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Sample records for enhanced afci sampling

  1. Enhanced AFCI Sampling, Analysis, and Safeguards Technology Review

    SciTech Connect

    John Svoboda

    2009-09-01

    The focus of this study includes the investigation of sampling technologies used in industry and their potential application to nuclear fuel processing. The goal is to identify innovative sampling methods using state of the art techniques that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements. Sampling and analysis of nuclear fuel recycling plant processes is required both to monitor the operations and ensure Safeguards and Security goals are met. In addition, environmental regulations lead to additional samples and analysis to meet licensing requirements. The volume of samples taken by conventional means, can restrain productivity while results samples are analyzed, require process holding tanks that are sized to meet analytical issues rather than process issues (and that create a larger facility footprint), or, in some cases, simply overwhelm analytical laboratory capabilities. These issues only grow when process flowsheets propose new separations systems and new byproduct material for transmutation purposes. Novel means of streamlining both sampling and analysis are being evaluated to increase the efficiency while meeting all requirements for information. This report addresses just a part of the effort to develop and study novel methods by focusing on the sampling and analysis of aqueous samples for metallic elements. It presents an overview of the sampling requirements, including frequency, sensitivity, accuracy, and programmatic drivers, to demonstrate the magnitude of the task. The sampling and analysis system needed for metallic element measurements is then discussed, and novel options being applied to other industrial analytical needs are presented. Inductively coupled mass spectrometry instruments are the most versatile for metallic element analyses and are thus chosen as the focus for the study. Candidate novel means of process sampling, as well as modifications that are necessary to couple such instruments to

  2. AFCI Safeguards Enhancement Study: Technology Development Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Dougan, A.; Tobin, Stephen; Cipiti, B.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Bakel, A. J.; Bean, Robert; Grate, Jay W.; Santi, P.; Bryan, Steven; Kinlaw, M. T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Burr, Tom; Lehn, Scott A.; Tolk, K.; Chichester, David; Menlove, H.; Vo, D.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Merkle, P.; Wang, T. F.; Duran, F.; Nakae, L.; Warren, Glen A.; Friedrich, S.; Rabin, M.

    2008-12-31

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Safeguards Campaign aims to develop safeguards technologies and processes that will significantly reduce the risk of proliferation in the U.S. nuclear fuel cycle of tomorrow. The Safeguards Enhancement Study was chartered with identifying promising research and development (R&D) directions over timescales both near-term and long-term, and under safeguards oversight both domestic and international. This technology development roadmap documents recognized gaps and needs in the safeguarding of nuclear fuel cycles, and outlines corresponding performance targets for each of those needs. Drawing on the collective expertise of technologists and user-representatives, a list of over 30 technologies that have the potential to meet those needs was developed, along with brief summaries of each candidate technology. Each summary describes the potential impact of that technology, key research questions to be addressed, and prospective development milestones that could lead to a definitive viability or performance assessment. Important programmatic linkages between U.S. agencies and offices are also described, reflecting the emergence of several safeguards R&D programs in the U.S. and the reinvigoration of nuclear fuel cycles across the globe.

  3. AFCI Storage & Disposal FY-06 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W G; Wigeland, R; Dixon, B

    2006-09-27

    AFCI Storage and Disposal participants at LLNL, ANL and INL provide assessment of how AFCI technology can optimize the future evolution of the fuel cycle, including optimization of waste management. Evaluation of material storage and repository disposal technical issues provides feedback on criteria and metrics for AFCI, and evaluation of AFCI waste streams provides technical alternatives for future repository optimization. LLNL coordinates this effort that includes repository analysis at ANL and incorporation of repository impacts into AFCI criteria at INL. Cooperative evaluation with YMP staff is pursued to provide a mutually agreed technical base. Cooperation with select international programs is supported.

  4. 2014 AFCI Glovebox Event Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Joseph Lenard

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary INL missions is to support development of advanced fuels with the goal of creating reactor fuels that produce less waste and are easier to store. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Glovebox in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF) is used for several fuel fabrication steps that involve transuranic elements, including americium. The AFCI glove box contains equipment used for fuel fabrication, including an arc melter – a small, laboratory-scale version of an electric arc furnace used to make new metal alloys for research – and an americium distillation apparatus. This overview summarizes key findings related to the investigation into the releases of airborne radioactivity that occurred in the AFCI glovebox room in late August and early September 2014. The full report (AFCI Glovebox Radiological Release – Evaluation, Corrective Actions and Testing, INL/INL-15-36996) provides details of the identified issues, corrective actions taken as well as lessons learned

  5. Superposition Enhanced Nested Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiniani, Stefano; Stevenson, Jacob D.; Wales, David J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2014-07-01

    The theoretical analysis of many problems in physics, astronomy, and applied mathematics requires an efficient numerical exploration of multimodal parameter spaces that exhibit broken ergodicity. Monte Carlo methods are widely used to deal with these classes of problems, but such simulations suffer from a ubiquitous sampling problem: The probability of sampling a particular state is proportional to its entropic weight. Devising an algorithm capable of sampling efficiently the full phase space is a long-standing problem. Here, we report a new hybrid method for the exploration of multimodal parameter spaces exhibiting broken ergodicity. Superposition enhanced nested sampling combines the strengths of global optimization with the unbiased or athermal sampling of nested sampling, greatly enhancing its efficiency with no additional parameters. We report extensive tests of this new approach for atomic clusters that are known to have energy landscapes for which conventional sampling schemes suffer from broken ergodicity. We also introduce a novel parallelization algorithm for nested sampling.

  6. Quality Assurance Protocol for AFCI Advanced Structural Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T

    2009-05-01

    application of NQA-1 requirements at the site. The current program is being revised to incorporate changes imposed through the recently revised AFCI Technical Integration Office QA requirements. Testing conducted under the AFCI QA program for the advanced structural materials effort shall incorporate the following quality assurance expectations: (1) personnel are adequately trained to perform assigned work; (2) activities are controlled to ensure consistency of results; (3) records necessary to substantiate how the work was performed are maintained (dedicated laboratory notebooks will be used); (4) the pedigree and traceability of the various tested materials are maintained throughout the described processes using consistent sample numbering and adequate record keeping; (5) equipment with the potential to affect the quality of the planned work is calibrated and maintained in accordance with applicable operating requirements. In addition, all reporting or related dissemination by ORNL personnel of the results of the work described in this subcontract shall be conducted in accordance with the requirements described or referenced in the ORNL Standards Based Management System subject area entitled Scientific and Technical Information. Reporting or publications at other institutions will be conducted in accordance with the requirements of that institution. Successful implementation of these protocols will provide a sound basis for future decisions and research. In addition, these steps will also help ensure that results can also be applied to licensing discussions at a future date.

  7. UDS Recovery Equipment Installation (AFCI CETE Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2009-06-01

    This letter documents the successful installation of the un-dissolved solids (UDS) recovery equipment into the hot-cell in building 7920 at ORNL. This installation (see Figure 1) satisfies the AFCI Level 4 milestone in the CETE Investments and Hot Cell Upgrades work package (OR0915020323) to 'Complete UDS recovery equipment installation' (M4502032306), due 30 June 09.

  8. MDD Status Letter Report (AFCI CETE Milestone)

    SciTech Connect

    Vedder, Raymond James; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2009-09-01

    understanding of the chemistry of the uranium-ammonium double nitrate salt was developed. Later pilot-scale studies produced kilogram quantities of UO{sub 3} using engineering-scale (1 kg/hour), continuously-operated equipment, while establishing the reliability of the process and equipment. The current work was performed in support of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), utilizing glove-box-contained equipment (100 g/hour) to produce UO{sub 3}, PuO{sub 2}, and mixed oxides of uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium from a nitrate solution of those actinides. Then the MDD glove-box system was utilized in the Coupled-End-To-End (CETE) project to convert the U-Pu-Np and uranium product solutions into oxide powders. As part of the CETE project, a powder characterization laboratory was established in gloveboxes with instruments required for the determination of: (1) surface area by the BET methodology; (2) tap density by using a Quantachrome AutoTap; (3) flow properties by using a Freeman technology powder rheometer; (4) material composition and crystalline structure by using a powder X-ray diffractometer; (5) particle size distribution by using a laser light-scattering analyzer; and (6) imaging of the powders with a stereomicroscope. These instruments can be used to characterize the products and to determine the effects of MDD operating parameters on product powder morphology. Ultimately, the powder characteristics necessary to produce high-density, sintered MOX pellets can be determined.

  9. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L.

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the

  10. AFCI-2.0 Library of Neutron Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.; Pigni,M.; Hoblit,S.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Sonzogni,A.; Talou,P.; Chadwick,M.B.; Hale.G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G.

    2011-06-26

    Neutron cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. The covariances refer to central values given in the 2006 release of the U.S. neutron evaluated library ENDF/B-VII. The preliminary version (AFCI-2.0beta) has been completed in October 2010 and made available to the users for comments. In the final 2.0 release, covariances for a few materials were updated, in particular new LANL evaluations for {sup 238,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were adopted. BNL was responsible for covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work, while LANL was in charge of covariances for light nuclei and for actinides.

  11. AFCI-2.0 Neutron Cross Section Covariance Library

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.; Herman, M; Oblozinsky, P.; Mattoon, C.M.; Pigni, M.; Hoblit, S.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.; Talou, P.; Chadwick, M.B.; Hale, G.M.; Kahler, A.C.; Kawano, T.; Little, R.C.; Yount, P.G.

    2011-03-01

    The cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The project builds on two covariance libraries developed earlier, with considerable input from BNL and LANL. In 2006, international effort under WPEC Subgroup 26 produced BOLNA covariance library by putting together data, often preliminary, from various sources for most important materials for nuclear reactor technology. This was followed in 2007 by collaborative effort of four US national laboratories to produce covariances, often of modest quality - hence the name low-fidelity, for virtually complete set of materials included in ENDF/B-VII.0. The present project is focusing on covariances of 4-5 major reaction channels for 110 materials of importance for power reactors. The work started under Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) in 2008, which changed to Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) in 2009. With the 2011 release the name has changed to the Covariance Multigroup Matrix for Advanced Reactor Applications (COMMARA) version 2.0. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for AFCI data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. Responsibility of BNL was defined as developing covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work; LANL responsibility was defined as covariances for light nuclei and actinides. The COMMARA-2.0 covariance library has been developed by BNL-LANL collaboration for Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative applications over the period of three years, 2008-2010. It contains covariances for 110 materials relevant to fast reactor R&D. The library is to be used together with the ENDF/B-VII.0 central values of the latest official release of US files of evaluated neutron cross sections. COMMARA-2.0 library contains neutron cross section covariances for 12 light nuclei (coolants and moderators), 78 structural

  12. AFCI Transmutation Fuel Processes and By-Products Planning: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eric L. Shaber

    2005-09-01

    The goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program are to reduce high-level waste volume, reduce long-lived and radiotoxic elements, and reclaim valuable energy content of spent nuclear fuel. The AFCI chartered the Fuel Development Working Group (FDWG) to develop advanced fuels in support of the AFCI goals. The FDWG organized a phased strategy of fuel development that is designed to match the needs of the AFCI program: Phase 1 - High-burnup fuels for light-water reactors (LWRs) and tri-isotopic (TRISO) fuel for gas-cooled reactors Phase 2 – Mixed oxide fuels with minor actinides for LWRs, Am transmutation targets for LWRs, inert matrix fuels for LWRs, and TRISO fuel containing Pu and other transuranium for gas-cooled reactors Phase 3 – Fertile free or low-fertile metal, ceramic, ceramic dispersed in a metal matrix (CERMET), and ceramics dispersed in a ceramic matrix (CERCER) that would be used primarily in fast reactors. Development of advanced fuels requires the fabrication, assembly, and irradiation of prototypic fuel under bounding reactor conditions. At specialized national laboratory facilities small quantities of actinides are being fabricated into such fuel for irradiation tests. Fabrication of demonstration quantities of selected fuels for qualification testing is needed but not currently feasible, because existing manual glovebox fabrication approaches result in significant radiation exposures when larger quantities of actinides are involved. The earliest demonstration test fuels needed in the AFCI program are expected to be variants of commercial mixed oxide fuel for use in an LWR as lead test assemblies. Manufacture of such test assemblies will require isolated fabrication lines at a facility not currently available in the U.S. Such facilities are now being planned as part of an Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). Adequate planning for and specification of actinide fuel fabrication facilities capable of producing transmutation fuels

  13. Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

    2005-09-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

  14. Designing an enhanced groundwater sample collection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schalla, R.

    1994-10-01

    As part of an ongoing technical support mission to achieve excellence and efficiency in environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory for Energy and Health-Related Research (LEHR), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provided guidance on the design and construction of monitoring wells and identified the most suitable type of groundwater sampling pump and accessories for monitoring wells. The goal was to utilize a monitoring well design that would allow for hydrologic testing and reduce turbidity to minimize the impact of sampling. The sampling results of the newly designed monitoring wells were clearly superior to those of the previously installed monitoring wells. The new wells exhibited reduced turbidity, in addition to improved access for instrumentation and hydrologic testing. The variable frequency submersible pump was selected as the best choice for obtaining groundwater samples. The literature references are listed at the end of this report. Despite some initial difficulties, the actual performance of the variable frequency, submersible pump and its accessories was effective in reducing sampling time and labor costs, and its ease of use was preferred over the previously used bladder pumps. The surface seals system, called the Dedicator, proved to be useful accessory to prevent surface contamination while providing easy access for water-level measurements and for connecting the pump. Cost savings resulted from the use of the pre-production pumps (beta units) donated by the manufacturer for the demonstration. However, larger savings resulted from shortened field time due to the ease in using the submersible pumps and the surface seal access system. Proper deployment of the monitoring wells also resulted in cost savings and ensured representative samples.

  15. AFCI UFP, Final Technical Report DE-FC07-00AL67053

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Dixon

    2005-02-21

    The project ''Creating an Educational Consortium to Support the Recruitment and Retention of Expertise for the Nuclear Weapons Complex'' was also known as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) University Fellowship Program. Since its inception, the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program and its predecessor, the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) program, have engaged university researchers and students in the sciences necessary to answer technical questions related to reducing high-level waste volumes, optimizing the economics and performance of Yucca Mountain, reducing the technical need for a second repository, reducing the long-term inventories of plutonium in spent fuel, and enabling the proliferation-resistant recovery of the energy contained in spent fuel. The Advanced Fuel Cycle University Fellowship Program is intended to support top students across the nation in a variety of disciplines that will be required to support transmutation research and technology development in the coming decades.

  16. AFCI Fuel Irradiation Test Plan, Test Specimens AFC-1Æ and AFC-1F

    SciTech Connect

    D. C. Crawford; S. L. Hayes; B. A. Hilton; M. K. Meyer; R. G. Ambrosek; G. S. Chang; D. J. Utterbeck

    2003-11-01

    The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository (DOE, 2003). One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. There are little irradiation performance data available on non-fertile fuel forms, which would maximize the destruction rate of plutonium, and low-fertile (i.e., uranium-bearing) fuel forms, which would support a sustainable nuclear energy option. Initial scoping level irradiation tests on a variety of candidate fuel forms are needed to establish a transmutation fuel form design and evaluate deployment of transmutation fuels.

  17. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Repository Impact Evaluation FY-05 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W G

    2005-09-12

    An important long-term objective of advanced nuclear fuel cycle (AFC) technologies is to provide improvement in the long-term management of radioactive waste. Compared to a once-thru fuel cycle, it is possible to generate far less waste, and potentially easier waste to manage, with advanced fuel cycles. However, the precise extent and value of these benefits are complex and difficult to quantify. This document presents a status report of efforts within AFCI Systems Analysis to define and quantify the AFC benefits to geologic disposal, development of cooperative efforts with the US repository program, and participation with international evaluations of AFC impacts on waste management. The primary analysis of repository benefits is conducted by ANL. This year repository impact evaluations have included: (1) Continued evaluation of LWR recycle benefits in support of scenario analysis. (2) Extension of repository analyses to consider long-term dose reductions. (3) Developing the opportunity for cooperation with the U.S. repository program. (4) International cooperation with OECD-NEA.

  18. Reactor physics studies for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovskiy, Evgeny Yuryevich

    In the recently completed RACE Project of the AFCI, accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) experiments were conducted to develop technology of coupling accelerators to nuclear reactors. In these experiments electron accelerators induced photon-neutron reactions in heavy-metal targets to initiate fission reactions in ADS. Although the Idaho State University (ISU) RACE ADS was constructed only to develop measurement techniques for advanced experiments, many reactor kinetics experiments were conducted there. In the research reported in this dissertation, a method was developed to calculate kinetics parameters for measurement and calculation of the reactivity of ADS, a safety parameter that is necessary for control and monitoring of power production. Reactivity is measured in units of fraction of delayed versus prompt neutron from fission, a quantity that cannot be directly measured in far-subcritical reactors such as the ISU RACE configuration. A new technique is reported herein to calculate it accurately and to predict kinetic behavior of a far-subcritical ADS. Experiments conducted at ISU are first described and experimental data are presented before development of the kinetic theory used in the new computational method. Because of the complexity of the ISU ADS, the Monte-Carlo method as applied in the MCNP code is most suitable for modeling reactor kinetics. However, the standard method of calculating the delayed neutron fraction produces inaccurate values. A new method was developed and used herein to evaluate actual experiments. An advantage of this method is that its efficiency is independent of the fission yield of delayed neutrons, which makes it suitable for fuel with a minor actinide component (e.g. transmutation fuels). The implementation of this method is based on a correlated sampling technique which allows the accurate evaluation of delayed and prompt neutrons. The validity of the obtained results is indicated by good agreement between experimental

  19. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  20. Enhanced, targeted sampling of high-dimensional free-energy landscapes using variationally enhanced sampling, with an application to chignolin.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Patrick; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-02-01

    The capabilities of molecular simulations have been greatly extended by a number of widely used enhanced sampling methods that facilitate escaping from metastable states and crossing large barriers. Despite these developments there are still many problems which remain out of reach for these methods which has led to a vigorous effort in this area. One of the most important problems that remains unsolved is sampling high-dimensional free-energy landscapes and systems that are not easily described by a small number of collective variables. In this work we demonstrate a new way to compute free-energy landscapes of high dimensionality based on the previously introduced variationally enhanced sampling, and we apply it to the miniprotein chignolin. PMID:26787868

  1. Enhanced, targeted sampling of high-dimensional free-energy landscapes using variationally enhanced sampling, with an application to chignolin

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Patrick; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The capabilities of molecular simulations have been greatly extended by a number of widely used enhanced sampling methods that facilitate escaping from metastable states and crossing large barriers. Despite these developments there are still many problems which remain out of reach for these methods which has led to a vigorous effort in this area. One of the most important problems that remains unsolved is sampling high-dimensional free-energy landscapes and systems that are not easily described by a small number of collective variables. In this work we demonstrate a new way to compute free-energy landscapes of high dimensionality based on the previously introduced variationally enhanced sampling, and we apply it to the miniprotein chignolin. PMID:26787868

  2. A Variational Approach to Enhanced Sampling and Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, Michele

    2015-03-01

    The presence of kinetic bottlenecks severely hampers the ability of widely used sampling methods like molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo to explore complex free energy landscapes. One of the most popular methods for addressing this problem is umbrella sampling which is based on the addition of an external bias which helps overcoming the kinetic barriers. The bias potential is usually taken to be a function of a restricted number of collective variables. However constructing the bias is not simple, especially when the number of collective variables increases. Here we introduce a functional of the bias which, when minimized, allows us to recover the free energy. We demonstrate the usefulness and the flexibility of this approach on a number of examples which include the determination of a six dimensional free energy surface. Besides the practical advantages, the existence of such a variational principle allows us to look at the enhanced sampling problem from a rather convenient vantage point.

  3. Enhanced Sampling and Analysis, Selection of Technology for Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, John; Meikrantz, David

    2010-02-01

    The focus of this study includes the investigation of sampling technologies used in industry and their potential application to nuclear fuel processing. The goal is to identify innovative sampling methods using state of the art techniques that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements. This report details the progress made in the first half of FY 2010 and includes a further consideration of the research focus and goals for this year. Our sampling options and focus for the next generation sampling method are presented along with the criteria used for choosing our path forward. We have decided to pursue the option of evaluating the feasibility of microcapillary based chips to remotely collect, transfer, track and supply microliters of sample solutions to analytical equipment in support of aqueous processes for used nuclear fuel cycles. Microchip vendors have been screened and a choice made for the development of a suitable microchip design followed by production of samples for evaluation by ANL, LANL, and INL on an independent basis.

  4. Variational Approach to Enhanced Sampling and Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2014-08-01

    The ability of widely used sampling methods, such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations, to explore complex free energy landscapes is severely hampered by the presence of kinetic bottlenecks. A large number of solutions have been proposed to alleviate this problem. Many are based on the introduction of a bias potential which is a function of a small number of collective variables. However constructing such a bias is not simple. Here we introduce a functional of the bias potential and an associated variational principle. The bias that minimizes the functional relates in a simple way to the free energy surface. This variational principle can be turned into a practical, efficient, and flexible sampling method. A number of numerical examples are presented which include the determination of a three-dimensional free energy surface. We argue that, beside being numerically advantageous, our variational approach provides a convenient and novel standpoint for looking at the sampling problem.

  5. Enhanced spot preparation for liquid extractive sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; King, Richard C.

    2015-09-22

    A method for performing surface sampling of an analyte, includes the step of placing the analyte on a stage with a material in molar excess to the analyte, such that analyte-analyte interactions are prevented and the analyte can be solubilized for further analysis. The material can be a matrix material that is mixed with the analyte. The material can be provided on a sample support. The analyte can then be contacted with a solvent to extract the analyte for further processing, such as by electrospray mass spectrometry.

  6. Metadynamic metainference: Enhanced sampling of the metainference ensemble using metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Massimiliano; Camilloni, Carlo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and precise structural ensembles of proteins and macromolecular complexes can be obtained with metainference, a recently proposed Bayesian inference method that integrates experimental information with prior knowledge and deals with all sources of errors in the data as well as with sample heterogeneity. The study of complex macromolecular systems, however, requires an extensive conformational sampling, which represents a separate challenge. To address such challenge and to exhaustively and efficiently generate structural ensembles we combine metainference with metadynamics and illustrate its application to the calculation of the free energy landscape of the alanine dipeptide. PMID:27561930

  7. Metadynamic metainference: Enhanced sampling of the metainference ensemble using metadynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Massimiliano; Camilloni, Carlo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and precise structural ensembles of proteins and macromolecular complexes can be obtained with metainference, a recently proposed Bayesian inference method that integrates experimental information with prior knowledge and deals with all sources of errors in the data as well as with sample heterogeneity. The study of complex macromolecular systems, however, requires an extensive conformational sampling, which represents a separate challenge. To address such challenge and to exhaustively and efficiently generate structural ensembles we combine metainference with metadynamics and illustrate its application to the calculation of the free energy landscape of the alanine dipeptide. PMID:27561930

  8. Enhancing Paradynamics for QM/MM Sampling of Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Jerônimo; Kupchencko, Ilya; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-03-10

    Despite the enormous increase in computer power, it is still extremely challenging to obtain computationally converging sampling of ab initio QM/MM (QM(ai)/MM) free energy surfaces in condensed phases. The sampling problem can be significantly reduced by the use of the reference potential paradynamics (PD) approach, but even this approach still requires major computer time in studies of enzymatic reactions. To further reduce the sampling problem we developed here a new PD version where we use an empirical valence bond reference potential that has a minimum rather than a maximum at the transition state region of the target potential (this is accomplished conveniently by shifting the EVB of the product state). Hence, we can map the TS region in a more efficient way. Here, we introduce and validate the inverted EVB PD approach. The validation involves the study of the S(N)2 step of the reaction catalyzed by haloakene dehalogenase (DhlA) and the GTP hydrolysis in the RasGAP system. In addition, we have also studied the corresponding reaction in water for each of the systems described here and the reaction involving trimethylsulfonium and dimethylamine in solution. The results are encouraging and the new strategy appears to provide a powerful way of evaluating QM(ai)/MM activation free energies. PMID:26866994

  9. Active sampling technique to enhance chemical signature of buried explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, John S.; French, Patrick D.

    2004-09-01

    Deminers and dismounted countermine engineers commonly use metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and probes to locate mines. Many modern landmines have a very low metal content, which severely limits the effectiveness of metal detectors. Canines have also been used for landmine detection for decades. Experiments have shown that canines smell the explosives which are known to leak from most types of landmines. The fact that dogs can detect landmines indicates that vapor sensing is a viable approach to landmine detection. Several groups are currently developing systems to detect landmines by "sniffing" for the ultra-trace explosive vapors above the soil. The amount of material that is available to passive vapor sensing systems is limited to no more than the vapor in equilibrium with the explosive related chemicals (ERCs) distributed in the surface soils over and near the landmine. The low equilibrium vapor pressure of TNT in the soil/atmosphere boundary layer and the limited volume of the boundary layer air imply that passive chemical vapor sensing systems require sensitivities in the picogram range, or lower. ADA is working to overcome many of the limitations of passive sampling methods, by the use of an active sampling method that employs a high-powered (1,200+ joules) strobe lamp to create a highly amplified plume of vapor and/or ERC-bearing fine particulates. Initial investigations have demonstrated that this approach can amplify the detectability of TNT by two or three orders of magnitude. This new active sampling technique could be used with any suitable explosive sensor.

  10. Enhanced Sampling in the Well-Tempered Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomi, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2010-05-01

    We introduce the well-tempered ensemble (WTE) which is the biased ensemble sampled by well-tempered metadynamics when the energy is used as collective variable. WTE can be designed so as to have approximately the same average energy as the canonical ensemble but much larger fluctuations. These two properties lead to an extremely fast exploration of phase space. An even greater efficiency is obtained when WTE is combined with parallel tempering. Unbiased Boltzmann averages are computed on the fly by a recently developed reweighting method [M. Bonomi , J. Comput. Chem. 30, 1615 (2009)JCCHDD0192-865110.1002/jcc.21305]. We apply WTE and its parallel tempering variant to the 2d Ising model and to a Gō model of HIV protease, demonstrating in these two representative cases that convergence is accelerated by orders of magnitude.

  11. Enhanced sampling in the well-tempered ensemble.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, M; Parrinello, M

    2010-05-14

    We introduce the well-tempered ensemble (WTE) which is the biased ensemble sampled by well-tempered metadynamics when the energy is used as collective variable. WTE can be designed so as to have approximately the same average energy as the canonical ensemble but much larger fluctuations. These two properties lead to an extremely fast exploration of phase space. An even greater efficiency is obtained when WTE is combined with parallel tempering. Unbiased Boltzmann averages are computed on the fly by a recently developed reweighting method [M. Bonomi, J. Comput. Chem. 30, 1615 (2009)]. We apply WTE and its parallel tempering variant to the 2d Ising model and to a Gō model of HIV protease, demonstrating in these two representative cases that convergence is accelerated by orders of magnitude. PMID:20866953

  12. Enhanced Conformational Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solvated Peptides: Fragment-Based Local Elevation Umbrella Sampling.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Halvor S; Daura, Xavier; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2010-09-14

    A new method, fragment-based local elevation umbrella sampling (FB-LEUS), is proposed to enhance the conformational sampling in explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of solvated polymers. The method is derived from the local elevation umbrella sampling (LEUS) method [ Hansen and Hünenberger , J. Comput. Chem. 2010 , 31 , 1 - 23 ], which combines the local elevation (LE) conformational searching and the umbrella sampling (US) conformational sampling approaches into a single scheme. In LEUS, an initial (relatively short) LE build-up (searching) phase is used to construct an optimized (grid-based) biasing potential within a subspace of conformationally relevant degrees of freedom, which is then frozen and used in a (comparatively longer) US sampling phase. This combination dramatically enhances the sampling power of MD simulations but, due to computational and memory costs, is only applicable to relevant subspaces of low dimensionalities. As an attempt to expand the scope of the LEUS approach to solvated polymers with more than a few relevant degrees of freedom, the FB-LEUS scheme involves an US sampling phase that relies on a superposition of low-dimensionality biasing potentials optimized using LEUS at the fragment level. The feasibility of this approach is tested using polyalanine (poly-Ala) and polyvaline (poly-Val) oligopeptides. Two-dimensional biasing potentials are preoptimized at the monopeptide level, and subsequently applied to all dihedral-angle pairs within oligopeptides of 4,  6,  8, or 10 residues. Two types of fragment-based biasing potentials are distinguished: (i) the basin-filling (BF) potentials act so as to "fill" free-energy basins up to a prescribed free-energy level above the global minimum; (ii) the valley-digging (VD) potentials act so as to "dig" valleys between the (four) free-energy minima of the two-dimensional maps, preserving barriers (relative to linearly interpolated free-energy changes) of a prescribed magnitude

  13. Enhanced Gas Analysis for Diagnostics and Surveillance (EGADS): Contamination-free sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, L.M.; Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.

    1997-10-01

    Providing uncontaminated weapon internal atmosphere samples and measuring their dew points is of paramount importance for enhanced surveillance and accelerated aging. The authors are developing and integrating four types of gas sampling systems for use throughout the weapons complex. They are utilizing tools to extract time/age information from the gas analysis of weapon internal atmospheres.

  14. AFCI Options Study

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2009-09-01

    This report describes the background and framework for both organizing the discussion and providing information on the potential for nuclear energy R&D to develop alternative nuclear fuel cycles that would address the issues with the current implementations of nuclear power, including nuclear waste disposal, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics, and sustainability. The disposition of used fuel is the cause of many of the concerns, and the possible approaches to used fuel management identify a number of basic technology areas that need to be considered. The basic science in each of the technology areas is discussed, emphasizing what science is currently available, where scientific knowledge may be insufficient, and especially to identify specific areas where transformational discoveries may allow achievement of performance goals not currently attainable. These discussions lead to the wide range of technical options that have been the basis for past and current research and development on advanced nuclear fuel cycles in the United States. The results of this work are then briefly reviewed to show the extent to which such approaches are capable of addressing the issues with nuclear power, the potential for moving further, and the inherent limitations.

  15. Evaluation of Enhanced Sampling Provided by Accelerated Molecular Dynamics with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many problems studied via molecular dynamics require accurate estimates of various thermodynamic properties, such as the free energies of different states of a system, which in turn requires well-converged sampling of the ensemble of possible structures. Enhanced sampling techniques are often applied to provide faster convergence than is possible with traditional molecular dynamics simulations. Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-REMD) is a particularly attractive method, as it allows the incorporation of a variety of enhanced sampling techniques through modifications to the various Hamiltonians. In this work, we study the enhanced sampling of the RNA tetranucleotide r(GACC) provided by H-REMD combined with accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD), where a boosting potential is applied to torsions, and compare this to the enhanced sampling provided by H-REMD in which torsion potential barrier heights are scaled down to lower force constants. We show that H-REMD and multidimensional REMD (M-REMD) combined with aMD does indeed enhance sampling for r(GACC), and that the addition of the temperature dimension in the M-REMD simulations is necessary to efficiently sample rare conformations. Interestingly, we find that the rate of convergence can be improved in a single H-REMD dimension by simply increasing the number of replicas from 8 to 24 without increasing the maximum level of bias. The results also indicate that factors beyond replica spacing, such as round trip times and time spent at each replica, must be considered in order to achieve optimal sampling efficiency. PMID:24625009

  16. Free Energy Calculations using a Swarm-Enhanced Sampling Molecular Dynamics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Burusco, Kepa K; Bruce, Neil J; Alibay, Irfan; Bryce, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Free energy simulations are an established computational tool in modelling chemical change in the condensed phase. However, sampling of kinetically distinct substates remains a challenge to these approaches. As a route to addressing this, we link the methods of thermodynamic integration (TI) and swarm-enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (sesMD), where simulation replicas interact cooperatively to aid transitions over energy barriers. We illustrate the approach by using alchemical alkane transformations in solution, comparing them with the multiple independent trajectory TI (IT-TI) method. Free energy changes for transitions computed by using IT-TI grew increasingly inaccurate as the intramolecular barrier was heightened. By contrast, swarm-enhanced sampling TI (sesTI) calculations showed clear improvements in sampling efficiency, leading to more accurate computed free energy differences, even in the case of the highest barrier height. The sesTI approach, therefore, has potential in addressing chemical change in systems where conformations exist in slow exchange. PMID:26418190

  17. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.

    2015-07-01

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water.

  18. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.

    2015-07-14

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water.

  19. Modeling and enhanced sampling of molecular systems with smooth and nonlinear data-driven collective variables.

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Behrooz; Millán, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino

    2013-12-01

    Collective variables (CVs) are low-dimensional representations of the state of a complex system, which help us rationalize molecular conformations and sample free energy landscapes with molecular dynamics simulations. Given their importance, there is need for systematic methods that effectively identify CVs for complex systems. In recent years, nonlinear manifold learning has shown its ability to automatically characterize molecular collective behavior. Unfortunately, these methods fail to provide a differentiable function mapping high-dimensional configurations to their low-dimensional representation, as required in enhanced sampling methods. We introduce a methodology that, starting from an ensemble representative of molecular flexibility, builds smooth and nonlinear data-driven collective variables (SandCV) from the output of nonlinear manifold learning algorithms. We demonstrate the method with a standard benchmark molecule, alanine dipeptide, and show how it can be non-intrusively combined with off-the-shelf enhanced sampling methods, here the adaptive biasing force method. We illustrate how enhanced sampling simulations with SandCV can explore regions that were poorly sampled in the original molecular ensemble. We further explore the transferability of SandCV from a simpler system, alanine dipeptide in vacuum, to a more complex system, alanine dipeptide in explicit water. PMID:24320358

  20. Modeling and enhanced sampling of molecular systems with smooth and nonlinear data-driven collective variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, Behrooz; Millán, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino

    2013-12-01

    Collective variables (CVs) are low-dimensional representations of the state of a complex system, which help us rationalize molecular conformations and sample free energy landscapes with molecular dynamics simulations. Given their importance, there is need for systematic methods that effectively identify CVs for complex systems. In recent years, nonlinear manifold learning has shown its ability to automatically characterize molecular collective behavior. Unfortunately, these methods fail to provide a differentiable function mapping high-dimensional configurations to their low-dimensional representation, as required in enhanced sampling methods. We introduce a methodology that, starting from an ensemble representative of molecular flexibility, builds smooth and nonlinear data-driven collective variables (SandCV) from the output of nonlinear manifold learning algorithms. We demonstrate the method with a standard benchmark molecule, alanine dipeptide, and show how it can be non-intrusively combined with off-the-shelf enhanced sampling methods, here the adaptive biasing force method. We illustrate how enhanced sampling simulations with SandCV can explore regions that were poorly sampled in the original molecular ensemble. We further explore the transferability of SandCV from a simpler system, alanine dipeptide in vacuum, to a more complex system, alanine dipeptide in explicit water.

  1. Breast cancer detection based on serum sample surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Obieta, Enrique; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; González-Solís, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a sample at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the breast cancer detection based on serum SERS. The serum samples were obtained from 12 patients who were clinically diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and 15 controls. In the same proportion, the serum samples were mixed with colloidal gold nanoparticles of 40 nm using sonication. At least 10 spectra were collected of each serum sample using a Jobin-Yvon LabRAM Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830 nm. Raw spectra were processed by carrying baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization and then analyzed using principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Raman spectra showed strongly enhanced bands in the 600-1800 cm (-1) range due to the nanoparticle colloidal clusters observed. These Raman bands allowed identifying biomolecules present at low concentration as amide I and III, β carotene, glutathione, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Preliminary results demonstrated that SERS and PCA-LDA can be used to discriminate between control and cancer samples with high sensitivity and specificity. SERS allowed short exposures and required a minimal sample preparation. The preliminary results suggest that SERS and PCA-LDA could be an excellent support technique for the breast cancer detection using serum samples. PMID:27289243

  2. An aerodynamic assisted miniature mass spectrometer for enhanced volatile sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanbing; Jiang, Ting; Huang, Guangyan; Wei, Yongzheng; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-21

    Previously, we have reported the development of a miniature mass spectrometer with a continuous atmospheric pressure interface (CAPI), and the use of it for non-volatile sample analysis, such as drugs, peptides and proteins. However due to the diffusion effects in the CAPI, especially stronger for light ions, the instrument shows low detection sensitivities for volatile samples when coupling with an atmosphere pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source (>ppmv). In this study, an in-vacuum plasma ionization source was designed and integrated into the system. By performing ionization in the first vacuum stage, ion transfer loss through the CAPI was minimized and tens of ppbv level detection sensitivities were achieved for volatile samples. Due to its improved sensitivity, chemical source tracing was demonstrated in an indoor environment as a simple proof-of-concept example. Furthermore, an aerodynamic sampling method was developed to facilitate directional sample transfer towards the miniature mass spectrometer in an open environment. By coupling this aerodynamic method with the miniature mass spectrometer, remote chemical source sensing could be achieved at a distance of more than two meters. This aerodynamic sampling method could also be applied to other mass spectrometry instruments for enhanced sample sampling in open environments. PMID:27379359

  3. A modified transmission tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) setup provides access to opaque samples.

    PubMed

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Richter, Marc; Knebel, Detlef; Jähnke, Torsten; Jankowski, Tilo; Stock, Erik; Deckert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The combination of scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy enables chemical characterization of surfaces at highest spatial resolution. This so-called tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) can be employed for a variety of samples where a label-free characterization or identification of constituents on the nanometer scale is pursued. Present TERS setup geometries are always a compromise for specific dedicated applications and show different advantages and disadvantages: Transmission back-reflection setups, when using immersion objectives with a high numerical aperture, intrinsically provide the highest collection efficiency but cannot be applied for opaque samples. Those samples demand upright setups, at the cost of lower collection efficiency, even though very efficient systems using a parabolic mirror for illumination and collection have been demonstrated. In this contribution it is demonstrated that the incorporation of a dichroic mirror to a transmission TERS setup provides easy access to opaque samples without further modification of the setup. PMID:25061793

  4. Enhancing resolution of free-flow zone electrophoresis via a simple sheath-flow sample injection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Liu, Ji; Li, Jun-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ju-Fang; Xiao, Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Li, Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a simple and novel sheath-flow sample injection method (SFSIM) is introduced to reduce the band broadening of free-flow zone electrophoresis separation in newly developed self-balance free-flow electrophoresis instrument. A needle injector was placed in the center of the separation inlet, into which the BGE and sample solution were pumped simultaneously. BGE formed sheath flow outside the sample stream, resulting in less band broadening related to hydrodynamics and electrodynamics. Hemoglobin and C-phycocyanin were successfully separated by the proposed method in contrast to the poor separation of free-flow electrophoresis with the traditional injection method without sheath flow. About 3.75 times resolution enhancement could be achieved by sheath-flow sample injection method. PMID:27121853

  5. Premagnetization for Enhancing the Reactivity of Multiple Zerovalent Iron Samples toward Various Contaminants.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxiang; Qin, Hejie; Guan, Xiaohong

    2015-12-15

    Premagnetization was applied to enhance the removal of various oxidative contaminants (including amaranth (AR27), lead ion (Pb(2+)), cupric ion (Cu(2+)), selenite (Se(4+)), silver ion (Ag(+)), and chromate (Cr(6+))) by zerovalent iron (ZVI) from different origins under well-controlled experimental conditions. The rate constants of contaminants by premagnetized ZVI (Mag-ZVI) samples were 1.2-12.2-fold greater than those by pristine ZVI (Pri-ZVI) samples. Generally, there was a linear correlation between the specific reaction rate constants (kSA) of one particular contaminant removal by various Pri-ZVI or Mag-ZVI samples and those of the other contaminant, which could be successfully employed to predict the kSA of one contaminant by one ZVI sample if kSA of the other contaminant by this ZVI sample was available. The specific rate constant of Fe(II) release at pH 4.0 was proposed in this study to stand for the intrinsic reactivity of a ZVI sample. All Mag-ZVI samples had higher intrinsic reactivity than their counterparts without premagnetization. There were strong correlations between the intrinsic reactivity of various Pri-ZVI/Mag-ZVI samples and the removal rate constants of a specific contaminant by these ZVI samples not only at pH 4.0 when the intrinsic reactivity was determined but also at other pH levels. This correlation could be employed to predict the removal rate constant of this contaminant by a ZVI sample that was not included in the original data set once the intrinsic reactivity of the ZVI sample was known. PMID:26575344

  6. Extended Phase-Space Methods for Enhanced Sampling in Molecular Simulations: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Moritsugu, Kei; Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Morishita, Tetsuya; Maragliano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are a powerful approach to study biomolecular conformational changes or protein–ligand, protein–protein, and protein–DNA/RNA interactions. Straightforward applications, however, are often hampered by incomplete sampling, since in a typical simulated trajectory the system will spend most of its time trapped by high energy barriers in restricted regions of the configuration space. Over the years, several techniques have been designed to overcome this problem and enhance space sampling. Here, we review a class of methods that rely on the idea of extending the set of dynamical variables of the system by adding extra ones associated to functions describing the process under study. In particular, we illustrate the Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics (TAMD), Logarithmic Mean Force Dynamics (LogMFD), and Multiscale Enhanced Sampling (MSES) algorithms. We also discuss combinations with techniques for searching reaction paths. We show the advantages presented by this approach and how it allows to quickly sample important regions of the free-energy landscape via automatic exploration. PMID:26389113

  7. Bespoke Bias for Obtaining Free Energy Differences within Variationally Enhanced Sampling.

    PubMed

    McCarty, James; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-05-10

    Obtaining efficient sampling of multiple metastable states through molecular dynamics and hence determining free energy differences is central for understanding many important phenomena. Here we present a new biasing strategy, which employs the recent variationally enhanced sampling approach (Valsson and Parrinello Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 113, 090601). The bias is constructed from an intuitive model of the local free energy surface describing fluctuations around metastable minima and depends on only a few parameters which are determined variationally such that efficient sampling between states is obtained. The bias constructed in this manner largely reduces the need of finding a set of collective variables that completely spans the conformational space of interest, as they only need to be a locally valid descriptor of the system about its local minimum. We introduce the method and demonstrate its power on two representative examples. PMID:27057791

  8. Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC

    SciTech Connect

    Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

    1991-01-01

    In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a Deliberate Operating'' mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a Use Every Time'' (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

  9. Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC

    SciTech Connect

    Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

    1991-12-31

    In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a ``Deliberate Operating`` mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a ``Use Every Time`` (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

  10. Identification of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Histological Samples by Enhanced Darkfield Microscopy and Hyperspectral Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Gary A.; Sosa Peña, Maria del Pilar; Neu-Baker, Nicole M.; Tahiliani, Sahil; Brenner, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly prevalent throughout industry, manufacturing, and biomedical research. The need for tools and techniques that aid in the identification, localization, and characterization of nanoscale materials in biological samples is on the rise. Currently available methods, such as electron microscopy, tend to be resource-intensive, making their use prohibitive for much of the research community. Enhanced darkfield microscopy complemented with a hyperspectral imaging system may provide a solution to this bottleneck by enabling rapid and less expensive characterization of nanoparticles in histological samples. This method allows for high-contrast nanoscale imaging as well as nanomaterial identification. For this technique, histological tissue samples are prepared as they would be for light-based microscopy. First, positive control samples are analyzed to generate the reference spectra that will enable the detection of a material of interest in the sample. Negative controls without the material of interest are also analyzed in order to improve specificity (reduce false positives). Samples can then be imaged and analyzed using methods and software for hyperspectral microscopy or matched against these reference spectra in order to provide maps of the location of materials of interest in a sample. The technique is particularly well-suited for materials with highly unique reflectance spectra, such as noble metals, but is also applicable to other materials, such as semi-metallic oxides. This technique provides information that is difficult to acquire from histological samples without the use of electron microscopy techniques, which may provide higher sensitivity and resolution, but are vastly more resource-intensive and time-consuming than light microscopy. PMID:26709947

  11. Identification of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Histological Samples by Enhanced Darkfield Microscopy and Hyperspectral Mapping.

    PubMed

    Roth, Gary A; Sosa Peña, Maria del Pilar; Neu-Baker, Nicole M; Tahiliani, Sahil; Brenner, Sara A

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly prevalent throughout industry, manufacturing, and biomedical research. The need for tools and techniques that aid in the identification, localization, and characterization of nanoscale materials in biological samples is on the rise. Currently available methods, such as electron microscopy, tend to be resource-intensive, making their use prohibitive for much of the research community. Enhanced darkfield microscopy complemented with a hyperspectral imaging system may provide a solution to this bottleneck by enabling rapid and less expensive characterization of nanoparticles in histological samples. This method allows for high-contrast nanoscale imaging as well as nanomaterial identification. For this technique, histological tissue samples are prepared as they would be for light-based microscopy. First, positive control samples are analyzed to generate the reference spectra that will enable the detection of a material of interest in the sample. Negative controls without the material of interest are also analyzed in order to improve specificity (reduce false positives). Samples can then be imaged and analyzed using methods and software for hyperspectral microscopy or matched against these reference spectra in order to provide maps of the location of materials of interest in a sample. The technique is particularly well-suited for materials with highly unique reflectance spectra, such as noble metals, but is also applicable to other materials, such as semi-metallic oxides. This technique provides information that is difficult to acquire from histological samples without the use of electron microscopy techniques, which may provide higher sensitivity and resolution, but are vastly more resource-intensive and time-consuming than light microscopy. PMID:26709947

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26766517

  13. Enhancement of low sampling frequency recordings for ECG biometric matching using interpolation.

    PubMed

    Sidek, Khairul Azami; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) based biometric matching suffers from high misclassification error with lower sampling frequency data. This situation may lead to an unreliable and vulnerable identity authentication process in high security applications. In this paper, quality enhancement techniques for ECG data with low sampling frequency has been proposed for person identification based on piecewise cubic Hermite interpolation (PCHIP) and piecewise cubic spline interpolation (SPLINE). A total of 70 ECG recordings from 4 different public ECG databases with 2 different sampling frequencies were applied for development and performance comparison purposes. An analytical method was used for feature extraction. The ECG recordings were segmented into two parts: the enrolment and recognition datasets. Three biometric matching methods, namely, Cross Correlation (CC), Percent Root-Mean-Square Deviation (PRD) and Wavelet Distance Measurement (WDM) were used for performance evaluation before and after applying interpolation techniques. Results of the experiments suggest that biometric matching with interpolated ECG data on average achieved higher matching percentage value of up to 4% for CC, 3% for PRD and 94% for WDM. These results are compared with the existing method when using ECG recordings with lower sampling frequency. Moreover, increasing the sample size from 56 to 70 subjects improves the results of the experiment by 4% for CC, 14.6% for PRD and 0.3% for WDM. Furthermore, higher classification accuracy of up to 99.1% for PCHIP and 99.2% for SPLINE with interpolated ECG data as compared of up to 97.2% without interpolation ECG data verifies the study claim that applying interpolation techniques enhances the quality of the ECG data. PMID:23062461

  14. Enhanced Cleaning of Genesis Solar Wind Sample 61348 for Film Residue Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allums, K. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Kuhlman, K. R.; Allton, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Genesis mission returned to Earth on September 8, 2004, experiencing a nonnominal reentry. During the recovery of the collector materials from the capsule, many of the collector fragments were placed on the adhesive protion of post-it notes to prevent the fragments from moving during transport back to Johnson Space Center. This unknowingly provided an additional contaminate that would prove difficult to remove with the limited chemistries allowed in the Genesis Curation Laboratory. Generally when collector material samples are prepared for allocation to PIs, the samples are cleaned front side only with Ultra-Pure Water (UPW) via megasonic dispersion to the collector surface to remove crash debris and contamination. While this cleaning method works well on samples that were not placed on post-its during recovery, it has caused movement of the residue on the back of the sample to be deposited on the front in at least two examples. Therefore, samples placed on the adhesive portion on post-it note, require enhanced cleaning methods since post-it residue has proved resistant to UPW cleaning.

  15. Field enhancement sample stacking for analysis of organic acids in traditional Chinese medicine by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianqian; Xu, Xueqin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liangjun; Chen, Guonan

    2012-07-13

    A technique known as field enhancement sample stacking (FESS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation has been developed to analyze and detect organic acids in the three traditional Chinese medicines (such as Portulaca oleracea L., Crataegus pinnatifida and Aloe vera L.). In FESS, a reverse electrode polarity-stacking mode (REPSM) was applied as on-line preconcentration strategy. Under the optimized condition, the baseline separation of eight organic acids (linolenic acid, lauric acid, p-coumaric acid, ascorbic acid, benzoic acid, caffeic acid, succinic acid and fumaric acid) could be achieved within 20 min. Validation parameters of this method (such as detection limits, linearity and precision) were also evaluated. The detection limits ranged from 0.4 to 60 ng/mL. The results indicated that the proposed method was effective for the separation of mixtures of organic acids. Satisfactory recoveries were also obtained in the analysis of these organic acids in the above traditional Chinese medicine samples. PMID:22381886

  16. Highly efficient sample stacking by enhanced field amplification on a simple paper device.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Song, Yi-Zhen; Niu, Ji-Cheng; Wu, Zhi-Yong

    2016-09-21

    We present a novel electrokinetic stacking (ES) method based on field amplification on a simple paper device for sample preconcentration. With voltage application, charged probe ions in a solution of lower conductivity stack and form a narrow band at the boundary between the sample and the background electrolyte of higher conductivity. The stacking band appears quickly and stabilizes in a few minutes. With this ES method, three orders of magnitude signal improvement was successfully achieved for both a fluorescein probe and a double-stranded DNA within 300 s. This enhanced stacking efficiency is attributed to a focusing effect due to the balance between electromigration and counter electroosmotic flow. We also applied this ES method to other low-cost fiber substrates such as cloth and thread. Such a simple and highly efficient ES method will find wide applications in the development of sensitive paper-based analytical devices (PADs), especially for low-cost point-of-care testing (POCT). PMID:27528399

  17. Enhanced procedural blank control for organic geochemical studies of critical sample material.

    PubMed

    Leider, A; Schumacher, T C; Hallmann, C

    2016-09-01

    . Artificial black shale pellets can provide enhanced contamination control in biomarker studies - particularly for exceptionally vulnerable samples such as Precambrian rocks, meteorites or extraterrestrial sample-return material. PMID:27027877

  18. New approach based on compressive sampling for sample rate enhancement in DASs for low-cost sensing nodes.

    PubMed

    Bonavolontà, Francesco; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Liccardo, Annalisa; Vadursi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of improving the maximum sample rate of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) included in low cost wireless sensing nodes. To this aim, the authors propose an efficient acquisition strategy based on the combined use of high-resolution time-basis and compressive sampling. In particular, the high-resolution time-basis is adopted to provide a proper sequence of random sampling instants, and a suitable software procedure, based on compressive sampling approach, is exploited to reconstruct the signal of interest from the acquired samples. Thanks to the proposed strategy, the effective sample rate of the reconstructed signal can be as high as the frequency of the considered time-basis, thus significantly improving the inherent ADC sample rate. Several tests are carried out in simulated and real conditions to assess the performance of the proposed acquisition strategy in terms of reconstruction error. In particular, the results obtained in experimental tests with ADC included in actual 8- and 32-bits microcontrollers highlight the possibility of achieving effective sample rate up to 50 times higher than that of the original ADC sample rate. PMID:25313493

  19. New Approach Based on Compressive Sampling for Sample Rate Enhancement in DASs for Low-Cost Sensing Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Bonavolontà, Francesco; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Liccardo, Annalisa; Vadursi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of improving the maximum sample rate of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) included in low cost wireless sensing nodes. To this aim, the authors propose an efficient acquisition strategy based on the combined use of high-resolution time-basis and compressive sampling. In particular, the high-resolution time-basis is adopted to provide a proper sequence of random sampling instants, and a suitable software procedure, based on compressive sampling approach, is exploited to reconstruct the signal of interest from the acquired samples. Thanks to the proposed strategy, the effective sample rate of the reconstructed signal can be as high as the frequency of the considered time-basis, thus significantly improving the inherent ADC sample rate. Several tests are carried out in simulated and real conditions to assess the performance of the proposed acquisition strategy in terms of reconstruction error. In particular, the results obtained in experimental tests with ADC included in actual 8- and 32-bits microcontrollers highlight the possibility of achieving effective sample rate up to 50 times higher than that of the original ADC sample rate. PMID:25313493

  20. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulation: A simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Reducing atomic masses by 10-fold vastly improves sampling in MD simulations. • CLN025 folded in 4 of 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when masses were reduced by 10-fold. • CLN025 folded as early as 96.2 ns in 1 of the 4 simulations that captured folding. • CLN025 did not fold in 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when standard masses were used. • Low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic sampling enhancement technique. - Abstract: CLN025 is one of the smallest fast-folding proteins. Until now it has not been reported that CLN025 can autonomously fold to its native conformation in a classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. This article reports the autonomous and repeated folding of CLN025 from a fully extended backbone conformation to its native conformation in explicit solvent in multiple 500-ns MD simulations at 277 K and 1 atm with the first folding event occurring as early as 66.1 ns. These simulations were accomplished by using AMBER forcefield derivatives with atomic masses reduced by 10-fold on Apple Mac Pros. By contrast, no folding event was observed when the simulations were repeated using the original AMBER forcefields of FF12SB and FF14SB. The results demonstrate that low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling. This technique may propel autonomous folding of a wide range of miniature proteins in classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric MD simulations performed on commodity computers—an important step forward in quantitative biology.

  1. Energy Landscape of All-Atom Protein-Protein Interactions Revealed by Multiscale Enhanced Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Moritsugu, Kei; Terada, Tohru; Kidera, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are regulated by a subtle balance of complicated atomic interactions and solvation at the interface. To understand such an elusive phenomenon, it is necessary to thoroughly survey the large configurational space from the stable complex structure to the dissociated states using the all-atom model in explicit solvent and to delineate the energy landscape of protein-protein interactions. In this study, we carried out a multiscale enhanced sampling (MSES) simulation of the formation of a barnase-barstar complex, which is a protein complex characterized by an extraordinary tight and fast binding, to determine the energy landscape of atomistic protein-protein interactions. The MSES adopts a multicopy and multiscale scheme to enable for the enhanced sampling of the all-atom model of large proteins including explicit solvent. During the 100-ns MSES simulation of the barnase-barstar system, we observed the association-dissociation processes of the atomistic protein complex in solution several times, which contained not only the native complex structure but also fully non-native configurations. The sampled distributions suggest that a large variety of non-native states went downhill to the stable complex structure, like a fast folding on a funnel-like potential. This funnel landscape is attributed to dominant configurations in the early stage of the association process characterized by near-native orientations, which will accelerate the native inter-molecular interactions. These configurations are guided mostly by the shape complementarity between barnase and barstar, and lead to the fast formation of the final complex structure along the downhill energy landscape. PMID:25340714

  2. Enhanced Sampling Methods for the Computation of Conformational Kinetics in Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioli, Gianmarc

    Calculating the kinetics of conformational changes in macromolecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, is still very much an open problem in theoretical chemistry and computational biophysics. If it were feasible to run large sets of molecular dynamics trajectories that begin in one configuration and terminate when reaching another configuration of interest, calculating kinetics from molecular dynamics simulations would be simple, but in practice, configuration spaces encompassing all possible configurations for even the simplest of macromolecules are far too vast for such a brute force approach. In fact, many problems related to searches of configuration spaces, such as protein structure prediction, are considered to be NP-hard. Two approaches to addressing this problem are to either develop methods for enhanced sampling of trajectories that confine the search to productive trajectories without loss of temporal information, or coarse-grained methodologies that recast the problem in reduced spaces that can be exhaustively searched. This thesis will begin with a description of work carried out in the vein of the second approach, where a Smoluchowski diffusion equation model was developed that accurately reproduces the rate vs. force relationship observed in the mechano-catalytic disulphide bond cleavage observed in thioredoxin-catalyzed reduction of disulphide bonds. Next, three different novel enhanced sampling methods developed in the vein of the first approach will be described, which can be employed either separately or in conjunction with each other to autonomously define a set of energetically relevant subspaces in configuration space, accelerate trajectories between the interfaces dividing the subspaces while preserving the distribution of unassisted transition times between subspaces, and approximate time correlation functions from the kinetic data collected from the transitions between interfaces.

  3. Silver Nanoparticle-Enhanced Resonance Raman Sensor of Chromium(III) in Seawater Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Nguyễn Hoàng; Joo, Sang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (Tris-EDTA), upon binding Cr(III) in aqueous solutions at pH 8.0 on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), was found to provide a sensitive and selective Raman marker band at ~563 cm−1, which can be ascribed to the metal-N band. UV-Vis absorption spectra also supported the aggregation and structural change of EDTA upon binding Cr(III). Only for Cr(III) concentrations above 500 nM, the band at ~563 cm−1 become strongly intensified in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra. This band, due to the metal-EDTA complex, was not observed in the case of 50 μM of K+, Cd2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Na+, Cu2+, NH4+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ ions. Seawater samples containing K, Mg, Ca, and Na ion concentrations higher than 8 mM also showed the characteristic Raman band at ~563 cm−1 above 500 nM, validating our method. Our approach may be useful in detecting real water samples by means of AgNPs and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:25938200

  4. In Situ Passive Sampling of Sediment Porewater Enhanced by Periodic Vibration.

    PubMed

    Jalalizadeh, Mehregan; Ghosh, Upal

    2016-08-16

    Passive sampling for the measurement of freely dissolved concentrations of organic pollutants in sediment porewater has emerged as a promising approach, but in situ measurements are complicated by slow mass transfer of strongly hydrophobic compounds. The primary resistance to mass transfer arises in the sediment side where a concentration depletion layer develops in the vicinity of the polymeric passive sampling material. The slow mass transfer results in underequilibrated passive sampler measurements that need to be corrected for equilibrium, typically by extrapolation of the loss kinetics of performance reference compounds. Such corrections are prone to large errors, especially when deviation from equilibrium is large. In this research we address the challenge of slow mass transfer by disrupting the external depletion layer around an in situ passive sampler. We report an engineering innovation of adapting low-cost vibration motors for periodically disrupting the depletion layer in a passive sampler deployed in sediments. The uptake of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into polyethylene passive samplers was measured after 7, 14, 28, and 56 days of exposure to sediment under static, vibrating, and fully mixed modes. We demonstrate through laboratory experiments and numerical mass transfer modeling that short periodic shaking of a passive sampler deployed in static sediment enhances the rate of mass transfer and reduces the difference in the extent of equilibrium achieved compared to a well-mixed laboratory equilibrium. The improvement over static sediment deployment is especially evident for the high molecular weight compounds such as benzo(a)pyrene. PMID:27435492

  5. Depletion of cells and abundant proteins from biological samples by enhanced dielectrophoresis✩

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, C.; Provine, J.; Davis, R.W.; Howe, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Platforms that are sensitive and specific enough to assay low-abundance protein biomarkers, in a high throughput multiplex format, within a complex biological fluid specimen, are necessary to enable protein biomarker based diagnostics for diseases such as cancer. The signal from an assay for a low-abundance protein biomarker in a biological fluid sample like blood is typically buried in a background that arises from the presence of blood cells and from high-abundance proteins that make up 90% of the assayed protein mass. We present an automated on-chip platform for the depletion of cells and highly abundant serum proteins in blood. Our platform consists of two components, the first of which is a microfluidic mixer that mixes beads containing antibodies against the highly abundant proteins in the whole blood. This complex mixture (consisting of beads, cells, and serum proteins) is then injected into the second component of our microfluidic platform, which comprises a filter trench to capture all the cells and the beads. The size-based trapping of the cells and beads into the filter trench is significantly enhanced by leveraging additional negative dielectrophoretic forces to push the micron sized particles (cells and beads which have captured the highly abundant proteins) down into the trench, allowing the serum proteins of lower abundance to flow through. In general, dielectrophoresis using bare electrodes is incapable of producing forces beyond the low piconewton range that tend to be insufficient for separation applications. However, by using electrodes passivated with atomic layer deposition, we demonstrate the application of enhanced negative DEP electrodes together with size-based flltration induced by the filter trench, to deplete 100% of the micron sized particles in the mixture. PMID:26924893

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of silver nanoparticles in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiyuan; Xing, Baoshan; Hamlet, Leigh C; Chica, Andrea; He, Lili

    2016-06-01

    Growing concerns over the potential release and threat of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to environmental and biological systems urge researchers to investigate their fate and behavior. However, current analytical techniques cannot meet the requirements for rapidly, sensitively and reliably probing AgNPs in complex matrices. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has shown great capability for rapid detection of AgNPs based on an indicator molecule that can bind on the AgNP surface. The objective of this study was to exploit SERS to detect AgNPs in environmental and biological samples through optimizing the Raman indicator for SERS. Seven indicator molecules were selected and determined to obtain their SERS signals at optimal concentrations. Among them, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE), crystal violet and ferric dimethyl-dithiocarbamate (ferbam) produced the highest SERS intensities. Further experiments on binding competition between each two of the three candidates showed that ferbam had the highest AgNPs-binding ability. The underlying mechanism lies in the strong binding affinity of ferbam with AgNPs via multiple sulfur atoms. We further validated ferbam to be an effective indicator for SERS detection of as low as 0.1mg/L AgNPs in genuine surface water and 0.57 mg/L in spinach juice. Moreover, limited interference on SERS detection of AgNPs was found from environmentally relevant inorganic ions, organic matter, inorganic particles, as well as biologically relevant components, demonstrating the ferbam-assisted SERS is an effective and sensitive method to detect AgNPs in complex environmental and biological samples. PMID:26956173

  7. Application of enhanced sampling methods to mineral nucleation and growth processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral nucleation and growth are amongst the most critical processes occurring in natural environments. However, even with high-resolution in situ techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), mechanistic details must typically be inferred from kinetic measurements. Computational methods are potentially powerful tools which may assist in understanding aspects of mineral reactivity, however, in practice standard approaches effectively probe only those processes whose associated activation barriers are comparable to the ambient thermal energy (kBT). Therefore, due to inherent limitations on the simulation accessible timescale, many reactions of geochemical interest continue to challenge existing computational strategies. Enhanced sampling methods increase the rate at which rare events occur in atomistic simulations by accelerating the exploration of the free energy landscape. Here, two such methods are applied to aspects of calcium carbonate nucleation and growth. Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) is used to explore the initial formation of hydrated mineral clusters from solution (Wallace et al., in press, Science). Characterization of the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the clusters suggests that a dense liquid phase of calcium carbonate forms under certain conditions. Additionally, it is demonstrated that coalescence of the dense liquid products of the liquid-liquid separation results in the formation of a solid phase whose structure is consistent with amorphous calcium carbonate. Results from forward flux sampling (FFS) simulations are also presented. The rate of solvent exchange about calcium ions in solution is rapid enough to be determined directly from a standard molecular dynamics simulation and is used in this instance to calibrate the FFS method. The calibrated procedure is then applied to obtain preliminary rates of ion attachment and detachment from calcite surfaces.

  8. Applications of Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to the Analysis of Eukaryotic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Franziska; Joseph, Virginia; Panne, Ulrich; Kneipp, Janina

    In this chapter, we discuss Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis of cellular samples of plant and animal origin which are several tens to hundreds of microns in size. As was shown in the past several years, the favorable properties of noble metal nanostructures can be used to generate SERS signals in very complex biological samples such as cells, and result in an improved sensitivity and spatial resolution. Pollen grains, the physiological containers that produce the male gametes of seed plants, consist of a few vegetative cells and one generative cell, surrounded by a biopolymer shell. Their chemical composition has been a subject of research of plant physiologists, biochemists [1, 2], and lately even materials scientists [3, 4] for various reasons. In spite of a multitude of applied analytical approaches it could not be elucidated in its entirety yet. Animal cells from cell cultures have been a subject of intense studies due to their application in virtually all fields of biomedical research, ranging from studies of basic biological mechanisms to models for pharmaceutical and diagnostic research. Many aspects of all kinds of cellular processes including signalling, transport, and gene regulation have been elucidated, but many more facts about cell biology will need to be understood in order to efficiently address issues such as cancer, viral infection or genetic disorder. Using the information from spectroscopic methods, in particular combining normal Raman spectroscopy and SERS may open up new perspectives on cellular biochemistry. New sensitive Raman-based tools are being developed for the biochemical analysis of cellular processes [5-8].

  9. Silver nanoparticles enhanced flow injection chemiluminescence determination of gatifloxacin in pharmaceutical formulation and spiked urine sample.

    PubMed

    Wabaidur, Saikh mohammad; Alam, Seikh Mafiz; Alothman, Zeid A; Mohsin, Kazi

    2015-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been utilized for the enhanced chemiluminogenic estimation of fluoroquinolone antibiotic gatifloxacin. It has been found that the weak chemiluminescence intensity produced from the reaction between calcein and KMnO4 can further be strengthened by the addition of silver nanoparticles in the presence of gatifloxacin. This phenomenon has been exploited to the quantitative determination of gatifloxacin. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the calibration curves are linear over the range of 8.9×10(-9)-4.0×10(-6) M, while the limits of detections were found to be 2.6×10(-9) M with correlation coefficient value (r(2)) 0.9999. The relative standard deviation calculated from six replicate measurements (1.0×10(-4) M gatifloxacin) was 1.70%. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations and the results obtained were in reasonable agreement with the amount labeled on the formulations. The proposed method was also used for the determination of gatifloxacin in spiked urine samples with satisfactory results. No interference effects from some common excipients used in pharmaceutical preparations have been found. PMID:25754393

  10. Tip-enhanced laser ablation sample transfer for biomolecule mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Suman; Seneviratne, Chinthaka A; Murray, Kermit K

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-enhanced laser ablation was used to transfer molecules from thin films to a suspended silver wire for off-line mass spectrometry using laser desorption ionization (LDI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). An AFM with a 30 nm radius gold-coated silicon tip was used to image the sample and to hold the tip 15 nm from the surface for material removal using a 355 nm Nd:YAG laser. The ablated material was captured on a silver wire that was held 300 μm vertically and 100 μm horizontally from the tip. For the small molecules anthracene and rhodamine 6G, the wire was cut and affixed to a metal target using double-sided conductive tape and analyzed by LDI using a commercial laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Approximately 100 fg of material was ablated from each of the 1 μm ablation spots and transferred with approximately 3% efficiency. For larger polypeptide molecules angiotensin II and bovine insulin, the captured material was dissolved in saturated matrix solution and deposited on a target for MALDI analysis. PMID:25287125

  11. Dynamics and Kinetics Study of "In-Water" Chemical Reactions by Enhanced Sampling of Reactive Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Y Isaac; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-11-12

    High potential energy barriers and engagement of solvent coordinates set challenges for in silico studies of chemical reactions, and one is quite commonly limited to study reactions along predefined reaction coordinate(s). A systematic protocol, QM/MM MD simulations using enhanced sampling of reactive trajectories (ESoRT), is established to quantitatively study chemical transitions in complex systems. A number of trajectories for Claisen rearrangement in water and toluene were collected and analyzed, respectively. Evidence was found that the bond making and breaking during this reaction are concerted processes in solutions, preferentially through a chairlike configuration. Water plays an important dynamic role that helps stabilize the transition sate, and the dipole-dipole interaction between water and the solute also lowers the transition barrier. The calculated rate coefficient is consistent with the experimental measurement. Compared with water, the reaction pathway in toluene is "narrower" and the reaction rate is slower by almost three orders of magnitude due to the absence of proper interactions to stabilize the transition state. This study suggests that the "in-water" nature of the Claisen rearrangement in aqueous solution influences its thermodynamics, kinetics, as well as dynamics. PMID:26485567

  12. Silver nanoparticles enhanced flow injection chemiluminescence determination of gatifloxacin in pharmaceutical formulation and spiked urine sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabaidur, Saikh mohammad; Alam, Seikh Mafiz; Alothman, Zeid A.; Mohsin, Kazi

    2015-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been utilized for the enhanced chemiluminogenic estimation of fluoroquinolone antibiotic gatifloxacin. It has been found that the weak chemiluminescence intensity produced from the reaction between calcein and KMnO4 can further be strengthened by the addition of silver nanoparticles in the presence of gatifloxacin. This phenomenon has been exploited to the quantitative determination of gatifloxacin. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the calibration curves are linear over the range of 8.9 × 10-9-4.0 × 10-6 M, while the limits of detections were found to be 2.6 × 10-9 M with correlation coefficient value (r2) 0.9999. The relative standard deviation calculated from six replicate measurements (1.0 × 10-4 M gatifloxacin) was 1.70%. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations and the results obtained were in reasonable agreement with the amount labeled on the formulations. The proposed method was also used for the determination of gatifloxacin in spiked urine samples with satisfactory results. No interference effects from some common excipients used in pharmaceutical preparations have been found.

  13. Tip-Enhanced Laser Ablation Sample Transfer for Biomolecule Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorai, Suman; Seneviratne, Chinthaka A.; Murray, Kermit K.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-enhanced laser ablation was used to transfer molecules from thin films to a suspended silver wire for off-line mass spectrometry using laser desorption ionization (LDI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). An AFM with a 30 nm radius gold-coated silicon tip was used to image the sample and to hold the tip 15 nm from the surface for material removal using a 355 nm Nd:YAG laser. The ablated material was captured on a silver wire that was held 300 μm vertically and 100 μm horizontally from the tip. For the small molecules anthracene and rhodamine 6G, the wire was cut and affixed to a metal target using double-sided conductive tape and analyzed by LDI using a commercial laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Approximately 100 fg of material was ablated from each of the 1 μm ablation spots and transferred with approximately 3% efficiency. For larger polypeptide molecules angiotensin II and bovine insulin, the captured material was dissolved in saturated matrix solution and deposited on a target for MALDI analysis.

  14. DUSTER: dynamic contrast enhance up-sampled temporal resolution analysis method.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Gilad; Louzoun, Yoram; Artzi, Moran; Nadav, Guy; Ewing, James R; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI using Tofts' model for estimating vascular permeability is widely accepted, yet inter-tissue differences in bolus arrival time (BAT) are generally ignored. In this work we propose a method, incorporating the BAT in the analysis, demonstrating its applicability and advantages in healthy subjects and patients. A method for DCE Up Sampled TEmporal Resolution (DUSTER) analysis is proposed which includes: baseline T1 map using DESPOT1 analyzed with flip angle (FA) correction; preprocessing; raw-signal-to-T1-to-concentration time curves (CTC) conversion; automatic arterial input function (AIF) extraction at temporal super-resolution; model fitting with model selection while incorporating BAT in the pharmacokinetic (PK) model, and fits contrast agent CTC while using exhaustive search in the BAT dimension in super-resolution. The method was applied to simulated data and to human data from 17 healthy subjects, six patients with glioblastoma, and two patients following stroke. BAT values were compared to time-to-peak (TTP) values extracted from dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging. Results show that the method improved the AIF estimation and allowed extraction of the BAT with a resolution of 0.8 s. In simulations, lower mean relative errors were detected for all PK parameters extracted using DUSTER compared to analysis without BAT correction (vp:5% vs. 20%, Ktrans: 9% vs. 24% and Kep: 8% vs. 17%, respectively), and BAT estimates demonstrated high correlations (r = 0.94, p < 1e− 10) with true values. In real data, high correlations between BAT values were detected when extracted from data acquired with high temporal resolution (2 s) and sub-sampled standard resolution data (6 s) (mean r = 0.85,p < 1e− 10). BAT and TTP values were significantly correlated in the different brain regions in healthy subjects (mean r = 0.72,p = < 1e− 3), as were voxel-wise comparisons in patients (mean r = 0.89, p < 1e− 10). In conclusion

  15. Enhanced Method for Molybdenum Separation and Isotopic Determination in Geological Samples and Uranium-Rich Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migeon, V.; Bourdon, B.; Pili, E.

    2014-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) shares analogous geochemical properties with uranium. Mo ispresent as a minor or a trace element in uranium ores under two main oxidation states: +IVand +VI. Mo has seven stable isotopes (92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 and 100). In natural systems,Mo and Mo isotopes were shown to fractionate during redox reactions. Because Morepresents an impurity difficult to separate in the nuclear fuel cycle, it has the potential to beused as an indicator of the origins of uranium concentrates, in the framework of nuclearforensics. This work focuses on developing an enhanced separation method for Mo from auranium-rich matrix (uranium ore, uranium concentrate) in order to analyze the massfractionation induced by processes typical of the nuclear fuel cycle. Purification of Mo forisotope ratio measurements is performed with a three-step separation on ion-exchange resins,with yields between 45 and 82%. Matrix and isobaric interferences (Zr, Ru) were reduced ingeological and uranium standards, such as U/Mo ≤ 2*10-4, Zr/Mo ≤ 1*10-3, Ru/Mo ≤ 6*10-4and Fe/Mo ≤ 4*10-3. Mo isotopic compositions were measured on a Neptune Plus MC-ICPMSequipped with Jet cones, for a concentration of 30 ng/ml. The achieved sensitivity is~1200-1800 V/ppm with interferences below 10 mV and an overall reproducibility of 0.02 ‰on the δ98Mo values. A double spike, with 97Mo and 100Mo, was added to the samples beforethe purification. It allows for correction of the chemical and instrumental mass fractionations,without requiring a quantitative yield. For igneous rocks, δ98Mo values range between -0.55and -0.03 ‰, relative to the NIST-SRM 3134 molybdenum standard. Fractionation amonguranium ore concentrates is higher, with δ98Mo ranging between 0.02 and -2.84 ‰.

  16. Enhanced ligand sampling for relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaus, Joseph W; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-05-21

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein-ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  17. Enhanced Ligand Sampling for Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein–ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  18. MICROBIAL ACTIVITY IN SUBSURFACE SAMPLES BEFORE AND DURING NITRATE-ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine the microbial activity of a site contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel, before and during nitrate-enhanced bioremediation. amples at three depths from six different locations were collected aseptically under anaerobic conditions before and during trea...

  19. Pieces of Other Worlds - Enhance YSS Education and Public Outreach Events with Extraterrestrial Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.

    2010-12-01

    During the Year of the Solar System spacecraft will encounter two comets; orbit the asteroid Vesta, continue to explore Mars with rovers, and launch robotic explorers to the Moon and Mars. We have pieces of all these worlds in our laboratories. Extensive information about these unique materials, as well as actual lunar samples and meteorites, is available for display and education. The Johnson Space Center (JSC) curates NASA's extraterrestrial samples to support research, education, and public outreach. At the current time JSC curates five types of extraterrestrial samples: Moon rocks and soils collected by the Apollo astronauts Meteorites collected on US expeditions to Antarctica (including rocks from the Moon, Mars, and many asteroids including Vesta) “Cosmic dust” (asteroid and comet particles) collected by high-altitude aircraft Solar wind atoms collected by the Genesis spacecraft Comet and interstellar dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft These rocks, soils, dust particles, and atoms continue to be studied intensively by scientists around the world. Descriptions of the samples, research results, thousands of photographs, and information on how to request research samples are on the JSC Curation website: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/ NASA is eager for scientists and the public to have access to these exciting samples through our various loan procedures. NASA provides a limited number of Moon rock samples for either short-term or long-term displays at museums, planetariums, expositions, and professional events that are open to the public. The JSC Public Affairs Office handles requests for such display samples. Requestors should apply in writing to Mr. Louis Parker, JSC Exhibits Manager. He will advise successful applicants regarding provisions for receipt, display, and return of the samples. All loans will be preceded by a signed loan agreement executed between NASA and the requestor's organization. Email address: louis.a.parker@nasa.gov Sets

  20. Investigating the Influence of Flip Angle and k-Space Sampling on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Breast Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Ledger, Araminta E.W.; Borri, Marco; Pope, Romney J.E.; Scurr, Erica D.; Wallace, Toni; Richardson, Cheryl; Usher, Marianne; Allen, Steven; Wilson, Robin M.; Thomas, Karen; deSouza, Nandita M.; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To retrospectively investigate the effect of flip angle (FA) and k-space sampling on the performance of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) breast sequences. Materials and Methods Five DCE-MRI breast sequences were evaluated (10°, 14°, and 18° FAs; radial or linear k-space sampling), with 7–10 patients in each group (n = 45). All sequences were compliant with current technical breast screening guidelines. Contrast agent (CA) uptake curves were constructed from the right mammary artery for each examination. Maximum relative enhancement, Emax, and time-to-peak enhancement, Tmax, were measured and compared between protocols (analysis of variance and Mann–Whitney). For each sequence, calculated values of maximum relative enhancement, Ecalc, were derived from the Bloch equations and compared to Emax. Fat suppression performance (residual bright fat and chemical shift artifact) was rated for each examination and compared between sequences (Fisher exact tests). Results Significant differences were identified between DCE-MRI sequences. Emax increased significantly at higher FAs and with linear k-space sampling (P < .0001; P = .001). Radial protocols exhibited greater Tmax than linear protocols at FAs of both 14° (P = .025) and 18° (P < .0001), suggesting artificially flattened uptake curves. Good correlation was observed between Ecalc and Emax (r = 0.86). Fat suppression failure was more pronounced at an FA of 18° (P = .008). Conclusions This retrospective approach is validated as a tool to compare and optimize breast DCE-MRI sequences. Alterations in FA and k-space sampling result in significant differences in CA uptake curve shape which could potentially affect diagnostic interpretation. These results emphasize the need for careful parameter selection and greater standardization of breast DCE-MRI sequences. PMID:25179563

  1. Enhanced Detection of Rift Valley Fever Virus using Molecular Assays on Whole Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Grolla, Allen; Mehedi, Masfique; Lindsay, Robbin; Bosio, Catharine; Duse, Adriano; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Background Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging arthropod-borne zoonoses of global agricultural and public health importance. In December 2006, an RVF outbreak was recognized in Kenya which led to the deployment of international response laboratory teams to the area. Objectives A field laboratory was operated in Malindi, Kenya to provide safe sample handling and molecular testing for RVF virus (RVFV) as well as selected other pathogens for differential diagnosis. Study Design Safe sample handling was carried out using a negative pressure flexible film isolator (glovebox) and commercial reagents to inactivate clinical specimens and purify nucleic acid. Whole blood was routinely used for diagnostic testing although paired plasma samples were also tested in select cases. Subsequently, human macrophages were tested in vitro for their susceptibility to RVFV. Results The field laboratory received samples from 33 individuals and a definite laboratory diagnosis was provided in 16 of these cases. Using molecular diagnostic techniques, RVFV was more consistently detected in whole blood than in plasma samples most likely due to association of RVFV with blood cells. Subsequent in vitro studies identified macrophages as a target cell for RVFV replication. Conclusions RVFV appears to replicate in blood cells such as macrophages. Thus, the sensitivity of molecular diagnostic testing is improved if whole blood is used as the clinical specimen rather than plasma or serum. PMID:22632901

  2. Improved ligand binding energies derived from molecular dynamics: replicate sampling enhances the search of conformational space.

    PubMed

    Adler, Marc; Beroza, Paul

    2013-08-26

    Does a single molecular trajectory provide an adequate sample conformational space? Our calculations indicate that for Molecular Mechanics--Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) measurement of protein ligand binding, a single molecular dynamics trajectory does not provide a representative sampling of phase space. For a single trajectory, the binding energy obtained by averaging over a number of molecular dynamics frames in an equilibrated system will converge after an adequate simulation time. A separate trajectory with nearly identical starting coordinates (1% randomly perturbed by 0.001 Å), however, can lead to a significantly different calculated binding energy. Thus, even though the calculated energy converges for a single molecular dynamics run, the variation across separate runs implies that a single run inadequately samples the system. The divergence in the trajectories is reflected in the individual energy components, such as the van der Waals and the electrostatics terms. These results indicate that the trajectories sample different conformations that are not in rapid exchange. Extending the length of the dynamics simulation does not resolve the energy differences observed between different trajectories. By averaging over multiple simulations, each with a nearly equivalent starting structure, we find the standard deviation in the calculated binding energy to be ∼1.3 kcal/mol. The work presented here indicates that combining MM-PBSA with multiple samples of the initial starting coordinates will produce more precise and accurate estimates of protein/ligand affinity. PMID:23845109

  3. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.E.

    1991-08-20

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) and radiocalcium ({sup 41}Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS {sup 14}C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO{sub 2} to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high {sup 13}C{sup {minus}} ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, {sup 14}C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP.

  4. Using Past Data to Enhance Small Sample DIF Estimation: A Bayesian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Dorans, Neil J.; Grant, Mary C.; Blew, Edwin O.

    2009-01-01

    Test administrators often face the challenge of detecting differential item functioning (DIF) with samples of size smaller than that recommended by experts. A Bayesian approach can incorporate, in the form of a prior distribution, existing information on the inference problem at hand, which yields more stable estimation, especially for small…

  5. Ultra-deep imaging of turbid samples by enhanced photon harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosignani, Viera; Dvornikov, Alexander; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-02-01

    We constructed an advanced detection system for two-photon fluorescence microscopy that allows us to image in biological tissue and tissue phantoms up to the depth of a few mm with micron resolution. The innovation lies in the detection system which is much more sensitive to low level fluorescence signals than the fluorescence detection configuration used in conventional two-photon fluorescence microscopes. A wide area photocathode photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used to detect fluorescence photons directly from a wide (1 inch diameter) area of the turbid sample, as opposed to the photon collection by the microscope objective which can only collect light from a relatively small area of the sample. The optical path between the sample and the photocathode is refractive index matched to curtail losses at the boundaries due to reflections. The system has been successfully employed in the imaging of tissue phantoms simulating brain optical properties and in biological tissues, such as murine small intestine, colon, tumors, and other samples. The system has in-depth fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) capabilities and is also highly suitable for SHG signal detection, such as collagen fibers and muscles, due to the intrinsically forward-directed propagation of SHG photons.

  6. Ionic liquids in enhancing the sensitivity of capillary electrophoresis: Off-line and on-line sample preconcentration techniques.

    PubMed

    El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Wätzig, Hermann

    2016-07-01

    The popularity of ionic liquids (ILs) has grown during the last decade in enhancing the sensitivity of CE through different off-line or on-line sample preconcentration techniques. Water-insoluble ILs were commonly used in IL-based liquid phase microextraction, in all its variants, as off-line sample preconcentration techniques combined with CE. Water-soluble ILs were rarely used in IL-based aqueous two phase system (IL-ATPS) as an off-line sample preconcentration approach combined with CE in spite of IL-ATPS predicted features such as more compatibility with CE sample injection due to its relatively low viscosity and more compatibility with CE running buffers avoid, in some cases, anion exchange precipitation. Therefore, the attentions for the key parameters affecting the performance of IL-ATPSs were generally presented and discussed. On-line CE preconcentration techniques containing IL-based surfactants at nonmicellar or micellar concentrations have become another interesting area to improve CE sensitivity and it is likely to remain a focus of the field in the endeavor because of their numerous to create rapid, simple and sensitive systems. In this article, significant contributions of ILs in enhancing the sensitivity of CE are described, and a specific overview of the relevant examples of their applications is also given. PMID:27067143

  7. Application of Enhanced Sampling Monte Carlo Methods for High-Resolution Protein-Protein Docking in Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Schindler, Christina E. M.; Lange, Oliver F.; Zacharias, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The high-resolution refinement of docked protein-protein complexes can provide valuable structural and mechanistic insight into protein complex formation complementing experiment. Monte Carlo (MC) based approaches are frequently applied to sample putative interaction geometries of proteins including also possible conformational changes of the binding partners. In order to explore efficiency improvements of the MC sampling, several enhanced sampling techniques, including temperature or Hamiltonian replica exchange and well-tempered ensemble approaches, have been combined with the MC method and were evaluated on 20 protein complexes using unbound partner structures. The well-tempered ensemble method combined with a 2-dimensional temperature and Hamiltonian replica exchange scheme (WTE-H-REMC) was identified as the most efficient search strategy. Comparison with prolonged MC searches indicates that the WTE-H-REMC approach requires approximately 5 times fewer MC steps to identify near native docking geometries compared to conventional MC searches. PMID:26053419

  8. Application of Enhanced Sampling Monte Carlo Methods for High-Resolution Protein-Protein Docking in Rosetta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Schindler, Christina E M; Lange, Oliver F; Zacharias, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The high-resolution refinement of docked protein-protein complexes can provide valuable structural and mechanistic insight into protein complex formation complementing experiment. Monte Carlo (MC) based approaches are frequently applied to sample putative interaction geometries of proteins including also possible conformational changes of the binding partners. In order to explore efficiency improvements of the MC sampling, several enhanced sampling techniques, including temperature or Hamiltonian replica exchange and well-tempered ensemble approaches, have been combined with the MC method and were evaluated on 20 protein complexes using unbound partner structures. The well-tempered ensemble method combined with a 2-dimensional temperature and Hamiltonian replica exchange scheme (WTE-H-REMC) was identified as the most efficient search strategy. Comparison with prolonged MC searches indicates that the WTE-H-REMC approach requires approximately 5 times fewer MC steps to identify near native docking geometries compared to conventional MC searches. PMID:26053419

  9. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  10. Classification of bacterial samples as negative or positive for a UTI and antibiogram using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Pitris, Costas

    2011-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) diagnosis requires an overnight culture to identify a sample as positive or negative for a UTI. Additional cultures are required to identify the pathogen responsible for the infection and to test its sensitivity to antibiotics. A rise in ineffective treatments, chronic infections, rising health care costs and antibiotic resistance are some of the consequences of this prolonged waiting period of UTI diagnosis. In this work, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is used for classifying bacterial samples as positive or negative for UTI. SERS spectra of serial dilutions of E.coli bacteria, isolated from a urine culture, were classified as positive (105-108 cells/ml) or negative (103-104 cells/ml) for UTI after mixing samples with gold nanoparticles. A leave-one-out cross validation was performed using the first two principal components resulting in the correct classification of 82% of all samples. Sensitivity of classification was 88% and specificity was 67%. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was also done using SERS spectra of various species of gram negative bacteria collected 4 hours after exposure to antibiotics. Spectral analysis revealed clear separation between the spectra of samples exposed to ciprofloxacin (sensitive) and amoxicillin (resistant). This study can become the basis for identifying urine samples as positive or negative for a UTI and determining their antibiogram without requiring an overnight culture.

  11. A critical evaluation of sample extraction techniques for enhanced proteomic analysis of recalcitrant plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Ramu S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2004-09-01

    Most published proteomics studies of bulk plant tissues use a procedure in which proteins are precipitated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and acetone (TCA-A), but few attempts have been made to contrast this approach in a systematic way with alternative methods against a spectrum of tissues. To address this, TCA-A was compared with another acetone-based protocol (TCA-B) or a phenol (Phe)-based method, targeting a range of tomato tissues and three species of fruits that contain high levels of contaminating compounds: banana, avocado and orange. The Phe method gave a higher protein yield and typically greater resolution and spot intensity, particularly with extracts from tissues containing high levels of soluble polysaccharides. The methods also generated remarkably different two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) protein spot patterns. Peptide mass fingerprinting was used to identify polypeptides that were common to multiple extracts or uniquely present in one extract type. While no clear pattern emerged to explain the basis for the differential protein extraction, it was noted that the Phe method showed enhanced extraction of glycoproteins. These results suggest that the Phe protocol is highly effective with more recalcitrant tissues and that a combination of TCA-A and Phe methods provides enhanced 2-DE based proteomic analyses of most plant tissues. PMID:15352226

  12. Sampling of prenatal and postnatal offspring from individual rat dams enhances animal use without compromising development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, J. R.; Burden, H. W.; Hawes, N.; Ronca, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    To assess prenatal and postnatal developmental status in the offspring of a group of animals, it is typical to examine fetuses from some of the dams as well as infants born to the remaining dams. Statistical limitations often arise, particularly when the animals are rare or especially precious, because all offspring of the dam represent only a single statistical observation; littermates are not independent observations (biologically or statistically). We describe a study in which pregnant laboratory rats were laparotomized on day 7 of gestation (GD7) to ascertain the number and distribution of uterine implantation sites and were subjected to a simulated experience on a 10-day space shuttle flight. After the simulated landing on GD18, rats were unilaterally hysterectomized, thus providing a sample of fetuses from 10 independent uteruses, followed by successful vaginal delivery on GD22, yielding postnatal samples from 10 uteruses. A broad profile of maternal and offspring morphologic and physiologic measures indicated that these novel sampling procedures did not compromise maternal well-being and maintained normal offspring development and function. Measures included maternal organ weights and hormone concentrations, offspring body size, growth, organ weights, sexual differentiation, and catecholamine concentrations.

  13. Exploiting Population Samples to Enhance Genome-Wide Association Studies of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Shachar; Rosset, Saharon

    2014-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of complex human disease fail to explain a large portion of heritability, primarily due to lack of statistical power—a problem that is exacerbated when seeking detection of interactions of multiple genomic loci. An untapped source of information that is already widely available, and that is expected to grow in coming years, is population samples. Such samples contain genetic marker data for additional individuals, but not their relevant phenotypes. In this article we develop a highly efficient testing framework based on a constrained maximum-likelihood estimate in a case–control–population setting. We leverage the available population data and optional modeling assumptions, such as Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in the population and linkage equilibrium (LE) between distal loci, to substantially improve power of association and interaction tests. We demonstrate, via simulation and application to actual GWAS data sets, that our approach is substantially more powerful and robust than standard testing approaches that ignore or make naive use of the population sample. We report several novel and credible pairwise interactions, in bipolar disorder, coronary artery disease, Crohn’s disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24614931

  14. Examination of pterins using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using low-volume samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehigan, Sam; Smyth, Ciarán.; McCabe, Eithne M.

    2013-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a very useful tool for analysing compounds, however its ability to detect low concentrations of a substance are very limited. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) overcomes that issue and is reported to have achieved single molecule detection. Its main shortcoming is the reproducibility of SERS spectra. The variation in signal strength prevents SERS from being usable as a quantitative analytical technique. This variability have been investigated in this work and key factors in improving reproducibility have been considered. Pterins, such as xanthopterin are studied in this paper. Pterins are a group of biological compounds that are found in nature in colour pigmentation and in mammal's metabolic pathways. Moreover, they have been identified in abnormal concentrations in the urine of people suffering from certain kinds of cancer. The potential for pterin's use as a cancer diagnostic points to the importance of SERS detection for pterins.

  15. Informatics Enhanced SNP Microarray Analysis of 30 Miscarriage Samples Compared to Routine Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lathi, Ruth B.; Loring, Megan; Massie, Jamie A. M.; Demko, Zachary P.; Johnson, David; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Gemelos, George; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The metaphase karyotype is often used as a diagnostic tool in the setting of early miscarriage; however this technique has several limitations. We evaluate a new technique for karyotyping that uses single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP). This technique was compared in a blinded, prospective fashion, to the traditional metaphase karyotype. Methods Patients undergoing dilation and curettage for first trimester miscarriage between February and August 2010 were enrolled. Samples of chorionic villi were equally divided and sent for microarray testing in parallel with routine cytogenetic testing. Results Thirty samples were analyzed, with only four discordant results. Discordant results occurred when the entire genome was duplicated or when a balanced rearrangement was present. Cytogenetic karyotyping took an average of 29 days while microarray-based karytoyping took an average of 12 days. Conclusions Molecular karyotyping of POC after missed abortion using SNP microarray analysis allows for the ability to detect maternal cell contamination and provides rapid results with good concordance to standard cytogenetic analysis. PMID:22403611

  16. Enhanced sample multiplexing for nitrotyrosine-modified proteins using combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Renã A S; Evans, Adam R

    2012-06-01

    Current strategies for identification and quantification of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) post-translationally modified proteins (PTM) generally rely on biotin/avidin enrichment. Quantitative approaches have been demonstrated which employ isotopic labeling or isobaric tagging in order to quantify differences in the relative abundances of 3NT-modified proteins in two or potentially eight samples, respectively. Here, we present a novel strategy which uses combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT) to increase the multiplexing capability of quantifying 3NT-modified proteins to 12 or 16 samples using commercially available tandem mass tags (TMT) or isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), respectively. This strategy employs "light" and "heavy" labeled acetyl groups to block both N-termini and lysine residues of tryptic peptides. Next, 3NT is reduced to 3-aminotyrosine (3AT) using sodium dithionite followed by derivatization of light and heavy labeled 3AT-peptides with either TMT or iTRAQ multiplex reagents. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle utility of cPILOT with in vitro nitrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and mouse splenic proteins using TMT(0), TMT(6), and iTRAQ(8) reagents and discuss limitations of the strategy. PMID:22509719

  17. Optimal bandpass sampling strategies for enhancing the performance of a phase noise meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angrisani, Leopoldo; Schiano Lo Moriello, Rosario; D'Arco, Mauro; Greenhall, Charles

    2008-10-01

    Measurement of phase noise affecting oscillators or clocks is a fundamental practice whenever the need of a reliable time base is of primary concern. In spite of the number of methods or techniques either available in the literature or implemented as personalities in general-purpose equipment, very accurate measurement results can be gained only through expensive, dedicated instruments. To offer a cost-effective alternative, the authors have already realized a DSP-based phase noise meter, capable of assuring good performance and real-time operation. The meter, however, suffers from a reduced frequency range (about 250 kHz), and needs an external time base for input signal digitization. To overcome these drawbacks, the authors propose the use of bandpass sampling strategies to enlarge the frequency range, and of an internal time base to make standalone operation much more feasible. After some remarks on the previous version of the meter, key features of the adopted time base and proposed sampling strategies are described in detail. Results of experimental tests, carried out on sinusoidal signals provided both by function and arbitrary waveform generators, are presented and discussed; evidence of the meter's reliability and efficacy is finally given.

  18. Enhanced conformational sampling to visualize a free-energy landscape of protein complex formation.

    PubMed

    Iida, Shinji; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2016-06-15

    We introduce various, recently developed, generalized ensemble methods, which are useful to sample various molecular configurations emerging in the process of protein-protein or protein-ligand binding. The methods introduced here are those that have been or will be applied to biomolecular binding, where the biomolecules are treated as flexible molecules expressed by an all-atom model in an explicit solvent. Sampling produces an ensemble of conformations (snapshots) that are thermodynamically probable at room temperature. Then, projection of those conformations to an abstract low-dimensional space generates a free-energy landscape. As an example, we show a landscape of homo-dimer formation of an endothelin-1-like molecule computed using a generalized ensemble method. The lowest free-energy cluster at room temperature coincided precisely with the experimentally determined complex structure. Two minor clusters were also found in the landscape, which were largely different from the native complex form. Although those clusters were isolated at room temperature, with rising temperature a pathway emerged linking the lowest and second-lowest free-energy clusters, and a further temperature increment connected all the clusters. This exemplifies that the generalized ensemble method is a powerful tool for computing the free-energy landscape, by which one can discuss the thermodynamic stability of clusters and the temperature dependence of the cluster networks. PMID:27288028

  19. Enhanced conformational sampling to visualize a free-energy landscape of protein complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Shinji; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    We introduce various, recently developed, generalized ensemble methods, which are useful to sample various molecular configurations emerging in the process of protein–protein or protein–ligand binding. The methods introduced here are those that have been or will be applied to biomolecular binding, where the biomolecules are treated as flexible molecules expressed by an all-atom model in an explicit solvent. Sampling produces an ensemble of conformations (snapshots) that are thermodynamically probable at room temperature. Then, projection of those conformations to an abstract low-dimensional space generates a free-energy landscape. As an example, we show a landscape of homo-dimer formation of an endothelin-1-like molecule computed using a generalized ensemble method. The lowest free-energy cluster at room temperature coincided precisely with the experimentally determined complex structure. Two minor clusters were also found in the landscape, which were largely different from the native complex form. Although those clusters were isolated at room temperature, with rising temperature a pathway emerged linking the lowest and second-lowest free-energy clusters, and a further temperature increment connected all the clusters. This exemplifies that the generalized ensemble method is a powerful tool for computing the free-energy landscape, by which one can discuss the thermodynamic stability of clusters and the temperature dependence of the cluster networks. PMID:27288028

  20. Sampling Error: Impact on the Quantitative Analysis of Nanoparticle-Based Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Alexis C; Skuratovsky, Aleksander; Porter, Marc D

    2016-06-21

    This paper examines the impact of the sampling error caused by the small size of the focused laser spot when using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a quantitative readout tool to analyze a sandwich immunoassay. The assay consists of a thin-film gold substrate that is modified with a layer of capture monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) that consist of gold nanoparticle cores (60 nm diameter) coated with a monolayer of a Raman reporter molecule and a layer of human IgG mAbs to tag the captured antigen. The contribution of sampling error to the measurement is delineated first by constructing and analyzing an antigenic random accumulation model; this is followed by an experimental study of the analysis of an assay substrate using two different laser spot sizes. Both sets of findings indicate that the analysis with a small laser spot can lead to a sampling error (i.e., undersampling) much like that found when the size of a measured soil sample fails to accurately match that of a larger, more representative sample. That is, the smaller the laser spot size, the larger probable deviation in the accuracy of the measurement and the greater the imprecision of the measurement. Possible implications of these results with respect to the general application of SERS for quantitative measurements are also briefly discussed. PMID:27219507

  1. Electro-enhanced hollow fiber membrane liquid phase microextraction of Cr(VI) oxoanions in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Chanthasakda, Nattaporn; Nitiyanontakit, Sira; Varanusupakul, Pakorn

    2016-02-01

    Hollow fiber membrane liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) of metal oxoanions was studied using an ionic carrier enhanced by the application of an electric field (electro-enhanced HF-LPME). The Cr(VI) oxoanion was used as the model. The transportation of Cr(VI) oxoanions across the supported liquid membrane (SLM) was explored via the ion-exchange process and electrokinetic migration. The type of SLM, type of acceptor solution, extraction time, electric potential, and stirring rate were investigated and optimized using MilliQ water. Electro-enhanced HF-LPME provided a much higher enrichment factor compared to conventional HF-LPME (no electric potential) for the same extraction time. A mixture of an anion exchange carrier (methyltrialkyl-ammonium chloride, Aliquat 336) in the SLM facilitated the transportation of Cr(VI) oxoanions. The SLM that gave the best performance was 1-heptanol mixed with 5% Aliquat 336 with 1M NaOH as the acceptor. Linearity was obtained in the working range of 3-15 µg L(-1) Cr(VI) (R(2)>0.99) at 30 V with a 5 min extraction time. The limit of detection was below 5 µg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was less than 12%. The method was applied to drinking water samples. The recoveries of spiked Cr(VI) in drinking water samples were in the range of 96-101% based on the matrix-matched calibration curves. The method was limited to samples containing low levels of ions due to the occurrence of electrolysis. The type of SLM, particularly regarding its resistance, should be tuned to control this problematic phenomenon. PMID:26653501

  2. Enhanced Molecular Dynamics Sampling Methods Applied to Existing and Novel Polypeptide Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayre, Natha Robert

    This thesis consists of the application of certain advanced physics-based theoretical-computational approaches to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of polypeptides --- the key chemical constituents of proteins, a class of biologically essential molecules. Improved statistical-mechanical sampling methods and advanced computational methods were combined in studies that informed both theory and experiment. Part of this work was devoted to the development of improved sampling capabilities simultaneously on three fronts: (1) the ubiquitous use of generalized-ensemble techniques to broadly explore molecular energy landscapes, (2) efficient approximative multi-scale integration techniques for molecular dynamics, and (3) the deployment of novel parallel computational facilities capable of order-of-magnitude speed-ups in the evaluation of biomolecular models. Herein, biophysical experiments inform molecular-mechanical theory and vice versa. In one study, the known folding stability of a small beta-hairpin peptide was compared with the same from simulations using variant model parameterizations, while the more accurate of these latter enabled insight into mechanisms for stability. In another study, the observed stability of a native left-handed beta-helical peptide segment verified the accuracy of two refined parameter sets, while further simulations on diverse sequences suggest mechanisms for the folding behavior of the beta-helical motif. Furthermore, the sequences that were chosen for this latter study open up exciting avenues for more systematic theoretical study of homopolypeptides such as polyglutamine; variants of prion protein and other amyloidogenic sequences; and heuristically-designed super-stable beta-helical sequences. Indeed, the relative stability analysis presented herein is general to any structure or sequence, and could be extended to the study of other rare or novel folding motifs beyond the beta-helix.

  3. Bifidobacteria Enhance Antigen Sampling and Processing by Dendritic Cells in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Strisciuglio, Caterina; Miele, Erasmo; Giugliano, Francesca P; Vitale, Serena; Andreozzi, Marialuisa; Vitale, Alessandra; Catania, Maria R; Staiano, Annamaria; Troncone, Riccardo; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Bifidobacteria have been reported to reduce inflammation and contribute to intestinal homeostasis. However, the interaction between these bacteria and the gut immune system remains largely unknown. Because of the central role played by dendritic cells (DCs) in immune responses, we examined in vitro the effects of a Bifidobacteria mixture (probiotic) on DC functionality from children with inflammatory bowel disease. DCs obtained from peripheral blood monocytes of patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis, and noninflammatory bowel disease controls (HC) were incubated with fluorochrome-conjugated particles of Escherichia coli or DQ-Ovalbumin (DQ-OVA) after a pretreatment with the probiotic, to evaluate DC phenotype, antigen sampling and processing. Moreover, cell supernatants were collected to measure tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma, interleukin 17, and interleukin 10 production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DCs from CD children showed a higher bacteria particles uptake and DQ-OVA processing after incubation with the probiotic; in contrast, DC from both ulcerative colitis and HC showed no significant changes. Moreover, a marked tumor necrosis factor alpha release was observed in DC from CD after exposure to E. coli particles, whereas the probiotic did not affect the production of this proinflammatory cytokine. In conclusion, the Bifidobacteria significantly improved the antigen uptake and processing by DCs from patients with CD, which are known to present an impaired autophagic functionality, whereas, in DCs from ulcerative colitis and HC, no prominent effect of probiotic mixture was observed. This improvement of antigen sampling and processing could partially solve the impairment of intestinal innate immunity and reduce uncontrolled microorganism growth in the intestine of children with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25895109

  4. Electric field-enhanced transport across phase boundaries and membranes and its potential use in sample pretreatment for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kubán, Pavel; Slampová, Andrea; Bocek, Petr

    2010-03-01

    Separation techniques, such as electrodialysis, electroextraction, electro-membrane extraction and extraction across phase interfaces, are reviewed and discussed as methods for sample cleanup and preconcentration. This survey clearly shows that electromigration of ionic species across phase interfaces, especially across supported liquid membranes, may be very selective and is strongly dependent on the chemical composition of these interfaces. Thus, electric field-enhanced transport across chemically tailored liquid membranes may open new perspectives in preparative analytical chemistry. This review offers comprehensive survey of related literature and discussion of the topic, which may stimulate interest of experts and practitioners in bioanalysis. PMID:20191542

  5. A comb-sampling method for enhanced mass analysis in linear electrostatic ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J. B.; Kelly, O.; Calvert, C. R.; Duffy, M. J.; King, R. B.; Belshaw, L.; Graham, L.; Alexander, J. D.; Williams, I. D.; Bryan, W. A.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Cacho, C. M.; Springate, E.

    2011-04-15

    In this paper an algorithm for extracting spectral information from signals containing a series of narrow periodic impulses is presented. Such signals can typically be acquired by pickup detectors from the image-charge of ion bunches oscillating in a linear electrostatic ion trap, where frequency analysis provides a scheme for high-resolution mass spectrometry. To provide an improved technique for such frequency analysis, we introduce the CHIMERA algorithm (Comb-sampling for High-resolution IMpulse-train frequency ExtRAaction). This algorithm utilizes a comb function to generate frequency coefficients, rather than using sinusoids via a Fourier transform, since the comb provides a superior match to the data. This new technique is developed theoretically, applied to synthetic data, and then used to perform high resolution mass spectrometry on real data from an ion trap. If the ions are generated at a localized point in time and space, and the data is simultaneously acquired with multiple pickup rings, the method is shown to be a significant improvement on Fourier analysis. The mass spectra generated typically have an order of magnitude higher resolution compared with that obtained from fundamental Fourier frequencies, and are absent of large contributions from harmonic frequency components.

  6. Ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction for the determination of Cd and Ni in tea and water samples.

    PubMed

    Ezoddin, Maryam; Taghizadeh, Tayebeh; Majidi, Behrooz

    2014-01-01

    A microextraction method based on ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification using solidification of a floating organic droplet (UASEME-SFO) was evaluated for simultaneous determination of Cd and Ni in water and tea samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the UASEME-SFO technique, Triton X-100 was used as an emulsifier to accelerate the emulsification of the extraction solvent into a sample solution and hasten the mass transfer of the analytes. Analytes form a complex and are extracted into 1-dodecanol which was used as an extraction solvent. Some parameters such as type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and concentration of the surfactant, ultrasound extraction time, reagent concentration, centrifuge conditions and salt concentration were investigated. Under optimum conditions, calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.3-100 and 0.6-180 microg L(-1) with detection limits of 0.11 and 0.20 microg L(-1) for Cd and Ni, respectively. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by parallel analyses using the certified reference material of water and tea samples. The recoveries of the analytes in tea leaves, tea infusions and water samples were in the range of 96.5-105.1%. PMID:25145194

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of house paint and wallpaper samples from an 18th century historic property.

    PubMed

    Harroun, S G; Bergman, J; Jablonski, E; Brosseau, C L

    2011-09-01

    Conservation efforts for heritage buildings require a substantial knowledge of the chemical makeup of materials that were used throughout the lifetime of the property. In particular, conservators are often concerned with the identification of colorants used in both interior and exterior wall treatments (paint, wallpaper, etc.) in order to gain perspective into how the building may have appeared during a certain time period in its existence. Ideally, such an analysis requires a technique that provides molecular level information as to the identity of the colorant as well as other sample components (binders, fillers, etc.), which is useful for dating purposes. In addition, the technique should be easily applied to paint layer samples which can be extremely thin and fragile. Herein we report the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis of paint and wallpaper samples taken from exterior and interior surfaces of a historic building. Several pigments were identified in the samples, which ranged from early inorganic pigments (lead white, barium sulfate, calcium carbonate, anhydrous chromium(III) oxide) which have been used in house paints for centuries, to a more modern pigment (phthalocyanine blue), developed in the middle of the 20th century. This analysis highlights the usefulness of SERS in such a conservation effort, and demonstrates for the first time pigment identification in house paints and wallpaper using SERS, which has far-reaching implications not only in the field of conservation, but also in forensics, industrial process control, and environmental health and safety. PMID:21267481

  8. Comparison of hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride and oxalic acid leaching of stream sediment and coated rock samples as anomaly enhancement techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filipek, L.H.; Chao, T.T.; Theobald, P.K., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride (H-Hxl) extraction in 25% acetic acid is compared with the commonly used oxalic acid extraction as a method of anomaly enhancement for Cu and Zn in samples from two very different metal deposits and climatic environments. Results obtained on minus-80-mesh stream sediments from an area near the Magruder massive sulfide deposit in Lincoln County, Georgia, where the climate is humid subtropical, indicate that H-Hxl enhances the anomaly for Cu by a factor of 2 and for Zn by a factor of 1.5, compared to the oxalic method. Analyses of Fe oxide-coated rock samples from outcrops overlying the North Silver Bell porphyry copper deposit near Tucson, Arizona, where the climate is semi-arid to arid, indicate that both techniques effectively outline the zones of hydrothermal alteration. The H-Hxl extraction can also perform well in high-carbonate or high-clay environments, where other workers have suggested that oxalic acid is not very effective. Therefore, the H-Hxl method is recommended for general exploration use. ?? 1982.

  9. Structural Diversity of Ligand-Binding Androgen Receptors Revealed by Microsecond Long Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling.

    PubMed

    Duan, Mojie; Liu, Na; Zhou, Wenfang; Li, Dan; Yang, Minghui; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-09-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays important roles in the development of prostate cancer (PCa). The antagonistic drugs, which suppress the activity of AR, are widely used in the treatment of PCa. However, the molecular mechanism of antagonism about how ligands affect the structures of AR remains elusive. To better understand the conformational variability of ARs bound with agonists or antagonists, we performed long time unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and enhanced sampling simulations for the ligand binding domain of AR (AR-LBD) in complex with various ligands. Based on the simulation results, we proposed an allosteric pathway linking ligands and helix 12 (H12) of AR-LBD, which involves the interactions among the ligands and the residues W741, H874, and I899. The interaction pathway provides an atomistic explanation of how ligands affect the structure of AR-LBD. A repositioning of H12 was observed, but it is facilitated by the C-terminal of H12, instead of by the loop between helix 11 (H11) and H12. The bias-exchange metadynamics simulations further demonstrated the above observations. More importantly, the free energy profiles constructed by the enhanced sampling simulations revealed the transition process between the antagonistic form and agonistic form of AR-LBD. Our results would be helpful for the design of more efficient antagonists of AR to combat PCa. PMID:27560203

  10. Rapid detection of polychlorinated biphenyls at trace levels in real environmental samples by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Xian; Huang, Yu; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2011-01-01

    Detection of trace levels of persistent pollutants in the environment is difficult but significant. Organic pollutant homologues, due to their similar physical and chemical properties, are even more difficult to distinguish, especially in trace amounts. We report here a simple method to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil and distilled spirit samples by the surface-enhanced Raman scattering technique using Ag nanorod arrays as substrates. By this method, polychlorinated biphenyls can be detected to a concentration of 5 μg/g in dry soil samples within 1 minute. Furthermore, based on simulation and understanding of the Raman characteristics of PCBs, we recognized homologues of tetrachlorobiphenyl by using the surface-enhance Raman scattering method even in trace amounts in acetone solutions, and their characteristic Raman peaks still can be distinguished at a concentration of 10(-6) mol/L. This study provides a fast, simple and sensitive method for the detection and recognition of organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls. PMID:22346675

  11. MEASUREMENT OF PYRETHROID RESIDUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FOOD SAMPLES BY ENHANCED SOLVENT EXTRACTION/SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract summarizes pyrethorid methods development research. It provides a summary of sample preparation and analytical techniques such as supercritical fluid extraction, enhance solvent extraction, gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

  12. Enhancing positive parent-child interactions and family functioning in a poverty sample: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Negrão, Mariana; Pereira, Mariana; Soares, Isabel; Mesman, Judi

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the attachment-based intervention program Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) in a randomized controlled trial with poor families of toddlers screened for professional's concerns about the child's caregiving environment. The VIPP-SD is an evidence-based intervention, but has not yet been tested in the context of poverty. The sample included 43 families with 1- to 4-year-old children: mean age at the pretest was 29 months and 51% were boys. At the pretest and posttest, mother-child interactions were observed at home, and mothers reported on family functioning. The VIPP-SD proved to be effective in enhancing positive parent-child interactions and positive family relations in a severely deprived context. Results are discussed in terms of implications for support services provided to such poor families in order to reduce intergenerational risk transmission. PMID:24972101

  13. Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics with Soft-Ratcheting Criterion Orients Enhanced Sampling by Low-Resolution Information.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Bouvier, Guillaume; Nilges, Michael; Maragliano, Luca; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2015-07-14

    Many proteins exhibit an equilibrium between multiple conformations, some of them being characterized only by low-resolution information. Visiting all conformations is a demanding task for computational techniques performing enhanced but unfocused exploration of collective variable (CV) space. Otherwise, pulling a structure toward a target condition biases the exploration in a way difficult to assess. To address this problem, we introduce here the soft-ratcheting temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics (sr-TAMD), where the exploration of CV space by TAMD is coupled to a soft-ratcheting algorithm that filters the evolving CV values according to a predefined criterion. Any low resolution or even qualitative information can be used to orient the exploration. We validate this technique by exploring the conformational space of the inactive state of the catalytic domain of the adenyl cyclase AC from Bordetella pertussis. The domain AC gets activated by association with calmodulin (CaM), and the available crystal structure shows that in the complex the protein has an elongated shape. High-resolution data are not available for the inactive, CaM-free protein state, but hydrodynamic measurements have shown that the inactive AC displays a more globular conformation. Here, using as CVs several geometric centers, we use sr-TAMD to enhance CV space sampling while filtering for CV values that correspond to centers moving close to each other, and we thus rapidly visit regions of conformational space that correspond to globular structures. The set of conformations sampled using sr-TAMD provides the most extensive description of the inactive state of AC up to now, consistent with available experimental information. PMID:26575778

  14. Enhancement of the low resolution image quality using randomly sampled data for multi-slice MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yong; Yu, Baiying

    2014-01-01

    Low resolution images are often acquired in in vivo MR applications involving in large field-of-view (FOV) and high speed imaging, such as, whole-body MRI screening and functional MRI applications. In this work, we investigate a multi-slice imaging strategy for acquiring low resolution images by using compressed sensing (CS) MRI to enhance the image quality without increasing the acquisition time. In this strategy, low resolution images of all the slices are acquired using multiple-slice imaging sequence. In addition, extra randomly sampled data in one center slice are acquired by using the CS strategy. These additional randomly sampled data are multiplied by the weighting functions generated from low resolution full k-space images of the two slices, and then interpolated into the k-space of other slices. In vivo MR images of human brain were employed to investigate the feasibility and the performance of the proposed method. Quantitative comparison between the conventional low resolution images and those from the proposed method was also performed to demonstrate the advantage of the method. PMID:24834426

  15. Resolution and quality enhancement in terahertz in-line holography by sub-pixel sampling with double-distance reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zeyu; Li, Lei; Qin, Yu; Li, Guangbin; Wang, Du; Zhou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement of resolution and image quality in terahertz (THz) lens-free in-line digital holography by sub-pixel sampling with double-distance reconstruction. Multiple sub-pixel shifted low-resolution (LR) holograms recorded by a pyroelectric array detector (100 μm × 100 μm pixel pitch, 124 × 124 pixels) are aligned precisely to synthesize a high-resolution (HR) hologram. By this method, the lateral resolution is no more limited by the pixel pitch, and lateral resolution of 150 μm is obtained, which corresponds to 1.26λ with respect to the illuminating wavelength of 118.8 μm (2.52 THz). Compared with other published works, to date, this is the highest resolution in THz digital holography when considering the illuminating wavelength. In addition, to suppress the twin-image and zero-order artifacts, the complex amplitude distributions of both object and illuminaing background wave fields are reconstructed simultaneously. This is achieved by iterative phase retrieval between the double HR holograms and background images at two recording planes, which does not require any constraints on object plane or a priori knowledge of the sample. PMID:27607716

  16. Predicting the Structure-Activity Relationship of Hydroxyapatite-Binding Peptides by Enhanced-Sampling Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weilong; Xu, Zhijun; Cui, Qiang; Sahai, Nita

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the molecular structural and energetic basis of the interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces is critical to their applications in tissue engineering and biomimetic material synthesis. Despite recent experimental progresses in the identification and functionalization of hydroxyapatite (HAP)-binding peptides, the molecular mechanisms of their interactions with HAP surfaces are yet to be explored. In particular, the traditional method of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suffers from insufficient sampling at the peptide-inorganic interface that renders the molecular-level observation dubious. Here we demonstrate that an integrated approach combining bioinformatics, MD, and metadynamics provides a powerful tool for investigating the structure-activity relationship of HAP-binding peptides. Four low charge density peptides, previously identified by phage display, have been considered. As revealed by bioinformatics and MD, the binding conformation of the peptides is controlled by both the sequence and the amino acid composition. It was found that formation of hydrogen bonds between lysine residue and phosphate ions on the surface dictates the binding of positively charged peptide to HAP. The binding affinities of the peptides to the surface are estimated by free energy calculation using parallel-tempering metadynamics, and the results compare favorably to measurements reported in previous experimental studies. The calculation suggests that the charge density of the peptide primarily controls the binding affinity to the surface, while the backbone secondary structure that may restrain side chain orientation toward the surface plays a minor role. We also report that the application of enhanced-sampling metadynamics effects a major advantage over the steered MD method by significantly improving the reliability of binding free energy calculation. In general, our novel integration of diverse sampling techniques should contribute to the rational

  17. Enhanced expression of polysialic acid correlates with malignant phenotype in breast cancer cell lines and clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xiang; Zeng, Ying-Nan; He, Fa; Yang, Xiao-Min; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is highly expressed during embryonic development, but barely expressed during postnatal development, and may be 're-expressed' in cancer tissues. In this study, motility and migration assays were performed to compare the changes in cell behavior between non-malignant and maligant cells. Next, the expression levels of PSA were evaluated in 4 human and mouse normal breast or breast cancer (BC) cell lines using 1,2-diamino-4,5-methylenedioxybenzene-labeling HPLC technology, as well as in human clinical BC tissue samples. PSA expression was significantly higher in malignant cells (where it appeared to facilitate cell migration and motility) than in non-malignant cells. Enhanced PSA expression levels were also observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a leading cause of cancer cell metastasis, which was induced in the NMuMG and MCF10A cells by treatment with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). An increased PSA expression also correlated with the disease stage in the patients with BC (P<0.0001). Using RT-qPCR, we found that polysialyltransferase ST8SiaIV (PST) and polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII (STX), which are responsible for PSA synthesis, were differently expressed in the tested BC samples. However, PST, but not STX, was re-expressed in 14 out of 20 clinical BC samples. The findings of the present study indicate that the pathophysiology of BC involves the aberrant regulation of PSA expression and PST gene expression. PMID:26530860

  18. Unambiguous characterization of analytical markers in complex, seized opiate samples using an enhanced ion mobility trace detector-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liuni, Peter; Romanov, Vladimir; Binette, Marie-Josée; Zaknoun, Hafid; Tam, Maggie; Pilon, Pierre; Hendrikse, Jan; Wilson, Derek J

    2014-11-01

    Ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS)-based trace-compound detectors (TCDs) are powerful and widely implemented tools for the detection of illicit substances. They combine high sensitivity, reproducibility, rapid analysis time, and resistance to dirt with an acceptable false alarm rate. The analytical specificity of TCD-IMS instruments for a given analyte depends strongly on a detailed knowledge of the ion chemistry involved, as well as the ability to translate this knowledge into field-robust analytical methods. In this work, we introduce an enhanced hybrid TCD-IMS/mass spectrometer (TCD-IMS/MS) that combines the strengths of ion-mobility-based target compound detection with unambiguous identification by tandem MS. Building on earlier efforts along these lines (Kozole et al., Anal. Chem. 2011, 83, 8596-8603), the current instrument is capable of positive and negative-mode analyses with tightly controlled gating between the IMS and MS modules and direct measurement of ion mobility profiles. We demonstrate the unique capabilities of this instrument using four samples of opium seized by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), consisting of a mixture of opioid alkaloids and other naturally occurring compounds typically found in these samples. Although many analytical methods have been developed for analyzing naturally occurring opiates, this is the first detailed ion mobility study on seized opium samples. This work demonstrates all available analytical modes for the new IMS-MS system including "single-gate", "dual-gate", MS/MS, and precursor ion scan methods. Using a combination of these modes, we unambiguously identify all signals in the IMS spectra, including previously uncharacterized minor peaks arising from compounds that are common in raw opium. PMID:25302672

  19. An enhanced droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS for spatially resolved analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Weiskittel, Taylor M.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2014-11-07

    Droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for spatially resolved analysis provides the possibility of effective analysis of complex matrix samples and can provide a greater degree of chemical information from a single spot sample than is typically possible with a direct analysis of an extract. Described here is the setup and enhanced capabilities of a discrete droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling system employing a commercially available CTC PAL autosampler. The system enhancements include incorporation of a laser distance sensor enabling unattended analysis of samples and sample locations of dramatically disparate height as well as reliably dispensing just 0.5 μL of extraction solvent to make the liquid junction to the surface, wherein the extraction spot size was confined to an area about 0.7 mm in diameter; software modifications improving the spatial resolution of sampling spot selection from 1.0 to 0.1 mm; use of an open bed tray system to accommodate samples as large as whole-body rat thin tissue sections; and custom sample/solvent holders that shorten sampling time to approximately 1 min per sample. Lastly, the merit of these new features was demonstrated by spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection of pharmaceuticals and metabolites from whole-body rat thin tissue sections and razor blade (“crude”) cut mouse tissue.

  20. An enhanced droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS for spatially resolved analysis.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Weiskittel, Taylor M; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2015-03-01

    Droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for spatially resolved analysis provides the possibility of effective analysis of complex matrix samples and can provide a greater degree of chemical information from a single spot sample than is typically possible with a direct analysis of an extract. Described here is the setup and enhanced capabilities of a discrete droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling system employing a commercially available CTC PAL autosampler. The system enhancements include incorporation of a laser distance sensor enabling unattended analysis of samples and sample locations of dramatically disparate height as well as reliably dispensing just 0.5 μL of extraction solvent to make the liquid junction to the surface, wherein the extraction spot size was confined to an area about 0.7 mm in diameter; software modifications improving the spatial resolution of sampling spot selection from 1.0 to 0.1 mm; use of an open bed tray system to accommodate samples as large as whole-body rat thin tissue sections; and custom sample/solvent holders that shorten sampling time to approximately 1 min per sample. The merit of these new features was demonstrated by spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection of pharmaceuticals and metabolites from whole-body rat thin tissue sections and razor blade ("crude") cut mouse tissue. PMID:25377777

  1. An enhanced droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS for spatially resolved analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Weiskittel, Taylor M.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2014-11-07

    Droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for spatially resolved analysis provides the possibility of effective analysis of complex matrix samples and can provide a greater degree of chemical information from a single spot sample than is typically possible with a direct analysis of an extract. Described here is the setup and enhanced capabilities of a discrete droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling system employing a commercially available CTC PAL autosampler. The system enhancements include incorporation of a laser distance sensor enabling unattended analysis of samples and sample locations of dramatically disparatemore » height as well as reliably dispensing just 0.5 μL of extraction solvent to make the liquid junction to the surface, wherein the extraction spot size was confined to an area about 0.7 mm in diameter; software modifications improving the spatial resolution of sampling spot selection from 1.0 to 0.1 mm; use of an open bed tray system to accommodate samples as large as whole-body rat thin tissue sections; and custom sample/solvent holders that shorten sampling time to approximately 1 min per sample. Lastly, the merit of these new features was demonstrated by spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection of pharmaceuticals and metabolites from whole-body rat thin tissue sections and razor blade (“crude”) cut mouse tissue.« less

  2. Enhanced Spatial & Temporal Sampling of Air/Sea Interaction with the NASA CYGNSS MicroSat Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, C. S.; Ridley, A. J.; O'Brien, A.; Johnson, J.; Yi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a new spaceborne mission to address the deficiencies with current tropical cyclone (TC) intensity forecasts related to inadequate observations and modeling of the inner core. The inadequacy results from two causes: 1) much of the inner core ocean surface is obscured from conventional remote sensing instruments by intense precipitation in the eye wall and inner rain bands; and 2) the rapidly evolving (genesis and intensification) stages of the TC life cycle are poorly sampled by conventional polar-orbiting imagers. CYGNSS is specifically designed to address these two limitations by combining the all-weather performance of GNSS-R bistatic ocean surface scatterometry with the enhanced sampling properties of a constellation of satellites. CYGNSS will provide surface wind measurements of the TC inner core that could not previously be measured from space. Mission simulations predict a median(mean) revisit time of 2(5) hours. The CYGNSS wind fields, when combined with as-frequent precipitation fields (e.g. produced by the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement mission), will resolve the evolution of both the precipitation and underlying wind fields throughout the TC life cycle. They will provide near simultaneous and continuous observations and enable new insights into TC inner core dynamics and energetics. The use of a dense constellation of GNSS-R microsats results in spatial and temporal sampling properties that are markedly different from previous wide swath polar imagers. In particular, revisit times in the tropics are characterized by a probability distribution rather than a single, deterministic number of hours. The asymmetric shape of the probability distribution results in median revisit times that are less than half that of the mean, and mean revisit times that are less than half that of current polar orbiting imagers. CYGNSS is currently in Phase B project development. In parallel with the

  3. Novel flashlamp-based time-resolved fluorescence microscope reduces autofluorescence for 30-fold contrast enhancement in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connally, Russell; Veal, Duncan; Piper, James A.

    2003-07-01

    The abundance of naturally fluorescing components (autofluorophors) encountered in environmentally sourced samples can greatly hinder the detection and identification of fluorescently labeled target using fluorescence microscopy. Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy (TRFM) is a technique that reduces the effects of autofluorescence through precisely controlled time delays. Lanthanide chelates have fluorescence lifetimes many orders of magnitude greater than typical autofluorophors, and persist in their luminescence long after autofluorescence has ceased. An intense short pulse of (UV) light is used to excite fluorescence in the sample and after a short delay period the longer persisting fluorescence from the chelate is captured with an image-intensified CCD camera. The choice of pulsed excitation source for TRFM has a large impact on the price and performance of the instrument. A flashlamp with a short pulse duration was selected for our instrument because of the high spectral energy in the UV region and short pulse length. However, flash output decays with an approximate lifetime of 18μs and the TRFM requires a long-lived chelate to ensure probe fluorescence is still visible after decay of the flash plasma. We synthesized a recently reported fluorescent chelate (BHHCT) and conjugated it to a monoclonal antibody directed against the water-borne parasite Giardia lamblia. Fluorescence lifetime of the construct was determined to be 339μs +/- 14μs and provided a 45-fold enhancement of labeled Giardia over background using a gate delay of 100μs. Despite the sub-optimal decay characteristics of the light pulse, flashlamps have many advantages compared to optical chopper wheels and modulated lasers. Their low cost, lack of vibration, ease of interface and small footprint are important factors to consider in TRFM design.

  4. Chemical derivatization for enhancing sensitivity during LC/ESI-MS/MS quantification of steroids in biological samples: a review.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Shoujiro

    2016-09-01

    Sensitive and specific methods for the detection, characterization and quantification of endogenous steroids in body fluids or tissues are necessary for the diagnosis, pathological analysis and treatment of many diseases. Recently, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) has been widely used for these purposes due to its specificity and versatility. However, the ESI efficiency and fragmentation behavior of some steroids are poor, which lead to a low sensitivity. Chemical derivatization is one of the most effective methods to improve the detection characteristics of steroids in ESI-MS/MS. Based on this background, this article reviews the recent advances in chemical derivatization for the trace quantification of steroids in biological samples by LC/ESI-MS/MS. The derivatization in ESI-MS/MS is based on tagging a proton-affinitive or permanently charged moiety on the target steroid. Introduction/formation of a fragmentable moiety suitable for the selected reaction monitoring by the derivatization also enhances the sensitivity. The stable isotope-coded derivatization procedures for the steroid analysis are also described. PMID:26454158

  5. Assessing the Accuracy of Two Enhanced Sampling Methods Using EGFR Kinase Transition Pathways: The Influence of Collective Variable Choice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Albert C; Weinreich, Thomas M; Shan, Yibing; Scarpazza, Daniele P; Shaw, David E

    2014-07-01

    Structurally elucidating transition pathways between protein conformations gives deep mechanistic insight into protein behavior but is typically difficult. Unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide one solution, but their computational expense is often prohibitive, motivating the development of enhanced sampling methods that accelerate conformational changes in a given direction, embodied in a collective variable. The accuracy of such methods is unclear for complex protein transitions, because obtaining unbiased MD data for comparison is difficult. Here, we use long-time scale, unbiased MD simulations of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase deactivation as a complex biological test case for two widely used methods-steered molecular dynamics (SMD) and the string method. We found that common collective variable choices, based on the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the entire protein, prevented the methods from producing accurate paths, even in SMD simulations on the time scale of the unbiased transition. Using collective variables based on the RMSD of the region of the protein known to be important for the conformational change, however, enabled both methods to provide a more accurate description of the pathway in a fraction of the simulation time required to observe the unbiased transition. PMID:26586510

  6. U-2012: An improved Lowry protein assay, insensitive to sample color, offering reagent stability and enhanced sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Girish C; Wang, Yanming; Finn, Alona; Sharrock, Abigail; Feisst, Nicholas; Davy, Marcus; Jordan, Robert B

    2012-03-01

    Traditional colorimetric protein assays such as Biuret, Lowry, and modified Lowry (U-1988) are unsuitable for colored biological samples. Here we describe an improved Lowry protein assay (U-2012), which utilizes stable reagents and offers enhanced sensitivity over the U-1988 assay. U-2012 circumvents interference from colored pigments and other substances (for example sugars) bound to perchloric acid (PCA) precipitated proteins by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced oxidation at 50°C. Unused hydrogen peroxide is neutralized with sodium pyruvate before protein estimation for a stable end color. The U-2012 assay is carried out on the PCA precipitated protein pellet after neutralization (with Na2CO3 plus NaOH), solubilization (in Triton-NaCl), decolorization (by H2O2) and pyruvate treatment. Protein contents in red wine and homogenates of beetroot and blueberry are calculated from standard curves established for various proteins and generated using a rectangular hyperbola with parameters estimated with Microsoft Excel's Solver add-in. The U-2012 protein assay represents an improvement over U-1988 and gives a more accurate estimation of protein content. PMID:22401548

  7. High-speed concatenation of frequency ramps using sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector laser diode sources for OCT resolution enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Brandon; Derickson, Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Wavelength tunable sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector (SG-DBR) lasers used for telecommunications applications have previously demonstrated the ability for linear frequency ramps covering the entire tuning range of the laser at 100 kHz repetition rates1. An individual SG-DBR laser has a typical tuning range of 50 nm. The InGaAs/InP material system often used with SG-DBR lasers allows for design variations that cover the 1250 to 1650 nm wavelength range. This paper addresses the possibility of concatenating the outputs of tunable SGDBR lasers covering adjacent wavelength ranges for enhancing the resolution of OCT measurements. This laser concatenation method is demonstrated by combining the 1525 nm to 1575 nm wavelength range of a "C Band" SG-DBR laser with the 1570nm to 1620 nm wavelength coverage of an "L-Band" SG-DBR laser. Measurements show that SGDBR lasers can be concatenated with a transition switching time of less than 50 ns with undesired leakage signals attenuated by 50 dB.

  8. H3 Histone Tail Conformation within the Nucleosome and the Impact of K14 Acetylation Studied Using Enhanced Sampling Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Jinzen; Sakuraba, Shun; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues in histone tails is associated with gene transcription. Because histone tails are structurally flexible and intrinsically disordered, it is difficult to experimentally determine the tail conformations and the impact of acetylation. In this work, we performed simulations to sample H3 tail conformations with and without acetylation. The results show that irrespective of the presence or absence of the acetylation, the H3 tail remains in contact with the DNA and assumes an α-helix structure in some regions. Acetylation slightly weakened the interaction between the tail and DNA and enhanced α-helix formation, resulting in a more compact tail conformation. We inferred that this compaction induces unwrapping and exposure of the linker DNA, enabling DNA-binding proteins (e.g., transcription factors) to bind to their target sequences. In addition, our simulation also showed that acetylated lysine was more often exposed to the solvent, which is consistent with the fact that acetylation functions as a post-translational modification recognition site marker. PMID:26967163

  9. Enhanced prion detection in biological samples by magnetic particle extraction and real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    PubMed

    Denkers, Nathaniel D; Henderson, Davin M; Mathiason, Candace K; Hoover, Edward A

    2016-08-01

    Prions have been demonstrated in body fluids and excreta using bioassay, but at levels too low for detection by conventional direct-detection assays. More rapid and sensitive detection of prions in these clinically accessible specimens would be valuable for diagnosis and investigations of transmission, environmental impact, and interventions. In addition to very low concentrations of prions, in vitro amplification assays are challenged by the presence of inhibitors in these complex sources. Here, we leverage the prion attribute of avid metal binding with the versatile power of real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to enhance and simplify detection of chronic wasting-disease prions in biological samples. Iron oxide particle binding and magnetic extraction combined with RT-QuIC permitted rapid analysis of the low concentrations of prions in saliva, urine, faeces, and cerebrospinal fluid. These methods are pertinent to ante-mortem detection, monitoring, and surveillance, and could conceivably be applicable to other protein-misfolding disorders. PMID:27233771

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of ammonium nitrate samples fabricated using drop-on-demand inkjet technology.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Mikella E; Holthoff, Ellen L; Pellegrino, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The United States Army and the first responder community are increasingly focusing efforts on energetic materials detection and identification. Main hazards encountered in theater include homemade explosives and improvised explosive devices, in part fabricated from simple components like ammonium nitrate (AN). In order to accurately detect and identify these unknowns (energetic or benign), fielded detection systems must be accurately trained using well-understood universal testing substrates. These training substrates must contain target species at known concentrations and recognized polymorphic phases. Ammonium nitrate is an explosive precursor material that demonstrates several different polymorphic phases dependent upon how the material is deposited onto testing substrates. In this paper, known concentrations of AN were uniformly deposited onto commercially available surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates using a drop-on-demand inkjet printing system. The phase changes observed after the deposition of AN under several solvent conditions are investigated. Characteristics of the collected SERS spectra of AN are discussed, and it is demonstrated that an understanding of the exact nature of the AN samples deposited will result in an increased ability to accurately and reliably "train" hazard detection systems. PMID:24666945

  11. Field-enhanced sample injection micelle-to-solvent stacking capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of antibiotics in seawater after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Alain; Haddad, Paul R; Quirino, Joselito P

    2016-05-01

    The synergistic stacking approach of field-enhanced sample injection-micelle-to-solvent stacking was used for high sensitivity CZE-ESI-MS of eight penicillins and sulfonamides. Sensitivity enhancement factors (peak height) were 1629-3328 compared to typical injection, with LODs from 0.11 to 0.55 ng/mL. The analytical figures of merit were acceptable. SPE on a fortified seawater sample resulted in 50-fold enrichment with recoveries of 85-110%. The overall method LODs were 0.002-0.011 ng/mL. PMID:27135307

  12. Emission enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for aqueous sample analysis based on Au nanoparticles and solid-phase substrate.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xu; Lin, Qingyu; Niu, Guanghui; Shi, Qi; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-08-20

    In this paper, porous electrospun ultrafine fiber with a nanoparticle coating was proposed as an effective approach to enhance the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) signal for metal ions in aqueous systems. It is known that the LIBS technique is very limited when used for liquid sample analysis. On the other hand, in practical applications, many LIBS measurements have been accomplished in a liquid environment. A signal enhancement method for aqueous sample LIBS analysis was presented in this work, where Au nanoparticles and a solid-phase support were combined for the first time for aqueous sample analysis with LIBS. The system operation was relatively simple, which only required Au nanoparticles being dropped onto the surface of porous electrospun ultrafine fibers before LIBS analysis. Significant signal enhancement was achieved due to the integration of the merits of the Au nanoparticles and the ultrafine fibers. Nanoparticles possess significant LIBS signal enhancement effects by providing several plasma ignition points and then causing more efficient emissions. In addition, Au nanoparticles could also help to decrease the breakdown threshold of target elements for LIBS analysis. The electrospun ultrafine fibers as solid-phase support can accommodate a larger volume of aqueous sample. Meanwhile, the aqueous solution on the fiber surface was easy to evaporate. The experimental results showed that the limits of detection (LODs) with this method were significantly improved, 0.5 μg/mL for Cr, 0.5 μg/mL for Pb, and 1.1 μg/mL for Cu, respectively, compared with 2.0 μg/mL for Cr and 3.3 μg/mL for Cu in the previous research. In the proposed method, signal enhancement could be achieved without any extra equipment, which makes the LIBS technique feasible for direct measurement of an aqueous sample. PMID:27556992

  13. On-line concentration of neutral analytes for micellar electrokinetic chromatography. 5. Field-enhanced sample injection with reverse migrating micelles.

    PubMed

    Quirino, J P; Terabe, S

    1998-05-01

    Elementary conditions for the on-line concentration of neutral analytes by field-enhanced sample injection with reverse migrating micelles for micellar electrokinetic chromatography is presented. Acidic phosphate buffers containing micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate are utilized as both sample solvent and separation solution. After the capillary is conditioned with a separation solution, a water plug is hydrodynamically injected to achieve field enhancement at the injection end of the capillary during injection by application of voltage. A model is provided to give insight into the stacking scheme. Significant detector response improvements are confirmed experimentally. Moreover, utility of the technique for the analysis of a real sample is tested using urine spiked with testosterone and progesterone. PMID:21651282

  14. Surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric determination of total aflatoxins from wheat samples after magnetic solid-phase extraction using modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manafi, Mohammad Hanif; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh

    2015-07-01

    The extraction and preconcentration of total aflatoxins (including aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2) using magnetic nanoparticles based solid phase extraction (MSPE) followed by surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric detection was proposed. Ethylene glycol bis-mercaptoacetate modified silica coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles as an efficient antibody-free adsorbent was successfully applied to extract aflatoxins from wheat samples. High surface area and strong magnetization properties of magnetic nanoparticles were utilized to achieve high enrichment factor (97), and satisfactory recoveries (92-105%) using only 100 mg of the adsorbent. Furthermore, the fast separation time (less than 10 min) avoids many time-consuming cartridge loading or column-passing procedures accompany with the conventional SPE. In determination step, signal enhancement was performed by formation of Triton X-100 micelles around the analytes in 15% (v/v) acetonitrile-water which dramatically increase the sensitivity of the method. Main factors affecting the extraction efficiency and signal enhancement of the analytes including pH of sample solution, desorption conditions, extraction time, sample volume, adsorbent amount, surfactant concentration and volume and time of micelle formation were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, wide linear range of 0.1-50 ng mL-1 with low detection limit of 0.03 ng mL-1 were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxins in three commercially available wheat samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method.

  15. A divide-and-conquer strategy in tumor sampling enhances detection of intratumor heterogeneity in routine pathology: A modeling approach in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lopez, José I; Cortes, Jesús M

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) is an inherent process in cancer development which follows for most of the cases a branched pattern of evolution, with different cell clones evolving independently in space and time across different areas of the same tumor. The determination of ITH (in both spatial and temporal domains) is nowadays critical to enhance patient treatment and prognosis. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) provides a good example of ITH. Sometimes the tumor is too big to be totally analyzed for ITH detection and pathologists decide which parts must be sampled for the analysis. For such a purpose, pathologists follow internationally accepted protocols. In light of the latest findings, however, current sampling protocols seem to be insufficient for detecting ITH with significant reliability. The arrival of new targeted therapies, some of them providing promising alternatives to improve patient survival, pushes the pathologist to obtain a truly representative sampling of tumor diversity in routine practice. How large this sampling must be and how this must be performed are unanswered questions so far.  Here we present a very simple method for tumor sampling that enhances ITH detection without increasing costs. This method follows a divide-and-conquer (DAC) strategy, that is, rather than sampling a small number of large-size tumor-pieces as the routine protocol (RP) advises, we suggest sampling many small-size pieces along the tumor. We performed a computational modeling approach to show that the usefulness of the DAC strategy is twofold: first, we show that DAC outperforms RP with similar laboratory costs, and second, DAC is capable of performing similar to total tumor sampling (TTS) but, very remarkably, at a much lower cost. We thus provide new light to push forward a shift in the paradigm about how pathologists should sample tumors for achieving efficient ITH detection. PMID:27127618

  16. A divide-and-conquer strategy in tumor sampling enhances detection of intratumor heterogeneity in routine pathology: A modeling approach in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, José I.; Cortes, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) is an inherent process in cancer development which follows for most of the cases a branched pattern of evolution, with different cell clones evolving independently in space and time across different areas of the same tumor. The determination of ITH (in both spatial and temporal domains) is nowadays critical to enhance patient treatment and prognosis. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) provides a good example of ITH. Sometimes the tumor is too big to be totally analyzed for ITH detection and pathologists decide which parts must be sampled for the analysis. For such a purpose, pathologists follow internationally accepted protocols. In light of the latest findings, however, current sampling protocols seem to be insufficient for detecting ITH with significant reliability. The arrival of new targeted therapies, some of them providing promising alternatives to improve patient survival, pushes the pathologist to obtain a truly representative sampling of tumor diversity in routine practice. How large this sampling must be and how this must be performed are unanswered questions so far.  Here we present a very simple method for tumor sampling that enhances ITH detection without increasing costs. This method follows a divide-and-conquer (DAC) strategy, that is, rather than sampling a small number of large-size tumor-pieces as the routine protocol (RP) advises, we suggest sampling many small-size pieces along the tumor. We performed a computational modeling approach to show that the usefulness of the DAC strategy is twofold: first, we show that DAC outperforms RP with similar laboratory costs, and second, DAC is capable of performing similar to total tumor sampling (TTS) but, very remarkably, at a much lower cost. We thus provide new light to push forward a shift in the paradigm about how pathologists should sample tumors for achieving efficient ITH detection. PMID:27127618

  17. Three-step stacking of cationic analytes by field-enhanced sample injection, sweeping, and micelle to solvent stacking in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Grochocki, Wojciech; Markuszewski, Michał J; Quirino, Joselito P

    2015-12-11

    The sensitivity enhancement factor (SEF) in field enhanced sample injection (FESI) in capillary electrophoresis is dictated by the conductivity ratio. The higher the conductivity ratio (using very low conductivity sample diluents such as water), the higher the SEF. Here, we improved the performance of FESI by combination with sweeping and micelle to solvent stacking (MSS) in a well-defined three-step stacking procedure using model cationic drugs. The separation was by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) using 100mM phosphoric acid as background solution (BGS). Under the experimental conditions studied, the SEF (vs. typical injection in CZE) range of FESI using a conductivity ratio of 10, 100, and 1000 (sample diluent with conductivity 10, 100, and 1000× lower than the BGS, respectively) was 5-6, 33-50, and 272-393, respectively. The SEF range of three-step stacking was 308-891, 2188-6463, and 3088-6499, correspondingly. The SEF enhancement factor due to three-step stacking (SEF of three-step stacking divided by SEF of FESI) was from 11 to 161. We evaluated the performance of proposed procedure using a conductivity ratio of 10 (10mM phosphoric acid as diluent) which is the minimum requirement for field-enhancement. The strategy was as follows: long FESI (e.g., 420s at 10kV) to form an overloaded stacked zone; sweeping (e.g., 315s at -10kV) with 10mM sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles; and MSS by injection (6s at 50mbar) of 30% acetonitrile. The strategy was studied in terms of sweeping and MSS conditions, FESI/sweeping time ratio, and FESI time at constant FESI/sweeping ratio. Analytical figures of merit including linearity, LOD (S/N=3), and repeatability (intraday and interday) were determined. Moreover, sample matrix effect was studied using acetone treated plasma sample. PMID:26592558

  18. Evaluation of Multiplex PCR with Enhanced Spore Germination for Detection of Clostridium difficile from Stool Samples of the Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Hadpanus, Piyapong; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Ngamwongsatit, Puriya; Chotiprasitsakul, Darunee; Chongtrakool, Piriyaporn; Janvilisri, Tavan

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile poses as the most common etiologic agent of nosocomial diarrhea. Although there are many diagnostic methods to detect C. difficile directly from stool samples, the nucleic acid-based approach has been largely performed in several laboratories due to its high sensitivity and specificity as well as rapid turnaround time. In this study, a multiplex PCR was newly designed with recent accumulated nucleotide sequences. The PCR testing with various C. difficile ribotypes, other Clostridium spp., and non-Clostridium strains revealed 100% specificity with the ability to detect as low as ~22 genomic copy number per PCR reaction. Different combinations of sample processing were evaluated prior to multiplex PCR for the detection of C. difficile in fecal samples from hospitalized patients. The most optimal condition was the non-selective enrichment at 37°C for 1 h in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with taurocholate, followed by the multiplex PCR. The detection limit after sample processing was shown as being 5 spores per gram of fecal sample. Two hundred and thirty-eight fecal samples collected from the University affiliated hospital were analyzed by the enrichment multiplex PCR procedure. The results suggested that the combination of sample processing with the high-performance detection method would be applicable for routine diagnostic use in clinical setting. PMID:23586062

  19. Use of complementary and alternative medicines by a sample of Turkish women for infertility enhancement: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infertility patients are a vulnerable group that often seeks a non-medical solution for their failure to conceive. World-wide, women use CAM for productive health, but only a limited number of studies report on CAM use to enhance fertility. Little is known about traditional and religious forms of therapies that are used in relation to conventional medicine in Turkey. We investigated the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used by infertile Turkish women for fertility enhancement. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information and types of CAM used for fertility enhancement were completed by hundred infertility patients admitted to a primary care family planning centre in Van, Turkey between January and July 2009. Results The vast majority of infertile women had used CAM at least once for infertility. CAM use included religious interventions, herbal products and recommendations of traditional "hodja's" (faith healers). Of these women, 87.8% were abused in the last 12 months, 36.6% felt not being supported by her partner and 80.5% had never spoken with a physician about CAM. Conclusions Infertile Turkish women use complementary medicine frequently for fertility enhancement and are in need of information about CAM. Religious and traditional therapies are used as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, conventional medical therapy. Physicians need to approach fertility patients with sensitivity and should be able to council their patients about CAM accordingly. PMID:20307291

  20. Impact of grey zone sample testing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in enhancing blood safety: Experience at a tertiary care hospital in North India

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Archana; Singh, Abhay; Chaudhary, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used for screening blood donors for transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs) can sometimes fail to detect blood donors who are recently infected or possessing the low strength of pathogen. Estimation of a grey zone in ELISA testing and repeat testing of grey zone samples can further help in reducing the risks of TTI in countries where nucleic acid amplification testing for TTIs is not feasible. Materials and Methods: Grey zone samples with optical density (OD) lying between cut-off OD and 10% below the cut-off OD (cut-off OD × 0.9) were identified during routine ELISA testing. On performing repeat ELISA testing on grey zone samples in duplicate, the samples showing both OD value below grey zone were marked nonreactive, and samples showing one or both OD value in the grey zone were marked indeterminate. The samples on repeat testing showing one or both OD above cut-off value were marked positive. Results: About 119 samples (77 for hepatitis B virus [HBV], 23 for human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and 19 for hepatitis C virus [HCV]) were found to be in grey zone. On repeat testing of these samples in duplicate, 70 (58.8%) samples (45 for HBV, 12 for HIV, and 13 for HCV) were found to be reactive. Six (5%) samples (four for HBV, one for HIV, and one for HCV) were found to be indeterminate. Conclusion: Seventy donors initially screened negative, were found out to be potentially infectious on repeat grey zone testing. Thus, estimation of grey zone samples with repeat testing can further enhance the safety of blood transfusion. PMID:27011675

  1. Sample-based engine noise synthesis using an enhanced pitch-synchronous overlap-and-add method.

    PubMed

    Jagla, Jan; Maillard, Julien; Martin, Nadine

    2012-11-01

    An algorithm for the real time synthesis of internal combustion engine noise is presented. Through the analysis of a recorded engine noise signal of continuously varying engine speed, a dataset of sound samples is extracted allowing the real time synthesis of the noise induced by arbitrary evolutions of engine speed. The sound samples are extracted from a recording spanning the entire engine speed range. Each sample is delimitated such as to contain the sound emitted during one cycle of the engine plus the necessary overlap to ensure smooth transitions during the synthesis. The proposed approach, an extension of the PSOLA method introduced for speech processing, takes advantage of the specific periodicity of engine noise signals to locate the extraction instants of the sound samples. During the synthesis stage, the sound samples corresponding to the target engine speed evolution are concatenated with an overlap and add algorithm. It is shown that this method produces high quality audio restitution with a low computational load. It is therefore well suited for real time applications. PMID:23145595

  2. Efficiency enhancement of optimized Latin hypercube sampling strategies: Application to Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis and meta-modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Mohammad Mahdi; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Janssen, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The majority of literature regarding optimized Latin hypercube sampling (OLHS) is devoted to increasing the efficiency of these sampling strategies through the development of new algorithms based on the combination of innovative space-filling criteria and specialized optimization schemes. However, little attention has been given to the impact of the initial design that is fed into the optimization algorithm, on the efficiency of OLHS strategies. Previous studies, as well as codes developed for OLHS, have relied on one of the following two approaches for the selection of the initial design in OLHS: (1) the use of random points in the hypercube intervals (random LHS), and (2) the use of midpoints in the hypercube intervals (midpoint LHS). Both approaches have been extensively used, but no attempt has been previously made to compare the efficiency and robustness of their resulting sample designs. In this study we compare the two approaches and show that the space-filling characteristics of OLHS designs are sensitive to the initial design that is fed into the optimization algorithm. It is also illustrated that the space-filling characteristics of OLHS designs based on midpoint LHS are significantly better those based on random LHS. The two approaches are compared by incorporating their resulting sample designs in Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) for uncertainty propagation analysis, and then, by employing the sample designs in the selection of the training set for constructing non-intrusive polynomial chaos expansion (NIPCE) meta-models which subsequently replace the original full model in MCSs. The analysis is based on two case studies involving numerical simulation of density dependent flow and solute transport in porous media within the context of seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers. We show that the use of midpoint LHS as the initial design increases the efficiency and robustness of the resulting MCSs and NIPCE meta-models. The study also illustrates that this

  3. High-resolution CT by diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging: mapping of breast tissue samples and comparison with their histo-pathology.

    PubMed

    Bravin, Alberto; Keyriläinen, Jani; Fernández, Manuel; Fiedler, Stefan; Nemoz, Christian; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Leidenius, Marjut; von Smitten, Karl; Sipilä, Petri; Suortti, Pekka

    2007-04-21

    The aim of this study was to introduce high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of breast tumours using the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging (DEI) technique and to compare results with radiological and histo-pathological examinations. X-ray CT images of tumour-bearing breast tissue samples were acquired by monochromatic synchrotron radiation (SR). Due to the narrow beam and a large sample-to-detector distance scattering is rejected in the absorption contrast images (SR-CT). Large contrast enhancement is achieved by the use of the DEI-CT method, where the effects of refraction and scatter rejection are analysed by crystal optics. Clinical mammograms and CT images were recorded as reference material for a radiological examination. Three malignant and benign samples were studied in detail. Their radiographs were compared with optical images of stained histological sections. The DEI-CT images map accurately the morphology of the samples, including collagen strands and micro-calcifications of dimensions less than 0.1 mm. Histo-pathological examination and reading of the radiographs were done independently, and the conclusions were in general agreement. High-resolution DEI-CT images show strong contrast and permit visualization of details invisible in clinical radiographs. The radiation dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude without compromising image quality, which would make possible clinical in vivo DEI-CT with future compact SR sources. PMID:17404464

  4. Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Detection of Gold Nanoparticles in Biological Samples Using the Synergy between Added Matrix and the Gold Core.

    PubMed

    Marsico, Alyssa L M; Elci, Gokhan S; Moyano, Daniel F; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Duncan, Bradley; Landis, Ryan F; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2015-12-15

    Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) has been used to detect gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in biological samples, such as cells and tissues, by ionizing their attached monolayer ligands. Many NP-attached ligands, however, are difficult to ionize by LDI, making it impossible to track these NPs in biological samples. In this work, we demonstrate that concentrations of matrix-assisted LDI (MALDI) matrices an order of magnitude below the values typically used in MALDI can facilitate the selective detection of AuNPs with these ligands, even in samples as complex as cell lysate. This enhanced sensitivity arises from a synergistic relationship between the gold core and the matrix that helps to selectively ionize ligands attached to the AuNPs. PMID:26560844

  5. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  7. Enhanced cellular responses and environmental sampling within inner foreskin explants: implications for the foreskin’s role in HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Fahrbach, KM; Barry, SM; Anderson, MR; Hope, TJ

    2012-01-01

    The decrease in HIV acquisition after circumcision suggests a role for the foreskin in HIV transmission. However, the mechanism leading to protection remains undefined. Using tissue explant cultures we found that Langerhans cells (LCs) in foreskin alter their cellular protein expression in response to external stimuli. Furthermore, we observe that upon treatment with TNF-α, tissue-resident LCs became activated and that stimulatory cytokines can specifically cause an influx of CD4+ T-cells into the epithelial layer. Importantly, both of these changes are significant in the inner, but not outer, foreskin. In addition, we find that LCs in the inner foreskin have increased ability to sample environmental proteins. These results suggest differences in permeability between the inner and outer foreskin and indicate that HIV target cells in the inner foreskin have increased interaction with external factors. This increased responsiveness and sampling provides novel insights into the underlying mechanism of how circumcision can decrease HIV transmission. PMID:20410876

  8. Enhanced cellular responses and environmental sampling within inner foreskin explants: implications for the foreskin's role in HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Fahrbach, K M; Barry, S M; Anderson, M R; Hope, T J

    2010-07-01

    The decrease in HIV acquisition after circumcision suggests a role for the foreskin in HIV transmission. However, the mechanism leading to protection remains undefined. Using tissue explant cultures we found that Langerhans cells (LCs) in foreskin alter their cellular protein expression in response to external stimuli. Furthermore, we observe that upon treatment with TNF-alpha, tissue-resident LCs became activated and that stimulatory cytokines can specifically cause an influx of CD4+ T-cells into the epithelial layer. Importantly, both of these changes are significant in the inner, but not outer, foreskin. In addition, we find that LCs in the inner foreskin have increased ability to sample environmental proteins. These results suggest differences in permeability between the inner and outer foreskin and indicate that HIV target cells in the inner foreskin have increased interaction with external factors. This increased responsiveness and sampling provides novel insights into the underlying mechanism of how circumcision can decrease HIV transmission. PMID:20410876

  9. Quantum memory enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance of nanometer-scale samples with a single spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Zaiser, Sebastian; Favaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Momenzadeh, S. Ali; Denisenko, Andrej; Isoya, Junichi; Neumann, Philipp; Wrachtrup, Joerg

    Recently nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of nanoscale samples at ambient conditions has been achieved with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. So far the spectral resolution in the NV NMR experiments was limited by the sensor's coherence time, which in turn prohibited revealing the chemical composition and dynamics of the system under investigation. By entangling the NV electron spin sensor with a long-lived memory spin qubit we increase the spectral resolution of NMR measurement sequences for the detection of external nuclear spins. Applying the latter sensor-memory-couple it is particularly easy to track diffusion processes, to identify the molecules under study and to deduce the actual NV center depth inside the diamond. We performed nanoscale NMR on several liquid and solid samples exhibiting unique NMR response. Our method paves the way for nanoscale identification of molecule and protein structures and dynamics of conformational changes.

  10. Surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric determination of total aflatoxins from wheat samples after magnetic solid-phase extraction using modified Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Mohammad Hanif; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh

    2015-07-01

    The extraction and preconcentration of total aflatoxins (including aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2) using magnetic nanoparticles based solid phase extraction (MSPE) followed by surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric detection was proposed. Ethylene glycol bis-mercaptoacetate modified silica coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles as an efficient antibody-free adsorbent was successfully applied to extract aflatoxins from wheat samples. High surface area and strong magnetization properties of magnetic nanoparticles were utilized to achieve high enrichment factor (97), and satisfactory recoveries (92-105%) using only 100mg of the adsorbent. Furthermore, the fast separation time (less than 10 min) avoids many time-consuming cartridge loading or column-passing procedures accompany with the conventional SPE. In determination step, signal enhancement was performed by formation of Triton X-100 micelles around the analytes in 15% (v/v) acetonitrile-water which dramatically increase the sensitivity of the method. Main factors affecting the extraction efficiency and signal enhancement of the analytes including pH of sample solution, desorption conditions, extraction time, sample volume, adsorbent amount, surfactant concentration and volume and time of micelle formation were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, wide linear range of 0.1-50 ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.03 ng mL(-1) were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxins in three commercially available wheat samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method. PMID:25804513

  11. Ultrafast in vivo microwave irradiation for enhanced metabolic stability of brain biopsy samples during HRMAS NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Detour, J; Elbayed, K; Piotto, M; Moussallieh, F M; Nehlig, A; Namer, I J

    2011-09-30

    High resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy is a well established technique for ex vivo metabolite investigations but experimental factors such as ischemic delay or mechanical stress due to continuous spinning deserve further investigations. Cortical brain samples from rats that underwent ultrafast in vivo microwave irradiation (MWp group) were compared to similar samples that underwent standard nitrogen freezing with and without exposure to domestic microwaves (FN and FN+MWd groups). One dimensional (1)H HRMAS NMR spectra were acquired and 16 metabolites of interest were quantified. Within each group 3 samples underwent long lasting acquisition (up to 15 h). Statistically significant differences in metabolite concentrations were observed between groups for metabolites associated to post mortem biochemical changes and/or anaerobic glycolysis including several neurotransmitters. Spectral assessment over time showed a drastic reduction of biochemical variations in both MW groups. Only 2/16 metabolites exhibited significant signal variations after 15 h of continuous spinning and acquisition in the MWp group. This number increased to 10 in the FN group. We confirmed limited anaerobic metabolism and post mortem degradation after ultra fast in vivo MW irradiation. Furthermore, spectra obtained after MWp and MWd irradiation exhibited an extremely stable spectral pattern over extended periods of continuous acquisition. PMID:21803072

  12. Three-step stacking by field-enhanced sample injection, sweeping, and micelle to solvent stacking in capillary electrophoresis: Anionic analytes.

    PubMed

    Grochocki, Wojciech; Markuszewski, Michał J; Quirino, Joselito P

    2016-04-15

    Three-step stacking by field-enhanced sample injection (FESI), sweeping, and micelle to solvent stacking (MSS) in co-EOF capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is presented for anionic analytes. Long FESI produced an overloaded stacked zone of analytes (four model penicillins). Sweeping of the FESI zone was by electrokinetic injection of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles. MSS was by short injection of 60% methanol that released the swept analytes from CTAB micelles. The sensitivity enhancement factors were 146-279 and 519-954 for conductivity ratio of 10 and 100, respectively. The SEF enhancement factors (factor=SEF from three-step stacking/SEF from FESI) were 16-32 and 6-10, correspondingly. The LODs were between 6.6-13.2 ng/mL, repeatability (intraday and interday) was %RSD≤5.4%, and linearity was R(2)≥0.998. Application to real sample was investigated using fortified plasma after liquid-liquid extraction. PMID:27000740

  13. Selective melamine detection in multiple sample matrices with a portable Raman instrument using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mecker, Laura C; Tyner, Katherine M; Kauffman, John F; Arzhantsev, Sergey; Mans, Daniel J; Gryniewicz-Ruzicka, Connie M

    2012-07-01

    Melamine adulteration of food and pharmaceutical products is a major concern and there is a growing need to protect the public from exposure to contaminated or adulterated products. One approach to reduce this threat is to develop a portable method for on-site rapid testing. We describe a universal and selective method for the detection of melamine in a variety of solid matrices at the 100-200 μg L(-1) level by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with gold nanoparticles. With minimal sample preparation and the use of a portable Raman spectrometer, this work will lead to field-based screening for melamine adulteration. Citrate coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were investigated for both colorimetric and Raman-based responses. Several non-hazardous solvents were evaluated in order to develop a melamine extraction procedure safe for field applications. Au NP agglomerates formed by the addition of isopropanol (IPA) prior to sample introduction enhanced the Raman signal for melamine and eliminated matrix interference for substrate formation. The melamine Raman signal resulted in a 10(5) enhancement through the use of Au NP agglomerates. To our knowledge, we have developed the first portable SERS method using Au NPs to selectively screen for the presence of melamine adulteration in a variety of food and pharmaceutical matrices, including milk powder, infant formula, lactose, povidone, whey protein, wheat bran and wheat gluten. PMID:22704375

  14. Constant pressure-assisted head-column field-amplified sample injection in combination with in-capillary derivatization for enhancing the sensitivity of capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Na; Zhou, Lei; Zhu, Zaifang; Zhang, Huige; Zhou, Ximin; Chen, Xingguo

    2009-05-15

    In this work, a novel method combining constant pressure-assisted head-column field-amplified sample injection (PA-HC-FASI) with in-capillary derivatization was developed for enhancing the sensitivity of capillary electrophoresis. PA-HC-FASI uses an appropriate positive pressure to counterbalance the electroosmotic flow in the capillary column during electrokinetic injection, while taking advantage of the field amplification in the sample matrix and the water of the "head column". Accordingly, the analytes were stacked at the stationary boundary between water and background electrolyte. After 600s PA-HC-FASI, 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole as derivatization reagent was injected, followed by an electrokinetic step (5kV, 45s) to enhance the mixing efficiency of analytes and reagent plugs. Standing a specified time of 10min for derivatization reaction under 35 degrees C, then the capillary temperature was cooled to 25 degrees C and the derivatives were immediately separated and determined under 25 degrees C. By investigating the variables of the presented approach in detail, on-line preconcentration, derivatization and separation could be automatically operated in one run and required no modification of current CE commercial instrument. Moreover, the sensitivity enhancement factor of 520 and 800 together with the detection limits of 16.32 and 6.34pg/mL was achieved for model compounds: glufosinate and aminomethylphosphonic acid, demonstrating the high detection sensitivity of the presented method. PMID:19342058

  15. A nested PCR assay exhibits enhanced sensitivity for detection of Theileria parva infections in bovine blood samples from carrier animals.

    PubMed

    Odongo, David O; Sunter, Jack D; Kiara, Henry K; Skilton, Robert A; Bishop, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Theileria parva causes East Coast fever, an economically important disease of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe a nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assay for the detection of T. parva DNA in cattle blood spotted onto filter paper using primers derived from the T. parva-specific 104-kDa antigen (p104) gene. The sensitivity of this assay was compared to a previously described p104-based PCR and also the reverse line blot (RLB) technique, using serial dilutions of blood from a calf with known T. parva piroplasm parasitaemia. The relative sensitivities of the three assays were 0.4, 1.4 and 4 parasites/microl corresponding to blood parasitaemias of 9.2 x 10(-6)%, 2.8 x 10(-5)% and 8.3 x 10(-5)%, respectively. The three assays were applied to samples from two calves infected with the T. parva Muguga stock. Parasite DNA was consistently detectable by the two p104 PCR assays until 48 and 82 days post-infection, respectively, and thereafter sporadically. RLB detected parasite DNA in the two infected calves until days 43 and 45. Field samples from 151 Kenyan cattle exhibited 37.7% positivity for T. parva by regular p104 PCR and 42.3% positivity using p104 nPCR. Among 169 cattle blood samples from Southern Sudan, 36% were positive for T. parva using nPCR. The nPCR assay represents a highly sensitive tool for detection and monitoring of asymptomatic carrier state infections of T. parva in the blood of cattle. PMID:19902251

  16. Determination of Lead in Water Samples Using a New Vortex-Assisted, Surfactant-Enhanced Emulsification Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Lu, Ying; Mmereki, Daniel; Pan, Weiliang; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Guangming; Mao, Yufeng; Su, Xaioxuan

    2016-04-01

    A low toxic solvent-based vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (LT-VSLLME) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the extraction and determination of lead (Pb) in water samples. In the LT-VSLLME method, the extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous samples by the assistance of vortex agitator. Meanwhile, the addition of a surfactant, which acted as an emulsifier, could enhance the speed of the mass-transfer from aqueous samples to the extraction solvent. The influences of analytical parameters, including extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, pH, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and extraction time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a good relative standard deviation of 3.69% at 10 ng L(-1) was obtained. The calibration graph showed a linear pattern in the ranges of 5-30 ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.76 ng L(-1). The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 5-30 ngL(-1). The enrichment factor was 320. The procedure was applied to wastewater and river water, and the accuracy was assessed through the analysis of the recovery experiments. PMID:26614355

  17. Flow-injection chemiluminescence determination of cloxacillin in water samples and pharmaceutical preparation by using CuO nanosheets-enhanced luminol-hydrogen peroxide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khataee, Alireza; Iranifam, Mortaza; Fathinia, Mehrangiz; Nikravesh, Mina

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a rapid and sensitive flow-injection chemiluminescence (flow-CL) system was developed for the determination of cloxacillin sodium in environmental water samples and pharmaceutical preparations. The method was based on the enhancement effect of cloxacillin sodium on the CL reaction of luminal-H2O2-CuO nanosheets (NSs) in alkaline medium. The CuO nanosheets were synthesized using a green sonochemical method. The physical properties of the synthesized CuO nanosheets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. The influences of various experimental factors such as H2O2, NaOH, luminol and CuO nanosheets concentrations were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced CL intensity was linearly related to the concentration of cloxacillin sodium in the range of the 0.05-30.00 mg L-1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.995. The corresponding detection limit (3σ) was calculated to be 0.026 mg L-1. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the developed method was 2.21% with 11 repeated measurements of 4.00 mg L-1 cloxacillin sodium. Also, a total analysis time per sample was 30 s which confirmed the rapidity of the proposed method. The analytical applicability of the proposed CL system was assessed by determining cloxacillin sodium in spiked environmental water samples and pharmaceutical preparation. Furthermore, the possible mechanism of CL reaction was discussed.

  18. Application of electro-enhanced solid-phase microextraction for determination of phthalate esters and bisphenol A in blood and seawater samples.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Amayreh; Basheer, Chanbasha; Al-Arfaj, Abdul Rahman

    2013-10-15

    The electro-enhanced solid-phase microextraction (EE-SPME) method was developed for the determination of endocrine disruptor compounds such as phthalate esters and bisphenol A in human blood and seawater samples. After EE-SPME, samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In this approach, commercial SPME fiber was used in direct-immersion mode with an applied potential to extract di-ethyl phthalate, di-butyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate and bisphenol A. The applied potential facilitates and enhances the extraction efficiency of the target analytes. Various experimental conditions influencing performance of the EE-SPME such as extraction time, applied potential and ionic strength were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, EE-SPME was more efficient than a conventional SPME approach. Very good linearity was observed for all analytes in a range between 1 and 100 µg L(-1) with correlation of determination (R(2)) between 0.963 and 0.996. The limits of a detection based signal-to-noise of 3 were from 0.004 to 0.15 µg L(-1). The reproducibility of EE-SPME was evaluated and the relative standard deviations were between 1.0% and 5.0% (n=9). The proposed method was applied to human blood samples stored in transfusion bags and seawater. Results showed that the proposed EE-SPME was simple and suitable for trace level analysis. PMID:24054596

  19. Ionic-liquid-based, manual-shaking- and ultrasound-assisted, surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction for the determination of three fungicide residues in juice samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochu; You, Xiangwei; Liu, Fengmao; Hou, Fan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    A novel manual-shaking- and ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction method was developed for the determination of three fungicides in juice samples. In this method, the ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide, instead of a volatile organic solvent was used as the extraction solvent. The surfactant, NP-10, was used as an emulsifier to enhance the dispersion of the water-immiscible ionic liquid into an aqueous phase, which accelerated the mass transfer of the analytes. Organic dispersive solvent typically required in common dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction methods was not necessary. In addition, manual shaking for 15 s before ultrasound to preliminarily mix the extraction solvent and the aqueous sample could greatly shorten the time for dispersing the ionic liquid into aqueous solution by ultrasound irradiation. Several experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including type and volume of extraction solvent, type and concentration of surfactant, extraction time, and pH, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, good linearity with the correlation coefficients (γ) higher than 0.9986 and high sensitivity with the limit of detection ranging from 0.4 to 1.6 μg/L were obtained. The average recoveries ranged from 61.4 to 86.0% for spiked juice, with relative standard deviations from 1.8 to 9.7%. The proposed method was demonstrated to be a simple, fast, and efficient method for the analysis of the target fungicides in juice samples. PMID:25394281

  20. Ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and enhanced spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum (VI) in water and plant leaves samples by FO-LADS.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, Maysam; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2011-02-01

    A new simple and rapid ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) has been applied to preconcentrate trace levels of molybdenum (VI) as a prior step to its enhanced determination by fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry (FO-LADS). In this method, a small amount of [Hmim][Tf(2)N] (1-hexyl-3-methylimmidazolium bis (trifluormethylsulfonyl) imid) as an extraction solvent was applied to extract molybdenum - pyrogallol red complex, which was formed in an aqueous solution in the presence of N-cetyl-N-N-N-trimethyl ammonium chloride as a sensitizing agent. Under optimum conditions, enhancement factor, detection limit and relative standard deviation (n=5, for 30 μg L(-1) of molybdenum (VI)) in 10 mL water sample were 72.6, 1.43 μg L(-1) and 2.8%, respectively. PMID:21092750

  1. Free-Breathing Contrast-Enhanced Multiphase MRI of the Liver Using a Combination of Compressed Sensing, Parallel Imaging, and Golden-Angle Radial Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Hersh; Feng, Li; Block, Tobias K.; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Lim, Ruth P.; Babb, James S.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Otazo, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to develop a new method for free-breathing contrast-enhanced multiphase liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a combination of compressed sensing, parallel imaging, and radial k-space sampling and to demonstrate the feasibility of this method by performing image quality comparison with breath-hold cartesian T1-weighted (conventional) postcontrast acquisitions in healthy participants. Materials and Methods This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant prospective study received approval from the institutional review board. Eight participants underwent 3 separate contrast-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted gradient-echo MRI examinations with matching imaging parameters: conventional breath-hold examination with cartesian k-space sampling volumetric interpolate breath hold examination (BH-VIBE) and free-breathing acquisitions with interleaved angle-bisection and continuous golden-angle radial sampling schemes. Interleaved angle-bisection and golden-angle data from each 100 consecutive spokes were reconstructed using a combination of compressed sensing and parallel imaging (interleaved-angle radial sparse parallel [IARASP] and golden-angle radial sparse parallel [GRASP]) to generate multiple postcontrast phases. Arterial- and venous-phase BH-VIBE, IARASP, and GRASP reconstructions were evaluated by 2 radiologists in a blinded fashion. The readers independently assessed quality of enhancement (QE), overall image quality (IQ), and other parameters of image quality on a 5-point scale, with the highest score indicating the most desirable examination. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to compare each measure of image quality. Results Images of BH-VIBE and GRASP had significantly higher QE and IQ values compared with IARASP for both phases (P < 0.05). The differences in QE between BH-VIBE and GRASP for the arterial and venous phases were not significant (P > 0.05). Although GRASP had lower IQ

  2. Searching for Li-rich giants in a sample of 12 open clusters. Li enhancement in two stars with substellar companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Mena, E.; Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Kunitomo, M.; Adibekyan, V.; Zaworska, P.; Santos, N. C.; Israelian, G.; Lovis, C.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to search for Li-rich giants in a sample of clusters where planets have been searched, thus we can study the planet engulfment scenario to explain Li replenishment using a proper comparison sample of stars without detected giant planets. Methods: We derived Li abundances for a sample of 67 red giant stars in 12 different open clusters using standard spectral synthesis techniques and high-resolution spectra (from HARPS and UVES). We also determined masses, ages, and radius from PARSEC stellar isochrones to constrain the evolutionary stage of these stars. Results: We found three stars in different clusters with clearly enhanced Li abundances compared to other stars within the cluster. Interestingly, the only two stars with a detected substellar companion in our sample belong to that group. One of the planet hosts, NGC 2423 No. 3, might lie close to the luminosity bump on the HR diagram, a phase where Li production by the Cameron-Fowler process is supported by extra-mixing to bring fresh Li up to the surface. On the other hand, NGC 4349 No. 127 is a more massive and more evolved giant that does not seem to be in the evolutionary phase where other Li-rich stars are found. We discuss the possibility that the Li enhancement of this star is triggered by the engulfment of a planet, considering that close-in planets hardly survive the RGB tip and the early AGB phases. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile), with HARPS/3.6 m (runs ID 075.C-0140, 076.C-0429, 077.C-0088, and 078.C-0133) and with UVES/VLT at the Cerro Paranal Observatory (run 079.C-0131).

  3. Enhanced resolution of fluorescence anisotropy decays by simultaneous analysis of progressively quenched samples. Applications to anisotropic rotations and to protein dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, J R; Cherek, H; Gryczynski, I; Joshi, N; Johnson, M L

    1987-01-01

    Enhanced resolution of rapid and complex anisotropy decays was obtained by measurement and analysis of data from progressively quenched samples. Collisional quenching by acrylamide was used to vary the mean decay time of indole or of the tryptophan fluorescence from melittin. Anisotropy decays were obtained from the frequency-response of the polarized emission at frequencies from 4 to 2,000 MHz. Quenching increases the fraction of the total emission, which occurs on the subnanosecond timescale, and thereby provides increased information on picosecond rotational motions or local motions in proteins. For monoexponential subnanosecond anisotropy decays, enhanced resolution is obtained by measurement of the most highly quenched samples. For complex anisotropy decays, such as those due to both local motions and overall protein rotational diffusion, superior resolution is obtained by simultaneous analysis of data from quenched and unquenched samples. We demonstrate that measurement of quenched samples greatly reduces the uncertainty of the 50-ps correlation time of indole in water at 20 degrees C, and allows resolution of the anisotropic rotation of indole with correlation times of 140 and 720 ps. The method was applied to melittin in the monomeric and tetrameric forms. With increased quenching, the anisotropy data showed decreasing contributions from overall protein rotation and increased contribution from picosecond tryptophan motions. The tryptophan residues in both the monomeric and the tetrameric forms of melittin displayed substantial local motions with correlation times near 0.16 and 0.06 ns, respectively. The amplitude of the local motion is twofold less in the tetramer. These highly resolved anisotropy decays should be valuable for comparison with molecular dynamics simulations of melittin. PMID:3593873

  4. HyperSPASM NMR: A new approach to single-shot 2D correlations on DNP-enhanced samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Frydman, Lucio

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution DNP experiments are limited to a single or at most a few scans, before the non-Boltzmann magnetization has been consumed. This makes it impractical to record 2D NMR data by conventional, t1-incremented schemes. Here a new approach termed HyperSPASM to establish 2D heteronuclear correlations in a single scan is reported, aimed at dealing with this kind of challenge. The HyperSPASM experiment relies on imposing an amplitude-modulation of the data by a single Δt1 indirect-domain evolution time, and subsequently monitoring the imparted encoding on separate echo and anti-echo pathway signals within a single continuous acquisition. This is implemented via the use of alternating, switching, coherence selection gradients. As a result of these manipulations the phase imparted by a heteronucleus over its indirect domain evolution can be accurately extracted, and 2D data unambiguously reconstructed with a single-shot excitation. The nature of this sequence makes the resulting experiment particularly well suited for collecting indirectly-detected HSQC data on hyperpolarized samples. The potential of the ensuing HyperSPASM method is exemplified with natural-abundance hyperpolarized correlations on model systems.

  5. Modeling the temperature-dependent peptide vibrational spectra based on implicit-solvent model and enhance sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianmin, Wu; Tianjun, Wang; Xian, Chen; Bin, Fang; Ruiting, Zhang; Wei, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    We herein review our studies on simulating the thermal unfolding Fourier transform infrared and two-dimensional infrared spectra of peptides. The peptide-water configuration ensembles, required forspectrum modeling, aregenerated at a series of temperatures using the GBOBC implicit solvent model and the integrated tempering sampling technique. The fluctuating vibrational Hamiltonians of the amide I vibrational band are constructed using the Frenkel exciton model. The signals are calculated using nonlinear exciton propagation. The simulated spectral features such as the intensity and ellipticity are consistent with the experimental observations. Comparing the signals for two beta-hairpin polypeptides with similar structures suggests that this technique is sensitive to peptide folding landscapes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21203178), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21373201), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21433014), the Science and Technological Ministry of China (Grant No. 2011YQ09000505), and “Strategic Priority Research Program” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. XDB10040304 and XDB100202002).

  6. Method comparison for enhanced recovery, isolation and qualitative detection of C. jejuni and C. coli from wastewater effluent samples.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Florez-Cuadrado, Diego; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Porrero, María Concepción; Domínguez, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Seeking a sensitive protocol, culture-dependent methods were compared to detect thermophilic Campylobacter species in untreated urban effluents. We evaluated various combinations of selective media, with and without an enrichment steps, as well as an extra filtration step. Culture-independent real-time quantitative PCR was also included and all detected isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All tested water samples contained Campylobacter DNA, but only 64% were positive after culture. Although enrichment using Preston broth resulted in better recovery of potentially stressed Campylobacter than Bolton or Campyfood broth (CFB), there was no significant increase in efficiency compared to direct plating. The type of selective agar media used, on the other hand, had a significant effect, with CASA plates performing better than mCCDA or CFA ones. Inclusion of an enrichment step increased the ratio of C. coli vs. C. jejuni being isolated. Resistances against all antimicrobials tested were observed in C. coli, but fewer instances of resistance were found in C. jejuni isolates. Whether this difference was the result of selection during the enrichment step could not be determined. The presence of Campylobacter in urban effluents can be considered as a valuable proxy for Campylobacter populations present in urban environments. PMID:25739008

  7. Method Comparison for Enhanced Recovery, Isolation and Qualitative Detection of C. jejuni and C. coli from Wastewater Effluent Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Florez-Cuadrado, Diego; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Porrero, María Concepción; Domínguez, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Seeking a sensitive protocol, culture-dependent methods were compared to detect thermophilic Campylobacter species in untreated urban effluents. We evaluated various combinations of selective media, with and without an enrichment steps, as well as an extra filtration step. Culture-independent real-time quantitative PCR was also included and all detected isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All tested water samples contained Campylobacter DNA, but only 64% were positive after culture. Although enrichment using Preston broth resulted in better recovery of potentially stressed Campylobacter than Bolton or Campyfood broth (CFB), there was no significant increase in efficiency compared to direct plating. The type of selective agar media used, on the other hand, had a significant effect, with CASA plates performing better than mCCDA or CFA ones. Inclusion of an enrichment step increased the ratio of C. coli vs. C. jejuni being isolated. Resistances against all antimicrobials tested were observed in C. coli, but fewer instances of resistance were found in C. jejuni isolates. Whether this difference was the result of selection during the enrichment step could not be determined. The presence of Campylobacter in urban effluents can be considered as a valuable proxy for Campylobacter populations present in urban environments. PMID:25739008

  8. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of triazine herbicides in water samples by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran-Hong; Liu, Dong-Hui; Yang, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Peng

    2012-07-01

    A novel method based on the combination of microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) and vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (VSLLME) was developed for the determination of five triazine herbicides (simazine, atrazine, ametryn, prometryn, and terbutryn) in water samples. The five triazine herbicides were baseline separated by using the microemulsion buffer containing a 10 mmol/L borate buffer at pH 9.5, 2.5% (w/v) SDS as surfactant, 0.8% (w/v) ethyl acetate as oil phase, and 6.0% (w/v) 1-butanol as cosurfactant. The optimum extraction conditions of VSLLME were as follows: 100 μL chloroform was used as extraction solvent, 5.0 × 10⁻⁵ mol/L Tween-20 was chosen as the surfactant to enhance the emulsification, and the extraction process was carried out by vortex mixing for 3 min. Under these optimum experimental conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 2.0-200.0 ng/mL, with the correlation coefficients (r²) varying from 0.9927 to 0.9958. The detection limits of the method varied from 0.41 to 0.62 ng/mL. The purposed method was applied to the determination of five triazine herbicides in real water samples, and the recoveries were between 80.6 and 107.3%. PMID:22821495

  9. On-Line Organic Solvent Field Enhanced Sample Injection in Capillary Zone Electrophoresis for Analysis of Quetiapine in Beagle Dog Plasma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuqing; Wen, Jun; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method with field enhanced sample injection (FESI) was developed and validated for the determination of quetiapine fumarate in beagle dog plasma, with a sample pretreatment by LLE in 96-well deep format plate. The optimum separation was carried out in an uncoated 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 13 kV. The electrophoretic analysis was performed by 50 mM phosphate at pH 2.5. The detection wavelength was 210 nm. Under these optimized conditions, FESI with acetonitrile enhanced the sensitivity of quetiapine about 40-50 folds in total. The method was suitably validated with respect to stability, specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, accuracy, precision and extraction recovery. Using mirtazapine as an internal standard (100 ng/mL), the response of quetiapine was linear over the range of 1-1000 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification was 1 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precisions for the assay were within 4.8% and 12.7%, respectively. The method represents the first application of FESI-CZE to the analysis of quetiapine fumarate in beagle dog plasma after oral administration. PMID:26805796

  10. Effective extraction of triazines from environmental water samples using magnetism-enhanced monolith-based in-tube solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia; Yang, Xiaodong; Luo, Qing

    2016-09-21

    This article reports on the effective extraction of triazines from environmental water samples using magnetism-enhanced monolith-based in-tube solid phase microextraction (ME-MB/IT-SPME). Firstly, monolithic poly (octyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) capillary column doped with magnetic nanoparticles was synthesized inside a fused silica. After that, the monolithic capillary column was placed inside a magnetic coil that allowed the exertion of a variable magnetic field during adsorption and desorption steps. The effects of intensity of magnetic field, adsorption and desorption flow rate, volume of sample and desorption solvent, pH value and ionic strength in sample matrix on the performance of ME-MB/IT-SPME for triazines were investigated in details. Under the optimized conditions, the developed ME-MB/IT-SPME showed satisfactory quantitative extraction efficiencies of the target analytes between 64.8% and 99.7%. At the same time, the ME-MB/IT-SPME was combined with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection to detect six triazines in water samples. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) and limits of quantification (S/N = 10) were in the ranges of 0.074-0.23 μg/L and 0.24-0.68 μg/L, respectively. The precision of the proposed method was evaluated in terms of intra- and inter-assay variability calculated as relative standard deviation, and it was found that the values were all below 10%. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for environmental water samples such as farmland, lake and river water with spiked recoveries in the range of 70.7-119%. PMID:27590547

  11. Analysis of triazolopyrimidine herbicides in soils using field-enhanced sample injection-coelectroosmotic capillary electrophoresis combined with solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Borges, Javier; García-Montelongo, Francisco J; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2005-12-30

    In this work, a combined methodology using off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE), on-line field-enhanced sample injection (FESI) and coelectroosmotic capillary electrophoresis with UV detection (CE-UV) is developed for the trace analysis of five triazolopyrimidine sulfonanilide pesticides (i.e., flumetsulam, florasulam, cloransulam-methyl, diclosulam and metosulam). An adequate background electrolyte (BGE) was obtained for the separation of these pesticides using hexadimethrine bromide (HDB) as electroosmotic flow (EOF) modifier. This BGE consisted of 0.00042% HDB, 11 mM formic acid, 16 mM ammonium carbonate and 2.5 mM alpha-CD solution at pH 7.6. The use of this running buffer together with the FESI preconcentration method provided limits of detection (LODs) in the low microg/L range (i.e., between 13.0 and 31.5 microg/L). The optimized FESI-CE-UV method was combined with off-line SPE using C(18) cartridges and applied to the determination of the selected group of pesticides in soil samples. Recovery percentages ranged between 50 and 84% in these samples with LODs between 18 and 34 microg/kg. This work shows the great possibilities of the combined use of SPE-FESI-CE-UV to improve CE sensitivity allowing the achievement of LODs similar to other analytical techniques as GC or HPLC. PMID:16212970

  12. Highly sensitive determination of sulfonamides in environmental water samples by sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate enhanced micro-solid phase extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Fang, Zhi

    2015-08-15

    Sulfonamides are important antibiotics, and have achieved great applications. However they also impose serious threat on the environment and human health when they enter into environment by various ways. Present study developed a new determination method for six sulfonamides such as sulfadiazine, sulfamerazine, sulfamethazine, sulfadimethoxine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfafurazole in water samples, which was based on micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) using TiO2 nanotube arrays as the adsorbent in combination with high performance liquid chromatography. Surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) was used to enhance the extraction performance in this enrichment procedure. The parameters that affected the extraction efficiency had been investigated. Under the optimal conditions, it was observed that there were good linear relationships between the peak areas and the concentrations of the sulfonamides. The linear ranges were 1-200μg L(-1) for the six sulfonamides with the correlation coefficients in the range of 0.998-0.999. The repeatability of the proposed method was satisfactory in the range of 2.1-4.4% (RSD, n=6). The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0.27-0.6μg L(-1). The proposed method was validated with real environmental samples, and the spiked recoveries were satisfied. These results indicated that the proposed method was a good tool for monitoring sulfonamides in the water samples. PMID:25966398

  13. Application of nonionic surfactant as a new method for the enhancement of electromembrane extraction performance for determination of basic drugs in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Hasheminasab, Kobra Sadat; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2015-01-23

    This paper proposes for the first time the use of a nonionic surfactant for the enhancement of electromembrane extraction performance. The presence of nonionic surfactant in donor phase promotes ionic analytes efficient migration through the organic liquid membrane. Surfactant assisted electromembrane extraction coupled with capillary electrophoresis was used for the extraction of basic drugs (methamphetamine, ephedrine and methadone) from biological samples. Parameters that affect the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized for the proposed method. Optimal extractions were accomplished with 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether as the supported liquid membrane, with 125V as the driving force and 0.2mM Triton X-100 with pH 5.0 in donor and pH 1 in acceptor solutions. Equilibrium extraction conditions were obtained after 20min of operation where the whole assembly agitated at 1000rpm. Under the optimum experimental conditions, good limits of detection (0.90-2.42ngmL(-1)), linearities (R(2)>0.9995), and repeatability of extraction (RSDs below 4.4%, n=5) were obtained. Finally, the developed method was applied to drug level monitoring in the biological samples including hair and urine samples and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:25560453

  14. A competitive immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of Hg(2+) in water, human serum and urine samples using immunochromatographic test based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    She, Pei; Chu, Yanxin; Liu, Chunwei; Guo, Xun; Zhao, Kang; Li, Jianguo; Du, Haijing; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Hong; Deng, Anping

    2016-02-01

    An immunochromatographic test (ICT) strip was developed for ultrasensitive competitive immunoassay of Hg(2+). This strategy was achieved by combining the easy-operation and rapidity of ICT with the high sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Monoclonal antibody (mAb) against Hg(2+) and Raman active substance 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) dual labelled gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were prepared as an immunoprobe. The Raman scattering intensity of MBA on the test line of the ICT strip was measured for quantitative determination of Hg(2+). The ICT was able to directly detect Hg(2+) without complexing due to the specific recognition of the mAb with Hg(2+). The IC50 and limit of detection (LOD) of the assay for Hg(2+) detection were 0.12 ng mL(-1) and 0.45 pg mL(-1), respectively. There was no cross-reactivity (CR) of the assay with other nineteen ions and the ICT strips could be kept for 5 weeks without loss of activity. The recoveries of the assay for water, human serum and urine samples spiked with Hg(2+) were in range of 88.3-107.3% with the relative standard deviations (RSD) of 1.5-9.5% (n = 3). The proposed ICT was used for the detection of Hg(2+) in urine samples collected from Occupational Disease Hospital and the results were confirmed by cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CV-AFS). The assay exhibited high sensitivity, selectivity, stability, precision and accuracy, demonstrating a promising method for the detection of trace amount of Hg(2+) in environmental water samples and biological serum and urine samples. PMID:26772133

  15. Increased sensitivity for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in human DNA samples by dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoroimmunoassay (DELFIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Schoket, B.; Doty, W.A.; Vincze, I.; Strickland, P.T.; Ferri, G.M.; Assennato, G.; Poirier, M.C. )

    1993-07-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the most frequently used immunoassay for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in human tissues, has been modified to achieve approximately a 6-fold increase in sensitivity. The new assay, a competitive dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoroimmunoassay (DELFIA) has utilized the same rabbit antiserum as the ELISA, antiserum elicited against DNA modified with benzo[a]pyrene. However, the alkaline phosphatase conjugate has been replaced with a biotin-europium-labeled streptavidin signal amplification system, and the release of europium into the solution forms a highly fluorescent chelate complex that is measured by time-resolved fluorometry. The DELFIA has achieved a 5- to 6-fold increase in sensitivity for measurement of DNA samples modified in vitro with benzo[a]pyrene, for cultured cells exposed to radiolabeled benzo[a]pyrene, and for human samples from occupationally exposed workers. The assay has been validated by comparison of adduct levels determined by DELFIA, ELISA, and radioactivity in DNA from mouse keratinocytes exposed to radiolabeled benzo[a]pyrene. Human lymphocyte DNA samples from 104 Hungarian aluminum plant workers were assayed by ELISA and compared to blood cell DNA samples from 69 Italian coke oven workers assayed by DELFIA. The standard curves demonstrated that the limit of detection of 4.0 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts by ELISA, using 35 micrograms of DNA/microtiter plate well, has been decreased to 1.3 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides by DELFIA, using 20 micrograms of DNA/microtiter well. If 35 micrograms of DNA were used in the DELFIA, the calculated detection limit would be 0.7 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides.

  16. Increased sensitivity for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in human DNA samples by dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoroimmunoassay (DELFIA).

    PubMed

    Schoket, B; Doty, W A; Vincze, I; Strickland, P T; Ferri, G M; Assennato, G; Poirier, M C

    1993-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the most frequently used immunoassay for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in human tissues, has been modified to achieve approximately a 6-fold increase in sensitivity. The new assay, a competitive dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoroimmunoassay (DELFIA) has utilized the same rabbit antiserum as the ELISA, antiserum elicited against DNA modified with benzo[a]pyrene. However, the alkaline phosphatase conjugate has been replaced with a biotin-europium-labeled streptavidin signal amplification system, and the release of europium into the solution forms a highly fluorescent chelate complex that is measured by time-resolved fluorometry. The DELFIA has achieved a 5- to 6-fold increase in sensitivity for measurement of DNA samples modified in vitro with benzo[a]pyrene, for cultured cells exposed to radiolabeled benzo[a]pyrene, and for human samples from occupationally exposed workers. The assay has been validated by comparison of adduct levels determined by DELFIA, ELISA, and radioactivity in DNA from mouse keratinocytes exposed to radiolabeled benzo[a]pyrene. Human lymphocyte DNA samples from 104 Hungarian aluminum plant workers were assayed by ELISA and compared to blood cell DNA samples from 69 Italian coke oven workers assayed by DELFIA. The standard curves demonstrated that the limit of detection of 4.0 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts by ELISA, using 35 micrograms of DNA/microtiter plate well, has been decreased to 1.3 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides by DELFIA, using 20 micrograms of DNA/microtiter well. If 35 micrograms of DNA were used in the DELFIA, the calculated detection limit would be 0.7 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8348058

  17. Enhanced amperometric detection of metronidazole in drug formulations and urine samples based on chitosan protected tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine thin-film modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, S; Pandian, K; Jayakumari, L S; Inbasekaran, S

    2016-02-01

    An enhanced electrocatalytic reduction of metronidazole antibiotic drug molecule using chitosan protected tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine (Chit/CuTsPc) thin-film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been developed. An irreversible reduction occurs at -0.47V (vs. Ag/AgCl) using Chit/CuTsPc modified GCE. A maximum peak current value is obtained at pH1 and the electrochemical reduction reaction is a diffusion controlled one. The detection limit is found to be 0.41nM from differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) method. This present investigation method is adopted for electrochemical detection of metronidazole in drug formulation and urine samples by using DPV method. PMID:26652358

  18. Ball-and-Stick Local Elevation Umbrella Sampling: Molecular Simulations Involving Enhanced Sampling within Conformational or Alchemical Subspaces of Low Internal Dimensionalities, Minimal Irrelevant Volumes, and Problem-Adapted Geometries.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Halvor S; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2010-09-14

    A new method, ball-and-stick local elevation umbrella sampling (B&S-LEUS), is proposed to enhance the sampling in computer simulations of (bio)molecular systems. It enables the calculation of conformational free-energy differences between states (or alchemical free-energy differences between molecules), even in situations where the definition of these states relies on a conformational subspace involving more than a few degrees of freedom. The B&S-LEUS method consists of the following steps: (A) choice of a reduced conformational subspace; (B) representation of the relevant states by means of spheres ("balls"), each associated with a biasing potential involving a one-dimensional radial memory-based term and a radial confinement term; (C) definition of a set of lines ("sticks") connecting these spheres, each associated with a biasing potential involving a one-dimensional longitudinal memory-based term and a transverse confinement term; (D) unification of the biasing potentials corresponding to the union of all of the spheres and lines (active subspace) into a single biasing potential according to the enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) scheme; (E) build-up of the memory using the local elevation (LE) procedure, leading to a biasing potential enabling a nearly uniform sampling (radially within the spheres, longitudinally within the lines) of the active subspace; (F) generation of a biased ensemble of configurations using this preoptimized biasing potential, following an umbrella sampling (US) approach; and (G) calculation of the relative free energies of the states via reweighting and state assignment. The main characteristics of this approach are: (i) a low internal dimensionality, that is, the memory only involves one-dimensional grids (acceptable memory requirements); (ii) a minimal irrelevant volume, that is, the conformational volume opened to sampling includes a minimal fraction of irrelevant regions in terms of the free energy of the physical system or of

  19. Synergistic enhancement effect of room temperature ionic liquids for cloud point extraction combined with UV-vis spectrophotometric determination nickel in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chujie; Xu, Xili; Zhou, Neng; Lin, Yao

    A new method based on enhancement effect of room temperature ionic liquids for cloud point extraction trace amounts of nickel combined with UV-vis spectrophotometric determination was developed. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) were used enhancement reagent and chelating reagent, respectively. The addition of room temperature ionic liquids leads to 3.0 times improvement in the determination of nickel. The nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 was used as the extractant. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-100, Ni-DTC complex was extracted into Triton X-100 and separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Some parameters that influenced cloud point extraction and subsequent determination were evaluated in detail, such as the concentrations of RTILs, DDTC and Triton X-100; pH of sample solution, as well as interferences. Under optimized conditions, an enrichment factor of 72 could be obtained, and the detection limit (LOD) for Ni was 0.5 ng mL-1. Relative standard deviations for five replicate determinations of the standard solution containing 50 ng mL-1 Ni was 3.9%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of nickel in certified reference materials with satisfactory results.

  20. Sampling Development

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of the enterprise. This article discusses how to sample development in order to accurately discern the shape of developmental change. The ideal solution is daunting: to summarize behavior over 24-hour intervals and collect daily samples over the critical periods of change. We discuss the magnitude of errors due to undersampling, and the risks associated with oversampling. When daily sampling is not feasible, we offer suggestions for sampling methods that can provide preliminary reference points and provisional sketches of the general shape of a developmental trajectory. Denser sampling then can be applied strategically during periods of enhanced variability, inflections in the rate of developmental change, or in relation to key events or processes that may affect the course of change. Despite the challenges of dense repeated sampling, researchers must take seriously the problem of sampling on a developmental time scale if we are to know the true shape of developmental change. PMID:22140355

  1. 5-color multiplexed microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence: detection and analysis of multiple DNA sequences from within one sample well within a few seconds.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Anatoliy; Geddes, Chris D

    2014-11-01

    We present a potentially highly sensitive and selective bio-assay for the potential detection of any five different DNA sequences from one sample in one well. The assay is based on a DNA "rapid catch and signal" (DNA-RCS) technology developed for the detection of different DNA sequences from a sample well area. Our signal amplification utilizes the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) of dyes attached to the probe-DNAs, which hybridizes with the pre-formed mixture of anchor-DNA scaffolds on silver island films (SiFs). Low-power microwave irradiation accelerates both the formation of the anchor-DNA scaffold on the SiF-surface and anchor/probe DNA hybridization, i.e. "rapid catch" of target DNAs from a bulk solution, decreasing the assay run time from hours to only a few seconds. Localization of signaling dye-labels close to the SiFs make them extremely photostable, which allows for collecting/integrating the signal over a long time period. To demonstrate a 5 color DNA assay (5-plex) we have used a range of readily available Alexa™ dyes. Advantages and perspectives of the RCS-technologies ability to detect 5 different DNA sequences from within one plate-well are discussed. PMID:25263097

  2. Protein profiling of blood samples from patients with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kamai, Takao; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Abe, Hideyuki; Kaji, Yasushi; Oyama, Tetsunari; Yoshida, Ken-Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an extremely rare syndrome with autosomal dominant inheritance. HLRCC is characterized by a predisposition to leiomyomas of the skin and the uterus as well as renal cell carcinoma. The disease-related gene has been identified as fumarate hydratase (fumarase, FH), which encodes an enzyme involved in the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle. Protein profiling may give some insight into the molecular pathways of HLRCC. Therefore, we performed protein profiling of blood samples from HLRCC patients, their family members, and healthy volunteers, using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) coupled with IMAC-Cu chips. For hierarchical clustering analysis, we used the 45 peaks that revealed significant differences in single-marker analysis over the range from 1500 to 15,000 m/z. Heat map analysis based on the results of clustering distinguished the HLRCC kindred from non-HLRCC subjects with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 90%. SELDI-TOF MS profiling of blood samples can be applied to identify patients with HLRCC and to assess specific molecular mechanisms involved in this condition. PMID:23203078

  3. Evaluation of Dietary Supplement Contamination by Xenobiotic and Essential Elements Using Microwave-Enhanced Sample Digestion and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Gregory M; Rahman, G M Mizanur; Faber, Scott; Wolle, Mesay Mulugeta; Pamuku, Matt; Kingston, H M Skip

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements were analyzed by evaluating the elemental content in six widely consumed products manufactured by four well-known companies. The elements included the neurotoxic and carcinogenic elements cadmium, mercury, aluminum, lead, arsenic, and antimony, as well as the essential elements zinc, selenium, chromium, iron, and copper, which were often not listed as ingredients on the product labels. Contamination from either xenobiotic or essential elements was found in all samples analyzed. The samples were prepared using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 3052, microwave-enhanced digestion. The resulting digests were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry based on EPA Method 6020B. The analytical protocols were validated by analyzing a multivitamin standard reference material, the National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 3280. The application of EPA standard methods demonstrated their utility in making accurate and precise measurements in complex matrices with multiple ingredients and excipients. In the future, the use of these methods could provide a uniform quality assurance protocol that can be implemented along with other industry guidelines to improve the production of dietary supplements. PMID:25730528

  4. Ab initio molecular dynamics with enhanced sampling for surface reaction kinetics at finite temperatures: CH2⇌ CH + H on Ni(111) as a case study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Geng; Jiang, Hong

    2015-12-21

    A comprehensive understanding of surface thermodynamics and kinetics based on first-principles approaches is crucial for rational design of novel heterogeneous catalysts, and requires combining accurate electronic structure theory and statistical mechanics modeling. In this work, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) combined with the integrated tempering sampling (ITS) method has been explored to study thermodynamic and kinetic properties of elementary processes on surfaces, using a simple reaction CH2⇌CH+H on the Ni(111) surface as an example. By a careful comparison between the results from ITS-AIMD simulation and those evaluated in terms of the harmonic oscillator (HO) approximation, it is found that the reaction free energy and entropy from the HO approximation are qualitatively consistent with the results from ITS-AIMD simulation, but there are also quantitatively significant discrepancies. In particular, the HO model misses the entropy effects related to the existence of multiple adsorption configurations arising from the frustrated translation and rotation motion of adsorbed species, which are different in the reactant and product states. The rate constants are evaluated from two ITS-enhanced approaches, one using the transition state theory (TST) formulated in terms of the potential of mean force (PMF) and the other one combining ITS with the transition path sampling (TPS) technique, and are further compared to those based on harmonic TST. It is found that the rate constants from the PMF-based TST are significantly smaller than those from the harmonic TST, and that the results from PMF-TST and ITS-TPS are in a surprisingly good agreement. These findings indicate that the basic assumptions of transition state theory are valid in such elementary surface reactions, but the consideration of statistical averaging of all important adsorption configurations and reaction pathways, which are missing in the harmonic TST, are critical for accurate description of

  5. Determination of melamine in soil samples using surfactant-enhanced hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction followed by HPLC–UV using experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Sarafraz Yazdi, Ali; Raouf Yazdinezhad, Samaneh; Heidari, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant-enhanced hollow fiber liquid phase (SE-HF-LPME) microextraction was applied for the extraction of melamine in conjunction with high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC–UV). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was added firstly to the sample solution at pH 1.9 to form hydrophobic ion-pair with protonated melamine. Then the protonated melamine–dodecyl sulfate ion-pair (Mel–DS) was extracted from aqueous phase into organic phase immobilized in the pores and lumen of the hollow fiber. After extraction, the analyte-enriched 1-octanol was withdrawn into the syringe and injected into the HPLC. Preliminary, one variable at a time method was applied to select the type of extraction solvent. Then, in screening step, the other variables that may affect the extraction efficiency of the analyte were studied using a fractional factorial design. In the next step, a central composite design was applied for optimization of the significant factors having positive effects on extraction efficiency. The optimum operational conditions included: sample volume, 5 mL; surfactant concentration, 1.5 mM; pH 1.9; stirring rate, 1500 rpm and extraction time, 60 min. Using the optimum conditions, the method was analytically evaluated. The detection limit, relative standard deviation and linear range were 0.005 μg mL−1, 4.0% (3 μg mL−1, n = 5) and 0.01–8 μg mL−1, respectively. The performance of the procedure in extraction of melamine from the soil samples was good according to its relative recoveries in different spiking levels (95–109%). PMID:26644934

  6. Blind Evaluation of the Microwave-Accelerated Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence Ultrarapid and Sensitive Chlamydia trachomatis Test by Use of Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Johan H.; Huppert, Jill S.; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Hesse, Elizabeth A.; Quinn, Nicole; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tests for Chlamydia trachomatis infection are urgently needed for the rapid treatment of patients. In a blind comparative study, we evaluated microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF) assays for ultrafast and sensitive detection of C. trachomatis DNA from vaginal swabs. The results of two distinct MAMEF assays were compared to those of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The first assay targeted the C. trachomatis 16S rRNA gene, and the second assay targeted the C. trachomatis cryptic plasmid. Using pure C. trachomatis, the MAMEF assays detected as few as 10 inclusion-forming units/ml of C. trachomatis in less than 9 min, including DNA extraction and detection. A total of 257 dry vaginal swabs from 245 female adolescents aged 14 to 22 years were analyzed. Swabs were eluted with water, the solutions were lysed to release and to fragment genomic DNA, and MAMEF-based DNA detection was performed. The prevalence of C. trachomatis by NAATs was 17.5%. Of the 45 samples that were C. trachomatis positive and the 212 samples that were C. trachomatis negative by NAATs, 33/45 and 197/212 were correctly identified by the MAMEF assays if both assays were required to be positive (sensitivity, 73.3%; specificity, 92.9%). Using the plasmid-based assay alone, 37/45 C. trachomatis-positive and 197/212 C. trachomatis-negative samples were detected (sensitivity, 82.2%; specificity, 92.9%). Using the 16S rRNA assay alone, 34/45 C. trachomatis-positive and 197/212 C. trachomatis-negative samples were detected (sensitivity, 75.5%; specificity, 92.9%). The overall rates of agreement with NAAT results for the individual 16S rRNA and cryptic plasmid assays were 89.5% and 91.0%, respectively. Given the sensitivity, specificity, and rapid detection of the plasmid-based assay, the plasmid-based MAMEF assay appears to be suited for clinical POC testing. PMID:23804384

  7. Diagnostic potential for gold nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to provide colorectal cancer screening using blood serum sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Duo; Feng, Shangyuan; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Yanping; Lin, Juqiang; Sun, Liqing; Chen, Rong

    2012-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that is capable of probing the biomolecular changes associated with diseased transformation. The objective of our study was to explore gold nanoparticle based SERS to obtain blood serum biochemical information for non-invasive colorectal cancer detection. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of blood serum samples: one group from patients (n = 38) with pathologically confirmed colorectal cancer and the other group from healthy volunteers (control subjects, n = 45). Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the measured SERS spectra suggested interesting cancer specific biomolecular changes, including an increase in the relative amounts of nucleic acid, a decrease in the percentage of saccharide and proteins contents in the blood serum of colorectal cancer patients as compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the measured SERS spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps. Linear discriminate analysis (LDA) based on the PCA generated features differentiated the nasopharyngeal cancer SERS spectra from normal SERS spectra with high sensitivity (97.4%) and specificity (100%). The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that gold nanoparticle based SERS serum analysis combined with PCA-LDA has tremendous potential for the non-invasive detection of colorectal cancers.

  8. Diagnostic potential for gold nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to provide colorectal cancer screening using blood serum sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Duo; Feng, Shangyuan; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Yanping; Lin, Juqiang; Sun, Liqing; Chen, Rong

    2011-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that is capable of probing the biomolecular changes associated with diseased transformation. The objective of our study was to explore gold nanoparticle based SERS to obtain blood serum biochemical information for non-invasive colorectal cancer detection. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of blood serum samples: one group from patients (n = 38) with pathologically confirmed colorectal cancer and the other group from healthy volunteers (control subjects, n = 45). Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the measured SERS spectra suggested interesting cancer specific biomolecular changes, including an increase in the relative amounts of nucleic acid, a decrease in the percentage of saccharide and proteins contents in the blood serum of colorectal cancer patients as compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the measured SERS spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps. Linear discriminate analysis (LDA) based on the PCA generated features differentiated the nasopharyngeal cancer SERS spectra from normal SERS spectra with high sensitivity (97.4%) and specificity (100%). The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that gold nanoparticle based SERS serum analysis combined with PCA-LDA has tremendous potential for the non-invasive detection of colorectal cancers.

  9. Electrochemical determination of Sudan I in food samples at graphene modified glassy carbon electrode based on the enhancement effect of sodium dodecyl sulphonate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinying; Chao, Mingyong; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a novel electrochemical method for the determination of Sudan I in food samples based on the electrochemical catalytic activity of graphene modified glassy carbon electrode (GMGCE) and the enhancement effect of an anionic surfactant: sodium dodecyl sulphonate (SDS). Using pH 6.0 phosphate buffer solution (PBS) as supporting electrolyte and in the presence of 1.5 × 10(-4)mol L(-1) SDS, Sudan I yielded a well-defined and sensitive oxidation peak at a GMGCE. The oxidation peak current of Sudan I remarkably increased in the presence of SDS. The experimental parameters, such as supporting electrolyte, concentration of SDS, and accumulation time, were optimised for Sudan I determination. The oxidation peak current showed a linear relationship with the concentrations of Sudan I in the range of 7.50 × 10(-8)-7.50 × 10(-6)mol L(-1), with the detection limit of 4.0 × 10(-8)mol L(-1). This new voltammetric method was successfully used to determine Sudan I in food products such as ketchup and chili sauce with satisfactory results. PMID:23411169

  10. In-situ formation of ion-association nanoparticles induced enhancements of resonance Rayleigh scattering intensities for quantitative analysis of trace Hg(2+) ions in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingling; Liu, Jian; Li, Banglin; Hu, Xiaoli; Liu, Shaopu; Chen, Gangcai

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, Hg(2+) ions are demonstrated to form anionic [HgI4](2-) complexes after interacting with massive amount of I(-) ions. Subsequently, the addition of tetradecyl pyridyl bromide (TPB) can make [HgI4](2-) anionic complexes react with univalent tetradecyl pyridyl cationic ions (TP(+)), forming dispersed ion-association complexes (TP)2(HgI4). Due to the extrusion action of water and Van der Waals force, the hydrophobic ion-association complexes aggregate together, forming dispersed nanoparticles with an average size of about 8.5nm. Meanwhile, resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensity is apparently enhanced due to the formation of (TP)2(HgI4) ion-association nanoparticles, contributing to a novel technique for Hg(2+) detection. The wavelength of 365nm is chosen as a detection wavelength and several conditions affecting the RRS responses of Hg(2+) are optimized. Under the optimum condition, the developed method is used for the determination of Hg(2+) in aqueous solution and the detection limit is estimated to be 0.8ngmL(-1). Finally, the practical application of the developed method can be confirmed through the detections of Hg(2+) in waste and river water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:27235829

  11. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of the Prostate With High Spatiotemporal Resolution Using Compressed Sensing, Parallel Imaging, and Continuous Golden-Angle Radial Sampling: Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Geppert, Christian; Grimm, Robert; Block, Tobias K.; Glielmi, Christian; Feng, Li; Otazo, Ricardo; Ream, Justin M.; Romolo, Melanie Moccaldi; Taneja, Samir S.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Chandarana, Hersh

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate with both high spatial and temporal resolution via a combination of golden-angle radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing, and parallel-imaging reconstruction (GRASP), and to compare image quality and lesion depiction between GRASP and conventional DCE in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods Twenty prostate cancer patients underwent two 3T prostate MRI examinations on separate dates, one using standard DCE (spatial resolution 3.0 × 1.9 × 1.9 mm, temporal resolution 5.5 sec) and the other using GRASP (spatial resolution 3.0 × 1.1 × 1.1 mm, temporal resolution 2.3 sec). Two radiologists assessed measures of image quality and dominant lesion size. The experienced reader recorded differences in contrast arrival times between the dominant lesion and benign prostate. Results Compared with standard DCE, GRASP demonstrated significantly better clarity of the capsule, peripheral/ transition zone boundary, urethra, and periprostatic vessels; image sharpness; and lesion conspicuity for both readers (P<0.001–0.020). GRASP showed improved interreader correlation for lesion size (GRASP: r=0.691–0.824, standard: r=0.495–0.542). In 8/20 cases, only GRASP showed earlier contrast arrival in tumor than benign; in no case did only standard DCE show earlier contrast arrival in tumor. Conclusion High spatiotemporal resolution prostate DCE is possible with GRASP, which has the potential to improve image quality and lesion depiction as compared with standard DCE. PMID:24833417

  12. Sampling and Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawicki, Rubén O.

    Quality attributes in food products, raw materials, or ingredients are measurable characteristics that need monitoring to ensure that specifications are met. Some quality attributes can be measured online by using specially designed sensors and results obtained in real time (e.g., color of vegetable oil in an oil extraction plant). However, in most cases quality attributes are measured on small portions of material that are taken periodically from continuous processes or on a certain number of small portions taken from a lot. The small portions taken for analysis are referred to as samples, and the entire lot or the entire production for a certain period of time, in the case of continuous processes, is called a population. The process of taking samples from a population is called sampling. If the procedure is done correctly, the measurable characteristics obtained for the samples become a very accurate estimation of the population.

  13. Enhancement of the spectral selectivity of complex samples by measuring them in a frozen state at low temperatures in order to improve accuracy for quantitative analysis. Part II. Determination of viscosity for lube base oils using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mooeung; Chung, Hoeil

    2013-03-01

    The use of selectivity-enhanced Raman spectra of lube base oil (LBO) samples achieved by the spectral collection under frozen conditions at low temperatures was effective for improving accuracy for the determination of the kinematic viscosity at 40 °C (KV@40). A collection of Raman spectra from samples cooled around -160 °C provided the most accurate measurement of KV@40. Components of the LBO samples were mainly long-chain hydrocarbons with molecular structures that were deformable when these were frozen, and the different structural deformabilities of the components enhanced spectral selectivity among the samples. To study the structural variation of components according to the change of sample temperature from cryogenic to ambient condition, n-heptadecane and pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane) were selected as representative components of LBO samples, and their temperature-induced spectral features as well as the corresponding spectral loadings were investigated. A two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis was also employed to explain the origin for the improved accuracy. The asynchronous 2D correlation pattern was simplest at the optimal temperature, indicating the occurrence of distinct and selective spectral variations, which enabled the variation of KV@40 of LBO samples to be more accurately assessed. PMID:23342358

  14. IGSN at Work in the Land Down Under: Exploiting an International Sample Identifier System to Enhance Reproducibility of Australian Geochemcial and Geochronological Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrakova, I.; Klump, J. F.; McInnes, B.; Wyborn, L. A.; Brown, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International Geo-Sample Number (IGSN) provides a globally unique identifier for physical samples used to generate analytical data. This unique identifier provides the ability to link each physical sample to any analytical data undertaken on that sample, as well as to any publications derived from any data derived on the sample. IGSN is particularly important for geochemical and geochronological data, where numerous analytical techniques can be undertaken at multiple analytical facilities not only on the parent rock sample itself, but also on derived sample splits and mineral separates. Australia now has three agencies implementing IGSN: Geoscience Australia, CSIRO and Curtin University. All three have now combined into a single project, funded by the Australian Research Data Services program, to better coordinate the implementation of IGSN in Australia, in particular how these agencies allocate IGSN identifiers. The project will register samples from pilot applications in each agency including the CSIRO National Collection of Mineral Spectra database, the Geoscience Australia sample collection, and the Digital Mineral Library of the John De Laeter Centre for Isotope Research at Curtin University. These local agency catalogues will then be aggregated into an Australian portal, which will ultimately be expanded for all geoscience specimens. The development of this portal will also involve developing a common core metadata schema for the description of Australian geoscience specimens, as well as formulating agreed governance models for registering Australian samples. These developments aim to enable a common approach across Australian academic, research organisations and government agencies for the unique identification of geoscience specimens and any analytical data and/or publications derived from them. The emerging pattern of governance and technical collaboration established in Australia may also serve as a blueprint for similar collaborations internationally.

  15. Tip-enhanced near-field optical microscope with side-on and ATR-mode sample excitation for super-resolution Raman imaging of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilman, A. L.; Gordon, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    A tip-enhanced near-field optical microscope with side-on and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) excitation and collection is described and used to demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited (super-resolution) optical and chemical characterization of surfaces. ATR illumination is combined with an Au optical antenna tip to show that (i) the tip can quantitatively transduce the optical near-field (evanescent waves) above the surface by scattering photons into the far-field, (ii) the ATR geometry enables excitation and characterization of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), whose associated optical fields are shown to enhance Raman scattering from a thin layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and (iii) SPPs can be used to plasmonically excite the tip for super-resolution chemical imaging of patterned CuPc via tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). ATR-illumination TERS is also quantitatively compared with the more conventional side-on illumination scheme. In both cases, spatial resolution was better than 40 nm and tip on/tip off Raman enhancement factors were >6500. Furthermore, ATR illumination was shown to provide similar Raman signal levels at lower "effective" pump powers due to additional optical energy delivered by SPPs to the active region in the tip-surface gap.

  16. Repeated stool sampling and use of multiple techniques enhance the sensitivity of helminth diagnosis: a cross-sectional survey in southern Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    PubMed

    Sayasone, Somphou; Utzinger, Jürg; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Odermatt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are common in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). We investigated the accuracy of the Kato-Katz (KK) technique in relation to varying stool sampling efforts, and determined the effect of the concurrent use of a quantitative formalin-ethyl acetate concentration technique (FECT) for helminth diagnosis and appraisal of concomitant infections. The study was carried out between March and May 2006 in Champasack province, southern Lao PDR. Overall, 485 individuals aged ≥6 months who provided three stool samples were included in the final analysis. All stool samples were subjected to the KK technique. Additionally, one stool sample per individual was processed by FECT. Diagnosis was done under a light microscope by experienced laboratory technicians. Analysis of three stool samples with KK plus a single FECT was considered as diagnostic 'gold' standard and resulted in prevalence estimates of hookworm, Opisthorchis viverrini, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Schistosoma mekongi infection of 77.9%, 65.0%, 33.4%, 26.2% and 24.3%, respectively. As expected, a single KK and a single FECT missed a considerable number of infections. While our diagnostic 'gold' standard produced similar results than those obtained by a mathematical model for most helminth infections, the 'true' prevalence predicted by the model for S. mekongi (28.1%) was somewhat higher than after multiple KK plus a single FECT (24.3%). In the current setting, triplicate KK plus a single FECT diagnosed helminth infections with high sensitivity. Hence, such a diagnostic approach might be utilised for generating high-quality baseline data, assessing anthelminthic drug efficacy and rigorous monitoring of community interventions. PMID:25225157

  17. 3D-printed polylactic acid supports for enhanced ionization efficiency in desorption electrospray mass spectrometry analysis of liquid and gel samples.

    PubMed

    Elviri, Lisa; Foresti, Ruben; Bianchera, Annalisa; Silvestri, Marco; Bettini, Ruggero

    2016-08-01

    The potential of 3D printing technology was here exploited to prepare tailored polylactic acid (PLA) supports for desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) experiments. PLA rough solid supports presenting wells of different shape (i.e. cylindrical, cubic and hemispherical cavities) were designed to accommodate samples of different physical state. The potentials of such supports in terms of sample loading capacity, sensitivity, signal stability were tested by analysing a peptide (i.e. insulin) and an aminoglycoside antibiotic (i.e. gentamicin sulphate) from solution and a chitosan-based gel. The results obtained were compared with those obtained by using a traditional polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) support and discussed. By using PLA support on the flat side, signal intensity improved almost twice with respect to PTFE support, whereas with spherical wells a five times improved signal sensitivity and good stability (RSD<6%) were obtained for the analysis of two model molecules. Limits of detection were in the 3-10nM range and linearity was demonstrated for both analytes in the 0.05-0.5μM range for semi-quantitative or quantitative purposes. The use of a well and the set-up of optimal source parameters allowed the analysis of samples in a gel state with good precision (RSD<10%) and accuracy (86±6-102±9%), otherwise difficult to analyse on a flat smooth surface. These findings are of great interest and stimulus to exploit the advantages of 3D printing technology for the development of devices for a DESI source, presenting different shapes or configuration as a function of the sample types. PMID:27216689

  18. Blocking primers to enhance PCR amplification of rare sequences in mixed samples – a case study on prey DNA in Antarctic krill stomachs

    PubMed Central

    Vestheim, Hege; Jarman, Simon N

    2008-01-01

    Background Identification of DNA sequence diversity is a powerful means for assessing the species present in environmental samples. The most common molecular strategies for estimating taxonomic composition depend upon PCR with universal primers that amplify an orthologous DNA region from a range of species. The diversity of sequences within a sample that can be detected by universal primers is often compromised by high concentrations of some DNA templates. If the DNA within the sample contains a small number of sequences in relatively high concentrations, then less concentrated sequences are often not amplified because the PCR favours the dominant DNA types. This is a particular problem in molecular diet studies, where predator DNA is often present in great excess of food-derived DNA. Results We have developed a strategy where a universal PCR simultaneously amplifies DNA from food items present in DNA purified from stomach samples, while the predator's own DNA is blocked from amplification by the addition of a modified predator-specific blocking primer. Three different types of modified primers were tested out; one annealing inhibiting primer overlapping with the 3' end of one of the universal primers, another annealing inhibiting primer also having an internal modification of five dI molecules making it a dual priming oligo, and a third elongation arrest primer located between the two universal primers. All blocking primers were modified with a C3 spacer. In artificial PCR mixtures, annealing inhibiting primers proved to be the most efficient ones and this method reduced predator amplicons to undetectable levels even when predator template was present in 1000 fold excess of the prey template. The prey template then showed strong PCR amplification where none was detectable without the addition of blocking primer. Our method was applied to identifying the winter food of one of the most abundant animals in the world, the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. Dietary

  19. Dispersive micro-solid phase extraction using magnetic nanoparticle modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes coupled with surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetry for sensitive determination of lomefloxacin and ofloxacin from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Hajjaran, Somayeh

    2016-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) procedure coupled with surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric detection was developed for determination of ofloxacin and lomefloxacin from biological and environmental samples. The D-μ-SPE procedure was performed using magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle grafted multi-walled carbon nanotube as an efficient adsorbent. The main factors affecting the signal enhancement (including surfactant concentration and pH) and extraction efficiency (including pH, extraction time, sample volume, amount of magnetic adsorbent, and desorption conditions) were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curves were linear (R(2)˃0.9995) over the concentration range of 50-450 ng mL(-1) with detection limits (LOD) of 12 and 15 ng mL(-1) for ofloxacin and lomefloxacin respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD %) of 1.9 and 2.1% (C=100 ng mL(-1), n=5) and the enrichment factor of 192 and 188 were achieved for ofloxacin and lomefloxacin respectively. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the extraction and preconcentration of these drugs in biological (plasma and urine) samples. PMID:26706503

  20. Sensitivity and specificity enhanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by rational hapten modification and heterogeneous antibody/coating antigen combinations for the detection of melamine in milk, milk powder and feed samples.

    PubMed

    Cao, Biyun; Yang, Hong; Song, Juan; Chang, Huafang; Li, Shuqun; Deng, Anping

    2013-11-15

    The adulteration of food products with melamine has led to an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, rapid and reliable quantitative/screening methods. To enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of melamine in milk, milk powder and feed samples, rational hapten modification and heterogeneous antibody/coating antigen combinations were adopted. Three melamine derivatives with different length of carboxylic spacer at the end were synthesized and linked to carrier proteins for the production of immunogens and coating antigens. Monoclonal antibody against melamine was produced by hybridoma technology. Under optimal experimental conditions, the standard curves of the ELISAs for melamine were constructed in range of 0.1-100 ng mL(-1). The sensitivity was 10-300 times enhanced compared to those in the published literatures. The cross-reactivity values of the ELISAs also demonstrated the assays exhibited high specificity. Five samples were spiked with melamine at different concentrations and detected by the ELISA. The recovery rates of 72.8-123.0% and intra-assay coefficients of variation of 0.8-18.9% (n=3) were obtained. The ELISA for milk sample was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with a high correlation coefficient of 0.9902 (n=6). The proposed ELISA was proven to be a feasible quantitative/screening method for melamine analysis. PMID:24148389

  1. The Long March: A Sample Preparation Technique that Enhances Contig Length and Coverage by High-Throughput Short-Read Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Dale; Dimon, Michelle; Ruby, J. Graham; Hekele, Armin; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    High-throughput short-read technologies have revolutionized DNA sequencing by drastically reducing the cost per base of sequencing information. Despite producing gigabases of sequence per run, these technologies still present obstacles in resequencing and de novo assembly applications due to biased or insufficient target sequence coverage. We present here a simple sample preparation method termed the “long march” that increases both contig lengths and target sequence coverage using high-throughput short-read technologies. By incorporating a Type IIS restriction enzyme recognition motif into the sequencing primer adapter, successive rounds of restriction enzyme cleavage and adapter ligation produce a set of nested sub-libraries from the initial amplicon library. Sequence reads from these sub-libraries are offset from each other with enough overlap to aid assembly and contig extension. We demonstrate the utility of the long march in resequencing of the Plasmodium falciparum transcriptome, where the number of genomic bases covered was increased by 39%, as well as in metagenomic analysis of a serum sample from a patient with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related acute liver failure, where the number of HBV bases covered was increased by 42%. We also offer a theoretical optimization of the long march for de novo sequence assembly. PMID:18941527

  2. Redshift-space Enhancement of Line-of-sight Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main-galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. J.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2011-02-01

    We show that redshift-space distortions of galaxy correlations have a strong effect on correlation functions with distinct, localized features, like the signature of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). Near the line of sight, the features become sharper as a result of redshift-space distortions. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the correlation function in Gaussian simulations and the Millennium simulation. We also analyze the SDSS DR7 main-galaxy sample, splitting the sample into slices 2fdg5 on the sky in various rotations. Measuring two-dimensional correlation functions in each slice, we do see a sharp bump along the line of sight. Using Mexican-hat wavelets, we localize it to (110 ± 10) h -1 Mpc. Averaging only along the line of sight, we estimate its significance at a particular wavelet scale and location at 2.2σ. In a flat angular weighting in the (π, rp ) coordinate system, the noise level is suppressed, pushing the bump's significance to 4σ. We estimate that there is about a 0.2% chance of getting such a signal anywhere in the vicinity of the BAO scale from a power spectrum lacking a BAO feature. However, these estimates of the significances make some use of idealized Gaussian simulations, and thus are likely a bit optimistic.

  3. Redshift-Space Enhancement of Line-of-Sight Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main-Galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Haijun; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Budavari, Tamas; SZALAY, AlEXANDER

    2015-08-01

    We show that redshift-space distortions of galaxy correlations have a strong effect on correlation functions with distinct, localized features, like the signature of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). Near the line of sight, the features become sharper as a result of redshift-space distortions. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the correlation function in Gaussian simulations and the Millennium simulation. We also analyze the SDSS DR7 main-galaxy sample, splitting the sample into slices 2.5 on the sky in various rotations. Measuring two-dimensional correlation functions in each slice, we do see a sharp bump along the line of sight. Using Mexican-hat wavelets, we localize it to (110 ± 10) Mpc/h. Averaging only along the line of sight, we estimate its significance at a particular wavelet scale and location at 2.2σ. In a flat angular weighting in the (π,rp) coordinate system, the noise level is suppressed, pushing the bump’s significance to 4σ . We estimate that there is about a 0.2% chance of getting such a signal anywhere in the vicinity of the BAO scale from a power spectrum lacking a BAO feature. However, these estimates of the significances make some use of idealized Gaussian simulations, and thus are likely a bit optimistic.

  4. Enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulation captures experimentally suggested intermediate and unfolded states in the folding pathway of Trp-cage miniprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2012-09-01

    The ability of molecular dynamics simulation to capturing the transient states within the folding pathway of protein is important to the understanding of protein folding mechanism. In the present study, the integrated-tempering-sampling molecular dynamics (ITS-MD) simulation was performed to investigate the transient states including intermediate and unfolded ones in the folding pathway of a miniprotein, Trp-cage. Three force fields (FF03, FF99SB, and FF96) were tested, and both intermediate and unfolded states with their characteristics in good agreement with experiments were observed during the simulations, which supports the hypothesis that observable intermediates might present in the folding pathway of small polypeptides. In addition, it was demonstrated that FF03 force field as combined with ITS-MD is in overall a more proper force field than the others in reproducing experimentally recorded properties in UVRS, ECD, and NMR, Photo-CIDNP NMR, and IR T-jump experiments, and the folding/unfolding thermodynamics parameters, such as ΔGU, ΔCp, and ΔHU (Tm). In summary, the present study showed that using suitable force field and energy sampling method, molecular dynamics simulation could capture the transient states within the folding pathway of protein which are consistent with the experimental measurements, and thus provide information of protein folding mechanism and thermodynamics.

  5. An enhanced Fourier law derivable from the Boltzmann transport equation and a sample application in determining the mean-free path of nondiffusive phonon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, Ashok T.; Ma, Yanbao

    2014-09-01

    An enhanced Fourier law that we term the unified nondiffusive-diffusive (UND) phonon transport model is proposed in order to account for the effect of low-frequency phonon modes of long mean-free path that propagate concomitantly to the dominant high-frequency modes. The theory is based on spherical harmonic expansions of the phonon distribution functions, wherein the high-frequency mode distribution function is truncated at the first order in the expansion, while the low-frequency mode distribution function, which is farther out of thermal equilibrium, is truncated at the second order. As an illustrative application, the predictions of the proposed model are compared with data from a recent experiment that utilized the transient gratings method to investigate the deviation of thermal transport in a silicon membrane from the predictions of the Fourier law. The good fit of the experimental effective thermal conductivity (ETC) with the analytical solution derived in this work yields quantitative information about the mean-free path of the dominant low-frequency heat-transfer mode in silicon.

  6. Trimethylation Enhancement Using (13)C-Diazomethane ((13)C-TrEnDi): Increased Sensitivity and Selectivity of Phosphatidylethanolamine, Phosphatidylcholine, and Phosphatidylserine Lipids Derived from Complex Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Canez, Carlos R; Shields, Samuel W J; Bugno, Magdalena; Wasslen, Karl V; Weinert, Hillary P; Willmore, William G; Manthorpe, Jeffrey M; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2016-07-19

    Significant sensitivity enhancements in the tandem mass spectrometry-based analysis of complex mixtures of several phospholipid classes has been achieved via (13)C-TrEnDi. (13)C-TrEnDi-modified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids extracted from HeLa cells demonstrated greater sensitivity via precursor ion scans (PISs) than their unmodified counterparts. Sphingomyelin (SM) species exhibited neither an increased nor decreased sensitivity following modification. The use of isotopically labeled diazomethane enabled the distinction of modified PE and modified PC species that would yield isobaric species with unlabeled diazomethane. (13)C-TrEnDi created a PE-exclusive PIS of m/z 202.1, two PS-exclusive PISs of m/z 148.1 and m/z 261.1, and a PIS of m/z 199.1 for PC species (observed at odd m/z values) and SM species (observed at even m/z values). The standardized average area increase after TrEnDi modification was 10.72-fold for PE species, 2.36-fold for PC, and 1.05-fold for SM species. The sensitivity increase of PS species was not quantifiable, as there were no unmodified PS species identified prior to derivatization. (13)C-TrEnDi allowed for the identification of 4 PE and 7 PS species as well as the identification and quantitation of an additional 4 PE and 4 PS species that were below the limit of detection (LoD) prior to modification. (13)C-TrEnDi also pushed 24 PE and 6 PC lipids over the limit of quantitation (LoQ) that prior to modification were above the LoD only. PMID:27275841

  7. Examination of Post-Training Supervision of Peer Counselors in a Motivational Enhancement Intervention to Reduce Drinking in a Sample of Heavy Drinking College Students

    PubMed Central

    Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Turrisi, Rob; Carney, JoLynn V.; Ray, Anne E.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of peer counselor post-training supervision on Motivational Interviewing microskills and post-intervention drinking outcomes were evaluated in a sample of heavy drinking undergraduate students completing BASICS (Dimeff et al., 1999). Two peer counselor groups were trained using identical protocols. Post-training, one group was randomized to receive supervision, while the other received no supervision. Groups were subsequently compared on MI microskills. College students (N=122) were randomly assigned to either assessment-only control, supervision, or no supervision groups and completed a BASICS intervention. Post-intervention drinking outcomes were examined. Results suggested supervision aided peer counselors in reducing use of closed-ended questions. Both treatment groups reduced total drinks per week and heavy drinking behaviors compared to control. No differences on peak BAC or alcohol related consequences were observed. Differences in supervision did not influence drinking outcomes; however post-training supervision for peer counselors deficient in MI microskills may be needed to improve BASICS fidelity. PMID:20673621

  8. Simultaneous detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals including conjugates in municipal wastewater and sludge with enhanced sample pretreatment and UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Ben, Weiwei; Yuan, Xiangjuan; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Qiang, Zhimin

    2015-08-01

    The co-existence of free and conjugated estrogens and the interference from complex matrices often lead to largely variable detected concentrations and sometimes even negative removal efficiencies of typical endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, a highly selective and sensitive method was developed for simultaneous extraction, elution, and detection of 12 EDCs (i.e., 4 free estrogens, 6 conjugated estrogens, and 2 phenolic compounds) in municipal wastewater and sludge. Sample pretreatment and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection were optimized to improve the detection selectivity and sensitivity. The results indicate that the additional purification process was highly effective in reducing the matrix interference, and the limits of quantification reached as low as 0.04-2.2 ng L(-1) in wastewater and 0.05-4.9 ng g(-1) in sludge for all target EDCs. The developed method was successfully applied to explore the behavior of target EDCs in a local WWTP. The conjugates occupied a considerable portion (4.3-76.9% in molar ratio) of each related estrogen in the influent. Most of the target EDCs could not be completely removed in WWTPs, thus posing a potential threat to aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26161687

  9. Fe3O4@Graphene Oxide@Ag Particles for Surface Magnet Solid-Phase Extraction Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SMSPE-SERS): From Sample Pretreatment to Detection All-in-One.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yi; Deng, Rong; Yang, Liyuan; Yu, Shihua; Xu, Shuping; Xu, Weiqing

    2016-06-01

    A multifunctional magnetic graphene surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was fabricated successfully by the layer-by-layer assembly of silver and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles (NPs) on the magnetic ferroferric oxide particles (Fe3O4@GO@Ag). This ternary particle possesses magnetic properties, SERS activity, and adsorption ability simultaneously. Owing to the multifunction of this Fe3O4@GO@Ag ternary complex, we put forward a new method called a surface magnetic solid-phase extraction (SMSPE) technique, for the SERS detections of pesticide residues on the fruit peels. SMSPE integrates many sample pretreatment procedures, such as surface extraction, separation sample, and detection, all-in-one. So this method shows great superiority in simplicity, rapidity, and high efficiency above other standard methods. The whole detection process can be finished within 20 min including the sample pretreatment and SERS detection. Owing to the high density of Ag NPs, the detection sensitivity is high enough that the lowest detectable concentrations are 0.48 and 40 ng/cm(2) for thiram and thiabendazole, which are much lower than the maximal residue limits in fruit prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This multifunctional ternary particle and its corresponding analytical method have been proven to be applicable for practical samples and also valuable for other surface analysis. PMID:27191584

  10. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast determination of cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; Lu, Ying; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhong, Zhihui; Zhao, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    A novel vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) was developed for the fast, simple and efficient determination of cadmium (Cd) in water samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In the VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could enhance the mass transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous phase under vigorous shaking with the vortex. In this paper, we investigated the influences of analytical parameters, including pH, extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and vortex time, on the extraction efficiency of Cd. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.16 μg/L. The analyte enrichment factor was 37.68. The relative standard deviation was 3.2% (10 μg/L, n = 10) and the calibration graph was linear, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μg/L. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of ultra-trace Cd in river water and wastewater samples. PMID:27232416

  11. Employment of 4-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)phenol as a signal enhancer of the chemiluminescent luminol-H2O2-horseradish peroxidase reaction for detection of hepatitis C virus in real samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lili; Fu, Chuanyun; Wang, Yunshan; Sun, Shanhui

    2015-12-01

    Highly sensitive detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in serum is a key method for diagnosing and classifying the extent of HCV infection. In this study, a p-phenol derivative, 4-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)phenol (4-TRP), was employed as an efficient enhancer of the luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) chemiluminescence (CL) system for detection of HCV. Compared with a traditional enhancer, 4-TRP strongly enhanced CL intensity with the effect of prolonging and stabilizing light emission. The developed CL system was applied to detecting HCV core antigen (HCV-cAg) using a sandwich structure inside microwells. Our experimental results showed that there was good linear relationship between CL intensity and HCV-cAg concentration in the 0.6-3.6 pg/mL range (R = 0.99). The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 4.5-5.8% and 5.0-7.3%, respectively. In addition, sensitive determination of HCV-cAg in serum samples using the luminol-H2O2-HRP-4-TRP CL system was also feasible in clinical settings. PMID:25820800

  12. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with vortex-assisted hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles based solid-phase extraction for determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk samples by sensitive micelle enhanced spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Manafi, Mohammad Hanif

    2015-03-01

    An efficient, simple and fast low-density solvent based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (LDS-DLLME) followed by vortex-assisted dispersive solid phase extraction (VA-D-SPE) has been developed as a new approach for extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk samples prior to its micelle enhanced spectrofluorimetic determination. In this LDS-DLLME coupled VA-D-SPE method, milk samples were first treated with methanol/water (80:20, v/v) after removing the fat layer. This solvent was directly used as the dispersing solvent in DLLME along with using 1-heptanol (as a low-density solvent with respect to water) as the extracting solvent. In VA-D-SPE approach, hydrophobic oleic acid modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used to retrieve the analyte from the DLLME step. It is considerably that the target of VA-D-SPE was 1-heptanol rather than the aflatoxin M1 directly. The main parameters affecting the efficiency of LDS-DLLME and VA-D-SPE procedures and signal enhancement of aflatoxin M1 were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the method was linear in the range from 0.02 to 200 µg L(-1) with the correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9989 and detection limit of 13 ng L(-1). The intra-day precision was 2.9 and 4.3% and the inter-day precision was 2.1 and 3.3% for concentration of 2 and 50 µg L(-1) respectively. The developed method was applied for extraction and preconcentration of AFM1 in three commercially available milk samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method. PMID:25618645

  13. An enhanced cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G chemiluminescence system using guest-host interactions in a lab-on-a-chip platform for estimating the total phenolic content in food samples.

    PubMed

    Al Haddabi, Buthaina; Al Lawati, Haider A J; Suliman, FakhrEldin O

    2016-04-01

    Two chemiluminescence-microfluidic (CL-MF) systems, e.g., Ce(IV)-rhodamine B (RB) and Ce(IV)-rhodamine 6G (R6G), for the determination of the total phenolic content in teas and some sweeteners were evaluated. The results indicated that the Ce(IV)-R6G system was more sensitive in comparison to the Ce(IV)-RB CL system. Therefore, a simple (CL-MF) method based on the CL of Ce(IV)-R6G was developed, and the sensitivity, selectivity and stability of this system were evaluated. Selected phenolic compounds (PCs), such as quercetin (QRC), catechin (CAT), rutin (RUT), gallic acid (GA), caffeic acid (CA) and syringic acid (SA), produced analytically useful chemiluminescence signals with low detection limits ranging from 0.35 nmol L(-1) for QRC to 11.31 nmol L(-1) for SA. The mixing sequence and the chip design were crucial, as the sensitivity and reproducibility could be substantially affected by these two factors. In addition, the anionic surfactant (i.e., sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) can significantly enhance the CL signal intensity by as much as 300% for the QRC solution. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the enhancement was due to a strong guest-host interaction between the cationic R6G molecules and the anionic amphiphilic environment. Other parameters that could affect the CL intensities of the PCs were carefully optimized. Finally, the method was successfully applied to tea and sweetener samples. Six different tea samples exhibited total phenolic/antioxidant levels from 7.32 to 13.5 g per 100g of sample with respect to GA. Four different sweetener samples were also analyzed and exhibited total phenolic/antioxidant levels from 500.9 to 3422.9 mg kg(-1) with respect to GA. The method was selective, rapid and sensitive when used to estimate the total phenolic/antioxidant level, and the results were in good agreement with those reported for honey and tea samples. PMID:26838423

  14. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  15. [The level of DNA damage and DNA reparation rate in cells of earthworms sampled from natural populations for numerous generations inhabited territories with anthropogenically enhanced levels of radionuclides in soil].

    PubMed

    Kaneva, A V; Belykh, E S; Maystrenko, T A; Shadrin, D M; Pylina, Ya I; Velegzhaninov, I O

    2015-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation and chemical toxic agent effects on biological systems on different organization levels have been studied by numerous researchers. But there is a clear lack of experimental data that allow one to reveal molecular and cellular adaptations of plants and animals from natural populations to adverse effects of environmental factors. The present study was aimed to assess genotoxic effects in earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister sampled from the populations that during numerous generations inhabited the territories with a technogeneously enhanced content of natural origin radionuclides and heavy metals in soil. The levels ofthe DNA damage detected with alkaline and neutral versions of Comet-assay in invertebrates from contaminated territories were established not to differ from the spontaneous level found in the animals from the reference population. At the same time the rate of the DNA damage reparation induced in A. caliginosa sampled from the contaminated sites with additional acute γ-irradiation (4 Gy) was found to be considerably higher as compared with earthworms from the reference population. PMID:25962273

  16. Solvent-assisted stir bar sorptive extraction by using swollen polydimethylsiloxane for enhanced recovery of polar solutes in aqueous samples: Application to aroma compounds in beer and pesticides in wine.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; David, Frank; Sandra, Pat

    2016-07-15

    A novel solvent-assisted stir bar sorptive extraction (SA-SBSE) technique was developed for enhanced recovery of polar solutes in aqueous samples. A conventional PDMS stir bar was swollen in several solvents with log Kow ranging from 1.0 to 3.5 while stirring for 30min prior to extraction. After extraction, thermal desorption - gas chromatography - (tandem) mass spectrometry (TD-GC-(MS/)MS) or liquid desorption - large volume injection (LD-LVI)-GC-MS were performed. An initial study involved investigation of potential solvents for SA-SBSE by weighing of the residual solvent in the swollen PDMS stir bar before and after extraction. Compared to conventional SBSE, SA-SBSE using diethyl ether, methyl isobutyl ketone, dichloromethane, diisopropyl ether and toluene provided higher recoveries from water samples for test solutes with log Kow<2.5. For SA-SBSE using dichloromethane, recoveries were improved by factors of 1.4-4.1, while maintaining or even improving the recoveries for test solutes with log Kow>2.5. The performance of the SA-SBSE method using dichloromethane, diisopropyl ether, and cyclohexane is illustrated with analyses of aroma compounds in beer and of pesticides in wine. PMID:27289502

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics with enhanced sampling for surface reaction kinetics at finite temperatures: CH2 ⇌ CH + H on Ni(111) as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Geng; Jiang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of surface thermodynamics and kinetics based on first-principles approaches is crucial for rational design of novel heterogeneous catalysts, and requires combining accurate electronic structure theory and statistical mechanics modeling. In this work, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) combined with the integrated tempering sampling (ITS) method has been explored to study thermodynamic and kinetic properties of elementary processes on surfaces, using a simple reaction CH 2 ⇌ CH + H on the Ni(111) surface as an example. By a careful comparison between the results from ITS-AIMD simulation and those evaluated in terms of the harmonic oscillator (HO) approximation, it is found that the reaction free energy and entropy from the HO approximation are qualitatively consistent with the results from ITS-AIMD simulation, but there are also quantitatively significant discrepancies. In particular, the HO model misses the entropy effects related to the existence of multiple adsorption configurations arising from the frustrated translation and rotation motion of adsorbed species, which are different in the reactant and product states. The rate constants are evaluated from two ITS-enhanced approaches, one using the transition state theory (TST) formulated in terms of the potential of mean force (PMF) and the other one combining ITS with the transition path sampling (TPS) technique, and are further compared to those based on harmonic TST. It is found that the rate constants from the PMF-based TST are significantly smaller than those from the harmonic TST, and that the results from PMF-TST and ITS-TPS are in a surprisingly good agreement. These findings indicate that the basic assumptions of transition state theory are valid in such elementary surface reactions, but the consideration of statistical averaging of all important adsorption configurations and reaction pathways, which are missing in the harmonic TST, are critical for

  18. Sampling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  19. Elevating sampling

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Joseph M.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Sampling – the process of collecting, preparing, and introducing an appropriate volume element (voxel) into a system – is often under appreciated and pushed behind the scenes in lab-on-a-chip research. What often stands in the way between proof-of-principle demonstrations of potentially exciting technology and its broader dissemination and actual use, however, is the effectiveness of sample collection and preparation. The power of micro- and nanofluidics to improve reactions, sensing, separation, and cell culture cannot be accessed if sampling is not equally efficient and reliable. This perspective will highlight recent successes as well as assess current challenges and opportunities in this area. PMID:24781100

  20. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  1. Fluidic sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, E.D.

    1992-04-20

    This paper covers the development of the fluidic sampler and its testing in a fluidic transfer system. The major findings of this paper are as follows. Fluidic jet samples can dependably produce unbiased samples of acceptable volume. The fluidic transfer system with a fluidic sampler in-line will transfer water to a net lift of 37.2--39.9 feet at an average ratio of 0.02--0.05 gpm (77--192 cc/min). The fluidic sample system circulation rate compares very favorably with the normal 0.016--0.026 gpm (60--100 cc/min) circulation rate that is commonly produced for this lift and solution with the jet-assisted airlift sample system that is normally used at ICPP. The volume of the sample taken with a fluidic sampler is dependant on the motive pressure to the fluidic sampler, the sample bottle size and on the fluidic sampler jet characteristics. The fluidic sampler should be supplied with fluid having the motive pressure of the 140--150 percent of the peak vacuum producing motive pressure for the jet in the sampler. Fluidic transfer systems should be operated by emptying a full pumping chamber to nearly empty or empty during the pumping cycle, this maximizes the solution transfer rate.

  2. Fluidic sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, E. D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper covers the development of the fluidic sampler and its testing in a fluidic transfer system. The major findings of this paper are as follows. Fluidic jet samples can dependably produce unbiased samples of acceptable volume. The fluidic transfer system with a fluidic sampler in-line will transfer water to a net lift of 37.2-39.9 feet at an average ratio of 0.02-0.05 gpm (77-192 cc/min). The fluidic sample system circulation rate compares very favorably with the normal 0.016-0.026 gpm (60-100 cc/min) circulation rate that is commonly produced for this lift and solution with the jet-assisted airlift sample system that is normally used at ICPP. The volume of the sample taken with a fluidic sampler is dependant on the motive pressure to the fluidic sampler, the sample bottle size and on the fluidic sampler jet characteristics. The fluidic sampler should be supplied with fluid having the motive pressure of the 140-150 percent of the peak vacuum producing motive pressure for the jet in the sampler. Fluidic transfer systems should be operated by emptying a full pumping chamber to nearly empty or empty during the pumping cycle, this maximizes the solution transfer rate.

  3. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  4. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOEpatents

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  5. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  6. β-Cyclodextrin enhanced on-line organic solvent field-amplified sample stacking in capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of ambroxol in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Bi, Youwei; Wang, Li; Sun, Fanlu; Chen, Zhao; Xu, Guili; Fan, Guorong

    2012-07-01

    A field-amplified sample stacking (FASS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method is described for the quantification of ambroxol hydrochloride in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format. The separation was carried out at 25 °C in a 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 15 kV. The background electrolyte (BGE) was composed of 6.25 mM borate-25 mM phosphate (pH 3.0) and 1mM β-cyclodextrin. The detection wavelength was 210 nm. Clean-up and preconcentration of plasma biosamples were developed by 96-well format liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). In this study, FASS in combination with β-cyclodextrin enhanced the sensitivity about 60-70 fold in total. The method was suitably validated with respect to stability, specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, accuracy, precision, extraction recovery and robustness. The calibration graph was linear for ambroxol hydrochloride from 2 to 500 ng/ml. The lower limit of quantification was 2 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-day precisions of lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) were 9.61 and 11.80%, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied to the evaluation of clinical pharmacokinetic study of ambroxol hydrochloride tablet after oral administration to 12 healthy volunteers. PMID:22464560

  7. Sampling Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Three locations to the right of the test dig area are identified for the first samples to be delivered to the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL), and the Optical Microscope (OM) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These sampling areas are informally labeled 'Baby Bear', 'Mama Bear', and 'Papa Bear' respectively. This image was taken on the seventh day of the Mars mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008) by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Moral Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Opponents of biomedical enhancement often claim that, even if such enhancement would benefit the enhanced, it would harm others. But this objection looks unpersuasive when the enhancement in question is a moral enhancement — an enhancement that will expectably leave the enhanced person with morally better motives than she had previously. In this article I (1) describe one type of psychological alteration that would plausibly qualify as a moral enhancement, (2) argue that we will, in the medium-term future, probably be able to induce such alterations via biomedical intervention, and (3) defend future engagement in such moral enhancements against possible objections. My aim is to present this kind of moral enhancement as a counter-example to the view that biomedical enhancement is always morally impermissible. PMID:19132138

  9. Fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, T.; Yan, D.; Hanf, S.; Popp, J.

    2014-05-01

    Fiber enhanced Raman sensing is presented for versatile and extremely sensitive analysis of pharmaceutical drugs and biogenic gases. Elaborated micro-structured optical fibers guide the light with very low losses within their hollow core and provide at the same time a miniaturized sample container for the analytes. Thus, fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy (FERS) allows for chemically selective detection of minimal sample amounts with high sensitivity. Two examples are presented in this contribution: (i) the detection of picomolar concentrations of pharmaceutical drugs; and (ii) the analysis of biogenic gases within a complex mixture of gases with analytical sensitivities in the ppm range.

  10. Conformational sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Marcus P D; Lovas, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy hyper-surface of a protein relates the potential energy of the protein to its conformational space. This surface is useful in determining the native conformation of a protein or in examining a statistical-mechanical ensemble of structures (canonical ensemble). In determining the potential energy hyper-surface of a protein three aspects must be considered; reducing the degrees of freedom, a method to determine the energy of each conformation and a method to sample the conformational space. For reducing the degrees of freedom the choice of solvent, coarse graining, constraining degrees of freedom and periodic boundary conditions are discussed. The use of quantum mechanics versus molecular mechanics and the choice of force fields are also discussed, as well as the sampling of the conformational space through deterministic and heuristic approaches. Deterministic methods include knowledge-based statistical methods, rotamer libraries, homology modeling, the build-up method, self-consistent electrostatic field, deformation methods, tree-based elimination and eigenvector following routines. The heuristic methods include Monte Carlo chain growing, energy minimizations, metropolis monte carlo and molecular dynamics. In addition, various methods to enhance the conformational search including the deformation or smoothing of the surface, scaling of system parameters, and multi copy searching are also discussed. PMID:23947647

  11. 40 CFR 141.703 - Sampling locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 141.703 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Source Water Monitoring Requirements § 141.703 Sampling locations. (a) Systems required to conduct source water...

  12. 40 CFR 141.703 - Sampling locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 141.703 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Source Water Monitoring Requirements § 141.703 Sampling locations. (a) Systems required to conduct source water...

  13. 40 CFR 141.703 - Sampling locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 141.703 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Source Water Monitoring Requirements § 141.703 Sampling locations. (a) Systems required to conduct source water...

  14. Enhancing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on enhancing employee skills. "The Effect of Study Skills Training Intervention on United States Air Force Aeromedical Apprentices" (John C. Griffith) demonstrates how study skills intervention resulted in a significant increase in the end-of-course scores of a sample of 90 randomly selected Air Force…

  15. Self-reported oral health among a community sample of people experiencing social and health inequities: cross-sectional findings from a study to enhance equity in primary healthcare settings

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bruce; Browne, Annette J; Varcoe, Colleen; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Wathen, Nadine; Long, Phoebe M; Parker, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the self-reported oral health issues among a community sample of primary care clients experiencing socioeconomic disadvantages. Methods As part of a larger mixed-methods, multiple case study evaluating an equity-oriented primary healthcare intervention, we examined the oral health of a sample of 567 people receiving care at four clinics that serve marginalised populations in two Canadian provinces. Data collected included self-rated oral health and experiences accessing and receiving healthcare, standard self-report measures of health and quality of life, and sociodemographic information. Results The prevalence of self-rated poor oral health was high, with almost half (46.3%) of the participants reporting poor or fair oral health. Significant relationships were observed between poor oral health and vulnerabilities related to mental health, trauma and housing instability. Our findings suggest that the oral health of some Canadian populations may be dramatically worse than what is reported in existing population health surveys. Conclusions Our findings reinforce the importance of addressing oral health as part of health equity strategies. The health and oral health issues experienced by this client cohort highlight the need for interdisciplinary, team-based care that can address the intersections among people's health status, oral health and social issues. PMID:26700285

  16. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  17. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample handling system, a subsystem of the proposed Dragon landed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission [1], that can return to Earth orbit a significant mass of frozen Mars samples potentially consisting of: rock cores, subsurface drilled rock and ice cuttings, pebble sized rocks, and soil scoops. The sample collection, storage, retrieval and packaging assumptions and concepts in this study are applicable for the NASA's MPPG MSR mission architecture options [2]. Our study assumes a predecessor rover mission collects samples for return to Earth to address questions on: past life, climate change, water history, age dating, understanding Mars interior evolution [3], and, human safety and in-situ resource utilization. Hence the rover will have "integrated priorities for rock sampling" [3] that cover collection of subaqueous or hydrothermal sediments, low-temperature fluidaltered rocks, unaltered igneous rocks, regolith and atmosphere samples. Samples could include: drilled rock cores, alluvial and fluvial deposits, subsurface ice and soils, clays, sulfates, salts including perchlorates, aeolian deposits, and concretions. Thus samples will have a broad range of bulk densities, and require for Earth based analysis where practical: in-situ characterization, management of degradation such as perchlorate deliquescence and volatile release, and contamination management. We propose to adopt a sample container with a set of cups each with a sample from a specific location. We considered two sample cups sizes: (1) a small cup sized for samples matching those submitted to in-situ characterization instruments, and, (2) a larger cup for 100 mm rock cores [4] and pebble sized rocks, thus providing diverse samples and optimizing the MSR sample mass payload fraction for a given payload volume. We minimize sample degradation by keeping them frozen in the MSR payload sample canister using Peltier chip cooling. The cups are sealed by interference fitted heat activated memory

  18. Force-Control Algorithm for Surface Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Quadrelli, Marco B.; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    A G-FCON algorithm is designed for small-body surface sampling. It has a linearization component and a feedback component to enhance performance. The algorithm regulates the contact force between the tip of a robotic arm attached to a spacecraft and a surface during sampling.

  19. Sampling mechanisms for asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, D.; Franzen, M. A.; Preble, J.; Long, T.

    2003-04-01

    There is a unique challenge in developing sample collectors for low-gravity bodies such as asteroids. Traditional devices rely mostly on gravity for sample collection which is inappropriate in the case of asteroids. The NEAR Shoemaker has shown that we can design spacecrafts that can maneuver very closely to asteroids and provide us with a wealth of valuable data. However, a sample collector that can return samples to the Earth has yet to be fully developed. During the Near-Earth Sample Return Workshop held in Los Angeles in July 2002, the scientific requirements and engineering constraints of sample return collectors were discussed. It was proposed that the touch-and-go-sampler is to be preferred for the first missions. The collector should be as simple as possible, with the minimum of moving parts to reduce cost and prevent damage to the sampler during the collection process as well as minimize surface disturbance on the asteroid. However, the collection procedure must meet certain conditions in order for a complete assessment of the samples. The collection process should not change the composition (molecular, elemental, or isotopic), physical properties, mineral and phase proportions, or grain size distribution. Our answer to these challenges is an adhesive tray collector. The adhesive tray touch-and-go-sampler would include a thirty centimeter in diameter tray bound to a boom. The boom would allow the spacecraft to collect samples with a minimum amount of disturbance from the one to two second encounter with the surface of the asteroid with the adhesive tray. The adhesive tray would be able to sample surface regolith including one to two centimeter clasts in a diverse number of scientifically valuable sites. Once the sample has been collected, the boom will retract and place the adhesive sample tray into a sample return canister. Progress in the development of this collector and preliminary results of testing under microgravity and space conditions will be

  20. Biocatalyst Enhancement

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing availability of enzyme collections has assisted attempts by pharmaceutical producers to adopt green chemistry approaches to manufacturing. A joint effort between an enzyme producer and a pharmaceutical manufacturer has been enhanced over the past three years by ena...

  1. Enhancer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, Masanori; Takemoto, Tatsuya

    During embryonic development, genes are expressed under a strict spatial and temporal order in cells and tissues. This regulation is governed by regulatory regions in the genome, usually identified as enhancers (Kondoh, 2008). The identification and mapping of a set of enhancers allow clarification of essential regulatory elements involved in the enhancer action and their interacting protein factors. Enhancer analysis also determines upstream signaling cascades that regulate interacting protein factors. If the regulatory regions do not function properly, spatio-temporal order of the gene expression will be disrupted, and this may cause abnormal development and dis eases (Kleinjan & van Heyningen, 2005; Sabherwal et al., 2007). Thus, identifica tion of the regulatory regions provides an important entry point to clarify regulatory mechanisms underlying embryonic development.

  2. Sensitivity of nonuniform sampling NMR.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Melissa R; Suiter, Christopher L; Henry, Geneive E; Rovnyak, James; Hoch, Jeffrey C; Polenova, Tatyana; Rovnyak, David

    2015-06-01

    Many information-rich multidimensional experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can benefit from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement of up to about 2-fold if a decaying signal in an indirect dimension is sampled with nonconsecutive increments, termed nonuniform sampling (NUS). This work provides formal theoretical results and applications to resolve major questions about the scope of the NUS enhancement. First, we introduce the NUS Sensitivity Theorem in which any decreasing sampling density applied to any exponentially decaying signal always results in higher sensitivity (SNR per square root of measurement time) than uniform sampling (US). Several cases will illustrate this theorem and show that even conservative applications of NUS improve sensitivity by useful amounts. Next, we turn to a serious limitation of uniform sampling: the SNR by US decreases for extending evolution times, and thus total experimental times, beyond 1.26T2 (T2 = signal decay constant). Thus, SNR and resolution cannot be simultaneously improved by extending US beyond 1.26T2. We find that NUS can eliminate this constraint, and we introduce the matched NUS SNR Theorem: an exponential sampling density matched to the signal decay always improves the SNR with additional evolution time. Though proved for a specific case, broader classes of NUS densities also improve SNR with evolution time. Applications of these theoretical results are given for a soluble plant natural product and a solid tripeptide (u-(13)C,(15)N-MLF). These formal results clearly demonstrate the inadequacies of applying US to decaying signals in indirect nD-NMR dimensions, supporting a broader adoption of NUS. PMID:25901905

  3. Misoe Sample Data Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creager, John A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Among the purposes of this chapter is the provision of a description of the sample and research design of the MISOE sample data systems, including a specification of the size of the sample. (Author/RK)

  4. SAMPLING TUBING EFFECTS ON GROUNDWATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds pose a challenge to groundwater sampling protocols, since they can be lost as a water sample degasses or lost due to sorption on tubing or pump materials. Laboratory sorption experiments have been conducted with five common flexible tubing materials to ...

  5. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  6. Selecting a Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of sampling methods that are appropriate for conducting online surveys. The authors review some of the basic concepts relevant to online survey sampling, present some probability and nonprobability techniques for selecting a sample, and briefly discuss sample size determination and nonresponse bias. Although some…

  7. LASIK enhancements.

    PubMed

    Durrie, D S; Vande Garde, T L

    2000-01-01

    As the field of refractive surgery continues to evolve, an increasing number of surgical options are available for LASIK enhancements. Nonetheless, older methods such as AK continue to play an important role in enhancement procedures. Improvements in instruments and techniques allow for previously made LASIK flaps to be safely lifted for additional myopic or hyperopic ablations. Newer methods such as Intacs placement provide an effective option for patients who are not good candidates for further ablative procedures. These advancements allow refractive surgeons to treat a wider range of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism effectively in eyes with a history of LASIK surgery. PMID:10941651

  8. Stardust Sample: Investigator's Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carl

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust spacecraft returned the first in situ collection of samples from a comet, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Stardust is the first US sample return mission from a planetary body since Apollo, and the first ever from beyond the moon. This handbook is a basic reference source for allocation procedures and policies for Stardust samples. These samples consist of particles and particle residues in aerogel collectors, in aluminum foil, and in spacecraft components. Contamination control samples and unflown collection media are also available for allocation.

  9. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  10. Apollo 14 rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    Petrographic descriptions of all Apollo 14 samples larger than 1 cm in any dimension are presented. The sample description format consists of: (1) an introductory section which includes information on lunar sample location, orientation, and return containers, (2) a section on physical characteristics, which contains the sample mass, dimensions, and a brief description; (3) surface features, including zap pits, cavities, and fractures as seen in binocular view; (4) petrographic description, consisting of a binocular description and, if possible, a thin section description; and (5) a discussion of literature relevant to sample petrology is included for samples which have previously been examined by the scientific community.