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Sample records for enhanced mucosal reactions

  1. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  2. Cinnamon-induced Oral Mucosal Contact Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Ana P. M; Migliari, Dante A

    2015-01-01

    Contact stomatitis associated with consumption of cinnamon flavoring agents is a relatively uncommon disorder. Of relevance, both clinical features and the histopathologic findings of this condition are nonspecific, and, more importantly, may resemble some other inflammatory oral mucosa disorders, eventually making diagnosis difficult. Usually a patient exhibits a combination of white and erythematous patches of abrupt onset, accompanied by a burning sensation. To shed some light on this subject, a case of a 64-year-old woman with hypersensitivity contact reaction on the oral mucosa due to cinnamon mints is presented, with emphasis on differential diagnosis and the process for confirmation of the diagnosis. The treatment consists of discontinuing the use of cinnamon products. Clinicians will be able to recognize this disorder following a careful clinical examination and detailed history. This recognition is important in order to avoid invasive and expensive diagnostic procedures. PMID:26312097

  3. Polymeric penetration enhancers promote humoral immune responses to mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katja; Mann, Jamie F S; Rogers, Paul; Shattock, Robin J

    2014-06-10

    Protective mucosal immune responses are thought best induced by trans-mucosal vaccination, providing greater potential to generate potent local immune responses than conventional parenteral vaccination. However, poor trans-mucosal permeability of large macromolecular antigens limits bioavailability to local inductive immune cells. This study explores the utility of polymeric penetration enhancers to promote trans-mucosal bioavailability of insulin, as a biomarker of mucosal absorption, and two vaccine candidates: recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (CN54gp140) and tetanus toxoid (TT). Responses to vaccinating antigens were assessed by measurement of serum and the vaginal humoral responses. Polyethyleneimine (PEI), Dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD) and Chitosan enhanced the bioavailability of insulin following intranasal (IN), sublingual (SL), intravaginal (I.Vag) and intrarectal (IR) administration. The same penetration enhancers also increased antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses to the model vaccine antigens in serum and vaginal secretions following IN and SL application. Co-delivery of both antigens with PEI or Chitosan showed the highest increase in systemic IgG and IgA responses following IN or SL administration. However the highest IgA titres in vaginal secretions were achieved after IN immunisations with PEI and Chitosan. None of the penetration enhancers were able to increase antibody responses to gp140 after I.Vag immunisations, while in contrast PEI and Chitosan were able to induce TT-specific systemic IgG levels following I.Vag administration. In summary, we present supporting data that suggest appropriate co-formulation of vaccine antigens with excipients known to influence mucosal barrier functions can increase the bioavailability of mucosally applied antigens promoting the induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses. PMID:24657807

  4. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  5. Use of inactivated E.Coli enterotoxins to enhance respiratory mucosal adjuvanticity during vaccination in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to augment responses to respiratory vaccines in swine, various adjuvants were intranasally co-administered with an antigen to pigs. Detoxified E. coli enterotoxins LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced mucosal and systemic immunity to the model peptide, exhibiting their efficacy as mucosal adjuvants for...

  6. Oral Mucosal Lesions: Oral Lichen Planus and Lichenoid Tissue Reaction/Interface Dermatitis-Part II.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Syed, Nazim Hussain; Aggarwal, Ashok; Sehgal, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    In order to succinctly interpret the clinical undertones of oral lichen planus and lichenoid tissue reaction/interface dermatitis, the well-recognized oral mucosal lesions, it is mandatory to comprehend oral cavity biology in the right perspective, the clinical connotations of which have been highlighted in perspective to facilitate diagnosis. In addition, a focus is formed on systemic association. Additionally, the imperative of salient histopathology in the diagnosis is emphasized for instant reference. PMID:26861523

  7. Enhancement of Microbiota in Healthy Macaques Results in Beneficial Modulation of Mucosal and Systemic Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Manuzak, Jennifer A; Hensley-McBain, Tiffany; Zevin, Alexander S; Miller, Charlene; Cubas, Rafael; Agricola, Brian; Gile, Jill; Richert-Spuhler, Laura; Patilea, Gabriela; Estes, Jacob D; Langevin, Stanley; Reeves, R Keith; Haddad, Elias K; Klatt, Nichole R

    2016-03-01

    Given the critical role of mucosal surfaces in susceptibility to infection, it is imperative that effective mucosal responses are induced when developing efficacious vaccines and prevention strategies for infection. Modulating the microbiota in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract through the use of probiotics (PBio) is a safe and well-tolerated approach to enhance mucosal and overall health. We assessed the longitudinal impact of daily treatment with the VSL#3 probiotic on cellular and humoral immunity and inflammation in healthy macaques. PBio therapy resulted in significantly increased frequencies of B cells expressing IgA in the colon and lymph node (LN), likely because of significantly increased LN T follicular helper cell frequencies and LN follicles. Increased frequencies of IL-23(+) APCs in the colon were found post-PBio treatment, which correlated with LN T follicular helper cells. Finally, VSL#3 significantly downmodulated the response of TLR2-, TLR3-, TLR4-, and TLR9-expressing HEK293 cells to stimulation with Pam3CSK4, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, LPS, and ODN2006, respectively. These data provide a mechanism for the beneficial impact of PBio on mucosal health and implicates the use of PBio therapy in the context of vaccination or preventative approaches to enhance protection from mucosal infection by improving immune defenses at the mucosal portal of entry. PMID:26826246

  8. A Molecular Mucosal Adjuvant To Enhance Immunity Against Pneumococcal Infection In The Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Ikeda, Yorihiko; Ohori, Junichiro; Sugita, Gen; Aso, Kazuyoshi; Fujihashi, Keiko; Briles, David E.; McGhee, Jerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) causes a major upper respiratory tract infection often leading to severe illness and death in the elderly. Thus, it is important to induce safe and effective mucosal immunity against this pathogen in order to prevent pnuemocaccal infection. However, this is a very difficult task to elicit protective mucosal IgA antibody responses in older individuals. A combind nasal adjuvant consisting of a plasmid encoding the Flt3 ligand cDNA (pFL) and CpG oligonucleotide (CpG ODN) successfully enhanced S. pneumoniae-specific mucosal immunity in aged mice. In particular, a pneumococcal surface protein A-based nasal vaccine given with pFL and CpG ODN induced complete protection from S. pneumoniae infection. These results show that nasal delivery of a combined DNA adjuvant offers an attractive potential for protection against the pneumococcus in the elderly. PMID:25713504

  9. Neutrophil interactions with epithelial-expressed ICAM-1 enhances intestinal mucosal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, J C; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, A C; Weber, D A; Neish, A S; Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A

    2016-09-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. Although epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 has an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  10. Neutrophil Interactions with Epithelial Expressed ICAM-1 Enhances Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, JC; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, AC; Weber, DA; Neish, AS; Nusrat, A; Parkos, CA

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. While epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 plays an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  11. Mucosal Muscarinic Receptors Enhance Bladder Activity in Cats With Feline Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Birder, L.; Buffington, C.; Roppolo, J.; Kanai, A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Interstitial cystitis is a chronic pelvic pain syndrome of which the origin and mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study Ca2+ transients in the bladder wall of domestic cats diagnosed with naturally occurring feline interstitial cystitis were examined. Materials and Methods Cross-sections of full-thickness bladder strips from normal cats and cats with feline interstitial cystitis were examined by optically mapping Ca2+ transients and recording tension. Responses of Ca2+ activity and detrusor contractions to pharmacological interventions were compared. In addition, pharmacological responses were compared in mucosa denuded preparations. Results Optical mapping showed that feline interstitial cystitis bladders had significantly more spontaneous Ca2+ transients in the mucosal layer than control bladders. Optical mapping also demonstrated that feline interstitial cystitis bladders were hypersensitive to a low dose (50 nM) of the muscarinic receptor agonist arecaidine when the mucosal layer was intact. This hypersensitivity was markedly decreased in mucosa denuded bladder strips. Conclusions In feline interstitial cystitis cat bladders there is increased Ca2+ activity and sensitivity of muscarinic receptors in the mucosal layer, which can enhance smooth muscle spontaneous contractions. PMID:19157447

  12. Pattern Analysis of Acute Mucosal Reactions in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Conventional and Accelerated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wygoda, Andrzej Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Skladowski, Krzysztof; Hutnik, Marcin; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Golen, Maria; Rutkowski, Tomasz

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate severity of acute mucosal reactions (AMR) caused by conventional (CF) and accelerated fractionation (AF) regimens using a modified Dische system and to analyze differences in incidence and severity of AMR according to frequency and regularity of scoring. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six consecutive patients (33 CF, 33 AF) with head and neck cancer irradiated with 5 fractions in 5 days per week (CF) or with 7 fractions in 7 days (AF) to a total dose of 70 Gy. A modified Dische system was used for daily quantitation of AMR during radiotherapy until complete healing. Results: Confluent mucositis (CM) was noted in 79% of patients in the CF group and 85% in the AF group. In 24% of the CF group and 18% of the AF group the CM presented a wave-like pattern. In 55% of CF and 67% of AF a classic triphasic pattern was noted. In 12 patients acute reactions did not transgress the level of spotted mucositis. The present study clearly shows that quantitation of the incidence and severity of acute mucosal effects strongly depends on frequent and regular scoring. A significant difference in the incidence of CM between the CF and AF groups was noted, mainly in weeks 4-6 of irradiation. When once-weekly irregular instead of daily scoring was evaluated, the incidence of CM was underestimated by approximately 20-36%. Conclusions: Acute mucosal reactions occur as a complex of morphologic and functional disorders with individual intensity, even among patients treated with the same fractionation regimen. In some cases they present a 'wave-like' pattern during irradiation. Therefore, precise quantitation of acute effects requires regular and frequent scoring.

  13. CpG adjuvant enhances the mucosal immunogenicity and efficacy of a Treponema pallidum DNA vaccine in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feijun; Liu, Shuangquan; Zhang, Xiaohong; Yu, Jian; Zeng, Tiebing; Gu, Weiming; Cao, Xunyu; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yimou

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The protective response against Treponema pallidum (Tp) infection of a DNA vaccine enhanced by an adjuvant CpG ODN was investigated. Results: The mucosal adjuvant CpG ODN enhanced the production of higher levels of anti-TpGpd antibodies induced by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 in rabbits. It also resulted in higher levels of secretion of IL-2 and IFN-γ, and facilitated T cell proliferation and differentiation (p < 0.05). No significant difference about testing index above-mentioned was found in the intranasal immunization group of pcD/Gpd-IL-2 vaccine adjuvanted by CpG ODN when compared with the immunization by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 vaccine intramuscular injection alone (p > 0.05). Furthermore, CpG ODN stimulated the production of mucosa-specific anti-sIgA antibodies and resulted in the lowest Tp-positive rate (6.7%) for Tp-infection of skin lesions and the lowest rates (8.3%) of ulceration lesions, thus achieving better protective effects. Methods: New Zealand rabbits were immunized with the eukaryotic vector encoding recombinant pcD/Gpd-IL-2 using intramuscular multi-injection or together with mucosal enhancement via a nasal route. The effect of the mucosal adjuvant CpG ODN was examined. Conclusions:The CpG ODN adjuvant significantly enhances the humoral and cellular immune effects of the immunization by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 with mucosal enhancement via nasal route. It also stimulates strong mucosal immune effects, thus initiating more efficient immune-protective effects. PMID:23563515

  14. Enhanced Mucosal Immune Responses Induced by a Combined Candidate Mucosal Vaccine Based on Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Structural Proteins Linked to Tuftsin

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao; Jia, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hao; Lu, Xuexin; Qiu, Feng; Bi, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) are the most common causes of infectious hepatitis. These viruses are spread largely by the fecal-oral route and lead to clinically important disease in developing countries. To evaluate the potential of targeting hepatitis A and E infection simultaneously, a combined mucosal candidate vaccine was developed with the partial open reading frame 2 (ORF2) sequence (aa 368–607) of HEV (HE-ORF2) and partial virus protein 1 (VP1) sequence (aa 1–198) of HAV (HA-VP1), which included the viral neutralization epitopes. Tuftsin is an immunostimulatory peptide which can enhance the immunogenicity of a protein by targeting it to macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, we developed a novel combined protein vaccine by conjugating tuftsin to HE-ORF2 and HA-VP1 and used synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) as the adjuvant. Subsequent experiments in BALB/c mice demonstrated that tuftsin enhanced the serum-specific IgG and IgA antibodies against HEV and HAV at the intestinal, vaginal and pulmonary interface when delivered intranasally. Moreover, mice from the intranasally immunized tuftsin group (HE-ORF2-tuftsin + HA-VP1-tuftsin + CpG) showed higher levels of IFN-γ-secreting splenocytes (Th1 response) and ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells than those of the no-tuftsin group (HE-ORF2 + HA-VP1 + CpG). Thus, the tuftsin group generated stronger humoral and cellular immune responses compared with the no-tuftsin group. Moreover, enhanced responses to the combined protein vaccine were obtained by intranasal immunization compared with intramuscular injection. By integrating HE-ORF2, HA-VP1 and tuftsin in a vaccine, this study validated an important concept for further development of a combined mucosal vaccine against hepatitis A and E infection. PMID:25875115

  15. Antigen targeting to M cells for enhancing the efficacy of mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae-Hae; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most successful applications of immunology and for a long time has depended on parenteral administration protocols. However, recent studies have pointed to the promise of mucosal vaccination because of its ease, economy and efficiency in inducing an immune response not only systemically, but also in the mucosal compartment where many pathogenic infections are initiated. However, successful mucosal vaccination requires the help of an adjuvant for the efficient delivery of vaccine material into the mucosa and the breaking of the tolerogenic environment, especially in oral mucosal immunization. Given that M cells are the main gateway to take up luminal antigens and initiate antigen-specific immune responses, understanding the role and characteristics of M cells is crucial for the development of successful mucosal vaccines. Especially, particular interest has been focused on the regulation of the tolerogenic mucosal microenvironment and the introduction of the luminal antigen into the lymphoid organ by exploiting the molecules of M cells. Here, we review the characteristics of M cells and the immune regulatory factors in mucosa that can be exploited for mucosal vaccine delivery and mucosal immune regulation. PMID:24626171

  16. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  17. Zymosan enhances the mucosal adjuvant activity of poly(I:C) in a nasal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ainai, Akira; Ichinohe, Takeshi; Tamura, Shin-Ichi; Kurata, Takeshi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tashiro, Masato; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2010-03-01

    The synthetic double-stranded RNA polyriboinocinic polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] is a potent mucosal adjuvant in mice immunized intranasally with an inactivated influenza vaccine. In an attempt, to increase the effectiveness of a nasal poly(I:C)-combined vaccine, the effect of zymosan, a cell wall extract from Saccharomyces cervisiae was investigated, on the adjuvant activity of poly(I:C) in BALB/c mice. The addition of zymosan (10 microg) as an adjuvant in mice which were immunized intranasally with a poly(I:C) (1-5 microg)-combined vaccine (1 microg) enhanced the ability of the mice to mount an effective immune response to a lethal dose of influenza virus, and resulted in a synergistic increase in secretory IgA and serum IgG antibody levels. To define the mechanism by which zymosan enhanced the adjuvant activity of poly(I:C), bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) were cultured in the presence of poly(I:C) and/or zymosan. There was a synergistic increase in cytokine production (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-beta) in BM-DCs, together with an increase in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD86 and CD40) in response to co-treatment with poly(I:C) and zymosan. This synergistic effect on cytokine production was mimicked by co-treatment with poly(I:C) and a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, which represented one of the components of zymosan. The results of the current study suggest that one of the mechanisms by which zymosan enhances the adjuvant activity of poly(I:C) is through increased cytokine production by DCs involving the synergistic activation of poly(I:C)-induced TLR3- and zymosan-induced TLR2-mediated signaling pathways. J. Med. Virol. 82:476-484, 2010. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20087927

  18. Distinct TRPV1- and TRPA1-based mechanisms underlying enhancement of oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain by 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiichiro; Ono, Kentaro; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ito, Misa; Nodai, Tomotaka; Goto, Tetsuya; Harano, Nozomu; Watanabe, Seiji; Inoue, Hiromasa; Miyano, Kanako; Uezono, Yasuhito; Matoba, Motohiro; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2016-05-01

    In many patients with cancer, chemotherapy-induced severe oral ulcerative mucositis causes intractable pain, leading to delays and interruptions in therapy. However, the pain mechanism in oral ulcerative mucositis after chemotherapy has not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia in a preclinical model of oral ulcerative mucositis after systemic administration of the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, using our proprietary pain assay system for conscious rats. 5-Fluorouracil caused leukopenia but did not induce pain-related behaviors. After 5-fluorouracil administration, oral ulcers were developed with topical acetic acid treatment. Compared with saline-treated rats, 5-fluorouracil-exposed rats showed more severe mucositis with excessive bacterial loading due to a lack of leukocyte infiltration, as well as enhancements of spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia. Antibacterial drugs, the lipid A inhibitor polymyxin B and the TRPV1/TRPA1 channel pore-passing anesthetic QX-314, suppressed both the spontaneous pain and the mechanical allodynia. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin and the TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791 inhibited the spontaneous pain, but not the mechanical allodynia. In contrast, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 and the N-formylmethionine receptor FPR1 antagonist Boc MLF primarily suppressed the mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that 5-fluorouracil-associated leukopenia allows excessive oral bacterial infection in the oral ulcerative region, resulting in the enhancement of spontaneous pain through continuous TRPV1 activation and cyclooxygenase pathway, and mechanical allodynia through mechanical sensitization of TRPA1 caused by neuronal effects of bacterial toxins. These distinct pain mechanisms explain the difficulties encountered with general treatments for oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain in patients with cancer and suggest more effective approaches. PMID:26808144

  19. Enhanced Mucosal Antibody Production and Protection against Respiratory Infections Following an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Christian; Salami, Olawale; Taneja, Manisha; Gollwitzer, Eva S.; Trompette, Aurelien; Pattaroni, Céline; Yadava, Koshika; Bauer, Jacques; Marsland, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections following influenza infection are a pressing problem facing respiratory medicine. Although antibiotic treatment has been highly successful over recent decades, fatalities due to secondary bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death associated with influenza. We have assessed whether administration of a bacterial extract alone is sufficient to potentiate immune responses and protect against primary infection with influenza, and secondary infections with either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. We show that oral administration with the bacterial extract, OM-85, leads to a maturation of dendritic cells and B-cells characterized by increases in MHC II, CD86, and CD40, and a reduction in ICOSL. Improved immune responsiveness against influenza virus reduced the threshold of susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and thus protected the mice. The protection was associated with enhanced polyclonal B-cell activation and release of antibodies that were effective at neutralizing the virus. Taken together, these data show that oral administration of bacterial extracts provides sufficient mucosal immune stimulation to protect mice against a respiratory tract viral infection and associated sequelae. PMID:25593914

  20. Enhanced Mucosal Antibody Production and Protection against Respiratory Infections Following an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Christian; Salami, Olawale; Taneja, Manisha; Gollwitzer, Eva S; Trompette, Aurelien; Pattaroni, Céline; Yadava, Koshika; Bauer, Jacques; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections following influenza infection are a pressing problem facing respiratory medicine. Although antibiotic treatment has been highly successful over recent decades, fatalities due to secondary bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death associated with influenza. We have assessed whether administration of a bacterial extract alone is sufficient to potentiate immune responses and protect against primary infection with influenza, and secondary infections with either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. We show that oral administration with the bacterial extract, OM-85, leads to a maturation of dendritic cells and B-cells characterized by increases in MHC II, CD86, and CD40, and a reduction in ICOSL. Improved immune responsiveness against influenza virus reduced the threshold of susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and thus protected the mice. The protection was associated with enhanced polyclonal B-cell activation and release of antibodies that were effective at neutralizing the virus. Taken together, these data show that oral administration of bacterial extracts provides sufficient mucosal immune stimulation to protect mice against a respiratory tract viral infection and associated sequelae. PMID:25593914

  1. Enhanced Th1/Th17 Functions of CD161+ CD8+ T Cells in Mucosal Tissues of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the C-type lectin-like receptor CD161 by human T cells is associated with type-17 responses, which play critical regulatory roles in immunity and inflammation at mucosal sites. However, the functions of CD161-expressing T cells in macaques, the pre-clinical model of several human diseases, remain unknown. This study examined the phenotypic and functional characteristics of CD161+ T cells in peripheral blood, mucosal tissues and lymph nodes of rhesus macaques. Majority of CD161-expressing T cells in peripheral blood and lung/intestinal mucosal tissues of rhesus macaques were found to be CD8+CD4– in phenotype. There was a significant enrichment of CD161+CD8+ T cells in the lungs and colonic mucosa (16.1%±6.6 and 16.8%±5.7) in comparison to peripheral blood (4.2%±1.2) and mesenteric lymph nodes (1.3%±0.8). Regardless of the tissue compartment, CD161+CD8+ T cells mainly comprised of γδ T cells and TCR Vα7.2+ MAIT cells (up to 80%), and displayed Th1 and Th17 cytokine responses to mitogen stimulation. Mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells were characterized by very high expression of CD69, a recent activation marker that is preferentially expressed on tissue resident cells. Furthermore, lung and colonic mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells showed enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17, and Perforin production in comparison to those in blood. Thus, macaque CD161+CD8+ T cells represent mucosal tissue-homing innate-like CD8+ T-cell populations with Th1/Th17 type cytokine and cytotoxic effector functions that can potentially enhance the recruitment of adaptive immune cells and control initial pathogen burden/dissemination in tissues. Analysis of their role in early immune responses to mucosal pathogens will be valuable in the design of vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:27309719

  2. N-succinyl chitosan as buccal penetration enhancer for delivery of herbal agents in treatment of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Neha; Kumar, Krishan; Kalia, A N; Arora, Saahil

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the major side effects of cancer chemotherapy (30-76%) and radiotherapy (over 50%). Current palliative treatments of oral mucositis include specialized agents like pelifermin, platelet derived factors etc. or oral hygienic agents which suffered from various drawbacks like systemic side effect, least effect owing to fast wash out of buccal mucosa, patient unfriendly delivery systems, and mere symptomatic relief. In this research work, N-succinyl chitosan gel delivery system of microemulsified eugenol, honey and sodium hyaluronate was prepared to explore their multiple and synergistic effects on various pathological factors of oral mucositis. N-succinyl chitosan was synthesized in our laboratory and loaded with microemulsified eugenol (10% v/v), honey (10% v/v) and sodium hyaluronate (0.2% w/v) to prepare orogel with optimum pH, spreadability, mucoadhesion strength, and viscosity. In vitro eugenol release from N-succinyl chitosan gel after 8 hours in PBS (pH-6.4) was found to be 87.45±0.14%, which was better in comparison to that released from chitosan gel. Ex vivo penetration studies using rat buccal mucosal tissue also suggested better J-efflux of eugenol through N-succinyl chitosan in comparison to chitosan gel with enhancement ratio (ER) of 1.71. The antimicrobial effect of N-succinyl chitosan based orogel against S. aureus and C. albicans efficacy was found to be statistically high in comparison to chitosan based orogel as well as marketed formulation of chlorhexidine (p<0.05). The N-succinyl chitosan orogel in 5-fluoro uracil induced oral mucositis animal (Wistar rats) model showed enhanced survival ratio, weight gain and high tissue regeneration activity than chitosan gel formulation within 15 days. The formulation was successful in elevating the survival and reducing the inflammation in the oral mucosa of animals compared to disease control (p<0.05) and hence suggesting the potential of N-succinyl chitosan orogel in the treatment of

  3. Dietary Apostichopus japonicus enhances the respiratory and intestinal mucosal immunity in immunosuppressive mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Rong; Li, Xuemin; Cao, Binbin; Zuo, Tao; Wu, Juan; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu; Tang, Qingjuan

    2015-01-01

    Although Apostichopus japonicus is recognized as a food and drug resource with significant immunomodulatory activity, its role in regulating the mucosal immunity remains unclear. This study aimed to explore the effects of dietary A. japonicus on mucosal immunity with an immunosuppressive mouse model. The expression of lysozyme, secretory immunoglobulin A(sIgA), and immunoglobulin A(IgA) as well as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor(pIgR) in respiratory and intestine organs was investigated. The results showed that A. japonicus could improve both the systematic and mucosal immunity. The expression of lysozyme, sIgA, and IgA in the respiratory organ was increased more significantly. Consumption of A. japonicus with the dose of 512 mg kg(-1), which equals to (1)/2 sea cucumber per day for adults, showed better effects. This study elucidated positive effects of A. japonicus on mucosal immunity for the first time, suggesting that moderate consumption of A. japonicus is helpful in improving mucosal immunity and preventing exogenous infection. PMID:25186733

  4. AdHu5Ag85A Respiratory Mucosal Boost Immunization Enhances Protection against Pulmonary Tuberculosis in BCG-Primed Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuefeng; Harkness, Robin; Jiang, Rong; Li, Junqiang; Xing, Zhou; Zhu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Persisting high global tuberculosis (TB) morbidity and mortality and poor efficacy of BCG vaccine emphasizes an urgent need for developing effective novel boost vaccination strategies following parenteral BCG priming in humans. Most of the current lead TB vaccine candidates in the global pipeline were developed for parenteral route of immunization. Compelling evidence indicates respiratory mucosal delivery of vaccine to be the most effective way to induce robust local mucosal protective immunity against pulmonary TB. However, despite ample supporting evidence from various animal models, there has been a lack of evidence supporting the safety and protective efficacy of respiratory mucosal TB vaccination in non-human primates (NHP) and humans. By using a rhesus macaque TB model we have evaluated the safety and protective efficacy of a recombinant human serotype 5 adenovirus-based TB vaccine (AdHu5Ag85A) delivered via the respiratory mucosal route. We show that mucosal AdHu5Ag85A boost immunization was safe and well tolerated in parenteral BCG-primed rhesus macaques. A single AdHu5Ag85A mucosal boost immunization in BCG-primed rhesus macaques enhanced the antigen–specific T cell responses. Boost immunization significantly improved the survival and bacterial control following M.tb challenge. Furthermore, TB-related lung pathology and clinical outcomes were lessened in BCG-primed, mucosally boosted animals compared to control animals. Thus, for the first time we show that a single respiratory mucosal boost immunization with a novel TB vaccine enhances protection against pulmonary TB in parenteral BCG-primed NHP. Our study provides the evidence for the protective potential of AdHu5Ag85A as a respiratory mucosal boost TB vaccine for human application. PMID:26252520

  5. Mucosal immunisation with novel Streptococcus pneumoniae protein antigens enhances bacterial clearance in an acute mouse lung infection model.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Maha; Kyd, Jennelle M; Cripps, Allan W

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae contains many proteins that have not been evaluated as potential protective vaccine antigens. In this study we isolated proteins from a serotype 3 strain of S. pneumoniae for use in mouse immunisation studies. Separation of the protein mix was achieved by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis followed by electro-elution to isolate individual proteins. This procedure successfully separated 21 fractions from which six proteins were selected based on purity and quantity and were initially denoted by their molecular masses: 14-, 34-, 38-, 48-, 57- and 75-kDa. The immunogenicity of these proteins was investigated in a mucosal immunisation model in mice involving a primary inoculation to the intestinal Peyer's patches followed by an intra-tracheal boost two weeks later. The immune response was assessed by enhancement of pulmonary clearance of infection, recruitment of phagocytes to the lungs and induction of an antibody response. Two of the proteins, the 14-kDa identified as a L7/L12 ribosomal protein, and the 34-kDa identified as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase resulted in up to 99% and 94%, respectively, enhanced clearance of infection within 5 h following pulmonary challenge with S. pneumoniae. This study has shown that novel pneumococcal proteins have the potential to be vaccine candidates to enhance clearance of an acute mucosal S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:15780579

  6. Photocatalytic silver enhancement reaction for gravimetric immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyejung; Joo, Jinmyoung; Ko, Wooree; Jung, Namchul; Jeon, Sangmin

    2010-12-01

    A novel microgravimetric immunosensor has been developed using TiO2 nanoparticle-modified immunoassay and silver enhancement reaction. An antibody-conjugated TiO2 nanoparticle is bound to the AFP antigen immobilized on a quartz resonator. When the nanoparticles are exposed to UV light in a silver nitrate solution, the photocatalytic reduction of silver ions results in the formation of metallic silver onto the nanoparticles and induces a decrease in the resonance frequency. The frequency change by this photocatalytic reduction reaction is three orders of magnitude larger than the change by antigen binding alone. The efficiency of the photocatalytic reaction has been found to increase with the fraction of anatase crystallites in the nanoparticles and the concentration of the AgNO3 solution. The results highlight the potential of the photocatalytic nanoparticles for the detection of low concentrations of target molecules using gravimetric sensors.

  7. Enhanced aqueous photochemical reaction rates after freezing.

    PubMed

    Grannas, Amanda M; Bausch, Alexandra R; Mahanna, Kendell M

    2007-11-01

    Sunlit snow/ice is known to play an important role in the processing of atmospheric species, including photochemical production of NO(x), HONO, molecular halogens, alkyl halides, and carbonyl compounds, among others. It has been shown that a liquid-like (quasi-liquid or disordered) layer exists on the surface of pure ice and that this quasi-liquid layer is also found on the surface of ambient snow crystals and ice at temperatures similar to polar conditions. However, it is unclear what role the liquid-like fractions present in and on frozen water play in potential photochemical reactions, particularly with regard to organic substrates. Here, we report a detailed study of enhanced rates of photochemical nucleophilic substitution of p-nitroanisole (PNA) with pyridine, a well-characterized and commonly used actinometer system. Reaction rates were enhanced by a factor of up to approximately 40 when frozen at temperatures between 236 and 272 K. Reaction rates were dependent on temperature and solute concentration, both variables that control the nature of the liquid-like fraction in frozen water. The results obtained indicate that a major portion of the organic solutes is excluded to the liquid-like layer, significantly impacting the rate of the photochemical nucleophilic substitution reaction studied here. Also, the direct comparison of liquid-phase kinetics to reactions occurring in frozen water systems is drawn into question, indicating that a simple extrapolation of liquid-phase mechanisms to snow/ice may not be valid for certain reactions. PMID:17918916

  8. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  9. Mucosal immunization with high-mobility group box 1 in chitosan enhances DNA vaccine-induced protection against coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maowei; Yue, Yan; Dong, Chunsheng; Li, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wei; Xiong, Sidong

    2013-11-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a small single-stranded RNA virus, belongs to the Picornaviridae family. Its infection is the most common cause of myocarditis, with no vaccine available. Gastrointestinal mucosa is the major entry port for CVB3; therefore, the induction of local immunity in mucosal tissues may help control initial viral infections and alleviate subsequent myocardial injury. Here we evaluated the ability of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) encapsulated in chitosan particles to enhance the mucosal immune responses induced by the CVB3-specific mucosal DNA vaccine chitosan-pVP1. Mice were intranasally coimmunized with 4 doses of chitosan-pHMGB1 and chitosan-pVP1 plasmids, at 2-week intervals, and were challenged with CVB3 4 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with chitosan-pVP1 immunization alone, coimmunization with chitosan-pHMGB1 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced CVB3-specific fecal secretory IgA levels and promoted mucosal T cell immune responses. In accordance, reduced severity of myocarditis was observed in coimmunized mice, as evidenced by significantly (P < 0.05) reduced viral loads, decreased myocardial injury, and increased survival rates. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that HMGB1 enhanced dendritic cell (DC) recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes and promoted DC maturation, which might partly account for its mucosal adjuvant effect. This strategy may represent a promising approach to candidate vaccines against CVB3-induced myocarditis. PMID:24027262

  10. Endogenous IL-21 regulates pathogenic mucosal CD4 T-cell responses during enhanced RSV disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, J S; Clark, D; Muir, R; Korpis, C; Openshaw, P J M

    2013-01-01

    A role for interleukin-21 (IL-21) has recently been found in several diseases, but contribution to mucosal defences has not been described. In BALB/c mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), IL-21 depletion had little effect in primary infection. However, depletion of mice during priming with recombinant vaccinia expressing RSV G protein (which primes RSV-specific T helper type 2 cells and causes lung eosinophilia during RSV infection) further exacerbated pathology during RSV challenge, with reduced viral clearance and impaired virus-specific serum antibody responses. This enhancement was accompanied by lymphocyte, neutrophil, and antigen-presenting cell recruitment to the lungs, with increased bronchoalveolar lavage interferon-γ and IL-17 levels. Adoptive transfer of splenic CD4 T cells from depleted mice into naive recipients replicated these effects, indicating that IL-21 mediates its effects via CD4 T cells. Endogenous IL-21, therefore, has potent and specific effects on mucosal antiviral responses, assisting viral clearance, regulating pulmonary T- and B-cell responses, and inhibiting IL-17 production. PMID:23168836

  11. Enhanced Mucosal Delivery of Antigen with Cell Wall Mutants of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grangette, Corinne; Müller-Alouf, Heide; Hols, Pascal; Goudercourt, Denise; Delcour, Jean; Turneer, Mireille; Mercenier, Annick

    2004-01-01

    The potential of recombinant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to deliver heterologous antigens to the immune system and to induce protective immunity has been best demonstrated by using the C subunit of tetanus toxin (TTFC) as a model antigen. Two types of LAB carriers have mainly been used, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis, which differ substantially in their abilities to resist passage through the stomach and to persist in the mouse gastrointestinal tract. Here we analyzed the effect of a deficiency in alanine racemase, an enzyme that participates in cell wall synthesis, in each of these bacterial carriers. Recombinant wild-type and mutant strains of L. plantarum NCIMB8826 and L. lactis MG1363 producing TTFC intracellularly were constructed and used in mouse immunization experiments. Remarkably, we observed that the two cell wall mutant strains were far more immunogenic than their wild-type counterparts when the intragastric route was used. However, intestinal TTFC-specific immunoglobulin A was induced only after immunization with the recombinant L. plantarum mutant strain. Moreover, the alanine racemase mutant of either LAB strain allowed induction of a much stronger serum TTFC-specific immune response after immunization via the vagina, which is a quite different ecosystem than the gastrointestinal tract. The design and use of these mutants thus resulted in a major improvement in the mucosal delivery of antigens exhibiting vaccine properties. PMID:15102782

  12. Enhanced respiratory clearance of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae following mucosal immunization with P6 in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kyd, J M; Dunkley, M L; Cripps, A W

    1995-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common cause of infection of the respiratory tract in children and adults. The search for an effective vaccine against this pathogen has focused on components of the outer membrane, and peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein P6 is among the proposed candidates. This study investigated the immunogenicity of P6 in a rat respiratory model. P6 was purified from two strains of NTHi, one capsule-deficient strain and an H. influenzae type b strain, and assessed for clearance of both homologous and heterologous bacterial strains following mucosal immunization. A protective immune response was determined by enhancement of pulmonary clearance of live bacteria and an increased rate of recruitment of phagocytic cells to the lungs. This was most effective when Peyer's patch immunization was accompanied by an intratracheal (IT) boost. However, the rate of bacterial clearance varied between strains, which suggests some differences in anti-P6 immunological defenses recognizing the expression of the highly conserved P6 lipoprotein on the bacterial surface in some strains. P6-specific antibodies in both serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were cross-reactive and did not differ significantly in strain specificity, demonstrating that difference in clearance was unlikely due to differences in P6-specific antibody levels. Serum homologous and heterologous P6-antibody was bactericidal against NTHi even when enhanced clearance had not been observed. Peyer's patch immunization induced P6-specific CD4+ T-helper cell proliferation in lymphocytes isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes. An IT boost increased the level of P6-specific antibodies in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and P6-specific mesenteric node lymphocyte proliferation. Cells from rats immunized with P6 demonstrated proliferation following stimulation with P6 from nonhomologous strains; however, there was some variation in proliferative responses to P6 from different

  13. Solar thermal harvesting for enhanced photocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyyed Mohammad Hosseini; Choi, Jae-Woo; Psaltis, Demetri

    2014-03-21

    The Shockley-Queisser limit predicts a maximum efficiency of 30% for single junction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The rest of the solar energy is lost as heat and due to phenomena such as reflection and transmission through the PV and charge carrier recombination. In the case of photocatalysis, this maximum value is smaller since the charge carriers should be transferred to acceptor molecules rather than conductive electrodes. With this perspective, we realize that at least 70% of the solar energy is available to be converted into heat. This is specifically useful for photocatalysis, since heat can provide more kinetic energy to the reactants and increase the number of energetic collisions leading to the breakage of chemical bonds. Even in natural photosynthesis, at the most 6% of the solar spectrum is used to produce sugar and the rest of the absorbed photons are converted into heat in a process called transpiration. The role of this heating component is often overlooked; in this paper, we demonstrate a coupled system of solar thermal and photocatalytic decontamination of water by titania, the most widely used photocatalyst for various photo reactions. The enhancement of this photothermal process over solely photocatalytic water decontamination is demonstrated to be 82% at 1× sun. Our findings suggest that the combination of solar thermal energy capture with photocatalysis is a suitable strategy to utilize more of the solar spectrum and improve the overall performance. PMID:24480846

  14. POZylation: a new approach to enhance nanoparticle diffusion through mucosal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Edward D. H.; Sillence, Katy; Hole, Patrick; Williams, Adrian C.; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V.

    2015-08-01

    The increasing use of nanoparticles in the pharmaceutical industry is generating concomitant interest in developing nanomaterials that can rapidly penetrate into, and permeate through, biological membranes to facilitate drug delivery and improve the bioavailability of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Here, we demonstrate that the permeation of thiolated silica nanoparticles through porcine gastric mucosa can be significantly enhanced by their functionalization with either 5 kDa poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) or poly(ethylene glycol). Nanoparticle diffusion was assessed using two independent techniques; Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and fluorescence microscopy. Our results show that poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) and poly(ethylene glycol) have comparable abilities to enhance diffusion of silica nanoparticles in mucin dispersions and through the gastric mucosa. These findings provide a new strategy in the design of nanomedicines, by surface modification or nanoparticle core construction, for enhanced transmucosal drug delivery.The increasing use of nanoparticles in the pharmaceutical industry is generating concomitant interest in developing nanomaterials that can rapidly penetrate into, and permeate through, biological membranes to facilitate drug delivery and improve the bioavailability of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Here, we demonstrate that the permeation of thiolated silica nanoparticles through porcine gastric mucosa can be significantly enhanced by their functionalization with either 5 kDa poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) or poly(ethylene glycol). Nanoparticle diffusion was assessed using two independent techniques; Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and fluorescence microscopy. Our results show that poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) and poly(ethylene glycol) have comparable abilities to enhance diffusion of silica nanoparticles in mucin dispersions and through the gastric mucosa. These findings provide a new strategy in the design of nanomedicines, by surface modification or

  15. Unique IL-13Rα2-based HIV-1 vaccine strategy to enhance mucosal immunity, CD8(+) T-cell avidity and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, C; Trivedi, S; Stambas, J; Jackson, R J

    2013-11-01

    We have established that mucosal immunization can generate high-avidity human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with systemic immunization, and interleukin (IL)-13 is detrimental to the functional avidity of these T cells. We have now constructed two unique recombinant HIV-1 vaccines that co-express soluble or membrane-bound forms of the IL-13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2), which can "transiently" block IL-13 activity at the vaccination site causing wild-type animals to behave similar to an IL-13 KO animal. Following intranasal/intramuscular prime-boost immunization, these IL-13Rα2-adjuvanted vaccines have shown to induce (i) enhanced HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher functional avidity, with broader cytokine/chemokine profiles and greater protective immunity using a surrogate mucosal HIV-1 challenge, and also (ii) excellent multifunctional mucosal CD8(+) T-cell responses, in the lung, genito-rectal nodes (GN), and Peyer's patch (PP). Data revealed that intranasal delivery of these IL-13Rα2-adjuvanted HIV vaccines recruited large numbers of unique antigen-presenting cell subsets to the lung mucosae, ultimately promoting the induction of high-avidity CD8(+) T cells. We believe our novel IL-13R cytokine trap vaccine strategy offers great promise for not only HIV-1, but also as a platform technology against range of chronic infections that require strong sustained high-avidity mucosal/systemic immunity for protection. PMID:23403475

  16. Aldosterone induces active K+ secretion by enhancing mucosal expression of Kcnn4c and Kcnma1 channels in rat distal colon

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satish K.; O'Hara, Bryan; Talukder, Jamilur R.

    2012-01-01

    Although both Kcnn4c and Kcnma1 channels are present on colonic mucosal membranes, only Kcnma1 has been suggested to mediate K+ secretion in the colon. Therefore, studies were initiated to investigate the relative roles of Kcnn4c and Kcnma1 in mediating aldosterone (Na-free diet)-induced K+ secretion. Mucosal to serosal (m-s), serosal to mucosal (s-m), and net 86Rb+ (K+ surrogate) fluxes as well as short circuit currents (Isc; measure of net ion movement) were measured under voltage clamp condition in rat distal colon. Active K+ absorption, but not K+ secretion, is present in normal, while aldosterone induces active K+ secretion (1.04 ± 0.26 vs. −1.21 ± 0.15 μeq·h−1·cm−2; P < 0.001) in rat distal colon. Mucosal VO4 (a P-type ATPase inhibitor) inhibited the net K+ absorption in normal, while it significantly enhanced net K+ secretion in aldosterone animals. The aldosterone-induced K+ secretion was inhibited by the mucosal addition of 1) either Ba2+ (a nonspecific K+ channel blocker) or charybdotoxin (CTX; a common Kcnn4 and Kcnma1 channel blocker) by 89%; 2) tetraethyl ammonium (TEA) or iberiotoxin (IbTX; a Kcnma1 channel blocker) by 64%; and 3) TRAM-34 (a Kcnn4 channel blocker) by 29%. TRAM-34, but not TEA, in the presence of IbTX further significantly inhibited the aldosterone-induced K+ secretion. Thus the aldosterone-induced Ba2+/CTX-sensitive K+ secretion consists of IbTX/TEA-sensitive (Kcnma1) and IbTX/TEA-insensitive fractions. TRAM-34 inhibition of the IbTX-insensitive fraction is consistent with the aldosterone-induced K+ secretion being mediated partially via Kcnn4c. Western and quantitative PCR analyses indicated that aldosterone enhanced both Kcnn4c and Kcnma1α protein expression and mRNA abundance. In vitro exposure of isolated normal colonic mucosa to aldosterone also enhanced Kcnn4c and Kcnma1α mRNA levels, and this was prevented by exposure to actinomycin D (an RNA synthesis inhibitor). These observations indicate that aldosterone

  17. Mucosal immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M; Mestecky, Jiri

    2005-08-01

    Due to their vast surface area, the mucosal surfaces of the body represent a major site of potential attack by invading pathogens. The secretions that bathe mucosal surfaces contain significant levels of immunoglobulins (Igs), which play key roles in immune defense of these surfaces. IgA is the predominant antibody class in many external secretions and has many functional attributes, both direct and indirect, that serve to prevent infective agents such as bacteria and viruses from breaching the mucosal barrier. This review details current understanding of the structural and functional characteristics of IgA, including interaction with specific receptors (such as Fc(alpha)RI, Fc(alpha)/microR, and CD71) and presents examples of the means by which certain pathogens circumvent the protective properties of this important Ig. PMID:16048542

  18. Enhancement of Sonochemical Reaction by Dual-Pulse Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Yasuda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to apply sonochemistry in wastewater treatment, enhancement of sonochemical reaction is necessary. Oxidation of potassium iodide and the degradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution using ultrasound irradiation were performed at 490 kHz. Power-modulated pulsed waves were employed and the enhancement of reaction amount was observed compared with using continuous wave. The enhancement ratio for irradiation to rigid wall was larger than that for irradiation to free surface. Moreover, the best modulated pulsed on time was experimentally determined and the effect of the superposition of pulsed waves (dual-pulse) was studied. Enhancement was also observed and calculated separately when using dual-pulse ultrasound. The enhancement upon the use of the dual-transducer was ascribed to the enlargement of sonochemical reaction field. The enhancement upon the incorporating pulsed waves was ascribed to both the reduction of reaction threshold effect and the residual acoustical pressure at the pulsed off time.

  19. Mannose-modified chitosan microspheres enhance OprF-OprI-mediated protection of mice against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection via induction of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ziyin; Han, Dong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Mingliang; Feng, Xin; Sun, Changjiang; Gu, Jingmin; Tong, Chunyu; Lei, Liancheng; Han, Wenyu

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that localizes to and colonizes mucosal tissue. Thus, vaccines that elicit a strong mucosal response against P. aeruginosa should be superior to other vaccination strategies. In this study, to stimulate rapid and enhanced mucosal immune responses, mannose-modified chitosan microspheres loaded with the recombinant outer membrane protein OprF190-342-OprI21-83 (FI) (FI-MCS-MPs) of P. aeruginosa were developed as a potent subunit vaccine for mucosal delivery. FI-MCS-MPs were successfully obtained via the tripolyphosphate ionic crosslinking method. Confocal and immunohistochemical analyses indicated that FI-MCS-MPs exhibited the ability to bind the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206) in vitro and in vivo. After intranasal immunization of mice with FI-MCS-MPs, FI-specific humoral immune responses were detected, measured as local IgM antibody titers in lung tissue slurry; IgA antibody titers in nasal washes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and intestinal lavage; and systemic IgA and IgG antibody titers in serum. FI-MCS-MPs induced early and high mucosal and systemic humoral antibody responses comparable to those in the group vaccinated with unmodified mannose. High levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 in addition to T lymphocyte subsets induced a mixed Th1/Th2 response in mice immunized with FI-MCS-MPs, resulting in the establishment of cellular immunity. Additionally, when immunized mice were challenged with P. aeruginosa via the nasal cavity, FI-MCS-MPs demonstrated 75 % protective efficacy. Together, these data indicate that mannose-modified chitosan microspheres are a promising subunit delivery system for vaccines against P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:25381907

  20. Mucosal co-immunization with AIM2 enhances protective SIgA response and increases prophylactic efficacy of chitosan-DNA vaccine against coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Dafei; Yue, Yan; Xu, Wei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection is considered as the most common cause of viral myocarditis with no available vaccine. Considering that CVB3 mainly invades through the gastrointestinal mucosa, the development of CVB3-specific mucosal vaccine, which is the most efficient way to induce mucosal immune responses, gains more and more attention. In this study, we used absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) as a mucosal adjuvant to enhance the immunogenicity and immunoprotection of CVB3-specific chitosan-pVP1 vaccine. Mice were intranasally co-immunized with 50 μg chitosan-pAIM2 and equal amount of chitosan-pVP1 vaccine 4 times at 2 week-intervals, and then challenged with CVB3 2 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with chitosan-pVP1 vaccine immunization alone, chitosan-pAIM2 co-immunization enhanced resistance to CVB3-induced myocarditis evidenced by significantly enhanced ejection fractions from 55.40 ± 9.35 to 80.31 ± 11.35, improved myocarditis scores from 1.50 ± 0.45 to 0.30 ± 0.15, reduced viral load from 3.33 ± 0.50 to 0.50 ± 0.65, and increased survival rate from 40.0% to 75.5%. This increased immunoprotection might be attributed to the augmented level of CVB3-specific fecal SIgA with high affinity and neutralizing ability. In addition, co-immunization with chitosan-pAIM2 remarkably facilitated dendritic cells (DCs) recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and promoted the expression of IgA-inducing factors (BAFF, APRIL, iNOS, RALDH1, IL-6, TGF-β), which might account for its mucosal adjuvant effect. This strategy may represent a promising prophylactic vaccine against CVB3-induced myocarditis. PMID:24614684

  1. Heat Shock Protein 70 Enhances Mucosal Immunity against Human Norovirus When Coexpressed from a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuanmei; Duan, Yue; Wei, Yongwei; Liang, Xueya; Niewiesk, Stefan; Oglesbee, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human norovirus (NoV) accounts for 95% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there is no vaccine available to combat human NoV as it is not cultivable and lacks a small-animal model. Recently, we demonstrated that recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing human NoV capsid protein (rVSV-VP1) induced strong immunities in mice (Y. Ma and J. Li, J. Virol. 85:2942–2952, 2011). To further improve the safety and efficacy of the vaccine candidate, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was inserted into the rVSV-VP1 backbone vector. A second construct was generated in which the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene was inserted in place of HSP70 as a control for the double insertion. The resultant recombinant viruses (rVSV-HSP70-VP1 and rVSV-Luc-VP1) were significantly more attenuated in cell culture and viral spread in mice than rVSV-VP1. At the inoculation dose of 1.0 × 106 PFU, rVSV-HSP70-VP1 triggered significantly higher vaginal IgA than rVSV-VP1 and significantly higher fecal and vaginal IgA responses than rVSV-Luc-VP1, although serum IgG and T cell responses were similar. At the inoculation dose of 5.0 × 106 PFU, rVSV-HSP70-VP1 stimulated significantly higher T cell, fecal, and vaginal IgA responses than rVSV-VP1. Fecal and vaginal IgA responses were also significantly increased when combined vaccination of rVSV-VP1 and rVSV-HSP70 was used. Collectively, these data indicate that (i) insertion of an additional gene (HSP70 or Luc) into the rVSV-VP1 backbone further attenuates the VSV-based vaccine in vitro and in vivo, thus improving the safety of the vaccine candidate, and (ii) HSP70 enhances the human NoV-specific mucosal and T cell immunities triggered by a VSV-based human NoV vaccine. IMPORTANCE Human norovirus (NoV) is responsible for more than 95% of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there is no vaccine for this virus. Development of a live attenuated vaccine for human NoV has not been possible because it is

  2. A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis secreting detoxified heat labile toxin enhances mucosal immunity and confers protection against wild-type challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) capable of constitutively secreting detoxified double mutant Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (dmLT) was developed. The biologically adjuvanted strain was generated via transformation of a highly immunogenic SE JOL1087 with a plasmid encoding dmLT gene cassette; the resultant strain was designated JOL1641. A balanced-lethal host-vector system stably maintained the plasmid via auxotrophic host complementation with a plasmid encoded aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene. Characterization by western blot assay revealed the dmLT subunit proteins in culture supernatants of JOL1641. For the investigation of adjuvanticity and protective efficacy, chickens were immunized via oral or intramuscular routes with PBS, JOL1087 and JOL1641. Birds immunized with JOL1641 showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) increases in intestinal SIgA production at the 1(st) and 2(nd) weeks post-immunization via oral and intramuscular routes, respectively. Interestingly, while both strains showed significant splenic protection via intramuscular immunization, JOL1641 outperformed JOL1087 upon oral immunization. Oral immunization of birds with JOL1641 significantly reduced splenic bacterial counts. The reduction in bacterial counts may be correlated with an adjuvant effect of dmLT that increases SIgA secretion in the intestines of immunized birds. The inclusion of detoxified dmLT in the strain did not cause adverse reactions to birds, nor did it extend the period of bacterial fecal shedding. In conclusion, we report here that dmLT could be biologically incorporated in the secretion system of a live attenuated Salmonella-based vaccine, and that this construction is safe and could enhance mucosal immunity, and protect immunized birds against wild-type challenge. PMID:27262338

  3. H9N2 influenza whole inactivated virus combined with polyethyleneimine strongly enhances mucosal and systemic immunity after intranasal immunization in mice.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Huang, Lulu; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2015-04-01

    Influenza whole inactivated virus (WIV) is more immunogenic and induces protective antibody responses compared with other formulations, like split virus or subunit vaccines, after intranasal mucosal delivery. Polyethyleneimine (PEI), an organic polycation, is widely used as a reagent for gene transfection and DNA vaccine delivery. Although PEI recently has demonstrated potent mucosal adjuvant activity for viral subunit glycoprotein antigens, its immune activity with H9N2 WIV is not well demonstrated. Here, mice were immunized intranasally with H9N2 WIV combined with PEI, and the levels of local respiratory tract and systemic immune responses were measured. Compared to H9N2 WIV alone, antigen-specific IgA levels in the local nasal cavity, trachea, and lung, as well as levels of IgG and its subtypes (IgG1 and IgG2a) in the serum, were strongly enhanced with the combination. Similarly, the activation and proliferation of splenocytes were markedly increased. In addition, PEI is superior as an H9N2 WIV delivery system due to its ability to greatly increase the viral adhesion to mucosal epithelial cells and to enhance the cellular uptake and endosomal escape of antigens in dendritic cells (DCs) and further significantly activate DCs to mature. Taken together, these results provided more insights that PEI has potential as an adjuvant for H9N2 particle antigen intranasal vaccination. PMID:25673304

  4. A Novel Peptide for Simultaneously Enhanced Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer and Mitigation of Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peili; Mancini, Maria; Sonis, Stephen T.; Fernandez-Martinez, Juan; Liu, Jing; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Toback, F. Gary

    2016-01-01

    We have characterized a novel 21 amino acid-peptide derived from Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18 that mediates growth promotion of cultured normal epithelial cells and mitigates radiation-induced oral mucositis in animal models, while suppressing in vitro function of cancer cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate these dual potential therapeutic effects of AMP peptide in a clinically relevant animal model of head and neck cancer (HNC) by simultaneously assessing its effect on tumor growth and radiation-induced oral mucositis in an orthotopic model of HNC. Bioluminescent SCC-25 HNC cells were injected into the anterior tongue and tumors that formed were then subjected to focal radiation treatment. Tumor size was assessed using an in vivo imaging system, and the extent of oral mucositis was compared between animals treated with AMP peptide or vehicle (controls). Synergism between AMP peptide and radiation therapy was suggested by the finding that tumors in the AMP peptide/radiation therapy cohort demonstrated inhibited growth vs. radiation therapy-only treated tumors, while AMP peptide-treatment delayed the onset and reduced the severity of radiation therapy-induced oral mucositis. A differential effect on apoptosis appears to be one mechanism by which AMP-18 can stimulate growth and repair of injured mucosal epithelial cells while inhibiting proliferation of HNC cells. RNA microarray analysis identified pathways that are differentially targeted by AMP-18 in HNC vs. nontransformed cells. These observations confirm the notion that normal cells and tumor cells may respond differently to common biological stimuli, and that leveraging this finding in the case of AMP-18 may provide a clinically relevant opportunity. PMID:27049860

  5. [Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  6. Grape Seed Extract Dose-Responsively Decreases Disease Severity in a Rat Model of Mucositis; Concomitantly Enhancing Chemotherapeutic Effectiveness in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Ker Yeaw; Howarth, Gordon Stanley; Bastian, Susan Elaine Putnam

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mucositis is a serious disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that results from cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the effects of increasing grape seed extract doses on the severity of chemotherapy in a rat model and its coincident impact on chemotherapeutic effectiveness in colon cancer cells. Design Female Dark Agouti rats were gavaged with grape seed extract (400–1000 mg/kg) or water (day 3–11) and were injected intraperitoneally with 5-Fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) or saline (control) on day 9 to induce mucositis. Daily metabolic data were collected and rats were sacrificed on day 12. Intestinal tissues were collected for histological and myeloperoxidase analyses. Caco-2 cell viability was examined in response to grape seed extract in combination with 5-Fluorouracil by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay. Results Compared with 5-Fluorouracil controls, grape seed extract (400–1000 mg/kg) significantly decreased the histological damage score (P<0.05) in the jejunum. Grape seed extract (1000 mg/kg) increased jejunal crypt depth by 25% (P<0.05) in 5-Fluorouracil treated rats compared to 5-Fluorouracil controls, and attenuated the 5-Fluorouracil -induced reduction of mucosal thickness (25%, P<0.05). Grape seed extract (600 mg/kg) decreased myeloperoxidase activity by 55% (P<0.01) compared to 5-Fluorouracil controls. Grape seed extract was more effective at ameliorating 5-Fluorouracil induced intestinal injury, with effects most pronounced in the proximal jejunum. Grape seed extract (10–25 ug/mL) significantly enhanced the growth-inhibitory effects of 5-Fluorouracil by 26% (P<0.05) in Caco-2 cells and was more potent than 5-Fluorouracil at 50–100 µg/mL. Conclusion Grape seed extract may represent a new therapeutic option to decrease the symptoms of intestinal mucositis while concurrently impacting on the viability of colon cancer cells. PMID:24465501

  7. Gas-solid reaction-rate enhancement by pressure cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, H. Y.; Aboukheshem, M. B.

    1992-06-01

    An experimental study and mathematical modeling of the effects of external pressure cycling on gas-solid reactions have been conducted using the reduction of nickel oxide pellets by hy-drogen. Experiments were carried out in two phases: In the first phase, the intrinsic kinetic parameters were measured, and in the second phase, the gas-solid reaction was carried out under a constant or cycling external pressure. The effects of the frequency and amplitude of pressure cycling were studied at various reaction conditions. Pressure cycling substantially increases the overall rate of the reaction. A mathematical model was developed from the first principles to establish the extent of the overall reaction-rate enhancement and subsequently to analyze the experimental observations. The calculated values from the mathematical model are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects are most pronounced when the overall rate under a constant pressure is controlled by diffusion. Depending on the reaction condition, a very large degree of rate enhancement could be achieved. Furthermore, low-amplitude pressure waves, like acoustic waves, could significantly increase the rates of gas-solid reactions.

  8. Enhancement of mucosal and cellular immune response in mice by vaccination with respiratory syncytial virus DNA encapsulated with transfersome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Ding, Yunzhen; Yang, Yi

    2008-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the principal causes of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children, and currently there is no safe and effective vaccine. DNA vaccines encoding RSV surface glycoproteins are one option being examined. We evaluated the topical delivery of transfersome encapsulated DNA vaccine for its ability to confer protection against RSV challenge in mice and to determine whether such delivery could induce strong and specific immunity against RSV. After topical vaccination with a transfersome encapsulated RSV-F DNA, both RSV-specific mucosal antibody response and IFN-gamma-producing cells were detected. Intramuscular vaccination of naked RSV-F DNA only induced a significant anti-RSV IgG antibody response but no remarkable sIgA antibody and virus-specific cellular activity. Lungs from mice receiving topical vaccination had fewer histopathologic anomalies after RSV challenge than did mice receiving intramuscular vaccination or controls. Immunization with transfersome encapsulated F gene encoding DNA induces mucosal and cellular immune responses in mice that appear to produce protective immunity against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:19115938

  9. An Alphavirus-Based Adjuvant Enhances Serum and Mucosal Antibodies, T Cells, and Protective Immunity to Influenza Virus in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Syed Muaz; Tonkin, Daniel R.; Snead, Andrew T.; Parks, Griffith D.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neonatal immune responses to infection and vaccination are biased toward TH2 at the cost of proinflammatory TH1 responses needed to combat intracellular pathogens. However, upon appropriate stimulation, the neonatal immune system can induce adult-like TH1 responses. Here we report that a new class of vaccine adjuvant is especially well suited to enhance early life immunity. The GVI3000 adjuvant is a safe, nonpropagating, truncated derivative of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus that targets dendritic cells (DCs) in the draining lymph node (DLN) and produces intracellular viral RNA without propagating to other cells. RNA synthesis strongly activates the innate immune response so that in adult animals, codelivery of soluble protein antigens induces robust humoral, cellular, and mucosal responses. The adjuvant properties of GVI3000 were tested in a neonatal BALB/c mouse model using inactivated influenza virus (iFlu). After a single immunization, mice immunized with iFlu with the GVI3000 adjuvant (GVI3000-adjuvanted iFlu) had significantly higher and sustained influenza virus-specific IgG antibodies, mainly IgG2a (TH1), compared to the mice immunized with antigen only. GVI3000 significantly increased antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, primed mucosal immune responses, and enhanced protection from lethal challenge. As seen in adult mice, the GVI3000 adjuvant increased the DC population in the DLNs, caused activation and maturation of DCs, and induced proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the DLNs soon after immunization, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). In summary, the GVI3000 adjuvant induced an adult-like adjuvant effect with an influenza vaccine and has the potential to improve the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of new and existing neonatal vaccines. IMPORTANCE The suboptimal immune responses in early life constitute a

  10. Development of a novel mucosal vaccine against strangles by supercritical enhanced atomization spray-drying of Streptococcus equi extracts and evaluation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Miguel A; Figueiredo, Lara; Padrela, Luís; Cadete, Ana; Tiago, João; Matos, Henrique A; Gomes de Azevedo, Edmundo; Florindo, Helena F; Gonçalves, Lídia M D; Almeida, António J

    2012-10-01

    Strangles is an extremely contagious and sometimes deadly disease of the Equidae. The development of an effective vaccine should constitute an important asset to eradicate this worldwide infectious disease. In this work, we address the development of a mucosal vaccine by using a Supercritical Enhanced Atomization (SEA) spray-drying technique. Aqueous solutions containing the Streptococcus equi extracts and chitosan were converted into nanospheres with no use of organic solvents. The immune response in a mouse model showed that the nanospheres induced a well-balanced Th1 and Th2 response characterized by a unitary ratio between the concentrations of IgG2a and IgG1, together with IgA production. This strategy revealed to be an effective alternative for immunization against S. equi, and therefore, it may constitute a feasible option for production of a strangles vaccine. PMID:22841882

  11. Evaluation of intestinal absorption enhancement and local mucosal toxicity of two promoters. I. Studies in isolated rat and human colonic mucosae.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sam; Kennelly, Rory; Bzik, Victoria A; Baird, Alan W; Wang, Xuexuan; Winter, Desmond; Brayden, David J

    2009-11-01

    The effects of two absorption promoters, (sodium caprate (C(10)) and melittin), on intestinal permeability and viability were measured in intact rat and human colonic epithelia mounted in Ussing chambers. Apical-side addition of C(10) (10 mM) and melittin (10-50 microM) rapidly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increased the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of [(14)C]-mannitol and FITC-dextran-4 kDa (FD4) across colonic mucosae from both species. Effects of C(10) on flux were greater than those of melittin at the concentrations selected. C(10) irreversibly decreased TEER, but the effects of melittin were partially reversible. Enhanced permeability of polar sugars (0.18-70 kDa) in colonic mucosae with C(10) was accompanied by significant release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the luminal surface as well as by inhibition of electrogenic chloride secretion induced by the muscarinic agonist, carbachol (0.1-10 microM). Although melittin did not alter electrogenic chloride secretion in rat or human colonic mucosae, it caused leakage of LDH from rat tissue. Gross histology and electron microscopy of rat and human colonic mucosae demonstrated that each permeation enhancer can induce colonic epithelial damage at concentrations required to increase marker fluxes. C(10) led to more significant mucosal damage than melittin, characterised by sloughing and mucosal erosion. Overall, these results indicate that while C(10) and melittin increase transport of paracellular flux markers across isolated human and rat colonic mucosae in vitro, these effects are associated with some cytotoxicity. PMID:19737613

  12. Oral mucositis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation ...

  13. Reaction enhancement of initially distant scalars by Lagrangian coherent structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Kenneth R. Crimaldi, John P.; Meiss, James D.

    2015-03-15

    Turbulent fluid flows have long been recognized as a superior means of diluting initial concentrations of scalars due to rapid stirring. Conversely, experiments have shown that the structures responsible for this rapid dilution can also aggregate initially distant reactive scalars and thereby greatly enhance reaction rates. Indeed, chaotic flows not only enhance dilution by shearing and stretching but also organize initially distant scalars along transiently attracting regions in the flow. To show the robustness of this phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. We demonstrate that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), as identified by ridges in finite time Lyapunov exponents, are directly responsible for this coalescence of reactive scalar filaments. When highly concentrated filaments coalesce, reaction rates can be orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted in a well-mixed system. This is further supported by an idealized, analytical model that was developed to quantify the competing effects of scalar dilution and coalescence. Chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, therefore have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution, resulting in reaction enhancement.

  14. High Concentrate Diet Induced Mucosal Injuries by Enhancing Epithelial Apoptosis and Inflammatory Response in the Hindgut of Goats

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shiyu; Duanmu, Yongqian; Dong, Haibo; Ni, Yingdong; Chen, Jie; Shen, Xiangzhen; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It is widely accepted that lipopolysaccharide and volatile fatty acids (VFA) accumulate in the digestive tract of ruminants fed diets containing high portions of grain. Compared to the ruminal epithelium, the hindgut epithelium is composed of a monolayer structure that is more “leaky” for lipopolysaccharide and susceptible to organic acid-induced damage. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in epithelial structure, apoptosis and inflammatory response in the hindgut of goats fed a high-concentrate diet for 6 weeks. Experimental Design Eight local Chinese goats with rumen cannulas were randomly assigned to two groups: one group was fed a high-concentrate diet (65% concentrate of dry matter, HC) and the other group was fed a low-concentrate diet (35% concentrate of dry matter, LC) for 6 wks. Ruminal fluid, plasma, and hindgut mucosa tissues were collected. Histological techniques, real-time PCR and western blotting were used to evaluate the tissues structure, cell apoptosis and local inflammation in the hindguts. Results Feeding HC diet for 6 wks resulted in a significant decrease of ruminal pH (p<0.01), and ruminal lipopolysaccharide concentrations were significantly increased in HC goats (p<0.05). Obvious damage was observed to mucosal epithelium of the hindgut and the intercellular tight junctions in HC, but not in LC, goats. The expression of MyD88 and caspase-8 mRNA was increased in colonic epithelium of HC goats compared to LC (p<0.05), and the expression of TLR-4 and caspase-3 showed a tendency to increase. In the cecum, interleukin-1β mRNA expression was decreased (p<0.05), and caspase-3 showed a potential increase (p = 0.07) in HC goats. The level of NF-κB protein was increased in colonic epithelium of HC goats. Caspase-3 activity was elevated in both colon and cecum, whereas caspase-8 activity was statistically increased only in colon. Conclusions Feeding a high-concentrate diet to goats for 6 wks led to hindgut mucosal injuries

  15. Development of a novel adjuvanted nasal vaccine: C48/80 associated with chitosan nanoparticles as a path to enhance mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bento, D; Staats, H F; Gonçalves, T; Borges, O

    2015-06-01

    In a time in which mucosal vaccines development has been delayed by the lack of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants, the combination of adjuvants has started to be explored as a strategy to obtain potent vaccine formulations. This study describes a novel adjuvant combination as an effective approach for a nasal vaccine - the association of the mast cell activator compound 48/80 with chitosan based nanoparticles. It was hypothesized that mucoadhesive nanoparticles would promote the cellular uptake and prolong the antigen residence time on nasal cavity. Simultaneously, mast cell activation would promote a local microenvironment favorable to the development of an immune response. To test this hypothesis, two different C48/80 loaded nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared: Chitosan-C48/80 NP (Chi-C48/80 NP) and Chitosan/Alginate-C48/80 NP (Chi/Alg-C48/80 NP). The potential as a vaccine adjuvant of the two delivery systems was evaluated and directly compared. Both formulations had a mean size near 500nm and a positive charge; however, Chi-C48/80 NP was a more effective adjuvant delivery system when compared with Chi/Alg-C48/80 NP or C48/80 alone. Chi-C48/80 NP activated mast cells at a greater extent, were better internalized by antigen presenting cells than Chi/Alg-C48/80 NP and successfully enhanced the nasal residence time of a model antigen. Superiority of Chi-C48/80 NP as adjuvant was also observed in vivo. Therefore, nasal immunization of mice with Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) adsorbed on Chi-C48/80 NP elicited high levels of serum anti-PA neutralizing antibodies and a more balanced Th1/Th2 profile than C48/80 in solution or Chi/Alg-C48/80 NP. The incorporation of C48/80 within Chi NP also promoted a mucosal immunity greater than all the other adjuvanted groups tested, showing that the combination of a mast cell activator and chitosan NP could be a promising strategy for nasal immunization. PMID:25818119

  16. A critical role of T follicular helper cells in human mucosal anti-influenza response that can be enhanced by immunological adjuvant CpG-DNA.

    PubMed

    Aljurayyan, A N; Sharma, R; Upile, N; Beer, H; Vaughan, C; Xie, C; Achar, P; Ahmed, M S; McNamara, P S; Gordon, S B; Zhang, Q

    2016-08-01

    T Follicular helper cells (TFH) are considered critical for B cell antibody response, and recent efforts have focused on promoting TFH in order to enhance vaccine efficacy. We studied the frequency and function of TFH in nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT) from children and adults, and its role in anti-influenza antibody response following stimulation by a live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) or an inactivated seasonal virus antigen (sH1N1). We further studied whether CpG-DNA promotes TFH and by which enhances anti-influenza response. We showed NALT from children aged 1.5-10 years contained abundant TFH, suggesting efficient priming of TFH during early childhood. Stimulation by LAIV induced a marked increase in TFH that correlated with a strong production of anti-hemagglutinin (HA) IgA/IgG/IgM antibodies in tonsillar cells. Stimulation by the inactivated sH1N1 antigen induced a small increase in TFH which was markedly enhanced by CpG-DNA, accompanied by enhanced anti-HA antibody responses. In B cell co-culture experiment, anti-HA responses were only seen in the presence of TFH, and addition of plasmacytoid dendritic cell to TFH-B cell co-culture enhanced the TFH-mediated antibody production following CpG-DNA and sH1N1 antigen stimulation. Induction of TFH differentiation from naïve T cells was also shown following the stimulation. Our results support a critical role of TFH in human mucosal anti-influenza antibody response. Use of an adjuvant such as CpG-DNA that has the capacity to promote TFH by which to enhance antigen-induced antibody responses in NALT tissue may have important implications for future vaccination strategies against respiratory pathogens. PMID:27247060

  17. Enhanced Diffusion of Enzymes that Catalyze Exothermic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes have been recently found to exhibit enhanced diffusion due to their catalytic activities. A recent experiment [C. Riedel et al., Nature (London) 517, 227 (2015)] has found evidence that suggests this phenomenon might be controlled by the degree of exothermicity of the catalytic reaction involved. Four mechanisms that can lead to this effect, namely, self-thermophoresis, boost in kinetic energy, stochastic swimming, and collective heating are critically discussed, and it is shown that only the last two can be strong enough to account for the observations. The resulting quantitative description is used to examine the biological significance of the effect.

  18. Mucosal vaccination with formalin-inactivated avian metapneumovirus Subtype C reduces clinical signs of disease but enhances local pathology of turkeys following challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were performed to determine if mucosal vaccination with inactivated avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subtype C protected turkey poults from clinical disease and virus replication following mucosal challenge. Although decreases in clinical disease were observed in vaccinated groups, the vaccine...

  19. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Anand, M.; Carvill, B.

    1995-09-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process, the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The consequences of SER are: (1) reformation reaction at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than conventional SMR (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (2) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 99+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (3) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The early focus of the program will be on the identification of an adsorbent/chemisorbent for CO{sub 2} and on the demonstration of the SER concept for SMR in our state-of-the-art bench scale process. In the latter stages, a pilot plant will be built to scale-up the technology and to develop engineering data. The program has just been initiated and no significant results for SMR will be reported. However, results demonstrating the basic principles and process schemes of SER technology will be presented for reverse water gas shift reaction as the model reaction. If successful, this technology will be commercialized by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and used in its existing hydrogen business. APCI is the world leader in merchant hydrogen production for a wide range of industrial applications.

  20. Enhanced reaction rates in NDP analysis with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R. Gregory

    2014-04-15

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) makes accessible quantitative information on a few isotopic concentration profiles ranging from the surface into the sample a few micrometers. Because the candidate analytes for NDP are few, there is little interference encountered. Furthermore, neutrons have no charge so mixed chemical states in the sample are of no direct concern. There are a few nuclides that exhibit large probabilities for neutron scattering. The effect of neutron scattering on NDP measurements has not previously been evaluated as a basis for either enhancing the reaction rates or as a source of measurement error. Hydrogen is a common element exhibiting large neutron scattering probability found in or around sample volumes being analyzed by NDP. A systematic study was conducted to determine the degree of signal change when neutron scattering occurs during analysis. The relative signal perturbation was evaluated for materials of varied neutron scattering probability, concentration, total mass, and geometry. Signal enhancements up to 50% are observed when the hydrogen density is high and in close proximity to the region of analysis with neutron beams of sub thermal energies. Greater signal enhancements for the same neutron number density are reported for thermal neutron beams. Even adhesive tape used to position the sample produces a measureable signal enhancement. Because of the shallow volume, negligible distortion of the NDP measured profile shape is encountered from neutron scattering.

  1. Mucosal dendritic cells shape mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun-Young; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key modulators that shape the immune system. In mucosal tissues, DCs act as surveillance systems to sense infection and also function as professional antigen-presenting cells that stimulate the differentiation of naive T and B cells. On the basis of their molecular expression, DCs can be divided into several subsets with unique functions. In this review, we focus on intestinal DC subsets and their function in bridging the innate signaling and adaptive immune systems to maintain the homeostasis of the intestinal immune environment. We also review the current strategies for manipulating mucosal DCs for the development of efficient mucosal vaccines to protect against infectious diseases. PMID:24626170

  2. Porous platinum mesoflowers with enhanced activity for methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Lina; Wang Wenjin; Hong Feng; Yang Shengchun; You Hongjun; Fang Jixiang; Ding Bingjun

    2012-07-15

    Porous Pt and Pt-Ag alloy mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesized using Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic reaction. The silver content in Pt-Ag alloys can be facilely controlled by nitric acid treatment. And the pure Pt MFs can be obtained by selective removal of silver element from Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} MFs electrochemically. Both Pt{sub 45}Ag{sub 55}, Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} and pure Pt show a high catalytic performance in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Especially, pure Pt MFs exhibited a 2 to 3 times current density enhancement in MOR compared with the commercial used Pt black, which can be attributed to their porous nanostructure with 3-dimentional nature and small crystal sizes. - Graphical Abstract: The CVs of MOR on Pt (red) and Pt black (green) catalysts in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} and 0.5 M CH{sub 3}OH for specific mass current. The insert shows the SEM images of two porous Pt MFs. Platinum mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesised with Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic replacement. The porous Pt MFs exhibited a more than 3 times enhancement in electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction compared the commercial used Pt black. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous Pt and Pt-Ag mesoflowers (MFs) were synthesized using Ag MFs sacrifical template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt MFs presents an improved catalytic activity in MOR compared with Pt black. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provided a facile approach for the development of high performance Pt electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  3. Computerized approaches to enhance understanding of organic reaction mechanisms: CAN reaction mechanisms and CPLEX prelaboratory methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shammari, Abdulrahman G. Alhamzani

    2008-10-01

    Two approaches to enhance the understanding of organic reaction mechanisms are described. First, a new method for teaching organic reaction mechanisms that can be used in a Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) environment is proposed and tested (Chapter 1). The method concentrates upon the important intermediate structures, which are assumed to be on the reaction coordinate, and which can be evaluated and graded by currently available computer techniques. At the same time, the "curved arrows" that show the electron flow in a reaction mechanism are neglected, since they cannot be evaluated and graded with currently available computer techniques. By allowing student practice for learning organic reaction mechanisms using the Curved Arrow Neglect (CAN) method within a "Practice Makes Perfect" CAI method, student performance in the drawing of traditional reaction mechanisms, in which students had to include the "curved arrows" on their written classroom exams, was significantly enhanced. Second, computerized prelaboratory experiments (CPLEX) for organic chemistry laboratory 1 & 2 courses have been created, used, and evaluated (Chapters 2 and 3). These computerized prelabs are unique because they combine both "dry lab" actions with detailed animations of the actual chemistry occurring at the molecular level. The "dry lab" serves to simulate the actual physical manipulations of equipment and chemicals that occur in the laboratory experiment through the use of drag-and-drop computer technology. At the same time, these physical actions are accompanied on a separate part of the computer screen by animations showing the chemistry at the molecular level that is occurring in the experiment. These CPLEX modules were made into Internet accessible modules. The students were allowed to access the CPLEX modules prior to performing the actual laboratory experiment. A detailed evaluation of students' perception of the modules was accomplished via survey methodology during the entire

  4. Palliation of radiation-related mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, B.R.; Spektor, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oral mucositis associated with head and neck radiotherapy can substantially hinder completion of cancer therapy. Alleviation of this often severe stomatitis can provide enhanced patient comfort and facilitate appropriate care. A double-blind format was used in a pilot project to measure, against a control rinse, the effectiveness of an oral rinse consisting of hydrocortisone, nystatin, tetracycline, and diphenhydramine in controlling radiation-related mucositis. A combination of clinical evaluation and patient responses to a questionnaire was used to judge the results of the topical medications. Patients using the experimental medication developed less mucositis than did patients in the control group.

  5. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.; Nataraj, S.; Rao, M.; Sircar, S.

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, its hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.

  6. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  7. Exploiting Mucosal Immunity for Antiviral Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-20

    Mucosal surfaces provide a remarkably effective barrier against potentially dangerous pathogens. Therefore, enhancing mucosal immunity through vaccines-strengthening that first line of defense-holds significant promise for reducing the burden of viral diseases. The large and varied class of viral pathogens, however, continues to present thorny challenges to vaccine development. Two primary difficulties exist: Viruses exhibit a stunning diversity of strategies for evading the host immune response, and even when we understand the nature of effective immune protection against a given virus, eliciting that protection is technically challenging. Only a few mucosal vaccines have surmounted these obstacles thus far. Recent developments, however, could greatly improve vaccine design. In this review, we first sketch out our understanding of mucosal immunity and then compare the herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and influenza virus to illustrate the distinct challenges of developing successful vaccines and to outline potential solutions. PMID:27168245

  8. Why mucosal health?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  9. Intestinal inflammation and mucosal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Romero-Calvo, Isabel; Mascaraque, Cristina; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal mucosal barrier function is the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules while preserving the ability to absorb nutrients. The central element is the epithelial layer, which physically separates the lumen and the internal milieu and is in charge of vectorial transport of ions, nutrients, and other substances. The secretion of mucus-forming mucins, sIgA, and antimicrobial peptides reinforces the mucosal barrier on the extraepithelial side, while a variety of immune cells contributes to mucosal defense in the inner side. Thus, the mucosal barrier is of physical, biochemical, and immune nature. In addition, the microbiota may be viewed as part of this system because of the mutual influence occurring between the host and the luminal microorganisms. Alteration of the mucosal barrier function with accompanying increased permeability and/or bacterial translocation has been linked with a variety of conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease. Genetic and environmental factors may converge to evoke a defective function of the barrier, which in turn may lead to overt inflammation of the intestine as a result of an exacerbated immune reaction toward the microbiota. According to this hypothesis, inflammatory bowel disease may be both precipitated and treated by either stimulation or downregulation of the different elements of the mucosal barrier, with the outcome depending on timing, the cell type affected, and other factors. In this review, we cover briefly the elements of the barrier and their involvement in functional defects and the resulting phenotype. PMID:25222662

  10. Intranasal Mucosal Boosting with an Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccine Markedly Enhances the Protection of BCG-Primed Guinea Pigs against Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zhou; McFarland, Christine T.; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Izzo, Angelo; Wang, Jun; McMurray, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recombinant adenovirus-vectored (Ad) tuberculosis (TB) vaccine platform has demonstrated great potential to be used either as a stand-alone or a boost vaccine in murine models. However, Ad TB vaccine remains to be evaluated in a more relevant and sensitive guinea pig model of pulmonary TB. Many vaccine candidates shown to be effective in murine models have subsequently failed to pass the test in guinea pig models. Methods and Findings Specific pathogen-free guinea pigs were immunized with BCG, AdAg85A intranasally (i.n), AdAg85A intramuscularly (i.m), BCG boosted with AdAg85A i.n, BCG boosted with AdAg85A i.m, or treated only with saline. The animals were then infected by a low-dose aerosol of M. tuberculosis (M.tb). At the specified times, the animals were sacrificed and the levels of infection in the lung and spleen were assessed. In separate studies, the long-term disease outcome of infected animals was monitored until the termination of this study. Immunization with Ad vaccine alone had minimal beneficial effects. Immunization with BCG alone and BCG prime-Ad vaccine boost regimens significantly reduced the level of M.tb infection in the tissues to a similar extent. However, while BCG alone prolonged the survival of infected guinea pigs, the majority of BCG-immunized animals succumbed by 53 weeks post-M.tb challenge. In contrast, intranasal or intramuscular Ad vaccine boosting of BCG-primed animals markedly improved the survival rate with 60% of BCG/Ad i.n- and 40% of BCG/Ad i.m-immunized guinea pigs still surviving by 74 weeks post-aerosol challenge. Conclusions Boosting, particularly via the intranasal mucosal route, with AdAg85A vaccine is able to significantly enhance the long-term survival of BCG-primed guinea pigs following pulmonary M.tb challenge. Our results thus support further evaluation of this viral-vectored TB vaccine in clinical trials. PMID:19516906

  11. Pressure-enhanced dehydrogenation reaction of the LiBH4-YH3 composite.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kee-Bum; Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Cho, Young Whan; Oh, Kyu Hwan

    2011-09-21

    The increase in hydrogen back pressure unexpectedly enhances the overall dehydrogenation reaction rate of the 4LiBH(4) + YH(3) composite significantly. Also, argon back pressure has a similar influence on the composite. Gas back pressure seems to enhance the dehydrogenation reaction by kinetically suppressing the formation of the diborane by-product. PMID:21811726

  12. Roles of M cells in infection and mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system plays a crucial part in the control of infection. Exposure of humans and animals to potential pathogens generally occurs through mucosal surfaces, thus, strategies that target the mucosa seem rational and efficient vaccination measures. Vaccination through the mucosal immune system can induce effective systemic immune responses simultaneously with mucosal immunity compared with parenteral vaccination. M cells are capable of transporting luminal antigens to the underlying lymphoid tissues and can be exploited by pathogens as an entry portal to invade the host. Therefore, targeting M-cell-specific molecules might enhance antigen entry, initiate the immune response, and induce protection against mucosal pathogens. Here, we outline our understanding of the distribution and function of M cells, and summarize the advances in mucosal vaccine strategies that target M cells. PMID:25483705

  13. Gasoline-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.L.; Swanson, B.Z. Jr.; Lutins, N.D.

    1980-02-01

    Gasoline-induced mucositis may become more common because of fuel shortages or increased fuel cost. Dentists should, therefore, consider this oral irritant in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

  14. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  15. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  16. Mucosal delivery of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, G; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1999-09-01

    Oral delivery represents one of the most pursued approaches for large-scale human vaccination. Due to the different characteristics of mucosal immune response, as compared with systemic response, oral immunization requires particular methods of antigen preparation and selective strategies of adjuvanticity. In this paper, we describe the preparation and use of genetically detoxified bacterial toxins as mucosal adjuvants and envisage the possibility of their future exploitation for human oral vaccines. PMID:10525451

  17. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: Mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface.

  18. [Immunoglobulin for prevention of radiogenic mucositis].

    PubMed

    Mose, S; Adamietz, I A; Thilmann, C; Saran, F; Heyd, R; Knecht, R; Böttcher, H D

    1995-07-01

    Among various therapies administered during radiation-induced mucositis, treatment with immunoglobulin has proven clinically successful. In this study the efficacy of prophylactic applications of immunoglobulin was investigated from January 1992 through August 1993. Forty-two patients with histologically-proven head and neck cancer were given postoperative radiation treatment. In cases with macroscopic tumor residues or inoperability, combined radio-chemotherapy was given. This included 51.3 Gy at 1.9 Gy 5x/week, boosted to 10-26 Gy at 2 Gy 5x/week and carboplatin 60 mg/m2 at days 1-5 and 29-33. Panthenol (4x10 ml/day) and nystatin (4 x 1 ml/day) were given to 20 patients as prophylactic treatment for mucositis. Twenty-two subsequent patients also received intramuscular 800 mg (5 ml) human immunoglobulin (1x/week). According to the Seegenschmiedt/Sauer classification the extent of mucositis was determined 3x/week. Comparison of the distribution of maximal mucositis revealed a slightly more severe mucosal reaction in the control group (n.s.). Analysis of the mean degree of mucositis in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (p = 0.031) related to the whole collective and patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy while no effect of immunoglobulin was found in patients treated by radiation alone. In the immunoglobulin-treated-group, the time from the beginning of therapy to the first interruption was prolonged 5 days (37.5 +/- 13.1 vs. 42.7 +/- 13.3 days), but this difference was not significant. Although prophylactic application of immunoglobulin seemed to lower the degree of radiation-induced mucositis, this effect was less significant when compared to the immunoglobulin given in a therapeutic manner. PMID:7672999

  19. Humoral immunity induced by mucosal and/or systemic SIV-specific vaccine platforms suggest novel combinatorial approaches for enhancing responses

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Tuero, Iskra; Mohanram, Venkatramanan; Musich, Thomas; Pegu, Poonam; Valentin, Antonio; Sui, Yongjun; Rosati, Margherita; Bear, Jenifer; Venzon, David J.; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Pilkington, Guy R.; Liyanage, Namal P.M.; Demberg, Thorsten; Gordon, Shari N.; Wang, Yichuan; Hogg, Alison E.; Frey, Blake; Patterson, L. Jean; DiPasquale, Janet; Montefiori, David C.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Reed, Steven G.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Franchini, Genoveffa; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial HIV/SIV vaccine approaches targeting multiple arms of the immune system might improve protective efficacy. We compared SIV-specific humoral immunity induced in rhesus macaques by five vaccine regimens. Systemic regimens included ALVAC-SIVenv priming and Env boosting (ALVAC/Env); DNA immunization; and DNA plus Env co-immunization (DNA&Env). RepAd/Env combined mucosal replication-competent Ad-env priming with systemic Env boosting. A Peptide/Env regimen, given solely intrarectally, included HIV/SIV peptides followed by MVA-env and Env boosts. Serum antibodies mediating neutralizing, phagocytic and ADCC activities were induced by ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env and DNA&Env vaccines. Memory B cells and plasma cells were maintained in bone marrow. RepAd/Env vaccination induced early SIV-specific IgA in rectal secretions before Env boosting, although mucosal IgA and IgG responses were readily detected at necropsy in ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env, DNA&Env and DNA vaccinated animals. Our results suggest combined RepAd priming with ALVAC/Env or DNA&Env regimen boosting might induce potent, functional, long-lasting systemic and mucosal SIV-specific antibodies. PMID:24907411

  20. Humoral immunity induced by mucosal and/or systemic SIV-specific vaccine platforms suggests novel combinatorial approaches for enhancing responses.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Tuero, Iskra; Mohanram, Venkatramanan; Musich, Thomas; Pegu, Poonam; Valentin, Antonio; Sui, Yongjun; Rosati, Margherita; Bear, Jenifer; Venzon, David J; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Pilkington, Guy R; Liyanage, Namal P M; Demberg, Thorsten; Gordon, Shari N; Wang, Yichuan; Hogg, Alison E; Frey, Blake; Patterson, L Jean; DiPasquale, Janet; Montefiori, David C; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Reed, Steven G; Berzofsky, Jay A; Franchini, Genoveffa; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2014-08-01

    Combinatorial HIV/SIV vaccine approaches targeting multiple arms of the immune system might improve protective efficacy. We compared SIV-specific humoral immunity induced in rhesus macaques by five vaccine regimens. Systemic regimens included ALVAC-SIVenv priming and Env boosting (ALVAC/Env); DNA immunization; and DNA plus Env co-immunization (DNA&Env). RepAd/Env combined mucosal replication-competent Ad-env priming with systemic Env boosting. A Peptide/Env regimen, given solely intrarectally, included HIV/SIV peptides followed by MVA-env and Env boosts. Serum antibodies mediating neutralizing, phagocytic and ADCC activities were induced by ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env and DNA&Env vaccines. Memory B cells and plasma cells were maintained in the bone marrow. RepAd/Env vaccination induced early SIV-specific IgA in rectal secretions before Env boosting, although mucosal IgA and IgG responses were readily detected at necropsy in ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env, DNA&Env and DNA vaccinated animals. Our results suggest that combined RepAd priming with ALVAC/Env or DNA&Env regimen boosting might induce potent, functional, long-lasting systemic and mucosal SIV-specific antibodies. PMID:24907411

  1. CpG DNA is a potent enhancer of systemic and mucosal immune responses against hepatitis B surface antigen with intranasal administration to mice.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1998-11-01

    Mucosal immunity is difficult to induce with subunit vaccines unless such vaccines are administered with a mucosal adjuvant such as cholera toxin (CT); however, CT is toxic in humans. Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG) are potent adjuvants for the induction of Th1-like systemic immune responses against parenterally delivered proteins. Here, we show in mice that intranasal delivery of hepatitis B surface Ag, which alone has no effect, elicits good immune responses when given with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and/or CT. Overall, CpG is superior to CT for the induction of humoral and cell-mediated systemic immunity as well as mucosal immune responses (IgA) at local (lung) and distant (feces) sites. Furthermore, CpG and CT act synergistically, giving stronger responses than those observed with 10 times more of either adjuvant alone. Ab isotypes were predominantly IgG1 (Th2-like) with CT, mixed IgG1/IgG2a (Th0) with CpG, and predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) with CpG and CT together. PMID:9794366

  2. A novel retinoic acid, catechin hydrate and mustard oil-based emulsion for enhanced cytokine and antibody responses against multiple strains of HIV-1 following mucosal and systemic vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Non-replicating protein- or DNA-based antigens generally require immune-enhancing adjuvants and delivery systems. It has been particularly difficult to raise antibodies against gp120 of HIV-1, which constitutes an important approach in HIV vaccine design. While almost all effort in adjuvant research has focused on mimicking the pathogens and the danger signals they engender in the host, relatively little effort has been spent on nutritive approaches. In this study, a new nutritive immune-enhancing delivery system (NIDS) composed of vitamin A, a polyphenol-flavonoid catechin hydrate, and mustard oil was tested for its adjuvant effect in immune responses against the gp120 protein of HIV-1CN54. Following a combination of two mucosal and two systemic vaccinations of mice, we found significant enhancement of both local and systemic antibodies as well as cytokine responses. These data have important implications for vaccine and adjuvant design against HIV-1 and other pathogens. PMID:21272602

  3. Enhanced humoral and mucosal immune responses after intranasal immunization with chimeric multiple antigen peptide of LcrV antigen epitopes of Yersinia pestis coupled to palmitate in mice.

    PubMed

    Uppada, Srijayaprakash Babu; Bhat, Ajaz Ahmed; Sah, Anil; Donthamshetty, Rao Nageswara

    2011-11-21

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the most deadly disease plague. F1 and V antigens are the major vaccine candidates. Six protective epitopes of V antigen of varying length (15-25aa) were assembled on a lysine backbone as multiple antigen peptide (MAP) using standard Fmoc chemistry. Palmitate was coupled at amino terminus end. Amino acid analysis, SDS-PAGE, immunoblot and immunoreactivity proved the authenticity of MAP. MAP was immunized intranasally encapsulated in PLGA (polylactide-co-glycolide) microspheres and with/without/adjuvants murabutide and CpG ODN 1826 (CpG), in three strains of mice. Humoral and mucosal immune responses were studied till day 120 and memory response was checked after immunization with native V antigen on day 120. Epitope specific serum and mucosal washes IgG, IgA, IgG subclasses and specific activity were measured by indirect ELISA and sandwich ELISA, respectively. IgG and IgA peak antibody titers of all the MAP construct formulations in sera were ranging from 71,944 to 360,578 and 4493 to 28,644, respectively. MAP with CpG showed significantly high (p<0.0001) antibody titers ranging from 101,690 to 360,578 for IgG and 28,644 for IgA. Mucosal peak IgG and IgA titers were ranging from 1425 to 8072 and 1425 to 7183, respectively in intestinal washes and 799-4528 and 566-4027, respectively in lung washes. MAP with CpG showed significantly high (p<0.001) SIgA titers of 8000 in lung and 16,000 in intestinal washes. IgG isotyping revealed IgG2a/IgG1 ratio>1 with CpG. Serum and mucosal antipeptide IgG and IgA specific activities correlated well with antibody titers. All the constituent peptides contributed towards immune response. Structural analysis of MAP revealed little or no interaction between the peptides. Present study showed MAP to be highly immunogenic with high and long lasting antibody titers in serum and mucosal washes with good recall response with/without CpG as an adjuvant which can be used for vaccine development for

  4. The pathophysiology of extracellular hemoglobin associated with enhanced oxidative reactions

    PubMed Central

    Rifkind, Joseph M.; Mohanty, Joy G.; Nagababu, Enika

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) continuously undergoes autoxidation producing superoxide which dismutates into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and is a potential source for subsequent oxidative reactions. Autoxidation is most pronounced under hypoxic conditions in the microcirculation and for unstable dimers formed at reduced Hb concentrations. In the red blood cell (RBC), oxidative reactions are inhibited by an extensive antioxidant system. For extracellular Hb, whether from hemolysis of RBCs and/or the infusion of Hb-based blood substitutes, the oxidative reactions are not completely neutralized by the available antioxidant system. Un-neutralized H2O2 oxidizes ferrous and ferric Hbs to Fe(IV)-ferrylHb and OxyferrylHb, respectively. FerrylHb further reacts with H2O2 producing heme degradation products and free iron. OxyferrylHb, in addition to Fe(IV) contains a free radical that can undergo additional oxidative reactions. Fe(III)Hb produced during Hb autoxidation also readily releases heme, an additional source for oxidative stress. These oxidation products are a potential source for oxidative reactions in the plasma, but to a greater extent when the lower molecular weight Hb dimers are taken up into cells and tissues. Heme and oxyferryl have been shown to have a proinflammatory effect further increasing their potential for oxidative stress. These oxidative reactions contribute to a number of pathological situations including atherosclerosis, kidney malfunction, sickle cell disease, and malaria. The toxic effects of extracellular Hb are of particular concern with hemolytic anemia where there is an increase in hemolysis. Hemolysis is further exacerbated in various diseases and their treatments. Blood transfusions are required whenever there is an appreciable decrease in RBCs due to hemolysis or blood loss. It is, therefore, essential that the transfused blood, whether stored RBCs or the blood obtained by an Autologous Blood Recovery System from the patient, do not further increase

  5. Experiments concerning the laser-enhanced reaction between vibrationally excited O3 and NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, K.-K.; Cool, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    The enhancement in reaction rate between O3 and NO is studied for the case of O3 vibrationally excited by a CO2 laser. Chemiluminescence observations of a vibrationally excited and an electronically excited nitrogen dioxide reaction product provide information on the separate contributions to the overall reaction rate of these two reactive channels. The contribution of the stretching and bending modes of O3 to the reaction rate enhancement is also discussed. In addition, consideration is given to the nonreactive vibrational deactivation of vibrationally excited O3.

  6. Plasmon-assisted chemical reactions revealed by high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shuaicheng; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Zhenglong; Xu, Hongxing; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is the technique that combines the nanoscale spatial resolution of a scanning probe microscope and the highly sensitive Raman spectroscopy enhanced by the surface plasmons. It is suitable for chemical analysis at nanometer scale. Recently, TERS exhibited powerful potential in analyzing the chemical reactions at nanoscale. The high sensitivity and spatial resolution of TERS enable us to learn the reaction processes more clearly. More importantly, the chemical reaction in TERS is assisted by surface plasmons, which provides us an optical method to manipulate the chemical reactions at nanoscale. Here using our home-built high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) setup, we successfully observed the plasmon-assisted molecule dimerization and dissociation reactions. In HV-TERS system, under laser illumination, 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) molecules can be dimerized to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), and dissociation reaction occurs for malachite green (MG) molecules. Using our HV-TERS setup, the dynamic processes of the reactions are clearly revealed. The chemical reactions can be manipulated by controlling the plasmon intensity through changing the power of the incident laser, the tunneling current and the bias voltage. We also investigated the role of plasmonic thermal effect in the reactions by measuring both the Stokes and anti- Stokes Raman peaks. Our findings extend the applications of TERS, which can help to study the chemical reactions and understand the dynamic processes at single molecular level, and even design molecules by the plasmon-assisted chemical reactions.

  7. Enhancing Paradynamics for QM/MM Sampling of Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Jerônimo; Kupchencko, Ilya; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-03-10

    Despite the enormous increase in computer power, it is still extremely challenging to obtain computationally converging sampling of ab initio QM/MM (QM(ai)/MM) free energy surfaces in condensed phases. The sampling problem can be significantly reduced by the use of the reference potential paradynamics (PD) approach, but even this approach still requires major computer time in studies of enzymatic reactions. To further reduce the sampling problem we developed here a new PD version where we use an empirical valence bond reference potential that has a minimum rather than a maximum at the transition state region of the target potential (this is accomplished conveniently by shifting the EVB of the product state). Hence, we can map the TS region in a more efficient way. Here, we introduce and validate the inverted EVB PD approach. The validation involves the study of the S(N)2 step of the reaction catalyzed by haloakene dehalogenase (DhlA) and the GTP hydrolysis in the RasGAP system. In addition, we have also studied the corresponding reaction in water for each of the systems described here and the reaction involving trimethylsulfonium and dimethylamine in solution. The results are encouraging and the new strategy appears to provide a powerful way of evaluating QM(ai)/MM activation free energies. PMID:26866994

  8. Enhancing Research Productivity in Counseling Psychology: Reactions to Three Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Nancy E.

    2005-01-01

    The present reaction responds to the three research-related core articles in the Scientific Forum of the May 2005 issue of "The Counseling Psychologist." I agree that too few of our studies are based on theories or models. Using the nomological network, I suggest how research ideas can more readily be depicted to allow model and theory testing. I…

  9. Enhanced stereocontrol in Diels-Alder reactions of chiral dienols.

    PubMed

    Cayzer, Tory N; Miller, Natalie A; Paddon-Row, Michael N; Sherburn, Michael S

    2006-05-21

    This combined experimental-computational investigation demonstrates that the presence of a removable bromine substituent on a diene leads to complete pi-diastereofacial and endo/exo stereoselection in both intermolecular and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions. The influence of the bromine upon stereoselectivity is dramatic: the cycloaddition of nonbrominated precursor 18E, for example, gives four diastereomeric products in a 55:13:16:16 ratio; the bromine-containing analogue gives one stereoisomer within the limits of detection. The examination of B3LYP/6-31+G(d) transition structures allows an interpretation of these experimental findings. A method for the completely stereoselective synthesis of complimentary diastereomeric products (30Z and 31Z) from the same simple starting materials (28 and 2) is reported. Discrepancies between calculation and experiment in an earlier investigation into the Diels-Alder reaction are explained. PMID:16688346

  10. Fluctuation enhanced electrochemical reaction rates at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Vladimir; Krischer, Katharina

    2010-03-01

    The electrode potential constitutes a dynamical variable whenever an electrode is resistively coupled to the electric circuit. We show that at the nanoscale, the discreteness and stochasticity of an electron transfer event causes fluctuations of the electrode potential that render all elementary electrochemical reactions to be faster on a nanoelectrode than predicted by the macroscopic (Butler-Volmer) electrochemical kinetics. This phenomenon is substantiated by means of a generalized (electro)chemical master equation. PMID:20176966

  11. Mucosal vaccines: non toxic derivatives of LT and CT as mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Pizza, M; Giuliani, M M; Fontana, M R; Monaci, E; Douce, G; Dougan, G; Mills, K H; Rappuoli, R; Del Giudice, G

    2001-03-21

    Most vaccines are still delivered by injection. Mucosal vaccination would increase compliance and decrease the risk of spread of infectious diseases due to contaminated syringes. However, most vaccines are unable to induce immune responses when administered mucosally, and require the use of strong adjuvant on effective delivery systems. Cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli enterotoxin (LT) are powerful mucosal adjuvants when co-administered with soluble antigens. However, their use in humans is hampered by their extremely high toxicity. During the past few years, site-directed mutagenesis has permitted the generation of LT and CT mutants fully non toxic or with dramatically reduced toxicity, which still retain their strong adjuvanticity at the mucosal level. Among these mutants, are LTK63 (serine-to-lysine substitution at position 63 in the A subunit) and LTR72 (alanine-to-arginine substitution at position 72 in the A subunit). The first is fully non toxic, whereas the latter retains some residual enzymatic activity. Both of them are extremely active as mucosal adjuvants, being able to induce very high titers of antibodies specific for the antigen with which they are co-administered. Both mutants have now been tested as mucosal adjuvants in different animal species using a wide variety of antigens. Interestingly, mucosal delivery (nasal or oral) of antigens together with LTK63 or LTR72 mutants also conferred protection against challenge in appropriate animal models (e.g. tetanus, Helicobacter pylori, pertussis, pneumococci, influenza, etc). In conclusion, these LTK63 and LTR72 mutants are safe adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines at the mucosal level, and will be tested soon in humans. PMID:11257389

  12. Infrared chemiluminescence study of the reaction Cl + HI yielding HCl + I at enhanced collision energies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, L. T.; Horne, D. S.; Polanyi, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Performed chemiluminescence and beam experiments show a markedly increased efficiency of conversion of the reaction energy into vibration and a markedly enhanced tendency for forward scattering in the reaction Cl + HI yields HCl + I as compared with H + Cl2 yields HCl + Cl. These differences appear to be due predominantly to the difference in the masses involved.

  13. Enhanced mucosal immune responses against tetanus toxoid using novel delivery system comprised of chitosan-functionalized gold nanoparticles and botanical adjuvant: characterization, immunogenicity, and stability assessment.

    PubMed

    Barhate, Ganesh; Gautam, Manish; Gairola, Sunil; Jadhav, Suresh; Pokharkar, Varsha

    2014-11-01

    Approaches based on combined use of delivery systems and adjuvants are being favored to maximize efficient mucosal delivery of antigens. Here, we describe a novel delivery system comprised of chitosan-functionalized gold nanoparticles (CsAuNPs) and saponin-containing botanical adjuvant; Asparagus racemosus extract (ARE) for oral delivery of tetanus toxoid (TT). A significant increase in TT-specific IgG (34.53-fold) and IgA (43.75-fold) was observed when TT-CsAuNPs were formulated with ARE (TT-ARE-CsAuNPs). The local IgA immune responses for TT also showed a significant increase (106.5-fold in intestine washes and 99.74-fold in feces) with ARE-based formulations as compared with plain TT group. No effect of ARE was observed on size, charge, and loading properties of CsAuNPs. Additionally, no effect of ARE and CsAuNPs was observed on antigenicity and secondary structure of TT as determined by fluorescence, circular dichroism, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The stability studies demonstrated excellent stability profile of formulation at recommended storage conditions. The study establishes the possible role of immunomodulatory adjuvants in particulate delivery systems for mucosal delivery of vaccines. PMID:25219511

  14. Tension-Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Vanadium Disulfide Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Water electrolysis is an efficient way for hydrogen production. Finding efficient, cheap, and eco-friendly electrocatalysts is essential to the development of this technology. In the work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of tension on the hydrogen evolution reaction of a novel electrocatalyst, vanadium disulfide (VS2) monolayer. Two electrocatalytic processes, individual and collective processes, are investigated. We show that the catalytic ability of VS2 monolayer at higher hydrogen coverage can be efficiently improved by escalating tension. We find that the individual process is easier to occur in a wide range of hydrogen coverage and the collective process is possible at a certain hydrogen coverage under the same tension. The best hydrogen evolution reaction with near-zero Gibbs free energy can be achieved by tuning tension. We further show that the change of catalytic activity with tension and hydrogen coverage is induced by the change of free carrier density around the Fermi level, that is, higher carrier density, better catalytic performance. It is expected that tension can be a simple way to improve the catalytic activity, leading to the design of novel electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production from water electrolysis. PMID:26924817

  15. Tension-Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Vanadium Disulfide Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Water electrolysis is an efficient way for hydrogen production. Finding efficient, cheap, and eco-friendly electrocatalysts is essential to the development of this technology. In the work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of tension on the hydrogen evolution reaction of a novel electrocatalyst, vanadium disulfide (VS2) monolayer. Two electrocatalytic processes, individual and collective processes, are investigated. We show that the catalytic ability of VS2 monolayer at higher hydrogen coverage can be efficiently improved by escalating tension. We find that the individual process is easier to occur in a wide range of hydrogen coverage and the collective process is possible at a certain hydrogen coverage under the same tension. The best hydrogen evolution reaction with near-zero Gibbs free energy can be achieved by tuning tension. We further show that the change of catalytic activity with tension and hydrogen coverage is induced by the change of free carrier density around the Fermi level, that is, higher carrier density, better catalytic performance. It is expected that tension can be a simple way to improve the catalytic activity, leading to the design of novel electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production from water electrolysis.

  16. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface. Résumé. Il se produit au voisinage de l'interface entre les aquifères et les imperméables plusieurs réactions biogéochimiques importantes. Il s'agit des réactions de réduction de l'oxygène, de la dénitrification et de la réduction de Fe3+, SO42- et CO2 (méthanogenèse). Dans certaines situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté imperméable de l'interface, avec des accepteurs d'électrons qui vont de l'aquifère vers l'imperméable riche en donneurs d'électrons. Dans d'autres situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté aquifère de l'interface, avec des donneurs d'électrons qui se déplacent de l'imperméable vers l'aquifère riche en accepteurs d'électrons ou en microorganismes. Ainsi, l'interface aquif

  17. Enhancement of hydroxyl radical generation in the Fenton reaction by alpha-hydroxy acid.

    PubMed

    Ali, M A; Konishi, T

    1998-09-01

    The effect of various organic acids on hydroxyl radical (.OH) generation in the Fenton reaction were examined by the ESR spin trapping technique, where 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyroline-N-nitroxide (DMPO) and alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) were used as the spin trapping reagents. alpha-Hydroxy acids such as lactic acid, glycolic acid and 2-hydroxy isobutyric acid were found to markedly enhance .OH generation in the reaction. In contrast, beta-hydroxy acid, alpha-keto acid, esters of alpha-hydroxy acids, aldehydes and other straight chain organic acids had no such enhancing activity. alpha-Amino acids had also no enhancing effect. The results suggest that the alpha-hydroxy acid moiety is prerequisite for the enhancement of .OH generation in the Fenton reaction. Superoxide dismutase did not inhibit the enhancing effect of alpha-hydroxy acids whereas catalase completely inhibited the .OH generation. Thus, alpha-hydroxy acids directly enhanced the .OH generation via the Fenton reaction but not the Haber-Weiss reaction. Possible role of lactic acid manipulating .OH generation is discussed in relation to the ischemia-reperfusion cell damage. PMID:9784848

  18. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. PMID:26823380

  19. Speed of reaction to sensory stimulation is enhanced during movement.

    PubMed

    Juravle, Georgiana; Spence, Charles

    2015-10-01

    We report four experiments on the speed of people's reactions to sensory stimulation while throwing and catching a basketball. Thirty participants participated in Experiment 1, split according to basketball expertise: none, intermediate (6years on average), or advanced (20years or more). The participants had to catch a bouncing basketball. The movement triggered a short tactile pulse in a tactor attached to their wrist to which they made a speeded vocal response (RT). The pulse could be presented either at rest, at two time-points during the reaching movement, or when the hand reached forward to catch the ball. The results indicated that participants responded more rapidly to vibrations on the moving hand relative to preparing or catching the ball, with expert athletes responding significantly faster than novices. In a second experiment, participants made a speeded vocal response to an auditory signal. As in Experiment 1, faster auditory RTs were observed when the hand was moving, as compared to the other time-points. In a third study, the participants responded to a pulse delivered at their resting hand at various time-points corresponding to the average timings of stimulation in Experiment 1. The results revealed comparable RTs across the tested time-points. In a final experiment, the participants made a vocal response to a pulse presented at various time-points while they were throwing the basketball. The results indicated faster tactile RTs while the ball was being thrown. These results are discussed with reference to the literature on goal-directed movements and in terms of current theories of attention and sensory suppression. PMID:26398485

  20. CpG DNA as mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1999-09-01

    We have previously found synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs to be a potent adjuvant to protein administered by intramuscular injection or intranasal inhalation to BALB/c mice. Herein we have further evaluated the potential of CpG ODN as a mucosal adjuvant to purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) when administered alone or with cholera toxin (CT). CpG ODN and CT both augmented systemic (humoral and cellular) and mucosal immune responses against HBsAg, and these could be further enhanced with higher doses of adjuvant or boosting. Overall, antibody isotypes with CT alone were predominantly IgG1 (Th2-like) whereas they were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) with CpG ODN alone or in combination with CT. Results from this study indicate that stimulatory CpG ODN are promising new adjuvants for mucosal vaccination strategies, whether used alone or in combination with other mucosal adjuvants. PMID:10506647

  1. Mucosal Immunization with Recombinant Fusion Protein DnaJ-ΔA146Ply Enhances Cross-Protective Immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection in Mice via Interleukin 17A

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yusi; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Shuai; Zeng, Lingbin; Xu, Xiuyu; Wu, Kaifeng; Wang, Wei; Yin, Nanlin; Song, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    Pneumolysin (Ply) and its variants are protective against pneumococcal infections in animal models, and as a Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, pneumolysin has been reported to be a mucosal adjuvant. DnaJ has been approved as a useful candidate vaccine protein; we therefore designed novel fusion proteins of DnaJ with a form of Ply that has a deletion of A146 (ΔA146Ply-DnaJ [the C terminus of ΔA146Ply connected with the N terminus of DnaJ] and DnaJ-ΔA146Ply [the C terminus of DnaJ connected with the N terminus of ΔA146Ply]) to test whether they are protective against focal and lethal pneumococcal infections and their potential protective mechanisms. The purified proteins were used to intranasally immunize the animals without additional adjuvant. Immunization with DnaJ-ΔA146Ply or DnaJ plus ΔA146Ply (Ply with a single deletion of A146) could significantly reduce S. pneumoniae colonization in the nasopharynx and lung relative with DnaJ alone. Additionally, we observed the best protection for DnaJ-ΔA146Ply-immunized mice after challenge with lethal doses of S. pneumoniae strains, which was comparable to that achieved by PPV23. Mice immunized with DnaJ-ΔA146Ply produced significantly higher levels of anti-DnaJ IgG in serum and secretory IgA (sIgA) in saliva than those immunized with DnaJ alone. The production of IL-17A was also striking in DnaJ-ΔA146Ply-immunized mice. IL-17A knockout (KO) mice did not benefit from DnaJ-ΔA146Ply immunization in colonization experiments, and sIgA production was impaired in IL-17A KO mice. Collectively, our results indicate a mucosal adjuvant potential for ΔA146Ply and that, without additional adjuvant, DnaJ-ΔA146Ply fusion protein exhibits extensive immune stimulation and is effective against pneumococcal challenges, properties which are partially attributed to the IL-17A-mediated immune responses. PMID:24491576

  2. Mucosal immunization with recombinant fusion protein DnaJ-ΔA146Ply enhances cross-protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice via interleukin 17A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yusi; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Shuai; Zeng, Lingbin; Xu, Xiuyu; Wu, Kaifeng; Wang, Wei; Yin, Nanlin; Song, Zhixin; Zhang, Xuemei; Yin, Yibing

    2014-04-01

    Pneumolysin (Ply) and its variants are protective against pneumococcal infections in animal models, and as a Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, pneumolysin has been reported to be a mucosal adjuvant. DnaJ has been approved as a useful candidate vaccine protein; we therefore designed novel fusion proteins of DnaJ with a form of Ply that has a deletion of A146 (ΔA146Ply-DnaJ [the C terminus of ΔA146Ply connected with the N terminus of DnaJ] and DnaJ-ΔA146Ply [the C terminus of DnaJ connected with the N terminus of ΔA146Ply]) to test whether they are protective against focal and lethal pneumococcal infections and their potential protective mechanisms. The purified proteins were used to intranasally immunize the animals without additional adjuvant. Immunization with DnaJ-ΔA146Ply or DnaJ plus ΔA146Ply (Ply with a single deletion of A146) could significantly reduce S. pneumoniae colonization in the nasopharynx and lung relative with DnaJ alone. Additionally, we observed the best protection for DnaJ-ΔA146Ply-immunized mice after challenge with lethal doses of S. pneumoniae strains, which was comparable to that achieved by PPV23. Mice immunized with DnaJ-ΔA146Ply produced significantly higher levels of anti-DnaJ IgG in serum and secretory IgA (sIgA) in saliva than those immunized with DnaJ alone. The production of IL-17A was also striking in DnaJ-ΔA146Ply-immunized mice. IL-17A knockout (KO) mice did not benefit from DnaJ-ΔA146Ply immunization in colonization experiments, and sIgA production was impaired in IL-17A KO mice. Collectively, our results indicate a mucosal adjuvant potential for ΔA146Ply and that, without additional adjuvant, DnaJ-ΔA146Ply fusion protein exhibits extensive immune stimulation and is effective against pneumococcal challenges, properties which are partially attributed to the IL-17A-mediated immune responses. PMID:24491576

  3. Organic radicals for the enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction in Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Tesio, A Y; Blasi, D; Olivares-Marín, M; Ratera, I; Tonti, D; Veciana, J

    2015-12-25

    We examine for the first time the ability of inert carbon free-radicals as soluble redox mediators to catalyze and enhance the oxygen reduction reaction in a (TEGDME)-based electrolyte. We demonstrate that the tris(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)methyl (TTM) radical is capable of chemically favoring the oxygen reduction reaction improving significantly the Li-O2 battery performance. PMID:26488114

  4. Cathodic current enhancement via manganese and oxygen related reactions in marine biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Matthew James

    Corrosion is a threat that has economic, and environmental impacts worldwide. Many types of corrosive attack are the subject of ongoing research. One of these areas of research is microbiologically influenced corrosion, which is the enhancement and/or initiation of corrosion events caused by microorganisms. It is well known that colonies of microorganisms can enhance cathodic currents through biofilm formation. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the role of manganese in enhancing cathodic currents in the presence of biofilms. Repeated polarizations conducted in Delaware Bay waters, on biofilm coated Cr identified potentially sustainable reduction reactions. The reduction of MnO2 and the enhancement of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were proven to be factors that influence cathodic current enhancement. The removal of ambient oxygen during polarizations resulted in a shutdown of cathodic current enhancement. These field data led to an exploration of the synergistic relationship between MnO2 and the ORR. Laboratory studies of the catalysis of peroxide disproportionation by MnO2 were monitored using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Experiments were run at an ambient sweater pH of 8 and pH 9, which simulated the near-surface conditions typical of cathodes immersed in seawater. Rapid reoxidation at the more basic pH was shown to allow manganese to behave as a persistent catalyst under the typical electrochemical surface conditions of a cathode. As a result a mechanism for ORR enhancement by manganese was proposed as a unique mechanism for cathodic current enhancement in biofilms. A separate field study of Delaware biofilms on stainless steel coupled to a sacrificial Al anode was carried out to identify the ORR enhancement mechanism and sustainable redox reactions at the cathode. Chemical treatments of glutaraldehyde and formaldoxime were applied to cathodes with biofilms to distinguish between enzymatic and MnO2 related ORR enhancement. The results ruled

  5. [Utilizing fereducer reaction to enhance DC corona radical shower for benzene treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Bo; Kang, Ying; Wu, Zu-cheng

    2005-11-01

    Fereducer reaction is introduced to enhance DC corona radicals shower for removal of benzene in air. In the presence of nozzle electrode gas containing Fereducer reagent, the enhanced decomposing efficiencies were 21% and 4.2% for benzene concentration of 953 mg/m3 and 63 mg/m3, respectively. The enhancement of benzene removal was remarkable in the presence of nozzle electrode gas (O2, H2O) with the highest removal rate of 89.6%. Lower initial concentration of benzene has higher removal efficiency. However, higher absolute removal rate would be achieved when initial concentration of benzene was higher. PMID:16447423

  6. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation. PMID:25660883

  7. A cytochrome c-enhanced peroxidation reaction with potential use in screening dietary antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Suiping; Yao, Yu; Davison, Allan; Vieira, Amandio

    2004-03-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result from events such as cellular respiration can cause damage to biological molecules and tissues. A variety of endogenous and dietary antioxidants function in moderating the extent of oxidative damage in the body. In this report, a pro-oxidant system is presented as an assay for screening possible antioxidant activities of dietary factors. The assay reaction involves peroxidatic oxidation of the redox indicator N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (TMPD). It is shown that the reaction rate is enhanced by up to 10-fold in the presence of cytochrome c (cyt c), a mitochondrial electron transport protein. The extent to which selected dietary antioxidant factors inhibit the cytochrome c-enhanced peroxidatic oxidation of TMPD is also reported. Considering the known pathological consequences of mitochondrial membrane disruption and cytochrome c release in the cell, this reaction and assay may be of pathological and therapeutic relevance. PMID:15019039

  8. Intranasal Immunization with DOTAP Cationic Liposomes Combined with DC-Cholesterol Induces Potent Antigen-Specific Mucosal and Systemic Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Naoko; Takahashi, Saeko; Yamakita, Yuki; Iwata, Tomoko; Muto, Shoko; Sato, Emi; Takayama, Noriko; Honjo, Emi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun; Aramaki, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    Despite the progress made by modern medicine, infectious diseases remain one of the most important threats to human health. Vaccination against pathogens is one of the primary methods used to prevent and treat infectious diseases that cause illness and death. Vaccines administered by the mucosal route are potentially a promising strategy to combat infectious diseases since mucosal surfaces are a major route of entry for most pathogens. However, this route of vaccination is not widely used in the clinic due to the lack of a safe and effective mucosal adjuvant. Therefore, the development of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants is key to preventing infectious diseases by enabling the use of mucosal vaccines in the clinic. In this study, we show that intranasal administration of a cationic liposome composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) and 3β-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] (DC-chol) (DOTAP/DC-chol liposome) has a potent mucosal adjuvant effect in mice. Intranasal vaccination with ovalbumin (OVA) in combination with DOTAP/DC-chol liposomes induced the production of OVA-specific IgA in nasal tissues and increased serum IgG1 levels, suggesting that the cationic DOTAP/DC-chol liposome leads to the induction of a Th2 immune response. Additionally, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue and splenocytes from mice treated with OVA plus DOTAP/DC-chol liposome showed high levels of IL–4 expression. DOTAP/DC-chol liposomes also enhanced OVA uptake by CD11c+ dendritic cells in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. These data demonstrate that DOTAP/DC-chol liposomes elicit immune responses via an antigen-specific Th2 reaction. These results suggest that cationic liposomes merit further development as a mucosal adjuvant for vaccination against infectious diseases. PMID:26440657

  9. Communication: Enhanced oxygen reduction reaction and its underlying mechanism in Pd-Ir-Co trimetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Hyung Chul; Hwang, Gyeong S.; Manogaran, Dhivya; Lee, Kang Hee; Jin, Seon-ah; You, Dae Jong; Pak, Chanho; Kwon, Kyungjung

    2013-11-28

    Based on a combined density functional theory and experimental study, we present that the electrochemical activity of Pd{sub 3}Co alloy catalysts toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be enhanced by adding a small amount of Ir. While Ir tends to favorably exist in the subsurface layers, the underlying Ir atoms are found to cause a substantial modification in the surface electronic structure. As a consequence, we find that the activation barriers of O/OH hydrogenation reactions are noticeably lowered, which would be mainly responsible for the enhanced ORR activity. Furthermore, our study suggests that the presence of Ir in the near-surface region can suppress Co out-diffusion from the Pd{sub 3}Co substrate, thereby improving the durability of Pd-Ir-Co catalysts. We also discuss the relative roles played by Ir and Co in enhancing the ORR activity relative to monometallic Pd catalysts.

  10. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties. PMID:21741878

  11. Experience with registered mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Guido; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Lang, Alois B; Viret, Jean-François

    2003-01-30

    Most pathogens gain access to their host through mucosal surfaces. It is therefore desirable to develop vaccination strategies that lead to mucosal immune responses. Ideally, a vaccine should be administered mucosally in order to elicit mucosal protection. Several attenuated live viral and bacterial pathogens are registered as oral vaccines for human use, including the oral polio vaccine (Sabin) as well as attenuated strains of Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. These attenuated bacterial live vaccines-S. typhi Ty21a as well as V. cholerae CVD 103-HgR-are employed as vaccines against typhoid and cholera, respectively. In this manuscript, we review the immune responses that are induced by these vaccines, with a focus on mucosal immunity. PMID:12531339

  12. Oral mucositis complicating chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy: options for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Köstler, W J; Hejna, M; Wenzel, C; Zielinski, C C

    2001-01-01

    Chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis represents a therapeutic challenge frequently encountered in cancer patients. This side effect causes significant morbidity and may delay the treatment plan, as well as increase therapeutic expenses. The pathogenesis of this debilitating side effect can be attributed to the direct mucosal toxicity of cytotoxic agents and ionizing radiation and to indirect mucosal damage caused by a concomitant inflammatory reaction exacerbated in the presence of neutropenia, and the emergence of bacterial, mycotic, and viral infections. The prophylactic and therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of oral mucositis consists of locally and systemically applied nonpharmacological measures and pharmacotherapeutics. PMID:11577493

  13. Trehalose enhances osmotic tolerance and suppresses lysophosphatidylcholine-induced acrosome reaction in ram spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, E; Naseer, Z; Aksoy, M; Küçük, N; Uçan, U; Serin, I; Ceylan, A

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of trehalose on osmotic tolerance and the ability of ram spermatozoon to undergo acrosome reaction induced by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In experiment 1, the diluted ejaculates were exposed to anisosmotic fructose solutions (70, 500, 750 and 1000 mOsm l(-1) ) with or without 50 mm trehalose. The presence of trehalose in hyperosmotic conditions enhanced (P < 0.05) the percentage of live, live-intact and intact spermatozoa. Similarly, trehalose enhanced (P < 0.05) the live and live-intact spermatozoa during hypo-osmotic conditions. In experiment 2, the centrifuged ejaculates were diluted with TCG only or TCG containing either 50 or 100 mm trehalose. The acrosome reaction was induced by LPC. The percentage of acrosome-reacted spermatozoon was less (P < 0.05) in trehalose-supplemented groups compared to control. In experiment 3, the ejaculates were cryopreserved in an extender containing 0 mm (control), 50 mm or 100 mm trehalose. Supplementation of extender with trehalose, either 50 mm or 100 mm, enhanced the cryosurvival rate (P < 0.05) compared to the control. In conclusion, the presence of trehalose in anisosmotic conditions enhances the osmotic tolerance, cryosurvival rate of ram spermatozoon and suppresses their ability to undergo LPC and cryo-induced acrosome reaction. PMID:25269572

  14. Dynamics and Kinetics Study of "In-Water" Chemical Reactions by Enhanced Sampling of Reactive Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Y Isaac; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-11-12

    High potential energy barriers and engagement of solvent coordinates set challenges for in silico studies of chemical reactions, and one is quite commonly limited to study reactions along predefined reaction coordinate(s). A systematic protocol, QM/MM MD simulations using enhanced sampling of reactive trajectories (ESoRT), is established to quantitatively study chemical transitions in complex systems. A number of trajectories for Claisen rearrangement in water and toluene were collected and analyzed, respectively. Evidence was found that the bond making and breaking during this reaction are concerted processes in solutions, preferentially through a chairlike configuration. Water plays an important dynamic role that helps stabilize the transition sate, and the dipole-dipole interaction between water and the solute also lowers the transition barrier. The calculated rate coefficient is consistent with the experimental measurement. Compared with water, the reaction pathway in toluene is "narrower" and the reaction rate is slower by almost three orders of magnitude due to the absence of proper interactions to stabilize the transition state. This study suggests that the "in-water" nature of the Claisen rearrangement in aqueous solution influences its thermodynamics, kinetics, as well as dynamics. PMID:26485567

  15. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  16. Enzyme immunoassay by dynamic enhanced vibrational spectroscopy of the enzyme reaction product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiying; Dou, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a kind of application of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to immunology. In the proposed system, antibody immobilized on a solid substrate reacts with antigen, which binds with another antibody labeled with peroxidase. If this immunocomplex is subjected to reaction with o-phenylenediamine and hydrogenperoxide at 37°C, azoaniline is generated. This azo compound is adsorbed on a silver colloid and only the azo compound gives a strong surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) spectrum. A linear relationship was observed between the peak intensity of the N=N stretching band and the concentration of antigen, revealing that one can determine the concentration of antigen by the SERRS measurement of the reaction product.

  17. Mucosal Lesions in an Allergy Practice.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, John J; Bruce, Alison J; Torgerson, Rochelle R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of mucosal disease with an allergic pathogenesis are challenging. Oral allergy is often a hypersensitivity reaction with variable symptoms and physical exam findings. Clinical diagnosis requires a history of prior allergen exposure, a delay from exposure to clinical findings, and improvement following allergen removal. The past decades have seen great contributions to the field of oral allergy. The aim of this review is to provide an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of oral dermatologic disease with a focus on diseases with an investigated allergic pathogenesis. PMID:26922434

  18. Gastric mucosal cell proliferation in ethanol-induced chronic mucosal injury is related to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Muñoz, R; Montiel-Ruíz, C; Vázquez-Martínez, O

    2000-08-01

    The oxygen free radicals-induced lipid peroxidation (LP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions. However, the role of LP in the generation of chronic gastric mucosal injury is unknown. We have developed a model of chronic mucosal injury induced by continuous ethanol ingestion for 5 days and characterized by marked alterations in plasma membranes from gastric mucosa. Therefore, LP was evaluated in this experimental model. Indicators of peroxidative activity, mucosal glutathione content, thymidine kinase activity (an index of cell proliferation), and histamine H2-receptor (H2R) binding constants were quantified in animals undergoing gastric mucosal damage. The effect of famotidine, a H2R antagonist that readily ameliorates the chronic mucosal injury, was also tested. Increased free radicals and LP levels were detected during gastritis; however, a second, higher peak of LP was noted in mucosal plasma membranes after ethanol withdrawal (recovery period). This further increase of LP coincided with active cell proliferation, decreased mucosal glutathione levels, and diminished specific cimetidine binding by H2R. Administration of famotidine accelerated the mucosal proliferative process, inducing the second lipoperoxidative episode sooner, and preserved the content of glutathione. In addition, LP correlated directly with cell proliferation and inversely with mucosal membrane cimetidine binding. In conclusion, LP seems to be involved in chronic ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury. However, a further enhancement of plasma membrane LP occurred, associated with increased DNA synthesis and diminished cimetidine binding by membrane H2R. Therefore, increased LP could also participate in the compensatory mucosal proliferation initiated after ethanol withdrawal. PMID:10950107

  19. An Overview of Challenges Limiting the Design of Protective Mucosal Vaccines for Finfish

    PubMed Central

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifying key areas that require optimization in mucosal vaccine design. Some of the factors that limit the success for designing protective mucosal vaccines for finfish identified in this review include the lack optimized protective antigen doses for mucosal vaccines, absence of immunostimulants able to enhance the performance of non-replicative mucosal vaccines, reduction of systemic antibodies due to prolonged exposure to oral vaccination and the lack of predefined correlates of protective immunity for use in the optimization of newly developed mucosal vaccines. This review also points out the need to develop prime-boost vaccination regimes able to induce long-term protective immunity in vaccinated fish. By overcoming some of the obstacles identified herein, it is anticipated that future mucosal vaccines shall be designed to induce long-term protective immunity in finfish. PMID:26557121

  20. The adjuvants MF59 and LT-K63 enhance the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of subunit influenza vaccine administered intranasally in mice.

    PubMed

    Barchfeld, G L; Hessler, A L; Chen, M; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Van Nest, G A

    1999-02-26

    Commercial influenza vaccines generate serum antibody, but not local IgA. Influenza vaccines that induce both serum and secretory antibody are more likely to protect against infection and disease progression. The adjuvants MF59 and LT-K63 were tested intramuscularly and intranasally with subunit HA. In naive mice, intranasal adjuvant effect was more apparent when included with the first than second immunization. In previously infected mice, intranasal adjuvants had little effect on serum antibodies and were most effective for nasal antibodies after the second immunization. Overall, both adjuvants enhanced anti-HA IgA and IgG by intranasal vaccination whereas, by intramuscular vaccination, they only enhanced serum IgG. PMID:10067675

  1. Augmentation of the gastric mucosal defense mechanism induced by KW-5805, a novel antiulcer agent.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Kosaka, N; Tomaru, A; Shuto, K; Ogihara, T; Sato, N

    1989-01-01

    KW-5805 (a new antiulcer agent), given p. o. at 30 mg/kg to rats, significantly increased the amount of gastric adherent mucus and mucosal glycoproteins. Gastric mucosal glucosamine synthetase activity was significantly enhanced by KW-5805 (30 mg/kg, p. o.). KW-5805 (10, 30 mg/kg, p. o.) significantly suppressed the decrease of gastric mucosal blood volume and oxygen sufficiency induced by hemorrhagic shock. The agent also significantly inhibited the extravasation of Evans blue into the gastric mucosa after ischemia-reinfusion. In conclusion, KW-5805 increased biosynthesis, storage and secretion of gastric mucus and improved the gastric mucosal hemodynamics. PMID:2595291

  2. Differential Effect Triggered by a Heparan Mimetic of the RGTA Family Preventing Oral Mucositis Without Tumor Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Mangoni, Monica; Yue Xiaoli; Morin, Christophe; Violot, Dominique; Frascogna, Valerie; Tao Yungan; Opolon, Paule; Castaing, Marine; Auperin, Anne; Biti, Giampaolo; Barritault, Denis; Vozenin-Brotons, Marie-Catherine; Deutsch, Eric; Bourhis, Jean

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a common side effect induced by radio/chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Although it dramatically impairs patient quality of life, no efficient and safe therapeutic solution is available today. Therefore, we investigated the protective efficacy of a new heparan mimetic biopolymer, RGTA-OTR4131, used alone or in combination with amifostine, for oral mucositis and simultaneously evaluated its effect on tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: A single dose of 16.5 Gy was selectively delivered to the snout of mice, and the effects of OTR4131 or amifostine-OTR4131 were analyzed by macroscopic scoring and histology. The effect of OTR4131 administration on tumor growth was then investigated in vitro and in xenograft models using two cell lines (HEP-2 and HT-29). Results: Amifostine and OTR4131 significantly decreased the severity and duration of lip mucosal reactions. However, amifostine has to be administered before irradiation, whereas the most impressive protection was obtained when OTR4131 was injected 24 h after irradiation. In addition, OTR4131 was well tolerated, and the combination of amifostine and OTR4131 further enhanced mucosal protection. At the tumor level, OTR4131 did not modify HEP-2 cell line clonogenic survival in vitro or protect xenografted tumor cells from radiotherapy. Of interest, high doses of OTR4131 significantly decreased clonogenic survival of HT-29 cells. Conclusions: RGTAs-OTR4131 is a well-tolerated, natural agent that effectively reduces radio-induced mucositis without affecting tumor sensitivity to irradiation. This suggests a possible transfer into the clinic for patients' benefit.

  3. Plasmon-enhanced reverse water gas shift reaction over oxide supported Au catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Zeng, X; Kim, HJ; Tejedor, I; Anderson, MA; Dumesic, JA; Huber, GW

    2015-01-01

    We show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the catalytic activities of different oxide-supported Au catalysts for the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Oxide-supported Au catalysts showed 30 to 1300% higher activity for RWGS under visible light compared to dark conditions. Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation (DP) method with 3.5 nm average Au particle size showed the highest activity for the RWGS reaction. Visible light is converted into chemical energy for this reaction with up to a 5% overall efficiency. A shift in the apparent activation energy (from 47 kJ mol(-1) in dark to 35 kJ mol(-1) in light) and apparent reaction order with respect to CO2 (from 0.5 in dark to 1.0 in light) occurs due to the LSPR. Our kinetic results indicate that the LSPR increases the rate of either the hydroxyl hydrogenation or carboxyl decomposition more than any other steps in the reaction network.

  4. Origin of bimodal fluorescence enhancement factors of Chlorobaculum tepidum reaction centers on silver island films.

    PubMed

    Maćkowski, Sebastian; Czechowski, Nikodem; Ashraf, Khuram U; Szalkowski, Marcin; Lokstein, Heiko; Cogdell, Richard J; Kowalska, Dorota

    2016-08-01

    We focus on the spectral dependence of plasmon-induced enhancement of fluorescence of Chlorobaculum tepidum reaction centers. When deposited on silver island film, they exhibit up to a 60-fold increase in fluorescence. The dependence of enhancement factors on the excitation wavelength is not correlated with the absorption spectrum of the plasmonic structure. In particular, the presence of one (or multiple) trimers of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein reveals itself in bimodal distribution of enhancement factors for the excitation at 589 nm, the wavelength corresponding to bacteriochlorophyll absorption of FMO and the core of the RC. We conclude that the structure of multichromophoric complexes can substantially affect the impact of plasmonic excitations, which is important in the context of assembling functional biohybrid systems. PMID:27406896

  5. Stakeholder perspectives and reactions to "academic" cognitive enhancement: Unsuspected meaning of ambivalence and analogies.

    PubMed

    Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Eric

    2012-07-01

    The existence of diverging discourses in the media and academia on the use of prescription medications to improve cognition in healthy individuals, i.e. "cognitive enhancement" (CE) creates the need to better understand perspectives from stakeholders. This qualitative focus-group study examined perspectives from students, parents and healthcare providers on CE. Stakeholders expressed ambivalence regarding CE (i.e. reactions to, definitions of, risks, and benefits). They were reluctant to adopt analogies to performance-enhancing steroids and caffeine though these analogies were useful in discussing concepts common to the use of different performance-enhancing substances. Media coverage of CE was criticized for lack of scientific rigor, ethical clarity, and inadvertent promotion of CE. Ambivalence of stakeholders suggests fundamental discomfort with economic and social driving forces of CE. Forms of public dialogue that voice the unease and ambivalence of stakeholders should be pursued to avoid opting hastily for permissive or restrictive health policies for CE. PMID:23823168

  6. Application of multisection packing concept to sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming reaction for high-purity hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan Hyun; Mun, Sungyong; Lee, Ki Bong

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen has been gaining popularity as a new clean energy carrier, and bulk hydrogen production is achieved through the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Since hydrogen produced via the SMR reaction contains large amounts of impurities such as unreacted reactants and byproducts, additional purification steps are needed to produce high-purity hydrogen. By applying the sorption-enhanced reaction (SER), in which catalytic reaction and CO2 byproduct removal are carried out simultaneously in a single reactor, high-purity hydrogen can be directly produced. Additionally, the thermodynamic limitation of conventional SMR reaction is circumvented, and the SMR reaction process becomes simplified. To improve the performance of the SER, a multisection packing concept was recently proposed. In this study, the multisection packing concept is experimentally demonstrated by applying it to a sorption-enhanced SMR (SE-SMR) reaction. The experimental results show that the SE-SMR reaction is significantly influenced by the reaction temperature, owing to the conflicting dependence of the reaction rate and the CO2 sorption uptake on the reaction temperature. Additionally, it is confirmed that more high-purity hydrogen (<10 ppm of CO) can be produced by applying the multisection packing concept to the SE-SMR reactions operated at sufficiently high temperatures where the SMR reaction is not limited by rate.

  7. Staphylococcal protein A primed leukocytes enhance the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, G.I.; Lederman, M.M.; Liebman, M.L.; Ellner, J.J.

    1986-04-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were preincubated for 3 days in medium alone or with various mitogens then washed and irradiated. The preincubated cells then were cultured with autologous T-cells in an autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) pretreatment of PBMC enhanced autologous T-lymphocyte proliferation from 1375 +/- 321 cpm (mean +/- SEM untreated PBMC) to 42,467 +/- 7985 cpm (SPA primed PBMC) (p less than 0.01). The ability of SPA treated PBMC to enhance the AMLR was not simply a reflection of their proliferation in preculture, as PBMC precultured with phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A showed greater proliferation than SPA-treated PBMC yet only minimally enhanced the AMLR. Kinetic studies and pre-exposure of PBMC to graded doses of gamma radiation showed that SPA augmentation of the AMLR was mediated by 2 components which differed in kinetics and radiosensitivity. Although incubation of PBMC with SPA did not increase the percentage of cells with detectable surface Ia antigen, SPA did increase the density of Ia in the preincubated cells. Cell separation studies revealed that SPA enhancement of the AMLR was not mediated by T-cells, but was mediated by a non-adherent non-E-rosetting fraction of cells. SPA enhancement of the AMLR was associated with an increased Ia density in the stimulator population but not with an increase in Ia positive cells and was mediated by proliferation-dependent and proliferation-independent mechanisms.

  8. Near-Infrared Plasmonic-Enhanced Solar Energy Harvest for Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiabin; Li, Yongjia; Liu, Lei; Chen, Lin; Xu, Jun; Ma, Jingwen; Fang, Gang; Zhu, Enbo; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Lixia; Wang, Leyu; Huang, Yu

    2015-10-14

    We report a highly efficient photocatalyst comprised of Cu7S4@Pd heteronanostructures with plasmonic absorption in the near-infrared (NIR)-range. Our results indicated that the strong NIR plasmonic absorption of Cu7S4@Pd facilitated hot carrier transfer from Cu7S4 to Pd, which subsequently promoted the catalytic reactions on Pd metallic surface. We confirmed such enhancement mechanism could effectively boost the sunlight utilization in a wide range of photocatalytic reactions, including the Suzuki coupling reaction, hydrogenation of nitrobenzene, and oxidation of benzyl alcohol. Even under irradiation at 1500 nm with low power density (0.45 W/cm(2)), these heteronanostructures demonstrated excellent catalytic activities. Under solar illumination with power density as low as 40 mW/cm(2), nearly 80-100% of conversion was achieved within 2 h for all three types of organic reactions. Furthermore, recycling experiments showed the Cu7S4@Pd were stable and could retain their structures and high activity after five cycles. The reported synthetic protocol can be easily extended to other Cu7S4@M (M = Pt, Ag, Au) catalysts, offering a new solution to design and fabricate highly effective photocatalysts with broad material choices for efficient conversion of solar energy to chemical energy in an environmentally friendly manner. PMID:26373787

  9. Three Dimensional Hybrids of Vertical Graphene-nanosheet Sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles for Enhanced Surface Selectively Catalytic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mentao; Liu, Zhe; Quan, Baogang; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie

    2015-11-01

    Three dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure is perfect for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and also very suitable for surface catalytic reaction, but how to design and fabricate is still a robust task. Here, we show a 3D plasmonic nanohybrid of vertical graphene-nanosheet sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles on the silicon nanocone array substrate for enhanced surface catalytic reaction. By SERS detection, we find that this hierarchical nanohybrid structure is highly efficient in the enhancement of catalytic reaction, even at a very low concentration of 10-11 M, which is far better than previous reports by four orders of magnitude. A strong electric field enhancement produced in the 3D framework nanohybrids of graphene nanosheet/Ag-nanoparticles is responsible for this great enhancement of catalytic reaction, due to larger electron collective oscillation in the composite system. Especially the oxygen adsorbed on the graphene and Ag nanoparticles can be excited to triplet excited states, and the electrons on the graphene and the nanoparticles can be effectively transferred to the oxygen, which plays very important role in molecular catalytic reactions. Our results demonstrate the contribution of graphene in plasmon-driven catalytic reactions, revealing a co-driven reaction process.This excellent SERS substrate can be used for future plasmon and graphene co-catalytic surface catalytic reactions, graphene-based surface plasmon sensors and so on.

  10. Three Dimensional Hybrids of Vertical Graphene-nanosheet Sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles for Enhanced Surface Selectively Catalytic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mentao; Liu, Zhe; Quan, Baogang; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure is perfect for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and also very suitable for surface catalytic reaction, but how to design and fabricate is still a robust task. Here, we show a 3D plasmonic nanohybrid of vertical graphene-nanosheet sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles on the silicon nanocone array substrate for enhanced surface catalytic reaction. By SERS detection, we find that this hierarchical nanohybrid structure is highly efficient in the enhancement of catalytic reaction, even at a very low concentration of 10−11 M, which is far better than previous reports by four orders of magnitude. A strong electric field enhancement produced in the 3D framework nanohybrids of graphene nanosheet/Ag-nanoparticles is responsible for this great enhancement of catalytic reaction, due to larger electron collective oscillation in the composite system. Especially the oxygen adsorbed on the graphene and Ag nanoparticles can be excited to triplet excited states, and the electrons on the graphene and the nanoparticles can be effectively transferred to the oxygen, which plays very important role in molecular catalytic reactions. Our results demonstrate the contribution of graphene in plasmon-driven catalytic reactions, revealing a co-driven reaction process.This excellent SERS substrate can be used for future plasmon and graphene co-catalytic surface catalytic reactions, graphene-based surface plasmon sensors and so on. PMID:26522142

  11. Process for the oxidation of materials in water at supercritical temperatures utilizing reaction rate enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, K.C.; Killilea, W.R.; Hong, G.T.; Bourhis, A.L.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for substantially completely oxidizing combustible materials in which an aqueous stream bearing the combustible materials is reacted in the presence of an oxidant comprising diatomic oxygen and at a temperature greater than the critical temperature of water and at a pressure greater than about 25 bar, within a reactor for a period of less than about 5 minutes to produce a reaction product stream, wherein the reaction is initiated in the presence of a rate enhancer comprising at least one oxidizing agent in addition to said oxidant selected from the group consisting of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, salts containing persulfate, salts containing permanganate, nitric acid, salts containing nitrate, oxyacids of chlorine and their corresponding salts, hypochlorous acid, salts containing hypochlorite, chlorous acid, salts containing chlorite, chloric acid, salts containing chlorate, perchloric acid, and salts containing perchlorate.

  12. Energetic composite and system with enhanced mechanical sensitivity to initiation of self-sustained reaction

    DOEpatents

    Gash, Alexander E.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2012-05-29

    An energetic composition and system using amassed energetic multilayer pieces which are formed from the division, such as for example by cutting, scoring, breaking, crushing, shearing, etc., of a mechanically activatable monolithic energetic multilayer(s) (e.g. macro-scale sheets of multilayer films), for enhancing the sensitivity of the energetic composite and system to mechanical initiation of self-sustained reaction. In particular, mechanical initiation of the energetic composition may be achieved with significantly lower mechanical energy inputs than that typically required for initiating the monolithic energetic multilayers from which it is derived.

  13. C-Reactive Protein Levels and Radiation-Induced Mucositis in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels or the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the grade of acute radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was performed in 40 patients who received intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a radical treatment of primary laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Serum CRP level and ESR were initially checked on the day of radiotherapy simulation and were measured every week during the irradiation schedule and two times biweekly after radiotherapy. Mucosal reactions were evaluated by radiation oncologists on days of blood sampling. Results: The distribution of the most severe mucositis was Grade I mucositis in 10% of the patients, Grade II in 60% of the patients and Grade III in 30% of the patients. Statistical analysis indicated a significant rise in the CRP level (p < 0.001) according to radiation fraction number and grade of mucositis. A change of the mean CRP level was correlated with progression of mean grade of mucositis according to fraction number. The ESR did not show any statistically significant relationship with radiotherapy fraction number and grade of acute mucositis. Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between the presence of acute mucositis and CRP level in this study. The CRP level could be conveniently determined along with evaluation of mucosal reactions during or after radiotherapy to provide further information on radiation-induced mucositis.

  14. Deep Sub-Barrier Fusion Enhancement in the {sup 6}He+{sup 206}Pb Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.; Zagrebaev, V.I.; Lukyanov, S.M.; Kalpakchieva, R.

    2006-04-28

    The fusion of {sup 6}He with {sup 206}Pb has been studied at energies close to and below the Coulomb barrier. The experiment was carried out at the Dubna Radioactive Ion Beams complex of FLNR, JINR. The {sup 6}He beam intensity was about 5x10{sup 6} pps, the maximum energy being 60.3{+-}0.4 MeV. The yield of the {sup 210}Po isotope, produced in the 2n-evaporation channel, demonstrates an extremely large enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross section as compared with the {sup 4}He+{sup 208}Pb reaction. This enhancement is most likely due to the mechanism of 'sequential fusion' with an intermediate neutron transfer from {sup 6}He to the Pb nucleus with positive Q values.

  15. How can macromolecular crowding inhibit biological reactions? The enhanced formation of DNA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sen; Trochimczyk, Piotr; Sun, Lili; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Xuzhu; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the already known effect that macromolecular crowding usually promotes biological reactions, solutions of PEG 6k at high concentrations stop the cleavage of DNA by HindIII enzyme, due to the formation of DNA nanoparticles. We characterized the DNA nanoparticles and probed the prerequisites for their formation using multiple techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence analytical ultracentrifugation etc. In >25% PEG 6k solution, macromolecular crowding promotes the formation of DNA nanoparticles with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers. The formation of DNA nanoparticles is a fast and reversible process. Both plasmid DNA (2686 bp) and double-stranded/single-stranded DNA fragment (66bp/nt) can form nanoparticles. We attribute the enhanced nanoparticle formation to the depletion effect of macromolecular crowding. This study presents our idea to enhance the formation of DNA nanoparticles by macromolecular crowding, providing the first step towards a final solution to efficient gene therapy. PMID:26903405

  16. Noises- and delay-enhanced stability in a bistable dynamical system describing chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Chun; Han, Qinglin; Zeng, Chun-Hua; Wang, Hua; Tian, Dong; Long, Fei

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the Schlögl model with time-delayed feedback to study the switching behavior of a bistable chemical reaction system in the presence of cross-correlated multiplicative and additive noise sources. Our results show that (i) the multiplicative noise (or additive noise) can induce the switch from high (or low) concentration state to low (or high) concentration one; (ii) the mean first passage time (MFPT) of switch from high concentration state to the low concentration one as functions of the noise strengths exhibits a maximum, which is the signature of the noise enhanced stability (NES) phenomenon for the high concentration state; and (iii) as the value of cross-correlation strength λ, time delay τ, or strength K of the feedback loop increases, the maximum in the MFPT increases, i.e., λ, τ, or K can enhance stability of the high concentration state.

  17. How can macromolecular crowding inhibit biological reactions? The enhanced formation of DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sen; Trochimczyk, Piotr; Sun, Lili; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Xuzhu; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the already known effect that macromolecular crowding usually promotes biological reactions, solutions of PEG 6k at high concentrations stop the cleavage of DNA by HindIII enzyme, due to the formation of DNA nanoparticles. We characterized the DNA nanoparticles and probed the prerequisites for their formation using multiple techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence analytical ultracentrifugation etc. In >25% PEG 6k solution, macromolecular crowding promotes the formation of DNA nanoparticles with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers. The formation of DNA nanoparticles is a fast and reversible process. Both plasmid DNA (2686 bp) and double-stranded/single-stranded DNA fragment (66bp/nt) can form nanoparticles. We attribute the enhanced nanoparticle formation to the depletion effect of macromolecular crowding. This study presents our idea to enhance the formation of DNA nanoparticles by macromolecular crowding, providing the first step towards a final solution to efficient gene therapy. PMID:26903405

  18. Engineered injection and extraction to enhance reaction for improved in situ remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscopo, Amy N.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Mays, David C.

    2013-06-01

    During in situ remediation, a treatment solution is often injected into a contaminated aquifer to degrade the groundwater contaminant. Since contaminant degradation reactions occur only at locations where the treatment solution and groundwater contaminant overlap, mixing of the treatment solution and the contaminated groundwater is necessary for reaction to occur. Mixing results from molecular diffusion and pore-scale dispersion, which operate over small length scales; thus, mixing during in situ remediation can only occur where the separation distance between the treatment solution and contaminated groundwater is small. To promote mixing, advection can be used to spread the treatment solution into the contaminated groundwater to increase the extent of the region where the two solutions coexist. A certain degree of passive spreading is the natural consequence of aquifer heterogeneity, which is manifested as macrodispersion. An alternative mechanism is active spreading, in which unsteady flows lead to stretching and folding of plumes. Active spreading can be accomplished by engineered injection and extraction (EIE), in which clean water is injected and extracted at wells surrounding a contaminant plume to create unsteady flow fields that stretch and fold the treatment solution and contaminant plumes. For a model system in which nested plumes of two reactants undergo scalar transport and instantaneous reaction, the simulation results reported here indicate that EIE enhances degradation of groundwater contamination in homogeneous and heterogeneous aquifers compared to baseline models without EIE. Furthermore, this study shows that the amount of reaction provided by the spreading due to EIE is greater than the amount of reaction due to spreading from heterogeneity alone.

  19. Suppression of the stellar enhancement factor and the reaction {sup 85}Rb(p,n){sup 85}Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Rauscher, T.; Kiss, G. G.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Simon, A.; Fueloep, Zs.; Somorjai, E.

    2009-09-15

    It is shown that a Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor occurs in many endothermic reactions at and far from stability. Contrary to common assumptions, reaction measurements for astrophysics with minimal impact of stellar enhancement should be preferably performed for those reactions instead of their reverses, despite of their negative Q value. As a demonstration, the cross section of the astrophysically relevant {sup 85}Rb(p,n){sup 85}Sr reaction has been measured by activation between 2.16{<=}E{sub c.m.}{<=}3.96 MeV and the astrophysical reaction rates at p process temperatures for (p,n) as well as (n,p) are directly inferred from the data. Additionally, our results confirm a previously derived modification of a global optical proton potential. The presented arguments are also relevant for other {alpha}- and proton-induced reactions in the p, rp, and {nu}p processes.

  20. Enhancing stability of octahedral PtNi nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction by halide treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juhyuk; Lee, Youhan; Kim, Jihan; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-03-01

    Because a reduction in the amount of Pt catalysts is essential for the commercialization of fuel cells, various approaches have been tested to maximize the mass activity of Pt-based catalysts. Among these, the most successful results so far were obtained using shaped PtNi alloy nanoparticles, preferably with PtNi(111) facets. However, these nanoparticles typically suffer from much lower activity after the durability tests due to the leaching out of the surface Ni during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which leads to the disappearance of the activity-enhancing effect caused by electronic structure modification. Here, we showed that halide treatment of the octahedral PtNi nanoparticles could significantly enhance their durability. Halides are adsorbed on surface Ni more strongly than on surface Pt, and the surface halides are found to preserve the surface Ni that induces the ORR activity enhancement. Especially, Br can preserve the surface Ni effectively. Durability testing by repeating cyclic voltammetry 10,000 times in the 0.6-1.1 V range showed that the mass activity decreased by 52.6% for the as-prepared PtNi octahedral nanoparticles, whereas the mass activity decreased by only 15.0% for the Br-treated PtNi nanoparticles. The simple treatment significantly enhanced the long-term stability of the highly active PtNi alloy nano-octahedra.

  1. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Peatman, Eric; Lange, Miles; Zhao, Honggang; Beck, Benjamin H

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catfish depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Our understanding of these barriers, while growing, is still limited relative to that of mammalian model systems. Nevertheless, a combination of molecular and cellular studies in catfish over the last few decades, and particularly within the last few years, has helped to elucidate many of the primary actors and pathways critical to their mucosal health. Here we describe aspects of innate and adaptive immune responses in the primary mucosal tissues (skin, gill, and intestine) of catfish, focusing on mucus-driven responses, pathogen recognition, soluble mediators, and immunoglobulin and T-cell derived immunity. Modulation of mucosal barriers will be critical moving forward for crafting better diets, improving vaccine delivery, enhancing water quality, and ensuring sustainable production practices in catfish. PMID:26716071

  2. Plasmonic photocatalytic reactions enhanced by hot electrons in a one-dimensional quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. J.; Liu, B.-H.; Lin, C.-T.; Su, W. S.

    2015-11-01

    The plasmonic endothermic oxidation of ammonium ions in a spinning disk reactor resulted in light energy transformation through quantum hot charge carriers (QHC), or quantum hot electrons, during a chemical reaction. It is demonstrated with a simple model that light of various intensities enhance the chemical oxidization of ammonium ions in water. It was further observed that light illumination, which induces the formation of plasmons on a platinum (Pt) thin film, provided higher processing efficiency compared with the reaction on a bare glass disk. These induced plasmons generate quantum hot electrons with increasing momentum and energy in the one-dimensional quantum well of a Pt thin film. The energy carried by the quantum hot electrons provided the energy needed to catalyze the chemical reaction. The results indicate that one-dimensional confinement in spherical coordinates (i.e., nanoparticles) is not necessary to provide an extra excited state for QHC generation; an 8 nm Pt thin film for one-dimensional confinement in Cartesian coordinates can also provide the extra excited state for the generation of QHC.

  3. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum–nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum–nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum–nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum–nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon. PMID:27503412

  4. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum-nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-08-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum-nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum-nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum-nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon.

  5. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. PMID:27216660

  6. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum-nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum-nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum-nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum-nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon. PMID:27503412

  7. Plasmonic photocatalytic reactions enhanced by hot electrons in a one-dimensional quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. J. E-mail: hhjhuangkimo@gmail.com; Liu, B. H.; Lin, C. T.; Su, W. S.

    2015-11-15

    The plasmonic endothermic oxidation of ammonium ions in a spinning disk reactor resulted in light energy transformation through quantum hot charge carriers (QHC), or quantum hot electrons, during a chemical reaction. It is demonstrated with a simple model that light of various intensities enhance the chemical oxidization of ammonium ions in water. It was further observed that light illumination, which induces the formation of plasmons on a platinum (Pt) thin film, provided higher processing efficiency compared with the reaction on a bare glass disk. These induced plasmons generate quantum hot electrons with increasing momentum and energy in the one-dimensional quantum well of a Pt thin film. The energy carried by the quantum hot electrons provided the energy needed to catalyze the chemical reaction. The results indicate that one-dimensional confinement in spherical coordinates (i.e., nanoparticles) is not necessary to provide an extra excited state for QHC generation; an 8 nm Pt thin film for one-dimensional confinement in Cartesian coordinates can also provide the extra excited state for the generation of QHC.

  8. Topical protection of human esophageal mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Woodland, P; Batista-Lima, F; Lee, C; Preston, S L; Dettmar, P; Sifrim, D

    2015-06-15

    Patients with nonerosive reflux disease exhibit impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which may underlie enhanced reflux perception. In vitro topical application of an alginate solution can protect mucosal biopsies against acid-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). We aimed to confirm this finding in a second model using 3D cell cultures and to assess prolonged protection in a biopsy model. We assessed the protective effect of a topically applied alginate solution 1 h after application. 3D cell cultures were grown by using an air-liquid interface and were studied in Ussing chambers. The apical surface was "protected" with 200 μl of either alginate or viscous control or was unprotected. The tissue was exposed to pH 3 + bile acid solution for 30 min and TER change was calculated. Distal esophageal mucosal biopsies were taken from 12 patients and studied in Ussing chambers. The biopsies were coated with either alginate or viscous control solution. The biopsies were then bathed in pH 7.4 solution for 1 h. The luminal chamber solution was replaced with pH 2 solution for 30 min. Percentage changes in TER were recorded. In five biopsies fluorescein-labeled alginate solution was used to allow immunohistological localization of the alginate after 1 h. In the cell culture model, alginate solution protected tissue against acid-induced change in TER. In biopsies, 60 min after protection with alginate solution, the acidic exposure caused a -8.3 ± 2.2% change in TER compared with -25.1 ± 4.5% change after protection with the viscous control (P < 0.05). Labeled alginate could be seen coating the luminal surface in all cases. In vitro, alginate solutions can adhere to the esophageal mucosa for up to 1 h and exert a topical protectant effect. Durable topical protectants can be further explored as first-line/add-on therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25907692

  9. Cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin enhances osmotic tolerance and inhibits the acrosome reaction in rabbit spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Melih; Akman, Orhan; Lehimcioğlu, Necdet Cankat; Erdem, Hüseyin

    2010-07-01

    The effects of cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC) treatment on the osmotic tolerance and ability to undergo the acrosome reaction of rabbit spermatozoa, with an unusually high cholesterol/phospholipid ratio in plasma membranes, were examined in two successive experiments. In the first experiment, CLC-pretreated and untreated sperm cells were exposed for 15min to one of five fructose solutions, adjusted to 20, 80, 290, 500 or 1500mOsm/L. After the anisoosmotic challenge, the integrity of sperm membranes in the CLC-supplemented (at a dose level of 3mg/120x10(6)spermatozoa) and control groups was estimated by a modified hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) associated with a supravital eosin staining test (HE-test). In the second part of the study, the influence of cholesterol supplementation on the acrosome reaction of sperm cells stimulated by either calcium ionophore A23187 (CI) or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was evaluated. CLC pretreatment increased viable and live-HOST-responsive sperm rates (P<0.01) after incubation in anisoosmotic solutions varying from 80 to 1500mOsm/L. However, CLC supplementation did not influence the percentage of HOST-responsive sperm cells (P>0.05). A significant interaction was determined between CLC pretreatment and the level of osmotic pressure in maintaining the functional and physical integrities of sperm membranes undergoing osmotic challenges. Both CI and LPC successfully induced the acrosome reaction in rabbit spermatozoa (P<0.001). Compared with CI, LPC was more effective (P<0.0001). CLC pretreatment resulted in a significant reduction (P<0.01) in the percentage of acrosome reacted sperm cells irrespective of the inducing agent, either CI or LPC. In conclusion, CLC treatment enhanced the anisoosmotic tolerance of rabbit spermatozoa and reduced their ability to undergo the acrosome reaction after stimulation by CI or LPC. PMID:20304567

  10. Intervertebral reaction force prediction using an enhanced assembly of OpenSim models.

    PubMed

    Senteler, Marco; Weisse, Bernhard; Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Snedeker, Jess G

    2016-01-01

    OpenSim offers a valuable approach to investigating otherwise difficult to assess yet important biomechanical parameters such as joint reaction forces. Although the range of available models in the public repository is continually increasing, there currently exists no OpenSim model for the computation of intervertebral joint reactions during flexion and lifting tasks. The current work combines and improves elements of existing models to develop an enhanced model of the upper body and lumbar spine. Models of the upper body with extremities, neck and head were combined with an improved version of a lumbar spine from the model repository. Translational motion was enabled for each lumbar vertebrae with six controllable degrees of freedom. Motion segment stiffness was implemented at lumbar levels and mass properties were assigned throughout the model. Moreover, body coordinate frames of the spine were modified to allow straightforward variation of sagittal alignment and to simplify interpretation of results. Evaluation of model predictions for level L1-L2, L3-L4 and L4-L5 in various postures of forward flexion and moderate lifting (8 kg) revealed an agreement within 10% to experimental studies and model-based computational analyses. However, in an extended posture or during lifting of heavier loads (20 kg), computed joint reactions differed substantially from reported in vivo measures using instrumented implants. We conclude that agreement between the model and available experimental data was good in view of limitations of both the model and the validation datasets. The presented model is useful in that it permits computation of realistic lumbar spine joint reaction forces during flexion and moderate lifting tasks. The model and corresponding documentation are now available in the online OpenSim repository. PMID:26031341

  11. Intestinal mucosal tolerance and impact of gut microbiota to mucosal tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Kozarov, Emil; Sobenin, Igor A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal barriers are very sensitive to pathogenic infection, thereby assuming the capacity of the mucosal immune system to induce protective immunity to harmful antigens and tolerance against harmless substances. This review provides current information about mechanisms of induction of mucosal tolerance and about impact of gut microbiota to mucosal tolerance. PMID:25628617

  12. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; Sohn, Young-Jun; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.; et al

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  13. Exploration of the Role of Heat Activation in Enhancing Serpentine Carbon Sequestration Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    McKelvy, M.J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Diefenbacher, J.; Bearat, H.; Wolf, G.

    2005-03-29

    As compared with other candidate carbon sequestration technologies, mineral carbonation offers the unique advantage of permanent disposal via geologically stable and environmentally benign carbonates. The primary challenge is the development of an economically viable process. Enhancing feedstock carbonation reactivity is key. Heat activation dramatically enhances aqueous serpentine carbonation reactivity. Although the present process is too expensive to implement, the materials characteristics and mechanisms that enhance carbonation are of keen interest for further reducing cost. Simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) of the serpentine mineral lizardite was used to isolate a series of heat-activated materials as a function of residual hydroxide content at progressively higher temperatures. Their structure and composition are evaluated via TGA/DTA, X-ray powder diffraction (including phase analysis), and infrared analysis. The meta-serpentine materials that were observed to form ranged from those with longer range ordering, consistent with diffuse stage-2 like interlamellar order, to an amorphous component that preferentially forms at higher temperatures. The aqueous carbonation reaction process was investigated for representative materials via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Magnesite was observed to form directly at 15 MPa CO{sub 2} and at temperatures ranging from 100 to 125 C. Carbonation reactivity is generally correlated with the extent of meta-serpentine formation and structural disorder.

  14. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  15. Multiple antigen peptide consisting of B- and T-cell epitopes of F1 antigen of Y. pestis showed enhanced humoral and mucosal immune response in different strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Riyasat; Kumar, Sudhir; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Sheikh, Ishfaq Ahmed; Rao, D N

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a causative agent of plague. F1 and V antigen based vaccines have shown remarkable protection in experimental animals. In order to develop epitope based immunogen, three B and one T-cell epitopes of F1 antigen with palmitate residue at amino terminal were assembled on a lysine backbone as multiple antigen peptide (MAP or F1-MAP). MAP was characterized by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot and immunoreactivity with anti F1 sera. MAP was entrapped in PLGA (polylactide-co-glycolide) microparticles and humoral, mucosal immune responses were studied after intranasal immunization with/without CpG ODN 1826 (CpG)/murabutide in different strains of mice. Serum and mucosal washes were measured for MAP specific IgG, IgA, sIgA and IgG subclasses in three strains of mice. F1-MAP showed high serum antibody and mucosal IgG and IgA peak antibody titers. MAP with CpG showed significantly high (p<0.001) peak antibody titer ranging from 102,400 to 204,800 for IgG and 6400 to 12,800 for IgA. High mucosal sIgA and its secretary component detection confirmed generation of mucosal response in intestinal and lung washes. MAP antisera also showed significant immunoreactivity with individual peptides. Moreover, antibody specific activity (IgG, IgA and sIgA) positively correlates with peak antibody titers. Predominantly IgG2a/IgG2b subclass was observed with CpG formulation but in other formulation a mixed IgG1 and IgG2a response was observed. The present study highlights the importance of multiple antigen peptide approach of F1-antigen with CpG as an alternative approach for subunit vaccine. PMID:23174507

  16. Complex dynamics and enhanced photosensitivity in a modified Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Li Nan; Zhao Jinpei; Wang Jichang

    2008-06-28

    This study presents an experimental investigation of nonlinear dynamics in a modified Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, in which the addition of 1,4-benzoquinone induced various complex behaviors such as mixed-mode oscillations and consecutive period-adding bifurcations. In addition, the presence of 1,4-benzoquinone significantly enhanced the photosensitivity of the ferroin-catalyzed BZ system, in which light-induced transitions between simple and complex oscillations have been achieved. Mechanistic study suggests that the influence of benzoquinone may arise from its interactions with the metal catalyst ferroin/ferriin, where cyclic voltammograms illustrate that the presence of benzoquinone causes an increase in the redox potential of ferroin/ferriin couple, which may consequently alternate the oxidation and reduction paths of the catalyst.

  17. Redundant sensory information does not enhance sequence learning in the serial reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Abrahamse, Elger L; van der Lubbe, Rob H J; Verwey, Willem B; Szumska, Izabela; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    In daily life we encounter multiple sources of sensory information at any given moment. Unknown is whether such sensory redundancy in some way affects implicit learning of a sequence of events. In the current paper we explored this issue in a serial reaction time task. Our results indicate that redundant sensory information does not enhance sequence learning when all sensory information is presented at the same location (responding to the position and/or color of the stimuli; Experiment 1), even when the distinct sensory sources provide more or less similar baseline response latencies (responding to the shape and/or color of the stimuli; Experiment 2). These findings support the claim that sequence learning does not (necessarily) benefit from sensory redundancy. Moreover, transfer was observed between various sets of stimuli, indicating that learning was predominantly response-based. PMID:22679466

  18. Redundant sensory information does not enhance sequence learning in the serial reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamse, Elger L.; van der Lubbe, Rob H. J.; Verwey, Willem B.; Szumska, Izabela; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    In daily life we encounter multiple sources of sensory information at any given moment. Unknown is whether such sensory redundancy in some way affects implicit learning of a sequence of events. In the current paper we explored this issue in a serial reaction time task. Our results indicate that redundant sensory information does not enhance sequence learning when all sensory information is presented at the same location (responding to the position and/or color of the stimuli; Experiment 1), even when the distinct sensory sources provide more or less similar baseline response latencies (responding to the shape and/or color of the stimuli; Experiment 2). These findings support the claim that sequence learning does not (necessarily) benefit from sensory redundancy. Moreover, transfer was observed between various sets of stimuli, indicating that learning was predominantly response-based. PMID:22679466

  19. Covalent Reactions on Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Graphene Studied by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kovaříček, Petr; Bastl, Zdeněk; Valeš, Václav; Kalbac, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Graphene is a material of unmatched properties and eminent potential in disciplines ranging from physics, to chemistry, to biology. Its advancement to applications with a specific function requires rational design and fine tuning of its properties, and covalent introduction of various substituents answers this requirement. We challenged the obstacle of non-trivial and harsh procedures for covalent functionalization of pristine graphene and developed a protocol for mild nucleophilic introduction of organic groups in the gas phase. The painstaking analysis problem of monolayered materials was addressed by using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which allowed us to monitor and characterize in detail the surface composition. These deliverables provide a toolbox for reactivity of fluorinated graphene under mild reaction conditions, providing structural freedom of the species to-be-grafted to the single-layer graphene. PMID:26929075

  20. Forest Thinning Dramatically Enhances Ozone Flux due to Reactions With Elevated Emissions of Biogenic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, A. H.; McKay, M.; Kurpius, M. R.; Schade, G. W.

    2003-12-01

    Forests are routinely managed for timber production and fire suppression by thinning and harvesting. The impact of these activities on biosphere-atmosphere exchange of reactive trace gases is profound, but has rarely been studied in the field. Here we present simultaneous observations of ozone and terpene fluxes before, during, and after pre-commercial thinning of a ponderosa pine plantation at Blodgett Forest (1300 m elevation on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, CA). We previously reported that monoterpene emissions increased by an order of magnitude during and following forest thinning (Schade and Goldstein, GRL 2003). We also previously reported that half the daytime ozone flux to this ecosystem under normal summertime conditions (no disturbance) was due to gas-phase chemical loss, and we suggested that this ozone loss was occurring by reactions with biogenically emitted terpenes whose lifetime was short enough that they reacted before escaping the forest canopy (Kurpius and Goldstein, GRL 2003). Here we report that ozone loss was also dramatically enhanced during and following thinning, and we link these observations to confirm that the chemical ozone loss in the canopy was indeed due to reaction with biogenically emitted compounds whose emission was enhanced by disturbance. Based on the magnitudes of ozone flux due to chemical loss and the measured terpene fluxes, we infer that the emissions of previously undetected short-lived terpenes are approximately 15-20 times those of a-pinene during thinning, and 30-50 times those of a-pinene during summer and fall. Since a-pinene accounts for approximately 25% of the total monoterpenes we routinely measure with our automated in-situ GC instrumentation, we conclude that emissions of highly reactive terpenoid compounds could have been drastically under measured in previous field campaigns and that emissions of unidentified reactive terpenes could be 5-10 times larger than emissions of total terpenes

  1. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-10-01

    For oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over alloy electrocatalysts, the understanding of how the atomic arrangement of the metal species in the nanocatalysts is responsible for the catalytic enhancement is challenging for achieving better design and tailoring of nanoalloy catalysts. This paper reports results of an investigation of the atomic structures and the electrocatalytic activities of ternary and binary nanoalloys, aiming at revealing a fundamental insight into the unique atomic-scale structure-electrocatalytic activity relationship. PtIrCo catalyst and its binary counterparts (PtCo and PtIr) are chosen as a model system for this study. The effect of thermochemical treatment temperature on the atomic-scale structure of the catalysts was examined as a useful probe to the structure-activity correlation. The structural characterization of the binary and ternary nanoalloy catalysts was performed by combining surface sensitive techniques such as XPS and 3D atomic ordering sensitive techniques such as high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis (HE-XRD/PDFs) and computer simulations. The results show that the thermal treatment temperature tunes the nanoalloy’s atomic and chemical ordering in a different way depending on the chemical composition, leading to differences in the nanoalloy’s mass and specific activities. A unique structural tunability of the atomic ordering in a platinum-iridium-cobalt nanoalloy has been revealed for enhancing greatly the electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction, which has significant implication for rational design and nanoengineering of advanced catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

  2. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation reaction on Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs hybrid electro-catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouralishahi, Amideddin; Rashidi, Ali Morad; Mortazavi, Yadollah; Khodadadi, Abbas Ali; Choolaei, Mohammadmehdi

    2015-04-01

    The electro-catalytic behavior of Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs in methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) is investigated and compared to that of Pt/MWCNTs. The electro-catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. The morphological and physical characteristics of samples are examined by XRD, TEM, ICP and EDS techniques. In the presence of CoOx, Pt nanoparticles were highly distributed on the support with an average particle size of 2 nm, an obvious decrease from 5.1 nm for Pt/MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry, CO-stripping, Chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are used to study the electrochemical behavior of the electro-catalysts. The results revealed a considerable enhancement in the oxidation kinetics of COads on Pt active sites by the participation of CoOx. Compared to Pt/MWCNTs, Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs sample has a larger electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and higher electro-catalytic activity and stability toward methanol electro-oxidation. According to the results of cyclic voltammetry, the forward anodic peak current density enhances more than 89% at the optimum atomic ratio of Pt:Co = 2:1. Furthermore, inclusion of cobalt oxide species causes the onset potential of methanol electro-oxidation reaction to shift 84 mV to negative values compared to that on Pt/MWCNTs. Based on EIS data, dehydrogenation of methanol is the rate-determining step of MOR on both Pt/MWCNTs and Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs, at small overpotentials. However, at higher overpotentials, the oxidation of adsorbed oxygen-containing groups controls the total rate of MOR process.

  3. Why Chitosan? From properties to perspective of mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Vimal, Archana; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-10-01

    Non-parenteral drug delivery routes primarily remove the local pain at the injection site. The drugs administered through the oral route encounter the process of hepatic first pass metabolism. Among the alternative delivery routes, mucosal route is being investigated as the most preferred route. Different mucosal routes include the gastrointestinal tract (oral), vagina, buccal cavity and nasal cavity. Novel formulations are being developed using natural and synthetic polymers that could increase the residence time of the drug at mucosal surface in order to facilitate permeation and reduce (or bypass) the first pass metabolism. For recombinant drugs, the formulations are accompanied by enzyme inhibitors and penetration enhancers. Buccal cavity (buccal and sublingual mucosa) has smaller surface area than the gastrointestinal tract but the drugs can easily escape the first pass metabolism. Chitosan is the most applied natural polymer while synthetic polymers include Carbopol and Eudragit. Chitosan has inherent properties of mucoadhesion and penetration enhancement apart from biodegradability and efflux pump inhibition. This review hoards the important research purview of chitosan as a compatible drug carrier macromolecule for mucosal delivery on single platform. PMID:27196368

  4. Unique Sandwiched Carbon Sheets@Ni-Mn Nanoparticles for Enhanced Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Huijuan; Yang, Jiao; Bai, Yuanjuan; Qiu, Huajun; Wang, Yu

    2016-05-11

    A unique sandwich-like architecture, where Ni-Mn nanoparticles are enveloped in coupled carbon sheets (CS@Ni-Mn), has been successfully fabricated. In the synthesis process, a great quantity of uniform NiMnO3 nanosheets generated by a universal hydrothermal method acts as precursors and templates and the cheap, environmentally friendly and recyclable glucose functions as a green carbon source. Via subsequent hydrothermal reaction and thermal annealing, sandwiched nanocomposites with Ni-Mn nanoparticles embedded inside and carbon sheets encapsulating outside can be massively prepared. The novel sandwich-like CS@Ni-Mn possesses numerous advantages, such as an intrinsic porous feature, large specific surface area, and enhanced electronic conductivity. Moreover, as a promising NiMn-based oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst, the special sandwiched nanostructure demonstrates improved electrochemical properties in 1 M KOH, including a low overpotential of about 250 mV, a modest Tafel slope of 40 mV dec(-1), excellent stability over 2000 cycles, and durability for 40 h. PMID:27101350

  5. Sorption enhanced reaction process for production of hydrogen. Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayorga, S.G.; Hufton, J.R.; Sircar, S.; Gaffney, T.R.

    1997-07-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most suitable energy sources from both technological and environmental perspectives for the next century, especially in the context of a sustainable global energy economy. The most common industrial process to produce high-purity (99.99+ mol%) hydrogen is to reform natural gas by a catalytic reaction with steam at a high temperature. Conventional steam-methane reforming (SMR) contributed to approximately 2.4 billion standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of hydrogen production in the US. By 1998, the growth of SMR-produced hydrogen in the US is expected to reach 3.4 billion SCFD, with the increased demand attributed to hydrogen`s use in reformulated gasolines required by the Clean Air Act. The goal of this work is to develop an even more efficient process for reforming steam and methane to hydrogen product than the conventional SMR process. The application of Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) technology to SMR has the potential to markedly reduce the cost of hydrogen through lower capital and energy requirements. The development of a more cost-effective route to hydrogen production based on natural gas as the primary energy source will accelerate the transition to a more hydrogen-based economy in the future. The paper describes the process, which includes a sorbent for CO{sub 2} removal, and the various tasks involved in its development.

  6. Enhancing the reactivity of 1,2-diphospholes in cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Zagidullin, Almaz; Miluykov, Vasili; Oshchepkova, Elena; Tufatullin, Artem; Kataeva, Olga; Sinyashin, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Two different approaches have been employed to enhance the reactivity of 1-alkyl-1,2-diphospholes - the introduction of electron-withdrawing groups either at the phosphorus atoms or in the para-position of the arene ring. The alkylation of sodium 1,2-diphospha-3,4,5-triphenylcyclopentadienide with alkyl halides Hal-CH2-R (R = CN, COOEt, OMe, CH2OEt) results in corresponding 1-alkyl-3,4,5-triphenyl-1,2-diphospholes (alkyl = CH2CN (1a), CH2COOEt (1b), CH2OMe (1c), and (CH2)2OEt (1d)), which spontaneously undergo the intermolecular [4 + 2] cycloaddition reactions at room temperature to form the mixture of the cycloadducts, 2a-c, respectively. However the alkylation of sodium 1,2-diphospha-3,4,5-tri(p-fluorophenyl)cyclopentadienide with ethyl iodide leads to stable 1-ethyl-3,4,5-tris(p-fluorophenyl)-1,2-diphosphole (1e), which forms the [4 + 2] cycloadduct 2,3,4,4a,5,6-hexa(p-fluorophenyl)-1-ethyl-1,7,7a-triphospha-4,7-(ethylphosphinidene)indene (2e) only upon heating up to 60 °C. With further heating to 120 °C with N-phenylmaleimide, the cycloadducts 2a-c and 2e undergo the retro-Diels-Alder reaction and form only one product of the [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction 3a-с, 3e with good yields up to 65%. PMID:25815066

  7. Oral mucosal involvement and petechial lesions: a SDRIFE case with unusual findings.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Ozlu, Emin; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Uzuncakmak, Tugba Kevser; Turkoglu, Zafer; Ozkanli, Seyma; Zemheri, Ebru

    2016-06-01

    Symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE) is a type IV hypersensitivity reaction characterized by a symmetrical erythematous rash in the gluteal and intertriginous areas. SDRIFE was previously considered to be the same presentation as Baboon Syndrome, however, has been suggested to be a different entity in the recent publications. The lesions are generally maculopapular and there is no mucosal involvement. To date, no case with petechial findings and mucosal involvement has been reported in the literature. The present study reports a SDRIFE case with a symmetrical erythematous petechial rash and oral mucosal involvement after taking oral amoxicillin. PMID:26339719

  8. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  9. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  10. Pulsed Multiple Reaction Monitoring Approach to Enhancing Sensitivity of a Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Prasad, Satendra; Prior, David C.; Danielson, William F.; Weitz, Karl; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC)–triple quadrupole mass spectrometers operating in a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode are increasingly used for quantitative analysis of low-abundance analytes in highly complex biochemical matrixes. After development and selection of optimum MRM transitions, sensitivity and data quality limitations are largely related to mass spectral peak interferences from sample or matrix constituents and statistical limitations at low number of ions reaching the detector. Herein, we report on a new approach to enhancing MRM sensitivity by converting the continuous stream of ions from the ion source into a pulsed ion beam through the use of an ion funnel trap (IFT). Evaluation of the pulsed MRM approach was performed with a tryptic digest of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 spiked with several model peptides. The sensitivity improvement observed with the IFT coupled in to the triple quadrupole instrument is based on several unique features. First, ion accumulation radio frequency (rf) ion trap facilitates improved droplet desolvation, which is manifested in the reduced background ion noise at the detector. Second, signal amplitude for a given transition is enhanced because of an order-of-magnitude increase in the ion charge density compared to a continuous mode of operation. Third, signal detection at the full duty cycle is obtained, as the trap use eliminates dead times between transitions, which are inevitable with continuous ion streams. In comparison with the conventional approach, the pulsed MRM signals showed 5-fold enhanced peak amplitude and 2–3-fold reduced chemical background, resulting in an improvement in the limit of detection (LOD) by a factor of ~4–8. PMID:21344863

  11. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal adjuvant candidates when compared with other substances that can be used as mucosal adjuvants. The strategy of a DNA-based mucosal adjuvant facilitates the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells, and thus is an effective and safe approach. It would also provide great flexibility for the development of effective vaccines for various mucosal pathogens. PMID:19722892

  12. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications. PMID:16937429

  13. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR studies of heterogeneous catalytic reaction over HY zeolite using natural abundance reactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Su, Yongchao; Li, Bojie; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR (PRE ssNMR) technique was used to investigate catalytic reaction over zeolite HY. After introducing paramagnetic Cu(II) ions into the zeolite, the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation rates of nearby nuclei, i.e.(29)Si of the framework and (13)C of the absorbents, was measured. It was demonstrated that the PRE ssNMR technique facilitated the fast acquisition of NMR signals to monitor the heterogeneous catalytic reaction (such as acetone to hydrocarbon) using natural abundance reactants. PMID:25616847

  14. Mucosal vaccination: lung versus nose.

    PubMed

    Vujanic, Ana; Sutton, Philip; Snibson, Kenneth J; Yen, Hung-Hsun; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2012-07-15

    The induction of potent mucosal immune responses able to prevent the establishment of infection at the onset of mucosal pathogen colonisation represents a desirable but challenging goal for vaccine development. Here we compare nasal vaccine delivery with intra-pulmonary vaccination using a sheep lymphatic cannulation model. Our results demonstrate that nasal delivery of a non-infective ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine does not induce primary immune responses in the lymph draining the nasal lymph nodes, suggesting that local immune responses in the lymph nodes draining the nasal cavity are relatively weak. However, this mode of delivery can boost existing immunity in the nasal lymph. Using the same adjuvant we were able to induce very potent immune responses in both blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), following intra-pulmonary delivery of ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine, even when very small doses of antigen were employed. Lung delivery could also induce comparable immune responses against other recombinant antigens mixed with ISCOMATRIX(®) adjuvant and could therefore become a method of choice for the induction of immunity to mucosal pathogens infecting the lower respiratory tract. PMID:21492942

  15. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  16. Mucosal Immunology of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Berin, M. Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in IgE sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors such as dietary factors and microbiota in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy. PMID:23660362

  17. Parenteral and mucosal prime-boost immunization strategies in mice with hepatitis B surface antigen and CpG DNA.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, Michael J; Weeratna, Risini D; Payette, Paul J; Davis, Heather L

    2002-02-18

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG ODN) are potent adjuvants to protein antigens administered by parenteral or mucosal routes to BALB/c mice. To date, there have been no studies using combined parenteral/mucosal approaches with CpG DNA as adjuvant. In this study we evaluated different parenteral prime-mucosal boost and mucosal prime-parenteral boost strategies using hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) alone or with different adjuvants: aluminum hydroxide (alum), cholera toxin (CT), CpG ODN. In addition, since CpG ODN has previously been shown to act synergistically with other adjuvants after parenteral or mucosal delivery, we also evaluated adjuvant combinations: alum+CpG ODN and CT+CpG ODN. The effects of adjuvant and administration strategy on systemic and mucosal humoral responses were measured, as well as cell-mediated immune responses (cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity). These results were compared to parenteral only or mucosal only strategies. Our findings demonstrate that parenteral immunization can prime for mucosal responses even when different lymph nodes were being targeted. HBsAg-specific immune responses (IgG in plasma, cytotoxic T lymphocytes) induced by parenteral prime could all be significantly enhanced by mucosal boosting and despite the fact that intramuscular immunization alone could not induce mucosal IgA, it could prime for a subsequent mucosal boost. In addition, the presence of adjuvant at time of boosting could influence the nature of subsequent immune responses (Th1 vs. Th2). Mice primed intranasally could have their systemic immune responses boosted with a parenteral administration and it was also possible to enhance mucosal responses induced by intranasal prime with an intramuscular boost. PMID:11934561

  18. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  19. Can prophylactic application of immunoglobulin decrease radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis?

    PubMed

    Mose, S; Adamietz, I A; Saran, F; Thilmann, C; Heyd, R; Knecht, R; Böttcher, H D

    1997-08-01

    Therapeutic application of immunoglobulin is reported to be successful in radiation-induced oral and oropharyngeal mucositis. In this study the efficacy of prophylactic application of immunoglobulin was investigated. In 42 patients with head and neck cancer, postoperative radiation treatment or radiation combined with chemotherapy was performed. In 20 consecutive patients, prophylactic mucositis treatment consisted of panthenol (4 x 10 ml/day) and nystatin (4 x 1 ml/day). The 22 following patients received, supplementary to panthenol and nystatin, 800 mg (5 ml) human immunoglobulin intramuscularly once weekly. During the treatment time, the degree of mucositis was examined 3 times a week. The distribution of maximal mucositis degree revealed slightly more severe mucous membrane reaction in the control group compared with the immunoglobulin group (n.s.). The analysis of mean mucositis degrees in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (t test, p = 0.031) related to the entire group (n = 42) and to those 16 patients receiving radiation combined with chemotherapy. There was no significant immunoglobulin-induced effect on mucositis in patients treated by radiation alone. The time from the beginning of therapy to the first interruption could be prolonged 5 days in the immunoglobulin group (n.s.). In conclusion, it is demonstrated that the prophylactic application of immunoglobulin seems to lower the degree of radiation-induced mucositis. In comparison to the published data about therapeutically given immunoglobulin, the clinical efficacy of the prophylactic application of immunoglobulin as it is performed in this study is less evident. PMID:9256900

  20. Elite Control, Gut CD4 T Cell Sparing, and Enhanced Mucosal T Cell Responses in Macaca nemestrina Infected by a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Lacking a gp41 Trafficking Motif

    PubMed Central

    Breed, Matthew W.; Elser, Samra E.; Torben, Workineh; Jordan, Andrea P. O.; Aye, Pyone P.; Midkiff, Cecily; Schiro, Faith; Sugimoto, Chie; Alvarez-Hernandez, Xavier; Blair, Robert V.; Somasunderam, Anoma; Utay, Netanya S.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Pahar, Bapi; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Marsh, Mark; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Keele, Brandon F.; Fultz, Patricia N.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deletion of Gly-720 and Tyr-721 from a highly conserved GYxxØ trafficking signal in the SIVmac239 envelope glycoprotein cytoplasmic domain, producing a virus termed ΔGY, leads to a striking perturbation in pathogenesis in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Infected macaques develop immune activation and progress to AIDS, but with only limited and transient infection of intestinal CD4+ T cells and an absence of microbial translocation. Here we evaluated ΔGY in pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina), a species in which SIVmac239 infection typically leads to increased immune activation and more rapid progression to AIDS than in rhesus macaques. In pig-tailed macaques, ΔGY also replicated acutely to high peak plasma RNA levels identical to those for SIVmac239 and caused only transient infection of CD4+ T cells in the gut lamina propria and no microbial translocation. However, in marked contrast to rhesus macaques, 19 of 21 pig-tailed macaques controlled ΔGY replication with plasma viral loads of <15 to 50 RNA copies/ml. CD4+ T cells were preserved in blood and gut for up to 100 weeks with no immune activation or disease progression. Robust antiviral CD4+ T cell responses were seen, particularly in the gut. Anti-CD8 antibody depletion demonstrated CD8+ cellular control of viral replication. Two pig-tailed macaques progressed to disease with persisting viremia and possible compensatory mutations in the cytoplasmic tail. These studies demonstrate a marked perturbation in pathogenesis caused by ΔGY's ablation of the GYxxØ trafficking motif and reveal, paradoxically, that viral control is enhanced in a macaque species typically predisposed to more pathogenic manifestations of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) reflects a balance between viral replication, host innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses, and sustained immune activation

  1. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m2 g-1) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications.

  2. Sintering Behavior of Metal Powders Involving Microwave-Enhanced Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Sadatsugu; Saito, Yasushi; Sato, Motoyasu; Nagasaka, Takuya; Muroga, Takeo; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko

    2006-03-01

    Copper powder compacts were sintered by microwave radiation in air. In this procedure, the samples were sintered by microwave in air without using any special atmosphere, only by protecting them in a container filled with ceramic powder. The enhancement of the deoxidation reaction by the microwave was observed. The samples were analyzed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The samples were deoxidized on the surface and were well sintered to the edge from the inside throughout the entire cross section. The tensile strength of the copper samples sintered by the microwave in air was higher than that found in conventional sintering in N2 gas. No other differences were noticed between the samples sintered by the microwave under the air-rich conditions and in the conventional furnace in H2+N2 gas. The microwave-sintered copper samples were of good quality; for example, the tensile strength measured throughout the cross section was the same as that for the samples sintered in H2+N2 gas by the conventional method.

  3. Trace MicroRNA Quantification by Means of Plasmon-Enhanced Hybridization Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fangfei; Liu, Huiqiao; Li, Qiang; Gao, Xia; Yin, Yongmei; Liu, Dingbin

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying trace microRNAs (miRNAs) is extremely important in a number of biomedical applications but remains a great challenge. Here we present an enzyme-free amplification strategy called plasmon-enhanced hybridization chain reaction (PE-HCR) for quantifying trace miRNAs with an outstanding linear range from 1 fM to 1 pM (r(2) = 0.991), along with a detection limit of 0.043 fM (1300 molecules in 50 μL of sample). The merits of the PE-HCR assay, including high sensitivity and specificity, quantitative detection, no enzyme involvement, low false positives, and easy-to-operate procedures, have been demonstrated for high-confidence quantification of the contents of miRNAs in even single cancer cells. The PE-HCR assay may open up new avenues for highly sensitive quantification of biomarkers and thus should hold great potentials in clinical diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:27088492

  4. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objectives of this work are to conduct research that will provide the basis for an improved liquefaction process, and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying wig be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying, and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semisolid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction.

  5. Observing Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reactions in Situ Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Pd–Au Nanoshells

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Kimberly N.; Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Insight into the nature of transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions is obtainable from a number of surface spectroscopic techniques. Carrying out these investigations under actual reaction conditions is preferred but remains challenging, especially for catalytic reactions that occur in water. Here, we report the direct spectroscopic study of the catalytic hydrodechlorination of 1,1-dichloroethene in H2O using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). With Pd islands grown on Au nanoshell films, this reaction can be followed in situ using SERS, exploiting the high enhancements and large active area of Au nanoshell SERS substrates, the transparency of Raman spectroscopy to aqueous solvents, and the catalytic activity enhancement of Pd by the underlying Au metal. The formation and subsequent transformation of several adsorbate species was observed. These results provide the first direct evidence of the room-temperature catalytic hydrodechlorination of a chlorinated solvent, a potentially important pathway for groundwater cleanup, as a sequence of dechlorination and hydrogenation steps. More broadly, the results highlight the exciting prospects of studying catalytic processes in water in situ, like those involved in biomass conversion and proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. PMID:19554693

  6. Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

  7. Mucosal Vaccination Overcomes the Barrier to Recombinant Vaccinia Immunization Caused by Preexisting Poxvirus Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, Igor M.; Moss, Bernard; Strober, Warren; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    1999-04-01

    Overcoming preexisting immunity to vaccinia virus in the adult population is a key requirement for development of otherwise potent recombinant vaccinia vaccines. Based on our observation that s.c. immunization with vaccinia induces cellular and antibody immunity to vaccinia only in systemic lymphoid tissue and not in mucosal sites, we hypothesized that the mucosal immune system remains naive to vaccinia and therefore amenable to immunization with recombinant vaccinia vectors despite earlier vaccinia exposure. We show that mucosal immunization of vaccinia-immune BALB/c mice with recombinant vaccinia expressing HIV gp160 induced specific serum antibody and strong HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. These responses occurred not only in mucosal but also in systemic lymphoid tissue, whereas systemic immunization was ineffective under these circumstances. In this context, intrarectal immunization was more effective than intranasal immunization. Boosting with a second dose of recombinant vaccinia was also more effective via the mucosal route. The systemic HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response was enhanced by coadministration of IL-12 at the mucosal site. These results also demonstrate the independent compartmentalization of the mucosal versus systemic immune systems and the asymmetric trafficking of lymphocytes between them. This approach to circumvent previous vaccinia immunity may be useful for induction of protective immunity against infectious diseases and cancer in the sizable populations with preexisting immunity to vaccinia from smallpox vaccination.

  8. Atmospheric CO2 uptake throughout bio-enhanced brucite-water reaction at Montecastelli serpentinites (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedini, Federica; Boschi, Chiara; Ménez, Benedicte; Perchiazzi, Natale; Zanchetta, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    active microbial communities in or at the serpentinites surface could promote and/or enhance the key reaction through which serpentine, reacting with the carbon dioxide, becomes hydrated Mg-carbonates. This novel study aims to provide a contribution to the identification of the biominerals that could be a valid proof between CO2-mineral sequestration and microbial activity interactions. This innovative research is designed to provide a plan in future at industrial scale to reduce and capture the greenhouse gas content by Earth's atmosphere, thanks to the precipitation of carbonate biominerals. Keywords: serpentinite, carbonation, biominerals. Bedini F., Boschi C., Ménez B., Perchiazzi N., Natali C., Zanchetta G. (2013) Interaction between Geosphere and Biosphere in CO2-mineral sequestration environment. FIST GEOITALIA 2013- XI Forum di Scienze della Terra (Pisa, Italy).

  9. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance

  10. Posttraining Interventions To Enhance Transfer: The Moderating Effects of Work Environments. [and] Invited Reaction: Posttraining Interventions To Enhance Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman-Hirsch, Wendy L.

    2001-01-01

    After 267 workers were trained, one group received goal-setting training, a second group self-management training, and a third no additional training. Goal setting improved perceptions of transfer; both interventions were more effective in supportive work environments. (Dale M. Brethower's invited reaction critiques the study from the perspective…

  11. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D.; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P.

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4+ T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will shed light

  12. Choice and Design of Adjuvants for Parenteral and Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Savelkoul, Huub F. J.; Ferro, Valerie A.; Strioga, Marius M.; Schijns, Virgil E. J. C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of pathogens that escape recognition by specific vaccines, the need to improve existing vaccines and the increased availability of therapeutic (non-infectious disease) vaccines necessitate the rational development of novel vaccine concepts based on the induction of protective cell-mediated immune responses. For naive T-cell activation, several signals resulting from innate and adaptive interactions need to be integrated, and adjuvants may interfere with some or all of these signals. Adjuvants, for example, are used to promote the immunogenicity of antigens in vaccines, by inducing a pro-inflammatory environment that enables the recruitment and promotion of the infiltration of phagocytic cells, particularly antigen-presenting cells (APC), to the injection site. Adjuvants can enhance antigen presentation, induce cytokine expression, activate APC and modulate more downstream adaptive immune reactions (vaccine delivery systems, facilitating immune Signal 1). In addition, adjuvants can act as immunopotentiators (facilitating Signals 2 and 3) exhibiting immune stimulatory effects during antigen presentation by inducing the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on APC. Together, these signals determine the strength of activation of specific T-cells, thereby also influencing the quality of the downstream T helper cytokine profiles and the differentiation of antigen-specific T helper populations (Signal 3). New adjuvants should also target specific (innate) immune cells in order to facilitate proper activation of downstream adaptive immune responses and homing (Signal 4). It is desirable that these adjuvants should be able to exert such responses in the context of mucosal administered vaccines. This review focuses on the understanding of the potential working mechanisms of the most well-known classes of adjuvants to be used effectively in vaccines. PMID:26344951

  13. Choice and Design of Adjuvants for Parenteral and Mucosal Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, Huub F J; Ferro, Valerie A; Strioga, Marius M; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2015-01-01

    The existence of pathogens that escape recognition by specific vaccines, the need to improve existing vaccines and the increased availability of therapeutic (non-infectious disease) vaccines necessitate the rational development of novel vaccine concepts based on the induction of protective cell-mediated immune responses. For naive T-cell activation, several signals resulting from innate and adaptive interactions need to be integrated, and adjuvants may interfere with some or all of these signals. Adjuvants, for example, are used to promote the immunogenicity of antigens in vaccines, by inducing a pro-inflammatory environment that enables the recruitment and promotion of the infiltration of phagocytic cells, particularly antigen-presenting cells (APC), to the injection site. Adjuvants can enhance antigen presentation, induce cytokine expression, activate APC and modulate more downstream adaptive immune reactions (vaccine delivery systems, facilitating immune Signal 1). In addition, adjuvants can act as immunopotentiators (facilitating Signals 2 and 3) exhibiting immune stimulatory effects during antigen presentation by inducing the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on APC. Together, these signals determine the strength of activation of specific T-cells, thereby also influencing the quality of the downstream T helper cytokine profiles and the differentiation of antigen-specific T helper populations (Signal 3). New adjuvants should also target specific (innate) immune cells in order to facilitate proper activation of downstream adaptive immune responses and homing (Signal 4). It is desirable that these adjuvants should be able to exert such responses in the context of mucosal administered vaccines. This review focuses on the understanding of the potential working mechanisms of the most well-known classes of adjuvants to be used effectively in vaccines. PMID:26344951

  14. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  15. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  16. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  17. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis. PMID:24376587

  18. The sonochemical degradation of azobenzene and related azo dyes: Rate enhancements via Fenton's reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J.M.; Destaillats, H.; Hung, H.M.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    2000-01-20

    The sonochemical degradation of aqueous solutions of azobenzene and related azo dyes (methyl orange, o-methyl red, and p-methyl red) was performed at 500 kHz and 50 W, under air, O{sub 2}, or Ar saturation at 288 K. Reaction products and intermediates were identified by HPLC-ES-MS. Total organic carbon (TOC) was also determined as a function of reaction time. The authors propose a reaction mechanism based on the observed species and the extent and rate of TOC depletion. The effects of the dye structures and of the background gas on the sonochemical bleaching rates were also investigated. The reaction rates for o-methyl red were approximately 30--40% faster than those for the other compounds. Saturating with Ar instead of air or O{sub 2} increased the pseudo first-order rate constants for the degradation by 10%. The acceleration of the sonochemical bleaching and the mineralization process upon addition of Fe(II) was also investigated in Ar-saturated methyl orange solutions. A 3-fold increase in the reaction rate was observed at optimal Fe(II) concentrations. This kinetic effect is quantitatively accounted for by a simple kinetic model based on the reaction of Fe(II) with sonochemically produced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (Fenton's reaction). This latter effect illustrates a simple way of achieving a substantial improvement in the efficiency of sonochemical degradation reactions.

  19. Investigation of pyridine/propargyl bromide reaction and strong fluorescence enhancements of the resultant poly(propargyl pyridinium bromide).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changming; Gao, Yong; Chen, Daoyong

    2012-09-20

    Poly(propargyl pyridinium bromide), a kind of conjugated polyelectrolyte with polyacetylene as the backbone and pyridinium as side groups, was synthesized simply via reaction between pyridine and propargyl bromide under mild conditions. The resultant polymer was characterized by (1)H NMR, elemental analysis, FT-IR, and GPC-MALLS. An alkyne group was confirmed as the end group of the polymer chains by the alkyne/azide click chemistry, which reveals that the polymerization is terminated by the reaction between propargyl bromide and carbon anions. It is known that monosubstituted polyacetylenes reported have very weak fluorescence intensities, which limit their applications. As a monosubstituted polyacetylene, the freshly prepared poly(propargyl pyridinium bromide) also has a very weak fluorescence. However, we confirmed that addition of some anions to the polymer solution in DMF or DMSO leads to the fluorescence enhancements up to 25 times. Besides, heating the polymer solution at a temperature between 70 and 130 °C for longer than 0.5 h greatly enhanced the fluorescence intensity. The interaction with the anions or the heating enhances the effective exciton confinement within the conjugated backbone and thus results in the fluorescence enhancements. After the fluorescence enhancements, poly(propargyl pyridinium bromide) has relatively strong fluorescence emissions, which will make it promising in fluorescence-based applications. PMID:22928912

  20. Direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic reaction activity of Au nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxides by SERS.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu; You, Tingting; Liu, Dapeng; Lang, Xiufeng; Tan, Enzhong; Shi, Jihua; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-04-21

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have recently attracted tremendous research interest in the field of catalysis due to their unique optical and electronic properties. However, direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles (NPs) supported on reduced graphene oxides (Au/rGO) has rarely been reported. Herein, based on the reduction from 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), the catalytic property of Au/rGO nanocomposites was investigated and compared with corresponding Au NP samples with similar size distribution. Our results show that Au/rGO nanocomposites could serve as a good catalytic and analytic platform for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. In addition, systematic comparisons were conducted during power- and time-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments, which exhibited a lower power threshold and higher catalytic efficiency for Au/rGO as compared to Au NPs toward the reaction. PMID:25793752

  1. Highly sensitive DNA methylation analysis at CpG resolution by surface-enhanced Raman scattering via ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuling; Wee, Eugene J H; Trau, Matt

    2015-07-11

    Sensitive and accurate DNA methylation analysis at CpG resolution was demonstrated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) via ligase chain reaction (LCR). The method was sensitive to 10% changes in methylation and the accuracy of methylation estimates in cells and serum DNA validated with sequencing. The LCR/SERS approach may have broad applications as an alternative (epi)genetic detection method. PMID:26063626

  2. Coincidence of different structures of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) in the respiratory tract of children: no indications for enhanced mucosal immunostimulation in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Debertin, A S; Tschernig, T; Schürmann, A; Bajanowski, T; Brinkmann, B; Pabst, R

    2006-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is the principal inductive site for mucosal immune responses that are capable of T and B cell responses and antigen-specific responses. In previous independent studies different structures of MALT, e.g. bronchus-, larynx- and nose-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT, LALT, NALT) have been described separately in various frequencies in the human respiratory tract over life spans. Because upper respiratory tract infections are common in infants, dysregulations of mucosal immune responses might be seriously involved in the aetiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In the present study the coincidental occurrence of the three different MALT structures in the respiratory tract within the same patients were studied, and cases of SIDS and children who had died from different traumatic and natural causes of death (non-SIDS) were compared. First, the frequency of BALT and LALT in 46 children (35 SIDS, 11 non-SIDS) with or without NALT were examined. A tendency was found of a coincidence of respiratory MALT structures. In 50 additional cases of infant death (30 SIDS, 20 non-SIDS) from the multi-centric German Study on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (GeSID) where death had occurred in the first year of life, the coincidence was evaluated. A coincidental occurrence of BALT, LALT and NALT or BALT and LALT (each about 30%) was found in both groups, whereby the coincidence in SIDS and the control patients did not differ. Interestingly, the children with coincidental MALT were strikingly older, supporting the hypothesis of respiratory MALT formation via environmental stimulation over time. PMID:16968398

  3. Synthesis and characterization of Ag/PPy composite films via enhanced redox reaction of metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Xu, Yunlong; Chen, Jun; Chen, Guorong; Zhao, Chongjun; Qian, Xiuzhen; Wang, Meng

    2009-10-01

    A facile approach to the formation of Ag/PPy composite film, through the reaction of Ag + and pyrrole monomer, was developed with the help of synergistic effect of NH 3·H 2O on this reaction. Black or gray Ag/PPy film precipitated on the insert wall of the vessel within 0.5 h with this new method. The Ag/PPy composite film has good conductivity (sheet resistance: 0.28 Ω/square) and superhydrophility (contact angle of water, CAW ˜0°). Mechanism involved in the reaction rate acceleration was briefly discussed.

  4. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction.

  5. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd(2+) ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction. PMID:27079897

  6. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction. PMID:27079897

  7. Respiratory mucosal permeability in asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, R.K.; Kennedy, S.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.; Pare, P.D.

    1983-09-01

    The permeability of respiratory mucosa to technetium-labeled diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) was measured in 10 clinically stable chronic asthmatics and the results were compared with those in 9 nonasthmatic control subjects. Nonspecific bronchial reactivity was measured using methacholine, and the PC20 was calculated. The intrapulmonary distribution and dose of the inhaled /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was determined by a gamma camera and the half-life of the aerosolized label in the lung was calculated. The accumulation of radioactivity in the blood was monitored and a permeability index was calculated at 10, 25, and 60 min after aerosolization. Despite marked differences in airway reactivity, no differences in either parameter of permeability could be detected between the asthmatics and the control group. It is concluded that clinically stable asthmatics do not demonstrate increase mucosal permeability to small solutes when compared with normal subjects.

  8. Effects of chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition in cold-restraint and ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiu, B S; Pfeiffer, C J; Cho, C H

    1996-01-01

    Gastric actions of Nw-nitro-1-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were investigated in rats, as this agent is a reliable nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME solutions were placed in subcutaneous osmotic minipumps which continuously released L-NAME at 0.1, 1.0, 10, or 40 mg/kg/day. L-NAME dose and time-dependently enhanced stress-induced gastric ulceration but did not affect mucosal mast cell population. Ulcerogenic actions of L-NAME were reversed by L-arginine but not by D-arginine. Ten L-NAME treatment also enhanced the ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage, depressed gastric mucosal blood flow but did not alter gastric mucus, secretory volume, or acid output. It is concluded that in the present models, chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced ulcerogenesis by decreasing mucosal resistance due to reduced mucosal blood perfusion. This implicates nitric oxide as a mucosal defense factor which acts in part by maintaining mucosal blood flow. PMID:8626050

  9. Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on pattering of platinum surfaces with cyanide.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; Escudero-Escribano, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; Inst. de Quimica Fisica; Toyota Central R&D Labs., Inc.

    2010-08-15

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

  10. Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; Escudero, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M.

    2010-10-01

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

  11. The surface sulfur doping induced enhanced performance of cobalt catalysts in oxygen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Zhu, Zhengju; Yin, Huajie; Su, Xintai; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Wang, Dan; Tang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-08-01

    A novel surface sulfur (S) doped cobalt (Co) catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is theoretically designed through the optimisation of the electronic structure of highly reactive surface atoms which is also validated by electrocatalytic OER experiments. PMID:27377872

  12. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2003-04-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus (vessel) for providing a heat transfer rate from a reaction chamber through a wall to a heat transfer chamber substantially matching a local heat transfer rate of a catalytic thermal chemical reaction. The key to the invention is a thermal distance defined on a cross sectional plane through the vessel inclusive of a heat transfer chamber, reaction chamber and a wall between the chambers. The cross sectional plane is perpendicular to a bulk flow direction of the reactant stream, and the thermal distance is a distance between a coolest position and a hottest position on the cross sectional plane. The thermal distance is of a length wherein the heat transfer rate from the reaction chamber to the heat transfer chamber substantially matches the local heat transfer rate.

  13. Reaction mechanisms and rate constants of waste degradation in landfill bioreactor systems with enzymatic-enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, P A; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Mehrotra, A K; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    Augmenting leachate before recirculation with peroxidase enzymes is a novel method to increase the available carbon, and therefore the food supply to microorganisms at the declining phase of the anaerobic landfill bioreactor operation. In order to optimize the enzyme-catalyzed leachate recirculation process, it is necessary to identify the reaction mechanisms and determine rate constants. This paper presents a kinetic model developed to ascertain the reaction mechanisms and determine the rate constants for enzyme catalyzed anaerobic waste degradation. The maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) for MnP enzyme-catalyzed reactors was 0.076 g(TOC)/g(DS).day. The catalytic turnover number (k(cat)) of the MnP enzyme-catalyzed was 506.7 per day while the rate constant (k) of the un-catalyzed reaction was 0.012 per day. PMID:24759644

  14. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  15. Results demonstrating techniques for enhancing electrochemical reactions involving iron oxide in slags and C in liquid iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Uday B.; MacDonald, Scott A.; Woolley, David W.; Powell, Adam C.

    2005-04-01

    Two techniques are described for the enhancement of the kinetics of reduction of iron oxide from slags by carbon in molten iron. Laboratory experiments have shown that the rate of iron oxide reduction by carbon-saturated iron can be increased by 5 to 10 times when the reaction is carried out under a reduced-pressure atmosphere. This effect is thought to be the result of the increased volumetric gas evolution through the slag layer and the associated increase in slag stirring. A model is presented, which relates the mass-transfer coefficient for ferrous ions in the slag to its stirring that is controlled by varying the ambient pressure. Additional laboratory experiments examined the electrochemical nature of iron oxide reduction from slag by carbon in liquid iron. Results indicate that the reduction of iron oxide from slag is increased in the presence of an applied electric field. The external circuit allows for the separation of the half-cell reactions associated with iron oxide reduction and decarburization and increases the reaction area available for the individual reactions. These results have significant implications for several important slag metal reactions, which occur during ironmaking and steelmaking operations.

  16. The mucosal immune system for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Azegamia, Tatsuhiko; Kiyonoa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-20

    Mucosal surfaces are continuously exposed to the external environment and therefore represent the largest lymphoid organ of the body. In the mucosal immune system, gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), including Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in the gut. GALTs have unique organogenesis characteristics and interact with the network of dendritic cells and T cells for the simultaneous induction and regulation of IgA responses and oral tolerance. In these lymphoid tissues, antigens are up taken by M cells in the epithelial layer, and antigen-specific immune responses are subsequently initiated by GALT cells. Nasopharynx- and tear-duct-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs and TALTs) are key organized lymphoid structures in the respiratory tract and ocular cavities, respectively, and have been shown to interact with each other. Mucosal surfaces are also characterized by host-microbe interactions that affect the genesis and maturation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues and the induction and regulation of innate and acquired mucosal immune responses. Because most harmful pathogens enter the body through mucosal surfaces by ingestion, inhalation, or sexual contact, the mucosa is a candidate site for vaccination. Mucosal vaccination has some physiological and practical advantages, such as decreased costs and reduced risk of needle-stick injuries and transmission of bloodborne diseases, and it is painless. Recently, the application of modern bioengineering and biochemical engineering technologies, including gene transformation and manipulation systems, resulted in the development of systems to express vaccine antigens in transgenic plants and nanogels, which will usher in a new era of delivery systems for mucosal vaccine antigens. In this review, based on some of our research group's thirty seven years of progress and effort, we highlight the unique features of mucosal immune

  17. Interfacial engineering of MoS2/TiO2 hybrids for enhanced electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaolin; Chen, Guifeng; Guan, Lixiu; Zhang, Hui; Tao, Junguang

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we show that the synergistic effect between MoS2 and TiO2 enhances the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performance of their hybrids, which is tunable via interface engineering. Among several interfaces, MoS2/TiO2–H complexes exhibit the best HER activity. The observed Tafel slope of 66.9 mV/dec is well in range of previous literature reports, suggesting a Volmer–Heyrovsky mechanism. Enhanced activities were attributed to abundant active sites at the interfaces, as well as improved charge transfer efficiency. Our results emphasize the roles that interfaces play in enhancing the HER activities of MoS2-based heterogeneous catalysts.

  18. Oral mucositis. A complication of radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, C.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a complication of head and neck radiotherapy. It is understood what causes the inflammation and what biological tissue changes occur, however, a definite cure for oral mucositis has not yet been found. Supportive treatments, analgesics, antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory agents have been prescribed, none of which has been a thorough measure of treatment. An effective cure for oral mucositis is still in the midst of scientific research. In the interim local palliative treatments will help to alleviate the patients', debilitating symptoms.

  19. Mucosal transmission and pathogenesis of chronic wasting disease in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Perrott, Matthew R; Sigurdson, Christina J; Mason, Gary L; Hoover, Edward A

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids is almost certainly transmitted by mucosal contact with the causative prion, whether by direct (animal-to-animal) or indirect (environmental) means. Yet the sites and mechanisms of prion entry remain to be further understood. This study sought to extend this understanding by demonstrating that ferrets exposed to CWD via several mucosal routes developed infection, CWD prion protein (PrP(CWD)) amplification in lymphoid tissues, neural invasion and florid transmissible spongiform encephalopathy lesions resembling those in native cervid hosts. The ferrets developed extensive PrP(CWD) accumulation in the nervous system, retina and olfactory epithelium, with lesser deposition in tongue, muscle, salivary gland and the vomeronasal organ. PrP(CWD) accumulation in mucosal sites, including upper respiratory tract epithelium, olfactory epithelium and intestinal Peyer's patches, make the shedding of prions by infected ferrets plausible. It was also observed that regionally targeted exposure of the nasopharyngeal mucosa resulted in an increased attack rate when compared with oral exposure. The latter finding suggests that nasal exposure enhances permissiveness to CWD infection. The ferret model has further potential for investigation of portals for initiation of CWD infection. PMID:23100363

  20. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Assisted by Radical Capturer for Tracking of Plasmon-Driven Redox Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuefeng; Wang, Lingzhi; Tan, Xianjun; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    The deep understanding about the photocatalytic reaction induced by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect is desirable but remains a considerable challenge due to the ultrafast relaxation of hole-electron exciton from SPR process and a lack of an efficient monitoring system. Here, using the p-aminothiophenol (PATP) oxidation SPR-catalyzed by Ag nanoparticle as a model reaction, a radical-capturer-assisted surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been used as an in-situ tracking technique to explore the primary active species determining the reaction path. Hole is revealed to be directly responsible for the oxidation of PATP to p, p′-dimercaptoazobenzene (4, 4′-DMAB) and O2 functions as an electron capturer to form isolated hole. The oxidation degree of PATP can be further enhanced through a joint utilization of electron capturers of AgNO3 and atmospheric O2, producing p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP) within 10 s due to the improved hole-electron separation efficiency. PMID:27444268

  2. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:26578100

  3. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Assisted by Radical Capturer for Tracking of Plasmon-Driven Redox Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xuefeng; Wang, Lingzhi; Tan, Xianjun; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-07-01

    The deep understanding about the photocatalytic reaction induced by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect is desirable but remains a considerable challenge due to the ultrafast relaxation of hole-electron exciton from SPR process and a lack of an efficient monitoring system. Here, using the p-aminothiophenol (PATP) oxidation SPR-catalyzed by Ag nanoparticle as a model reaction, a radical-capturer-assisted surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been used as an in-situ tracking technique to explore the primary active species determining the reaction path. Hole is revealed to be directly responsible for the oxidation of PATP to p, p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene (4, 4‧-DMAB) and O2 functions as an electron capturer to form isolated hole. The oxidation degree of PATP can be further enhanced through a joint utilization of electron capturers of AgNO3 and atmospheric O2, producing p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP) within 10 s due to the improved hole-electron separation efficiency.

  4. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Assisted by Radical Capturer for Tracking of Plasmon-Driven Redox Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuefeng; Wang, Lingzhi; Tan, Xianjun; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    The deep understanding about the photocatalytic reaction induced by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect is desirable but remains a considerable challenge due to the ultrafast relaxation of hole-electron exciton from SPR process and a lack of an efficient monitoring system. Here, using the p-aminothiophenol (PATP) oxidation SPR-catalyzed by Ag nanoparticle as a model reaction, a radical-capturer-assisted surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been used as an in-situ tracking technique to explore the primary active species determining the reaction path. Hole is revealed to be directly responsible for the oxidation of PATP to p, p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (4, 4'-DMAB) and O2 functions as an electron capturer to form isolated hole. The oxidation degree of PATP can be further enhanced through a joint utilization of electron capturers of AgNO3 and atmospheric O2, producing p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP) within 10 s due to the improved hole-electron separation efficiency. PMID:27444268

  5. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:26578100

  6. Low-energy enhancement of nuclear γ strength and its impact on astrophysical reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, A. C.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Bürger, A.; Camera, F.; Eriksen, T. K.; Giacoppo, F.; Goriely, S.; Guttormsen, M.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Harissopulos, S.; Koehler, P. E.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T. T.; Rose, S.; Ruud, I. E.; Schiller, A.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A. V.; Wiedeking, M.

    2014-03-01

    An unexpected enhancement in the low-energy part of the γ-strength function for light and medium-mass nuclei has been discovered at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. This enhancement could lead to an increase in the neutron-capture rates up to two orders of magnitude for very exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. However, it is still an open question whether this structure persists when approaching the neutron drip line.

  7. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  8. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Wegeng, Robert S.; Gao, Yufei

    2003-09-09

    Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

  9. ENHANCING THE STABILITY OF POROUS CATALYSTS WITH SUPERCRITICAL REACTION MEDIA. (R826034)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption/desorption and pore-transport are key parameters influencing the activity and product selectivity in porous catalysts. With conventional reaction media (gas or liquid phase), one of these parameters is generally favorable while the other is not. For instance, while ...

  10. Emphasizing Multiple Levels of Representation to Enhance Students' Understandings of the Changes Occurring during Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    An alternative program of instruction was implemented with 33 high-achieving Grade 9 students (15-16 years old) in Singapore that overtly focused on the use of macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic representations to describe and explain the changes that occurred during the burning of metals, reactions of dilute acids, ionic precipitations,…

  11. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Wegeng, Robert S.; Gao, Yufei

    2006-05-16

    Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

  12. Enhancement of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer to dilute binary mixtures using endothermic chemical reactions around the smoothed horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafraz, M. M.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Alavifazel, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Experimental studies on enhancing the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient of binary dilute mixtures of water/glycerol, water/MEG (Mono-ethylene glycol) and water/DEG (di-ethylene glycol) have been carried out. Some particular endothermic chemical reactions related to ammonium salts were used to enhance the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient, simultaneously with occurrence of pool boiling heat transfer. Accordingly, 100 g of Ammonium nitrate, ammonium perborate and Ammonium sulfate were selected to dissolve into mixtures. High and extreme solution enthalpies of each of these ammonium salt powders are employed to reduce the surface temperature around the horizontal cylinder locally. Results demonstrated that presence of ammonium salts into the mixtures deteriorates the surface temperature of cylinder and as the result, higher pool boiling heat transfer coefficient is reported for tested solutions. Results are also reported and compared for different ammonium salts to find the influence of inducing different enthalpies of solution on pool boiling heat transfer coefficient. Obtained results also indicated that presence of endothermic reaction besides the pool boiling heat transfer enhances the heat transfer coefficients in comparison with nucleate pool boiling phenomenon solely.

  13. Baicalin inhibits the fenton reaction by enhancing electron transfer from Fe (2+) to dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Daisuke; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Sho-saiko-to is an herbal medicine that is known to have diverse pharmacological activities and has been used for the treatment of various infectious diseases. Here, we examined the effects of baicalin, a compound isolated from Sho-saiko-to, and the effects of the iron chelator quinolinic acid on the Fenton reaction. The control reaction mixture contained 0.1 M 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 0.2 mM H 2 O 2, 0.2 mM FeSO 4( NH 4)2 SO 4, and 40 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Upon the addition of 0.6 mM baicalin or quinolinic acid to the control reaction mixture, the ESR peak heights of DMPO/OH radical adducts were measured as 32% ± 1% (baicalin) and 166% ± 27% (quinolinic acid) of that of the control mixture. In order to clarify why baicalin and quinolinic acid exerted opposite effects on the formation of hydroxyl radicals, we measured oxygen consumption in the presence of either compound. Upon the addition of 0.6 mM baicalin (or quinolinic acid) to the control reaction mixture without DMPO and H 2 O 2, the relative oxygen consumption rates were found to be 449% ± 40% (baicalin) and 18% ± 9% (quinolinic acid) of that of the control mixture without DMPO and H 2 O 2, indicating that baicalin facilitated the transfer of electrons from Fe (2+) to dissolved oxygen. Thus, the great majority of Fe (2+) turned into Fe (3+), and the formation of hydroxyl radicals was subsequently inhibited in this reaction. PMID:25640849

  14. Localized Pemphigus Vegetans without Mucosal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Jain, VK; Jindal, N; Imchen, S

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vegetans is a rare variant of pemphigus vulgaris. A 62-year-old woman presented with erythematous moist vegetative plaque on the left breast and left groin. There was no mucosal involvement. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence findings were suggestive of pemphigus vegetans. She showed excellent response to oral steroids. Literature is scarcely available on the limited involvement with pemphigus vegetans without mucosal involvement. PMID:24700958

  15. Enhanced Reaction Kinetics and Structure Integrity of Ni/SnO2 Nanocluster toward High-Performance Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yinzhu; Li, Yong; Zhou, Peng; Yu, Shenglan; Sun, Wenping; Dou, Shixue

    2015-12-01

    SnO2 is regarded as one of the most promising anodes via conversion-alloying mechanism for advanced lithium ion batteries. However, the sluggish conversion reaction severely degrades the reversible capacity, Coulombic efficiency and rate capability. In this paper, through constructing porous Ni/SnO2 composite electrode composed of homogeneously distributed SnO2 and Ni nanoparticles, the reaction kinetics of SnO2 is greatly enhanced, leading to full conversion reaction, superior cycling stability and improved rate capability. The uniformly distributed Ni nanoparticles provide a fast charge transport pathway for electrochemical reactions, and restrict the direct contact and aggregation of SnO2 nanoparticles during cycling. In the meantime, the void space among the nanoclusters increases the contact area between the electrolyte and active materials, and accommodates the huge volume change during cycling as well. The Ni/SnO2 composite electrode possesses a high reversible capacity of 820.5 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) up to 100 cycles. More impressively, large capacity of 841.9, 806.6, and 770.7 mAh g(-1) can still be maintained at high current densities of 2, 5, and 10 A g(-1) respectively. The results demonstrate that Ni/SnO2 is a high-performance anode for advanced lithium-ion batteries with high specific capacity, excellent rate capability, and cycling stability. PMID:26580088

  16. Role of bombesin on gut mucosal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K U; Evers, B M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Thompson, J C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the effects of exogenous bombesin (BBS) on gut mucosal growth in chow-fed rats and the mucosal regeneration after gut atrophy brought about by feeding an elemental diet and after intestinal injury produced by methotrexate (MTX). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Bombesin is one of many gastrointestinal peptides implicated in the regulation of gut mucosal growth. Although BBS is known to stimulate growth of normal pancreatic tissue, the trophic effect of BBS on gut mucosa is less clear and its exact role in gut mucosal regeneration and repair is not known. METHODS: Rats were fed a regular chow diet (control) or an elemental diet plus either saline or BBS (10 micrograms/kg). In another experiment, rats fed a chow diet and treated with saline or BBS were given MTX (20 micrograms/kg) or a single intraperitoneal injection. In all experiments, small and large bowel mucosa and pancreas were removed and analyzed for BBS-mediated proliferation. RESULTS: Bombesin produced significant mucosal proliferation of the small bowel at day 14, but not at day 7, in rats fed regular chow. In contrast, BBS treatment for 7 days produced significant proliferation in both the atrophic and injured gut mucosa of rats given elemental diet or MTX. CONCLUSIONS: Bombesin may be an important enterotrophic factor for normal mucosal proliferation and may be clinically beneficial as an agent to restore or maintain gut mucosa during periods of atrophy or injury. PMID:7618976

  17. Intermediates in the cation reactions in solution probed by an in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering method

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Hsueh-Szu; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-01-01

    For chemical reactions in liquid state, such as catalysis, understanding of dynamical changes is conducive to practical applications. Solvation of copper salts in aqueous solution has implications for life, the environment, and industry. In an ongoing research, the question arises that why the color of aqueous CuCl2 solution changes with solution concentration? In this work, we have developed a convenient and efficient in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering technique to probe the presence of many intermediates, some of them are responsible for color change, in crystallization of aqueous copper chloride solution. The versatility of the novel technique was confirmed in the identification of five intermediates states in the transition from CdS to MoS2 nanowires in solution. The facile in situ method is expected to be widely applicable in probing intermediate states in a variety of chemical reactions in solution. PMID:26333518

  18. Intermediates in the cation reactions in solution probed by an in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Hsueh-Szu; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-09-01

    For chemical reactions in liquid state, such as catalysis, understanding of dynamical changes is conducive to practical applications. Solvation of copper salts in aqueous solution has implications for life, the environment, and industry. In an ongoing research, the question arises that why the color of aqueous CuCl2 solution changes with solution concentration? In this work, we have developed a convenient and efficient in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering technique to probe the presence of many intermediates, some of them are responsible for color change, in crystallization of aqueous copper chloride solution. The versatility of the novel technique was confirmed in the identification of five intermediates states in the transition from CdS to MoS2 nanowires in solution. The facile in situ method is expected to be widely applicable in probing intermediate states in a variety of chemical reactions in solution.

  19. Mucosal Immunology of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in the immunology, pathogenesis, and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continue to reveal clues to the mechanisms involved in the progressive immunodeficiency attributed to infection but more importantly have shed light on the correlates of immunity to infection and disease progression. HIV selectively infects, eliminates, and/or dysregulates several key cells of the human immune system, thwarting multiple arms of the host immune response, and inflicting severe damage to mucosal barriers, resulting in tissue infiltration of ‘symbiotic’ intestinal bacteria and viruses that essentially become opportunistic infections promoting systemic immune activation. This leads to activation and recruitment or more target cells for perpetuating HIV infection, resulting in persistent, high level viral replication in lymphoid tissues, rapid evolution of resistant strains, and continued evasion of immune responses. However, vaccine studies and studies of spontaneous controllers are finally providing correlates of immunity from protection and disease progression, including virus-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, binding antibodies, innate immune responses, and generation of antibodies with potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity. Emerging correlates of immunity indicate that prevention of HIV infection may be possible through effective vaccine strategies that protect and stimulate key regulatory cells and immune responses in susceptible hosts. Further, immune therapies specifically directed towards boosting specific aspects of the immune system may eventually lead to a cure for HIV-infected patients. PMID:23772612

  20. Covalent grafting of carbon nanotubes with a biomimetic heme model compound to enhance oxygen reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ping-Jie; Yu, Guo-Qiang; Naruta, Yoshinori; Liu, Jin-Gang

    2014-06-23

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the most important reactions in both life processes and energy conversion systems. The replacement of noble-metal Pt-based ORR electrocatalysts by nonprecious-metal catalysts is crucial for the large-scale commercialization of automotive fuel cells. Inspired by the mechanisms of dioxygen activation by metalloenzymes, herein we report a structurally well-defined, bio-inspired ORR catalyst that consists of a biomimetic model compound-an axial imidazole-coordinated porphyrin-covalently attached to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Without pyrolysis, this bio-inspired electrocatalyst demonstrates superior ORR activity and stability compared to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst in both acidic and alkaline solutions, thus making it a promising alternative as an ORR electrocatalyst for application in fuel-cell technology. PMID:24842193

  1. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  2. Prediction of enhanced solvent-induced enantioselectivity for a ring opening with a bifurcating reaction path

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Glowacki, David R.

    2014-12-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the deazetisation and ring opening of meso-2,3-difluoro-2,3-dimethyldiazocyclopropane in three solvents: CHCl3, CHFClBr and CH3CH(OH)CF3 (TFIPA). In this study, the achiral reactant leads to enantiomeric allene products, and the question addressed in the study is whether either of the chiral, enantiomerically pure solvents can induce significant enantiomeric excess in the products. The direct dynamics calculations use an empirical valence bond potential for the solute, with empirical parameters optimised against M06-2X/cc-pVTZ density functional results. The results reveal that the exothermic N2 loss and ring opening promote transient strong solvent–solute interactions within the first ~100 fsmore » of the reaction. Because of the bifurcating reaction path, these interactions occur at time when the “decision” about which enantiomer of the product to form has yet to be made (at least for many of the trajectories). Hence, it is possible in principle that the solvent could exert a larger-than-normal influence on the course of the reaction. In fact, the results reveal no such effect for CHFClBr but do predict that TFIPA should induce 15.2 ± 2.1% enantiomeric excess. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than solvent-induced enantiomeric excesses found experimentally in reactions where the conversion of reactant(s) to enantiomeric products occur over separate transition states.« less

  3. Prediction of enhanced solvent-induced enantioselectivity for a ring opening with a bifurcating reaction path

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Glowacki, David R.

    2014-12-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the deazetisation and ring opening of meso-2,3-difluoro-2,3-dimethyldiazocyclopropane in three solvents: CHCl3, CHFClBr and CH3CH(OH)CF3 (TFIPA). In this study, the achiral reactant leads to enantiomeric allene products, and the question addressed in the study is whether either of the chiral, enantiomerically pure solvents can induce significant enantiomeric excess in the products. The direct dynamics calculations use an empirical valence bond potential for the solute, with empirical parameters optimised against M06-2X/cc-pVTZ density functional results. The results reveal that the exothermic N2 loss and ring opening promote transient strong solvent–solute interactions within the first ~100 fs of the reaction. Because of the bifurcating reaction path, these interactions occur at time when the “decision” about which enantiomer of the product to form has yet to be made (at least for many of the trajectories). Hence, it is possible in principle that the solvent could exert a larger-than-normal influence on the course of the reaction. In fact, the results reveal no such effect for CHFClBr but do predict that TFIPA should induce 15.2 ± 2.1% enantiomeric excess. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than solvent-induced enantiomeric excesses found experimentally in reactions where the conversion of reactant(s) to enantiomeric products occur over separate transition states.

  4. Enhancing alkaline hydrogen evolution reaction activity through Ni-Mn3O4 nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Liu, Peng Fei; Zhang, Le; Zu, Meng Yang; Yang, Yun Xia; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-08-18

    Developing efficient, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts towards hydrogen production in alkaline environments is vital to improve energy efficiency for water splitting. In this work, we prepared Ni-Mn3O4 nanocomposites on Ni foam which exhibit an excellent hydrogen evolution reaction catalytic activity with a current density (j) of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential (η) of 91 mV and show good stability in an alkaline medium. PMID:27500290

  5. Pentabody-mediated antigen delivery induces antigen-specific mucosal immune response.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenghua; Zheng, Wenju; Kuolee, Rhonda; Hirama, Tomoko; Henry, Matthew; Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; Fjällman, Ted; Chen, Wangxue; Zhang, Jianbing

    2009-05-01

    An efficient immunization system is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. Cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (LT) are among the strongest adjuvants tested in experimental animals but their use in humans has been hindered by their toxicity. On the other hand, the role of their non-toxic B-subunits, CTB or LTB, in enhancing mucosal immune response is not clear. We propose here a novel strategy for the induction of mucosal immune responses. Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) against a model antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA) were raised from the antibody repertoire of a llama immunized with BSA, pentamerized by fusing the sdAbs to CTB, generating the so-called pentabodies. These pentabodies were used to deliver the antigen by mixing the two components and administering the mixture to mice intranasally. One construct was equivalent to CT in helping induce mucosal immune response. It was also found that this ability was probably due to its high affinity to BSA, providing some insight into the controversial role of CTB in mucosal immunization: at least for BSA, the model antigen BSA employed in this study, CTB has to be tightly linked to the antigen to have adjuvant/immune-enhancing effect. PMID:19269688

  6. Enhanced agglutination reaction of ABO subgroups by gold nanoparticle solution: implication for identification of ABO subgroups.

    PubMed

    Ammaranond, P; Sriyarak, J; Saejong, S; Deesin, P; Seereemaspun, A; Rojanathanes, R

    2011-12-01

    Although the ABO blood group is the most significant in blood group system in human, other subgroups system is also important to be concerned in blood banking laboratory. ABO subgroups have weak antigen potency on red blood cell. In some cases, they could not been detected by cell grouping and serum grouping methods. This may lead to misinterpretation of ABO typing which will cause serious problems for transfusion and transplantation. Gold nanoparticle solution can increase the agglutination reaction of ABO typing. Thus far, the investigation of ABO blood group system has been performed using gold nanoparticle solution. Samples were tested comparing between with and without gold nanoparticle solution. After reading the agglutination reaction, supernatants were collected and measured at the optical density at 760 nm by spectrophotometer. The optical density of 2-5% cell suspension and monoclonal antibody was higher than in the tube of 2-5% cell suspension, monoclonal antibody and gold nanoparticle solution. By adding the gold nanoparticle solution, the agglutination reaction was increased ranging from 7.0-37.7% (median 15.0%) for ABO grouping system whereas 12.1-50.9% (median 23.4%) was observed in ABO subgroups. It could decrease the chance of misinterpretation by 33.3%. By using gold nanoparticle solution might be the alternative way for investigation of weak antigen potency on red blood cell. PMID:22416584

  7. Kinetics and proposed mechanism of the reaction of an immunoinhibition, particle-enhanced immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J C; Craig, A R; Davey, C L; Newman, D J; Lonsdale, M L; Bucher, W J; Nagle, P D; Price, C P

    1997-12-01

    We report kinetic studies on the reaction of a latex agglutination immunoassay used to quantify phenytoin in serum. In this assay, polystyrene particles with a covalently attached analog of phenytoin react with an antiphenytoin monoclonal antibody to form light-scattering aggregates, with the rate of this reaction being decreased by addition of phenytoin from sample. In the absence of free (sample) phenytoin, this reaction did not exhibit a maximum rate of agglutination in the presence of excess antibody, i.e., an equivalence point. Furthermore, agglutination was inhibitable by free phenytoin even when the latter was added after agglutination of particles with antibody had begun. Most significantly, the immunoagglutination proceeded in an identical fashion with monovalent F(ab) fragment. These data are consistent with low-affinity immunospecific particle-antibody complexation, which then induces colloidal aggregation, without requiring immunospecific bridging by antibody molecules. The described mechanism is not generalizable to all latex agglutination immunoassays, although disturbance of colloidal stability may be a component in most assays. PMID:9439458

  8. Protein derivatization and sequential ion/ion reactions to enhance sequence coverage produced by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lissa C.; English, A. Michelle; Wang, Weihan; Bai, Dina L.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we described implementation of a front-end ETD (electron transfer dissociation) source for an Orbitrap instrument (1). This source facilitates multiple fills of the C-trap with product ions from ETD of intact proteins prior to mass analysis. The result is a dramatic enhancement of the observed ion current without the need for time consuming averaging of data from multiple mass measurements. Here we show that ion-ion proton transfer (IIPT) reactions can be used to simplify ETD spectra and to disperse fragment ions over the entire mass range in a controlled manner. We also show that protein derivatization can be employed to selectively enhance the sequence information observed at the N- and C-termini of a protein. PMID:25844056

  9. Enhancement of the Chemiluminescence Response of Enzymatic Reactions by Plasmonic Surfaces for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Biebele; Odukoya, Babatunde; Mohammed, Muzaffer; Aslan, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    We report the enhancement of chemiluminescence response of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in bioassays by plasmonic surfaces, which are comprised of (i) silver island films (SIFs) and (ii) metal thin films (silver, gold, copper, and nickel, 1 nm thick) deposited onto glass slides. A model bioassay, based on the interactions of avidin-modified HRP with a monolayer of biotinylated poly(ethylene-glycol)-amine, was employed to evaluate the ability of plasmonic surfaces to enhance chemiluminescence response of HRP. Chemiluminescence response of HRP in model bioassays were increased up to ~3.7-fold as compared to the control samples (i.e. glass slides without plasmonic nanoparticles), where the largest enhancement of the chemiluminescence response was observed on SIFs with high loading. These findings allowed us to demonstrate the use of SIFs (high loading) for the detection of a biologically relevant target protein (glial fibrillary acidic protein or GFAP), where the chemiluminescence response of the standard bioassay for GFAP was enhanced up to ~50% as compared to bioassay on glass slides. PMID:26582101

  10. The enhancement activities of histidyl-histidine in some prebiotic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C.; Lazcano, A.; Oro, J.

    1990-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of His and its dimer has led us to study the possible catalytic properties of His-His. The enhancing effect of His-His has been tested in the dephosphorylation of dAMP, the hydrolysis of oligo(A)12, and the oligomerization of 2'3'-cAMP.