997, we have been developing a protocol for ecotoxicological bioassays in 2-L laboratory microcosms and have applied it to the study of various pollutants and ecotoxicological risk assessment scenarios in the area of urban facilities and transport infrastructures. The effects on five different organisms (micro-algae, duckweeds, daphnids, amphipods, chironomids) are assessed using biological responses such as growth, emergence (chironomids), reproduction (daphnids) and survival, with a duration of exposure of 3 weeks. This bioassay has mainly been used as a batch bioassay, i.e., the water was not renewed during the test. A flow-through microcosm bioassay has been developed recently, with the assumption that conditions for the biota should be improved, variability reduced, and the range of exposure patterns enlarged (e.g., the possibility of maintaining constant exposure in the water column). This paper compares the results obtained in batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays, using cadmium as a model toxicant. As expected, the stabilization of physico-chemical parameters, increased organism fitness and reduced variability were observed in the flow-through microcosm bioassay. PMID:25086825

  1. Primary Bioassay of Human Myeloma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, Anne; Salmon, Sydney E.

    1977-01-01

    The ability to clone primary tumors in soft agar has proven useful in the study of the kinetics and biological properties of tumor stem cells. We report the development of an in vitro assay which permits formation of colonies of human monoclonal plasma cells in soft agar. Colony growth has been observed from bone marrow aspirates from 75% of the 70 patients with multiple myeloma or related monoclonal disorders studied. Growth was induced with either 0.02 ml of human type O erythrocytes or 0.25 ml of medium conditioned by the adherent spleen cells of mineral oil-primed BALB/c mice. 5-500 colonies appeared after 2-3 wk in culture yielding a plating efficiency of 0.001-0.1%. The number of myeloma colonies was proportional to the number of cells plated between concentrations of 105-106 and back-extrapolated through zero, suggesting that colonies were clones derived from single myeloma stem cells. Morphological, histochemical, and functional criteria showed the colonies to consist of immature plasmablasts and mature plasma cells. 60-80% of cells picked from colonies contained intracytoplasmic monoclonal immunoglobulin. Colony growth was most easily achieved from the bone marrow cells of untreated patients or those in relapse. Only 50% of bone marrow samples from patients in remission were successfully cultured. Tritiated thymidine suicide studies provided evidence that for most myeloma patients, a very high proportion of myeloma colony-forming cells was actively in transit through the cell cycle. Velocity sedimentation at 1 g showed myeloma stem cells sedimented in a broad band with a peak at 13 mm/h. Antibody to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not reduce the number or size of the colonies. Increased numbers of myeloma colonies were seen when the marrow was depleted of colony-stimulating factor elaborating adherent cells before plating. This bioassay should prove useful in studying the in vitro biological behavior of certain bone marrow-derived (B

  2. A novel laboratory screening bioassay for crop seedling allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Crops that control weeds by root exudation of allelochemicals are receiving increased attention, and there are efforts to breed allelopathic cultivars in several crops. The genetic improvement of allelopathic traits is based upon parental germ plasm with high allelopathic activity. Identification of allelopathic germplasm is done in laboratory screening bioassays, but experimental protocols are limited. We developed a fast and reliable laboratory screening bioassay for grain crops that includes dose-response considerations as an integral part of the experimental design. The bioassay was conducted in hydroponic culture, and a range of experiments with 2-(3H)-benzoxazolinone (BOA), an allelochemical of several grain crops, was carried out to define the basic protocol. Because of its sensitivity to BOA, Sinapis alba L. was selected as the receiver species. BOA affected growth (fresh weight and length of shoot and root), enzyme activities (ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase, peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase), and chlorophyll fluorescence, whereby root length was the most reliable response parameter. BOA sensitivity was dependent on nutrients for all parameters measured, and, thus, no nutrients were added. A set of experiments with Secale cereale L. and Triticum aestivum L. as donor species was carried out to optimize the protocol. Light and pH were eliminated as primary causes for the observed inhibition. The proposed bioassay has several methodological advantages over current bioassays. PMID:15074665

  3. Soil bioassays and the {sup 129}I problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    Iodine-129 is a very long-lived radionuclide associated with spent nuclear fuel. Because {sup 129}I has a 10{sup 7}-year half-life, is very mobile in the environment and is a biologically essential element, it is the most limiting radionuclide affecting disposal of spent fuel. Traditionally, the potential impacts of {sup 129}I have been estimated for human receptors, with the implicit assumption that all other organisms are less at risk. Risk is the operative word, the objective for protection of humans is to protect individuals, whereas the objective for other biota is usually to protect populations. Here, {sup 129}I poses an interesting problem: the half-life is so long it is barely radioactive. Thus, the chemical toxicity may be more limiting than the radiological impact. A series of soil bioassays were employed, including a life-cycle plant (Brassica rapa) bioassay, a modified earthworm survival bioassay, a microarthropod colonization/survival bioassay, and a series of more common soil and aquatic bioassays. Chemical toxicity was indicated at soil concentrations as low as 5 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. At these levels, radiological impact on non-human biota would not be expected, and therefore the chemical toxicity effects are more critical. However, human food-chain model estimates show these levels, as pure {sup 129}I, would be unacceptable for human radiological exposure, so that for {sup 129}I, protection of the human environment should also be protective of non-human biota.

  4. [Investigation on pattern and methods of quality control for Chinese materia medica based on dao-di herbs and bioassay - bioassay for Coptis chinensis].

    PubMed

    Yan, Dan; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2011-05-01

    Establishment of bioassay methods is the technical issues to be faced with in the bioassay of Chinese materia medica. Taking the bioassay of Coptis chinensis Franch. as an example, the establishment process and application of the bioassay methods (including bio-potency and bio-activity fingerprint) were explained from the aspects of methodology, principle of selection, experimental design, method confirmation and data analysis. The common technologies were extracted and formed with the above aspects, so as to provide technical support for constructing pattern and method of the quality control for Chinese materia medica based on the dao-di herbs and bioassay. PMID:21800546

  5. Environmental effects of dredging. A chronic sublethal sediment bioassay with the marine polychaete nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, T.M.; Moore, D.W.; Bridges, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    This note provides a general overview of a new 28-day chronic sublethal sediment bioassay designed for the regulatory evaluation of dredged material. The bioassay uses survival and growth rate endpoints with the polychaete Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. The primary technical reference for this new bioassay is Dillon, Moore, and Reish (in press), upon which this overview is based. Sediment bioassays are used to assess the aggregate toxicity of sediment associated anthropogenic chemicals. Historically, these bioassays have measured survival of highly sensitive species following acute exposures (10 days). A new generation of sediment bioassays is being developed in which the subtle, sublethal response of test species is measured following chronic sediment exposures (Dillon 1993).

  6. Internal dosimetry performing dose assessments via bioassay measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.M.

    1993-05-11

    The Internal Dosimetry Department at the Y-12 Plant maintains a state-of-the-art bioassay program managed under the guidance and regulations of the Department of Energy. The two major bioassay techniques currently used at Y-12 are the in vitro (urinalysis) and in vivo (lung counting) programs. Fecal analysis (as part of the in vitro program) is another alternative; however, since both urine and fecal analysis provide essentially the same capabilities for detecting exposures to uranium, the urinalysis is the main choice primarily for aesthetic reasons. The bioassay frequency is based on meeting NCRP 87 objectives which are to monitor the accumulation of radioactive material in exposed individuals, and to ensure that significant depositions are detected.

  7. Carbon-14 Bioassay for Decommissioning of Hanford Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Watson, David J.

    2012-05-01

    The old production reactors at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site used large graphite piles as the moderator. As part of long-term decommissioning plans, the potential need for 14C radiobioassay of workers was identified. Technical issues associated with 14C bioassay and worker monitoring were investigated, including anticipated graphite characterization, potential intake scenarios, and the bioassay capabilities that may be required to support the decommissioning of the graphite piles. A combination of urine and feces sampling would likely be required for the absorption type S 14C anticipated to be encountered. However the concentrations in the graphite piles appear to be sufficiently low that dosimetrically significant intakes of 14C are not credible, thus rendering moot the need for such bioassay.

  8. Method comparison for 241Am emergency urine bioassay.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Sadi, Baki; Benkhedda, Karima; St-Amant, Nadereh; Moodie, Gerry; Ko, Raymond; Dinardo, Anthony; Kramer, Gary

    2010-10-01

    241Am is one of the high-risk radionuclides that might be used in a terrorist attack. 241Am in urine bioassay can identify the contaminated individuals who need immediate medical intervention and decontamination. This paper compares three methods for the measurement of 241Am in urine, namely liquid scintillation counting (LSC), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gamma spectrometry (GS), at two levels, 20 and 2 Bq l(-1). All three methods satisfied the ANSI N13.30 radio-bioassay criteria for accuracy and repeatability. ICP-MS offered the best sensitivity and fastest sample turnaround; however, the ICP-MS system used in this work may not be available in many bioassay laboratories. LSC and GS are more commonly available instruments. GS requires minimal or no sample preparation, which makes it a good candidate method. Moreover, the sample throughput can be significantly improved if the GS and LSC methods are automated. PMID:20573683

  9. The effect of pesticide residue on caged mosquito bioassays.

    PubMed

    Barber, J A S; Greer, Mike; Coughlin, Jamie

    2006-09-01

    Wind tunnel experiments showed that secondary pickup of insecticide residue by mosquitoes in cage bioassays had a significant effect on mortality. Cage bioassays using adult Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) investigated the effect of exposure time to a contaminated surface. Cages were dosed in a wind tunnel using the LC50 for naled (0.124 mg a.i./ml) and an LC25 (0.0772 mg a.i./ml) for naled. Half of the bioassay mosquitoes were moved directly into clean cages with the other half remaining in the sprayed, hence contaminated, cage. Treatment mortality was assessed at 8, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, and 1,440 min postapplication. Cage contamination had a significant effect on mosquito mortality for both the LC25 and LC50 between 15 and 30 min postapplication. PMID:17067048

  10. Bioassay-directed chemical analysis in environmental research

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetzle, D.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of short-term bioassay tests in conjunction with analytical measurements, constitute a powerful tool for identifying important environmental contaminants. The authors have coined the terminology bioassay directed chemical analysis to best describe this marriage of analytical chemistry and biology. The objective of this methodology is to identify key compounds in various types of air-pollutant samples. Once that task is completed, studies on metabolism, sources, environmental exposure and atmospheric chemistry can be undertaken. The principles and methodologies for bioassay directed chemical analysis are presented and illustrated in this paper. Most of this work has been directed toward the characterization of ambient air and diesel particulates, which are used as examples in this report to illustrate the analytical logic used for identifying the bio-active components of complex mixtures.

  11. Do we really need in-situ bioassays?

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    In-situ bioassays are needed to validate the results from laboratory testing and to understand biological interactions. Standard laboratory protocols provide reproducible test results, and the precision of those tests can be mathematically defined. Significant correlations between toxic substances and levels of response (bioaccumulation and bioeffects) have also been demonstrated with natural field populations and suggest that the laboratory results can accurately predict field responses. An equal number of studies have shown a lack of correlation between laboratory bioassay results and responses of natural field populations. The best way to validate laboratory results is with manipulative field testing; i.e., in-situ bioassays with caged organisms. Bioaccumulation in transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay. The authors have refined those methods to include synoptic measurements of bioaccumulation and growth. Growth provides an easily-measured bioeffects endpoint and a means of calibrating bioaccumulation. Emphasis has been on minimizing the size range of test animals, repetitive measurements of individuals and standardization of test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Others have developed methods for in-situ bioassays using eggs, larvae, unicellular organisms, crustaceans, benthic invertebrates, bivalves, and fish. In the final analysis, the in-situ approach could be considered as an exposure system where any clinical measurements are possible. The most powerful approach would be to use the same species in laboratory and field experiments with the same endpoints.

  12. A statistical treatment of bioassay pour fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David

    A bioassay is a method for estimating the number of bacterial spores on a spacecraft surface for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with planetary protection (PP) requirements (Ref. 1). The details of the process may be seen in the appropriate PP document (e.g., for NASA, Ref. 2). In general, the surface is mechanically sampled with a damp sterile swab or wipe. The completion of the process is colony formation in a growth medium in a plate (Petri dish); the colonies are counted. Consider a set of samples from randomly selected, known areas of one spacecraft surface, for simplicity. One may calculate the mean and standard deviation of the bioburden density, which is the ratio of counts to area sampled. The standard deviation represents an estimate of the variation from place to place of the true bioburden density commingled with the precision of the individual sample counts. The accuracy of individual sample results depends on the equipment used, the collection method, and the culturing method. One aspect that greatly influences the result is the pour fraction, which is the quantity of fluid added to the plates divided by the total fluid used in extracting spores from the sampling equipment. In an analysis of a single sample’s counts due to the pour fraction, one seeks to answer the question: What is the probability that if a certain number of spores are counted with a known pour fraction, that there are an additional number of spores in the part of the rinse not poured. This is given for specific values by the binomial distribution density, where detection (of culturable spores) is success and the probability of success is the pour fraction. A special summation over the binomial distribution, equivalent to adding for all possible values of the true total number of spores, is performed. This distribution when normalized will almost yield the desired quantity. It is the probability that the additional number of spores does not exceed a certain value. Of course

  13. A statistical treatment of bioassay pour fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David

    A bioassay is a method for estimating the number of bacterial spores on a spacecraft surface for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with planetary protection (PP) requirements (Ref. 1). The details of the process may be seen in the appropriate PP document (e.g., for NASA, Ref. 2). In general, the surface is mechanically sampled with a damp sterile swab or wipe. The completion of the process is colony formation in a growth medium in a plate (Petri dish); the colonies are counted. Consider a set of samples from randomly selected, known areas of one spacecraft surface, for simplicity. One may calculate the mean and standard deviation of the bioburden density, which is the ratio of counts to area sampled. The standard deviation represents an estimate of the variation from place to place of the true bioburden density commingled with the precision of the individual sample counts. The accuracy of individual sample results depends on the equipment used, the collection method, and the culturing method. One aspect that greatly influences the result is the pour fraction, which is the quantity of fluid added to the plates divided by the total fluid used in extracting spores from the sampling equipment. In an analysis of a single sample’s counts due to the pour fraction, one seeks to answer the question: What is the probability that if a certain number of spores are counted with a known pour fraction, that there are an additional number of spores in the part of the rinse not poured. This is given for specific values by the binomial distribution density, where detection (of culturable spores) is success and the probability of success is the pour fraction. A special summation over the binomial distribution, equivalent to adding for all possible values of the true total number of spores, is performed. This distribution when normalized will almost yield the desired quantity. It is the probability that the additional number of spores does not exceed a certain value. Of course

  14. US Army Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry: The RBD software package

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K. F.; Ward, R. C.; Maddox, L. B.

    1993-01-01

    The RBD (Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry) software package was developed for the U. S. Army Material Command, Arlington, Virginia, to demonstrate compliance with the radiation protection guidance 10 CFR Part 20 (ref. 1). Designed to be run interactively on an IBM-compatible personal computer, RBD consists of a data base module to manage bioassay data and a computational module that incorporates algorithms for estimating radionuclide intake from either acute or chronic exposures based on measurement of the worker's rate of excretion of the radionuclide or the retained activity in the body. In estimating the intake,RBD uses a separate file for each radionuclide containing parametric representations of the retention and excretion functions. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent. For a given nuclide, if measurements exist for more than one type of assay, an auxiliary module, REPORT, estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. Bioassay data and computed results (estimates of intake and committed dose equivalent) are stored in separate data bases, and the bioassay measurements used to compute a given result can be identified. The REPORT module creates a file containing committed effective dose equivalent for each individual that can be combined with the individual's external exposure.

  15. Book Review: Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technical book "Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition" (2007. Jacqueline L. Robertson, Robert M. Russell, Haiganoush K, Preisler and N. E. Nevin, Eds. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 224 pp.) was reviewed for the scientific readership of the peer-reviewed publication Journal of Economic Entomology. ...

  16. US Army Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry: The RBD software package

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ward, R.C.; Maddox, L.B.

    1993-01-01

    The RBD (Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry) software package was developed for the U. S. Army Material Command, Arlington, Virginia, to demonstrate compliance with the radiation protection guidance 10 CFR Part 20 (ref. 1). Designed to be run interactively on an IBM-compatible personal computer, RBD consists of a data base module to manage bioassay data and a computational module that incorporates algorithms for estimating radionuclide intake from either acute or chronic exposures based on measurement of the worker`s rate of excretion of the radionuclide or the retained activity in the body. In estimating the intake,RBD uses a separate file for each radionuclide containing parametric representations of the retention and excretion functions. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent. For a given nuclide, if measurements exist for more than one type of assay, an auxiliary module, REPORT, estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. Bioassay data and computed results (estimates of intake and committed dose equivalent) are stored in separate data bases, and the bioassay measurements used to compute a given result can be identified. The REPORT module creates a file containing committed effective dose equivalent for each individual that can be combined with the individual`s external exposure.

  17. BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE BIOASSAYS WITH TOXIC SEDIMENT AND PORE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. he assays studied were: (a) Microtox, a 15-min assay of Photobacterium...

  18. Shape-encoded silica microparticles for multiplexed bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lily Nari; Kim, Mira; Jung, Keumsim; Bae, Hyung Jong; Jang, Jisung; Jung, Yushin; Kim, Jiyun; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2015-08-01

    Shape-encoded silica microparticles for use in multiplexed bioassays were fabricated by using optofluidic maskless lithography (OFML) and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) polymerization. These encoded silica microparticles exhibit excellent bioconjugation properties and negligible non-specific analyte adsorption. Encoded silica microparticles could be useful in a wide variety of applications, including DNA- and protein-based diagnostics. PMID:26125980

  19. HIGHLY SENSITIVE BIOASSAYS FOR EVALUATING AIRBORNE MUTAGENS INDOORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard mutagenicity bioassays that are readily applied to the valuation of outdoor air samples collected by high volume samplers are not efficiently sensitive to measure the mutagenicity of low volume air samples collected indoors. wo microsuspension mutation assays using v...

  20. Filtration effects due to bioassay cage design and screen type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of bioassay cages in the efficacy assessment of specific compounds, application techniques and technologies is a common practice. There are a number of cage designs being used that range across a variety of cage shapes and sizes and mesh types. The objective of this work was to examine a r...

  1. STRESS ETHYLENE: A BIOASSAY FOR RHIZOSPHERE-APPLIED PHYTOTOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bioassay for rhizosphere-applied phytotoxicants was developed and evaluated with a broad range of chemicals. Test substances were applied to the rhizosphere of whole, intact bush bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Bush Blue Lake 290) grown in a solid support medium and the ...

  2. Assessment of acrylamide toxicity using a battery of standardised bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zovko, Mira; Vidaković-Cifrek, Željka; Cvetković, Želimira; Bošnir, Jasna; Šikić, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide is a monomer widely used as an intermediate in the production of organic chemicals, e.g. polyacrylamides (PAMs). Since PAMs are low cost chemicals with applications in various industries and waste- and drinking water treatment, a certain amount of non-polymerised acrylamide is expected to end up in waterways. PAMs are non-toxic but acrylamide induces neurotoxic effects in humans and genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In order to evaluate the effect of acrylamide on freshwater organisms, bioassays were conducted on four species: algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, duckweed Lemna minor and water flea Daphnia magna according to ISO (International Organization for Standardisation) standardised methods. This approach ensures the evaluation of acrylamide toxicity on organisms with different levels of organisation and the comparability of results, and it examines the value of using a battery of low-cost standardised bioassays in the monitoring of pollution and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. These results showed that EC50 values were lower for Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata than for Daphnia magna and Lemna minor, which suggests an increased sensitivity of algae to acrylamide. According to the toxic unit approach, the values estimated by the Lemna minor and Daphnia magna bioassays, classify acrylamide as slightly toxic (TU=0-1; Class 1). The results obtained from algal bioassays (Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) revealed the toxic effect of acrylamide (TU=1-10; Class 2) on these organisms. PMID:26751864

  3. Artificial diets for life tables bioassays of TPB in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two artificial diets for mass rearing and bioassay of the tarnished plant bug, (TPB), Lygus lineolaris Palisot de Beauvois, (Hemiptera: Miridae) were modified and developed, respectively. The first diet is a modification of a semisolid artificial diet (NI diet), which permits large scale rearing of ...

  4. INFLUENCE OF SEDIMENT EXTRACT FRACTIONATION METHODS ON BIOASSAY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four bioassays [Microtax(tm), Mutatox(tm), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and metabolic cooperation] were used to analyze marine sediment extracts fractionated by two different methods: silica gel column chromatography and acid-base fractionation. esults indicated that a sedime...

  5. Statistical considerations in the analysis of data from replicated bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple-dose bioassay is generally the preferred method for characterizing virulence of insect pathogens. Linear regression of probit mortality on log dose enables estimation of LD50/LC50 and slope, the latter having substantial effect on LD90/95s (doses of considerable interest in pest management)...

  6. Correction of spray concentration and bioassay cage penetration data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trials were conducted to demonstrate the need for correcting sampled spray concentration data for sampler collection efficiencies and estimated spray exposure levels in mosquito bioassays for cage interference effects. A large spray block was targeted with aerial spray treatments of etofenpro...

  7. 1. VIEW IN ROOM 125, BIOASSAY LABORATORY, SHOWN IS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW IN ROOM 125, BIOASSAY LABORATORY, SHOWN IS THE FIRST STEP IN A SIX-STEP PROCESS TO ANALYZE URINE SAMPLES FOR PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM CONTAMINATION. IN THIS STEP, NITRIC ACID IS ADDED TO SAMPLE, AND THE SAMPLE IS BOILED DOWN TO A WHITE POWDER. - Rocky Flats Plant, Health Physics Laboratory, On Central Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  8. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  9. Sensitive bioassay for detection of biologically active ricin in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of ricin as an agent of biological warfare highlights the need to develop fast and effective methods to detect biologically active ricin. The current “gold standard” for ricin detection is an in vivo mouse bioassay; however, this method is not practical to test on a large number of...

  10. Sensitive bioassay for detection of PPARα potentially hazardous ligands with gold nanoparticle probe.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Wan, Yan-Jian; Wang, Xianliang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Chun-Xiang; Xu, Shun-qing

    2011-09-15

    There are so many kinds of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) ligands with hazardous effect for human health in the environment, such as certain herbicides, plasticizers and drugs. Among these agonists, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) are mostly investigated due to their persistence and accumulation in environment and their potential toxicity via PPARα. This investigation aims at developing a bioassay method to detect PPARα ligands based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. PPARα, which formed heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα), were activated by PPARα ligands to form ligands-PPARα-RXRα complexes. Then the complexes were transferred into a microplate and captured via monoclonal anti-PPARα antibody. The PPARα responsive elements (PPRE) modified-gold nanoparticle probes were captured by the ligand-PPARα-RXRα complexes immobilized on the microplate, and then could be quantified through measuring the optical density after silver enhancement. The results showed that PFOS was quantified with a linear range from 100 pM to 1 μM and the detection limit was 10 pM. In addition to PFOS, PFOA and MEHP were also quantified within a proper range through the proposed bioassay. This bioassay was compared with that of liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for water spiked samples with a significant correlation (r = 0.9893). This study provides a high-throughput detection method for PPARα ligands in microplate with high sensitivity and wide linear range. It may serve as an assistant of LC-MS for prescreening of PPARα ligands like PFOS. PMID:21726938

  11. Development of a Cell-Based Bioassay for Phospholipase A2-Triggered Liposomal Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Arouri, Ahmad; Trojnar, Jakub; Schmidt, Steffen; Hansen, Anders H.; Mollenhauer, Jan; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of exploiting secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) enzymes, which are overexpressed in tumors, to activate drug release from liposomes precisely at the tumor site has been demonstrated before. Although the efficacy of the developed formulations was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo models, the pattern of sPLA2-assisted drug release is unknown due to the lack of a suitable bio-relevant model. We report here on the development of a novel bioluminescence living-cell-based luciferase assay for the monitoring of sPLA2-triggered release of luciferin from liposomes. To this end, we engineered breast cancer cells to produce both luciferase and sPLA2 enzymes, where the latter is secreted to the extracellular medium. We report on setting up a robust and reproducible bioassay for testing sPLA2-sensitive, luciferin remote-loaded liposomal formulations, using 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (DSPC/DSPG) 7:3 and DSPC/DSPG/cholesterol 4:3:3 as initial test systems. Upon their addition to the cells, the liposomes were degraded almost instantaneously by sPLA2 releasing the encapsulated luciferin, which provided readout from the luciferase-expressing cells. Cholesterol enhanced the integrity of the formulation without affecting its susceptibility to sPLA2. PEGylation of the liposomes only moderately broadened the release profile of luciferin. The provided bioassay represents a useful tool for monitoring active drug release in situ in real time as well as for testing and optimizing of sPLA2-sensitive lipid formulations. In addition, the bioassay will pave the way for future in-depth in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:25945937

  12. Genotoxicity of leachates from a landfill using three bioassays.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, G L; Rodriguez, D M

    1999-05-19

    In the city of Queretaro, around 500 tons of solid wastes are produced everyday and are deposited in a landfill. This is the result of social and economic activities of human beings or from their normal physiological functions. As a result of rain, leachates are produced, which, if not handled and treated correctly, may pollute the underground water. Among the bioassays developed for the detection of mutagenicity in environmental pollutants, plant systems have been proven to be sensitive, cheap, and effective. The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of genotoxic agents in the leachates of the landfill of the city using three bioassays: Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN), Tradescantia stamen hair mutations (Trad-SHM) and Allium root anaphase aberrations (AL-RAA) and make a comparison of the results in the three assays. Leachates were sampled during both the dry and rainy seasons. Plant cuttings of Tradescantia or the roots of Allium were treated by submerging them in the leachates. Three replicates of each sample were analyzed in each of the three bioassays. As expected the samples of leachates collected during the dry season showed a higher genotoxicity than those collected during the rainy season. In conclusion, there are substances present in the leachates capable of inducing genotoxicity in the plant assays. On the other hand, the plant assays showed different degrees of sensitivity: the more sensitive was the Trad-MCN bioassay and the less sensitive the Trad-SHM assay. Therefore, when analyzing environmental pollutants it is recommended to use a battery of bioassays. PMID:10350599

  13. Immobilized magnetic beads based multi-target affinity selection coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for screening anti-diabetic compounds from a Chinese medicine "Tang-Zhi-Qing".

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Chen, Zhui; Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yiyu

    2013-05-01

    We developed an approach for screening bioactive compounds from botanical drug using multiple target-immobilized magnetic beads coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This novel approach was called magnetic beads based multi-target affinity selection-mass spectrometry (MT-ASMS). It can enrich and identify different types of ligands from mixture extracts. Multiple targets (maltase, invertase, lipase) were immobilized on the magnetic beads by covalent linkage using 1-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-3-ethyl-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as reaction reagents, respectively. The properties of enzyme conjugated magnetic beads were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometer and vibration sample magnetometer. Several factors including pH, ion strength, incubation time and temperature were optimized using three known ligands (caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and hesperidin). The established MT-ASMS approach was applied to screening for ligands from a Chinese medicine "Tang-Zhi-Qing", which was used to treat type II diabetes in China. Seven bound compounds were identified via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Five active compounds including 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-D-glucose, 1,2,3,4-tetra-O-galloyl-D-glucose, 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-d-glucose, quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide and quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucoside were identified and their activities were validated by conventional inhibitory assay. Our findings suggested that the proposed approach is efficient in screening compounds with multiple activities from extracts of botanical drugs. PMID:23501439

  14. BioAssay Ontology (BAO): a semantic description of bioassays and high-throughput screening results

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High-throughput screening (HTS) is one of the main strategies to identify novel entry points for the development of small molecule chemical probes and drugs and is now commonly accessible to public sector research. Large amounts of data generated in HTS campaigns are submitted to public repositories such as PubChem, which is growing at an exponential rate. The diversity and quantity of available HTS assays and screening results pose enormous challenges to organizing, standardizing, integrating, and analyzing the datasets and thus to maximize the scientific and ultimately the public health impact of the huge investments made to implement public sector HTS capabilities. Novel approaches to organize, standardize and access HTS data are required to address these challenges. Results We developed the first ontology to describe HTS experiments and screening results using expressive description logic. The BioAssay Ontology (BAO) serves as a foundation for the standardization of HTS assays and data and as a semantic knowledge model. In this paper we show important examples of formalizing HTS domain knowledge and we point out the advantages of this approach. The ontology is available online at the NCBO bioportal http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/44531. Conclusions After a large manual curation effort, we loaded BAO-mapped data triples into a RDF database store and used a reasoner in several case studies to demonstrate the benefits of formalized domain knowledge representation in BAO. The examples illustrate semantic querying capabilities where BAO enables the retrieval of inferred search results that are relevant to a given query, but are not explicitly defined. BAO thus opens new functionality for annotating, querying, and analyzing HTS datasets and the potential for discovering new knowledge by means of inference. PMID:21702939

  15. Isolation of Fungi from Heterodera glycines and in vitro Bioassays for Their Antagonism to Eggs.

    PubMed

    Meyer, S L; Huettel, R N; Sayre, R M

    1990-10-01

    Twenty fungi were assayed in vitro for antagonism to eggs of Heterodera glycines. Eight of the fungi were isolated from cysts or eggs of H. glycines during the current study, one was isolated from Panagrellus redivivus, and eleven were obtained from other researchers or collections. The bioassays were conducted on eggs from nematodes that had been grown monoxenically on excised root tips. Phoma chrysanthemicola, one strain of Verticillium chlamydosporium, and one strain of V. lecanii caused a decrease (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.05, respectively) in the number of viable eggs, although no hyphae were observed colonizing live eggs. Trichoderma polysporum infected live eggs but enhanced (P < 0.05) egg survival. Acremonium bacillisporum, Chaetomium sp., Drechmeria coniospora (two strains), Epicoccum sp., Exophiala jeanselmei, Fusarium sp., Neocosmospora vasinfecta, Scytalidium fulvum, Trichoderma harzianum (two strains), V. chlamydosporium (one strain), V. lecanii (three strains), and an unidentified fungus did not measurably affect egg viability, even though hyphae of five of these fungi were seen in live eggs. The bioassay provides a useful step in the selection of a biological control agent for this major nematode pest. PMID:19287754

  16. A Rapid and Simple Bioassay Method for Herbicide Detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Ng, Alan; King, Russell; Durnford, Dion G.

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, has been used in bioassay detection of a variety of toxic compounds such as pesticides and toxic metals, but mainly using liquid culture systems. In this study, an algal lawn—agar system for semi-quantitative bioassay of herbicidal activities has been developed. Sixteen different herbicides belonging to 11 different categories were applied to paper disks and placed on green alga lawns in Petri dishes. Presence of herbicide activities was indicated by clearing zones around the paper disks on the lawn 2–3 days after application. The different groups of herbicides induced clearing zones of variable size that depended on the amount, mode of action, and chemical properties of the herbicides applied to the paper disks. This simple, paper-disk-algal system may be used to detect the presence of herbicides in water samples and act as a quick and inexpensive semi-quantitative screening for assessing herbicide contamination. PMID:19578512

  17. Pullulan encapsulation of labile biomolecules to give stable bioassay tablets.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi-Anbuhi, Sana; Pennings, Kevin; Leung, Vincent; Liu, Meng; Carrasquilla, Carmen; Kannan, Balamurali; Li, Yingfu; Pelton, Robert; Brennan, John D; Filipe, Carlos D M

    2014-06-10

    A simple and inexpensive method is reported for the long-term stabilization of enzymes and other unstable reagents in premeasured quantities in water-soluble tablets (cast, not compressed) made with pullulan, a nonionic polysaccharide that forms an oxygen impermeable solid upon drying. The pullulan tablets dissolve in aqueous solutions in seconds, thereby facilitating the easy execution of bioassays at remote sites with no need for special reagent handling and liquid pipetting. This approach is modular in nature, thus allowing the creation of individual tablets for enzymes and their substrates. Proof-of-principle demonstrations include a Taq polymerase tablet for DNA amplification through PCR and a pesticide assay kit consisting of separate tablets for acetylcholinesterase and its chromogenic substrate, indoxyl acetate, both of which are highly unstable. The encapsulated reagents remain stable at room temperature for months, thus enabling the room-temperature shipping and storage of bioassay components. PMID:24764260

  18. A New Bioassay for Auxins and Cytokinins 1

    PubMed Central

    Boerjan, Wout; Genetello, Chris; Van Montagu, Marc; Inzé, Dirk

    1992-01-01

    The authors have developed a sensitive bioassay that can be used to detect auxins as well as cytokinins. The bioassay is based on the expression in transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mesophyll protoplasts of a chimeric gene, consisting of the upstream sequences of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens gene 5, coupled to the coding sequence of the β-glucuronidase. The expression of this gene is induced by the presence of both auxin and cytokinin in the culture medium. Using this assay, indole-3-acetic acid was detected at 5 × 10−8 molar, whereas trans-zeatin could be detected at 5 × 10−11 molar. The assay can be performed in microtiter plates, allowing numerous samples to be analyzed simultaneously. Only 2.5 × 105 protoplasts are required for one individual assay in 250 microliters of culture medium and for qualitative results, the reaction is readily visualized by ultraviolet light. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:16668975

  19. Improved bioassay for detecting autoinducer of Rhodovulum sulfidophilum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Umekage, S.

    2015-02-01

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial gene regulation system that enables prompt environmental adaptation in response to cell density. Quorum sensing is driven by an extracellularly secreted chemical signal called autoinducer. Gram-negative bacteria produce one or several types of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as autoinducers. Our previous study suggests that the gram-negative marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum produces AHL in the early stationary phase and plays a role in maintaining the bacterial cell aggregates called "floc". We performed conventional bioassay to identify AHL production by using Chromobacterium violaceum VIR07, which produces violet pigment (violacein) in response to AHL with side chains ranging from C10 to C18 in length. However, we were not able to observe the violacein with good reproducibility, suggesting that inhibitory chemical compounds co-existed in the AHL extract. Therefore, we improved the extraction method; the ethyl acetate-extracted AHLs were fractionated by using reverse phase TLC. By using the re-extracted AHLs for the bioassay, we observed an obvious production of violacein. This result clearly indicates that R. sulfidophilum produces AHLs with side chains ranging from C10 to C18 in length and suggests the utility of improved bioassay for AHL detection.

  20. A Bioassay System Using Bioelectric Signals from Small Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terawaki, Mitsuru; Soh, Zu; Hirano, Akira; Tsuji, Toshio

    Although the quality of tap water is generally examined using chemical assay, this method cannot be used for examination in real time. Against such a background, the technique of fish bioassay has attracted attention as an approach that enables constant monitoring of aquatic contamination. The respiratory rhythms of fish are considered an efficient indicator for the ongoing assessment of water quality, since they are sensitive to chemicals and can be indirectly measured from bioelectric signals generated by breathing. In order to judge aquatic contamination accurately, it is necessary to measure bioelectric signals from fish swimming freely as well as to stably discriminate measured signals, which vary between individuals. However, no bioassay system meeting the above requirements has yet been established. This paper proposes a bioassay system using bioelectric signals generated from small fish in free-swimming conditions. The system records signals using multiple electrodes to cover the extensive measurement range required in a free-swimming environment, and automatically discriminates changes in water quality from signal frequency components. This discrimination is achieved through an ensemble classification method using probability neural networks to solve the problem of differences between individual fish. The paper also reports on the results of related validation experiments, which showed that the proposed system was able to stably discriminate between water conditions before and after bleach exposure.

  1. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-09-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (T c) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at T c was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL(-1), and T c was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R (2) = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii. PMID:26405525

  2. Paper bioassay based on ceria nanoparticles as colorimetric probes.

    PubMed

    Ornatska, Maryna; Sharpe, Erica; Andreescu, Daniel; Andreescu, Silvana

    2011-06-01

    We report the first use of redox nanoparticles of cerium oxide as colorimetric probes in bioanalysis. The method is based on changes in the physicochemical properties of ceria nanoparticles, used here as chromogenic indicators, in response to the analyte. We show that these particles can be fully integrated in a paper-based bioassay. To construct the sensor, ceria nanoparticles and glucose oxidase were coimmobilized onto filter paper using a silanization procedure. In the presence of glucose, the enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide induces a visual color change of the ceria nanoparticles immobilized onto the bioactive sensing paper, from white-yellowish to dark orange, in a concentration-dependent manner. A detection limit of 0.5 mM glucose with a linear range up to 100 mM and a reproducibility of 4.3% for n = 11 ceria paper strips were obtained. The assay is fully reversible and can be reused for at least 10 consecutive measurement cycles, without significant loss of activity. Another unique feature is that it does not require external reagents, as all the sensing components are fixed onto the paper platform. The bioassay can be stored for at least 79 days at room temperature while maintaining the same analytical performance. An example of analytical application was demonstrated for the detection of glucose in human serum. The results demonstrate the potential of this type of nanoparticles as novel components in the development of robust colorimetric bioassays. PMID:21524141

  3. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-01-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (Tc) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at Tc was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL−1, and Tc was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R2 = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii. PMID:26405525

  4. Novel bioassay using Bacillus megaterium to detect tetracycline in milk.

    PubMed

    Tumini, Melisa; Nagel, Orlando G; Molina, Pilar; Althaus, Rafael L

    2016-01-01

    Tetracyclines are used for the prevention and control of dairy cattle diseases. Residues of these drugs can be excreted into milk. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a microbiological method using Bacillus megaterium to detect tetracyclines (chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and tetracycline) in milk. In order to approximate the limits of detection of the bioassay to the Maximum Residue Limit (100μg/l) for milk tetracycline, different concentrations of chloramphenicol (0, 1000, 1500 and 2000μg/l) were tested. The detection limits calculated were similar to the Maximum Residue Limits when a bioassay using B. megaterium ATCC 9885 spores (2.8×10(8)spores/ml) and chloramphenicol (2000μg/l) was utilized. This bioassay detects 105μg/l of chlortetracycline, 100μg/l of oxytetracycline and 134μg/l of tetracycline in 5h. Therefore, this method is suitable to be incorporated into a microbiological multi-residue system for the identification of tetracyclines in milk. PMID:27131738

  5. Nanoparticle-catalyzed reductive bleaching for fabricating turn-off and enzyme-free amplified colorimetric bioassays.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qiang, Weibing; Li, Jie; Li, Hui; Dong, Yifan; Zhao, Yaju; Xu, Danke

    2014-01-15

    Nanoparticle-catalyzed reductive bleaching reactions of colored substrates are emerging as a class of novel indicator reactions for fabricating enzyme-free amplified colorimetric biosensing (turn-off mode), which are exactly opposite to the commonly used oxidative coloring processes of colorless substrates in traditional enzyme-catalyzed amplified colorimetric bioassays (turn-on mode). In this work, a simple theoretical analysis shows that the sensitivity of this colorimetric bioassay can be improved by increasing the amplification factor (kcatΔt), or enhancing the binding affinity between analyte and receptor (Kd), or selecting the colored substrates with high extinction coefficients (ε). Based on this novel strategy, we have developed a turn-off and cost-effective amplified colorimetric thrombin aptasensor. This aptasensor made full use of sandwich binding of two affinity aptamers for increased specificity, magnetic particles for easy separation and enrichment, and gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-catalyzed reductive bleaching reaction to generate the amplified colorimetric signal. With 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) as the non-dye colored substrate, colorimetric bioassay of thrombin was achieved by the endpoint method with a detection limit of 91pM. In particular, when using methylene blue (MB) as the substrate, for the first time, a more convenient and efficient kinetic-based colorimetric thrombin bioassay was achieved without the steps of acidification termination and magnetic removal of particles, with a low detection limit of 10pM, which was superior to the majority of the existing colorimetric thrombin aptasensors. The proposed colorimetric protocol is expected to hold great promise in field analysis and point-of-care applications. PMID:23962710

  6. Toxicity of copper-spiked sediments to Tubifex tubifex (Oligochaeta, Tubificidae): Comparison of the 28-day reproductive bioassay with an early-life-stage bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, M.; Pasteris, A.; Bonomi, G. . Dipt. di Biologia Evoluzionistica Sperimentale); Reynoldson, T.B. . National Water Research Inst.)

    1999-06-01

    Two sediment bioassay methods using Tubifex tubifex (Mueller, 1774) as the test species were compared. The first was an adult reproduction test, the second an early-life-stage survival test. The duration of both bioassays is 28 d and the amount of work required was similar; they may be useful alternatives to each other in different circumstances (e.g., the early life stage bioassay could be carried out with smaller volumes of sediment). The two bioassays were performed simultaneously on copper-spiked sediments. Sediments from two freshwater and two terrestrial sites were used; five separate, nonsimultaneous experiments were performed, one for each sediment or soil and a further experiment with soil with a good supplement. In the adult bioassay, there were large differences in the production of cocoons, eggs, and young among the control treatments of the five experiments. There were also major differences in the NOEC and LOEC for copper between the tested substrates. The early life stage bioassay appears to be less sensitive to copper toxicity than the adult reproductive bioassay since NOECs and LOECs are higher for early survival than for the most sensitive endpoints of the adult bioassay in three experiments out of five.

  7. Toxicity assessment of effluent from flash light manufacturing industry by bioassay tests in Trigonella foenumgracum.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Narendra; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bauddh, Kuldeep; Dwivedi, Neetu; Singh, D P; Barman, S C

    2014-11-01

    A rapid bioassay test was conducted to study heavy metal accumulation and biochemical changes in Trigonella foenumgracum (methi) irrigated with 25, 50, 75 and 100% of effluent from flash light manufacturing industry at 60 days after sowing. Total metal concentration in effluent samples was: Cr = 0.12 < Cd = 0.18 < Pb = 0.24 < Cu = 2.68 mg l(-1) whereas, metals were not detected in control. An increase in photosynthetic pigments of exposed plant was noticed up to 50% concentrations of the effluent followed by a decrease at higher concentration as compared to their respective control.An enhanced lipid peroxidation in the treated plants was observed, which was evident by increased level of antioxidants: proline, cysteine, malondialdehyde and ascorbic acid content. The treated plants accumulated metals in the following order: Cu > Pb > Cr > Cd in the roots and shoots. PMID:25522513

  8. Microwave-accelerated bioassay technique for rapid and quantitative detection of biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Syed, Maleeha F; Aslan, Kadir

    2016-01-15

    Quantitative detection of molecules of interest from biological and environmental samples in a rapid manner, particularly with a relevant concentration range, is imperative to the timely assessment of human diseases and environmental issues. In this work, we employed the microwave-accelerated bioassay (MAB) technique, which is based on the combined use of circular bioassay platforms and microwave heating, for rapid and quantitative detection of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Shiga like toxin (STX 1). The proof-of-principle use of the MAB technique with the circular bioassay platforms for the rapid detection of GFAP in buffer based on colorimetric and fluorescence readouts was demonstrated with a 900W kitchen microwave. We also employed the MAB technique with a new microwave system (called the iCrystal system) for the detection of GFAP from mice with brain injuries and STX 1 from a city water stream. Control bioassays included the commercially available gold standard bioassay kits run at room temperature. Our results show that the lower limit of detection (LLOD) of the colorimetric and fluorescence based bioassays for GFAP was decreased by ~1000 times using the MAB technique and our circular bioassay platforms as compared to the commercially available bioassay kits. The overall bioassay time for GFAP and STX 1 was reduced from 4h using commercially available bioassay kits to 10min using the MAB technique. PMID:26356762

  9. An emergency bioassay method for (210)Po in urine.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2015-09-01

    A rapid method was developed to efficiently measure (210)Po in urine samples in an emergency situation. Polonium-210 in small urine samples (10 mL) was spontaneously deposited on a stainless steel disc in 1 M HCl at room temperature for 4 h in a polyethylene bottle. The metallic disc was then counted for 4 h by alpha spectrometry. The developed method allowed the preparation of large sample batch in a short time. The method meets the requirements for an emergency bioassay procedure. PMID:26115206

  10. New technique for collecting ambient diesel particles for bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, M.F.; Smith, T.J.; Hammond, S.K.; Beck, B.D.; Brain, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    This paper describes a new application of viable aerosol sampler, the Liquid electrostatic Aerosol Precipitator (LEAP), for the collection of diesel particles for bioassays of pulmonary toxicity and mutagenicity or carinogenicity. Currently used methods (filtration, dry electrostatic precipitation) cause agglomeration of particles and increases in particle size up to twenty-fold, which may alter particle toxicity significantly. Collection of diesel particles with the LEAP preserved submicronic particle size. Differences in chemical composition of extracts of surface adsorbents as compared to particles collected on filters also were observed. This technique may be applicable for collection other types of combustion products or oil mists that agglomerate when collected by filtration.

  11. A new technique for collecting ambient diesel particles for bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hallock, M F; Smith, T J; Hammond, S K; Beck, B D; Brain, J D

    1987-05-01

    This paper describes a new application of a viable aerosol sampler, the Liquid Electrostatic Aerosol Precipitator (LEAP), for the collection of diesel particles for bioassays of pulmonary toxicity and mutagenicity or carcinogenicity. Currently used methods (filtration, dry electrostatic precipitation) cause agglomeration of particles and increases in particle size up to twenty-fold, which may alter particle toxicity significantly. Collection of diesel particles with the LEAP preserved submicronic particle size. Differences in chemical composition of extracts of surface adsorbents as compared to particles collected on filters also were observed. This technique may be applicable for collection of other types of combustion products or oil mists that agglomerate when collected by filtration. PMID:2438921

  12. Field and Bioassay Indicators for Internal Dose Intervention Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2007-05-01

    Guidance is presented that is used at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site to identify the potential need for medical intervention in response to intakes of radioactivity. The guidance, based on ICRP Publication 30 models and committed effective dose equivalents of 20 mSv and 200 mSv, is expressed as numerical workplace measurements and derived first-day bioassay results for large intakes. It is used by facility radiation protection staff and on-call dosimetry support staff during the first few days following an intake.

  13. Field and bioassay indicators for internal dose intervention therapy.

    PubMed

    Carbaugh, Eugene H

    2007-05-01

    Guidance is presented that is used at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site to identify the potential need for medical intervention in response to intakes of radioactivity. The guidance, based on ICRP Publication 30 models and committed effective dose equivalents of 20 mSv and 200 mSv, is expressed as numerical workplace measurements and derived first-day bioassay results for large intakes. It is used by facility radiation protection staff and on-call dosimetry support staff during the first few days following an intake. PMID:17440323

  14. Electroantennographic bioassay as a screening tool for host plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Beck, John J; Light, Douglas M; Gee, Wai S

    2012-01-01

    Plant volatiles play an important role in plant-insect interactions. Herbivorous insects use plant volatiles, known as kairomones, to locate their host plant. When a host plant is an important agronomic commodity feeding damage by insect pests can inflict serious economic losses to growers. Accordingly, kairomones can be used as attractants to lure or confuse these insects and, thus, offer an environmentally friendly alternative to pesticides for insect control. Unfortunately, plants can emit a vast number volatiles with varying compositions and ratios of emissions dependent upon the phenology of the commodity or the time of day. This makes identification of biologically active components or blends of volatile components an arduous process. To help identify the bioactive components of host plant volatile emissions we employ the laboratory-based screening bioassay electroantennography (EAG). EAG is an effective tool to evaluate and record electrophysiologically the olfactory responses of an insect via their antennal receptors. The EAG screening process can help reduce the number of volatiles tested to identify promising bioactive components. However, EAG bioassays only provide information about activation of receptors. It does not provide information about the type of insect behavior the compound elicits; which could be as an attractant, repellent or other type of behavioral response. Volatiles eliciting a significant response by EAG, relative to an appropriate positive control, are typically taken on to further testing of behavioral responses of the insect pest. The experimental design presented will detail the methodology employed to screen almond-based host plant volatiles by measurement of the electrophysiological antennal responses of an adult insect pest navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) to single components and simple blends of components via EAG bioassay. The method utilizes two excised antennae placed across a "fork" electrode holder. The protocol

  15. How to Fabricate Functional Artificial Luciferases for Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces fabrication of artificial luciferases (ALuc(®)) by extracting the consensus amino acids from the alignment of copepod luciferase sequences. The made ALucs have unique sequential identities that are phylogenetically distinctive from those of any existing copepod luciferase. Some ALucs exhibited heat stability, and strong and greatly prolonged optical intensities. The made ALucs are applicable to various bioassays as an optical readout, including live cell imaging, single-chain probes, and bioluminescent tags of antibodies. The present protocol guides on how to fabricate a unique artificial luciferase with designed optical properties and functionalities. PMID:27424894

  16. Dichloromethane attracts diabroticite larvae in a laboratory behavioral bioassay.

    PubMed

    Jewett, D K; Bjostad, L B

    1996-07-01

    A two-choice laboratory behavioral bioassay was used to demonstrate that dichloromethane elicits the dose-dependent attraction of secondinstar western and southern corn rootworms. Preliminary data suggest that second-instar banded cucumber beetles are also attracted to dichloromethane. An eluotropic series of 10 materials, including distilled water, ethanol, methanol, acetone, ethyl dichloroacetate, dichloromethane, diethyl ether, benzene, hexadecane, and hexane, was tested for attraction of western corn rootworm larvae. Dichloromethane was the only one attractive at all doses tested, and orthogonal comparisons revealed a quadratic trend (convex) for responses of larvae to increasing dose. Benzene and hexadecane also attracted larvae, but significantly fewer than dichloromethane, and only at three doses and one dose, respectively. Orthogonal comparisons revealed no linear or quadratic trend for responses of larvae to increasing doses of either compound. Dichloromethane is the first organic compound demonstrated to attract western corn rootworm larvae in the absence of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide has previously been reported to attract western corn rootworm larvae either independently or when combined with other organic compounds, and the sensitivity of our bioassay was tested by demonstrating the dose-dependent attraction of western corn rootworm larvae to carbonated water as a carbon dioxide source. We have also demonstrated the attraction of southern corn rootworm larvae to carbon dioxide and propose that carbon dioxide and dichloromethane behave analogously when they interact with chemoreceptor sites on larvae. PMID:24226089

  17. [Evaluation of Antilles fish ciguatoxicity by mouse and chick bioassays].

    PubMed

    Pottier, I; Vernoux, J P

    2003-03-01

    Ciguatera is a common seafood poisoning in Western Atlantic and French West Indies. Ciguatera fish poisoning in the Caribbean is a public health problem. A toxicological study was carried out on 178 Caribbean fish specimens (26 species) captured off Guadeloupe and Saint Barthelemy between 1993 and 1999. The mouse bioassay and the chick feeding test were used to control fish edibility. Ciguatoxins presence was assumed when symptomatology was typical of ciguatera in mouse and chick. Fishes were classified in three groups: non toxic fish (edible), low toxic fish (not edible) and toxic fish (not edible). 75% of fishes were non toxic. Toxic fish specimens belonged to four families of high trophic level carnivores: Carangidae, Lutjanidae, Serranidae et Sphyraenidae. Percentages of toxic fishes to humans reached 55% for Caranx latus and 33% for Caranx bartholomaei and Caranx lugubris. Only a significant correlation between weight and toxicity was only found for C. latus and snappers. Small carnivorous groupers (Serranidae) were also toxic. Atoxic fish species were (a) pelagic fish (Coryphaena hippurus, Auxis thazard and Euthynnus pelamis), (b) invertebrates feeders (Malacanthus plumieri, Balistes vetula), (c) small high-risk fish or (d) fish of edible benthic fish families. Liver of four fishes (Mycteroperca venenosa, Caranx bartholomaei, Seriola rivoliana, Gymnothorax funebris) contained ciguatoxins at a significant level although their flesh was safe. This study confirms the usefulness of mouse and chick bioassays for sanitary control of fish. PMID:12784589

  18. A Bioassay for Lafora Disease and Laforin Glucan Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Amanda R.; Johnson, Mary Beth; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V.; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Lafora disease is a rare yet invariably fatal form of progressive neurodegenerative epilepsy resulting from mutations in the phosphatase laforin. Several therapeutic options for Lafora disease patients are currently being explored, and these therapies would benefit from a biochemical means of assessing functional laforin activity following treatment. To date, only clinical outcomes such as decreases in seizure frequency and severity have been used to indicate success of epilepsy treatment. However, these qualitative measures exhibit variability and must be assessed over long periods of time. In this work, we detail a simple and sensitive bioassay that can be used for the detection of functional endogenous laforin from human and mouse tissue. Design and methods We generated antibodies capable of detecting and immunoprecipitating endogenous laforin. Following laforin immunoprecipitation, laforin activity was assessed via phosphatase assays using para-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) and a malachite green-based assay specific for glucan phosphatase activity. Results We found that antibody binding to laforin does not impede laforin activity. Furthermore, the malachite green-based glucan phosphatase assay used in conjunction with a rabbit polyclonal laforin antibody was capable of detecting endogenous laforin activity from human and mouse tissue. Importantly, this assay discriminated between laforin activity and other phosphatases. Conclusions The bioassay that we have developed utilizing laforin antibodies and an assay specific for glucan phosphatase activity could prove valuable in the rapid detection of functional laforin in patients to which novel Lafora disease therapies have been administered. PMID:24012855

  19. Vicia faba bioassay for environmental toxicity monitoring: A review.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Munawar

    2016-02-01

    Higher plants are recognized as excellent genetic models to detect cytogenetic and mutagenic agents and are frequently used in environmental monitoring studies. Vicia faba (V. faba) bioassay have been used to study DNA damages i.e., chromosomal and nuclear aberrations induced by metallic compounds, pesticides, complex mixtures, petroleum derivates, toxins, nanoparticles and industrial effluents. The main advantages of using V. faba is its availability round the year, economical to use, easy to grow and handle; its use does not require sterile conditions, rate of cell division is fast, chromosomes are easy to score, less expensive and more sensitive as compared to other short-term tests that require pre-preparations. The V. faba test offers evaluation of different endpoints and tested agents can be classified as cytotoxic/genotoxic/mutagenic. This test also provides understanding about mechanism of action, whether the tested agent is clastogenic or aneugenic in nature. In view of advantages offered by V. faba test system, it is used extensively to assess toxic agents and has been emerged as an important bioassay for ecotoxicological studies. Based on the applications of V. faba test to assess the environmental quality, this article offers an overview of this test system and its efficiency in assessing the cytogenetic and mutagenic agents in different classes of the environmental concerns. PMID:26414739

  20. Effects of Wind Speed on Aerosol Spray Penetration in Adult Mosquito Bioassay Cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay cages are commonly used to assess efficacy of insecticides against adult mosquitoes in the field. To properly correlate adult mortality readings to insecticidal efficacy and/or spray application parameters, it is important to know how the cage used in the bioassay interacts with the spray ...

  1. LIFE CYCLE BIOASSAY FOR ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF TOXIC CHEMICALS USING RAPID CYCLING OF BRASSICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initial evaluation of a new plant life cycle bioassay for the assessment of the effects of toxic chemicals is presented. he bioassay features a rapid cycling Brassica species that can complete its life cycle in as little as 36 days. he herbicide dalapon (2,2 dichloropropionic aci...

  2. Immunochemical technologies for replacement of rodent bioassays in sensitive detection of toxins in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid sensitive assays for biothreat toxins that can be used to detect intentionally contaminated foods are now typically performed via bioassay in live mice. While bioassay provides essential data on bioavailability, animal models are technically, fiscally, and ethically challenging. Through carefu...

  3. Improved high-throughput bioassay for Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As we gain more information through functional genomic studies of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), we need a high throughput bioassay system to screen potential biopesticides. R. dominica is an internal feeder during immature stages and presents unique challenges with traditional bioassay methods. Our pri...

  4. Development of a High Throughput Translational Bioassay for Plant Biofuel Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using the well developed microbial system, Clostridium phytofermentans, we have developed a robust bioassay for biomass digestibility and conversion to biofuels. The bioassay can be used to measure the impact of plant genetic diversity on digestibility, and thereby determine the potential effects of...

  5. Resistance monitoring of Heliothis virescens to pyramided cotton varieties with a hydrateable, artificial cotton leaf bioassay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proof of concept was demonstrated for a practical, off the shelf bioassay to monitor for tobacco budworm resistance to pyramided Bt cotton using plant eluants. The bioassay was based on a previously described feeding disruption test using hydrateable artificial diet containing a blue indicator dye, ...

  6. Comparison of two mosquito bioassay methods for the estimate of minimum effective dose in repellents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is expected that laboratory-based repellent bioassays should reliably evaluate the efficacy of compounds that deter mosquito feeding behavior. The variety of repellent bioassays available allows for flexibility in design, but makes it difficult to compare any two methods, including in vitro and i...

  7. Profiling Animal Toxicants by Automatically Mining Public Bioassay Data: A Big Data Approach for Computational Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    In vitro bioassays have been developed and are currently being evaluated as potential alternatives to traditional animal toxicity models. Already, the progress of high throughput screening techniques has resulted in an enormous amount of publicly available bioassay data having been generated for a large collection of compounds. When a compound is tested using a collection of various bioassays, all the testing results can be considered as providing a unique bio-profile for this compound, which records the responses induced when the compound interacts with different cellular systems or biological targets. Profiling compounds of environmental or pharmaceutical interest using useful toxicity bioassay data is a promising method to study complex animal toxicity. In this study, we developed an automatic virtual profiling tool to evaluate potential animal toxicants. First, we automatically acquired all PubChem bioassay data for a set of 4,841 compounds with publicly available rat acute toxicity results. Next, we developed a scoring system to evaluate the relevance between these extracted bioassays and animal acute toxicity. Finally, the top ranked bioassays were selected to profile the compounds of interest. The resulting response profiles proved to be useful to prioritize untested compounds for their animal toxicity potentials and form a potential in vitro toxicity testing panel. The protocol developed in this study could be combined with structure-activity approaches and used to explore additional publicly available bioassay datasets for modeling a broader range of animal toxicities. PMID:24950175

  8. A Bioassay for Determining Resistance Levels in Tarnished Plant Bug Populations to Neonicotinoid Insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory bioassay was developed and used to test field populations of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), for resistance development to the neonicitinoid insecticides imidacloprid (Trimax®) and thiamethoxam (Centric®). The bioassay determined LC50 values by feeding...

  9. A LABORATORY BIOASSAY FOR MONITORING RESISTANCE IN TARNISHED PLANT BUG POPULATIONS TO NEONICOTINOID INSECTICIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory bioassay was developed for testing tarnished plant bug populations for resistance development to the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. The bioassay allows for the determination of LC50 values by feeding known doses of the insecticides to adult tarnished plant bu...

  10. Benthic invertebrate bioassays with toxic sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giesy, John P.; Rosiu, Cornell J.; Graney, Robert L.; Henry, Mary G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. The assays studied were: (a) Microtox®, a 15-min assay ofPhotobacterium phosphoreum bioluminescence inhibition by pore water; (b) 48-h Daphnia magnalethality test in pore water; (c) 10-d subchronic assay of lethality to and reduction of weight gain by Chironomus tentans performed in either whole sediment or pore water; (d) 168-h acute lethality assay of Hexagenia limbata in either whole sediment or pore water. The three methods of diluting sediments were: (a) extracting pore water from the toxic location and dilution with pore water from the control station; (b) diluting whole sediment from the toxic location with control whole sediment from a reference location, then extracting pore water; and (c) diluting toxic, whole sediment with whole sediment from a reference location, then using the whole sediment in bioassays. Based on lethality, H. limbata was the most sensitive organism to the toxicity of Detroit River sediment. Lethality of D. magna in pore water was similar to that of H. limbata in whole sediment and can be used to predict effects of whole sediment toxicity to H. limbata. The concentration required to cause a 50% reduction in C. tentans growth (10-d EC50) was approximately that which caused 50% lethality of D. magna (48-h LC50) and was similar to the toxicity that restricts benthic invertebrate colonization of contaminated sediments. While the three dilution techniques gave similar results with some assays, they gave very different results in other assays. The dose-response relationships determined by the three dilution techniques would be expected to vary with sediment, toxicant and bioassay type, and the dose-response relationship derived from each technique needs to be interpreted accordingly.

  11. Evaluation of the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of motor vehicle emissions in short-term bioassays.

    PubMed Central

    Lewtas, J

    1983-01-01

    Incomplete combustion of fuel in motor vehicles results in the emission of submicron carbonaceous particles which, after cooling and dilution, contain varying quantities of extractable organic constituents. These organics are mutagenic in bacteria. Confirmatory bioassays in mammalian cells provide the capability of detecting chromosomal and DNA damage in addition to gene mutations. In order to evaluate the mutagenicity of these organics in mammalian cells, extractable organics from particle emissions from several diesel and gasoline vehicles were compared in a battery of microbial, mammalian cell and in vivo bioassays. The mammalian cell mutagenicity bioassays were selected to detect gene mutations, DNA damage, and chromosomal effects. Carcinogenesis bioassays conducted included short-term assays for oncogenic transformation and skin tumorigenesis. The results in different assay systems are compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. Good quantitative correlations were observed between several mutagenesis and carcinogenesis bioassays for this series of diesel and gasoline emissions. PMID:6186475

  12. Chronic and Initiation/Promotion Skin Bioassays of Petroleum Refinery Streams.

    PubMed Central

    Skisak, C; Furedi-Machacek, EM; Schmitt, SS; Swanson, MS; Vernot, EH

    1994-01-01

    Nine refinery streams were tested in both chronic and initiation/promotion (I/P) skin bioassays. In the chronic bioassay, groups of 50 C3H/HeJ mice received twice weekly applications of 50 microl of test article for at least 2 years. In the initiation phase of the I/P bioassay, groups of CD-1 mice received an initiating dose of 50 microl of test article for 5 consecutive days, followed by promotion with 50 microl of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (0.01% w/v in acetone) for 25 weeks. In the promotion phase of the I/P bioassay, CD-1 mice were initiated with 50 microl of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (0.1% w/v in acetone) or acetone, followed by promotion with 50 microl of test article twice weekly for 25 weeks. The most volatile of the streams, sweetened naphtha, and the least volatile, vacuum residuum, were noncarcinogenic in both assays. Middle distillates, with a boiling range of 150 degrees-370 degreesC, demonstrated carcinogenic activity in the chronic bioassay and acted as promoters but not initiators in the I/P bioassay. Untreated mineral oil streams displayed initiating activity and were carcinogenic in the chronic bioassay, presumably due to the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of requisite size and structure. A highly solvent-refined mineral oil stream lacked initiating activity. These results indicate that the I/P bioassay, which takes 6 months to complete, may be a good qualitative predictor of the results of a chronic bioassay, at least for petroleum streams. Furthermore, the I/P bioassay can provide insight into possible mechanisms of tumor development. Images p82-a PMID:9719673

  13. Harvester ant bioassay for assessing hazardous chemical waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gano, K.A.; Carlile, D.W.; Rogers, L.E.

    1984-12-01

    A technique was developed for using harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex owhyeei, in terrestrial bioassays. Procedures were developed for maintaining stock populations, handling ants, and exposing ants to toxic materials. Relative toxicities were determined by exposing ants to 10 different materials. These materials included three insecticides, Endrin, Aldrin, and Dieldrin; one herbicide, 2,4-D; three oil-like compounds, wood preservative, drilling fluid, and slop oil; and three heavy metals, copper, zinc, and cadmium. Ants were exposed in petri dishes containing soil amended with a particular toxicant. Under these test conditions, ants showed no sensitivity to the metals or 2,4-D. Ants were sensitive to the insecticides and oils in repeated tests, and relative toxicity remained consistent throughout. Aldrin was the most toxic material, followed by Dieldrin, Endrin, wood preservative, drilling fluid, and slop oil. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Use of bioassay methods to evaluate incinerator emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.R.; DeMarini, D.M.; Linak, W.P.; Lemieux, P.M.; McSorley, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The organic components in combustion emissions are composed of thousands of chemicals. Analyzing such a complex mixture for the presence of even a few selected chemicals is difficult and provides information on only a fraction of the chemicals present. Reliance on such limited chemical analysis for determining possible health effects may ignore the contribution of many other chemical components of the effluent. Because combustion emissions are complex mixtures, they have been evaluated as such, rather than by studying a few selected chemicals that might be present. The Salmonella (Ames) assay was used to determine the mutagenicity associated with particles from the effluent of municipal-waste combustors, from ambient air collected near a municipal-waste combustor, and from the effluent of a pilot-sized rotary kiln in which polyethylene was combusted. Filter samples were extracted with dichloromethane, and concentrated extracts were solvent exchanged into dimethyl sulfoxide for bioassay.

  15. Toxicity assessment using different bioassays and microbial biosensors.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Hussein, Mohamed A M; Abskharon, Romany; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity assessment of water streams, wastewater, and contaminated sediments, is a very important part of environmental pollution monitoring. Evaluation of biological effects using a rapid, sensitive and cost effective method can indicate specific information on ecotoxicity assessment. Recently, different biological assays for toxicity assessment based on higher and lower organisms such as fish, invertebrates, plants and algal cells, and microbial bioassays have been used. This review focuses on microbial biosensors as an analytical device for environmental, food, and biomedical applications. Different techniques which are commonly used in microbial biosensing include amperometry, potentiometry, conductometry, voltammetry, microbial fuel cells, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and colorimetry. Examples of the use of different microbial biosensors in assessing a variety of environments are summarized. PMID:27071051

  16. A sediment suspension system for bioassays with small aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt-Dallmier, M. J.; Atchison, G.J.; Steingraeber, M.T.; Knights, B.C.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of aquatic organisms to suspended sediments can impair growth and survival and increase bioaccumulation of sediment-associated contaminants. However, evaluation of the effects of suspended sediments and their associated contaminants on aquatic organisms has been hampered by the lack of a practical and inexpensive exposure system for conducting bioassays. We present a cost-effective system for assessing the effects of suspended sediments and associated contaminants on small aquatic organisms. A 7-day suspension test was conducted with nominal sediment concentrations ranging from 0.0 To 5.0 g 1-1. The system maintained relatively constant suspended sediment concentrations, as measured by turbidity, and caused minimal mortality to test organisms.

  17. Acute bioassays with benthic macroinvertebrates conducted in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, M.; Garcia, R.; Sy, J. )

    1989-10-01

    Several methods of toxicity testing using macroinvertebrates in controlled laboratory experiments have been reported. Researchers conducted bioassays with natural assemblages of benthic macroinvertebrates exposed to several petroleum refinery effluents. They found that the populations of invertebrates declined after only a few days of exposure. The objective of the study was to determine the acute toxic effects of discharge water from a petrochemical complex on a natural assemblage of benthic macroinvertebrates. The discharge water consisted of refinery wastewater and sanitary wastewater, as well as brine discharge from a power/desalination plant. The benthic macroinvertebrates were transplanted from a healthy reef area to the outfall channel receiving the discharge water. The study began on October 7, 1985, and concluded that same week. Any decrease in specific species would indicate that the discharge was toxic to these species. These species could also serve as indicators of toxic conditions at other locations.

  18. Comprehensive integration of homogeneous bioassays via centrifugo-pneumatic cascading.

    PubMed

    Godino, Neus; Gorkin, Robert; Linares, Ana V; Burger, Robert; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-02-21

    This work for the first time presents the full integration and automation concept for a range of bioassays leveraged by cascading a centrifugo-pneumatic valving scheme to sequentially move several liquids through shared channel segments for multi-step sample preparation into the detection zone. This novel centrifugo-pneumatic liquid handling significantly simplifies system manufacture by obviating the need for complex surface functionalization procedures or hybrid material integration, as it is common in conventional valving methods such as capillary burst valves or sacrificial valves. Based on the centrifugo-pneumatic valving scheme, this work presents a toolkit of operational elements implementing liquid loading/transfer, metering, mixing and sedimentation in a microstructured polymer disc. As a proof of concept for the broad class of homogeneous bioassays, the full integration and automation of a colorimetric nitrate/nitrite test for the detection of clinically relevant nitric oxide (NO) in whole blood is implemented. First, 40 μL of plasma is extracted from a 100 μL sample of human blood, incubated for one hour with the enzymatic mixture (60 μL), and finally reacted with 100 μL of colorimetric (Greiss) reagents. Following just a single loading phase at the beginning of the process, all of these steps are automated through the centrifugo-pneumatic cascade with a high level of flow control and synchronization. Our system shows good correlation with controls up to 50 μM of nitrate, which adequately covers the healthy human range (4 to 45.3 μM). PMID:23250328

  19. A novel bioassay using root re-growth in Lemna.

    PubMed

    Park, Areum; Kim, Youn-Jung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Han, Taejun

    2013-09-15

    A new phytotoxicity test method based on root elongation of three Lemna species (Lemna gibba, L. minor, and L. paucicostata) has been developed. Tests with aquatic plants have, typically, favored measurements on fronds (e.g. frond number, area, biomass) rather than on roots, due, in part, to issues associated with handling fragile roots and the time-consuming procedures of selecting roots with identical root lengths. The present method differs in that roots were excised prior to exposure with subsequent measurements on newly developed roots. Results show that there were species-specific difference in sensitivity to the five metals tested (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu and Hg), with Ag being the most toxic (EC50=5.3-37.6 μgL(-1)) to all three species, and Cr the least toxic for L. gibba and L. minor (1148.3 and 341.8 μgL(-1), respectively) and Cu for L. paucicostata (470.4 μgL(-1)). Direct comparisons were made with measurements of frond area, which were found to be less sensitive. More generally, root re-growth was shown to reflect the toxic responses of all three Lemna species to these five important metals. The root growth bioassay differs from three internationally standardized methods (ISO, OCED and US EPA) in that it is completed in 48 h, the required volume of test solutions is only 3 ml and non-axenic plants are used. Our results show that the Lemna root method is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive and precise bioassay to assess the toxic risks of metals and has practical application for monitoring municipal and industrial waste waters where metals are common constituents. PMID:23917640

  20. Using lone star ticks, Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) in in vitro laboratory bioassays of repellents: dimensions, duration, and variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The in vitro bioassay is an important tool in repellent discovery and development, with a variety of bioassays used in recent years. Several factors, such as the dimensions and configuration of test surfaces and duration of tick exposure, can influence the outcome of bioassays. We tested two tick re...

  1. Evaluation and simplification of the assimilable organic carbon nutrient bioassay for bacterial growth in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, L A; Bott, T L; Reasoner, D J

    1993-05-01

    A modified assimilable organic carbon (AOC) bioassay is proposed. We evaluated all aspects of the AOC bioassay technique, including inoculum, incubation water, bioassay vessel, and enumeration technique. Other concerns included eliminating the need to prepare organic carbon-free glassware and minimizing the risks of bacterial and organic carbon contamination. Borosilicate vials (40 ml) with Teflon-lined silicone septa are acceptable incubation vessels. Precleaned vials are commercially available, and the inoculum can be injected directly through the septa. Both bioassay organisms, Pseudomonas fluorescens P-17 and Spirillum sp. strain NOX, are available from the American Type Culture Collection and grow well on R2A agar, making this a convenient plating medium. Turbid raw waters need to be filtered prior to an AOC analysis. Glass fiber filters used with either a peristaltic pump or a syringe-type filter holder are recommended for this purpose. A sampling design that emphasizes replication of the highest experimental level, individual batch cultures, is the most efficacious way to reduce the total variance associated with the AOC bioassay. Quality control for the AOC bioassay includes an AOC blank and checks for organic carbon limitation and inhibition of the bioassay organisms. PMID:8517748

  2. An in vitro rainbow trout cell bioassay for AhR-mediated toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Denison, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of PCBs, dioxins, and other halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHS) at environmentally relevant concentrations is in large part mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Bioassays which measure the activity of genes regulated by the receptor provide an integrative measure of the total AhR-mediated toxicity of a sample. The authors have recently developed and characterized a bioassay using recombinant rainbow trout hepatoma cells containing the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the regulation of the AhR. The cell line is designated Remodulated Lightning Trout (RLT). The RLT bioassay is relevant to fish, and is useful as a rapid screening device, a guide for chemical analysis, and a tool for studies of the AhR mechanism. The responses of the RLT cell line to various PCB congeners are similar to responses of in vivo fish bioassays. The authors now report on the responses of the bioassay to dioxins, dibenzofurans, and other related compounds as compared to in vivo fish bioassays. The authors will also report on the utility of the RLT bioassay in measuring the total TEQ of complex mixtures.

  3. Sensitive, Rapid, and Specific Bioassay for the Determination of Antilipogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ulitzur, S.; Goldberg, I.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid bioassay for the determination of the antilipogenic compounds cerulenin and CM-55 is described. The bioassay is based on the inhibitory effect of cerulenin and CM-55 on the in vivo luminescence of an aldehyde-requiring mutant of the marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi. A total quantity as low as 0.1 μg of cerulenin can be determined within 15 min with an error of ±2%. The bioassay, as presented, is specific for compounds that are known to inhibit fatty acid biosynthesis and, as such, it might be used as a general screening method for the detection of antilipogenic compounds. PMID:303076

  4. Toxicity assessment for petroleum-contaminated soil using terrestrial invertebrates and plant bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hentati, Olfa; Lachhab, Radhia; Ayadi, Mariem; Ksibi, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of soil quality after a chemical or oil spill and/or remediation effort may be measured by evaluating the toxicity of soil organisms. To enhance our understanding of the soil quality resulting from laboratory and oil field spill remediation, we assessed toxicity levels by using earthworms and springtails testing and plant growth experiments. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-contaminated soil samples were collected from an oilfield in Sfax, Tunisia. Two types of bioassays were performed. The first assessed the toxicity of spiked crude oil (API gravity 32) in Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development artificial soil. The second evaluated the habitat function through the avoidance responses of earthworms and springtails and the ability of Avena sativa to grow in TPH-contaminated soils diluted with farmland soil. The EC50 of petroleum-contaminated soil for earthworms was 644 mg of TPH/kg of soil at 14 days, with 67 % of the earthworms dying after 14 days when the TPH content reached 1,000 mg/kg. The average germination rate, calculated 8 days after sowing, varied between 64 and 74 % in low contaminated soils and less than 50 % in highly contaminated soils. PMID:22773148

  5. Methods to improve routine bioassay monitoring for freshly separated, poorly transported plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Bihl, D.E.; Lynch, T.P.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several human cases involving inhalation of plutonium oxide at Hanford have shown clearance half-times from the lung that are much longer than the 500-day half-time recommended for class Y plutonium in Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP). The more tenaciously retained material is referred to as super class Y plutonium. The ability to detect super class Y plutonium by current routine bioassay measurements is shown to be poor. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff involved in the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program investigated four methods to se if improvements in routine monitoring of workers for fresh super class Y plutonium are feasible. The methods were lung counting, urine sampling, fecal sampling, and use of diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) to enhance urinary excretion. Use of DTPA was determined to be not feasible. Routine fecal sampling was found to be feasible but not recommended. Recommendations were made to improve the detection level for routine annual urinalysis and routine annual lung counting. 12 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Detection of Organic Compounds with Whole-Cell Bioluminescent Bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices. PMID:25084996

  7. Bioassay-based risk assessment of complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, K.C.; Safe, S.H.; Randerath, K.; Randerath, E.

    1994-12-31

    To compare the standard chemical-based risk assessment with in vitro genotoxicity assays, two complex environmental mixtures from a wood preserving site were analyzed in the Salmonella/microsome and E. coli prophage induction assays. Using GC/MS, sample 003 was found to contain relatively low levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PNAs) and elevated levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), while sample 005 had higher levels of PNAs and relatively low levels of PCDDs. The complex mixtures were sequentially extracted with methylene chloride and methanol for analysis in Salmonella, or extracted with 1:1 hexane: acetone mixture for analysis in the prophage induction assay. At a dose of 1.0 mg/plate in Salmonella strain TA98 with metabolic activation, the methanol extract of sample 003 induced 197 net revertants, while sample 005 induced 436 net revertants. In the prophage induction assay, with activation, the hexane:acetone extract of sample 003 induced a fold increase that was slightly lower than that observed with sample 005. The estimated incremental carcinogenic risk for dermal adsorption and ingestion was 1.5E-3 for sample 003, while for sample 005 the estimated risk was 1.5E-2. Thus, the sample which induced the maximum response in both bioassays also had the highest estimated cancer risk. However, the frequency of PNA-DNA adducts in both skin and liver tissues was appreciably higher with sample 005 than with sample 003.

  8. Analyzing bioassay data using Bayesian methods -- A primer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.; Inkret, W.C.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1997-10-16

    The classical statistics approach used in health physics for the interpretation of measurements is deficient in that it does not allow for the consideration of needle in a haystack effects, where events that are rare in a population are being detected. In fact, this is often the case in health physics measurements, and the false positive fraction is often very large using the prescriptions of classical statistics. Bayesian statistics provides an objective methodology to ensure acceptably small false positive fractions. The authors present the basic methodology and a heuristic discussion. Examples are given using numerically generated and real bioassay data (Tritium). Various analytical models are used to fit the prior probability distribution, in order to test the sensitivity to choice of model. Parametric studies show that the normalized Bayesian decision level k{sub {alpha}}-L{sub c}/{sigma}{sub 0}, where {sigma}{sub 0} is the measurement uncertainty for zero true amount, is usually in the range from 3 to 5 depending on the true positive rate. Four times {sigma}{sub 0} rather than approximately two times {sigma}{sub 0}, as in classical statistics, would often seem a better choice for the decision level.

  9. Target organs in chronic bioassays of 533 chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, L.S.; Slone, T.H.; Manley, N.B. ); Bernstein, L. )

    1991-06-01

    A compendium of carcinogenesis bioassay results organized by target organ is presented for 533 chemicals that are carcinogenic in at least one species. This compendium is based primarily on experiments in rats or mice; results in hamsters, nonhuman primates, and dogs are also reported. The compendium can be used to identify chemicals that induce tumors at particular sites, and to determine whether target sites are the same for chemicals positive in more than one species. The Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB), which includes results of 3969 experiments, is used in the analysis. The published CPDB includes details on each test, and literature references. Chemical carcinogens are reported for 35 different target organs in rats or mice. More than 80% of the carcinogens in each of these species are positive in at least one of the 8 most frequent target sites; liver, lung, mammary gland, stomach, vascular system, kidney, hematopoietic system, and urinary bladder. An analysis is presented of how well one can predict the carcinogenic response in mice from results in rats, or vice versa. Among chemicals tested in both species, 76% of rat carcinogens are positive in mice, and 71% of mouse carcinogens are positive in rats. Prediction is less accurate to the same target site: 52% of rat carcinogens are positive in the same site in mice, and 48% of mouse carcinogens are positive in the same site in rats. The liver is the most frequent site in common between rats and mice.

  10. Using enzyme bioassays as a rapid screen for metal toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choate, LaDonna M.; Ross, P.E.; Blumenstein, E. P.; Ranville, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Mine tailings piles and abandoned mine soils are often contaminated by a suite of toxic metals, which were released in the mining process. Traditionally, toxicity of such areas has been determined by numerous chemical methods including the Toxicity Characteristic Leachate Procedure (TCLP) and traditional toxicity tests using organisms such as the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia. Such tests can be expensive and time-consuming. Enzymatic bioassays may provide an easier, less costly, and more time-effective toxicity screening procedure for mine tailings and abandoned mine soil leachates. This study evaluated the commercially available MetPLATE™ enzymatic toxicity assay test kit. The MetPLATE™ assay uses a modified strain of Escherichia coli bacteria as the test organism. Toxicity is defined by the activity of β-galactosidase enzyme which is monitored colorometrically with a 96-well spectrophotometer. The study used water samples collected from North Fork Clear Creek, a mining influenced water (MIW) located in Colorado. A great benefit to using the MetPLATE™ assay over the TCLP is that it shows actual toxicity of a sample by taking into account the bioavailability of the toxicants rather than simply measuring the metal concentration present. Benefits of the MetPLATE™ assay over the use of C. dubia include greatly reduced time for the testing process (∼2 hours), a more continuous variable due to a greater number of organisms present in each sample (100,000+), and the elimination of need to maintain a culture of organisms at all times.