Science.gov

Sample records for enhanced vver-1000 fuel

  1. Multiple recycle of REMIX fuel at VVER-1000 operation in closed fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, P. N.; Bobrov, E. A. Chibinyaev, A. V.; Teplov, P. S.; Dudnikov, A. A.

    2015-12-15

    The basic features of loading the VVER-1000 core with a new variant of REMIX fuel (REgenerated MIXture of U–Pu oxides) are considered during its multiple recycle in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. The fuel composition is produced on the basis of the uranium–plutonium regenerate extracted at processing the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from a VVER-1000, depleted uranium, and the fissionable material: {sup 235}U as a part of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from warheads superfluous for defense purposes or {sup 233}U accumulated in thorium blankets of fusion (electronuclear) neutron sources or fast reactors. Production of such a fuel assumes no use of natural uranium in addition. When converting a part of the VVER-1000 reactors to the closed fuel cycle based on the REMIX technology, the consumption of natural uranium decreases considerably, and there is no substantial degradation of the isotopic composition of plutonium or change in the reactor-safety characteristics at the passage from recycle to recycle.

  2. Multiple recycle of REMIX fuel at VVER-1000 operation in closed fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Bobrov, E. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V.; Teplov, P. S.; Dudnikov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The basic features of loading the VVER-1000 core with a new variant of REMIX fuel (REgenerated MIXture of U-Pu oxides) are considered during its multiple recycle in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. The fuel composition is produced on the basis of the uranium-plutonium regenerate extracted at processing the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from a VVER-1000, depleted uranium, and the fissionable material: 235U as a part of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from warheads superfluous for defense purposes or 233U accumulated in thorium blankets of fusion (electronuclear) neutron sources or fast reactors. Production of such a fuel assumes no use of natural uranium in addition. When converting a part of the VVER-1000 reactors to the closed fuel cycle based on the REMIX technology, the consumption of natural uranium decreases considerably, and there is no substantial degradation of the isotopic composition of plutonium or change in the reactor-safety characteristics at the passage from recycle to recycle.

  3. End-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linge, I. I.; Mitenkova, E. F.; Novikov, N. V.

    2012-12-01

    The results of end-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent nuclear fuel are presented. Details of formation of neutron and gamma-radiation sources are analyzed. Distributed sources of different types of radiation are considered. A comparative analysis of calculated radiation characteristics is performed with the use of nuclear data from different ENDF/B and EAF files and ANSI/ANS and ICRP standards.

  4. Sensitivity and System Response of Pin Power Peaking in VVER-1000 Fuel Assembly Using TSUNAMI-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frybort, J.

    2014-04-01

    Pin power peaking in a VVER-1000 fuel assembly and its sensitivity and uncertainty was analyzed by TSUNAMI-2D code. Several types of fuel assemblies were considered. They differ in number and position of gadolinium fuel pins. The calculations were repeated for several fuel compositions obtained by fuel depletion calculation. The results are quantified sensitivity data, which can be used for enrichment profiling.

  5. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  6. Changes to Irradiation Conditions of VVER-1000 Surveillance Specimens Resulting from Fuel Assemblies with Greater Fuel Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panferov, Pavel; Kochkin, Viacheslav; Erak, Dmitry; Makhotin, Denis; Reshetnikov, Alexandr; Timofeev, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the work was to obtain experimental data on the influence of newtype fuel assemblies with higher fuel rods on the irradiation conditions of surveillance specimens installed on the baffe of VVER-1000. For this purpose, two surveillance sets with container assemblies of the same design irradiated in reactors with different fuel assemblies in the core were investigated. Measurements of neutron dosimeters from these sets and retrospective measurements of 54Mn activity accumulated in each irradiated specimen allow a detailed distribution of the fast neutron flux in the containers to be obtained. Neutron calculations have been done using 3D discrete ordinate code KATRIN. On the basis of the obtained results, a change of the lead factor due to newtype fuel assemblies was evaluated for all types of VVER-1000 container assemblies.

  7. Comparison of the radiological hazard of thorium and uranium spent fuels from VVER-1000 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frybort, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Thorium fuel is considered as a viable alternative to the uranium fuel used in the current generation of nuclear power plants. Switch from uranium to thorium means a complete change of composition of the spent nuclear fuel produced as a result of the fuel depletion during operation of a reactor. If the Th-U fuel cycle is implemented, production of minor actinides in the spent fuel is negligible. This is favourable for the spent fuel disposal. On the other hand, thorium fuel utilisation is connected with production of 232U, which decays via several alpha decays into a strong gamma emitter 208Tl. Presence of this nuclide might complicate manipulations with the irradiated thorium fuel. Monte-Carlo computation code MCNPX can be used to simulate thorium fuel depletion in a VVER-1000 reactor. The calculated actinide composition will be analysed and dose rate from produced gamma radiation will be calculated. The results will be compared to the reference uranium fuel. Dependence of the dose rate on time of decay after the end of irradiation in the reactor will be analysed. This study will compare the radiological hazard of the spent thorium and uranium fuel handling.

  8. Reduction of the spent nuclear fuel of a VVER-1000 reactor by lithium in a lithium chloride melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, A. V.; Ishunin, V. S.; Kormilitsyn, M. V.

    2010-08-01

    Researchers at FGUP GNTs RF NIIAR performed a series of experiments on the lithium reduction of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of a VVER-1000 reactor to a metal in a lithium chloride melt. The depletion of the nuclear fuel taken before experiments is about 30000 (MW day)/t, and the cooling time is 5 years. The experiments are performed on 5.8-kg samples of a prepared SNF powder. Data are obtained on a decrease in the heat release, the specific activity of the processed powder, and the distribution of actinides and the main fission products between a salt phase and a reduced SNF powder.

  9. A New Insight into Energy Distribution of Electrons in Fuel-Rod Gap in VVER-1000 Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereshteh, Golian; Ali, Pazirandeh; Saeed, Mohammadi

    2015-06-01

    In order to calculate the electron energy distribution in the fuel rod gap of a VVER-1000 nuclear reactor, the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) governing the non-equilibrium behavior of electrons passing through the fuel-rod gap as an absorber has been solved in this paper. Besides, the Monte Carlo Geant4 code was employed to simulate the electron migration in the fuel-rod gap and the energy distribution of electrons was found. As for the results, the accuracy of the FPE was compared to the Geant4 code outcomes and a satisfactory agreement was found. Also, different percentage of the volatile and noble gas fission fragments produced in fission reactions in fuel rod, i.e. Krypton, Xenon, Iodine, Bromine, Rubidium and Cesium were employed so as to investigate their effects on the electrons' energy distribution. The present results show that most of the electrons in the fuel rod's gap were within the thermal energy limitation and the tail of the electron energy distribution was far from a Maxwellian distribution. The interesting outcome was that the electron energy distribution is slightly increased due to the accumulation of fission fragments in the gap. It should be noted that solving the FPE for the energy straggling electrons that are penetrating into the fuel-rod gap in the VVER-1000 nuclear reactor has been carried out for the first time using an analytical approach.

  10. Issues in the use of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel in VVER-1000 Nuclear Reactors: Comparison of UO2 and MOX Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J.

    2005-05-27

    The purpose of this report is to quantify the differences between mixed oxide (MOX) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and to assess in reasonable detail the potential impacts of MOX fuel use in VVER-1000 nuclear power plants in Russia. This report is a generic tool to assist in the identification of plant modifications that may be required to accommodate receiving, storing, handling, irradiating, and disposing of MOX fuel in VVER-1000 reactors. The report is based on information from work performed by Russian and U.S. institutions. The report quantifies each issue, and the differences between LEU and MOX fuels are described as accurately as possible, given the current sources of data.

  11. Evaluation of accuracy of calculations of VVER-1000 core states with incomplete covering of fuel by the absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, G. L.

    2012-07-01

    An additional verification of bundled software (BS) SAPFIR-95 and amp;RC [1] and code KORSAR/GP [2] was performed. Both software products were developed in A.P. Alexandrov NITI and certified by ROSTEKHNADZOR of RF for numeric simulation of stationary, transitional and emergency conditions of VVER reactors. A benchmark model for neutronics calculations was created within the limits of this work. The cold subcritical state of VVER - 1000 reactor stationary fuelling was simulated on the basis of FA with an increased height of the fuel column (TVS-2M) considering detailed presentation of radial and front neutron reflectors. A case of passing of pure condensate slug through the core in initially deep subcritical state during start of the first RCP set after refueling was considered as an examined condition of reactor operation. A relatively small size of the slug, its spatial position near the reflectors (lower and lateral), as well as failure of the inserted control rods of the control and protection system (CPS CR) to reach the lower limit of the fuel column stipulate for methodical complexity of a correct calculation of the neutron multiplication constant (K{sub eff}) using engineering codes. Code RC was used as a test program in the process of reactor calculated 3-D modeling. Code MCNP5 [3] was used as the precision program, which solves the equation of neutrons transfer by Monte-Carlo method and which was developed in the US (Los-Alamos). As a result of comparative calculations dependency of K{sub eff} on two parameters was evaluated - boron acid concentration (Cb) and CPS CR position. Reactivity effect was evaluated, which is implemented as a result of failure of all CPS control rods to reach the lower fuel limit calculated using the engineering codes mentioned above. (authors)

  12. The results of postirradiation examinations of VVER-1000 and VVER-440 fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovin, K. P.; Ivanov, E. G.; Strijov, P. N.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    1991-02-01

    The paper presents the results of postirradiation examination of the fuel rods having different fuel-cladding gaps, pellet densities, pellet inner diameters and so on. The fuel rods were irradiated in the material science reactor (MR) of the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy and at 4 unit of the Novo-Voronezh nuclear powerplant. Some data on fission gas release and rod geometry and compared with computer code predictions.

  13. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady; Khrennikov, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  14. PRIZMA predictions of in-core detection indications in the VVER-1000 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandiev, Yadgar Z.; Kashayeva, Elena A.; Malyshin, Gennady N.; Modestov, Dmitry G.; Khatuntsev, Kirill E.

    2014-06-01

    The paper describes calculations which were done by the PRIZMA code(1) to predict indications of in-core rhodium detectors in the VVER-1000 reactor for some core fragments with allowance for fuel and rhodium burnout.

  15. Modernization of existing VVER-1000 surveillance programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kochkin, V.; Erak, D.; Makhotin, D.

    2011-07-01

    According to generally accepted world practice, evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material behavior during operation is carried out using tests of surveillance specimens. The main objective of the surveillance program consists in insurance of safe RPV operation during the design lifetime and lifetime-extension period. At present, the approaches of pressure vessels residual life validation based on the test results of their surveillance specimens have been developed and introduced in Russia and are under consideration in other countries where vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactors- (VVER-) 1000 are in operation. In this case, it is necessary to ensure leading irradiation of surveillance specimens (as compared to the pressure vessel wall) and to provide uniformly irradiated specimen groups for mechanical testing. Standard surveillance program of VVER-1000 has several significant shortcomings and does not meet these requirements. Taking into account program of lifetime extension of VVER-1000 operating in Russia, it is necessary to carry out upgrading of the VVER-1000 surveillance program. This paper studies the conditions of a surveillance specimen's irradiation and upgrading of existing sets to provide monitoring and prognosis of RPV material properties for extension of the reactor's lifetime up to 60 years or more. (authors)

  16. 3D analysis of the reactivity insertion accident in VVER-1000

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullayev, A. M.; Zhukov, A. I.; Slyeptsov, S. M.

    2012-07-01

    Fuel parameters such as peak enthalpy and temperature during rod ejection accident are calculated. The calculations are performed by 3D neutron kinetics code NESTLE and 3D thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-W. Both hot zero power and hot full power cases were studied for an equilibrium cycle with Westinghouse hex fuel in VVER-1000. It is shown that the use of 3D methodology can significantly increase safety margins for current criteria and met future criteria. (authors)

  17. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q.; Cizek, J.

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  18. Thermal ageing mechanisms of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrombakh, Yaroslav I.; Gurovich, Boris A.; Kuleshova, Evgenia A.; Maltsev, Dmitry A.; Fedotova, Svetlana V.; Chernobaeva, Anna A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper a complex of microstructural studies (TEM and SEM) and a comparative analysis of the results of these studies with the data of mechanical tests of temperature sets of VVER-1000 RPV surveillance specimens with exposure times up to ∼200,000 h were conducted. Special annealing of control and temperature sets of SS which provides the dissolution of grain boundary segregation was performed to clarify the mechanisms of thermal ageing. It was demonstrated that during long-term exposures up to 200,000 h at the operating temperature of about 310-320 °C thermal ageing effects reveal themselves only for the weld metal (Ni content ⩾ 1.35%) and are the result of grain boundary segregation accumulation (development of reversible temper brittleness). The obtained results improve the accuracy of prediction of the thermal ageing rate of VVER-1000 materials in case of RPV service life extension up to 60 years.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis and Neutron Fluence Adjustment for VVER-1000 Rpv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, S.; Ilieva, Kr.; Kirilova, D.

    2003-06-01

    Adjustment of the neutron fluence at the VVER-1000 RPV inner wall has been carried out. For the purpose of this adjustment the neutron flux response sensitivity to the main parameters of calculation uncertainty has been calculated. The obtained sensitivities, the parameters uncertainty and activity measurement data of iron, copper and niobium detectors positioned behind the RPV of Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 have been used in this adjustment.

  20. Analysis of Weapons-Grade MOX VVER-1000 Benchmarks with HELIOS and KENO

    SciTech Connect

    Dourougie, C.; Emmett, M.B.; Gehin, J.C.; Lillie, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    Calculations of computational benchmark problems for the disposition of weapons-grade mixed-oxide fuel in VVER-1000 reactors have been performed with the HELIOS fuel assembly analysis code. The benchmarks cover pin cell, single fuel assembly, and multiassembly structures with several different fuel types, moderator densities, and boron content for operational and off-normal conditions. Fuel depletion is performed to a burnup of 60 MWd/kg. The detailed results have been tabulated for multiplication factors, macroscopic and microscopic cross sections, reaction rates, fuel isotopics, and fission distributions. Additional results are given for a preliminary analysis of a multiassembly variant using the KENO Monte Carlo code with cross sections from HELIOS.

  1. Validation of 3D Code KATRIN For Fast Neutron Fluence Calculation of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel by Ex-Vessel Measurements and Surveillance Specimens Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalandinov, A.; Tsofin, V.; Kochkin, V.; Panferov, P.; Timofeev, A.; Reshetnikov, A.; Makhotin, D.; Erak, D.; Voloschenko, A.

    2016-02-01

    Usually the synthesis of two-dimensional and one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations is used to evaluate neutron fluence on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for prognosis of radiation embrittlement. But there are some cases when this approach is not applicable. For example the latest projects of VVER-1000 have upgraded surveillance program. Containers with surveillance specimens are located on the inner surface of RPV with fast neutron flux maximum. Therefore, the synthesis approach is not suitable enough for calculation of local disturbance of neutron field in RPV inner surface behind the surveillance specimens because of their complicated and heterogeneous structure. In some cases the VVER-1000 core loading consists of fuel assemblies with different fuel height and the applicability of synthesis approach is also ambiguous for these fuel cycles. Also, the synthesis approach is not enough correct for the neutron fluence estimation at the RPV area above core top. Because of these reasons only the 3D neutron transport codes seem to be satisfactory for calculation of neutron fluence on the VVER-1000 RPV. The direct 3D calculations are also recommended by modern regulations.

  2. Analyses of Weapons-Grade MOX VVER-1000 Neutronics Benchmarks: Pin-Cell Calculations with SCALE/SAS2H

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.J.

    2001-01-11

    A series of unit pin-cell benchmark problems have been analyzed related to irradiation of mixed oxide fuel in VVER-1000s (water-water energetic reactors). One-dimensional, discrete-ordinates eigenvalue calculations of these benchmarks were performed at ORNL using the SAS2H control sequence module of the SCALE-4.3 computational code system, as part of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) of the US DOE. Calculations were also performed using the SCALE module CSAS to confirm the results. The 238 neutron energy group SCALE nuclear data library 238GROUPNDF5 (based on ENDF/B-V) was used for all calculations. The VVER-1000 pin-cell benchmark cases modeled with SAS2H included zero-burnup calculations for eight fuel material variants (from LEU UO{sub 2} to weapons-grade MOX) at five different reactor states, and three fuel depletion cases up to high burnup. Results of the SAS2H analyses of the VVER-1000 neutronics benchmarks are presented in this report. Good general agreement was obtained between the SAS2H results, the ORNL results using HELIOS-1.4 with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data, and the results from several Russian benchmark studies using the codes TVS-M, MCU-RFFI/A, and WIMS-ABBN. This SAS2H benchmark study is useful for the verification of HELIOS calculations, the HELIOS code being the principal computational tool at ORNL for physics studies of assembly design for weapons-grade plutonium disposition in Russian reactors.

  3. Absolute determination of power density in the VVER-1000 mock-up on the LR-0 research reactor.

    PubMed

    Košt'ál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Milčák, Ján

    2013-08-01

    The work presents a detailed comparison of calculated and experimentally determined net peak areas of selected fission products gamma lines. The fission products were induced during a 2.5 h irradiation on the power level of 9.5 W in selected fuel pins of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up. The calculations were done with deterministic and stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods. The effects of different nuclear data libraries used for calculations are discussed as well. The Net Peak Area (NPA) may be used for the determination of fission density across the mock-up. This fission density is practically identical to power density. PMID:23665766

  4. VVER-440 and VVER-1000 reactor dosimetry benchmark - BUGLE-96 versus ALPAN VII.0

    SciTech Connect

    Duo, J. I.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: Analytical results of the vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor-(VVER-) 440 and VVER-1000 reactor dosimetry benchmarks developed from engineering mockups at the Nuclear Research Inst. Rez LR-0 reactor are discussed. These benchmarks provide accurate determination of radiation field parameters in the vicinity and over the thickness of the reactor pressure vessel. Measurements are compared to calculated results with two sets of tools: TORT discrete ordinates code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library versus the newly Westinghouse-developed RAPTOR-M3G and ALPAN VII.0. The parallel code RAPTOR-M3G enables detailed neutron distributions in energy and space in reduced computational time. ALPAN VII.0 cross-section library is based on ENDF/B-VII.0 and is designed for reactor dosimetry applications. It uses a unique broad group structure to enhance resolution in thermal-neutron-energy range compared to other analogous libraries. The comparison of fast neutron (E > 0.5 MeV) results shows good agreement (within 10%) between BUGLE-96 and ALPAN VII.O libraries. Furthermore, the results compare well with analogous results of participants of the REDOS program (2005). Finally, the analytical results for fast neutrons agree within 15% with the measurements, for most locations in all three mockups. In general, however, the analytical results underestimate the attenuation through the reactor pressure vessel thickness compared to the measurements. (authors)

  5. Modernization of Cross Section Library for VVER-1000 Type Reactors Internals and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloschenko, Andrey; Zaritskiy, Sergey; Egorov, Aleksander; Boyarinov, Viktor

    2016-02-01

    The broad-group library BGL1000_B7 for neutron and gamma transport calculations in VVER-1000 internals, RPV and shielding was carried out on a base of fine-group library v7-200n47g from SCALE-6 system. The comparison of the library BGL1000_B7 with the library v7-200n47g and the library BGL1000 (the latter is using for VVER-1000 calculations) is demonstrated on several calculation and experimental tests.

  6. Chemical composition effect on VVER-1000 RPV weld metal thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B. A.; Chernobaeva, A. A.; Erak, D. Yu; Kuleshova, E. A.; Zhurko, D. A.; Papina, V. B.; Skundin, M. A.; Maltsev, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Temperature and fast neutron flux simultaneously affect the material of welded joints of reactor pressure vessels under irradiation. Understanding thermal aging effects on the weld metal allows for an explanation of the mechanisms that govern an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the reactor pressure vessel materials under long term irradiation at operation temperature. This paper reports on new results and reassessment of the VVER-1000 weld metal surveillance specimen database performed at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute". The current database of VVER-1000 weld metal thermal aging at 310-320 °C includes 50 transition temperature values with the maximum holding time of 208,896 h. The updated database completed with the information on intergranular fracture shear and phosphorous content in the grain boundaries has allowed us to propose a new mechanism of VVER-1000 weld materials thermal aging at 310-320 °C and develop models of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift for VVER-1000 weld metal during a long-term exposure at 310-320 °C.

  7. Kinetics Parameters of VVER-1000 Core with 3 MOX Lead Test Assemblies To Be Used for Accident Analysis Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A.M.

    2000-03-08

    The present work is a part of Joint U.S./Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactor and presents the neutronics calculations of kinetics parameters of VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs. MOX LTA design has been studied in [1] for two options of MOX LTA: 100% plutonium and of ''island'' type. As a result, zoning i.e. fissile plutonium enrichments in different plutonium zones, has been defined. VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs of chosen design has been calculated in [2]. In present work, the neutronics data for transient analysis codes (RELAP [3]) has been obtained using the codes chain of RRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' [5] that is to be used for exploitation neutronics calculations of VVER. Nowadays the 3D assembly-by-assembly code BIPR-7A and 2D pin-by-pin code PERMAK-A, both with the neutronics constants prepared by the cell code TVS-M, are the base elements of this chain. It should be reminded that in [6] TVS-M was used only for the constants calculations of MOX FAs. In current calculations the code TVS-M has been used both for UOX and MOX fuel constants. Besides, the volume of presented information has been increased and additional explications have been included. The results for the reference uranium core [4] are presented in Chapter 2. The results for the core with 3 MOX LTAs are presented in Chapter 3. The conservatism that is connected with neutronics parameters and that must be taken into account during transient analysis calculations, is discussed in Chapter 4. The conservative parameters values are considered to be used in 1-point core kinetics models of accident analysis codes.

  8. Assessments of Longevity of Equipment Metal of Nuclear Power Plants equipped with Reactors VVER-1000

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatykh, V.P.; Al Kassem, S.N.

    2004-07-01

    Characteristics of damage processes of metal of coffer-dams of steam generators collectors at nuclear power plants (NPPs) equipped with reactors VVER-1000 have been mentioned; principles of construction of longevity function has been cited and new approach has been shown while solving the problem of the longevity of the metal resource by substantiating the technological actions with new mode characteristics, performed with the help of specially developed equations and formulae, where practically all damage processes and all influencing factors can be accounted. (authors)

  9. Introduction of water chemistry conditions of the secondary coolant circuit with metering organic amines at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyapkov, V. F.; Erpyleva, S. F.; Bykova, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    Results from introduction of new water chemistry conditions involving metering of organic amines (morpholine and ethanolamine) at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors are presented.

  10. Comparison of attenuation coefficients for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, M.; Rataj, J.; Vandlik, S.

    2011-07-01

    The paper summarizes the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence with E > 0.5 MeV through a reactor pressure vessel for vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor (VVER) reactor types measured and/or calculated for mock-up experiments, as well as for operated nuclear power plant (NPP) units. The attenuation coefficient is possible to evaluate directly only by using the retro-dosimetry, based on a combination of the measured activities from the weld sample and concurrent ex-vessel measurement. The available neutron fluence attenuation coefficients (E > 0.5 MeV), calculated and measured at a mock-up experiment simulating the VVER-440-unit conditions, vary from 3.5 to 6.15. A similar situation is used for the calculations and mock-up experiment measurements for the VVER-1000 RPV, where the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence varies from 5.99 to 8.85. Because of the difference in calculations for the real units and the mock-up experiments, the necessity to design and perform calculation benchmarks both for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 would be meaningful if the calculation model is designed adequately to a given unit. (authors)

  11. Validation Cases of CATHARE 2 for VVER-1000 Main Steam Line Break Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Nikolay P.; Sabotinov, Luben; Petrov, Nikolay; Nikonov, Sergey; Donov, Jordan

    Recent coupled code benchmarks identified coolant mixing in the reactor vessel as an unresolved issue in the analysis of complex plant transients with reactivity insertion. Thus, Phase 2 of the OECD VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark (V1000CT-2) was defined. The benchmark includes calculation of vessel mixing tests and main steam line break (MSLB) analysis. The reference plant is Kozloduy-6 in Bulgaria. The general objective is the assessment of system codes for VVER safety analysis and specifically for their use in the analysis of reactivity transients. A specific objective is the testing of different scale mixing models (mixing matrix, multi-1D, coarse-3D and CFD), and analysis of MSLB transients with improved vessel thermal hydraulic models. The benchmark is sponsored by CEA-France and OECD and is jointly prepared by CEA and INRNE, in collaboration with the Kozloduy NPP, IRSN and PSU. This paper summarizes CATHARE2 code assessment calculations using multi-1D vessel thermal hydraulics with cross flow. Test cases are the OECD V1000CT-1 pump start-up benchmark and the V1000CT-2 benchmarks. Emphasis is put on vessel mixing aspects. Separate effects in the lower plenum as well as component and integral system tests are considered. The comparison shows that a six-sector vessel mixing model informed by plant data or validated CFD calculations in the initial state was able to correctly reproduce the channel average temperatures at the core inlet as well as the vessel outlet temperatures. Testing at system level including code-to-experiment and CATHARE-ATHLET comparison shows that the considered CATHARE VVER-1000 system model is capable of MSLB simulation.

  12. A Roadmap and Discussion of Issues for Physics Analyses Required to Support Plutonium Disposition in VVER-1000 Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, R.T.; Drischler, J.D.; Pavlovichev, A.M. Styrine, Y.A.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the physics analyses that must be performed to successfully disposition weapons-usable plutonium in VVER-1000 reactors in the Russian Federation. The report is a document to support programmatic and financial planning. It does not include documentation of the technical procedures by which physics analyses are performed, nor are the results of any analyses included.

  13. Design issues concerning Iran`s Bushehr nuclear power plant VVER-1000 conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    On January 8, 1995, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) signed a contract for $800 million with the Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (Minatom) to complete Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP) unit 1. The agreement called for a Russian VVER-1000/320 pressurized water reactor (PWR) to be successfully installed into the existing German-built BNPP facilities in 5 yr. System design differences, bomb damage, and environmental exposure are key issues with which Minatom must contend in order to fulfill the contract. The AEOI under the Shah of Iran envisioned Bushehr as the first of many nuclear power plants, with Iran achieving 24 GW(electric) by 1993 and 34 GW(electric) by 2000. Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) began construction of the two-unit plant near the Persian Gulf town of Halileh in 1975. Unit 1 was {approx}80% complete and unit 2 was {approx}50% complete when construction was interrupted by the 1979 Iranian Islamic revolution. Despite repeated AEOI attempts to lure KWU and other companies back to Iran to complete the plant, Western concerns about nuclear proliferation in Iran and repeated bombings of the plant during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war dissuaded Germany from resuming construction.

  14. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  15. Safety Related Investigations of the VVER-1000 Reactor Type by the Coupled Code System TRACE/PARCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Wadim; Espinoza, Victor Hugo Sánchez; Lischke, Wolfgang

    This study was performed at the Institute of Reactor Safety at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. It is embedded in the ongoing investigations of the international code assessment and maintenance program (CAMP) for qualification and validation of system codes like TRACE(1) and PARCS(2). The chosen reactor type used to validate these two codes was the Russian designed VVER-1000 because the OECD/NEA VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 2(3) includes detailed information of the Bulgarian nuclear power plant (NPP) Kozloduy unit 6. The post-test investigations of a coolant mixing experiment have shown that the predicted parameters (coolant temperature, pressure drop, etc.) are in good agreement with the measured data. The coolant mixing pattern, especially in the downcomer, has been also reproduced quiet well by TRACE. The coupled code system TRACE/PARCS which was applied on a postulated main steam line break (MSLB) provided good results compared to reference values and the ones of other participants of the benchmark. The results show that the developed three-dimensional nodalization of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is appropriate to describe the coolant mixing phenomena in the downcomer and the lower plenum of a VVER-1000 reactor. This phenomenon is a key issue for investigations of MSLB transient where the thermal hydraulics and the core neutronics are strongly linked. The simulation of the RPV and core behavior for postulated transients using the validated 3D TRACE RPV model, taking into account boundary conditions at vessel in- and outlet, indicates that the results are physically sound and in good agreement to other participant's results.

  16. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košťál, Michal; Milčák, Ján; Cvachovec, František; Jánský, Bohumil; Rypar, Vojtěch; Juříček, Vlastimil; Novák, Evžen; Egorov, Alexander; Zaritskiy, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1-10 MeV) and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1). Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  17. Reactivity effects in VVER-1000 of the third unit of the kalinin nuclear power plant at physical start-up. Computations in ShIPR intellectual code system with library of two-group cross sections generated by UNK code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizin, M. N.; Zimin, V. G.; Zizina, S. N.; Kryakvin, L. V.; Pitilimov, V. A.; Tereshonok, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    The ShIPR intellectual code system for mathematical simulation of nuclear reactors includes a set of computing modules implementing the preparation of macro cross sections on the basis of the two-group library of neutron-physics cross sections obtained for the SKETCH-N nodal code. This library is created by using the UNK code for 3D diffusion computation of first VVER-1000 fuel loadings. Computation of neutron fields in the ShIPR system is performed using the DP3 code in the two-group diffusion approximation in 3D triangular geometry. The efficiency of all groups of control rods for the first fuel loading of the third unit of the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant is computed. The temperature, barometric, and density effects of reactivity as well as the reactivity coefficient due to the concentration of boric acid in the reactor were computed additionally. Results of computations are compared with the experiment.

  18. Reactivity effects in VVER-1000 of the third unit of the kalinin nuclear power plant at physical start-up. Computations in ShIPR intellectual code system with library of two-group cross sections generated by UNK code

    SciTech Connect

    Zizin, M. N.; Zimin, V. G.; Zizina, S. N. Kryakvin, L. V.; Pitilimov, V. A.; Tereshonok, V. A.

    2010-12-15

    The ShIPR intellectual code system for mathematical simulation of nuclear reactors includes a set of computing modules implementing the preparation of macro cross sections on the basis of the two-group library of neutron-physics cross sections obtained for the SKETCH-N nodal code. This library is created by using the UNK code for 3D diffusion computation of first VVER-1000 fuel loadings. Computation of neutron fields in the ShIPR system is performed using the DP3 code in the two-group diffusion approximation in 3D triangular geometry. The efficiency of all groups of control rods for the first fuel loading of the third unit of the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant is computed. The temperature, barometric, and density effects of reactivity as well as the reactivity coefficient due to the concentration of boric acid in the reactor were computed additionally. Results of computations are compared with the experiment.

  19. Neutron and gamma field investigations in the VVER-1000 mock-up concrete shielding on the reactor LR-0

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, S.; Egorov, A.; Osmera, B.; Marik, M.; Rypar, V.; Cvachovec, F.; Kolros, A.

    2011-07-01

    Two sets of neutron and gamma field investigations were carried out in the dismountable model of radiation shielding of the VVER-1000 mock-up on the LR-0 reactor. First, measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate and fast neutrons and gamma flux spectra in the operational neutron monitor channel inside a concrete shielding for different shapes and locations of the channel (cylindrical channel in a concrete, channels with collimator in a concrete, cylindrical channel in a graphite). In all cases measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate were done with and without an additional moderator-polyethylene insert inside the channel. Second, measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate spatial distribution inside a concrete. The {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate measurements and calculations were carried out exploring the relative thermal neutron density in the channels and its space distribution in the concrete. Fast neutrons and gamma measurements were carried out with a stilbene (45 x 45 mm) scintillation spectrometer in the energy regions 0.5-10 MeV (neutrons) and 0.2-10 MeV (gammas). (authors)

  20. Specific features of corrosion damage to heat-transfer tubes of steam generators used at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemytov, D. S.; Tyapkov, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    Specific features of corrosion damage occurring to the heat-transfer tubes of steam generators used at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors are considered. The results obtained from metallographic studies of flaws found in samples cut out from steam-generator tubes are analyzed. Regularities with which flaws of steam-generator tubes are distributed over the tube bundle volume are discussed. Approaches for assessing the technical state and remaining service life of steam-generator tubes are presented.

  1. Enhancing VVER Annular Proliferation Resistance Fuel with Minor Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2007-06-01

    Key aspects of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) program. The merits of nuclear energy are the high-density energy, and low environmental impacts i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission. Planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current LWR as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. The challenges are solving the energy needs of the world, protection against nuclear proliferation, the problem of nuclear waste, and the global environmental problem. To reduce the spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu and 240Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, (b) use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope 238Pu /Pu ratio. For future advanced nuclear systems, the minor actinides are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, or transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply as a waste stream to be disposed of in expensive repository facilities. In this paper, a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) VVER-1000 annular fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance. We concluded that the concept of MARA, involves the use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and/or 241Am), can not only drastically

  2. On the interpretation of the inverted kinetics equation and space-time calculations of the effectiveness of the VVER-1000 reactor scram system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizin, M. N.; Ivanov, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to analyze the accuracy of calculating the effectiveness of the VVER-1000 reactor scram system by means of the inverted solution of the kinetics equation (ISKE). In the numerical studies in the intellectual ShIPR software system, the actuation of the reactor scram system with the possible jamming of one of the two most effective rods is simulated. First, the connection of functionals calculated in the space-time computation in different approximations with the kinetics equation is considered on the theoretical level. The formulas are presented in a manner facilitating their coding. Then, the results of processing of several such functions by the ISKE are presented. For estimating the effectiveness of the VVER-1000 reactor scram system, it is proposed to use the measured currents of ionization chambers (IC) jointly with calculated readings of IC imitators. In addition, the integral of the delayed neutron (DN) generation rate multiplied by the adjoint DN source over the volume of the reactor, calculated for the instant of time when insertion of safety rods ends, is used. This integral is necessary for taking into account the spatial reactivity effects. Reasonable agreement was attained for the considered example between the effectiveness of the scram system evaluated by this method and the values obtained by steady-state calculations as the difference of the reciprocal effective multiplication factors with withdrawn and inserted control rods. This agreement was attained with the use of eight-group DN parameters.

  3. Measures for ensuring reliable operation of the welded joint connecting the reactor coolant circuit's header to the shell of a steam generator used at a VVER-1000 reactor-based nuclear power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, S. A.; Trunov, N. B.; Korotaev, N. F.; Lyakishev, S. L.

    2011-03-01

    Problems that arose around the weld joint connecting the reactor coolant circuit's header to the steam generator shell during operation of steam generators at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors are considered. Works on studying the defects occurred in the header's metal are described, and ways for preventing their development are determined.

  4. Burnup of rhodium SPND in VVER-1000: Method for determination of linear energy release by SPND readings

    SciTech Connect

    Kurchenkov, A. Yu.

    2011-12-15

    A method for determination of linear energy release of a VVER fuel assembly near a rhodium self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is described. The dependence of SPND burnup on the charge passing through it is specified.

  5. LIGNITE FUEL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2005-06-07

    This 3rd quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project summarizes activities from January 1st through March 31st of 2005. It also summarizes the subsequent purchasing activity and final dryer/process design.

  6. LIGNITE FUEL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2005-07-07

    This 4th quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project summarizes activities from April 1st through June 30th of 2005. It also summarizes the subsequent purchasing activity and dryer/process construction.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron characteristics of VVER-1000 core using the MCU-PD program and comparison of the results with calculations by the BIPR-7A program and experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Dement'ev, V. G.; Oleinik, D. S.

    2011-12-15

    The Monte Carlo method has been used to simulate the neutron transport in nuclear reactors for over fifty years. Fast progress in computer power and development of more and more robust and reliable algorithms, codes, and nuclear databases allow solving more challenging problems, including three-dimensional (3D) simulations of full-scale reactor cores. Short descriptions of a full-scale 3D model of the VVER-1000 core and algorithms and methods implemented in the MCU-PD and BIPR-7A codes and a comparison of the calculations by each program as well as a comparison with experimental data are given in this paper.

  8. Shipping Cask Studies with MOX Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-05-17

    Tasks of nuclear safety assurance for storage and transport of fresh mixed uranium-plutonium fuel of the VVER-1000 reactor are considered in the view of 3 MOX LTAs introduction into the core. The precise code MCU that realizes the Monte Carlo method is used for calculations.

  9. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2006-02-03

    This 6th quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project summarizes activities from October 1st through December 31st of 2005. It also summarizes the subsequent purchasing activity and dryer/process construction. Hypothesis remains the same. We will be able to dry lignite an increment to benefit the performance of and reduce emissions from a coal burning electric power generating station.

  10. LIGNITE FUEL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2004-10-29

    This 1st quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project explains what has transpired since Great River Energy was selected to negotiate the Cooperative agreement in February of 2003. The report will summarize Pre-award activities and any other activity since signature of the contract on July 9th of this year. It also summarizes the subsequent purchasing activity and final dryer/process design up to September 30th of 2004.

  11. Mission Fuel Kinetics Input and RELAP-like Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    In this document issued according to ''Work Release 02. P. 99-4b'' the neutronics parameters intended for use in 1-point kinetics RELAP model are presented. They are obtained for equilibrium 30% MOX fueled core of VVER-1000 containing boron burnable poison rods.

  12. MOX LTA Fuel Cycle Analyses: Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    Tasks of nuclear safety assurance for storage and transport of fresh mixed uranium-plutonium fuel of the VVER-1000 reactor are considered in the view of 3 MOX LTAs introduction into the core. The precise code MCU that realizes the Monte Carlo method is used for calculations.

  13. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger; Nenad Sarunac

    2010-03-31

    Pulverized coal power plants which fire lignites and other low-rank high-moisture coals generally operate with reduced efficiencies and increased stack emissions due to the impacts of high fuel moisture on stack heat loss and pulverizer and fan power. A process that uses plant waste heat sources to evaporate a portion of the fuel moisture from the lignite feedstock in a moving bed fluidized bed dryer (FBD) was developed in the U.S. by a team led by Great River Energy (GRE). The demonstration was conducted with Department of Energy (DOE) funding under DOE Award Number DE-FC26-04NT41763. The objectives of GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project were to demonstrate reduction in lignite moisture content by using heat rejected from the power plant, apply technology at full scale at Coal Creek Station (CCS), and commercialize it. The Coal Creek Project has involved several stages, beginning with lignite drying tests in a laboratory-scale FBD at the Energy Research Center (ERC) and development of theoretical models for predicting dryer performance. Using results from these early stage research efforts, GRE built a 2 ton/hour pilot-scale dryer, and a 75 ton/hour prototype drying system at Coal Creek Station. Operated over a range of drying conditions, the results from the pilot-scale and prototype-scale dryers confirmed the performance of the basic dryer design concept and provided the knowledge base needed to scale the process up to commercial size. Phase 2 of the GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project included design, construction and integration of a full-scale commercial coal drying system (four FBDs per unit) with Coal Creek Units 1 and 2 heat sources and coal handling system. Two series of controlled tests were conducted at Coal Creek Unit 1 with wet and dried lignite to determine effect of dried lignite on unit performance and emissions. Wet lignite was fired during the first, wet baseline, test series conducted in September 2009. The second test series was performed

  14. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2007-03-31

    This 11th quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project summarizes activities from January 1st through March 31st of 2007. It summarizes the completion of the Prototype testing activity and initial full-scale dryer design, Budget Period 2 activity during that time period. The Design Team completed process design and layouts of air, water, and coal systems. Heyl-Patterson completed dryer drawings and has sent RFPs to several fabricators for build and assembly. Several meetings were held with Barr engineers to finalize arrangement of the drying, air jig, and coal handling systems. Honeywell held meetings do discuss the control system logic and hardware location. By the end of March we had processed nearly 300,000 tons of lignite through the dryer. Outage preparation maintenance activities on a coal transfer hopper restricted operation of the dryer in February and March. The Outage began March 17th. We will not dry coal again until early May when the Outage on Unit No.2 completes. The Budget Period 1 (Phase 1) final report was submitted this quarter. Comments were received from NETL and are being reviewed. The Phase 2 Project Management Plan was submitted to NETL in January 2007. This deliverable also included the Financing Plan. An application for R&D 100 award was submitted in February. The project received an award from the Minnesota Professional Engineering Society's Seven Wonders of Engineering Award and Minnesota ACEC Grand Award in January. To further summarize, the focus this quarter has been on finalizing commercial design and the layout of four dryers behind each Unit. The modification to the coal handling facilities at Coal Creek and incorporation of air jigs to further beneficiate the segregated material the dryers will reject 20 to 30 % of the mercury and sulfur is segregated however this modification will recover the carbon in that stream.

  15. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2006-04-03

    This 7th quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project summarizes activities from January 1st through March 31st of 2006. It also summarizes the subsequent purchasing activity, dryer/process construction, and testing. The Design Team began conferencing again as construction completed and the testing program began. Primary focus this quarter was construction/installation completion. Phase 1 extension recommendation, and subsequent new project estimate, Forms 424 and 4600 were accepted by DOE headquarters. DOE will complete the application and amended contract. All major mechanical equipment was run, checked out, and tested this quarter. All water, air, and coal flow loops were run and tested. The system was run on January 30th, shut down to adjust equipment timing in the control system on the 31st, and run to 75 ton//hour on February 1st. It ran for seven to eight hours per day until March 20th when ''pairs'' testing ( 24 hour running) began. ''Pairs'' involves comparative testing of unit performance with seven ''wet'' pulverizers versus six ''wet'' and one ''dry''. During the interim, more operators were brought up to speed on system operation and control was shifted to the main Unit No.2 Control Room. The system is run now from the Unit control board operator and an equipment operator checks the system during regular rounds or when an alarm needs verification. The flawless start-up is unprecedented in the industry and credit should be made to the diligence and tenacity of Coal Creek maintenance/checkout staff. Great River Energy and Headwaters did not meet to discuss the Commercialization Plan this quarter. The next meeting is pending data from the drying system. Discussions with Basin Electric, Otter Tail, and Dairyland continue and confidentiality secured as we promote dryers in their stations. Lighting and fire protection were completed in January. Invoices No.12 through No.20 are completed and forwarded following preliminary

  16. The U.S.-Russian joint studies on using power reactors to disposition surplus weapon plutonium as spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Chebeskov, A.; Kalashnikov, A.; Bevard, B.; Moses, D.; Pavlovichev, A.

    1997-09-01

    In 1996, the US and the Russian Federation completed an initial joint study of the candidate options for the disposition of surplus weapons plutonium in both countries. The options included long term storage, immobilization of the plutonium in glass or ceramic for geologic disposal, and the conversion of weapons plutonium to spent fuel in power reactors. For the latter option, the US is only considering the use of existing light water reactors (LWRs) with no new reactor construction for plutonium disposition, or the use of Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) heavy water reactors. While Russia advocates building new reactors, the cost is high, and the continuing joint study of the Russian options is considering only the use of existing VVER-1000 LWRs in Russia and possibly Ukraine, the existing BN-60O fast neutron reactor at the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant in Russia, or the use of the Canadian CANDU reactors. Six of the seven existing VVER-1000 reactors in Russia and the eleven VVER-1000 reactors in Ukraine are all of recent vintage and can be converted to use partial MOX cores. These existing VVER-1000 reactors are capable of converting almost 300 kg of surplus weapons plutonium to spent fuel each year with minimum nuclear power plant modifications. Higher core loads may be achievable in future years.

  17. Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of VVER type reactors at long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of the spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 type reactors are calculated during storage time up to 300,000 y. Decay heat power of radioactive waste (radwaste) determines parameters of the heat removal system for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. Radiotoxicity determines the radiological hazard of radwaste after its leakage and penetration into the environment. PMID:16381764

  18. Creation of Computational Benchmarks for LEU and MOX Fuel Assemblies Under Accident Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A M; Kalashnikov, A G; Kalugin, M A; Lazarenko, A P; Maiorov, L V; Sidorenko, V D

    1999-11-01

    The result of VVER-1000 computational benchmarks, calculations obtained with the use of various Russian codes (such as MCU-RFFI/A, TVS-M and WIMS-ABBN) are presented. List of benchmarks includes LEU and MOX cells with fresh and spent fuel under various conditions (for calculation of kinetic parameters, Doppler coefficient, reactivity effect of decreasing the water density). Calculations results are compared with each other and results of this comparison are discussed.

  19. Mission MOX Fuel Physics Design--Preliminary Equilibrium MOX Assembly Design and Expected Operating Power for Existing Balakovo Fuel Management Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    Among various versions of excess weapons-grade plutonium handling the most preferred in Russia is its burning in power reactors. This is accounted for by the desire to utilize the power value of weapons-grade plutonium and the potentialities of the existing nuclear industry complex. In Russia the versions of burning weapons-grade plutonium in the VVER-, BN-, and HTGR-type power reactors are being developed. However the analysis of the current structure of nuclear power and the energy strategy reveals that in the coming years the VVER-1000-type (designs B-320 and B-392) as well as the VVER-640 reactor (design B-407) now under development appear to be the most promising for this purpose. The experience with the use of mixed uranium/plutonium fuel in the LWR, gained in the West and the preliminary studies carried out in Russia show that weapons-grade plutonium may be actually used as fuel for the Russian VVER reactors. At present Russia has 7 operating VVER-1000 of total installed capacity 7 GWe, 11 reactors of this type are in operation in Ukraine, and 2 in Bulgaria. Before 2003 it is planned to put into operation 2 VVER-1000 units more in Russian and at least 2 units in Ukraine.

  20. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels: Metrics Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Lori Braase; Rose Montgomery; Chris Stanek; Robert Montgomery; Lance Snead; Larry Ott; Mike Billone

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development on enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). This mission emphasizes the development of novel fuel and cladding concepts to replace the current zirconium alloy-uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The overall mission of the ATF research is to develop advanced fuels/cladding with improved performance, reliability and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions, while minimizing waste generation. The initial effort will focus on implementation in operating reactors or reactors with design certifications. To initiate the development of quantitative metrics for ATR, a LWR Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held in October 2012 in Germantown, MD. This paper summarizes the outcome of that workshop and the current status of metrics development for LWR ATF.

  1. Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Anthony P.; Stachowski, Russell E.

    1995-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced.

  2. Binder enhanced refuse derived fuel

    DOEpatents

    Daugherty, Kenneth E.; Venables, Barney J.; Ohlsson, Oscar O.

    1996-01-01

    A refuse derived fuel (RDF) pellet having about 11% or more particulate calcium hydroxide which is utilized in a combustionable mixture. The pellets are used in a particulate fuel bring a mixture of 10% or more, on a heat equivalent basis, of the RDF pellet which contains calcium hydroxide as a binder, with 50% or more, on a heat equivalent basis, of a sulphur containing coal. Combustion of the mixture is effective to produce an effluent gas from the combustion zone having a reduced SO.sub.2 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of effluent gas from similar combustion materials not containing the calcium hydroxide.

  3. Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel

    DOEpatents

    Reese, A.P.; Stachowski, R.E.

    1995-08-08

    A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced. 10 figs.

  4. SELECTIVE ENHANCEMENT OF RDF FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conversion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste to a powdered fuel offers a number of advantages for improving both the quality and marketability of the product. Cellulose embrittlement processes have been developed to convert the organic fractionof MSW to a powder. T...

  5. Variant 22: Spatially-Dependent: Transient Processes in MOX Fueled Core

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    This work is a part of Joint U.S./Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactors and presents the results of spatial kinetics calculational benchmarks. The examinations were carried out with the following purposes: to verify one of spatial neutronic kinetics model elaborated in KI, to understand sensibility of the model to neutronics difference of UOX and MOX cores, and to compare in future point and spatial kinetics models (on the base of a set of selected accidents) in view of eventual creation of RELAP option with 3D kinetics. The document contains input data and results of model operation of three emergency dynamic processes in the VVER-1000 core: (1) Central control rod ejection by pressure drop caused by destroying of the moving mechanism cover. (2) Overcooling of the reactor core caused by steam line rupture and non-closure of steam generator stop valve. (3) The boron dilution of coolant in part of the VVER-1000 core caused by penetration of the distillate slug into the core at start up of non-working loop. These accidents have been applied to: (1) Uranium reference core that is the so-called Advanced VVER-1000 core with Zirconium fuel pins claddings and guide tubes. A number of assemblies contained 18 boron BPRs while first year operating. (2) MOX core with about 30% MOX fuel. At a solving it was supposed that MOX-fuel thermophysical characteristics are identical to uranium fuel ones. The calculations were carried out with the help of the program NOSTRA/1/, simulating VVER dynamics that is briefly described in Chapter 1. Chapter 3 contains the description of reference Uranium and MOX cores that are used in calculations. The neutronics calculations of MOX core with about 30% MOX fuel are named ''Variant 2 1''. Chapters 4-6 contain the calculational results of three above mentioned benchmark accidents that compose in a whole the ''Variant 22''.

  6. Increase of inherent protection level in spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnobaev, A.; Kryuchkov, E.; Glebov, V.

    2006-07-01

    The paper is devoted to upgrading inherent proliferation protection of fissionable nuclear materials (FNM). Some possibilities were investigated to form high radiation barrier inside spent fuel assemblies (SFA) discharged from power reactors of VVER-1000 type and research reactors of IRT type. The radiation barrier is estimated in the terms of rate of equivalent dose (RED) at 30-cm distance from SFA. The values of RED were calculated with application of the computer code package SCALE 4.3. The paper considers the criteria adopted for estimation of FNM proliferation resistance. The paper presents numerical results on a component-wise analysis of the radiation barrier in SFA from reactors of VVER-1000 and IRT type and on capability of various radionuclides to prolong action of the radiation barrier. Isotopic admixtures were selected and amounts of these admixtures were evaluated for significant prolongation of the radiation barrier action at the levels of the radiation standards used for estimation of FNM proliferation resistance. The paper considers vulnerability of the radiation barriers in respect to thermal processing of spent fuel. (authors)

  7. Fuel cell energy storage for Space Station enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stedman, J. K.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fuel cell energy storage for space station enhancement are presented. Topics covered include: power profile; solar dynamic power system; photovoltaic battery; space station energy demands; orbiter fuel cell power plant; space station energy storage; fuel cell system modularity; energy storage system development; and survival power supply.

  8. Plasma enhancement of combustion of solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Askarova, A.S.; Karpenko, E.I.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B.

    2006-03-15

    Plasma fuel systems that increase the coal burning efficiency are discussed. The systems were tested for fuel oil-free startup of boilers and stabilizating a pulverized-coal flame in power-generating boilers equipped with different types of burner and burning all types of power-generating coal. Plasma ignition, thermochemical treatment of an air-fuel mixture prior to combustion, and its burning in a power-generating boiler were numerically simulated. Environmental friendliness of the plasma technology was demonstrated.

  9. Comparison of REMIX vs. MOX fuel characteristics in multiple recycling in VVER reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dekusar, V.M.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Kapranova, E.N.; Korobitsyn, V.E.; Puzakov, A.Y.

    2013-07-01

    Multiple recycling of regenerated uranium-plutonium fuel in thermal reactors of VVER-1000 type with high enriched uranium feeding (REMIX-fuel) gives a possibility to terminate the accumulation of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and Pu and decrease the accumulation of irradiated uranium by an order of magnitude. Results of comparison of VVER-1000 nuclear fuel cycle characteristics vs different fuel types such as UOX, MOX and REMIX-fuel have been presented. REMIX fuel (Regenerated Mixture of U-, Pu oxides) is the mixture of plutonium and uranium extracted from SNF and refined from other actinides and fission products with the addition of enriched uranium to provide the power potential necessary. The savings in terms of uranium quantities and separation works in the nuclear energy system (NES) with reactors using REMIX-fuel compared to the NES with uranium-fuelled reactors are shown to be of about 30% and 8%, respectively. For the NES with thermal reactors partially loaded with MOX-fuel, the uranium and separation works saving of about 14% would be obtained. Production of neptunium and americium in reactors with REMIX-fuel in steady state increases by a factor 3, and production of curium - by 10 compared to the reactors with UOX-fuel. This increase of minor actinide buildup is owed to the multiple recycling of plutonium. It should be noted that in this case all fuel assemblies contain high-background plutonium, and their manufacturing involves an expensive technology. Besides, management of REMIX-fuel will require special protection measures even during the fresh fuel manufacturing phase. The above-said gives ground to state that the use of REMIX fuel would be questionable in economic aspect.

  10. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

    1985-12-03

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  11. Enhanced conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1986-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  12. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  13. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  14. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: • Give “priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools.” • Give “special technical emphasis and funding priority…to activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors.” • Report “to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020.” Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and

  15. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.M.; Musich, M.A.; Mann, M.D.; DeWall, R.A.; Richter, J.J.; Potas, T.A.; Willson, W.G.

    2000-04-25

    Methods are disclosed for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300 to 350 C.

  16. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Chris M.; Musich, Mark A.; Mann, Michael D.; DeWall, Raymond A.; Richter, John J.; Potas, Todd A.; Willson, Warrack G.

    2000-01-01

    Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

  17. ENHANCING ADVANCED CANDU PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FUEL WITH MINOR ACTINIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang

    2010-05-01

    The advanced nuclear system will significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and to enhance the spent fuel proliferation resistance. Minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs can play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In this work, an Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) fuel unit lattice cell model with 43 UO2 fuel rods will be used to investigate the effectiveness of a Minor Actinide Reduction Approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance. The main MARA objective is to increase the 238Pu / Pu isotope ratio by using the transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel and thereby increase the proliferation resistance even for a very low fuel burnup. As a result, MARA is a very effective approach to enhance the proliferation resistance for the on power refueling ACR system nuclear fuel. The MA transmutation characteristics at different MA loadings were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality assessed. The concept of MARA, significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate term of nuclear energy reconnaissance.

  18. Gold Nanoparticles-Enhanced Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongfei; Pan, Cheng; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav; Rafailovich, Miriam

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells have drawn great attention and been taken as a promising alternated energy source. One of the reasons hamper the wider application of PEM fuel cell is the catalytic poison effect from the impurity of the gas flow. Haruta has predicted that gold nanoparticles that are platelet shaped and have direct contact with the metal oxide substrate to be the perfect catalysts of the CO oxidization, yet the synthesis method is difficult to apply in the Fuel Cell. In our approach, thiol-functionalized gold nanoparticles were synthesized through two-phase method developed by Brust et al. We deposit these Au particles with stepped surface directly onto the Nafion membrane in the PEM fuel cell by Langmuir-Blodgett method, resulting in over 50% enhancement of the efficiency of the fuel cell. DFT calculations were conducted to understand the theory of this kind of enhancement. The results indicated that only when the particles were in direct surface contact with the membrane, where AuNPs attached at the end of the Nafion side chains, it could reduce the energy barrier for the CO oxidation that could happen at T<300K.

  19. Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Nyman, May; Shvareva, Tatiana; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances. PMID:22308442

  20. Enhancing BWR Proliferation Resistance Fuel with Minor Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang

    2009-03-01

    To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced light water reactor- LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate-term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm3) to the top (0.35 g/cm3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. The concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms

  1. Enhancing BWR proliferation resistance fuel with minor actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gray S.

    2009-03-01

    To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced light water reactor- LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO 2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate-term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm 3) to the top (0.35 g/cm 3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. The concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in

  2. Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

    2013-09-01

    The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy – UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

  3. Enhanced catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.

    1986-01-01

    The conversion of synthesis gas to liquid molar fuels by means of a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composition is enhanced by the addition of molybdenum, tungsten or a combination thereof as an additional component of said composition. The presence of the additive component increases the olefinic content of the hydrocarbon products produced. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

  4. Enhancing BWR Proliferation Resistance Fuel with Minor Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang

    2008-07-01

    Key aspects of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) program. It consists of both innovative nuclear reactors and innovative research in separation and transmutation. To accomplish these goals, international cooperation is very important and public acceptance is crucial. The merits of nuclear energy are high-density energy, with low environmental impacts (i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission). Planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. The challenges are solving the energy needs of the world, protection against nuclear proliferation, the problem of nuclear waste, and the global environmental problem. To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu and 240Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu /Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, the minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, or transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply as a waste stream to be disposed of in expensive repository facilities. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the

  5. Molecular Aluminum Additive for Burn Enhancement of Hydrocarbon Fuels.

    PubMed

    Guerieri, Philip M; DeCarlo, Samantha; Eichhorn, Bryan; Connell, Terrence; Yetter, Richard A; Tang, Xin; Hicks, Zachary; Bowen, Kit H; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-11-12

    Additives to hydrocarbon fuels are commonly explored to change the combustion dynamics, chemical distribution, and/or product integrity. Here we employ a novel aluminum-based molecular additive, Al(I) tetrameric cluster [AlBrNEt3]4 (Et = C2H5), to a hydrocarbon fuel and evaluate the resultant single-droplet combustion properties. This Al4 cluster offers a soluble alternative to nanoscale particulate additives that have recently been explored and may mitigate the observed problems of particle aggregation. Results show the [AlBrNEt3]4 additive to increase the burn rate constant of a toluene-diethyl ether fuel mixture by ∼20% in a room temperature oxygen environment with only 39 mM of active aluminum additive (0.16 wt % limited by additive solubility). In comparison, a roughly similar addition of nano-aluminum particulate shows no discernible difference in burn properties of the hydrocarbon fuel. High speed video shows the [AlBrNEt3]4 to induce microexplosive gas release events during the last ∼30% of the droplet combustion time. We attribute this to HBr gas release based on results of temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments of the [AlBrNEt3]4 dosed with O2 and D2O. A possible mechanism of burn rate enhancement is presented that is consistent with microexplosion observations and TPR results. PMID:26488461

  6. Heuristic rules embedded genetic algorithm for in-core fuel management optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Fatih

    The objective of this study was to develop a unique methodology and a practical tool for designing loading pattern (LP) and burnable poison (BP) pattern for a given Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core. Because of the large number of possible combinations for the fuel assembly (FA) loading in the core, the design of the core configuration is a complex optimization problem. It requires finding an optimal FA arrangement and BP placement in order to achieve maximum cycle length while satisfying the safety constraints. Genetic Algorithms (GA) have been already used to solve this problem for LP optimization for both PWR and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). The GA, which is a stochastic method works with a group of solutions and uses random variables to make decisions. Based on the theories of evaluation, the GA involves natural selection and reproduction of the individuals in the population for the next generation. The GA works by creating an initial population, evaluating it, and then improving the population by using the evaluation operators. To solve this optimization problem, a LP optimization package, GARCO (Genetic Algorithm Reactor Code Optimization) code is developed in the framework of this thesis. This code is applicable for all types of PWR cores having different geometries and structures with an unlimited number of FA types in the inventory. To reach this goal, an innovative GA is developed by modifying the classical representation of the genotype. To obtain the best result in a shorter time, not only the representation is changed but also the algorithm is changed to use in-core fuel management heuristics rules. The improved GA code was tested to demonstrate and verify the advantages of the new enhancements. The developed methodology is explained in this thesis and preliminary results are shown for the VVER-1000 reactor hexagonal geometry core and the TMI-1 PWR. The improved GA code was tested to verify the advantages of new enhancements. The core physics code

  7. Carbon fiber enhanced bioelectricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Wan, Lili; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation of organics contaminated soil. However, the electricity production and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC are seriously limited by the tremendous internal resistance of soil. Conductive carbon fiber was mixed with petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil and significantly enhanced the performance of soil MFC. The maximum current density, the maximum power density and the accumulated charge output of MFC mixed carbon fiber (MC) were 10, 22 and 16 times as high as those of closed circuit control due to the carbon fiber productively assisted the anode to collect the electron. The internal resistance of MC reduced by 58%, 83% of which owed to the charge transfer resistance, resulting in a high efficiency of electron transfer from soil to anode. The degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbons enhanced by 100% and 329% compared to closed and opened circuit controls without the carbon fiber respectively. The effective range of remediation and the bioelectricity recovery was extended from 6 to 20cm with the same area of air-cathode. The mixed carbon fiber apparently enhanced the bioelectricity generation and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC by means of promoting the electron transfer rate from soil to anode. The use of conductively functional materials (e.g. carbon fiber) is very meaningful for the remediation and bioelectricity recovery in the bioelectrochemical remediation. PMID:27162144

  8. Enhanced HFIR overpower margin through improvements in fuel plate homogeneity inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E.; Knight, R.W.; Cheverton, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    Fuel homogeneity inspection techniques used on the HFIR fuel plates have recently been improved through conversion of the X-ray inspection device to acquire, store, and process data digitally. This paper reports some early results from using the improved equipment and describes future plans for obtaining enhanced fuel thermal performance by exploiting this improved inspection capability.

  9. 2004 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Review Presentation COST AND PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENTS FOR A PEM FUEL CELL TURBOCOMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Mark K. Gee

    2004-04-01

    The objective is to assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.

  10. Thermoacoustic sensor for nuclear fuel temperaturemonitoring and heat transfer enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Alli; Steven L. Garrett

    2013-05-01

    A new acoustical sensing system for the nuclear power industry has been developed at The Pennsylvania State University in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratories. This sensor uses the high temperatures of nuclear fuel to convert a nuclear fuel rod into a standing-wave thermoacoustic engine. When a standing wave is generated, the sound wave within the fuel rod will be propagated, by acoustic radiation, through the cooling fluid within the reactor or spent fuel pool and can be monitored a remote location external to the reactor. The frequency of the sound can be correlated to an effective temperature of either the fuel or the surrounding coolant. We will present results for a thermoacoustic resonator built into a Nitonic-60 (stainless steel) fuel rod that requires only one passive component and no heat exchangers.

  11. Development of LWR Fuels with Enhanced Accident Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Lahoda, Edward J.; Boylan, Frank A.

    2015-10-30

    Significant progress was made on the technical, licensing, and business aspects of the Westinghouse Electric Company’s Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) by the Westinghouse ATF team. The fuel pellet options included waterproofed U15N and U3Si2 and the cladding options SiC composites and zirconium alloys with surface treatments. Technology was developed that resulted in U3Si2 pellets with densities of >94% being achieved at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The use of U3Si2 will represent a 15% increase in U235 loadings over those in UO₂ fuel pellets. This technology was then applied to manufacture pellets for 6 test rodlets which were inserted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in early 2015 in zirconium alloy cladding. The first of these rodlets are expected to be removed in about 2017. Key characteristics to be determined include verification of the centerline temperature calculations, thermal conductivity, fission gas release, swelling and degree of amorphization. Waterproofed UN pellets have achieved >94% density for a 32% U3Si2/68% UN composite pellet at Texas A&M University. This represents a U235 increase of about 31% over current UO2 pellets. Pellets and powders of UO2, UN, and U3Si2the were tested by Westinghouse and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using differential scanning calorimetry to determine what their steam and 20% oxygen corrosion temperatures were as compared to UO2. Cold spray application of either the amorphous steel or the Ti2AlC was successful in forming an adherent ~20 micron coating that remained after testing at 420°C in a steam autoclave. Tests at 1200°C in 100% steam on coatings for Zr alloy have not been successful, possibly due to the low density of the coatings which allowed steam transport to the base zirconium metal. Significant modeling and testing

  12. Estimate of the Sources of Plutonium-Containing Wastes Generated from MOX Fuel Production in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Kudinov, K. G.; Tretyakov, A. A.; Sorokin, Yu. P.; Bondin, V. V.; Manakova, L. F.; Jardine, L. J.

    2002-02-26

    In Russia, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel is produced in a pilot facility ''Paket'' at ''MAYAK'' Production Association. The Mining-Chemical Combine (MCC) has developed plans to design and build a dedicated industrial-scale plant to produce MOX fuel and fuel assemblies (FA) for VVER-1000 water reactors and the BN-600 fast-breeder reactor, which is pending an official Russian Federation (RF) site-selection decision. The design output of the plant is based on a production capacity of 2.75 tons of weapons plutonium per year to produce the resulting fuel assemblies: 1.25 tons for the BN-600 reactor FAs and the remaining 1.5 tons for VVER-1000 FAs. It is likely the quantity of BN-600 FAs will be reduced in actual practice. The process of nuclear disarmament frees a significant amount of weapons plutonium for other uses, which, if unutilized, represents a constant general threat. In France, Great Britain, Belgium, Russia, and Japan, reactor-grade plutonium is used in MOX-fuel production. Making MOX-fuel for CANDU (Canada) and pressurized water reactors (PWR) (Europe) is under consideration in Russia. If this latter production is added, as many as 5 tons of Pu per year might be processed into new FAs in Russia. Many years of work and experience are represented in the estimates of MOX fuel production wastes derived in this report. Prior engineering studies and sludge treatment investigations and comparisons have determined how best to treat Pu sludges and MOX fuel wastes. Based upon analyses of the production processes established by these efforts, we can estimate that there will be approximately 1200 kg of residual wastes subject to immobilization per MT of plutonium processed, of which approximately 6 to 7 kg is Pu in the residuals per MT of Pu processed. The wastes are various and complicated in composition. Because organic wastes constitute both the major portion of total waste and of the Pu to be immobilized, the recommended treatment of MOX-fuel production waste is

  13. Estimate of the Sources of Plutonium-Containing Wastes Generated from MOX Fuel Production in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Kudinov, K.G.; Tretyakov, A.A.; Sorokin, Y.P.; Bondin, V.V.; Manakova, L.F.; Jardine, L.J.

    2001-12-01

    In Russia, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel is produced in a pilot facility ''Paket'' at ''MAYAK'' Production Association. The Mining-Chemical Combine (MCC) has developed plans to design and build a dedicated industrial-scale plant to produce MOX fuel and fuel assemblies (FA) for VVER-1000 water reactors and the BN-600 fast-breeder reactor, which is pending an official Russian Federation (RF) site-selection decision. The design output of the plant is based on production capacity of 2.75 tons of weapons plutonium per year to produce the resulting fuel assemblies: 1.25 tons for the BN-600 reactor FAs and the remaining 1.5 tons for VVER-1000 FAs. It is likely the quantity of BN-600 FAs will be reduced in actual practice. The process of nuclear disarmament frees a significant amount of weapons plutonium for other uses, which, if unutilized, represents a constant general threat. In France, Great Britain, Belgium, Russia, and Japan, reactor-grade plutonium is used in MOX-fuel production. Making MOX-fuel for CANDU (Canada) and pressurized water reactors (PWR) (Europe) is under consideration Russia. If this latter production is added, as many as 5 tons of Pu per year might be processed into new FAs in Russia. Many years of work and experience are represented in the estimates of MOX fuel production wastes derived in this report. Prior engineering studies and sludge treatment investigations and comparisons have determined how best to treat Pu sludges and MOX fuel wastes. Based upon analyses of the production processes established by these efforts, we can estimate that there will be approximately 1200 kg of residual wastes subject to immobilization per MT of plutonium processed, of which approximately 6 to 7 kg is Pu in the residuals per MT of Pu processed. The wastes are various and complicated in composition. Because organic wastes constitute both the major portion of total waste and of the Pu to be immobilized, the recommended treatment of MOX-fuel production waste is incineration

  14. OECD NEA Benchmark Database of Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions for World Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, Ian C; Sly, Nicholas C; Michel-Sendis, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data on the isotopic concentrations in irradiated nuclear fuel represent one of the primary methods for validating computational methods and nuclear data used for reactor and spent fuel depletion simulations that support nuclear fuel cycle safety and safeguards programs. Measurement data have previously not been available to users in a centralized or searchable format, and the majority of accessible information has been, for the most part, limited to light-water-reactor designs. This paper describes a recent initiative to compile spent fuel benchmark data for additional reactor designs used throughout the world that can be used to validate computer model simulations that support nuclear energy and nuclear safeguards missions. Experimental benchmark data have been expanded to include VVER-440, VVER-1000, RBMK, graphite moderated MAGNOX, gas cooled AGR, and several heavy-water moderated CANDU reactor designs. Additional experimental data for pressurized light water and boiling water reactor fuels has also been compiled for modern assembly designs and more extensive isotopic measurements. These data are being compiled and uploaded to a recently revised structured and searchable database, SFCOMPO, to provide the nuclear analysis community with a centrally-accessible resource of spent fuel compositions that can be used to benchmark computer codes, models, and nuclear data. The current version of SFCOMPO contains data for eight reactor designs, 20 fuel assembly designs, more than 550 spent fuel samples, and measured isotopic data for about 80 nuclides.

  15. Microstructure of boron nitride coated on nuclear fuels by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör; Toker, Canan

    1998-08-01

    Three nuclear fuels, pure urania, 5% and 10% gadolinia containing fuels were coated with boron nitride to improve nuclear and physical properties. Coating was done by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique by using boron trichloride and ammonia. The specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Boron nitride formed a grainy structure on all fuels. Gadolinia decreased the grain size of boron nitride. The fractal dimensions of fragmentation and of area-perimeter relation were determined.

  16. ENHANCED IN SITU ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION OF FUEL-CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have demonstrated the application of an enhanced in situ anaerobic bioremediation technology to clean up ground water contaminated with fuel hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). The technology is based on introduction of electron acce...

  17. Oxygen enhanced switching to combustion of lower rank fuels

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.; Wu, Kuang Tsai

    2004-03-02

    A furnace that combusts fuel, such as coal, of a given minimum energy content to obtain a stated minimum amount of energy per unit of time is enabled to combust fuel having a lower energy content, while still obtaining at least the stated minimum energy generation rate, by replacing a small amount of the combustion air fed to the furnace by oxygen. The replacement of oxygen for combustion air also provides reduction in the generation of NOx.

  18. A database system for enhancing fuel records management capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rieke, Phil; Razvi, Junaid

    1994-07-01

    The need to modernize the system of managing a large variety of fuel related data at the TRIGA Reactors Facility at General Atomics, as well as the need to improve NRC nuclear material reporting requirements, prompted the development of a database to cover all aspects of fuel records management. The TRIGA Fuel Database replaces (a) an index card system used for recording fuel movements, (b) hand calculations for uranium burnup, and (c) a somewhat aged and cumbersome system of recording fuel inspection results. It was developed using Microsoft Access, a relational database system for Windows. Instead of relying on various sources for element information, users may now review individual element statistics, record inspection results, calculate element burnup and more, all from within a single application. Taking full advantage of the ease-of-use features designed in to Windows and Access, the user can enter and extract information easily through a number of customized on screen forms, with a wide variety of reporting options available. All forms are accessed through a main 'Options' screen, with the options broken down by categories, including 'Elements', 'Special Elements/Devices', 'Control Rods' and 'Areas'. Relational integrity and data validation rules are enforced to assist in ensuring accurate and meaningful data is entered. Among other items, the database lets the user define: element types (such as FLIP or standard) and subtypes (such as fuel follower, instrumented, etc.), various inspection codes for standardizing inspection results, areas within the facility where elements are located, and the power factors associated with element positions within a reactor. Using fuel moves, power history, power factors and element types, the database tracks uranium burnup and plutonium buildup on a quarterly basis. The Fuel Database was designed with end-users in mind and does not force an operations oriented user to learn any programming or relational database theory in

  19. Enhanced CANDU6: Reactor and fuel cycle options - Natural uranium and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Ovanes, M.; Chan, P. S. W.; Mao, J.; Alderson, N.; Hopwood, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced CANDU 6{sup R} (ECo{sup R}) is the updated version of the well established CANDU 6 family of units incorporating improved safety characteristics designed to meet or exceed Generation III nuclear power plant expectations. The EC6 retains the excellent neutron economy and fuel cycle flexibility that are inherent in the CANDU reactor design. The reference design is based on natural uranium fuel, but the EC6 is also able to utilize additional fuel options, including the use of Recovered Uranium (RU) and Thorium based fuels, without requiring major hardware upgrades to the existing control and safety systems. This paper outlines the major changes in the EC6 core design from the existing C6 design that significantly enhance the safety characteristics and operating efficiency of the reactor. The use of RU fuel as a transparent replacement fuel for the standard 37-el NU fuel, and several RU based advanced fuel designs that give significant improvements in fuel burnup and inherent safety characteristics are also discussed in the paper. In addition, the suitability of the EC6 to use MOX and related Pu-based fuels will also be discussed. (authors)

  20. Enhanced thermal conductivity oxide nuclear fuels by co-sintering with BeO: II. Fuel performance and neutronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Kevin; Mays, Claude

    2008-04-01

    The fuel rod performance and neutronics of enhanced thermal conductivity oxide (ECO) nuclear fuel with BeO have been compared to those of standard UO 2 fuel. The standards of comparison were that the ECO fuel should have the same infinite neutron-multiplication factor kinf at end of life and provide the same energy extraction per fuel assembly over its lifetime. The BeO displaces some uranium, so equivalence with standard UO 2 fuel was obtained by increasing the burnup and slightly increasing the enrichment. The COPERNIC fuel rod performance code was adapted to account for the effect of BeO on thermal properties. The materials considered were standard UO 2, UO 2 with 4.0 vol.% BeO, and UO 2 with 9.6 vol.% BeO. The smaller amount of BeO was assumed to provide increases in thermal conductivity of 0, 5, or 10%, whereas the larger amount was assumed to provide an increase of 50%. A significant improvement in performance was seen, as evidenced by reduced temperatures, internal rod pressures, and fission gas release, even with modest (5-10%) increases in thermal conductivity. The benefits increased monotonically with increasing thermal conductivity. Improvements in LOCA initialization performance were also seen. A neutronic calculation considered a transition from standard UO 2 fuel to ECO fuel. The calculation indicated that only a small increase in enrichment is required to maintain the kinf at end of life. The smallness of the change was attributed to the neutron-multiplication reaction of Be with fast neutrons and the moderating effect of BeO. Adoption of ECO fuel was predicted to provide a net reduction in uranium cost. Requirements for industrial hygiene were found to be comparable to those for processing of UO 2.

  1. Enhancing the ABAQUS thermomechanics code to simulate multipellet steady and transient LWR fuel rod behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, R. L.

    2011-08-01

    A powerful multidimensional fuels performance analysis capability, applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior, is developed based on enhancements to the commercially available ABAQUS general-purpose thermomechanics code. Enhanced capabilities are described, including: UO 2 temperature and burnup dependent thermal properties, solid and gaseous fission product swelling, fuel densification, fission gas release, cladding thermal and irradiation creep, cladding irradiation growth, gap heat transfer, and gap/plenum gas behavior during irradiation. This new capability is demonstrated using a 2D axisymmetric analysis of the upper section of a simplified multipellet fuel rod, during both steady and transient operation. Comparisons are made between discrete and smeared-pellet simulations. Computational results demonstrate the importance of a multidimensional, multipellet, fully-coupled thermomechanical approach. Interestingly, many of the inherent deficiencies in existing fuel performance codes (e.g., 1D thermomechanics, loose thermomechanical coupling, separate steady and transient analysis, cumbersome pre- and post-processing) are, in fact, ABAQUS strengths.

  2. Enhancing the ABAQUS Thermomechanics Code to Simulate Steady and Transient Fuel Rod Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Williamson; D. A. Knoll

    2009-09-01

    A powerful multidimensional fuels performance capability, applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior, is developed based on enhancements to the commercially available ABAQUS general-purpose thermomechanics code. Enhanced capabilities are described, including: UO2 temperature and burnup dependent thermal properties, solid and gaseous fission product swelling, fuel densification, fission gas release, cladding thermal and irradiation creep, cladding irradiation growth , gap heat transfer, and gap/plenum gas behavior during irradiation. The various modeling capabilities are demonstrated using a 2D axisymmetric analysis of the upper section of a simplified multi-pellet fuel rod, during both steady and transient operation. Computational results demonstrate the importance of a multidimensional fully-coupled thermomechanics treatment. Interestingly, many of the inherent deficiencies in existing fuel performance codes (e.g., 1D thermomechanics, loose thermo-mechanical coupling, separate steady and transient analysis, cumbersome pre- and post-processing) are, in fact, ABAQUS strengths.

  3. Plasma-Enhanced Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Fuel Blends Using Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, Mark; Mungal, M Godfrey

    2014-10-28

    This project had as its goals the study of fundamental physical and chemical processes relevant to the sustained premixed and non-premixed jet ignition/combustion of low grade fuels or fuels under adverse flow conditions using non-equilibrium pulsed nanosecond discharges.

  4. Chemical composition of tall oil-based cetane enhancer for diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Wong, A.; Monnier, J.

    1993-12-31

    Tall oil is a co-product of the manufacture of kraft softwood pulp. The principal constituents of tall oil are unsaturated C{sub 18} fatty acids, resin acids and unsaponifiables such as diterpenic alcohols/aldehydes. Tall oil has been shown to be an economical feedstock for the manufacture of cetane enhancer for diesel fuels, using the proprietary CANMET (Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) technology. Under a joint R&D project between Arbokem Inc./BC Chemicals Ltd. and CANMET, pilot plant tests were conducted recently at the CANMET Energy Research Labs. in Ottawa. The results showed that tall oil could by hydroprocessed efficiently to yield a valuable fuel blending agent. When this product was mixed with conventional diesel fuel, the cetane number of the diesel fuel increased linearly with the addition of the product. Chemical analysis including chromatography-mass spectrometry has confirmed high conversion of tall oil components into straight-chain alkanes. A small amount of cyclic hydrocarbons and sulphur components were present in the tall oil-based diesel enhancer. Preliminary results indicate that this type of cetane enhancer would provide additional technical benefits. The low aromatics content of the tall oil-based cetane enhancer would significantly reduce aromatics in the final diesel fuel blend. Diesel engines operating on such fuel blends would have a lower propensity to form particulates and NO{sub x}.

  5. Mixing enhancement in a scramjet combustor using fuel jet injection swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesberg, Sonja M.

    The scramjet engine has proven to be a viable means of powering a hypersonic vehicle, especially after successful flights of the X-51 WaveRider and various Hy-SHOT test vehicles. The major challenge associated with operating a scramjet engine is the short residence time of the fuel and oxidizer in the combustor. The fuel and oxidizer have only milliseconds to mix, ignite and combust in the combustion chamber. Combustion cannot occur until the fuel and oxidizer are mixed on a molecular level. Therefore the improvement of mixing is of utmost interest since this can increase combustion efficiency. This study investigated mixing enhancement of fuel and oxidizer within the combustion chamber of a scramjet by introducing swirl to the fuel jet. The investigation was accomplished with numerical simulations using STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamic software. The geometry of the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility was used to model the isolator, combustor and nozzle of a scramjet engine for simulation purposes. Experimental data from previous research at the facility was used to verify the simulation model before investigating the effect of fuel jet swirl on mixing. The model used coaxial fuel jet with a swirling annular jet. Single coaxial fuel jet and dual coaxial fuel jet configurations were simulated for the investigation. The coaxial fuel jets were modelled with a swirling annular jet and non-swirling core jet. Numerical analysis showed that fuel jet swirl not only increased mixing and entrainment of the fuel with the oxidizer but the mixing occurred further upstream than without fuel jet swirl. The burning efficiency was calculated for the all the configurations. An increase in burning efficiency indicated an increase in the mixing of H2 with O2. In the case of the single fuel jet models, the maximum burning efficiency increase due to fuel injection jet swirl was 23.3%. The research also investigated the possibility that interaction between two

  6. Development of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy monitoring of fuel markers to prevent fraud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Timothy; Clarkson, John; White, Peter C.; Meakin, Nicholas; McDonald, Ken

    2013-05-01

    Governments often tax fuel products to generate revenues to support and stimulate their economies. They also subsidize the cost of essential fuel products. Fuel taxation and subsidization practices are both subject to fraud. Oil marketing companies also suffer from fuel fraud with loss of legitimate sales and additional quality and liability issues. The use of an advanced marking system to identify and control fraud has been shown to be effective in controlling illegal activity. DeCipher has developed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy as its lead technology for measuring markers in fuel to identify and control malpractice. SERS has many advantages that make it highly suitable for this purpose. The SERS instruments are portable and can be used to monitor fuel at any point in the supply chain. SERS shows high specificity for the marker, with no false positives. Multiple markers can also be detected in a single SERS analysis allowing, for example, specific regional monitoring of fuel. The SERS analysis from fuel is also quick, clear and decisive, with a measurement time of less than 5 minutes. We will present results highlighting our development of the use of a highly stable silver colloid as a SERS substrate to measure the markers at ppb levels. Preliminary results from the use of a solid state SERS substrate to measure fuel markers will also be presented.

  7. Potential opportunities for nano materials to help enable enhanced nuclear fuel performance

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, Kenneth J.

    2012-06-06

    This presentation is an overview of the technical challenges for development of nuclear fuels with enhanced performance and accident tolerance. Key specific aspects of improved fuel performance are noted. Examples of existing nanonuclear projects and concepts are presented and areas of potential focus are suggested. The audience for this presentation includes representatives from: DOE-NE, other national laboratories, industry and academia. This audience is a mixture of nanotechnology experts and nuclear energy researchers and managers.

  8. Fuel property enhancement of biodiesel fuels from common and alternative feedstocks via complementary blending

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) prepared from field pennycress and meadowfoam seed oils were blended with methyl esters from camelina, cottonseed, palm, and soybean oils in an effort to ameliorate technical deficiencies inherent to these biodiesel fuels. For instance, camelina, cottonseed, and ...

  9. Recent view to the results of pulse tests in the IGR reactor with high burn-up fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L.

    1996-03-01

    Testing of 43 fuel elements (13 fuel elements with high burn-up fuel, 10 fuel elements with preirradiated cladding and fresh fuel, and 20 non-irradiated fuel elements) was carried out in the IGR pulse reactor with a half width of the reactor power pulse of about 0.7 sec. Tests were conducted in capsules with no coolant flow and with standard initial conditions in the capsule of 20{degrees}C and 0.2 MPa. Two types of coolant were used: water and air. One purpose of the test program was to determine the thresholds and mechanisms of fuel rod failure under RIA conditions for VVER fuel rods over their entire exposure range, from zero to high burn-up. These failure thresholds are often used in safety analyses. The tests and analyses were designed to reveal the influence on fuel rod failure of (1) the mechanical properties of the cladding, (2) the pellet-to-cladding gap, (3) fuel burn-up, (4) fuel-to-coolant heat transfer, and other parameters. The resulting data base can also be used for validation of computer codes used for analyzing fuel rod behavior. Three types of test specimens were used in the tests, and diagrams of these specimens are shown in Fig. 1. {open_quotes}Type-C{close_quotes} specimens were re-fabricated from commercial fuel rods of the VVER-1000 type that had been subjected to many power cycles of operation in the Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant (NV NPP). {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens were fabricated from the same commercial fuel rods used above, but the high burn-up oxide fuel was removed from the cladding and was replaced with fresh oxide fuel pellets. {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens thus provided a means of separating the effects of the cladding and the oxide fuel pellets and were used to examine cladding effects only.

  10. SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TREATMENT OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL TO ENHANCE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.; Torres, R.; Korinko, P.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Becnel, J.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Adams, T.

    2012-09-25

    Reactive Gas Recycling (RGR) technology development has been initiated at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), with a stretch-goal to develop a fully dry recycling technology for Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF). This approach is attractive due to the potential of targeted gas-phase treatment steps to reduce footprint and secondary waste volumes associated with separations relying primarily on traditional technologies, so long as the fluorinators employed in the reaction are recycled for use in the reactors or are optimized for conversion of fluorinator reactant. The developed fluorination via SF{sub 6}, similar to the case for other fluorinators such as NF{sub 3}, can be used to address multiple fuel forms and downstream cycles including continued processing for LWR via fluorination or incorporation into a aqueous process (e.g. modified FLUOREX) or for subsequent pyro treatment to be used in advanced gas reactor designs such metal- or gas-cooled reactors. This report details the most recent experimental results on the reaction of SF{sub 6} with various fission product surrogate materials in the form of oxides and metals, including uranium oxides using a high-temperature DTA apparatus capable of temperatures in excess of 1000{deg}C . The experimental results indicate that the majority of the fission products form stable solid fluorides and sulfides, while a subset of the fission products form volatile fluorides such as molybdenum fluoride and niobium fluoride, as predicted thermodynamically. Additional kinetic analysis has been performed on additional fission products. A key result is the verification that SF{sub 6} requires high temperatures for direct fluorination and subsequent volatilization of uranium oxides to UF{sub 6}, and thus is well positioned as a head-end treatment for other separations technologies, such as the volatilization of uranium oxide by NF{sub 3} as reported by colleagues at PNNL, advanced pyrochemical separations or traditional full recycle

  11. Conversion of vegetable oils and animal fats into paraffinic cetane enhancers for diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.; Feng, Y.; Hogan, E.

    1995-11-01

    The two principal methods of producing biodiesel fuels are (a) transesterification of vegetable oils and animal fats with a monohydric alcohol, and (b) direct hydrotreating of tree oils, vegetable oils and animal fats. The patented hydrotreating technology is based on the catalytic processing of biomass oils and fats with hydrogen, under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. The typical mix of hydrotreated products is as follows: 5-15% light distillate (naphta), 40-60% middle distillate (cetane), 5-15% heavy distillate and 5-10% burner gas. The naptha fraction may be used as a gasoline supplement. The middle distillate is designed for use as a cetane booster for diesel fuels. Both heavy distillate and light hydrocarbon gases are usable as power boiler fuels. Typically, the cetane enhancer would be admixed with diesel fuel in the range of 5 to 30% by volume. This new diesel blend meets the essential quality characteristics of the basic diesel fuel, for direct use in diesel engines without any modifications. The basic hydrotreatment technology has been evaluated further in the laboratory on degummed soya oil, yellow grease and animal tallow. The preliminary findings suggest that the technology can provide efficient conversion of these materials into cetane enhancers for diesel fuels.

  12. TRISO coated fuel particles with enhanced SiC properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Honorato, E.; Tan, J.; Meadows, P. J.; Marsh, G.; Xiao, P.

    2009-07-01

    The silicon carbide (SiC) layer used for the formation of TRISO coated fuel particles is normally produced at 1500-1650 °C via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition from methyltrichlorosilane in a hydrogen environment. In this work, we show the deposition of SiC coatings with uniform grain size throughout the coating thickness, as opposed to standard coatings which have larger grain sizes in the outer sections of the coating. Furthermore, the use of argon as the fluidizing gas and propylene as a carbon precursor, in addition to hydrogen and methyltrichlorosilane, allowed the deposition of stoichiometric SiC coatings with refined microstructure at 1400 and 1300 °C. The deposition of SiC at lower deposition temperatures was also advantageous since the reduced heat treatment was not detrimental to the properties of the inner pyrolytic carbon which generally occurs when SiC is deposited at 1500 °C. The use of a chemical vapor deposition coater with four spouts allowed the deposition of uniform and spherical coatings.

  13. Enhanced Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Element for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M. A.; DeHart, M. D.; Morrell, S. R.; Jamison, R. K.; Nef, E. C.; Nigg, D. W.

    2015-03-01

    Under the current US Department of Energy (DOE) policy and planning scenario, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its associated critical facility (ATRC) will be reconfigured to operate on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort has produced a conceptual design for an Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) element. This fuel features monolithic U-10Mo fuel foils and aluminum cladding separated by a thin zirconium barrier. As with previous iterations of the ELF design, radial power peaking is managed using different U-10Mo foil thicknesses in different plates of the element. The lead fuel element design, ELF Mk1A, features only three fuel meat thicknesses, a reduction from the previous iterations meant to simplify manufacturing. Evaluation of the ELF Mk1A fuel design against reactor performance requirements is ongoing, as are investigations of the impact of manufacturing uncertainty on safety margins. The element design has been evaluated in what are expected to be the most demanding design basis accident scenarios and has met all initial thermal-hydraulic criteria.

  14. Non-homogeneous hybrid rocket fuel for enhanced regression rates utilizing partial entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boronowsky, Kenny

    A concept was developed and tested to enhance the performance and regression rate of hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), a commonly used hybrid rocket fuel. By adding small nodules of paraffin into the HTPB fuel, a non-homogeneous mixture was created resulting in increased regression rates. The goal was to develop a fuel with a simplified single core geometry and a tailorable regression rate. The new fuel would benefit from the structural stability of HTPB yet not suffer from the large void fraction representative of typical HTPB core geometries. Regression rates were compared between traditional HTPB single core grains, 85% HTPB mixed with 15% (by weight) paraffin cores, 70% HTPB mixed with 30% paraffin cores, and plain paraffin single core grains. Each fuel combination was tested at oxidizer flow rates, ranging from 0.9 - 3.3 g/s of gaseous oxygen, in a small scale hybrid test rocket and average regression rates were measured. While large uncertainties were present in the experimental setup, the overall data showed that the regression rate was enhanced as paraffin concentration increased. While further testing would be required at larger scales of interest, the trends are encouraging. Inclusion of paraffin nodules in the HTPB grain may produce a greater advantage than other more noxious additives in current use. In addition, it may lead to safer rocket motors with higher integrated thrust due to the decreased void fraction.

  15. Enhancements to transmutation system performance through use of an accelerator/fluid fuel combination

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Buksa, J.; Davidson, J.W.; Poston, D.

    1995-07-01

    The destruction of plutonium and other long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste is receiving considerable international technical interest and effort. At Los Alamos, accelerator-based concepts are under investigation which achieve high burnups of plutonium and other actinides and which simultaneously transmute key long-lived fission products. This paper describes quantitative enhancements brought through use of an accelerator-driven/fluid fuel subcritical blanket. Results are described covering robust response to reactivity insertions, increased neutron economy for transmutation of long-lived fission products using thermal neutrons, and reduced frequencies required for fuel cleanup.

  16. Enhanced Fuel-Optimal Trajectory-Generation Algorithm for Planetary Pinpoint Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, James C.; Scharf, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    An enhanced algorithm is developed that builds on a previous innovation of fuel-optimal powered-descent guidance (PDG) for planetary pinpoint landing. The PDG problem is to compute constrained, fuel-optimal trajectories to land a craft at a prescribed target on a planetary surface, starting from a parachute cut-off point and using a throttleable descent engine. The previous innovation showed the minimal-fuel PDG problem can be posed as a convex optimization problem, in particular, as a Second-Order Cone Program, which can be solved to global optimality with deterministic convergence properties, and hence is a candidate for onboard implementation. To increase the speed and robustness of this convex PDG algorithm for possible onboard implementation, the following enhancements are incorporated: 1) Fast detection of infeasibility (i.e., control authority is not sufficient for soft-landing) for subsequent fault response. 2) The use of a piecewise-linear control parameterization, providing smooth solution trajectories and increasing computational efficiency. 3) An enhanced line-search algorithm for optimal time-of-flight, providing quicker convergence and bounding the number of path-planning iterations needed. 4) An additional constraint that analytically guarantees inter-sample satisfaction of glide-slope and non-sub-surface flight constraints, allowing larger discretizations and, hence, faster optimization. 5) Explicit incorporation of Mars rotation rate into the trajectory computation for improved targeting accuracy. These enhancements allow faster convergence to the fuel-optimal solution and, more importantly, remove the need for a "human-in-the-loop," as constraints will be satisfied over the entire path-planning interval independent of step-size (as opposed to just at the discrete time points) and infeasible initial conditions are immediately detected. Finally, while the PDG stage is typically only a few minutes, ignoring the rotation rate of Mars can introduce 10s

  17. Phase 1A Final Report for the AREVA Team Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, Mike E.

    2015-03-19

    In response to the Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to develop and deploy lead fuel assemblies (LFAs) of Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel (EATF) into a US reactor within 10 years, AREVA put together a team to develop promising technologies for improved fuel performance during off normal operations. This team consisted of the University of Florida (UF) and the University of Wisconsin (UW), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Duke Energy and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). This team brought broad experience and expertise to bear on EATF development. AREVA has been designing; manufacturing and testing nuclear fuel for over 50 years and is one of the 3 large international companies supplying fuel to the nuclear industry. The university and National Laboratory team members brought expertise in nuclear fuel concepts and materials development. Duke and TVA brought practical utility operating experience. This report documents the results from the initial “discovery phase” where the team explored options for EATF concepts that provide enhanced accident tolerance for both Design Basis (DB) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDB). The main driver for the concepts under development were that they could be implemented in a 10 year time frame and be economically viable and acceptable to the nuclear fuel marketplace. The economics of fuel design make this DOE funded project very important to the nuclear industry. Even incremental changes to an existing fuel design can cost in the range of $100M to implement through to LFAs. If this money is invested evenly over 10 years then it can take the fuel vendor several decades after the start of the project to recover their initial investment and reach a breakeven point on the initial investment. Step or radical changes to a fuel assembly design can cost upwards of $500M and will take even longer for the fuel vendor to recover their investment. With the projected lifetimes of the current generation of nuclear power

  18. Enhanced catalyst and process for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.

    1986-01-01

    The conversion of synthesis gas to liquid molar fuels by means of a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composition is enhanced by the addition of molybdenum, tungsten or a combination thereof as an additional component of said composition. The presence of the additive component increases the olefinic content of the hydrocarbon products produced. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

  19. Selecting enhancing solutions for electrokinetic remediation of dredged sediments polluted with fuel.

    PubMed

    Rozas, F; Castellote, M

    2015-03-15

    In this paper a procedure for selecting the enhancing solutions in electrokinetic remediation experiments is proposed. For this purpose, dredged marine sediment was contaminated with fuel, and a total of 22 different experimental conditions were tested, analysing the influence of different enhancing solutions by using three commercial non-ionic surfactants, one bio-surfactant, one chelating agent, and one weak acid. Characterisation, microelectrophoretic and electrokinetic remediation trials were carried out. The results are explained on the basis of the interactions between the fuel, the enhancing electrolytes and the matrix. For one specific system, the electrophoretic zeta potential, (ζ), of the contaminated matrix in the solution was found to be related to the electroosmotic averaged ζ in the experiment and not to the efficiency in the extraction. This later was correlated to a parameter accounting for both contributions, the contaminant and the enhancing solution, calculated on the basis of differences in the electrophoretic ζ in different conditions which has allowed to propose a methodology for selection of enhancing solutions. PMID:25559497

  20. Fluorinated carboxylic membranes deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thery, J.; Martin, S.; Faucheux, V.; Le Van Jodin, L.; Truffier-Boutry, D.; Martinent, A.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    Among the fuel cell technologies, the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are particularly promising because they are energy-efficient, clean, and fuel-flexible (i.e., can use hydrogen or methanol). The great majority of PEM fuel cells rely on a polymer electrolyte from the family of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, nevertheless alternative materials are currently being developed, mainly to offer the alternative workout techniques which are required for the portable energy sources. Plasma polymerization represents a good solution, as it offers the possibility to deposit thin layer with an accurate and homogeneous thickness, even on 3D surfaces. In this paper, we present the results for the growth of proton conductive fluoro carboxylic membranes elaborated by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. These membranes present conductivity values of the same order than the one of Nafion ®. The properties of the membrane, such as the chemical composition, the ionic conductivity, the swelling behaviour and the permeability were correlated to the plasma process parameters. The membranes were integrated in fuel cells on porous substrates and we present here the results regarding the barrier effect and the power output. Barrier effect similar to those of 40 μm Nafion ® layers was reached for 10 μm thick carboxylic membranes. Power outputs around 3 mW cm -2 were measured. We discuss the results regarding the gas barrier effect and the power outputs.

  1. Heat Transfer Enhancement By Three-Dimensional Surface Roughness Technique In Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najeeb, Umair

    This thesis experimentally investigates the enhancement of single-phase heat transfer, frictional loss and pressure drop characteristics in a Single Heater Element Loop Tester (SHELT). The heater element simulates a single fuel rod for Pressurized Nuclear reactor. In this experimental investigation, the effect of the outer surface roughness of a simulated nuclear rod bundle was studied. The outer surface of a simulated fuel rod was created with a three-dimensional (Diamond-shaped blocks) surface roughness. The angle of corrugation for each diamond was 45 degrees. The length of each side of a diamond block is 1 mm. The depth of each diamond block was 0.3 mm. The pitch of the pattern was 1.614 mm. The simulated fuel rod had an outside diameter of 9.5 mm and wall thickness of 1.5 mm and was placed in a test-section made of 38.1 mm inner diameter, wall thickness 6.35 mm aluminum pipe. The Simulated fuel rod was made of Nickel 200 and Inconel 625 materials. The fuel rod was connected to 10 KW DC power supply. The Inconel 625 material of the rod with an electrical resistance of 32.3 kO was used to generate heat inside the test-section. The heat energy dissipated from the Inconel tube due to the flow of electrical current flows into the working fluid across the rod at constant heat flux conditions. The DI water was employed as working fluid for this experimental investigation. The temperature and pressure readings for both smooth and rough regions of the fuel rod were recorded and compared later to find enhancement in heat transfer coefficient and increment in the pressure drops. Tests were conducted for Reynold's Numbers ranging from 10e4 to 10e5. Enhancement in heat transfer coefficient at all Re was recorded. The maximum heat transfer co-efficient enhancement recorded was 86% at Re = 4.18e5. It was also observed that the pressure drop and friction factor increased by 14.7% due to the increased surface roughness.

  2. Prism-patterned Nafion membrane for enhanced water transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Kang, Yun Sik; Ahn, Chiyeong; Jang, Segeun; Kim, Minhyoung; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoo, Sung Jong; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report a simple and effective strategy to enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by imprinting prism-patterned arrays onto the Nafion membrane, which provides three combined effects directly related to the device performance. First, a locally thinned membrane via imprinted micro prism-structures lead to reduced membrane resistance, which is confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Second, increments of the geometrical surface area of the prism-patterned Nafion membrane compared to a flat membrane result in the increase in the electrochemical active surface area. Third, the vertically asymmetric geometry of prism structures in the cathode catalyst layer lead to enhanced water transport, which is confirmed by oxygen gain calculation. To explain the enhanced water transport, we propose a simple theoretical model on removal of water droplets existing in the asymmetric catalyst layer. These three combined effects achieved via incorporating prism patterned arrays into the Nafion membrane effectively enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  3. Enhanced power production from microbial fuel cells with high cell density culture.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Dan-Dan; Li, Bing; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Sun, De-Zhen; Si, Rong-Wei; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Improvement of power production in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a high cell density culture strategy was developed. By using high cell density culture, the voltage output and power density output of the MFC were enhanced about 0.6 and 1.6 times compared to the control, respectively. Further analysis showed that riboflavin concentration in the MFC was dramatically increased from 0.1 mg/L to 1.2 mg/L by high cell density culture. Moreover, the biofilm formation on the anode surface was significantly enhanced by this new strategy. The increased accumulation of electron shuttle (riboflavin) as well as enhanced biofilm formation contributed to the improvement in anodic electrochemical activity and these factors were the underlying mechanism for MFC performance improvement by high cell density culture. This work demonstrated that high cell density culture would be a simple and practical strategy for MFC manipulation. PMID:27148719

  4. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

    2015-03-11

    Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode. PMID:25686380

  5. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Robert T.; Jackson, Kenneth J.; Duba, Alfred G.; Chen, Ching-I

    1998-01-01

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  6. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  7. Enhancement of Electricity Production by Graphene Oxide in Soil Microbial Fuel Cells and Plant Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg−1 was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg−1 of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m−2, which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m−2 generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m−2 of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs. PMID:25883931

  8. The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

  9. Numerical simulation of cantilevered ramp injector flow fields for hypervelocity fuel/air mixing enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jurgen Christian

    Increasing demand for affordable access to space and high speed terrestrial transport has spawned research interest into various air-breathing hypersonic propulsion systems. Propulsion concepts such as the supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) and the shock-induced combustion ramjet (shcramjet) utilize oxygen freely available in the atmosphere and thereby substantially reduce the weight penalty of on-board oxidizer tankage used in rocket based systems. Of key importance to the ultimate success of an air-breathing concept is the ability to efficiently mix the fuel with atmospheric air. In the case of a hypersonic air-breather the challenge is accentuated due to the requirement of supersonic combustion. Flow velocities through the combustor on the order of thousands of meters per second provide the fuel and air with only a brief time to adequately combine. Contemporary mixing augmentation methods to address this issue have focused on fuel injection devices which promote axial vortices to enhance the mixing process. Much research effort has been expended on investigation of ramp injectors for this purpose. The present study introduces a new ramp injector design, based on the conventional ramp injector, dubbed the cantilevered ramp injector. A two-pronged numerical approach was employed to investigate the mixing performance and characteristics of the cantilevered injector consisting of, (1) comparison with conventional designs and (2) a parametric study of various cantilevered injector geometries. A laminar, three-dimensional, multispecies flowsolver was developed in generalized coordinates to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for the flow fields of injected H2 into high-enthalpy air. The scheme consists of an upwind TVD scheme for discretization of the convective fluxes coupled with a semi-implicit LU-SGS scheme for temporal discretization. Through analysis of the numerical solutions, it has been shown that the cantilevered ramp injector is a viable fuel injection

  10. ESBWR enhanced flow distribution with optimized orificing and related fuel cycle performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, G. J.; Karve, A. A.; Fawcett, R. M.

    2012-07-01

    The Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) is GEH's latest Generation III+ reactor design with natural circulation coolant flow and passive safety features. Reliance on natural circulation as the sole means of core coolant driving force results in increased power-to-flow ratio and places increased importance on the efficient distribution of core flow in order to achieve optimum thermal margins and improved fuel cycle efficiency. In addition, the large core size of the ESBWR, containing 1132 bundles, greatly benefits from a more targeted distribution of flow, directing a higher fraction of flow to high power bundles in the 'ring of fire' region of typical BWR loading patterns and a lower fraction of flow to low power bundles on and near the core periphery. Desirable flow distributions can be achieved by modifying the hydraulic resistance of the inlet orifices to preferentially force flow to the targeted region. The inlet orifice is a feature that is incorporated into the fuel support piece of a typical BWR design. The majority of existing forced circulation BWR's rely on only two orifice types - a peripheral orifice located along the outermost row and a central orifice in all other locations. A more optimum distribution of core flow is achievable with the introduction of multiple inlet orifice types. Multi-zone orifice layouts comprised of two, three and four types have been evaluated for the ESBWR. An efficient radial distribution of flow can have a direct beneficial effect on the Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR). An improved multi-zone orifice layout in the ESBWR has the potential of significantly increasing active flow in high power bundles. On average, this flow increase corresponds to a noteworthy MCPR improvement. Additional MCPR margin may be used to enhance operating flexibility and to achieve reduced fuel cycle costs over the plant lifetime. Combined with GNF's latest high performance fuel design for the ESBWR, GNF2E, and improved loading

  11. Graphene-modified electrodes for enhancing the performance of microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is an emerging material with superior physical and chemical properties, which can benefit the development of microbial fuel cells (MFC) in several aspects. Graphene-based anodes can enhance MFC performance with increased electron transfer efficiency, higher specific surface area and more active microbe-electrode-electrolyte interaction. For cathodic processes, oxygen reduction reaction is effectively catalyzed by graphene-based materials because of a favorable pathway and an increase in active sites and conductivity. Despite challenges, such as complexity in synthesis and property degeneration, graphene-based electrodes will be promising for developing MFCs and other bioelectrochemical systems to achieve sustainable water/wastewater treatment and bioenergy production.

  12. Performance enhancement of direct ethanol fuel cell using Nafion composites with high volume fraction of titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, B. R.; Isidoro, R. A.; Santiago, E. I.; Fonseca, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    The present study reports on the performance enhancement of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at 130 °C with Nafion-titania composite electrolytes prepared by sol-gel technique and containing high volume fractions of the ceramic phase. It is found that for high volume fractions of titania (>10 vol%) the ethanol uptake of composites is largely reduced while the proton conductivity at high-temperatures is weakly dependent on the titania content. Such tradeoff between alcohol uptake and conductivity resulted in a boost of DEFC performance at high temperatures using Nafion-titania composites with high fraction of the inorganic phase.

  13. Graphene-modified electrodes for enhancing the performance of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2015-04-28

    Graphene is an emerging material with superior physical and chemical properties, which can benefit the development of microbial fuel cells (MFC) in several aspects. Graphene-based anodes can enhance MFC performance with increased electron transfer efficiency, higher specific surface area and more active microbe-electrode-electrolyte interaction. For cathodic processes, oxygen reduction reaction is effectively catalyzed by graphene-based materials because of a favorable pathway and an increase in active sites and conductivity. Despite challenges, such as complexity in synthesis and property degeneration, graphene-based electrodes will be promising for developing MFCs and other bioelectrochemical systems to achieve sustainable water/wastewater treatment and bioenergy production. PMID:25465393

  14. Nitrogen doped carbon nanoparticles enhanced extracellular electron transfer for high-performance microbial fuel cells anode.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Yang; Guo, Chun Xian; Yong, Yang-Chun; Li, Chang Ming; Song, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon nanoparticles (NDCN) were applied to modify the carbon cloth anodes of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, one of the most well-studied exoelectrogens. Experimental results demonstrated that the use of NDCN increased anodic absorption of flavins (i.e., the soluble electron mediator secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1), facilitating shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer. In addition, we also found that NDCN enabled enhanced contact-based direct electron transfer via outer-membrane c-type cytochromes. Taken together, the performance of MFCs with the NDCN-modified anode was enormously enhanced, delivering a maximum power density 3.5 times' higher than that of the MFCs without the modification of carbon cloth anodes. PMID:25439129

  15. A phosphorus-free anolyte to enhance coulombic efficiency of microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xinhua; Li, Haoran; Du, Zhuwei; Ng, How Yong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a phosphorus-free anolyte is prepared by using bicarbonate to replace phosphate buffer for application in two chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Optical density test and Bradford protein assay shows that this phosphorus-free anolyte effectively inhibits the growth and reproduction of microorganisms suspended in the solution and greatly reduces the suspended cell mass. As a result, it considerably enhances the coulombic efficiency (CE) of MFCs. When the acetate concentration is 11 mM, the CE of the MFC using the pH 7 phosphate-containing anolyte is 9.7% and the CE with the pH 8.3 phosphate-containing anolyte is 9.1%, while the CE of the MFC using the phosphorus-free anolyte (pH 8.3) achieves 26.6%. This study demonstrates that this phosphorus-free anolyte holds the potential to enhance the feasibility for practical applications of MFCs.

  16. Enhancement of bacterial denitrification for nitrate removal in groundwater with electrical stimulation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Ye; Tong, Shuang; Zheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Yinxin; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping

    2014-12-01

    Electricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly as electrical stimulation means for enhancement of bacterial denitrification to remove nitrate effectively from groundwater. With maximum power density of 502.5 mW m-2 and voltage outputs ranging from 500 mV to 700 mV, the nitrate removal is accelerated, with less intermediates accumulation, compared with control sets without electrical stimulation. Denitrification bacteria proliferations and activities are promoted as its number and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentration increased one order of magnitude (3.5 × 107 in per milliliter biofilm solution) and about 1.5 folds, respectively. Effects of electricity from MFCs on enhancement of bacterial behaviors are demonstrated for the first time. These results indicate that MFCs can be applied in the in-situ bioremediation of nitrate polluted groundwater for efficiency improvement.

  17. Torrefaction of cultivation residue of Auricularia auricula-judae to obtain biochar with enhanced fuel properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Yao, Aiying; Song, Kuiyan

    2016-04-01

    Auricularia auricula-judae, commonly known as the wood ear, is a species of edible Auriculariales fungus. Torrefactions of cultivation residues of A. auricula-judae (CRAA) at different temperatures and residence times are carried out. Effect of different torrefaction conditions on the mass and energy yields, elemental composition, heating value, thermal properties; and chemical, crystal and morphological structures of biochars are analyzed. Low torrefaction temperatures could not enhance the fuel properties as expected. Crystallinities of biochars derived from mild torrefaction conditions do not have a suitable variation trend because of the unstable degrees between degradation and recrystallization. Torrefaction of CRAA should be processed under severe conditions, such as 320°C for 60min and 280°C for 120min, in order to obtain enhanced biochar properties with DTGmax at low peak temperatures of 367 and 361°C, as well high burnout temperatures of 528 and 530°C, respectively. PMID:26859329

  18. The new generation of Orimulsion{reg{underscore}sign}: Enhancing the fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Marruffo, F.; Sarmiento, W.; Tavel, N.G.

    1999-07-01

    After 10 years of commercial experience and proven efficacy, Orimulsion {reg{underscore}sign} has been enhanced to improve its performance as a power plant fuel. The new generation of Orimulsion{reg{underscore}sign} is called Orimulsion{reg{underscore}sign} 400, and its constituents remain 70% bitumen (extracted from the Orinoco belt in Venezuela) and 30% water with a stabilizer agent or surfactant. The main changes in this new generation of fuels are a new surfactant package (NSP) and the exclusion of magnesium nitrate from the formulation. The NSP was specially designed to meet new regulations regarding tense-active compounds established by the European Economic Community (EEC) for the next millennium. The fuel reengineering process was focused on power producers' needs, taking into consideration the new, higher standards required to compete in a deregulated market. Orimulsion{reg{underscore}sign} 400 has undergone extensive tests in different pilot-scale facilities. The tests have included handling, combustion, and performance characteristics. Results obtained in these tests show that the new formulation has improved handling and combustion characteristics compared to the original formulation. As summary, combustion results show: better heat transfer capacity in all boiler zones, less ash produced, less nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) generated, and improved atomization properties. Two commercial trials have been performed to test the new formulation. These tests were carried out during 1998 at power plants currently using Orimulsion{reg{underscore}sign}.

  19. Iron-based cathode catalyst with enhanced power density in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Eric; Jaouen, Frédéric; Lefèvre, Michel; Larouche, Nicholas; Tian, Juan; Herranz, Juan; Dodelet, Jean-Pol

    2011-01-01

    H(2)-air polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells are electrochemical power generators with potential vehicle propulsion applications. To help reduce their cost and encourage widespread use, research has focused on replacing the expensive Pt-based electrocatalysts in polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells with a lower-cost alternative. Fe-based cathode catalysts are promising contenders, but their power density has been low compared with Pt-based cathodes, largely due to poor mass-transport properties. Here we report an iron-acetate/phenanthroline/zeolitic-imidazolate-framework-derived electrocatalyst with increased volumetric activity and enhanced mass-transport properties. The zeolitic-imidazolate-framework serves as a microporous host for phenanthroline and ferrous acetate to form a catalyst precursor that is subsequently heat treated. A cathode made with the best electrocatalyst from this work, tested in H(2)-O(2,) has a power density of 0.75 W cm(-2) at 0.6 V, a meaningful voltage for polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells operation, comparable with that of a commercial Pt-based cathode tested under identical conditions. PMID:21811245

  20. Performance enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by catalyst and support layer modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy David

    Possible enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) was investigated by modifying catalyst and support layers. Platinum (Pt) and platinum cobalt (Pt xCo1-x) alloys were prepared by pulsed electrodeposition onto Toray carbon paper. Composite supports composed of either commercial multi-walled nanofiber (MWNF) mats or MWNF layers on a commercial backing were also investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the surface structure, composition, and catalyst loading. Various electrochemical techniques with a wet electrochemical cell, a Nuvant multi-array system, and a Scribner fuel cell system were used to study and rank the effectiveness of the catalysts and supports toward both the methanol oxidation reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. The activity toward methanol oxidation of the electrodeposited Pt catalyst was found to be dependent on the deposited mass. Further comparisons between commercial electrodes in the Nuvant system showed these deposits can yield activities comparable to those of commercially available electrodes. The structure of the Pt electrodeposits was highly non-uniform due to the H2 evolution during the deposition process blocking the cathodes surface. The activities of the planar structured PtxCo1-x deposits were insignificant for both oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation. The composition of the deposits ranged from 5 to 15 at% Pt. It was found by both the Nuvant and Scribner systems that the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode would enhance the performance of a DMFC anode. In the Nuvant system, the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode also enhanced the PEM cathode activity. This however was not corroborated by Scribner analysis, showing a

  1. Studies of DDT enhancement approaches for kerosene-fueled small-scale pulse detonation engines applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Tang, H.; Li, J.; Zhang, C.

    2012-11-01

    Two-phase small-scale pulse detonation engine (SPDE) offers a competitive alternative for small-scale propulsion systems from a high cycle efficiency and structural simplicity standpoint. SPDE models are designed with the aero-valve, and three different cases of obstacle combinations are used as deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) devices. The inner diameters of detonation tubes are 29 mm, and the lengths of three SPDEs are 995, 1,100, and 1,175 mm. Using kerosene-air as the fuel-oxidizer, a series of high-frequency detonation tests is conducted to seek efficient DDT enhancement approaches that reduce DDT distance and time and increase the frequency of kerosene-fueled SPDE. The results show that the fully developed detonation wave can be achieved at a distance of 3.4 times the minimum characteristic distance for gaseous detonation formation from the igniter and that the SPDE can steadily operate at a maximal frequency of 62.5 Hz. By adopting these DDT enhancement approaches, the detonability of kerosene is significantly improved. In addition, experiments are performed to study the effects of firing frequencies on detonation transitions. The results clearly indicate that the values of detonation wave pressures and velocities, the degree of overdriven wave, the ignition delay times, and detonation initiation times vary with frequencies. In terms of the performance, the optimal frequencies of three SPDE models are 20, 42.5, and 50 Hz, respectively.

  2. US-Russian collaboration in MPC & A enhancements at the Elektrostal Uranium Fuel-Fabrication Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.; Murray, W.; Whiteson, R.

    1997-11-01

    Enhancement of the nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting of (MPC&A) at the Elektrostal Machine-Building Plant (ELEMASH) has proceeded in two phases. Initially, Elektrostal served as the model facility at which to test US/Russian collaboration and to demonstrate MPC&A technologies available for safeguards enhancements at Russian facilities. This phase addressed material control and accounting (MC&A) in the low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel-fabrication processes and the physical protection (PP) of part of the (higher-enrichment) breeder-fuel process. The second phase, identified later in the broader US/Russian agreement for expanded MPC&A cooperation. includes implementation of appropriate MC&A and PP systems in the breeder-fuel fabrication processes. Within the past year, an automated physical protection system has been installed and demonstrated in building 274, and an automated MC&A system has been designed and is being installed and will be tested in the LEU process. Attention has now turned to assuring longterm sustainability for the first phase and beginning MPC&A upgrades for the second phase. Sustainability measures establish the infrastructure for operation, maintenance, and repair of the installed systems-with US support for the lifetime of the US/Russian Agreement, but evolving toward full Russian operation of the system over the long term. For phase 2, which will address higher enrichments, projects have been identified to characterize the facilities, design MPC&A systems, procure appropriate equipment, and install and test final systems. One goal in phase 2 will be to build on initial work to create shared, plant-wide MPC&A assets for operation, maintenance, and evaluation of all safeguards systems.

  3. Subchronic JP-8 jet fuel exposure enhances vulnerability to noise-induced hearing loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Fechter, L D; Fisher, J W; Chapman, G D; Mokashi, V P; Ortiz, P A; Reboulet, J E; Stubbs, J E; Lear, A M; McInturf, S M; Prues, S L; Gearhart, C A; Fulton, S; Mattie, D R

    2012-01-01

    Both laboratory and epidemiological studies published over the past two decades have identified the risk of excess hearing loss when specific chemical contaminants are present along with noise. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potency of JP-8 jet fuel to enhance noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) using inhalation exposure to fuel and simultaneous exposure to either continuous or intermittent noise exposure over a 4-wk exposure period using both male and female Fischer 344 rats. In the initial study, male (n = 5) and female (n = 5) rats received inhalation exposure to JP-8 fuel for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk for 4 wk at concentrations of 200, 750, or 1500 mg/m³. Parallel groups of rats also received nondamaging noise (constant octave band noise at 85 dB(lin)) in combination with the fuel, noise alone (75, 85, or 95 dB), or no exposure to fuel or noise. Significant concentration-related impairment of auditory function measured by distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) and compound action potential (CAP) threshold was seen in rats exposed to combined JP-8 plus noise exposure when JP-8 levels of 1500 mg/m³ were presented with trends toward impairment seen with 750 mg/m³ JP-8 + noise. JP-8 alone exerted no significant effect on auditory function. In addition, noise was able to disrupt the DPOAE and increase auditory thresholds only when noise exposure was at 95 dB. In a subsequent study, male (n = 5 per group) and female (n = 5 per group) rats received 1000 mg/m³ JP-8 for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk for 4 wk with and without exposure to 102 dB octave band noise that was present for 15 min out of each hour (total noise duration 90 min). Comparisons were made to rats receiving only noise, and thosereceiving no experimental treatment. Significant impairment of auditory thresholds especially for high-frequency tones was identified in the male rats receiving combined treatment. This study provides a basis for estimating excessive hearing loss under

  4. New processing methods to produce silicon carbide and beryllium oxide inert matrix and enhanced thermal conductivity oxide fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, K. H.; Fourcade, J.; Lee, S.-G.; Solomon, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    For inert matrix fuels, SiC and BeO represent two possible matrix phase compounds that exhibit very high thermal conductivity, high melting points, low neutron absorption, and reasonably high radiation stability. BeO is chemically compatible with UO2, PuO2 and Zircaloy to very high temperatures, but SiC reacts with all three at somewhat lower temperatures. We have developed the Polymer Impregnation and Pyrolysis or PIP method, making use of a commercial SiC polymeric precursor, to consolidate both particulate fuels like 'TRISO' microsphere fuels, and to impregnate UO2 fuels with pure stoichiometric SiC to improve their thermal conductivity. This method was employed to fabricate Enhanced Conductivity Oxide fuels, or ECO fuels with 5-10 vol.% of the high conductivity phase, and with 50 vol.% for TRISO dispersion fuels. For ECO fuels, a new 'slug/bisque' method of fabricating the UO2 fuel granules was necessary to produce sintered fuel with open pore structures, allowing almost complete impregnation of the continuous SiC phase. The advantages of the PIP process are that it is a non-damaging consolidation process for particulates (TRU, UC or TRISO microspheres), forms a continuous, pure β-SiC phase at temperatures as low as 1573 K, and allows the maximum in fissile atom density. However, several PIP impregnation cycles and high crystallization temperatures are necessary to obtain high thermal conductivity SiC. For producing IMF fuels using the PIP process, the fissile PuC and/or TRU actinides can be added in small concentrations along with SiC 'filler particles' and consolidated with the SiC precursor for either open or closed fuel cycles. For BeO, a second approach was developed for ECO fuels that involves a 'co-sintering' route to produce high density fuels with a continuous BeO phase of 5-10 vol.%. Special granulation and mixing techniques were developed, but only one normal sintering cycle is required. For BeO matrix IMF fuels, PuO2 granules and TRU actinides or

  5. Investigations on optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident in a VVER-1000 pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Kliem, S.

    2012-07-01

    The reactor safety issues are of primary importance for preserving the health of the population and ensuring no release of radioactivity and fission products into the environment. A part of the nuclear research focuses on improvement of the safety of existing nuclear power plants. Studies, research and efforts are a continuing process at improving the safety and reliability of existing and newly developed nuclear power plants at prevention of a core melt accident. Station blackout (loss of AC power supply) is one of the dominant accidents taken into consideration at performing accident analysis. In case of multiple failures of safety systems it leads to a severe accident. To prevent an accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences, accident management measures must be performed. The present paper outlines possibilities for application and optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident. Assessed is the behaviour of the nuclear power plant during a station blackout accident without accident management measures and with application of primary/secondary side oriented accident management measures. Discussed are the possibilities for operators ' intervention and the influence of the performed accident management measures on the course of the accident. Special attention has been paid to the effectiveness of the passive feeding and physical phenomena having an influence on the system behaviour. The performed simulations show that the effectiveness of the secondary side feeding procedure can be limited due to an early evaporation or flashing effects in the feed water system. The analyzed cases show that the effectiveness of the accident management measures strongly depends on the initiation criteria applied for depressurization of the reactor coolant system. (authors)

  6. On formation of the asymptotic spectrum of delayed neutron emitters in measuring the VVER-1000 scram system effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkov, L. K.; Zizin, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    The process of formation of an asymptotic distribution of the neutron flux density in the reactor systems after introducing different negative reactivities is considered. The impact of two factors after the reactivity introduction is evaluated: (1) nonuniformity of perturbation of core properties, on one hand, and (2) a sharp reduction in the density of prompt neutrons, which prevents the appearance of new delayed neutron emitters distributed in accordance with the "new" prompt neutron distribution, on the other hand. The results of calculations show that the errors of measuring the scram system effectiveness using the method of inverse solution of the kinetics equation are caused by the fact that, after the negative reactivity insertion, the sources of prompt and delayed neutrons have different spatial distributions. In the case of high negative reactivities, this difference remains while the system still has neutrons, which can be measured.

  7. On formation of the asymptotic spectrum of delayed neutron emitters in measuring the VVER-1000 scram system effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkov, L. K. Zizin, M. N.

    2014-12-15

    The process of formation of an asymptotic distribution of the neutron flux density in the reactor systems after introducing different negative reactivities is considered. The impact of two factors after the reactivity introduction is evaluated: (1) nonuniformity of perturbation of core properties, on one hand, and (2) a sharp reduction in the density of prompt neutrons, which prevents the appearance of new delayed neutron emitters distributed in accordance with the “new” prompt neutron distribution, on the other hand. The results of calculations show that the errors of measuring the scram system effectiveness using the method of inverse solution of the kinetics equation are caused by the fact that, after the negative reactivity insertion, the sources of prompt and delayed neutrons have different spatial distributions. In the case of high negative reactivities, this difference remains while the system still has neutrons, which can be measured.

  8. Quantitative carbon detector for enhanced detection of molecules in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, flavors, and fuels.

    PubMed

    Beach, Connor A; Krumm, Christoph; Spanjers, Charles S; Maduskar, Saurabh; Jones, Andrew J; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of trace compounds, such as pesticides and other contaminants, within consumer products, fuels, and the environment requires quantification of increasingly complex mixtures of difficult-to-quantify compounds. Many compounds of interest are non-volatile and exhibit poor response in current gas chromatography and flame ionization systems. Here we show the reaction of trimethylsilylated chemical analytes to methane using a quantitative carbon detector (QCD; the Polyarc™ reactor) within a gas chromatograph (GC), thereby enabling enhanced detection (up to 10×) of highly functionalized compounds including carbohydrates, acids, drugs, flavorants, and pesticides. Analysis of a complex mixture of compounds shows that the GC-QCD method exhibits faster and more accurate analysis of complex mixtures commonly encountered in everyday products and the environment. PMID:26842653

  9. Copper catalysis for enhancement of cobalt leaching and acid utilization efficiency in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaxuan; Shen, Jingya; Huang, Liping; Wu, Dan

    2013-11-15

    Enhancement of both cobalt leaching from LiCoO2 and acid utilization efficiency (AUE) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was successfully achieved by the addition of Cu(II). A dosage of 10mg/L Cu(II) improved both cobalt leaching up to 308% and AUE of 171% compared to the controls with no presence of Cu(II). The apparent activation energy of cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs was only 11.8 kJ/mol. These results demonstrate cobalt leaching in MFCs using Cu(II) as a catalyst may be an effective strategy for cobalt recovery and recycle of spent Li-ion batteries, and the evidence of influence factors including solid/liquid ratio, temperature, and pH and solution conductivity can contribute to improving understanding of and optimizing cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs. PMID:24007993

  10. Enhanced biofilm distribution and cell performance of microfluidic microbial fuel cells with multiple anolyte inlets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Pengqing; Zhu, Xun; Li, Jun; Fu, Qian

    2016-05-15

    A laminar-flow controlled microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MMFC) is considered as a promising approach to be a bio-electrochemical system (BES). But poor bacterial colonization and low power generation are two severe bottlenecks to restrict its development. In this study, we reported a MMFC with multiple anolyte inlets (MMFC-MI) to enhance the biofilm formation and promote the power density of MMFCs. Voltage profiles during the inoculation process demonstrated MMFC-MI had a faster start-up process than the conventional microfluidic microbial fuel cell with one inlet (MMFC-OI). Meanwhile, benefited from the periodical replenishment of boundary layer near the electrode, a more densely-packed bacterial aggregation was observed along the flow direction and also the substantially low internal resistance for MMFC-MI. Most importantly, the output power density of MMFC-MI was the highest value among the reported µl-scale MFCs to our best knowledge. The presented MMFC-MI appears promising for bio-chip technology and extends the scope of microfluidic energy. PMID:26735875

  11. Proline as a fuel for insect flight: enhancing carbohydrate oxidation in hymenopterans.

    PubMed

    Teulier, Loïc; Weber, Jean-Michel; Crevier, Julie; Darveau, Charles-A

    2016-07-13

    Bees are thought to be strict users of carbohydrates as metabolic fuel for flight. Many insects, however, have the ability to oxidize the amino acid proline at a high rate, which is a unique feature of this group of animals. The presence of proline in the haemolymph of bees and in the nectar of plants led to the hypothesis that plants may produce proline as a metabolic reward for pollinators. We investigated flight muscle metabolism of hymenopteran species using high-resolution respirometry performed on permeabilized muscle fibres. The muscle fibres of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, do not have a detectable capacity to oxidize proline, as those from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, used here as an outgroup representative. The closely related bumblebee, Bombus impatiens, can oxidize proline alone and more than doubles its respiratory capacity when proline is combined with carbohydrate-derived substrates. A distant wasp species, Vespula vulgaris, exhibits the same metabolic phenotype as the bumblebee, suggesting that proline oxidation is common in hymenopterans. Using a combination of mitochondrial substrates and inhibitors, we further show that in B. impatiens, proline oxidation provides reducing equivalents and electrons directly to the electron transport system. Together, these findings demonstrate that some bee and wasp species can greatly enhance the oxidation of carbohydrates using proline as fuel for flight. PMID:27412285

  12. Novel quasi-symmetric solid oxide fuel cells with enhanced electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonghong; Cheng, Zhuanxia; Yang, Yang; Gu, Qingwen; Tian, Dong; Lu, Xiaoyong; Yu, Weili; Lin, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Symmetrical solid oxide fuel cell (SSOFC) using same materials as both anode and cathode simultaneously has gained extensively attentions, which can simplify fabrication process, minimize inter-diffusion between components, enhance sulfur and coking tolerance by operating the anode as the cathode in turn. With keeping the SSOFC's advantages, a novel quasi-symmetrical solid oxide fuel cell (Q-SSOFC) is proposed to further improve the performance, which optimally combines two different SSOFC electrode materials as both anode and cathode simultaneously. PrBaFe2O5+δ (PBFO) and PrBaFe1.6Ni0.4O5+δ (PBFNO, Fe is partially substituted by Ni.) are prepared and applied as both cathode and anode for SSOFC, which exhibit desirable chemical and thermal compatibility with Sm0.8Ce0.2O1.9 (SDC) electrolyte. PBFO cathode exhibits higher oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity than PBFNO cathode in air, whereas PBFNO anode exhibits higher hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity than PBFO anode in H2. The as-designed Q-SSOFC of PBFNO/SDC/PBFO exhibits higher electrochemical performance than the conventional SSOFCs of both PBFO/SDC/PBFO and PBFNO/SDC/PBFNO. The superior performance of Q-SSOFC is attributed to the lowest polarization resistance (Rp). The newly developed Q-SSOFCs open doors for further improvement of electrochemical performance in SSOFC, which hold more promise for various potential applications.

  13. Genetic engineering approaches for enhanced production of biodiesel fuel from microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G.

    1993-12-31

    Efforts are currently underway in several laboratories to develop renewable fuels from biological sources. This group has been involved in research concerning the production of lipid-derived {open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes} fuel from microscopic algae. Lipid accumulation in algae typically occurs during periods of environmental stress, including growth under nutrient-deficient conditions. Biochemical studies have suggested that acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-containing enzyme that catalyzes an early step in fatty acid biosynthesis, may be involved in the control of this lipid accumulation process. Therefore, it may be possible to enhance lipid production rates by increasing the activity of this enzyme via genetic engineering. As a first step toward this objective, the authors have cloned the gene that encodes ACC from the eukaryotic alga Cyclotella cryptica, representing the first time that this gene has been isolated from a photosynthetic organism. The amino acid sequence of ACC deducted from this gene exhibits a high degree of similarity to the sequences of animal and yeast ACCs in the biotin carboxylase and carboxyltransferase domains, but less similarity exists in the bioin carboxyl carrier protein domain. Comparison of the genomic nucleotide sequence to the sequences of cDNA clones has revealed the presence of two introns in the gene. The authors are currently constructing expression vectors containing this gene and developing algal transformation protocols to enable over expression of ACC in C. cryptica and all other algal species.

  14. Inhibited proton transfer enhances Au-catalyzed CO2-to-fuels selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wuttig, Anna; Yaguchi, Momo; Motobayashi, Kenta; Osawa, Masatoshi; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    CO2 reduction in aqueous electrolytes suffers efficiency losses because of the simultaneous reduction of water to H2 We combine in situ surface-enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and electrochemical kinetic studies to probe the mechanistic basis for kinetic bifurcation between H2 and CO production on polycrystalline Au electrodes. Under the conditions of CO2 reduction catalysis, electrogenerated CO species are irreversibly bound to Au in a bridging mode at a surface coverage of ∼0.2 and act as kinetically inert spectators. Electrokinetic data are consistent with a mechanism of CO production involving rate-limiting, single-electron transfer to CO2 with concomitant adsorption to surface active sites followed by rapid one-electron, two-proton transfer and CO liberation from the surface. In contrast, the data suggest an H2 evolution mechanism involving rate-limiting, single-electron transfer coupled with proton transfer from bicarbonate, hydronium, and/or carbonic acid to form adsorbed H species followed by rapid one-electron, one-proton, or H recombination reactions. The disparate proton coupling requirements for CO and H2 production establish a mechanistic basis for reaction selectivity in electrocatalytic fuel formation, and the high population of spectator CO species highlights the complex heterogeneity of electrode surfaces under conditions of fuel-forming electrocatalysis. PMID:27450088

  15. Enhanced performance of anion exchange membranes via crosslinking of ion cluster regions for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ao Nan; Guo, Dong; Lin, Chen Xiao; Zhang, Qiu Gen; Zhu, Ai Mei; Ye, Mei Ling; Liu, Qing Lin

    2016-09-01

    Development of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) with high hydroxide conductivity, good dimensional and alkaline stabilities is still a challenge for the practical application of AEM fuel cells. In this study, we report a new strategy to prepare high-performance AEMs with crosslinked ionic regions. A series of phenolphthalein-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s crosslinked AEMs was synthesized by grafting ion groups selectively and densely on the phenolphthalein units to form ion clusters that are further crosslinked to generate the hydrophilic ionic regions. The crosslinking reaction not only improved the dimensional stability of the AEMs, but also increased the aggregation of the ion clusters leading to the formation of hydrophilic/hydrophobic phase-separated morphology and ion-conducting channels. As a result, enhancements in both ion conductivity and dimensional stability can be achieved. The crosslinked AEMs showed high hydroxide conductivities in the range of 52.2-143.4 mS cm-1 from 30 to 80 °C and a superb ratio of relative conductivity to relative swelling at 80 °C. Furthermore, the crosslinked AEMs also exhibited good mechanical properties, thermal and alkaline stabilities and desirable single cell performance. This work presents a promising strategy for the synthesis of high-performance AEMs for fuel cells.

  16. A MultiAir®/MultiFuel Approach to Enhancing Engine System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Ronald

    2015-05-20

    FCA US LLC (formally known as Chrysler Group LLC, and hereinafter “Chrysler”) was awarded an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded project by the Department of Energy (DOE) titled “A MultiAir®/MultiFuel Approach to Enhancing Engine System Efficiency” (hereinafter “project”). This award was issued after Chrysler submitted a proposal for Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA- 0000079, “Systems Level Technology Development, Integration, and Demonstration for Efficient Class 8 Trucks (SuperTruck) and Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD).” Chrysler started work on this project on June 01, 2010 and completed testing activities on August 30, 2014. Overall objectives of this project were; Demonstrate a 25% improvement in combined Federal Test Procedure (FTP) City and Highway fuel economy over a 2009 Chrysler minivan; Accelerate the development of highly efficient engine and powertrain systems for light-duty vehicles, while meeting future emissions standards; and Create and retain jobs in accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

  17. Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Todosow M.; Todosow M.; Raitses, G. Galperin, A.

    2009-07-12

    Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the

  18. Enhanced stability of multilayer graphene-supported catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkas, A.; Hempelmann, R.; Heinzel, A.; Peinecke, V.; Radev, I.; Natter, H.

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the field of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is to enhance the lifetime and the long-term stability of PEMFC electrodes, especially of cathodes, furthermore, to reduce their platinum loading, which could lead to a cost reduction for efficient PEMFCs. These demands could be achieved with a new catalyst support architecture consisting of a composite of carbon structures with significant different morphologies. A highly porous cathode catalyst support layer is prepared by addition of various carbon types (carbon black particles, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)) to multilayer graphene (MLG). The reported optimized cathodes shows extremely high durability and similar performance to commercial standard cathodes but with 89% lower Pt loading. The accelerated aging protocol (AAP) on the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) shows that the presence of MLG increases drastically the durability and the Pt-extended electrochemical surface area (ECSA). In fact, after the AAP slightly enhanced performance can be observed for the MLG-containing cathodes instead of a performance loss, which is typical for the commercial carbon-based cathodes. Furthermore, the presence of MLG drastically decreases the ECSA loss rate. The MLG-containing cathodes show up to 6.8 times higher mass-normalized Pt-extended ECSA compared to the commercial standard systems.

  19. Enhanced microbial reduction of vanadium (V) in groundwater with bioelectricity from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liting; Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Ye; Shi, Chunhong; Cheng, Ming; Feng, Chuanping

    2015-08-01

    Bioelectricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly to enhance microbial reduction of vanadium (V) (V(V)) in groundwater. With the maximum power density of 543.4 mW m-2 from the MFC, V(V) removal is accelerated with efficiency of 93.6% during 12 h operation. Higher applied voltage can facilitate this process. V(V) removals decrease with the increase of initial V(V) concentration, while extra addition of chemical oxygen demand (COD) has little effect on performance improvement. Microbial V(V) reduction is enhanced and then suppressed with the increase of conductivity. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis implies the accumulated Enterobacter and Lactococcus reduce V(V) with products from fermentative microorganisms such as Macellibacteroides. The presentation of electrochemically active bacteria as Enterobacter promotes electron transfers. This study indicates that application of bioelectricity from MFCs is a promising strategy to improve the efficiency of in-situ bioremediation of V(V) polluted groundwater.

  20. Enhanced bioelectricity harvesting in microbial fuel cells treating food waste leachate produced from biohydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongdong; Ahn, Youngho

    2015-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) treating the food waste leachate produced from biohydrogen fermentation were examined to enhance power generation and energy recovery. In batch mode, the maximum voltage production was 0.56 V and the power density reached 1540 mW/m(2). The maximum Coulombic efficiency (CEmax) and energy efficiency (EE) in the batch mode were calculated to be 88.8% and 18.8%, respectively. When the organic loading rate in sequencing batch mode varied from 0.75 to 6.2 g COD/L-d (under CEmax), the maximum power density reached 769.2 mW/m(2) in OLR of 3.1 g COD/L-d, whereas higher energy recovery (CE=52.6%, 0.346 Wh/g CODrem) was achieved at 1.51 g COD/L-d. The results demonstrate that readily biodegradable substrates in biohydrogen fermentation can be effectively used for the enhanced bioelectricity harvesting of MFCs and a MFC coupled with biohydrogen fermentation is of great benefit on higher electricity generation and energy efficiency. PMID:25723127

  1. Theoretical design strategies of bipolar membrane fuel cell with enhanced self-humidification behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiushi; Gong, Jian; Peng, Sikan; Lu, Shanfu; Sui, Pang-Chieh; Djilali, Ned; Xiang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    The bipolar membrane fuel cells (BPMFCs), which have a unique acid-alkaline jointed membrane electrode assembly (MEA) structure, have demonstrated their great potential for self-humidification during operation. Although the self-humidification ability of such bipolar membranes (BPMs) has recently been validated by a one-dimensional BPM model, the transport mechanism and the formation of self-humidification in the MEAs are not well understood. In the present study, a two-dimensional cross-channel MEA model is developed to elucidate the mechanisms and enhancement of water transport on self-humidification with comprehensive consideration of the three electrochemical reaction zones. The water-formation interface model has been successfully investigated by theoretical and experimental interface reaction kinetics, streamlines of water flux present the formation process and mechanism of self-humidification. A critical current (voltage) value, beyond which self-humidification is initiated, is identified. It is also found that such critical current (voltage) can be adjusted by changing the membrane thickness and the water uptake property of the ionomer. It is concluded that fabricating BPMs with proper membrane thickness and water uptake property are effective strategies to enhance the water management and cell performance in BPMFCs.

  2. Nano mineral fiber enhanced catalyst coated membranes for improving polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Xu, Ran; Mu, Shichun

    In order to protect the perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer from an attack of contaminant metal ions as well as to enhance the mechanical stability of catalyst layers, palygorskite (PGS) is introduced into the catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. PGS is a widely used natural nano-sized silicate mineral fiber with unique nano-sized channel structure, has a strong absorption capacity for heavy metal ions. We identify a negative influence of Fe 2+ on PFSA membranes to make a comparative study. Subsequently catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) prepared with a PGS-Pt/C composite catalyst show a great effect in reducing Fe 2+ ion crossover. Results display that PGS absorbs Fe 2+ in nano-structure channels, and effectively protect PFSA ionomer in both the catalyst layer and membrane from hydroxyl radicals (OH rad) attack. Thus, the chemical stability of PFSA ionomer in both the catalyst layer and membrane is greatly improved. Furthermore, the enhancement of the mechanical performance of catalyst layers is discussed.

  3. Economic analysis of fuel ethanol production from hulled barley by the EDGE (Enhanced Dry Grind Enzymatic) process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cost model was developed for fuel ethanol production from barley based on the EDGE (Enhanced Dry Grind Enzymatic) process (Nghiem, et al., 2008). In this process, in addition to beta-glucanases, which is added to reduce the viscosity of the barley mash for efficient mixing, another enzyme, beta-...

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE MICROBIAL POTENTIAL FOR NITRATE- ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION OF A JP-4 FUEL-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A site that was contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel was characterized microbiologically to assess the feasibility of nitrate-enhanced bioremediation. The results of microcosm studies indicated that the mean pseudo zero-order rate constants for alkylbenzene biodegradation and NO3...

  5. Potential use of California lignite and other alternate fuel for enhanced oil recovery. Phase I and II. Final report. [As alternative fuels for steam generation in thermal EOR

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, R.; Shimizu, A.; Briggs, A.

    1980-02-01

    The Nation's continued reliance on liquid fossil fuels and decreasing reserves of light oils gives increased impetus to improving the recovery of heavy oil. Thermal enhanced oil recovery EOR techniques, such as steam injection, have generally been the most effective for increasing heavy oil production. However, conventional steam generation consumes a large fraction of the produced oil. The substitution of alternate (solid) fuels would release much of this consumed oil to market. This two-part report focuses on two solid fuels available in California, the site of most thermal EOR - petroleum coke and lignite. Phase I, entitled Economic Analysis, shows detailed cost comparisons between the two candidate fuels and also with Western coal. The analysis includes fuels characterizations, process designs for several combustion systems, and a thorough evaluation of the technical and economic uncertainties. In Phase II, many technical parameters of petroleum coke combustion were measured in a pilot-plant fluidized bed. The results of the study showed that petroleum coke combustion for EOR is feasible and cost effective in a fluidized bed combustor.

  6. A new approach to nuclear fuel safeguard enhancement through radionuclide profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Aaron Dawon

    The United States has led the effort to promote peaceful use of nuclear power amongst states actively utilizing it as well as those looking to deploy the technology in the near future. With the attraction being demonstrated by various countries towards nuclear power comes the concern that a nation may have military aspirations for the use of nuclear energy. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established nuclear safeguard protocols and procedures to mitigate nuclear proliferation. The work herein proposed a strategy to further enhance existing safeguard protocols by considering safeguard in nuclear fuel design. The strategy involved the use of radionuclides to profile nuclear fuels. Six radionuclides were selected as identifier materials. The decay and transmutation of these radionuclides were analyzed in reactor operation environment. MCNPX was used to simulate a reactor core. The perturbation in reactivity of the core due to the loading of the radionuclides was insignificant. The maximum positive and negative reactivity change induced was at day 1900 with a value of 0.00185 +/- 0.00256 and at day 2000 with -0.00441 +/- 0.00249, respectively. The mass of the radionuclides were practically unaffected by transmutation in the core; the change in radionuclide inventory was dominated by natural decay. The maximum material lost due to transmutation was 1.17% in Eu154. Extraneous signals from fission products identical to the radionuclide compromised the identifier signals. Eu154 saw a maximum intensity change at EOC and 30 days post-irradiation of 1260% and 4545%, respectively. Cs137 saw a minimum change of 12% and 89%, respectively. Mitigation of the extraneous signals is cardinal to the success of the proposed strategy. The predictability of natural decay provides a basis for the characterization of the signals from the radionuclide.

  7. 2005 DOE Hydrogen Program Review PresentationCOST AND PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENTS FOR A PEM FUEL CELL TURBOCOMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Mark K. Gee

    2005-04-01

    The objectives of the program during the past year was to complete Technical Objectives 2 and 3 and initiate Technical Objective 4 are described. To assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.

  8. Overall Plan for Physics Outlining Steps Necessary for Insertion of the LTA and Operation Using a 1/3 MOX Loaded Core

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-04-09

    Document issued according to Work Release KI-WR04RTP. P. 00-1 describes physics tasks that are included in the current version of ''Roadmap.Level 2'' concerning Reactor tasks of Weapon-grade plutonium disposition problem for VVER-1000. On this base the objective is to identify the physical tasks in FY2000 and in future as a part of global activities on weapon-grade MOX fuel introduction into VVER-1000.

  9. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides. PMID:16604724

  10. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  11. Metal foams application to enhance cooling of open cathode polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid Hossain, Mohammad; Shabani, Bahman

    2015-11-01

    Conventional channel flow fields of open cathode Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) introduce some challenges linked to humidity, temperature, pressure and oxygen concentration gradients along the conventional flow fields that reduce the cell performance. According to previous experimental reports, with conventional air flow fields, hotspot formation due to water accumulation in Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) is common. Unlike continuous long flow passages in conventional channels, metal foams provide randomly interrupted flow passages. Re-circulation of fluid, due to randomly distributed tortuous ligaments, enhances temperature and humidity uniformity in the fluid. Moreover, the higher electrical conductivity of metal foams compared to non-metal current collectors and their very low mass density compared to solid metal materials are expected to increase the electrical performance of the cell while significantly reducing its weight. This article reviews the existing cooling systems and identifies the important parameters on the basis of reported literature in the air cooling systems of PEMFCs. This is followed by investigating metal foams as a possible option to be used within the structure of such PEMFCs as an option that can potentially address cooling and flow distribution challenges associated with using conventional flow channels, especially in air-cooled PEMFCs.

  12. Enhanced surface functionality and microbial fuel cell performance of chitosan membranes through phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Holder, Shima L; Lee, Ching-Hwa; Popuri, Srinivasa R; Zhuang, Meng-Xin

    2016-09-20

    The effects of plasticization and cross-linking on the performance of chitosan as promising proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were investigated. The physico-chemical properties of chitosan (CS), sorbitol-chitosan (S-CS), phosphorylated-chitosan (CS-P) and phosphorylated-sorbitol-chitosan (S-CS-P) membranes were investigated by FESEM-EDS, FTIR-ATR, XRD, TGA, tensile strength and sorption studies. The performance of the fabricated PEMs was assessed by power density and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Maximum power densities achieved were 130.03, 20.76, 94.59 and 7.42mW/m(2) for CS-P, S-CS-P, S-CS and CS membranes respectively. Phosphorylation of the CS membranes increased CEC and tensile strength, attributed to an increase in bonded amide and phosphate ionic surface groups. Further, 49.07% COD removal from municipal wastewater was achieved with CS-P membranes. Thus, through chemical modifications, the physico-chemical and mechanical properties of natural abundant biopolymer chitosan can be enhanced for its use as an environmentally sustainable PEM in MFC technology. PMID:27261749

  13. Preparation and characterization of Pt supported on graphene with enhanced electrocatalytic activity in fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yuchen; Liu, Jian-guo; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Wenming; Gao, Jian; Xie, Yun; Yin, Ying; Zou, Zhigang

    Pt nanoparticles are deposited onto graphene sheets via synchronous reduction of H 2PtCl 6 and graphene oxide (GO) suspension using NaBH 4. Lyophilization is introduced to avoid irreversible aggregation of graphene (G) sheets, which happens during conventional drying process. Pt/G catalysts reveal a high catalytic activity for both methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction compared to Pt supported on carbon black (Pt/C). The performance of Pt/G catalysts is further improved after heat treatment in N 2 atmosphere at 300 °C for 2 h, and the peak current density of methanol oxidation for Pt/G after heat treatment is almost 3.5 times higher than Pt/C. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that the Pt particles are uniformly distributed on graphene sheets. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results demonstrate that the interaction between Pt and graphene is enhanced during annealing. It suggests that graphene has provided a new way to improve electrocatalytic activity of catalyst for fuel cell.

  14. Horizontal arrangement of anodes of microbial fuel cells enhances remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueyong; Wang, Xin; Li, Xiaojing; Cheng, Lijuan; Wan, Lili; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-02-01

    With the aim of in situ bioremediation of soil contaminated by hydrocarbons, anodes arranged with two different ways (horizontal or vertical) were compared in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Charge outputs as high as 833 and 762C were achieved in reactors with anodes horizontally arranged (HA) and vertically arranged (VA). Up to 12.5 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was removed in HA after 135 days, which was 50.6 % higher than that in VA (8.3 %) and 95.3 % higher than that in the disconnected control (6.4 %). Hydrocarbon fingerprint analysis showed that the degradation rates of both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in HA were higher than those in VA. Lower mass transport resistance in the HA than that of the VA seems to result in more power and more TPH degradation. Soil pH was increased from 8.26 to 9.12 in HA and from 8.26 to 8.64 in VA, whereas the conductivity was decreased from 1.99 to 1.54 mS/cm in HA and from 1.99 to 1.46 mS/cm in VA accompanied with the removal of TPH. Considering both enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon and generation of charge in HA, the MFC with anodes horizontally arranged is a promising configuration for future applications. PMID:25189807

  15. Enhancement of the inherent self-protection of the fast sodium reactor cores with oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, V.A.; Malisheva, I.V.; Matveev, V.I.; Egorov, A.V.; Maslov, P.A.

    2013-07-01

    With the development and research into the generation IV fast sodium reactors, great attention is paid to the enhancement of the core inherent self-protection characteristics. One of the problems dealt here is connected with the reduction of the reactivity margin so that the control rods running should not result in the core overheating and melting. In this paper we consider the possibilities of improving the core of BN-1200 with oxide fuel by a known method of introducing an axial fertile layer into the core. But unlike earlier studies this paper looks at the possibility of using such a layer not only for improving breeding, but also for reducing sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE). This proposed improvement of the BN-1200 core does not solve the problem of strong interference in control and protection system (CPS) rods of BN-1200, but they reduce significantly the reactivity margin for burn-up compensation. This helps compensate all the reactivity balances in the improved core configurations without violating constraints on SVRE value.

  16. Enhancement of Aviation Fuel Thermal Stability Characterization Through Application of Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, Samuel Tucker; Wong, Hubert; Hinderer, Cameron Branch; Klettlinger, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    ASTM D3241/Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester (JFTOT) procedure, the standard method for testing thermal stability of conventional aviation turbine fuels is inherently limited due to the subjectivity in the color standard for tube deposit rating. Quantitative assessment of the physical characteristics of oxidative fuel deposits provides a more powerful method for comparing the thermal oxidation stability characteristics of fuels, especially in a research setting. We propose employing a Spectroscopic Ellipsometer to determine the film thickness and profile of oxidative fuel deposits on JFTOT heater tubes. Using JP-8 aviation fuel and following a modified ASTM D3241 testing procedure, the capabilities of the Ellipsometer will be demonstrated by measuring oxidative fuel deposit profiles for a range of different deposit characteristics. The testing completed in this report was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project

  17. Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Yang, Yong Austin

    2013-10-28

    The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels; and, Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

  18. FEM (finite element method) thermal modeling and thermal hydraulic performance of an enhanced thermal conductivity UO2/BeO composite fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wenzhong

    2011-03-24

    An enhanced thermal conductivity UO2-BeO composite nuclear fuel was studied. A methodology to generate ANSYS (an engineering simulation software) FEM (Finite Element Method) thermal models of enhanced thermal conductivity oxide nuclear fuels was developed. The results showed significant increase in the fuel thermal conductivities and have good agreement with the measured ones. The reactor performance analysis showed that the decrease in centerline temperature was 250-350K for the UO2-BeO composite fuel, and thus we can improve nuclear reactors' performance and safety, and high-level radioactive waste generation.

  19. Enhancement of fuel cell performance with less-water dependent composite membranes having polyoxometalate anchored nanofibrous interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouzari-lotf, Ebrahim; Jacob, Mohan V.; Ghassemi, Hossein; Ahmad, Arshad; Nasef, Mohamed Mahmoud; Zakeri, Masoumeh; Mehdipour-Ataei, Shahram

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxometalate immobilized nanofiber was used to fabricate low gas permeable layer for composite membranes designed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) operating at low relative humidity (RH). The composite membranes revealed enhanced proton conductivity in dry conditions compared with state-of-the-art pristine membrane (Nafion 112, N112). This was coupled with a low fuel crossover inheriting the composite membranes about 100 mV higher OCV than N112 when tested in PEMFC at 60 °C and 40% RH. A maximum power density of up to 930 mW cm-2 was also achieved which is substantially higher than the N112 under similar conditions (577 mW cm-2). Such remarkable performance enhancement along with undetectable leaching of immobilized polyoxometalate, high dimensional stability and low water uptake of the composite membranes suggest a strong potential for PEMFC under low RH operation.

  20. Capacity enhancement of aqueous borohydride fuels for hydrogen storage in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, David; Neiner, Doinita; Bowden, Mark; Whittemore, Sean; Holladay, Jamie; Huang, Zhenguo; Autrey, Tom

    2015-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate enhanced hydrogen storage capacities through increased solubility of sodium borate product species in aqueous media achieved by adjusting the sodium (NaOH) to boron (B(OH)3) ratio, i.e., M/B, to obtain a distribution of polyborate anions. For a 1:1 mole ratio of NaOH to B(OH)3, M/B = 1, the ratio of the hydrolysis product formed from NaBH4 hydrolysis, the sole borate species formed and observed by 11B NMR is sodium metaborate, NaB(OH)4. When the ratio is 1:3 NaOH to B(OH)3, M/B = 0.33, a mixture of borate anions is formed and observed as a broad peak in the 11B NMR spectrum. The complex polyborate mixture yields a metastable solution that is difficult to crystallize. Given the enhanced solubility of the polyborate mixture formed when M/B = 0.33 it should follow that the hydrolysis of sodium octahydrotriborate, NaB3H8, can provide a greater storage capacity of hydrogen for fuel cell applications compared to sodium borohydride while maintaining a single phase. Accordingly, the hydrolysis of a 23 wt% NaB3H8 solution in water yields a solution having the same complex polyborate mixture as formed by mixing a 1:3 molar ratio of NaOH and B(OH)3 and releases >8 eq of H2. By optimizing the M/B ratio a complex mixture of soluble products, including B3O3(OH)52-, B4O5(OH)42-, B3O3(OH)4-, B5O6(OH)4- and B(OH)3, can be maintained as a single liquid phase throughout the hydrogen release process. Consequently, hydrolysis of NaB3H8 can provide a 40% increase in H2 storage density compared to the hydrolysis of NaBH4 given the decreased solubility of sodium metaborate. The authors would like to thank Jim Sisco and Paul Osenar of

  1. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m‑2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m‑2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m‑2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m‑2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  2. Enhanced diesel fuel fraction from waste high-density polyethylene and heavy gas oil pyrolysis using factorial design methodology.

    PubMed

    Joppert, Ney; da Silva, Alexsandro Araujo; da Costa Marques, Mônica Regina

    2015-02-01

    Factorial Design Methodology (FDM) was developed to enhance diesel fuel fraction (C9-C23) from waste high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and Heavy Gas Oil (HGO) through co-pyrolysis. FDM was used for optimization of the following reaction parameters: temperature, catalyst and HDPE amounts. The HGO amount was constant (2.00 g) in all experiments. The model optimum conditions were determined to be temperature of 550 °C, HDPE = 0.20 g and no FCC catalyst. Under such conditions, 94% of pyrolytic oil was recovered, of which diesel fuel fraction was 93% (87% diesel fuel fraction yield), no residue was produced and 6% of noncondensable gaseous/volatile fraction was obtained. Seeking to reduce the cost due to high process temperatures, the impact of using higher catalyst content (25%) with a lower temperature (500 °C) was investigated. Under these conditions, 88% of pyrolytic oil was recovered (diesel fuel fraction yield was also 87%) as well as 12% of the noncondensable gaseous/volatile fraction. No waste was produced in these conditions, being an environmentally friendly approach for recycling the waste plastic. This paper demonstrated the usefulness of using FDM to predict and to optimize diesel fuel fraction yield with a great reduction in the number of experiments. PMID:25532672

  3. Enhanced air/fuel mixing for automotive stirling engine turbulator-type combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Riecke, George T.; Stotts, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to the improved combustion of fuel in a combustion chamber of a stirling engine and the like by dividing combustion into primary and secondary combustion zones through the use of a diverter plate.

  4. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Douglas C.; Porter, Douglas L.; Hayes, Steven L.; Hill, Robert N.

    1999-01-01

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both.

  5. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, D.C.; Porter, D.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-03-23

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both. 7 figs.

  6. High Energy Density Additives for Hybrid Fuel Rockets to Improve Performance and Enhance Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a conceptual study of prototype strained hydrocarbon molecules as high energy density additives for hybrid rocket fuels to boost the performance of these rockets without compromising safety and reliability. Use of these additives could extend the range of applications for which hybrid rockets become an attractive alternative to conventional solid or liquid fuel rockets. The objectives of the study were to confirm and quantify the high enthalpy of these strained molecules and to assess improvement in rocket performance that would be expected if these additives were blended with conventional fuels. We confirmed the chemical properties (including enthalpy) of these additives. However, the predicted improvement in rocket performance was too small to make this a useful strategy for boosting hybrid rocket performance.

  7. Bacterial cellulose-polyaniline nano-biocomposite: A porous media hydrogel bioanode enhancing the performance of microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkour, Mehrdad; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Mashkour, Mahdi

    2016-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are one of the possible renewable energy supplies which microorganisms play an active role in bio-oxidize reactions of a substrate such as glucose. Electrode materials and surface modifications are highly effective tools in enhancing MFCs' Performance. In this study, new composite anodes are fabricated. Bacterial cellulose (BC) is used as continuous phase and polyaniline (PANI) as dispersed one which is synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization on BC's fibers. With hydrogel nature of BC as a novel feature and polyaniline conductivity there meet the favorable conditions to obtain an active microbial biofilm on anode surface. Maximum power density of 117.76 mW/m2 in current density of 617 mA/m2 is achieved for BC/PANI anode. The amounts demonstrate a considerable enhancement compared with graphite plate (1 mW/m2 and 10 mA/m2).

  8. JV Task 75 - Lignite Fuel Enhancement via Air-Jigging Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Lamb; Steven Benson; Joshua Stanislowski

    2007-03-01

    Several North Dakota lignite coals from the Falkirk Mine were processed in a 5-ton-per-hour dry coal-cleaning plant. The plant uses air-jigging technology to separate undesirable ash constituents as well as sulfur and mercury. The results of this study indicate average ash, sulfur, and mercury reductions on a weight basis of 15%, 22%, and 28%, respectively. The average heating value was increased by 2% on a Btu/lb basis. Two computer models were used to understand the impact of a cleaned fuel on boiler performance: PCQUEST{reg_sign} and Vista. The PCQUEST model indicated improvements in slagging and fouling potential when cleaned coals are used over feed coals. The Vista model was set up to simulate coal performance and economics at Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station. In all cases, the cleaned fuel performed better than the original feed coal, with economic benefits being realized for all fuels tested. The model also indicated that one fuel considered to be unusable before cleaning was transformed into a potentially salable product. While these data indicate full-scale implementation of air-jigging technology may be beneficial to the mine and the plant, complete economic analysis, including payback period, is needed to make the final decision to implement.

  9. Fuel moisture content enhances nonadditive effects of plant mixtures on flammability and fire behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blauw, Luke G; Wensink, Niki; Bakker, Lisette; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Aerts, Rien; Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A; Cornelissen, J Hans C

    2015-01-01

    Fire behavior of plant mixtures includes a complex set of processes for which the interactive contributions of its drivers, such as plant identity and moisture, have not yet been unraveled fully. Plant flammability parameters of species mixtures can show substantial deviations of fire properties from those expected based on the component species when burnt alone; that is, there are nonadditive mixture effects. Here, we investigated how fuel moisture content affects nonadditive effects in fire behavior. We hypothesized that both the magnitude and variance of nonadditivity in flammability parameters are greater in moist than in dry fuel beds. We conducted a series of experimental burns in monocultures and 2-species mixtures with two ericaceous dwarf shrubs and two bryophyte species from temperate fire-prone heathlands. For a set of fire behavior parameters, we found that magnitude and variability of nonadditive effects are, on average, respectively 5.8 and 1.8 times larger in moist (30% MC) species mixtures compared to dry (10% MC) mixed fuel beds. In general, the moist mixtures caused negative nonadditive effects, but due to the larger variability these mixtures occasionally caused large positive nonadditive effects, while this did not occur in dry mixtures. Thus, at moister conditions, mixtures occasionally pass the moisture threshold for ignition and fire spread, which the monospecific fuel beds are unable to pass. We also show that the magnitude of nonadditivity is highly species dependent. Thus, contrary to common belief, the strong nonadditive effects in mixtures can cause higher fire occurrence at moister conditions. This new integration of surface fuel moisture and species interactions will help us to better understand fire behavior in the complexity of natural ecosystems. PMID:26380709

  10. Stability enhancement and fuel economy of the 4-wheel-drive hybrid electric vehicles by optimal tyre force distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Avesta; Mohammadi, Masoud

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, vehicle stability control and fuel economy for a 4-wheel-drive hybrid vehicle are investigated. The integrated controller is designed within three layers. The first layer determines the total yaw moment and total lateral force made by using an optimal controller method to follow the desired dynamic behaviour of a vehicle. The second layer determines optimum tyre force distribution in order to optimise tyre usage and find out how the tyres should share longitudinal and lateral forces to achieve a target vehicle response under the assumption that all four wheels can be independently steered, driven, and braked. In the third layer, the active steering, wheel slip, and electrical motor torque controllers are designed. In the front axle, internal combustion engine (ICE) is coupled to an electric motor (EM). The control strategy has to determine the power distribution between ICE and EM to minimise fuel consumption and allowing the vehicle to be charge sustaining. Finally, simulations performed in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment show that the proposed structure could enhance the vehicle stability and fuel economy in different manoeuvres.

  11. Wiring microbial biofilms to the electrode by osmium redox polymer for the performance enhancement of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Shin, Hyosul; Kang, Chan; Kim, Sunghyun

    2016-04-01

    An osmium redox polymer, PAA-PVI-[Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)2Cl]+/2+ that has been used in enzymatic fuel cells and microbial sensors, was applied for the first time to the anode of single-chamber microbial fuel cells with the mixed culture inoculum aiming at enhancing performance. Functioning as a molecular wire connecting the biofilm to the anode, power density increased from 1479 mW m(-2) without modification to 2355 mW m(-2) after modification of the anode. Evidence from cyclic voltammetry showed that the catalytic activity of an anodic biofilm was greatly enhanced in the presence of an osmium redox polymer, indicating that electrons were more efficiently transferred to the anode via co-immobilized osmium complex tethered to wiring polymer chains at the potential range of -0.3 V-+0.1 V (vs. SCE). The optimum amount of the redox polymer was determined to be 0.163 mg cm(-2). PMID:26599210

  12. Engineering interface and surface of noble metal nanoparticle nanotubes toward enhanced catalytic activity for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chun-Hua; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-07-16

    In order for fuel cells to have commercial viability as alternative fuel sources, researchers need to develop highly active and robust fuel cell electrocatalysts. In recent years, the focus has been on the design and synthesis of novel catalytic materials with controlled interface and surface structures. Another goal is to uncover potential catalytic activity and selectivity, as well as understand their fundamental catalytic mechanisms. Scientists have achieved great progress in the experimental and theoretical investigation due to the urgent demand for broad commercialization of fuel cells in automotive applications. However, there are still three main problems: cost, performance, and stability. To meet these targets, the catalyst needs to have multisynergic functions. In addition, the composition and structure changes of the catalysts during the reactions still need to be explored. Activity in catalytic nanomaterials is generally controlled by the size, shape, composition, and interface and surface engineering. As such, one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes are of special interest. However, these structures tend to lose the nanoparticle morphology and inhibit the use of catalysts in both fuel cell anodes and cathodes. In 2003, Rubinstein and co-workers proposed the idea of nanoparticle nanotubes (NNs), which combine the geometry of nanotubes and the morphology of nanoparticles. This concept gives both the high surface-to-volume ratio and the size effect, which are both appealing in electrocatalyst design. In this Account, we describe our developments in the construction of highly active NNs with unique surface and heterogeneous interface structures. We try to clarify enhanced activity and stability in catalytic systems by taking into account the activity impact factors. We briefly introduce material structural effects on the electrocatalytic reactivity including metal oxide/metal and metal/metal interfaces, dealloyed pure Pt, and mixed Pt

  13. Development and evaluation of lime enhanced refuse-derived fuel (RDF) pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlsson, O.O.

    1996-12-31

    The disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) is of increasing concern for municipalities and state governments throughout the US. There are two technologies currently in use for the combustion of MSW: (1) mass burning in which unprocessed MSW is burned in a heat recovery furnace, and (2) a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) product, which consists of the organic (combustible) fraction of MSW which has been processed to produce a more homogeneous fuel product than raw MSW. The RDF is either marketed to outside users or combusted on-site in a dedicated or existing furnace. In an attempt to alleviate the problems encountered with RDF as a feedstock, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of North Texas (UNT) under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a multi-phase research study to investigate the development of a low-cost binder that would improve the quality of RDF pellets.

  14. Bioinspired Nanosucker Array for Enhancing Bioelectricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Qi, Dianpeng; Chandran, Bevita K; Bi, Lanpo; Cui, Fuyi; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-01-13

    A bioinspired active anode with a suction effect is demonstrated for microbial fuel cells by constructing polypyrrole (PPy) nanotubular arrays on carbon textiles. The oxygen in the inner space of the nanosucker can be depleted by micro-organisms with the capability of facul-tative respiration, forming a vacuum, which then activates the electrode to draw the microorganism by suction and thus improve the bioelectricity generation. PMID:26550771

  15. The crucial importance of the back-end in multinational initiatives to enhance fuel cycle security

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, Charles; Chapman, Neil; Isaacs, Thomas H.

    2007-07-01

    There have been repeated proposals for establishing multinational cooperation approaches that could reduce the security concerns of spreading nuclear technologies. Most recently, there have been initiatives by both Russia (GNPI ) and the USA (GNEP) - each aimed at promoting nuclear power whilst limiting security concerns. In practice, both initiatives place emphasis on the supply of reactors and enriched fuel but neither has made clear and specific proposals about the back-end part of the arrangement. The primary incentive offered to the user countries is 'security of supply' of the front end services. However, there is no current shortage of supply of front end services, so that the incentives are not large. A much greater incentive could be the provision of a spent fuel or waste disposal service. The fuel supplied to Tier 2 countries could be shipped back (with no return of wastes) to the supplier or else to an accepted third party country that is trusted to operate safe and secure disposal facilities. If a comprehensive service that obviates the need for a national deep repository is offered to small countries then there will be a really strong incentive for them to sign up to GNEP or GNPI type deals. (authors)

  16. A new state-observer of the inner PEM fuel cell pressures for enhanced system monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethoux, Olivier; Godoy, Emmanuel; Roche, Ivan; Naccari, Bruno; Amira Taleb, Miassa; Koteiche, Mohamad; Nassif, Younane

    2014-06-01

    In embedded systems such as electric vehicles, Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been an attractive technology for many years especially in automotive applications. This paper deals with PEMFC operation monitoring which is a current target for improvement for attaining extended durability. In this paper, supervision of the PEMFC is done using knowledge-based models. Without extra sensors, it enables a clear insight of state variables of the gases in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) which gives the PEMFC controller the ability to prevent abnormal operating conditions and associated irreversible degradations. First, a new state-observer oriented model of the PEM fuel cell is detailed. Based on this model, theoretical and practical observability issues are discussed. This analysis shows that convection phenomena can be considered negligible from the dynamic point of view; this leads to a reduced model. Finally a state-observer enables the estimation of the inner partial pressure of the cathode by using only the current and voltage measurements. This proposed model-based approach has been successfully tested on a PEM fuel cell simulator using a set of possible fault scenarios.

  17. Graphene nanoribbons hybridized carbon nanofibers: remarkably enhanced graphitization and conductivity, and excellent performance as support material for fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaonan; Gao, Hongrong; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yiren; Huang, Bowen; Zhao, Junhong; Zhu, Yan; Yuan, Wang Zhang; Zhang, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    High electronic conductivity of the support material and uniform distribution of the catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) are extremely desirable for electrocatalysts. In this paper, we present our recent progress on electrocatalysts for fuel cells with simultaneously improved conductivity of the supporting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and distribution of platinum (Pt) NPs through facile incorporation of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Briefly, GNRs were obtained by the cutting and unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and subsequent thermal reduction and were first used as novel nanofillers in CNFs towards high performance support material for electrocatalysis. Through electrospinning and carbonization processes, GNR embedded carbon nanofibers (G-CNFs) with greatly enhanced graphitization and electronic conductivity were synthesized. Chemical deposition of Pt NPs onto G-CNFs generated a new Pt-G-CNF hybrid catalyst, with homogeneously distributed Pt NPs of ~3 nm. Compared to Pt-CNF (Pt on pristine CNFs) and Pt-M-CNF (Pt on MWCNT embedded CNFs), Pt-G-CNF hybrids exhibit significantly improved electrochemically active surface area (ECSA), better CO tolerance for electro-oxidation of methanol and higher electrochemical stability, testifying G-CNFs are promising support materials for high performance electrocatalysts for fuel cells.High electronic conductivity of the support material and uniform distribution of the catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) are extremely desirable for electrocatalysts. In this paper, we present our recent progress on electrocatalysts for fuel cells with simultaneously improved conductivity of the supporting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and distribution of platinum (Pt) NPs through facile incorporation of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Briefly, GNRs were obtained by the cutting and unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and subsequent thermal reduction and were first used as novel nanofillers in CNFs towards high performance support material for

  18. Photosynthetic membrane-less microbial fuel cells to enhance microalgal biomass concentration.

    PubMed

    Uggetti, Enrica; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the net increase in microalgal biomass concentration induced by photosynthetic microbial fuel cells (PMFC). The experiment was conducted on six lab-scale PMFC constituted by an anodic chamber simulating an anaerobic digester connected to a cathodic chamber consisting of a mixed algae consortia culture. Three PMFC were operated at closed circuit (PMFC(+)) whereas three PMFC were left unconnected as control (PMFC(-)). PMFC(+) produced a higher amount of carbon dioxide as a product of the organic matter oxidation that resulted in 1.5-3 times higher biomass concentration at the cathode compartment when compared to PMFC(-). PMID:27455126

  19. Reduction of carbon dioxide gas formation at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell using chemically enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    The production of CO 2 gas at the DMFC anode leads to dramatic increases in pumping power requirements and reduced power output because of mass transfer limitations as bubble trains form in the channels of larger stacks. Experimental observations taken in a 5 cm 2 DMFC test cell operated at 60 °C, 1 atm, and with a methanol/water fuel flow rates of 5-10 cm 3 min -1 indicate that the rate of bubble formation can be reduced by increasing the fuel flow because more liquid is available for the CO 2 to dissolve in. Further observations indicate that KOH and LiOH added to the fuel eliminates CO 2 gas formation in situ at low concentrations because of the greatly increased solubility that results. A mathematical model for the volumetric rate of CO 2 gas production that includes effects of temperature and solubility is developed and extended to include the effects of hydroxide ions in solution. The model is used to predict the onset location of gas formation in the flow field as well as the void fraction at any point in the flow field. Predictions from the model agree very well with our experiments. Model predictions explain differences in the initial location of bubble formation for fuel solutions pre-saturated with CO 2 as opposed to CO 2-free solutions. Experiments with KOH and LiOH added to fuel solutions confirm the validity of the model extension that includes solubility that is enhanced by chemical reaction. Experiments with LiOH, KOH, and ammonium hydroxide show that the long-term durability of standard Pt-Ru/Nafion ®/Pt membrane electrode assemblies is compromised because of the presence of lithium, potassium, and ammonium cations that interact with the Nafion ® membrane and result in increasing the ohmic limitations of the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experiments with Ca(OH) 2, while reducing gas formation, precipitate the product CaCO 3 out of solution too rapidly for downstream filtering, blocking channels in the flow field.

  20. Barium carbonate nanoparticle to enhance oxygen reduction activity of strontium doped lanthanum ferrite for solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao; Chen, Fanglin; Xia, Changrong

    2015-03-01

    BaCO3 nanoparticles are demonstrated as outstanding catalysts for high-temperature oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the La0.8Sr0.2FeO3-δ (LSF) cathode for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) based on ytrria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes. Thermal gravitational and X-ray diffraction measurements show that BaCO3 is stable and chemically compatible with LSF under the fabrication and operation conditions of intermediate-temperature SOFCs. The BaCO3 nanoparticles can greatly reduce the interfacial polarization resistance; from 2.96 to 0.84 Ω cm2 at 700 °C when 12.9wt% BaCO3 is infiltrated to the porous LSF electrode on the YSZ electrolyte. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that there is about one order of magnitude decrease in the low-frequency resistance, indicating that BaCO3 nanoparticles can greatly enhance the surface steps for ORR. Electrical conductivity relaxation investigation indicates about one order of magnitude increase in the chemical oxygen surface exchange coefficient when BaCO3 is applied, directly demonstrating significant increase in the kinetics for ORR. In addition, LSF cathodes with infiltrated BaCO3 nanoparticles have shown excellent stability and substantially enhanced cell performance as demonstrated with single cells, suggesting BaCO3 nanoparticles are very effective in enhancing ORR on LSF.

  1. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm−2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  2. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm(-2) at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  3. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm-2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling.

  4. Electrochemically exfoliated graphene anodes with enhanced biocurrent production in single-chamber air-breathing microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Najafabadi, Amin Taheri; Ng, Norvin; Gyenge, Előd

    2016-07-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) present promising options for environmentally sustainable power generation especially in conjunction with waste water treatment. However, major challenges remain including low power density, difficult scale-up, and durability of the cell components. This study reports enhanced biocurrent production in a membrane-free MFC, using graphene microsheets (GNs) as anode and MnOx catalyzed air cathode. The GNs are produced by ionic liquid assisted simultaneous anodic and cathodic electrochemical exfoliation of iso-molded graphite electrodes. The GNs produced by anodic exfoliation increase the MFC peak power density by over 300% compared to plain carbon cloth (i.e., 2.85Wm(-2) vs 0.66Wm(-2), respectively), and by 90% compared to conventional carbon black (i.e., Vulcan XC-72) anode. These results exceed previously reported power densities for graphene-containing MFC anodes. The fuel cell polarization results are corroborated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicating three times lower charge transfer resistance for the GN anode. Material characterizations suggest that the best performing GN samples were of relatively smaller size (~500nm), with higher levels of ionic liquid induced surface functionalization during the electrochemical exfoliation process. PMID:26926591

  5. Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Fossil-fuel Combustion By-products.

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, A V.; Mccarthy, John F.; Amonette, James E.; Fisher, L S.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Daniels, William L.

    2004-03-01

    Concern for the potential global change consequences of increasing atmospheric CO2 has prompted interest in the development of mechanisms to reduce or stabilize atmospheric CO2 .During the next several decades, a program focused on terrestrial sequestration processes could make a significant contribution to abating CO2 increases.The reclamation of degraded lands, such as mine-spoil sites, highway rights-of-way, and poorly managed lands, represents an opportunity to couple C sequestration with the use of fossil-fuel and energy by-products and other waste material, such as biosolids and organic wastes from human and animal sewage treatment facilities, to improve soil quality. Degraded lands are often characterized by acidic pH, low levels of key nutrients, poor soil structure, and limited moisture-retention capacity.Much is known about the methods to improve these soils, but the cost of implementation is often a limiting factor.However, the additional financial and environmental benefit s of C sequestration may change the economics of land reclamation activities.The addition of energy-related by-products can address the adverse conditions of these degraded lands through a variety of mechanisms, such as enhancing plant growth and capturing of organic C in long-lived soil C pools.This review examines the use of fossil-fuel combustion by-products and organic amendments to enhance C sequestration and identifies the key gaps in information that still must be addressed before these methods can be implemented on an environmentally meaningful scale.

  6. Durability Enhancement of Intermetallics Electrocatalysts via N-anchor Effect for Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; An, Li; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Nanlin; Xia, Dingguo; Huang, Weifeng; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient durability and catalytic activity of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst are key issues that have to be solved for the practical application of low temperature fuel cell. This paper introduces a new catalyst design strategy using N-anchor to promote the corrosion resistance of electrocatalyst. The as-synthesized N-Pt3Fe1/C shows a high electrocatalytic activity and a superior durability towards ORR. The kinetic current density of N-Pt3Fe1/C as normalized by ECSA is still as high as 0.145 mA cm−2 and only 7% loss after 20000 potential cycles from 0.6 to 1.2 V (vs. NHE) in O2-bubbling perchloric acid solution, whereas Pt3Fe1/C shows 49% loss under the same tests. The N-anchor approach offers novel opportunities for the development of ORR catalyst with excellent electrochemical properties. PMID:24240982

  7. Analysis of a model of fuel cell - gas turbine hybrid power system for enhanced energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calay, Rajnish K.; Mustafa, Mohamad Y.; Virk, Mohammad S.; Mustafa, Mahmoud F.

    2012-11-01

    A simple mathematical model to evaluate the performance of FC-GT hybrid system is presented in this paper. The model is used to analyse the influence of various parameters on the performance of a typical hybrid system, where excess heat rejected from the solid-oxide fuel cell stack is utilised to generate additional power through a gas turbine system and to provide heat energy for space heating. The model is based on thermodynamic analysis of various components of the plant and can be adapted for various configurations of the plant components. Because there are many parameters defining the efficiency and work output of the hybrid system, the technique is based on mathematical and graphical optimisation of various parameters; to obtain the maximum efficiency for a given plant configuration.

  8. Optimization of enhanced bioelectrical reactor with electricity from microbial fuel cells for groundwater nitrate removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Feng, Chuanping; Wang, Zhijun; Cheng, Ming; Hu, Weiwu

    2016-04-01

    Factors influencing the performance of a continual-flow bioelectrical reactor (BER) intensified by microbial fuel cells for groundwater nitrate removal, including nitrate load, carbon source and hydraulic retention time (HRT), were investigated and optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). With the target of maximum nitrate removal and minimum intermediates accumulation, nitrate load (for nitrogen) of 60.70 mg/L, chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 849.55 mg/L and HRT of 3.92 h for the BER were performed. COD was the dominant factor influencing performance of the system. Experimental results indicated the undistorted simulation and reliable optimized values. These demonstrate that RSM is an effective method to evaluate and optimize the nitrate-reducing performance of the present system and can guide mathematical models development to further promote its practical applications. PMID:26402418

  9. Enhancing charge harvest from microbial fuel cells by controlling the charging and discharging frequency of capacitors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shiting; Xia, Xue; Yuan, Lulu; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2013-10-01

    Capacitor is a storage device to harvest charge produced from microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In intermittent charging mode, the capacitor is charged by an MFC first, and then discharged through an external resistance. The charge harvested by capacitor is affected by the charging and discharging frequency. In the present study, the effect of the charging and discharging frequency on charge harvest was investigated. At the switching time (ts) of 100 s, the average current over each time segment reached its maximum value (1.59 mA) the earliest, higher than the other tested conditions, and the highest COD removal (63%) was also obtained, while the coulombic efficiency reached the highest of 67% at the ts of 400 s. Results suggested that lower ts led to higher current output and COD removal, but appropriate ts should be selected in consideration of charge recovery efficiency. PMID:23993288

  10. Fuel cell plates with improved arrangement of process channels for enhanced pressure drop across the plates

    SciTech Connect

    Spurrier, Francis R.; Pierce, Bill L.; Wright, Maynard K.

    1986-01-01

    A plate for a fuel cell has an arrangement of ribs defining an improved configuration of process gas channels and slots on a surface of the plate which provide a modified serpentine gas flow pattern across the plate surface. The channels are generally linear and arranged parallel to one another while the spaced slots allow cross channel flow of process gas in a staggered fashion which creates a plurality of generally mini-serpentine flow paths extending transverse to the longitudinal gas flow along the channels. Adjacent pairs of the channels are interconnected to one another in flow communication. Also, a bipolar plate has the aforementioned process gas channel configuration on one surface and another configuration on the opposite surface. In the other configuration, there are not slots and the gas flow channels have a generally serpentine configuration.

  11. Engineering PQS Biosynthesis Pathway for Enhancement of Bioelectricity Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bin; Seviour, Thomas; Nesatyy, Victor J.; Marsili, Enrico; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Song, Hao; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Yang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the redox shuttle, phenazines, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an ubiquitous microorganism in wastewater microflora, is regulated by the 2-heptyl-3,4-dihydroxyquinoline (PQS) quorum-sensing system. However, PQS inhibits anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa. We constructed a P. aeruginosa strain that produces higher concentrations of phenazines under anaerobic conditions by over-expressing the PqsE effector in a PQS negative ΔpqsC mutant. The engineered strain exhibited an improved electrical performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and potentiostat-controlled electrochemical cells with an approximate five-fold increase of maximum current density relative to the parent strain. Electrochemical analysis showed that the current increase correlates with an over-synthesis of phenazines. These results therefore demonstrate that targeting microbial cell-to-cell communication by genetic engineering is a suitable technique to improve power output of bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:23700414

  12. Enhancing organic matter removal, biopolymer recovery and electricity generation from distillery wastewater by combining fungal fermentation and microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Ghosh Ray, S; Ghangrekar, M M

    2015-01-01

    For enhancing organic matter removal from cereal-based distillery stillage two-stage treatment consisting of fermentation by Aspergillus awamori followed by microbial fuel cell (MFC) is proposed. Considerable reduction in total and soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) up to 70% and 40%, respectively, along with 98% reduction of suspended solids (SS) has been achieved during fungal pretreatment. The process generated chitosan, a useful fermentation byproduct from fungal mycelia, as 0.6-0.7g/l of settled sludge with mycelium (3.8% solids). Prior treatment of wastewater with fungal strain enhanced the power generation in MFC by 2.9 times at an organic loading rate of 1.5kgCOD/m(3)day, demonstrating soluble COD reduction of 92% in MFC. While treating distillery wastewater, this two-stage integrated biological process demonstrated overall 99% COD removal and almost complete removal of SS, delivering ample scope for scale-up and industrial application to offer effective solution for distillery wastewater treatment. PMID:25460978

  13. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells.

  14. Using ammonium bicarbonate as pore former in activated carbon catalyst layer to enhance performance of air cathode microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Wang, Haiman; Feng, Yujie

    2014-12-01

    The rolling catalyst layers in air cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are prepared by introducing NH4HCO3 as pore former (PF) with four PF/activated carbon mass ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0. The maximum power density of 892 ± 8 mW m-2 is obtained by cathodes with the mass ratio of 0.2, which is 33% higher than that of the control reactor (without PF, 671 ± 22 mW m-2). Pore analysis indicates the porosity increases by 38% and the major pore range concentrates between 0.5 μm-0.8 μm which likely facilitates to enrich the active reaction sites compared to 0.8 μm-3.0 μm in the control and other PF-cathodes. In addition, pore structure endows the cathode improved exchange current density by 2.4 times and decreased charge transfer resistance by 44%, which are the essential reasons to enhance the oxygen reduction. These results show that addition of NH4HCO3 proves an effective way to change the porosity and pore distribution of catalyst layers and then enhance the MFC performance.

  15. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:26578100

  16. Enhancing the power generation in microbial fuel cells with effective utilization of goethite recovered from mining mud as anodic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Dipak A; Ghadge, Anil N; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2015-09-01

    Catalytic effect of goethite recovered from iron-ore mining mud was studied in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Characterization of material recovered from mining mud confirms the recovery of iron oxide as goethite. Heat treated goethite (550 °C) and untreated raw goethite were coated on stainless-steel anode of MFC-1 and MFC-2, respectively; whereas, unmodified stainless-steel anode was used in MFC-3 (control). Fivefold increment in power was obtained in MFC-1 (17.1 W/m(3) at 20 Ω) than MFC-3 (3.5 W/m(3)). MFC with raw goethite coated anode also showed enhanced power (11 W/m(3)). Higher Coulombic efficiency (34%) was achieved in MFC-1 than control MFC-3 (13%). Decrease in mass-transport losses and higher redox current during electrochemical analyses support improved electron transfer with the use of goethite on anode. Cheaper goethite coating kinetically accelerates the electron transfer between bacteria and anode, proving to be a novel approach for enhancing the electricity generation along with organic matter removal in MFC. PMID:25983229

  17. [Enhanced Performance of Rolled Membrane Electrode Assembly by Adding Cation Exchange Resin to Anode in Microbial Fuel Cells].

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhuo; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an anode-membrane-cathode structure ban reduce the distance between anode and cathode to improve the power of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Here in order to further promote the performance of MFCs, a novel MEA was constructed by rolling-press method without noble metal material, and the Ohmic resistance decreased to 3-5 Ω. The maximum power density was 446 mW x m(-2) when acetate was used as the substrate. Solid spheres (like polystyrene balls and glass microspheres) were added into anode to enhance the transportation of electrolyte to cathode, resulting in a 10% increase in power density by producing macropores on and in the anode during rolling process. Cation exchange resin was added to accelerate the transportation of proton through the anode so that the power density further increased to 543 mW x m(-2). Meanwhile, the stability of cell voltage and Coulomb efficiency of MFC were both enhanced after the addition of cation exchange resin. PMID:26911023

  18. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:26578100

  19. Carbon filtration cathode in microbial fuel cell to enhance wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kuichang; Liang, Shuai; Liang, Peng; Zhou, Xuechen; Sun, Dongya; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia

    2015-06-01

    A homogeneous carbon membrane with multi-functions of microfiltration, electron conduction, and oxygen reduction catalysis was fabricated without using noble metals. The produced carbon membrane has a pore size of 553nm, a resistance of 6.0±0.4Ωcm(2)/cm, and a specific surface area of 32.2m(2)/g. After it was assembled in microbial fuel cell (MFC) as filtration air cathode, a power density of 581.5mW/m(2) and a current density of 1671.4mA/m(2) were achieved, comparable with previous Pt air cathode MFCs. The filtration MFC was continuously operated for 20days and excellent wastewater treatment performance was also achieved with removal efficiencies of TOC (93.6%), NH4(+)-N (97.2%), and total nitrogen (91.6%). In addition, the carbon membrane was much cheaper than traditional microfiltration membrane, suggesting a promising multi-functional material in wastewater treatment field. PMID:25782632

  20. Use of Faraday instabilities to enhance fuel pulverisation in air-blast atomisers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukra, Madjid; Cartellier, Alain; Ducasse, Éric; Gajan, Pierre; Lalo, Marie; Noel, Thomas; Strzelecki, Alain

    2009-06-01

    The atomization of liquids into a spray is an important process in many industrial applications and particularly in the aero-engine sector. Conventional air-blast injectors in aircraft engines today use aerodynamic shearing effects to atomize the liquid fuel. However, at operating conditions where the air velocity is below 30 m/s (such as ground start and high altitude restart) the atomization quality is poor. Consequently combustion is less efficient with high pollutant emissions. The objective of this study is to validate a new concept of injector which couples the shearing effects with the principle of ultrasonic atomization. The latter consists of using piezoelectric actuators to generate the oscillations of a wall in contact with the liquid film. This excitation perpendicular to the liquid film surface creates Faraday instabilities at the liquid/air interface. Amplitudes higher than a defined threshold value induce the break-up of ligaments and the formation of droplets. To cite this article: M. Boukra et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  1. Simultaneously saccharification and fermentation approach as a tool for enhanced fossil fuels biodesulfurization.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Susana M; Arez, Bruno F; Roseiro, José C; Alves, Luís

    2016-11-01

    Biodesulfurization can be a complementary technology to the hydrodesulfurization, the commonly physical-chemical process used for sulfur removal from crude oil. The desulfurizing bacterium Gordonia alkanivorans strain 1B as a fructophilic microorganism requires fructose as C-source. In this context, the main goal of this work was the optimization of a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) approach using the Zygosaccharomyces bailii strain Talf1 crude enzymes with invertase activity and sucrose as a cheaper fructose-rich commercial C-source (50% fructose) towards dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization by strain 1B. The determination of optimal conditions, for both sucrose hydrolysis and DBT desulfurization was carried out through two sequential experimental uniform designs according to the Doehlert distribution for two factors: pH (5.5-7.5) and temperature (28-38 °C), with the enzyme load of 1.16 U/g/L; and enzyme load (0-4 U/g/L) and temperature (28-38 °C), with pH at 7.5. Based on 2-hydroxybiphenyl production, the analysis of the response surfaces obtained pointed out for pH 7.5, 32 °C and 1.8 U/g/L as optimal conditions. Further optimized SSF of sucrose during the DBT desulfurization process permitted to attain a 4-fold enhanced biodesulfurization. This study opens a new focus of research through the exploitation of sustainable low cost sucrose-rich feedstocks towards a more economical viable bioprocess scale-up. PMID:27505164

  2. Enhanced particulate collection from power plants firing fuels giving rise to ``difficult'' fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Gyllenspetz, J.; Parker, K.R.; Sanyal, A.; Chandran, R.

    1998-07-01

    The problem of particulate emission control from PC fired power plants is exacerbated by coal having a high ash coupled with low sulfur, plus ash having a low sodium oxide and high silica and alumna content. Although bag filters are now being considered as a means of particulate control for certain power plants, the ESP has to date been the traditional control method, in spite of the large specific collection area required for an emission compliance of < 50 mg/Nm{sup 3}. This emission is now demanded by many regulatory bodies and for funding through the World Bank. While new plants are being designed to satisfy this emission, a number of existing plants, even when in satisfactory electro-mechanical condition, face difficulty in meeting compliance. The paper examines the factors relating to high precipitator emissions and presents various scenarios for their reduction by: (a) facilities size increase, (b) flyash conditioning, (c) reduction in back end temperature to reduce gas volume and particle resistivity, and (d) alternative methods of energization, e.g., pulse charging, intermittent energization and high frequency derived DC. The method of enhancement finally selected is site specific and depends on the problem faced by the plant under consideration. The impact of improved combustion on ESP performance is also reviewed and finally the use of bag filters for some retrofit applications is considered as a potential cost effective solution. The improvement methods detailed in the paper should benefit many current ESP upgrading projects and also be of assistance to IPPs considering new plant.

  3. Enhancing Sulfur Tolerance of Ni-Based Cermet Anodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells by Ytterbium-Doped Barium Cerate Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Hua, Bin; Luo, Jing-Li; Jiang, San Ping; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Li, Jian

    2016-04-27

    Conventional anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are Ni-based cermets, which are highly susceptible to deactivation by contaminants in hydrocarbon fuels. Hydrogen sulfide is one of the commonly existed contaminants in readily available natural gas and gasification product gases of pyrolysis of biomasses. Development of sulfur tolerant anode materials is thus one of the critical challenges for commercial viability and practical application of SOFC technologies. Here we report a viable approach to enhance substantially the sulfur poisoning resistance of a Ni-gadolinia-doped ceria (Ni-GDC) anode through impregnation of proton conducting perovskite BaCe0.9Yb0.1O3-δ (BCYb). The impregnation of BCYb nanoparticles improves the electrochemical performance of the Ni-GDC anode in both H2 and H2S containing fuels. Moreover, more importantly, the enhanced stability is observed in 500 ppm of H2S/H2. The SEM and XPS analysis indicate that the infiltrated BCYb fine particles inhibit the adsorption of sulfur and facilitate sulfur removal from active sites, thus preventing the detrimental interaction between sulfur and Ni-GDC and the formation of cerium sulfide. The preliminary results of the cell with the BCYb+Ni-GDC anode in methane fuel containing 5000 ppm of H2S show the promising potential of the BCYb infiltration approach in the development of highly active and stable Ni-GDC-based anodes fed with hydrocarbon fuels containing a high concentration of sulfur compounds. PMID:27052726

  4. Enhanced thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide-silicon carbide composite fuel pellets prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, S.; Mckenna, E.; Baney, R.; Subhash, G.; Tulenko, J.

    2013-02-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO2)-10 vol% silicon carbide (SiC) composite fuel pellets were produced by oxidative sintering and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) at a range of temperatures from 1400 to 1600 °C. Both SiC whiskers and SiC powder particles were utilized. Oxidative sintering was employed over 4 h and the SPS sintering was employed only for 5 min at the highest hold temperature. It was noted that composite pellets sintered by SPS process revealed smaller grain size, reduced formation of chemical products, higher density, and enhanced interfacial contact compared to the pellets made by oxidative sintering. For given volume of SiC, the pellets with powder particles yielded a smaller grain size than pellets with SiC whiskers. Finally thermal conductivity measurements at 100 °C, 500 °C, and 900 °C revealed that SPS sintered UO2-SiC composites exhibited an increase of up to 62% in thermal conductivity compared to UO2 pellets, while the oxidative sintered composite pellets revealed significantly inferior thermal conductivity values. The current study points to the improved processing capabilities of SPS compared to oxidative sintering of UO2-SiC composites.

  5. Graphene/biofilm composites for enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production in a biocathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Song, Tian-Shun; Jin, Yuejuan; Bao, Jingjing; Kang, Dongzhou; Xie, Jingjing

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a simple method of biocathode fabrication in a Cr(VI)-reducing microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated. A self-assembling graphene was decorated onto the biocathode microbially, constructing a graphene/biofilm, in situ. The maximum power density of the MFC with a graphene biocathode is 5.7 times that of the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, resulting in 100% removal of Cr(VI) within 48h, at 40mg/L Cr(VI), compared with only 58.3% removal of Cr(VI) in the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cyclic voltammogram analyses showed that the graphene biocathode had faster electron transfer kinetics than the graphite felt version. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analysis revealed a possible adsorption-reduction mechanism for Cr(VI) reduction via the graphene biocathode. This study attempts to improve the efficiency of the biocathode in the Cr(VI)-reducing MFC, and provides a useful candidate method for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater, under neutral conditions. PMID:27262274

  6. Bioanodes/biocathodes formed at optimal potentials enhance subsequent pentachlorophenol degradation and power generation from microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Wang, Qiang; Quan, Xie; Liu, Yaxuan; Chen, Guohua

    2013-12-01

    Bioanodes formed at an optimal potential of 200 mV vs. SHE and biocathodes developed at -300 mV vs. SHE in bioelectrochemical cells (BECs) enhanced the subsequent performances of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) compared to the un-treated controls. While the startup times were reduced to 320 h (bioanodes) and 420-440 h (biocathodes), PCP degradation rates were improved by 28.5% (bioanodes) and 21.5% (biocathodes), and power production by 41.7% (bioanodes) and 44% (biocathodes). Accordingly, there were less accumulated products of PCP de-chlorination in the biocathodes whereas PCP in the bioanodes was more efficiently de-chlorinated, resulting in the formation of a new product of 3,4,5-trichlorophenol (24.3 ± 2.2 μM at 96 h). Charges were diverted to more generation of electricity in the bioanodes at 200 mV while oxygen in the biocathodes at -300 mV acted as a primary electron acceptor. Dominant bacteria known as recalcitrant organic degraders and/or exoelectrogens/electrotrophs included Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus and Dechlorospirillum sp. on the bioanodes at 200 mV, and Desulfovibrio marrakechensis, Comamonas testosteroni and Comamonas sp. on the biocathodes at -300 mV. These results demonstrated that an optimal potential was a feasible approach for developing both bioanodes and biocathodes for efficient PCP degradation and power generation from MFCs. PMID:23747520

  7. Functionalized carbon nanotube-poly(arylene sulfone) composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells with enhanced performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Pak, Chanho; Kim, Eun Ah; Lee, Yoon Hoi; Chang, Hyuk; Seung, Doyoung; Choi, Yeong Suk; Park, Jong-Bong; Kim, Tae Kyoung

    A new type of composite membrane, consisting of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and sulfonated poly(arylene sulfone) (sPAS), is prepared for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. The CNTs modified with sulfonic acid or PtRu nanopaticles are dispersed within the sPAS matrix by a solution casting method to afford SO 3CNT-sPAS or PtRu/CNT-sPAS composite membranes, respectively. Characterization of the composite membranes reveals that the functionalized CNTs are homogeneously distributed within the sPAS matrix and the composite membranes contain smaller ion clusters than the neat sPAS. The composite membranes exhibit enhanced mechanical properties in terms of tensile strength, strain and toughness, which leads to improvements in ion conductivity and methanol permeability compared with the neat sPAS membrane. In DMFC performance tests, the use of a PtRu/CNT-sPAS membrane yields high power density compared with the neat sPAS membrane, which demonstrates that the improved properties of the composite membranes induce an increase in power density. The strategy for CNT-sPAS composite membranes presented in this work can potentially be extended to other CNT-polymer composite systems.

  8. Enhancement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in estuarine invertebrates by surface runoff at a decommissioned military fuel depot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, A.K.; Roster, N.

    1999-01-01

    Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) and shore crabs (Hemigrapsus sp.) at a recently closed military fuel depot in central San Francisco Bay, California. In April 1996, during a period of above average precipitation, specimens were collected at the depot, near the depot, and at sites 10 and 20 km south of the depot. Four weeks after the rains ended, blue mussels were again collected at the depot, and at two additional sites in the central Bay region. In April, total PAHs in mussels from the depot were significantly higher only than that in mussels collected 20 km from the depot; however, seven specific, substituted PAHs were higher at the depot than at all other sites. In June, only two of the 38 PAHs common in mussels in April were detected at the depot; these concentrations were comparable to ambient concentrations in mussels at the Bay. It seemed that bioavailability of PAHs at the depot was enhanced by rainfall, probably due to the mobilization of PAHs via groundwater into the Bay. Concentrations in mussels from chronically contaminated sites were about five times higher than mussels collected from the depot. Low PAH concentrations were detected in shore crabs near the depot, and the highest levels were not associated with the depot. Observed PAH concentrations are discussed in relation to upper trophic organisms.

  9. Bifunctional Manganese Ferrite/Polyaniline Hybrid as Electrode Material for Enhanced Energy Recovery in Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Khilari, Santimoy; Pandit, Soumya; Varanasi, Jhansi L; Das, Debabrata; Pradhan, Debabrata

    2015-09-23

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are emerging as a sustainable technology for waste to energy conversion where electrode materials play a vital role on its performance. Platinum (Pt) is the most common material used as cathode catalyst in the MFCs. However, the high cost and low earth abundance associated with Pt prompt the researcher to explore inexpensive catalysts. The present study demonstrates a noble metal-free MFC using a manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4)/polyaniline (PANI)-based electrode material. The MnFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs) and MnFe2O4 NPs/PANI hybrid composite not only exhibited superior oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity for the air cathode but also enhanced anode half-cell potential upon modifying carbon cloth anode in the single-chambered MFC. This is attributed to the improved extracellular electron transfer of exoelectrogens due to Fe(3+) in MnFe2O4 and its capacitive nature. The present work demonstrates for the first time the dual property of MnFe2O4 NPs/PANI, i.e., as cathode catalyst and an anode modifier, thereby promising cost-effective MFCs for practical applications. PMID:26315619

  10. Experimental Substantiation, Testing, and Commissioning of a Novel Separation System for Steam Generators of Nuclear Power Plants with VVER-1000 Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, B. I.; Ageev, A. G.; Blinkov, V. N.; Vasil'eva, R. V.; Korol'kov, B. M.; Dragunov, Yu. G.; Trunov, N. B.; Nekrasov, A. V.; Ilyushin, V. F.

    2003-03-15

    The separation system of a PGV-1000 steam generator is modernized on the basis of bench tests of model PGV-1000 steam generators, full-scale tests of steam generators, and computational analysis of the results of these tests. The changes concern the configuration of the submerged plate and replacement of the louver separator by a receiver baffle. These measures increase the marginal evaporative capacity and the permissible range of variation of the water level, decrease the moisture content at the outlet from the steam generator, and improve the conditions for control and repair of its internal surface.

  11. The effect of biological shielding on fast neutron and photon transport in the VVER-1000 mock-up model placed in the LR-0 reactor.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Cvachovec, František; Milčák, Ján; Mravec, Filip

    2013-05-01

    The paper is intended to show the effect of a biological shielding simulator on fast neutron and photon transport in its vicinity. The fast neutron and photon fluxes were measured by means of scintillation spectroscopy using a 45×45 mm(2) and a 10×10 mm(2) cylindrical stilbene detector. The neutron spectrum was measured in the range of 0.6-10 MeV and the photon spectrum in 0.2-9 MeV. The results of the experiment are compared with calculations. The calculations were performed with various nuclear data libraries. PMID:23434890

  12. IMPACTT5A model : enhancements and modifications since December 1994 - with special reference to the effect of tripled-fuel-economy vehicles on fuel-cycle energy and emissions.

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M. M.; Saricks, C. L.

    1999-08-28

    Version 5A of the Integrated Market Penetration and Anticipated Cost of Transportation Technologies (IMPACTT5A) model is a spreadsheet-based set of algorithms that calculates the effects of advanced-technology vehicles on baseline fuel use and emissions. Outputs of this Argonne National Laboratory-developed model include estimates of (1) energy use and emissions attributable to conventional-technology vehicles under a baseline scenario and (2) energy use and emissions attributable to advanced- and conventional-technology vehicles under an alternative market-penetration scenario. Enhancements to IMPACIT made after its initial documentation in December 1994 have enabled it to deal with a wide range of fuel and propulsion system technologies included in Argonne's GREET model in a somewhat modified three-phased approach. Vehicle stocks are still projected in the largely unchanged STOCK module. Vehicle-miles traveled, fuel use, and oil displacement by advanced-technology vehicles are projected in an updated USAGE module. Now, both modules can incorporate vehicle efficiency and fuel share profiles consistent with those of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. Finally, fuel-cycle emissions of carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, toxics, and greenhouse gases are computed in the EMISSIONS module via an interface with the GREET model that was developed specifically to perform such calculations. Because of this interface, results are now more broadly informative than were results from earlier versions of IMPACTT.

  13. Generating power from cellulose in an alkaline fuel cell enhanced by methyl viologen as an electron-transfer catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Miaoqing; Liu, Xianhua; Feng, Mengnan; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Guangyi

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we developed a single-compartment direct cellulose alkaline fuel cell by using nickel foam as the anode and methyl viologen as an electron transfer catalyst. The maximum power density of the fuel cell at optimal conditions is 450 mW m-2. High-performance liquid chromatography detected short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids in the oxidation products. Using common reed and red algae as fuels, the fuel cell achieved maximum power densities of 295 mW m-2 and 154 mW m-2, respectively.

  14. Silver/iron oxide/graphitic carbon composites as bacteriostatic catalysts for enhancing oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong; Fu, Honggang

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms from anode heterotrophic bacteria are inevitably formed over cathodic catalytic sites, limiting the performances of single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Graphitic carbon (GC) - based nano silver/iron oxide (AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC) composites are prepared from waste pomelo skin and used as antibacterial oxygen reduction catalysts for MFCs. AgNPs and Fe3O4 are introduced in situ into the composites by one-step carbothermal reduction, enhancing their conductivity and catalytic activity. To investigate the effects of Fe species on the antibacterial and catalytic properties, AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC is washed with sulfuric acid (1 mol L-1) for 0.5 h, 1 h, and 5 h and marked as AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-x (x = 0.5 h, 1 h and 5 h, respectively). A maximum power density of 1712 ± 35 mW m-2 is obtained by AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-1 h, which declines by 4.12% after 17 cycles. Under catalysis of all AgNP-containing catalysts, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds via the 4e- pathway, and no toxic effects to anode microorganisms result from inhibiting the cathodic biofilm overgrowth. With the exception of AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-5 h, the AgNPs-containing composites exhibit remarkable power output and coulombic efficiency through lowering proton transfer resistance and air-cathode biofouling. This study provides a perspective for the practical application of MFCs using these efficient antibacterial ORR catalysts.

  15. Three-dimensional graphene/Pt nanoparticle composites as freestanding anode for enhancing performance of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shenlong; Li, Yuchen; Yin, Huajie; Liu, Zhouzhou; Luan, Enxiao; Zhao, Feng; Tang, Zhiyong; Liu, Shaoqin

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are able to directly convert about 50 to 90% of energy from oxidation of organic matters in waste to electricity and have great potential application in broad fields such as wastewater treatment. Unfortunately, the power density of the MFCs at present is significantly lower than the theoretical value because of technical limitations including low bacteria loading capacity and difficult electron transfer between the bacteria and the electrode. We reported a three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogel (GA) decorated with platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as an efficient freestanding anode for MFCs. The 3D GA/Pt-based anode has a continuous 3D macroporous structure that is favorable for microorganism immobilization and efficient electrolyte transport. Moreover, GA scaffold is homogenously decorated with Pt NPs to further enhance extracellular charge transfer between the bacteria and the anode. The MFCs constructed with 3D GA/Pt-based anode generate a remarkable maximum power density of 1460 mW/m(2), 5.3 times higher than that based on carbon cloth (273 mW/m(2)). It deserves to be stressed that 1460 mW/m(2) obtained from the GA/Pt anode shows the superior performance among all the reported MFCs inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Moreover, as a demonstration of the real application, the MFC equipped with the freestanding GA/Pt anode has been successfully applied in driving timer for the first time, which opens the avenue toward the real application of the MFCs. PMID:26702430

  16. Three-dimensional graphene/Pt nanoparticle composites as freestanding anode for enhancing performance of microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shenlong; Li, Yuchen; Yin, Huajie; Liu, Zhouzhou; Luan, Enxiao; Zhao, Feng; Tang, Zhiyong; Liu, Shaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are able to directly convert about 50 to 90% of energy from oxidation of organic matters in waste to electricity and have great potential application in broad fields such as wastewater treatment. Unfortunately, the power density of the MFCs at present is significantly lower than the theoretical value because of technical limitations including low bacteria loading capacity and difficult electron transfer between the bacteria and the electrode. We reported a three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogel (GA) decorated with platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as an efficient freestanding anode for MFCs. The 3D GA/Pt–based anode has a continuous 3D macroporous structure that is favorable for microorganism immobilization and efficient electrolyte transport. Moreover, GA scaffold is homogenously decorated with Pt NPs to further enhance extracellular charge transfer between the bacteria and the anode. The MFCs constructed with 3D GA/Pt–based anode generate a remarkable maximum power density of 1460 mW/m2, 5.3 times higher than that based on carbon cloth (273 mW/m2). It deserves to be stressed that 1460 mW/m2 obtained from the GA/Pt anode shows the superior performance among all the reported MFCs inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Moreover, as a demonstration of the real application, the MFC equipped with the freestanding GA/Pt anode has been successfully applied in driving timer for the first time, which opens the avenue toward the real application of the MFCs. PMID:26702430

  17. Rapid, online quantification of H2S in JP-8 fuel reformate using near-infrared cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Feng; Junaedi, Christian; Roychoudhury, Subir; Gupta, Manish

    2011-06-01

    One of the key challenges in reforming military fuels for use with fuel cells is their high sulfur content, which can poison the fuel cell anodes. Sulfur-tolerant fuel reformers can convert this sulfur into H(2)S and then use a desulfurizing bed to remove it prior to the fuel cell. In order to optimize and verify this desulfurization process, a gas-phase sulfur analyzer is required to measure H(2)S at low concentrations (<1 ppm(v)) in the presence of other reforming gases (e.g., 25-30% H(2), 10-15% H(2)O, 15% CO, 5% CO(2), 35-40% N(2), and trace amounts of light hydrocarbons). In this work, we utilize near-infrared cavity-enhanced optical absorption spectroscopy (off-axis ICOS) to quantify H(2)S in a JP-8 fuel reformer product stream. The sensor provides rapid (2 s), highly precise (±0.1 ppm(v)) measurements of H(2)S in reformate gases over a wide dynamic range (0-1000 ppm(v)) with a low detection limit (3σ = ±0.09 ppm(v) in 1 s) and minimal cross-interferences from other present species. It simultaneously quantifies CO(2) (±0.2%), CH(4) (±150 ppm(v)), C(2)H(4) (±30 ppm(v)), and H(2)O (±300 ppm(v)) in the reformed gas for a better characterization of the fuel reforming process. Other potential applications of this technology include measurement of coal syngas and H(2)S in natural gas. By including additional near-infrared, distributive feedback diode lasers, the instrument can also be extended to other reformate species, including CO and H(2). PMID:21486070

  18. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2005-10-03

    The Design Team continues to conference this quarter albeit not as often. Primary focus this quarter is the continued procurement of material, receiving, and construction/installation. Phase 1 extension recommendation, and subsequent new project estimate. Forms 424 and 4600 were submitted to Ms. Zysk. The NETL technology team subsequently agreed that the increase is justified and made their recommendation to DOE HQ. All major mechanical equipment was delivered this quarter. Three hot water in-bed coils are all that remains for delivery. Two of the five are installed above the dryer air distribution bed. The dryer, baghouse, bucket elevator, control room, exhaust fan, process ductwork, and piping have all been installed. The mezzanine level over the inlet ductwork for access to the dryer was installed. Instrumentation was delivered and locations were identified. Cable is being pulled and connections made from the Control Room to the Motor Control Center. ''Emergency Stop'' equipment logic conditions were discussed and finalized. The functional description was competed and reviewed with Honeywell Controls. Piping & Instrument diagrams are completed. Some electrical schematics have been delivered for equipment south of Q-line. Dry & Wet coal conveyors are not completed. The exhaust chimney was installed. An Open House and ribbon cutting took place on August 9th. GRE project manager gave a presentation of the technology. Joe Strakey, NETL, also spoke. The Open House was attended by Governor Hoevon and Senator Conrad who also spoke about Clean Coal and helped kick-off Blue Flint ethanol and a potential Liquefaction plant. The deign team met the following day to discuss test plan and progress update. Headwaters Energy Incorporated also attended the Open House. A meeting was conducted with them to begin planning for the marketing and finalize our memorandum of understanding. Headwaters still plans to contact all US lignite plants and all bituminous plants who have switched to PRB. Major pieces of equipment received this quarter included the Dryer, Exhaust Fan, additional duct work, and control cabinets.

  19. LIGNITE FUEL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2005-02-07

    The Design Team continued to conference this quarter. Their primary task during this timeframe was to finalize the dryer design based on information learned from the NDIC Pilot work and detailed design discussions at Barr offices in August. Heyl-Patterson was tasked with incorporating all comments and drafting drawings. They submitted a preliminary proposal which spawned detailed discussions about tube bundle, air locks, and fire suppression systems. The type of fire protection specified dictated the final structural arrangement. Three meetings were spent discussing the pro's and con's of suppression vs. ventilation systems. In the end, the dryer and bucket elevator will have suppression systems and the remaining equipment will be explosion vented. This is in agreement with GRE's current insurer, FM Global. Three inlet airlocks were reduced to two and four outlets were reduced to three. The inlet plenum was subdivided for greater flexibility and sparging air added in the outlet plenum. It was also decided to use bundles with varied material, diameter, and tube & fin spacing. This will be completed in an effort to identify for us which configuration has the best heat transfer characteristics using coal as the fluidizing medium. The dryer will also be delivered in four pieces. This will allow for installation through the current access door on the Air Heater deck. The Input/Output list and functional description was completed and forwarded to Honeywell to finalize controls. Major pieces of equipment received this quarter were the Bucket Elevator, Liewell Screen, conveyors, and Motor Control Center. ICI completed removal of the wall separating Silo 28 from the dryer area; handrail and grating between the two areas has also been removed. They relocated a blowdown line. They moved an Air Heater basket access hatch.

  20. Technical Project Plan for The Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Oxide Fuels Through the Addition of High Thermal Conductivity Fibers and Microstructural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Besmann, Theodore M; Armstrong, Beth L; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Lin, Hua-Tay; Ellis, Ronald James; Becher, Paul F; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Voit, Stewart L

    2010-09-01

    The commercial nuclear power industry is investing heavily in advanced fuels that can produce higher power levels with a higher safety margin and be produced at low cost. Although chemically stable and inexpensive to manufacture, the in-core performance of UO{sub 2} fuel is limited by its low thermal conductivity. There will be enormous financial benefits to any utility that can exploit a new type of fuel that is chemically stable, has a high thermal conductivity, and is inexpensive to manufacture. At reactor operating temperatures, UO{sub 2} has a very low thermal conductivity (<5 W/m {center_dot}K), which decreases with temperature and fuel burnup. This low thermal conductivity limits the rate at which energy can be removed from the fuel, thus limiting the total integrated reactor power. If the fuel thermal conductivity could be increased, nuclear reactors would be able to operate at higher powers and larger safety margins thus decreasing the overall cost of electricity by increasing the power output from existing reactors and decreasing the number of new electrical generating plants needed to meet base load demand. The objective of the work defined herein is to produce an advanced nuclear fuel based on the current UO{sub 2} fuel with superior thermal conductivity and structural integrity that is suitable for current and future nuclear reactors, using the existing fuel fabrication infrastructure with minimal modifications. There are two separate components to the research: (1) Enhanced Thermal Conductivity (ETC) - adding high conductivity fibers to the UO{sub 2} prior to sintering, which act as conduits for moving the heat energy generated within the pellet to the outer surface, (2) Microstructural Engineering (ME) - adding second phase particulates to UO{sub 2} bodies to retard grain growth and to increase thermal conductivity, as well as improve fracture and creep resistance. Different groups will perform the laboratory work for each of these research

  1. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J; Lee, C; Day, D; Wall, M; Saw, C; MoberlyChan, W; Farmer, J; Boussoufl, M; Liu, B; Egbert, H; Branagan, D; D'Amato, A

    2006-11-13

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, etc.). Neutron multiplication and the potential for criticality are enhanced by the presence of a moderator during cask loading in water, water incursion in accidents conditions during spent fuel storage or transport. To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, Boral{trademark}, Metamic{trademark}, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant material (HPCRM) can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance for many naval applications raises the interest in applying the HPCRM to USDOE/OCRWM spent fuel management program. The fact that the HPCRM relies on the high content of boron to make the material amorphous--an essential property for corrosion resistance--and that the boron has to be homogeneously distributed in the HPCRM qualify the material to be a neutron poison.

  2. Enhancement of direct urea-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell performance by three-dimensional porous nickel-cobalt anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fen; Cao, Dianxue; Du, Mengmeng; Ye, Ke; Wang, Guiling; Zhang, Wenping; Gao, Yinyi; Cheng, Kui

    2016-03-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) porous nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) film on nickel foam is successfully prepared and further used as an efficient anode for direct urea-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DUHPFC). By varying the cobalt/nickel mole ratios into 0%, 20%, 50%, 80% and 100%, the optimized Ni-Co/Ni foam anode with a ratio of 80% is obtained in terms of the best cell performance among five anodes. Effects of the KOH and urea concentrations, the flow rate and operation temperature on the fuel cell performance are investigated. Results show DUHPFC with the 3D Ni-Co/Ni foam anode exhibits a higher performance than those reported direct urea fuel cells. The cell gives an open circuit voltage of 0.83 V and a peak power density as high as 17.4 and 31.5 mW cm-2 at 20 °C and 70 °C, respectively, when operating on 7.0 mol L-1 KOH and 0.5 mol L-1 urea as the fuel at a flow rate of 15 mL min-1. Besides, when the human urine is directly fed as the fuel, direct urine-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell reaches a maximum power density of 7.5 mW cm-2 with an open circuit voltage of 0.80 V at 20 °C, showing a good application prospect in wastewater treatment.

  3. Enhanced Monopropellant Fuel Decomposition by High Aspect Ratio, Catalytic CNT Structures for Propulsion of Small Scale Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, Kevin; Claussen, Jonathan; Iverson, Brian

    2014-11-01

    Both maneuverability and efficiency for reagent-based propulsion systems of small-scale exploratory devices, such as autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), is largely dependent on their maximum fuel decomposition rate. Reagent-based systems, however, require large catalyst surface area to fuel volume ratios in order to achieve the fuel decomposition rates necessary for locomotion. This work demonstrates the utility of platinum-coated, carbon nanotube (CNT) scaffolds as high surface area catalysts for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a flowing environment. Usage of these functionalized microchannels ensures that both the maximum distance between fuel and catalyst is only half the microchannel diameter, and that the fuel concentration gradient increases due to boundary-layer thinning. These conditions facilitate intimate contact between fuel and catalyst and, therefore, faster decomposition rates. Electrochemical testing revealed that electroactive surface area to volume ratios of approximately 61.4 cm-1 can be achieved for samples fabricated using a static Pt deposition scheme. Thrust measurements were taken using a small-scale submersible which indicated a maximum thrust of 0.114 N using 50 weight percent H2O2 exposed to eight inline 2.867 cm2 Pt-CNT scaffolds.

  4. Fuel blends: Enhanced electro-oxidation of formic acid in its blend with methanol at platinum nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Deab, Mohamed S.; El-Nagar, Gumaa A.; Mohammad, Ahmad M.; El-Anadouli, Bahgat E.

    2015-07-01

    The current study addresses, for the first time, the enhanced direct electro-oxidation of formic acid (FA) at platinum-nanoparticles modified glassy carbon (nano-Pt/GC) electrode in the presence of methanol (MeOH) as a blending fuel. This enhancement is probed by: (i) the increase of the direct oxidation current of FA to CO2 (Ipd, dehydrogenation pathway), (ii) suppressing the dehydration pathway (Ipind, producing the poisoning intermediate CO) and (iii) a favorable negative shift of the onset potential of Ibd with increasing the mole fraction of MeOH in the blend. Furthermore, the charge of the direct FA oxidation in 0.3 M FA + 0.3 M MeOH blend is by 14 and 21times higher than that observed for 0.3 M FA and 0.3 M MeOH, respectively. MeOH is believed to adsorb at the Pt surface sites and thus disfavor the "non-faradaic" dissociation of FA (which produces the poisoning CO intermediate), i.e., MeOH induces a high CO tolerance of the Pt catalyst. The enhanced oxidation activity indicates that FA/MeOH blend is a promising fuel system.

  5. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  6. Pt-free carbon-based fuel cell catalyst prepared from spherical polyimide for enhanced oxygen diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabae, Yuta; Nagata, Shinsuke; Hayakawa, Teruaki; Niwa, Hideharu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Isoda, Ayano; Matsunaga, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kazuhisa; Aoki, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    The development of a non-precious metal (NPM) fuel cell catalyst is extremely important to achieve globalization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells due to the cost and scarcity of platinum. Here, we report on a NPM cathode catalyst prepared by the pyrolysis of spherical polyimide nanoparticles that contain small amounts of Fe additive. 60 nm diameter Fe-containing polyimide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization of pyromellitic acid dianhydride and 1,3,5-tris(4-aminophenyl)benzene with Fe(acac)3 (acac = acetylacetonate) as an additive. The particles were subsequently carbonized by multistep pyrolysis to obtain the NPM catalyst while retaining the small particle size. The catalyst has good performance and promising durability for fuel cell applications. The fuel cell performance under a 0.2 MPa air atmosphere at 80 °C of 1.0 A cm‑2 at 0.46 V is especially remarkable and better than that previously reported.

  7. Pt-free carbon-based fuel cell catalyst prepared from spherical polyimide for enhanced oxygen diffusion.

    PubMed

    Nabae, Yuta; Nagata, Shinsuke; Hayakawa, Teruaki; Niwa, Hideharu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Isoda, Ayano; Matsunaga, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kazuhisa; Aoki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    The development of a non-precious metal (NPM) fuel cell catalyst is extremely important to achieve globalization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells due to the cost and scarcity of platinum. Here, we report on a NPM cathode catalyst prepared by the pyrolysis of spherical polyimide nanoparticles that contain small amounts of Fe additive. 60 nm diameter Fe-containing polyimide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization of pyromellitic acid dianhydride and 1,3,5-tris(4-aminophenyl)benzene with Fe(acac)3 (acac = acetylacetonate) as an additive. The particles were subsequently carbonized by multistep pyrolysis to obtain the NPM catalyst while retaining the small particle size. The catalyst has good performance and promising durability for fuel cell applications. The fuel cell performance under a 0.2 MPa air atmosphere at 80 °C of 1.0 A cm(-2) at 0.46 V is especially remarkable and better than that previously reported. PMID:26987682

  8. Pt-free carbon-based fuel cell catalyst prepared from spherical polyimide for enhanced oxygen diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Nabae, Yuta; Nagata, Shinsuke; Hayakawa, Teruaki; Niwa, Hideharu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Isoda, Ayano; Matsunaga, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kazuhisa; Aoki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    The development of a non-precious metal (NPM) fuel cell catalyst is extremely important to achieve globalization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells due to the cost and scarcity of platinum. Here, we report on a NPM cathode catalyst prepared by the pyrolysis of spherical polyimide nanoparticles that contain small amounts of Fe additive. 60 nm diameter Fe-containing polyimide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization of pyromellitic acid dianhydride and 1,3,5-tris(4-aminophenyl)benzene with Fe(acac)3 (acac = acetylacetonate) as an additive. The particles were subsequently carbonized by multistep pyrolysis to obtain the NPM catalyst while retaining the small particle size. The catalyst has good performance and promising durability for fuel cell applications. The fuel cell performance under a 0.2 MPa air atmosphere at 80 °C of 1.0 A cm−2 at 0.46 V is especially remarkable and better than that previously reported. PMID:26987682

  9. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  10. Water vapor exchange system using a hydrophilic microporous layer coated gas diffusion layer to enhance performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells without cathode humidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, Tatsumi; Nakajima, Hironori; Morishita, Masashi

    2012-09-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) generally have external humidifiers to supply humidified hydrogen and oxidant gases, which prevents dehydration of the membrane. If a PEFC could be operated without humidification, then external humidifiers could be removed, which would result in a simplified PEFC system with increased total efficiency and reduced cost. A water vapor exchange system installed in the PEFC was developed to enhance the performance without cathode humidification. A gas diffusion layer (GDL) coated with a hydrophobic microporous layer (MPL) was used at the active reaction area. A GDL coated with a hydrophilic MPL consisting of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and carbon black was used at the cathode water vapor exchange area to promote water transport from the cathode outlet wet gas to the anode inlet dry gas. This is effective for reducing the IR overpotential, which enhances the PEFC performance. Appropriate enhancement of hydrophilicity by increasing the PVA content in the MPL to 20 mass% is effective to increase water transport from the cathode to anode. At the anode water exchange area, a GDL without the hydrophilic MPL is effective to promote water transport from the water exchange area to the active reaction area, which enhances the PEFC performance.