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Sample records for enhancement mri distinguishes

  1. Distinguishing intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma from poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma using precontrast and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Asayama, Yoshiki; Nishie, Akihiro; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yukihisa; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Kubo, Yuichiro; Aishima, Shinichi; Shirabe, Ken; Yoshiura, Takashi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to gain further insight in magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of mass-forming intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (mICC), its enhancement pattern with gadoxetic acid contrast agent, and distinction from poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC). METHODS Fourteen mICC and 22 pHCC nodules were included in this study. Two observers recorded the tumor shape, intratumoral hemorrhage, fat on chemical shift imaging, signal intensity at the center of the tumor on T2-weighted image, fibrous capsule, enhancement pattern on arterial phase of dynamic study, late enhancement three minutes after contrast injection (dynamic late phase), contrast uptake on hepatobiliary phase, apparent diffusion coefficient, vascular invasion, and intrahepatic metastasis. RESULTS Late enhancement was more common in mICC (n=10, 71%) than in pHCC (n=3, 14%) (P < 0.001). A fat component was observed in 11 pHCC cases (50%) versus none of mICC cases (P = 0.002). Fibrous capsule was observed in 13 pHCC cases (59%) versus none of mICC cases (P < 0.001). On T2-weighted images a hypointense area was seen at the center of the tumor in 43% of mICC (6/14) and 9% of pHCC (2/22) cases (P = 0.018). Other parameters were not significantly different between the two types of nodules. CONCLUSION The absence of fat and fibrous capsule, and presence of enhancement at three minutes appear to be most characteristic for mICC and may help its differentiation from pHCC. PMID:25698097

  2. On the distinguishability of HRF models in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Paulo N; Figueiredo, Patricia; Silvestre, Carlos J

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF) is a critical step in fMRI studies of brain activity, and it is often desirable to estimate HRF parameters with physiological interpretability. A biophysically informed model of the HRF can be described by a non-linear time-invariant dynamic system. However, the identification of this dynamic system may leave much uncertainty on the exact values of the parameters. Moreover, the high noise levels in the data may hinder the model estimation task. In this context, the estimation of the HRF may be seen as a problem of model falsification or invalidation, where we are interested in distinguishing among a set of eligible models of dynamic systems. Here, we propose a systematic tool to determine the distinguishability among a set of physiologically plausible HRF models. The concept of absolutely input-distinguishable systems is introduced and applied to a biophysically informed HRF model, by exploiting the structure of the underlying non-linear dynamic system. A strategy to model uncertainty in the input time-delay and magnitude is developed and its impact on the distinguishability of two physiologically plausible HRF models is assessed, in terms of the maximum noise amplitude above which it is not possible to guarantee the falsification of one model in relation to another. Finally, a methodology is proposed for the choice of the input sequence, or experimental paradigm, that maximizes the distinguishability of the HRF models under investigation. The proposed approach may be used to evaluate the performance of HRF model estimation techniques from fMRI data. PMID:26106322

  3. On the distinguishability of HRF models in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Paulo N.; Figueiredo, Patricia; Silvestre, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF) is a critical step in fMRI studies of brain activity, and it is often desirable to estimate HRF parameters with physiological interpretability. A biophysically informed model of the HRF can be described by a non-linear time-invariant dynamic system. However, the identification of this dynamic system may leave much uncertainty on the exact values of the parameters. Moreover, the high noise levels in the data may hinder the model estimation task. In this context, the estimation of the HRF may be seen as a problem of model falsification or invalidation, where we are interested in distinguishing among a set of eligible models of dynamic systems. Here, we propose a systematic tool to determine the distinguishability among a set of physiologically plausible HRF models. The concept of absolutely input-distinguishable systems is introduced and applied to a biophysically informed HRF model, by exploiting the structure of the underlying non-linear dynamic system. A strategy to model uncertainty in the input time-delay and magnitude is developed and its impact on the distinguishability of two physiologically plausible HRF models is assessed, in terms of the maximum noise amplitude above which it is not possible to guarantee the falsification of one model in relation to another. Finally, a methodology is proposed for the choice of the input sequence, or experimental paradigm, that maximizes the distinguishability of the HRF models under investigation. The proposed approach may be used to evaluate the performance of HRF model estimation techniques from fMRI data. PMID:26106322

  4. Distinguishing prostate cancer from benign confounders via a cascaded classifier on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litjens, G. J. S.; Elliott, R.; Shih, N.; Feldman, M.; Barentsz, J. O.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C. A.; Kovacs, I.; Huisman, H. J.; Madabhushi, A.

    2014-03-01

    Learning how to separate benign confounders from prostate cancer is important because the imaging characteristics of these confounders are poorly understood. Furthermore, the typical representations of the MRI parameters might not be enough to allow discrimination. The diagnostic uncertainty this causes leads to a lower diagnostic accuracy. In this paper a new cascaded classifier is introduced to separate prostate cancer and benign confounders on MRI in conjunction with specific computer-extracted features to distinguish each of the benign classes (benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), inflammation, atrophy or prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PIN). In this study we tried to (1) calculate different mathematical representations of the MRI parameters which more clearly express subtle differences between different classes, (2) learn which of the MRI image features will allow to distinguish specific benign confounders from prostate cancer, and (2) find the combination of computer-extracted MRI features to best discriminate cancer from the confounding classes using a cascaded classifier. One of the most important requirements for identifying MRI signatures for adenocarcinoma, BPH, atrophy, inflammation, and PIN is accurate mapping of the location and spatial extent of the confounder and cancer categories from ex vivo histopathology to MRI. Towards this end we employed an annotated prostatectomy data set of 31 patients, all of whom underwent a multi-parametric 3 Tesla MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. The prostatectomy slides were carefully co-registered to the corresponding MRI slices using an elastic registration technique. We extracted texture features from the T2-weighted imaging, pharmacokinetic features from the dynamic contrast enhanced imaging and diffusion features from the diffusion-weighted imaging for each of the confounder classes and prostate cancer. These features were selected because they form the mainstay of clinical diagnosis. Relevant features for each of the classes were selected using maximum relevance minimum redundancy feature selection, allowing us to perform classifier independent feature selection. The selected features were then incorporated in a cascading classifier, which can focus on easier sub-tasks at each stage, leaving the more difficult classification tasks for later stages. Results show that distinct features are relevant for each of the benign classes, for example the fraction of extra-vascular, extra-cellular space in a voxel is a clear discriminator for inflammation. Furthermore, the cascaded classifier outperforms both multi-class and one-shot classifiers in overall accuracy for discriminating confounders from cancer: 0.76 versus 0.71 and 0.62.

  5. Distinguishing Grammatical Constructions with fMRI Pattern Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kachina; Pereira, Francisco; Botvinick, Matthew; Goldberg, Adele E.

    2012-01-01

    All linguistic and psycholinguistic theories aim to provide psychologically valid analyses of particular grammatical patterns and the relationships that hold among them. Until recently, no tools were available to distinguish neural correlates of particular grammatical constructions that shared the same content words, propositional meaning, and…

  6. Distinguishing the Magnetorotational Instability (MRI) from Magnetized Ekman Flows in the PPPL MRI Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Caspary, Kyle; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao; Schartman, Ethan; Wei, Xing

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented from initial experiments on the upgraded Magnetorotational Instability (MRI) experiment that uses GaInSn as the working fluid and now operates with conductive end caps to improve the coupling of angular momentum to the fluid to increase the saturation amplitude of the MRI signal. Measurements of the fluid velocity field and perturbed magnetic field over a range of magnetic Reynolds numbers, Rm , and Lundquist numbers, S, are compared with results from the SFEMaNS code in order to separate the effects of MRI on the system from effects such as Ekman flows and Shercliff layer instabilities. The MRI can be identified by observing its growth rate, noting the relative magnitudes and spatial distributions of the perturbed radial flow velocity ur and radial magnetic field Br, and measuring the scaling of ur and Br with Rm . The clear identification of the onset of MRI in the apparatus is complicated by the geometry and boundary conditions creating an imperfect supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. Nevertheless, a stability diagram can be created that shows that MRI is a weak-field instability that occurs only below a certain value of the normalized magnetic field S / Rm but above a threshold where viscous effects damps the growth of the instability.

  7. Texture descriptors to distinguish radiation necrosis from recurrent brain tumors on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Prasanna, Prateek; Rogers, Lisa; Wolansky, Leo; Badve, Chaitra; Sloan, Andrew; Cohen, Mark; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Di erentiating radiation necrosis (a radiation induced treatment e ect) from recurrent brain tumors (rBT) is currently one of the most clinically challenging problems in care and management of brain tumor (BT) patients. Both radiation necrosis (RN), and rBT exhibit similar morphological appearance on standard MRI making non-invasive diagnosis extremely challenging for clinicians, with surgical intervention being the only course for obtaining de nitive ground truth". Recent studies have reported that the underlying biological pathways de n- ing RN and rBT are fundamentally di erent. This strongly suggests that there might be phenotypic di erences and hence cues on multi-parametric MRI, that can distinguish between the two pathologies. One challenge is that these di erences, if they exist, might be too subtle to distinguish by the human observer. In this work, we explore the utility of computer extracted texture descriptors on multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) to provide alternate representations of MRI that may be capable of accentuating subtle micro-architectural di erences between RN and rBT for primary and metastatic (MET) BT patients. We further explore the utility of texture descriptors in identifying the MRI protocol (from amongst T1-w, T2-w and FLAIR) that best distinguishes RN and rBT across two independent cohorts of primary and MET patients. A set of 119 texture descriptors (co-occurrence matrix homogeneity, neighboring gray-level dependence matrix, multi-scale Gaussian derivatives, Law features, and histogram of gradient orientations (HoG)) for modeling di erent macro and micro-scale morphologic changes within the treated lesion area for each MRI protocol were extracted. Principal component analysis based variable importance projection (PCA-VIP), a feature selection method previously developed in our group, was employed to identify the importance of every texture descriptor in distinguishing RN and rBT on MP-MRI. PCA-VIP employs regression analysis to provide an importance score to each feature based on their ability to distinguish the two classes (RN/rBT). The top performing features identi ed via PCA-VIP were employed within a random- forest classi er to di erentiate RN from rBT across two cohorts of 20 primary and 22 MET patients. Our results revealed that, (a) HoG features at di erent orientations were the most important image features for both cohorts, suggesting inherent orientation di erences between RN, and rBT, (b) inverse di erence moment (capturing local intensity homogeneity), and Laws features (capturing local edges and gradients) were identi ed as important for both cohorts, and (c) Gd-C T1-w MRI was identi ed, across the two cohorts, as the best MRI protocol in distinguishing RN/rBT.

  8. Texture Descriptors to distinguish Radiation Necrosis from Recurrent Brain Tumors on multi-parametric MRI.

    PubMed

    Pallavi, Tiwari; Prateek, Prasanna; Lisa, Rogers; Leo, Wolansky; Chaitra, Badve; Andrew, Sloan; Mark, Cohen; Anant, Madabhushi

    2014-01-01

    Differentiating radiation necrosis (a radiation induced treatment effect) from recurrent brain tumors (rBT) is currently one of the most clinically challenging problems in care and management of brain tumor (BT) patients. Both radiation necrosis (RN), and rBT exhibit similar morphological appearance on standard MRI making non-invasive diagnosis extremely challenging for clinicians, with surgical intervention being the only course for obtaining definitive "ground truth". Recent studies have reported that the underlying biological pathways defining RN and rBT are fundamentally different. This strongly suggests that there might be phenotypic differences and hence cues on multi-parametric MRI, that can distinguish between the two pathologies. One challenge is that these differences, if they exist, might be too subtle to distinguish by the human observer. In this work, we explore the utility of computer extracted texture descriptors on multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) to provide alternate representations of MRI that may be capable of accentuating subtle micro-architectural differences between RN and rBT for primary and metastatic (MET) BT patients. We further explore the utility of texture descriptors in identifying the MRI protocol (from amongst T1-w, T2-w and FLAIR) that best distinguishes RN and rBT across two independent cohorts of primary and MET patients. A set of 119 texture descriptors (co-occurrence matrix homogeneity, neighboring gray-level dependence matrix, multi-scale Gaussian derivatives, Law features, and histogram of gradient orientations (HoG)) for modeling different macro and micro-scale morphologic changes within the treated lesion area for each MRI protocol were extracted. Principal component analysis based variable importance projection (PCA-VIP), a feature selection method previously developed in our group, was employed to identify the importance of every texture descriptor in distinguishing RN and rBT on MP-MRI. PCA-VIP employs regression analysis to provide an importance score to each feature based on their ability to distinguish the two classes (RN/rBT). The top performing features identified via PCA-VIP were employed within a random-forest classifier to differentiate RN from rBT across two cohorts of 20 primary and 22 MET patients. Our results revealed that, (a) HoG features at different orientations were the most important image features for both cohorts, suggesting inherent orientation differences between RN, and rBT, (b) inverse difference moment (capturing local intensity homogeneity), and Laws features (capturing local edges and gradients) were identified as important for both cohorts, and (c) Gd-C T1-w MRI was identified, across the two cohorts, as the best MRI protocol in distinguishing RN/rBT. PMID:24910722

  9. Distinguishing benign confounding treatment changes from residual prostate cancer on MRI following laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litjens, G.; Huisman, H.; Elliott, R.; Shih, N.; Feldman, M.; Viswanath, S.; Fütterer, J.; Bomers, J.; Madabhushi, A.

    2014-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is a relatively new focal therapy technique for the ablation of localized prostate cancer. However, very little is known about the specific effects of LITT within the ablation zone and the surrounding normal tissue regions. For instance, it is important to be able to assess the extent of residual cancer within the prostate following LITT, which may be masked by thermally induced benign necrotic changes. Fortunately LITT is MRI compatible and hence this allows for quantitatively assessing LITT induced changes via multi-parametric MRI. Of course definite validation of any LITT induced changes on MRI requires confirmation via histopathology. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess and distinguish the imaging characteristics of prostate cancer and benign confounding treatment changes following LITTon 3 Tesla multi-parametric MRI by carefully mapping the treatment related changes from the ex vivo surgically resected histopathologic specimens onto the pre-operative in vivo imaging. A better understanding of the imaging characteristics of residual disease and successfully ablated tissue might lead to improved treatment monitoring and as such patient prognosis. A unique clinical trial at the Radboud University Medical Center, in which 3 patients underwent a prostatectomy after LITT treatment, yielded ex-vivo histopathologic specimens along with pre- and post-LITT MRI. Using this data we (1) identified the computer extracted MRI signatures associated with treatment effects including benign necrotic changes and residual disease and (2) subsequently evaluated the computer extracted MRI features previously identified in distinguishing LITT induced changes in the ablated area relative to the residual disease. Towards this end first a pathologist annotated the ablated area and the residual disease on the ex-vivo histology and then we transferred the annotations to the post-LITT MRI using semi-automatic elastic registration. The pre- and post-LITT MRI were subsequently registered and computer-derived multi-parametric MRI features extracted to determine differences in feature values between residual disease and successfully ablated tissue to assess treatment response. A scoring metric allowed us to identify those specific computer-extracted MRI features that maximally and differentially expressed between the ablated regions and the residual cancer, on a voxel- by­ voxel basis. Finally, we used a Fuzzy C-Means algorithm to assess the discriminatory power of these selected features. Our results show that specific computer-extracted features from multi-parametric MRI differentially express within the ablated and residual cancer regions, as evidenced by our ability to, on a voxel-by-voxel basis, classify tissue as residual disease. Additionally, we show that change of feature values between pre- and post­-LITT MRI may be useful as a quantitative marker for treatment response (T2-weighted texture and DCE MRI features showed largest differences between residual disease and successfully ablated tissue). Finally, a clustering approach to separate treatment effects and residual disease incorporating both (1) and (2) yielded a maximum area under the ROC curve of 0.97 on a voxel basis across 3 studies.

  10. Distinguishing Conjoint and Independent Neural Tuning for Stimulus Features With fMRI Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, Daniel M.; Kerr, Wesley Thomas; Aguirre, Geoffrey Karl

    2009-01-01

    A central focus of cognitive neuroscience is identification of the neural codes that represent stimulus dimensions. One common theme is the study of whether dimensions, such as color and shape, are encoded independently by separate pools of neurons or are represented by neurons conjointly tuned for both properties. We describe an application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation to distinguish between independent and conjoint neural representations of dimensions by examining the neural signal evoked by changes in one versus two stimulus dimensions and considering the metric of two-dimension additivity. We describe how a continuous carry-over paradigm may be used to efficiently estimate this metric. The assumptions of the method are examined as are optimizations. Finally, we demonstrate that the method produces the expected result for fMRI data collected from ventral occipitotemporal cortex while subjects viewed sets of shapes predicted to be represented by conjoint or independent neural tuning. PMID:19357342

  11. Distinguishing Cancerous Liver Cells Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Liu, Shupeng; Chen, Zhenyi; Chen, Na; Pang, Fufei; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. It possesses great potential for the analysis of biochemical processes in cell studies. In this article, the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of normal and cancerous liver cells incubated with SERS active substrates (gold nanoparticle) was measured using confocal Raman microspectroscopy technology. The chemical components of the cells were analyzed through statistical methods for the SERS spectrum. Both the relative intensity ratio and principal component analysis (PCA) were used for distinguishing the normal liver cells (QSG-7701) from the hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721). The relative intensity ratio of the Raman spectra peaks such as I937/I1209, I1276/I1308, I1342/I1375, and I1402/I1435 was set as the judge boundary, and the sensitivity and the specificity using PCA method were calculated. The results indicated that the surface-enhanced Raman spectrum could provide the chemical information for distinguishing the normal cells from the cancerous liver cells and demonstrated that SERS technology possessed the possible applied potential for the diagnosis of liver cancer. PMID:25432931

  12. Central nervous system infectious diseases mimicking multiple sclerosis: recognizing distinguishable features using MRI.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Antônio José da; Littig, Ingrid Aguiar; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; Tilbery, Charles Peter

    2013-09-01

    The current diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) confirm the relevant role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), supporting the possibility of characterizing the dissemination in space (DIS) and the dissemination in time (DIT) in a single scan. To maintain the specificity of these criteria, it is necessary to determine whether T2/FLAIR visible lesions and the gadolinium enhancement can be attributed to diseases that mimic MS. Several diseases are included in the MS differential diagnosis list, including diseases with exacerbation, remitting periods and numerous treatable infectious diseases, which can mimic the MRI features of MS. We discuss the most relevant imaging features in several infectious diseases that resemble MS and examine the primary spatial distributions of lesions and the gadolinium enhancement patterns related to MS. Recognizing imaging "red flags" can be useful for the proper diagnostic evaluation of suspected cases of MS, facilitating the correct differential diagnosis by assessing the combined clinical, laboratory and MR imaging information. PMID:24141516

  13. Background parenchymal enhancement in preoperative breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Satoko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Satake, Hiroko; Kawamura, Akiko; Kawai, Hisashi; Kikumori, Toyone; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We aimed to assess the influence of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on surgical planning performed using preoperative MRI for breast cancer evaluation. Between January 2009 and December 2010, 91 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (mean age, 55.5 years; range, 30−88 years) who underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI followed by planned breast conservation therapy were retrospectively enrolled. MRI was performed to assess the tumor extent in addition to mammography and breast ultrasonography. BPE in the contralateral normal breast MRI at the early dynamic phase was visually classified as follows: minimal (n=49), mild (n=27), moderate (n=7), and marked (n=8). The correlations between the BPE grade and age, menopausal status, index tumor size, changes in surgical management based on MRI results, positive predictive value (PPV) of MRI, and surgical margins were assessed. Patients in the strong BPE groups were significantly younger (p=0.002) and generally premenopausal (p<0.001). Surgical treatment was not changed in 67 cases (73.6%), while extended excision and mastectomy were performed in 12 cases (13.2%), each based on additional lesions on MRI. Six of 79 (7.6%) patients who underwent breast conservation therapy had tumor-positive resection margins. In cases where surgical management was changed, the PPV for MRI-detected foci was high in the minimal (91.7%) and mild groups (66.7%), and 0% in the moderate and marked groups (p=0.002). Strong BPE causes false-positive MRI findings and may lead to overly extensive surgery, whereas MRI may be beneficial in select patients with weak BPE. PMID:26412883

  14. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  15. Can Asperger syndrome be distinguished from autism? An anatomic likelihood meta-analysis of MRI studies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kevin K.; Cheung, Charlton; Chua, Siew E.; McAlonan, Gráinne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The question of whether Asperger syndrome can be distinguished from autism has attracted much debate and may even incur delay in diagnosis and intervention. Accordingly, there has been a proposal for Asperger syndrome to be subsumed under autism in the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, in 2013. One approach to resolve this question has been to adopt the criterion of absence of clinically significant language or cognitive delay — essentially, the “absence of language delay.” To our knowledge, this is the first meta-analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of people with autism to compare absence with presence of language delay. It capitalizes on the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approach to systematically explore the whole brain for anatomic correlates of delay and no delay in language acquisition in people with autism spectrum disorders. Methods We conducted a systematic search for VBM MRI studies of grey matter volume in people with autism. Studies with a majority (at least 70%) of participants with autism diagnoses and a history of language delay were assigned to the autism group (n = 151, control n = 190). Those with a majority (at least 70%) of individuals with autism diagnoses and no language delay were assigned to the Asperger syndrome group (n = 149, control n = 214). We entered study coordinates into anatomic likelihood estimation meta-analysis software with sampling size weighting to compare grey matter summary maps driven by Asperger syndrome or autism. Results The summary autism grey matter map showed lower volumes in the cerebellum, right uncus, dorsal hippocampus and middle temporal gyrus compared with controls; grey matter volumes were greater in the bilateral caudate, prefrontal lobe and ventral temporal lobe. The summary Asperger syndrome map indicated lower grey matter volumes in the bilateral amygdala/hippocampal gyrus and prefrontal lobe, left occipital gyrus, right cerebellum, putamen and precuneus compared with controls; grey matter volumes were greater in more limited regions, including the bilateral inferior parietal lobule and the left fusiform gyrus. Both Asperger syndrome and autism studies reported volume increase in clusters in the ventral temporal lobe of the left hemisphere. Limitations We assigned studies to autism and Asperger syndrome groups for separate analyses of the data and did not carry out a direct statistical group comparison. In addition, studies available for analysis did not capture the entire spectrum, therefore we cannot be certain that our findings apply to a wider population than that sampled. Conclusion Whereas grey matter differences in people with Asperger syndrome compared with controls are sparser than those reported in studies of people with autism, the distribution and direction of differences in each category are distinctive. PMID:21406158

  16. A Robust Classifier to Distinguish Noise from fMRI Independent Components

    PubMed Central

    Sochat, Vanessa; Supekar, Kaustubh; Bustillo, Juan; Calhoun, Vince; Turner, Jessica A.; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of resting brains to determine the spatial location and activity of intrinsic brain networks–a novel and burgeoning research field–is limited by the lack of ground truth and the tendency of analyses to overfit the data. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is commonly used to separate the data into signal and Gaussian noise components, and then map these components on to spatial networks. Identifying noise from this data, however, is a tedious process that has proven hard to automate, particularly when data from different institutions, subjects, and scanners is used. Here we present an automated method to delineate noisy independent components in ICA using a data-driven infrastructure that queries a database of 246 spatial and temporal features to discover a computational signature of different types of noise. We evaluated the performance of our method to detect noisy components from healthy control fMRI (sensitivity = 0.91, specificity = 0.82, cross validation accuracy (CVA) = 0.87, area under the curve (AUC) = 0.93), and demonstrate its generalizability by showing equivalent performance on (1) an age- and scanner-matched cohort of schizophrenia patients from the same institution (sensitivity = 0.89, specificity = 0.83, CVA = 0.86), (2) an age-matched cohort on an equivalent scanner from a different institution (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.88, CVA = 0.88), and (3) an age-matched cohort on a different scanner from a different institution (sensitivity = 0.72, specificity = 0.92, CVA = 0.79). We additionally compare our approach with a recently published method [1]. Our results suggest that our method is robust to noise variations due to population as well as scanner differences, thereby making it well suited to the goal of automatically distinguishing noise from functional networks to enable investigation of human brain function. PMID:24748378

  17. MRI RESOLUTION ENHANCEMENT USING TOTAL VARIATION REGULARIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shantanu H.; Marquina, Antonio; Osher, Stanley J.; Dinov, Ivo; Van Horn, John D.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel method for resolution enhancement for volumetric images based on a variational-based reconstruction approach. The reconstruction problem is posed using a deconvolution model that seeks to minimize the total variation norm of the image. Additionally, we propose a new edge-preserving operator that emphasizes and even enhances edges during the up-sampling and decimation of the image. The edge enhanced reconstruction is shown to yield significant improvement in resolution, especially preserving important edges containing anatomical information. This method is demonstrated as an enhancement tool for low-resolution, anisotropic, 3D brain MRI images, as well as a pre-processing step to improve skull-stripping segmentation of brain images. PMID:21113426

  18. USPIO-Enhanced MRI Neuroimaging: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gkagkanasiou, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi; Gazouli, Maria; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P

    2016-03-01

    MRI is a powerful tool for the diagnosis and management for a variety of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are a novel category of MRI contrast agents that seem to play a crucial role in the imaging of CNS. Due to their physical properties, USPIOs act as blood pool agents. USPIOs improve visualization of tumor vasculature and relative cerebral blood volume measurements, tumor-associated inflammation, inflammatory-immune mediated disorders, stroke and vascular malformations. Ferumoxytol, a new type of USPIO agent, appears to have ideal characteristics for the imaging of CNS. The last few years, ferumoxytol has been successfully used to image CNS neoplasms, CNS inflammations and cerebral malformations offering useful information on cellular and molecular level. In addition, ferumoxytol studies focused on the pathophysiology of other CNS disorders like multiple sclerosis and epilepsy are already in progress. Aim of this review article is to provide the potential role of USPIO-enhanced MRI and the latest clinical applications of ferumoxytol agent in CNS imaging. PMID:26932522

  19. Contrast Enhanced MRI in the Diagnosis of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Eric; Spilseth, Benjamin; Wang, Xiao; Taylor, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Imaging plays a critical role in HCC screening and diagnosis. Initial screening of patients at risk for HCC is performed with ultrasound. Confirmation of HCC can then be obtained by Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to the relatively high specificity of both techniques. This article will focus on reviewing MRI techniques for imaging HCC, felt by many to be the exam of choice for HCC diagnosis. MRI relies heavily upon the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents and while primarily extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents are used, there is an emerging role of hepatobiliary contrast agents in HCC imaging. The use of other non-contrast enhanced MRI techniques for assessing HCC will also be discussed and these MRI strategies will be reviewed in the context of the pathophysiology of HCC to help understand the MR imaging appearance of HCC. PMID:26854161

  20. Brain Parenchymal Fraction: A Relatively Simple MRI Measure to Clinically Distinguish ALS Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Venkateswaran; Pioro, Erik P.

    2015-01-01

    Even though neuroimaging and clinical studies indicate that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) manifests with distinct clinical phenotypes, no objective test exists to assess upper motor degeneration in ALS. There is great interest in identifying biomarkers of ALS to allow earlier diagnosis and to recognize disease subtypes. Current quantitative neuroimaging techniques such as T2 relaxometry and diffusion tensor imaging are time-consuming to use in clinical settings due to extensive postprocessing requirements. Therefore, we aimed to study the potential role of brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) as a relatively simple quantitative measure for distinguishing ALS phenotypes. T1-weighted MR images of brain were obtained in 15 neurological controls and 88 ALS patients categorized into 4 distinct clinical phenotypes, upper motor neuron- (UMN-) predominant ALS patients with/without corticospinal tract (CST) hyperintensity on T2/PD-weighted images, classic ALS, and ALS with frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). BPF was calculated using intracranial grey matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid volumes obtained in control and ALS subgroups using SPM8 software. Only ALS-FTD patients had significant reduction in BPF when compared to controls and nondemented ALS patients. Correlation of clinical measures such as disease duration with BPF further supports the view that the BPF could be a potential biomarker for clinical diagnosis of ALS-FTD patients. PMID:26783524

  1. Ferrite-enhanced MRI monitoring in hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Reinl, Herbert M; Peller, Michael; Hagmann, Mark; Turner, Paul; Issels, Rolf D; Reiser, Maximilian

    2005-12-01

    In an MRI hyperthermia hybrid system, T1 changes are investigated for monitoring thermal therapy at 0.2 T. The water bolus, which is needed for power transmission and cooling of the skin, limits MR image quality by signal compression and artifacts. Superparamagnetic ferrofluid in different concentration was investigated with MR relaxometry and MRI methods. We found that using ferrofluid in a low concentration of 70-90 ppm magnetite the water signal can be suppressed without susceptibility artifacts. With our method of signal suppression, a significant improvement of spatial and temporal resolution is possible. The ferrofluid is stable and allows RF heating at 100 MHz. This method of signal extinction may also be useful for other experimental setups where suppression of water is necessary. PMID:16376187

  2. Differentiation of Reactive and Tumor Metastatic Lymph Nodes with Diffusion-weighted and SPIO Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Xinglu; Niu, Gang; Chen, Siouan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Determination of lymphatic metastasis is of great importance for both treatment planning and patient prognosis. We aim to distinguish tumor metastatic lymph nodes (TLNs) and reactive lymph nodes (RLNs) with diffusion-weighted and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods Ipsilateral popliteal lymph node metastasis or lymphadenitis model was established by hock injection of either luciferase-expressing 4T1 murine breast cancer cells or Complete Freund Adjuvant (CFA) in male Balb/C mice. At different time points after inoculation, bioluminescence imaging, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted and SPIO enhanced MRI were performed. Imaging findings were confirmed by histopathological staining. Results Size enlargement was observed in both TLNs and RLNs. At day 28, TLNs showed strong bioluminescence signal and bigger size than RLNs (p < 0.01). At early stages up to day 21, both TLNs and RLNs appeared homogeneous on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). At day 28, TLNs showed heterogeneous apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map with significantly higher average ADC value of 0.41 ± 0.03 × 10−3 mm2/s than that of RLNs (0.34 ± 0.02 10−3 mm2/s, p < 0.05). On SPIO enhanced MRI, both TLNs and RLNs showed distinct T2 signal reduction at day 21 after inoculation. At day 28, TLNs demonstrated partial uptake of the iron oxide particles, which was confirmed by Prussian blue staining. Conclusions Both diffusion-weighted and SPIO enhanced MRI can distinguish tumor metastatic lymph nodes from reactive lymph nodes. However, neither method is able to detect tumor metastasis to the draining lymph nodes at early stages. PMID:22588595

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI to Study Atherosclerotic Plaque Microvasculature.

    PubMed

    van Hoof, Raf H M; Heeneman, Sylvia; Wildberger, Joachim E; Kooi, M Eline

    2016-06-01

    Rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque of the carotid artery is an important underlying cause of clinical ischemic events, such as stroke. Abundant microvasculature has been identified as an important aspect contributing to plaque vulnerability. Plaque microvasculature can be studied non-invasively with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-)MRI in animals and patients. In recent years, several DCE-MRI studies have been published evaluating the association between microvasculature and other key features of plaque vulnerability (e.g., inflammation and intraplaque hemorrhage), as well as the effects of novel therapeutic interventions. The present paper reviews this literature, focusing on DCE-MRI methods of acquisition and analysis of atherosclerotic plaques, the current state and future potential of DCE-MRI in the evaluation of plaque microvasculature in clinical and preclinical settings. PMID:27115144

  4. Clustered breast microcalcifications: Evaluation by dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, R.; Tardivon, A.A.; Vanel, D.; Guinebretiere, J.M.; Arriagada, R.

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI in the diagnosis of isolated clustered calcifications of the breast. One hundred seventy-two patients underwent surgical biopsy for isolated clustered breast calcifications. Their mammograms showed round (n = 88) or linear/irregular (n = 84) microcalcifications. All patients had a preoperative Gd-DOTA-enhanced subtraction dynamic study. Any early contrast enhancement in the breast parenchyma concomitant with early enhancement of normal vessels was considered positive. Fifty-eight in situ carcinomas, 22 invasive carcinomas, and 92 benign lesions were found at histological analysis. Dynamic MR sequences showed early contrast enhancement in 76 of 80 malignant lesions (sensitivity 95%) and in 45 of 92 benign lesions (specificity 51%). Two invasive and two intraductal carcinomas did not show early contrast enhancement. Three independent observers agreed in rating early contrast enhancement in 143 of 172 lesions. Poor specificity limits the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI in distinguishing benign from malignant microcalcifications on mammography. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Manganese-Enhanced MRI: Biological Applications in Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Paiva, Fernando Fernandes; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro; Hamani, Clement; Covolan, Luciene

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool to investigate biological systems. The administration of the paramagnetic divalent ion manganese (Mn(2+)) enhances MRI contrast in vivo. Due to similarities between Mn(2+) and calcium (Ca(2+)), the premise of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is that the former may enter neurons and other excitable cells through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. As such, MEMRI has been used to trace neuronal pathways, define morphological boundaries, and study connectivity in morphological and functional imaging studies. In this article, we provide a brief overview of MEMRI and discuss recently published data to illustrate the usefulness of this method, particularly in animal models. PMID:26217304

  6. Manganese-Enhanced MRI: Biological Applications in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Paiva, Fernando Fernandes; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro; Hamani, Clement; Covolan, Luciene

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool to investigate biological systems. The administration of the paramagnetic divalent ion manganese (Mn2+) enhances MRI contrast in vivo. Due to similarities between Mn2+ and calcium (Ca2+), the premise of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is that the former may enter neurons and other excitable cells through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. As such, MEMRI has been used to trace neuronal pathways, define morphological boundaries, and study connectivity in morphological and functional imaging studies. In this article, we provide a brief overview of MEMRI and discuss recently published data to illustrate the usefulness of this method, particularly in animal models. PMID:26217304

  7. Engineering Gd-loaded nanoparticles to enhance MRI sensitivity via T1 shortening

    PubMed Central

    Bruckman, Michael A.; Yu, Xin; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of obtaining high-resolution anatomical images of the body. Major drawbacks of MRI are the low contrast agent sensitivity and inability to distinguish healthy tissue from diseased tissue, making early detection challenging. To address this technological hurdle, paramagnetic contrast agents have been developed to increase the longitudinal relaxivity (R1), leading to an increased signal-to-noise ratio. This review focuses on methods and principles that enabled the design and engineering of nanoparticles to deliver contrast agents with enhanced ionic relaxivities. Different engineering strategies and nanoparticle platforms will be compared in terms of their manufacturability, biocompatibility properties, and their overall potential to make an impact in clinical MR imaging. PMID:24158750

  8. [MRI with dynamic contrast enhancement in brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Panfilenko, A F; Iakovlev, S A; Pozdniakov, A V; Tiumin, L A; Shcherbuk, A Iu

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the leading method of radiation diagnosis of brain tumors. In conditions of the artificial contrast enhancement there are more clearly differentiated the boundaries of the tumor node on the back of peritumorous edema and identified structural features of the tumor. The purpose of this study was to examine indicators of the dynamics of accumulation and removal of contrast agents by brain tumors in MRI technique with dynamic contrast and identify opportunities of this method in the differential diagnosis of various types of tumors. PMID:23814831

  9. Standardization of Radiological Evaluation of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Furman-Haran, E.; Feinberg, M. Shapiro; Badikhi, D.; Eyal, E.; Zehavi, T.; Degani, H.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI is applied as an adjuvant tool for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and follow-up of therapy. Despite improvements through the years in achieving higher spatial and temporal resolution, it still suffers from lack of scanning and processing standardization, and consequently, high variability in the radiological evaluation, particularly differentiating malignant from benign lesions. We describe here a hybrid method for achieving standardization of the radiological evaluation of breast dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols, based on integrating the model based three time point (3TP) method with principal component analysis (PCA). The scanning and image processing procedures consisted of three main steps: 1. 3TP standardization of the MRI acquisition parameters according to a kinetic model, 2. Applying PCA to test cases and constructing an eigenvectors' base related to the contrast-enhancement kinetics and 3. Projecting all new cases on the eigenvectors' base and evaluating the clinical outcome. Datasets of overall 96 malignant and 26 benign breast lesions were recorded on 1.5T and 3T scanners, using three different MRI acquisition parameters optimized by the 3TP method. The final radiological evaluation showed similar detection and diagnostic ability for the three different MRI acquisition parameters. The area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded a value of 0.88 ± 0.034 for differentiating malignant from benign lesions. This 3TP + PCA hybrid method is fast and can be readily applied as a computer aided diagnostic tool of breast cancer. The underlying principles of this method can be extended to standardize the evaluation of malignancies in other organs. PMID:24000989

  10. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment. PMID:10463643

  11. A Rim-Enhanced Mass with Central Cystic Changes on MR Imaging: How to Distinguish Breast Cancer from Inflammatory Breast Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Dengbin; Fei, Xiaochun; Ruan, Mei; Chai, Weimin; Xu, Lin; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the capacity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to distinguish breast cancer from inflammatory breast diseases manifesting as a rim-enhanced mass with central cystic changes. Materials and Methods Forty cases of breast cancer and 52 of inflammatory breast diseases showing a rim-enhanced mass with central cystic changes were retrospectively reviewed. All cases underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and 31 of them underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Morphological features, dynamic parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were comparatively analyzed using univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. Results Breast cancer had a significantly thicker wall than the inflammatory breast diseases (P<0.001) while internal enhancing septa were more common in inflammatory breast diseases (P = 0.003). On DWI, 86.7% of breast cancers demonstrate a peripheral hyperintensity whereas 93.8% of inflammatory breast diseases had a central hyperintensity (P<0.001). Compared to the inflammatory breast diseases, breast cancers had a lower ADC value for the wall (1.09×10−3 mm2/s vs 1.42×10−3 mm2/s, P<0.001) and a higher ADC value for the central part (1.94×10−3 mm2/s vs 1.05×10−3 mm2/s, P<0.001). Conclusions Both breast cancer and inflammatory breast diseases could present as a rim-enhanced mass with central cystic changes on MRI. Integrated analysis of the MR findings can allow for an accurate differential diagnosis. PMID:24598845

  12. De-enhancing the Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI for Robust Registration

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Yu, Jingyi; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Englander, Sarah; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Shen, Dinggang

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic enhancement causes serious problems for registration of contrast enhanced breast MRI, due to variable uptakes of agent on different tissues or even same tissues in the breast. We present an iterative optimization algorithm to de-enhance the dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI and then register them for avoiding the effects of enhancement on image registration. In particular, the spatially varying enhancements are modeled by a Markov Random Field, and estimated by a locally smooth function with boundaries using a graph cut algorithm. The de-enhanced images are then registered by conventional B-spline based registration algorithm. These two steps benefit from each other and are repeated until the results converge. Experimental results show that our two-step registration algorithm performs much better than conventional mutual information based registration algorithm. Also, the effects of tumor shrinking in the conventional registration algorithms can be effectively avoided by our registration algorithm. PMID:18051148

  13. In vivo Overhauser-enhanced MRI of proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koonjoo, Neha; Parzy, Elodie; Massot, Philippe; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Marque, Sylvain R A; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric; Mellet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing novel imaging strategies for sensing proteolytic activities in intact organisms in vivo. Overhauser-enhanced MRI (OMRI) offers the possibility to reveal the proteolysis of nitroxide-labeled macromolecules thanks to a sharp decrease of the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety upon cleavage. In this paper, this concept is illustrated in vivo at 0.2 T using nitroxide-labeled elastin orally administered in mice. In vitro, this elastin derivative was OMRI-visible and gave rise to high Overhauser enhancements (19-fold at 18 mm nitroxide) upon proteolysis by pancreatic porcine elastase. In vivo three-dimensional OMRI detection of proteolysis was carried out. A keyhole fully balanced steady-state free precession sequence was used, which allowed 3D OMRI acquisition within 20 s at 0.125 mm(3) resolution. About 30 min after mouse gavage, proteolysis was detected in the duodenum, where Overhauser enhancements were 7.2 ± 2.4 (n = 7) and was not observed in the stomach. Conversely, orally administered free nitroxides or pre-digested nitroxide-labeled elastin were detected in the mouse's stomach by OMRI. Combined with specific molecular probes, this Overhauser-enhanced MRI technique can be used to evaluate unregulated proteolytic activities in various models of experimental diseases and for drug testing. PMID:24729587

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects. PMID:24323376

  15. Delineation of liver necrosis using double contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Dupas, B; Bach-Gansmo, T; Nomballais, M F; Meflah, K

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the combination of gadolinium and dysprosium to enhance the different between normal and necrotic liver tissue. Small regions of acute necrosis were induced by injecting 200-300 microliters of 95% alcohol into the liver of 26 rats. MRI was performed 24 hours after necrosis induction, before and immediately after injection of one or both contrast agents. Using a mixed T1/T2-weighted sequence, the signal intensity of (SI) of the normal liver was reduced by 70%, whereas the necrotic regions had more than a 50% increase in SI after double contrast. The region that was enhanced corresponded largely with the region of necrosis as observed postmortem. The lesion size, when identified, was largely underestimated using either of the agents along, albeit using the common pulse sequences. The double contrast effect of simultaneous administration of gadolinium and dysprosium allows accurate delineation of liver necrosis. PMID:9170029

  16. Differentiation of solid pancreatic tumors by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing among different solid pancreatic tumor types, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) is important, as the treatment options are vastly different. This study compared characteristics of solid pancreatic tumors by using dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifty patients underwent MR imaging of pancreatic masses with a histopathology that was later confirmed as an adenocarcinoma (n = 27), a NET (n = 16), and a SPT (n = 7). For qualitative analysis, two reviewers evaluated the morphologic features of the tumors: locations, margins, shapes, contained products, pancreatic ductal dilatation, and grade of signal intensity (SI). For the quantitative analysis, all phases of the MR images were co-registered using proprietary image registration software; thus, a region of interest (ROI) defined on one phase could be re-applied in other phases. The following four ratios were considered: tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas SI ratio, percent SI change, tumor-touninvolved pancreas enhancement index, and arterial-to-delayed washout rate. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed for the four ratios. Adenocarcinomas had ill-defined margins, irregular shapes, and ductal dilatation compared with NETs and SPTs (P < 0.001). The tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas ratio on all dynamic phases was significantly higher for NETs than for both adenocarcinomas and SPTs (P < 0.05). Percentage SI changes of pancreatic tumors on the pancreatic and the portal venous phases were significantly higher for NETs than for both adenocarcinomas and SPTs (P < 0.05). A significant difference between NETs and adenocarcinomas was also found with respect to the tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas enhancement index and arterial-to-delayed washout rate. The percentage SI changes in the pancreatic phase and the arterial-to-delayed washout rate best distinguished between adenocarcinomas and NETs with the area under the ROC curve being 0.87. The percentage SI changes in the pancreatic and the portal venous phases best distinguished between NETs and SPTs with area under the ROC curve 0.87. In summary, contrast-enhanced MRI can be useful in differentiating solid pancreatic tumors in qualitative and quantitative analyses.

  17. Distinguishing adjacent molecules on a surface using plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Song; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Rui; Hu, Chunrui; Liao, Menghan; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jinlong; Dong, Zhenchao; Hou, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    Unambiguous chemical identification of individual molecules closely packed on a surface can offer the possibility to address single chemical species and monitor their behaviour at the individual level. Such a degree of spatial resolution can in principle be achieved by detecting their vibrational fingerprints using tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). The chemical specificity of TERS can be combined with the high spatial resolution of scanning probe microscopy techniques, an approach that has stimulated extensive research in the field. Recently, the development of nonlinear TERS in a scanning tunnelling microscope has pushed the spatial resolution down to ∼0.5 nm, allowing the identification of the vibrational fingerprints of isolated molecules on Raman-silent metal surfaces. Although the nonlinear TERS component is likely to help sharpen the optical contrast of the acquired image, the TERS signal still contains a considerable contribution from the linear term, which is spatially less confined. Therefore, in the presence of different adjacent molecules, a mixing of Raman signals may result. Here, we show that using a nonlinear scanning tunnelling microscope-controlled TERS set-up, two different adjacent molecules that are within van der Waals contact and of very similar chemical structure (a metal-centred porphyrin and a free-base porphyrin) on a silver surface can be distinguished in real space. In addition, with the help of density functional theory simulations, we are also able to determine their adsorption configurations and orientations on step edges and terraces.

  18. Diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in assessing response and recurrent disease in gynaecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hameeduddin, Ayshea; Sahdev, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has an established role in imaging pelvic gynaecological malignancies. It is routinely used in staging endometrial and cervical cancer, characterizing adnexal masses, selecting optimal treatment, monitoring treatment and detecting recurrent disease. MRI has also been shown to have an excellent performance and an evolving role in surveillance of patients after chemoradiotherapy in cervical cancer, post-trachelectomy, detecting early recurrence and planning exenterative surgery in isolated central recurrences in both cervical and endometrial cancer and in young patients on surveillance for medically managed endometrial cancer. However, conventional MRI still has limitations when the morphological appearance of early recurrent or residual disease overlaps with normal pelvic anatomy or treatment effects in the pelvis. In particular, after chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer, distinguishing between radiotherapy changes and residual or early recurrent disease within the cervix or the vaginal vault can be challenging on conventional MRI alone. Therefore, there is an emerging need for functional imaging to overcome these limitations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the emerging functional MRI techniques and their applications in predicting treatment response, detecting residual disease and early recurrent disease to optimize the treatment options available using diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhancement particularly in cervical and endometrial cancer. PMID:25889065

  19. Use of iron colloid-enhanced MRI for study of acute radiation-induced hepatic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yuji; Ametani, Masaki; Kato, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Kamba, Masayuki; Sugihara, Syuji; Ohta, Yoshio

    1996-03-01

    We present a case with acute radiation-induced hepatic injury using chondroitin sulfate iron colloid (CSIC)-enhanced MRI. Uptake of CSIC was decreased in the irradiated portion of the liver. CSIC-enhanced MRI is useful for obtaining information on the function of the reticuloendothelial system and demarcates between irradiated and nonirradiated zones. 18 refs., 3 figs

  20. Imaging unconditioned fear response with manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Tenney, Jeff; Kulkarni, Praveen; King, Jean A

    2007-08-01

    Recent use of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to assess the neural circuitry involved in autonomic and somatosensory paradigms has been promising. The current study addresses the feasibility of utilizing this technique to assess more complex cognitive and emotional processes. Since olfactory cues are particularly salient to animals, we utilized odorless air, novel/arousing and novel/fear-inducing scents to assess the neural circuitry sub-serving novelty and unconditioned fear. The present imaging data clearly indicate that animals with no prior exposure to a threat-inducing emotional stimulus selectively activated the unconditional fear neuronal pathway, specifically with heightened amygdala and hypothalamic activation. While animals exposed to the novel/arousing compared to fear-inducing odor demonstrated enhanced uptake in the cingulated and prefrontal cortices. In addition, as expected the hippocampus showed significantly enhanced manganese contrast after novelty exposure. Therefore the current study support the validity of MEMRI in the exploration of highly relevant complex neural circuitries associated with cognition and emotion. PMID:17570684

  1. Identifying Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Using Background Parenchymal Enhancement Heterogeneity on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Radiomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jeff; Kato, Fumi; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Li, Ruijiang; Cui, Yi; Tha, Khin Khin; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the added discriminative value of detailed quantitative characterization of background parenchymal enhancement in addition to the tumor itself on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI at 3.0 Tesla in identifying “triple-negative" breast cancers. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, DCE-MRI of 84 women presenting 88 invasive carcinomas were evaluated by a radiologist and analyzed using quantitative computer-aided techniques. Each tumor and its surrounding parenchyma were segmented semi-automatically in 3-D. A total of 85 imaging features were extracted from the two regions, including morphologic, densitometric, and statistical texture measures of enhancement. A small subset of optimal features was selected using an efficient sequential forward floating search algorithm. To distinguish triple-negative cancers from other subtypes, we built predictive models based on support vector machines. Their classification performance was assessed with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) using cross-validation. Results Imaging features based on the tumor region achieved an AUC of 0.782 in differentiating triple-negative cancers from others, in line with the current state of the art. When background parenchymal enhancement features were included, the AUC increased significantly to 0.878 (p<0.01). Similar improvements were seen in nearly all subtype classification tasks undertaken. Notably, amongst the most discriminating features for predicting triple-negative cancers were textures of background parenchymal enhancement. Conclusions Considering the tumor as well as its surrounding parenchyma on DCE-MRI for radiomic image phenotyping provides useful information for identifying triple-negative breast cancers. Heterogeneity of background parenchymal enhancement, characterized by quantitative texture features on DCE-MRI, adds value to such differentiation models as they are strongly associated with the triple-negative subtype. Prospective validation studies are warranted to confirm these findings and determine potential implications. PMID:26600392

  2. Distinguishing specific sexual and general emotional effects in fMRI-subcortical and cortical arousal during erotic picture viewing.

    PubMed

    Walter, Martin; Bermpohl, Felix; Mouras, Harold; Schiltz, Kolja; Tempelmann, Claus; Rotte, Michael; Heinze, Hans Jochen; Bogerts, Bernhard; Northoff, Georg

    2008-05-01

    Sexual activity involves excitement with high arousal and pleasure as typical features of emotions. Brain activations specifically related to erotic feelings and those related to general emotional processing are therefore hard to disentangle. Using fMRI in 21 healthy subjects (11 males and 10 females), we investigated regions that show activations specifically related to the viewing of sexually intense pictures while controlling for general emotional arousal (GEA) or pleasure. Activations in the ventral striatum and hypothalamus were found to be modulated by the stimulus' specific sexual intensity (SSI) while activations in the anterior cingulate cortex were associated with an interaction between sexual intensity and emotional valence. In contrast, activation in other regions like the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, the mediodorsal thalamus and the amygdala was associated only with a general emotional component during sexual arousal. No differences were found in these effects when comparing females and males. Our findings demonstrate for the first time neural differentiation between emotional and sexual components in the neural network underlying sexual arousal. PMID:18329905

  3. Contrast-enhanced MRI-guided photodynamic cancer therapy with a pegylated bifunctional polymer conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anagha; Sun, Yongen; Feng, Yi; Emerson, Lyska; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To study contrast-enhanced MRI guided photodynamic therapy with a pegylated bifunctional polymer conjugate containing an MRI contrast agent and a photosensitizer for minimally invasive image-guided cancer treatment. Methods Pegylated and non-pegylated poly-(L-glutamic acid) conjugates containing mesochlorin e6, a photosensitizer, and Gd(III)-DO3A, an MRI contrast agent, were synthesized. The effect of pegylation on the biodistribution and tumor targeting was non-invasively visualized in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts with MRI. MRI-guided photodynamic therapy was carried out in the tumor bearing mice. Tumor response to photodynamic therapy was evaluated by dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and histological analysis. Results The pegylated conjugate had longer blood circulation, lower liver uptake and higher tumor accumulation than the non-pegylated conjugate as shown by MRI. Site-directed laser irradiation of tumors resulted in higher therapeutic efficacy for the pegylated conjugate than the non-pegylated conjugate. Moreover, animals treated with photodynamic therapy showed reduced vascular permeability on DCE-MRI and decreased microvessel density in histological analysis. Conclusions Pegylation of the polymer bifunctional conjugates reduced non-specific liver uptake and increased tumor uptake, resulting in significant tumor contrast enhancement and high therapeutic efficacy. The pegylated poly(L-glutamic acid) bifunctional conjugate is promising for contrast enhanced MRI guided photodynamic therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:18584312

  4. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  5. MRI.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Dianne

    2016-03-01

    This poem describes the experience of having an MRI performed. The writer describes the jolting magnets against her banging heart. She closes her eyes and remembers reclining against her husband in a gondola in Venice. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26963782

  6. Glucose Administration Enhances fMRI Brain Activation and Connectivity Related to Episodic Memory Encoding for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Marise B.; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Ryan, John P.; Wilson, Jennifer S.; Harenski, Carla; Hamann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose enhances memory in a variety of species. In humans, glucose administration enhances episodic memory encoding, although little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Here we examined whether elevating blood glucose would enhance functional MRI (fMRI) activation and connectivity in brain regions associated with…

  7. Glucose Administration Enhances fMRI Brain Activation and Connectivity Related to Episodic Memory Encoding for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Marise B.; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Ryan, John P.; Wilson, Jennifer S.; Harenski, Carla; Hamann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose enhances memory in a variety of species. In humans, glucose administration enhances episodic memory encoding, although little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Here we examined whether elevating blood glucose would enhance functional MRI (fMRI) activation and connectivity in brain regions associated with

  8. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  9. The value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in diagnosis of malignant lymphoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Kishi, Kanji

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we attempted to diagnose malignant lymphoma on the basis of magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Eighteen lesions (in eight patients), all of which had been proven histopathologically, were detected on MRI. The eight patients included five patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, one with B-cell low-grade MALT lymphoma, one with follicular lymphoma, and one with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Nine lesions were located in the submandibular region, three in the buccal region, two in the orbit region, two in the submental region, and one each in the palatal and tonsil regions. The diameter of the lesions ranged between 9 and 42.2 mm (average: 22.4 mm). The signal intensities (SIs) of the 18 lesions were examined on T1-weighted (T1WI), T2WI, and gadopentetate (Gd)-T1WI. One lesion in case 8 was excluded from DCE-MRI findings, i.e., the regions of interest could not be adequately set on DCE-MRIs. The contrast index (CI) curves of the remaining 17 lesions were prepared. All 18 lesions showed almost the same images on T1WI, T2WI, and Gd-T1WI, although they represented four types of lymphoma. The images showed homogeneous SI that was intermediate to slightly high SI on T1WI, slightly high SI on T2WI, and moderately enhanced on Gd-T1WI. Thus, the cases of malignant lymphoma in this study showed relatively characteristic features based on MRI; however, these features might be non-specific. The CI curves in this study showed a relatively rapid increase, reaching a maximum CI at 45-120 s, and a relatively rapid decrease in most lesions (14/17; 82.4%); on the other hand, the curves of 3 of the 15 lesions (17.6%) showed relatively rapid increase, sustenance of a plateau, and a gradual decrease thereafter. These patterns of CI curves may indicate characteristic features useful for distinguishing malignant lymphomas from other lesions. PMID:14680911

  10. Neural Correlates of Feigned Memory Impairment are Distinguishable from Answering Randomly and Answering Incorrectly: An fMRI and Behavioral Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Chun-Yu; Xu, Zhi-Yuan; Mei, Wei; Wang, Li-Li; Xue, Li; Lu, De Jian; Zhao, Hu

    2012-01-01

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified activation in the prefrontal-parietal-sub-cortical circuit during feigned memory impairment when comparing with truthful telling. Here, we used fMRI to determine whether neural activity can differentiate between answering correctly, answering randomly, answering…

  11. Neural Correlates of Feigned Memory Impairment are Distinguishable from Answering Randomly and Answering Incorrectly: An fMRI and Behavioral Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Chun-Yu; Xu, Zhi-Yuan; Mei, Wei; Wang, Li-Li; Xue, Li; Lu, De Jian; Zhao, Hu

    2012-01-01

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified activation in the prefrontal-parietal-sub-cortical circuit during feigned memory impairment when comparing with truthful telling. Here, we used fMRI to determine whether neural activity can differentiate between answering correctly, answering randomly, answering

  12. Serial study of gadolinium-DTPA MRI enhancement in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bastianello, S; Pozzilli, C; Bernardi, S; Bozzao, L; Fantozzi, L M; Buttinelli, C; Fieschi, C

    1990-04-01

    We performed serial baseline and gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA-enhanced MRI in 4 patients with definite multiple sclerosis. Studies were performed every month for a total of 4 scans. We obtained short TR/short TE sequences at 10 and 60 minutes after Gd-DTPA injection. All patients had multiple hyperintense lesions seen on baseline MRI with long TR/short and long TE. There was Gd-DTPA enhancement in new, enlarging, and preexisting lesions that were unchanged in size. The enhancing lesions were always seen on T2-weighted images. There was no difference in enhancement between the 10- and 60-minute studies. Six of 85 preexisting lesions enhanced whereas all new or enlarging lesions enhanced. Enhancement persisted in only 1/3 of the new or enlarging lesions, suggesting that MR enhancement is a transient phenomenon due to local temporary blood-brain barrier breakdown. Our data indicate that Gd-DTPA enhancement monitoring is more sensitive than unenhanced MRI for detecting disease activity in MS. PMID:2320230

  13. The Potential for an Enhanced Role for MRI in Radiation-therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, P.; Liney, G. P.; Holloway, L.; Walker, A.; Barton, M.; Delaney, G. P.; Vinod, S.; Tomé, W.

    2013-01-01

    The exquisite soft-tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has meant that the technique is having an increasing role in contouring the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OAR) in radiation therapy treatment planning systems (TPS). MRI-planning scans from diagnostic MRI scanners are currently incorporated into the planning process by being registered to CT data. The soft-tissue data from the MRI provides target outline guidance and the CT provides a solid geometric and electron density map for accurate dose calculation on the TPS computer. There is increasing interest in MRI machine placement in radiotherapy clinics as an adjunct to CT simulators. Most vendors now offer 70 cm bores with flat couch inserts and specialised RF coil designs. We would refer to these devices as MR-simulators. There is also research into the future application of MR-simulators independent of CT and as in-room image-guidance devices. It is within the background of this increased interest in the utility of MRI in radiotherapy treatment planning that this paper is couched. The paper outlines publications that deal with standard MRI sequences used in current clinical practice. It then discusses the potential for using processed functional diffusion maps (fDM) derived from diffusion weighted image sequences in tracking tumor activity and tumor recurrence. Next, this paper reviews publications that describe the use of MRI in patient-management applications that may, in turn, be relevant to radiotherapy treatment planning. The review briefly discusses the concepts behind functional techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI sequences and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Significant applications of MR are discussed in terms of the following treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, prostate and cervix. While not yet routine, the use of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map analysis indicates an exciting future application for functional MRI. Although DW-MRI has not yet been routinely used in boost adaptive techniques, it is being assessed in cohort studies for sub-volume boosting in prostate tumors. PMID:23617289

  14. The potential for an enhanced role for MRI in radiation-therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, P; Liney, G P; Holloway, L; Walker, A; Barton, M; Delaney, G P; Vinod, S; Tome, W

    2013-10-01

    The exquisite soft-tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has meant that the technique is having an increasing role in contouring the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OAR) in radiation therapy treatment planning systems (TPS). MRI-planning scans from diagnostic MRI scanners are currently incorporated into the planning process by being registered to CT data. The soft-tissue data from the MRI provides target outline guidance and the CT provides a solid geometric and electron density map for accurate dose calculation on the TPS computer. There is increasing interest in MRI machine placement in radiotherapy clinics as an adjunct to CT simulators. Most vendors now offer 70 cm bores with flat couch inserts and specialised RF coil designs. We would refer to these devices as MR-simulators. There is also research into the future application of MR-simulators independent of CT and as in-room image-guidance devices. It is within the background of this increased interest in the utility of MRI in radiotherapy treatment planning that this paper is couched. The paper outlines publications that deal with standard MRI sequences used in current clinical practice. It then discusses the potential for using processed functional diffusion maps (fDM) derived from diffusion weighted image sequences in tracking tumor activity and tumor recurrence. Next, this paper reviews publications that describe the use of MRI in patient-management applications that may, in turn, be relevant to radiotherapy treatment planning. The review briefly discusses the concepts behind functional techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI sequences and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Significant applications of MR are discussed in terms of the following treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, prostate and cervix. While not yet routine, the use of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map analysis indicates an exciting future application for functional MRI. Although DW-MRI has not yet been routinely used in boost adaptive techniques, it is being assessed in cohort studies for sub-volume boosting in prostate tumors. PMID:23617289

  15. Dynamic Glucose-Enhanced (DGE) MRI: Translation to Human Scanning and First Results in Glioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Knutsson, Linda; Hua, Jun; Kalyani, Rita; Hall, Erica; Laterra, John; Blakeley, Jaishri; Strowd, Roy; Pomper, Martin; Barker, Peter; Chan, Kannie; Liu, Guanshu; McMahon, Michael T.; Stevens, Robert D.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent animal studies have shown that D-glucose is a potential biodegradable MRI contrast agent for imaging glucose uptake in tumors. Here, we show the first translation of that use of D-glucose to human studies. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI at a single frequency offset optimized for detection of hydroxyl protons in D-glucose (glucoCEST) was used to image dynamic signal changes in the human brain at 7T during and after infusion of D-glucose. Dynamic glucose-enhanced (DGE) image data from four normal volunteers and three glioma patients showed strong signal enhancement in blood vessels, while the enhancement varied spatially over the tumor. Areas of enhancement differed spatially between DGE and conventional Gd-enhanced imaging, suggesting complementary image information content for these two types of agents. In addition, different tumor areas enhanced with D-glucose at different times post-infusion, suggesting a sensitivity to perfusion-related properties such as substrate delivery and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. These preliminary results suggest that DGE MRI is feasible to study glucose uptake in humans, providing a time-dependent set of data that contains information regarding arterial input function (AIF), tissue perfusion, glucose transport across the BBB and cell membrane, and glucose metabolism. PMID:26779568

  16. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 ; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 ; Zhu, Lei; Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 ; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Conclusions: DC-MRI will be helpful to improve diagnostic accuracy and decrease the threshold size for lesion detection.

  17. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) in Preclinical Studies of Antivascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Thomas; Wittenborn, Thomas; Horsman, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Antivascular treatments can either be antiangiogenic or targeting established tumour vasculature. These treatments affect the tumour microvasculature and microenvironment but may not change clinical measures like tumour volume and growth. In research on antivascular treatments, information on the tumour vasculature is therefore essential. Preclinical research is often used for optimization of antivascular drugs alone or in combined treatments. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is an in vivo imaging method providing vascular information, which has become an important tool in both preclinical and clinical research. This review discusses common DCE-MRI imaging protocols and analysis methods and provides an overview of preclinical research on antivascular treatments utilizing DCE-MRI. PMID:24300371

  18. Atherosclerotic plaque inflammation quantification using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Kerwin, William S.; Yuan, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Given the increasing interest in using in-vivo imaging methods to study the physiology and treatment effects in atherosclerosis, noninvasive intraplaque inflammation quantitative method is needed. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed and validated to quantitatively characterize atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. Recent studies have optimized the imaging protocol, pharmacokinetic modeling techniques. All of these technical advances further promoted DCE-MRI to clinical investigations in plaque risk assessment and therapeutic response monitor. Although larger clinical studies are still needed, DCE-MRI has been proven to be a promising tool to reveal more about intraplaque inflammation by in vivo quantitative inflammation imaging. PMID:24404443

  19. Contrast-enhanced synthetic MRI for the detection of brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Masaaki; Suzuki, Michimasa; Andica, Christina; Nakazawa, Misaki; Tsuruta, Kouhei; Takano, Nao; Sato, Shuji; Hamasaki, Nozomi; Yoshida, Mariko; Kumamaru, Kanako Kunishima; Ohtomo, Kuni; Aoki, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Background Synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a technique that enables creation of various contrast-weighted images from a single MRI quantification scan, is a useful clinical tool. However, there are currently no reports examining the use of contrast-enhanced synthetic MRI for detecting brain metastases. Purpose To assess whether contrast-enhanced synthetic MRI is suitable for detecting brain metastases. Material and Methods Ten patients with a combined total of 167 brain metastases who underwent quantitative MRI and conventional T1-weighted inversion recovery fast spin-echo (conventional T1IR) MRI before and after administration of a contrast agent were included in the study. Synthetic T1IR and T1-weighted (synthetic T1W) images were produced after parameter quantification. Lesion-to-white matter contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated for each image. The number of visible lesions in each image was determined by two neuroradiologists. Results The mean lesion-to-white matter contrast and mean contrast-to-noise ratio of the synthetic T1IR images were significantly higher than those of the synthetic T1W (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively) and conventional T1IR (P = 0.04 and P = 0.002, respectively) images. Totals of 130 and 124 metastases were detected in the synthetic T1IR images by the first and second radiologists, respectively. The corresponding numbers were 91 and 85 in the synthetic T1W images and 119 and 119 in the conventional T1IR images. Statistical significance was not found among detected numbers of lesions. Conclusion Synthetic T1IR imaging created better contrast compared with synthetic T1W or conventional T1IR imaging. The ability to detect brain metastases was comparable among these imaging. PMID:26962461

  20. Oxygen-Enhanced MRI Accurately Identifies, Quantifies, and Maps Tumor Hypoxia in Preclinical Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B; Boult, Jessica K R; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff J M; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2016-02-15

    There is a clinical need for noninvasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning, and therapy monitoring. Oxygen-enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed "Oxy-R fraction") would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here, we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise, and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia noninvasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic. Cancer Res; 76(4); 787-95. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26659574

  1. Novel kinetic texture features for breast lesion classification on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agner, Shannon C.; Soman, Salil; Libfeld, Edward; McDonald, Margie; Rosen, Mark A.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Chin, Deanna; Nosher, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI has emerged as a promising new imaging modality for breast cancer screening. Currently, radiologists evaluate breast lesions based on qualitative description of lesion morphology and contrast uptake profiles. However, the subjectivity associated with qualitative description of breast lesions on DCE-MRI introduces a high degree of inter-observer variability. In addition, the high sensitivity of MRI results in poor specificity and thus a high rate of biopsies on benign lesions. Computer aided diagnosis (CAD) methods have been previously proposed for breast MRI, but research in the field is far from comprehensive. Most previous work has focused on either quantifying morphological attributes used by radiologists, characterizing lesion intensity profiles which reflect uptake of contrast dye, or characterizing lesion texture. While there has been much debate on the relative importance of the different classes of features (e.g., morphological, textural, and kinetic), comprehensive quantitative comparisons between the different lesion attributes have been rare. In addition, although kinetic signal enhancement curves may give insight into the underlying physiology of the lesion, signal intensity is susceptible to MRI acquisition artifacts such as bias field and intensity non-standardness. In this paper, we introduce a novel lesion feature that we call the kinetic texture feature, which we demonstrate to be superior compared to the lesion intensity profile dynamics. Our hypothesis is that since lesion intensity is susceptible to artifacts, lesion texture changes better reflect lesion class (benign or malignant). In this paper, we quantitatively demonstrate the superiority of kinetic texture features for lesion classification on 18 breast DCE-MRI studies compared to over 500 different morphological, kinetic intensity, and lesion texture features. In conjunction with linear and non-linear dimensionality reduction methods, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier yielded classification accuracy and positive predictive values of 78% and 86% with kinetic texture features compared to 78% and 73% with morphological features and 72% and 83% with textural features, respectively.

  2. Diffusion-weighted MRI monitoring of pancreatic cancer response to radiofrequency heat-enhanced intratumor chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Feng; Meng, Yanfeng; Wang, Han; Le, Thomas; Wei, Baojie; Lee, Donghoon; Willis, Patrick; Shen, Baozhong; Yang, Xiaoming

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using diffusion-weighted MRI to monitor the early response of pancreatic cancers to radiofrequency heat (RFH)-enhanced chemotherapy. Human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1) in different groups and 24 mice with pancreatic cancer xenografts in four groups were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as a control, RFH at 42 °C, gemcitabine and gemcitabine plus RFH at 42 °C. One day before and 1, 7 and 14 days after treatment, diffusion-weighted MRI and T2 -weighted imaging were applied to monitor the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of tumors and tumor growth. MRI findings were correlated with the results of tumor apoptosis analysis. In the in vitro experiments, the quantitative viability assay showed lower relative cell viabilities for treatment with gemcitabine plus RFH at 42 °C relative to treatment with RFH only and gemcitabine only (37 ± 5% versus 65 ± 4% and 58 ± 8%, respectively, p < 0.05). In the in vivo experiments, the combination therapy resulted in smaller relative tumor volumes than RFH only and chemotherapy only (0.82 ± 0.17 versus 2.23 ± 0.90 and 1.64 ± 0.44, respectively, p = 0.003). In vivo, 14-T MRI demonstrated a remarkable decrease in ADCs at day 1 and increased ADCs at days 7 and 14 in the combination therapy group. The apoptosis index in the combination therapy group was significantly higher than those in the chemotherapy-only, RFH-only and PBS treatment groups (37 ± 6% versus 20 ± 5%, 8 ± 2% and 3 ± 1%, respectively, p < 0.05). This study confirms that it is feasible to use MRI to monitor RFH-enhanced chemotherapy in pancreatic cancers, which may present new options for the efficient treatment of pancreatic malignancies using MRI/RFH-integrated local chemotherapy. PMID:24038282

  3. Efficient compressed sensing SENSE parallel MRI reconstruction with joint sparsity promotion and mutual incoherence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Il Yong Chun; Adcock, Ben; Talavage, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered a key modality for the future as it offers several advantages, including the use of non-ionizing radiation and having no known side effects on the human body, and has recently begun to serve as a key component of multi-modal neuroimaging. However, two major intrinsic problems exist: slow acquisition and intrusive acoustic noise. Parallel MRI (pMRI) techniques accelerate acquisition by reducing the duration and coverage of conventional gradient encoding. The under-sampled k-space data is detected with several receiver coils surrounding the object, using distinct spatial encoding information for each coil element to reconstruct the image. However, this scanning remains slow compared to typical clinical imaging (e.g. X-ray CT). Compressed Sensing (CS), a sampling theory based on random sub-sampling, has potential to further reduce the sampling used in pMRI, accelerating acquisition further. In this work, we propose a new CS SENSE pMRI reconstruction model promoting joint sparsity across channels and enhancing mutual incoherence to improve reconstruction accuracy from limited k-space data. For fast image reconstruction and fair comparisons, all reconstructions are computed with split-Bregman and variable splitting techniques. Numerical results show that, with the introduced methods, reconstruction performance can be crucially improved with limited amount of k-space data. PMID:25570479

  4. Perceptual enhancement of arteriovenous malformation in MRI angiography displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhari, Kamyar; Baxter, John S. H.; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2012-02-01

    The importance of presenting medical images in an intuitive and usable manner during a procedure is essential. However, most medical visualization interfaces, particularly those designed for minimally-invasive surgery, suffer from a number of issues as a consequence of disregarding the human perceptual, cognitive, and motor system's limitations. This matter is even more prominent when human visual system is overlooked during the design cycle. One example is the visualization of the neuro-vascular structures in MR angiography (MRA) images. This study investigates perceptual performance in the usability of a display to visualize blood vessels in MRA volumes using a contour enhancement technique. Our results show that when contours are enhanced, our participants, in general, can perform faster with higher level of accuracy when judging the connectivity of different vessels. One clinical outcome of such perceptual enhancement is improvement of spatial reasoning needed for planning complex neuro-vascular operations such as treating Arteriovenous Malformations (AVMs). The success of an AVM intervention greatly depends on fully understanding the anatomy of vascular structures. However, poor visualization of pre-operative MRA images makes the planning of such a treatment quite challenging.

  5. Cardiac Amyloidosis: Typical Imaging Findings and Diffuse Myocardial Damage Demonstrated by Delayed Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Eijun Sakamoto, Ichiro; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Tanaka, Kyouei; Toda, Genji

    2006-08-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare systemic disease. However, involvement of the heart is a common finding and is the most frequent cause of death in amyloidosis. We report the sonographic, scintigraphic, and MRI features of a pathologically proven case of cardiac amyloidosis. Delayed contrast-enhanced MR images, using an inversion recovery prepped gradient-echo sequence, revealed diffuse enhancement in the wall of both left and right ventricles. This enhancement suggested expansion of the extracellular space of the myocardium caused by diffuse myocardial necrosis secondary to deposition of amyloid.

  6. Voluntary Enhancement of Neural Signatures of Affiliative Emotion Using fMRI Neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Jorge; Weingartner, Julie H.; Bado, Patricia; Basilio, Rodrigo; Sato, João R.; Melo, Bruno R.; Bramati, Ivanei E.; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Zahn, Roland

    2014-01-01

    In Ridley Scott’s film “Blade Runner”, empathy-detection devices are employed to measure affiliative emotions. Despite recent neurocomputational advances, it is unknown whether brain signatures of affiliative emotions, such as tenderness/affection, can be decoded and voluntarily modulated. Here, we employed multivariate voxel pattern analysis and real-time fMRI to address this question. We found that participants were able to use visual feedback based on decoded fMRI patterns as a neurofeedback signal to increase brain activation characteristic of tenderness/affection relative to pride, an equally complex control emotion. Such improvement was not observed in a control group performing the same fMRI task without neurofeedback. Furthermore, the neurofeedback-driven enhancement of tenderness/affection-related distributed patterns was associated with local fMRI responses in the septohypothalamic area and frontopolar cortex, regions previously implicated in affiliative emotion. This demonstrates that humans can voluntarily enhance brain signatures of tenderness/affection, unlocking new possibilities for promoting prosocial emotions and countering antisocial behavior. PMID:24847819

  7. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Hakon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfor, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile-time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile-time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile-time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile-time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile-time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  8. Intraoperative detection of glioma invasion beyond MRI enhancement with Raman spectroscopy in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Mercier, Jeanne; Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Saint-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    Cancer tissue is frequently impossible to distinguish from normal brain during surgery. Gliomas are a class of brain cancer which invade into the normal brain. If left unresected, these invasive cancer cells are the source of glioma recurrence. Moreover, these invasion areas do not show up on standard-of-care pre-operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This inability to fully visualize invasive brain cancers results in subtotal surgical resections, negatively impacting patient survival. To address this issue, we have demonstrated the efficacy of single-point in vivo Raman spectroscopy using a contact hand-held fiber optic probe for rapid detection of cancer invasion in 8 patients with low and high grade gliomas. Using a supervised machine learning algorithm to analyze the Raman spectra obtained in vivo, we were able to distinguish normal brain from the presence of cancer cells with sensitivity and specificity greater than 90%. Moreover, by correlating these results with pre-operative MRI we demonstrate the ability to detect low density cancer invasion up to 1.5cm beyond the cancer extent visible using MRI. This represents the potential for significant improvements in progression-free and overall patient survival, by identifying previously undetectable residual cancer cell populations and preventing the resection of normal brain tissue. While the importance of maximizing the volume of tumor resection is important for all grades of gliomas, the impact for low grade gliomas can be dramatic because surgery can even be curative. This convenient technology can rapidly classify cancer invasion in real-time, making it ideal for intraoperative use in brain tumor resection.

  9. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Culling, Ross D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI. PMID:25379439

  10. Distinguishing species.

    PubMed

    Mller, Tobias; Philippi, Nicole; Dandekar, Thomas; Schultz, Jrg; Wolf, Matthias

    2007-09-01

    Given two organisms, how can one distinguish whether they belong to the same species or not? This might be straightforward for two divergent organisms, but can be extremely difficult and laborious for closely related ones. A molecular marker giving a clear distinction would therefore be of immense benefit. The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) has been widely used for low-level phylogenetic analyses. Case studies revealed that a compensatory base change (CBC) in the helix II or helix III ITS2 secondary structure between two organisms correlated with sexual incompatibility. We analyzed more than 1300 closely related species to test whether this correlation is generally applicable. In 93%, where a CBC was found between organisms classified within the same genus, they belong to different species. Thus, a CBC in an ITS2 sequence-structure alignment is a sufficient condition to distinguish even closely related species. PMID:17652131

  11. Added value of diffusion-weighted MRI in detection of cervical cancer recurrence: comparison with morphologic and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rita; Dias, João Lopes; Cunha, Teresa Margarida

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the added value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting post-treatment cervical cancer recurrence. The detection accuracy of T2-weighted (T2W) images was compared with that of T2W MRI combined with either dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI or DWI. METHODS Thirty-eight women with clinically suspected uterine cervical cancer recurrence more than six months after treatment completion were examined with 1.5 Tesla MRI including T2W, DCE, and DWI sequences. Disease was confirmed histologically and correlated with MRI findings. The diagnostic performance of T2W imaging and its combination with either DCE or DWI were analyzed. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. RESULTS Thirty-six women had histologically proven recurrence. The accuracy for recurrence detection was 80% with T2W/DCE MRI and 92.1% with T2W/DWI. The addition of DCE sequences did not significantly improve the diagnostic ability of T2W imaging, and this sequence combination misclassified two patients as falsely positive and seven as falsely negative. The T2W/DWI combination revealed a positive predictive value of 100% and only three false negatives. CONCLUSION The addition of DWI to T2W sequences considerably improved the diagnostic ability of MRI. Our results support the inclusion of DWI in the initial MRI protocol for the detection of cervical cancer recurrence, leaving DCE sequences as an option for uncertain cases. PMID:26200480

  12. Diffusion-tensor imaging as an adjunct to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for improved accuracy of differential diagnosis between breast ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Cao, Kun; Li, Yanling; Li, Xiaoting; Qi, Liping; Tang, Lei; Wang, Zhilong; Gao, Shunyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the value of diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) as an adjunct to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for improved accuracy of differential diagnosis between breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). Methods The MRI data of 63 patients pathologically confirmed as breast cancer were analyzed. The conventional MRI analysis metrics included enhancement style, initial enhancement characteristic, maximum slope of increase, time to peak, time signal intensity curve (TIC) pattern, and signal intensity on FS-T2WI. The values of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), directionally-averaged mean diffusivity (Davg), exponential attenuation (EA), fractional anisotropy (FA), volume ratio (VR) and relative anisotropy (RA) were calculated and compared between DCIS and IBC. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent factors for distinguishing IBC and DCIS. The diagnostic performance of the diagnosis equation was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The diagnostic efficacies of DCE-MRI, DWI and DTI were compared independently or combined. Results EA value, lesion enhancement style and TIC pattern were identified as independent factor for differential diagnosis of IBC and DCIS. The combination diagnosis showed higher diagnostic efficacy than a single use of DCE-MRI (P=0.02), and the area of the curve was improved from 0.84 (95% CI, 0.67-0.99) to 0.94 (95% CI, 0.85-1.00). Conclusions Quantitative DTI measurement as an adjunct to DCE-MRI could improve the diagnostic performance of differential diagnosis between DCIS and IBC compared to a single use of DCE-MRI. PMID:25937784

  13. Enhanced brain connectivity in math-gifted adolescents: An fMRI study using mental rotation.

    PubMed

    Prescott, James; Gavrilescu, Maria; Cunnington, Ross; O'Boyle, Michael W; Egan, Gary F

    2010-12-01

    Mathematical giftedness is a form of intelligence related to enhanced mathematical reasoning that can be tested using a variety of numerical and spatial tasks. A number of neurobiological mechanisms related to exceptional mathematical reasoning ability have been postulated, including enhanced brain connectivity. We aimed to further investigate this possibility by comparing a group of mathematically gifted adolescents with an average math ability control group performing mental rotation of complex three-dimensional block figures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected and differences in intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connectivity between the groups were assessed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The math-gifted showed heightened intrahemispheric frontoparietal connectivity, as well as enhanced interhemispheric frontal connectivity between the dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortex. These enhanced connectivity patterns are consistent with previous studies linking increased activation of the frontal and parietal regions with high fluid intelligence, and may be a unique neural characteristic of the mathematically gifted brain. PMID:24168381

  14. Use of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to measure subtle blood-brain barrier abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Paul A; Farrall, Andrew J; Carpenter, Trevor K; Doubal, Fergus N; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2011-04-01

    There is growing interest in investigating the role of subtle changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) function in common neurological disorders and the possible use of imaging techniques to assess these abnormalities. Some studies have used dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and these have demonstrated much smaller signal changes than obtained from more traditional applications of the technique, such as in intracranial tumors and multiple sclerosis. In this work, preliminary results are presented from a DCE-MRI study of patients with mild stroke classified according to the extent of visible underlying white matter abnormalities. These data are used to estimate typical signal enhancement profiles in different tissue types and by degrees of white matter abnormality. The effect of scanner noise, drift and different intrinsic tissue properties on signal enhancement data is also investigated and the likely implications for interpreting the enhancement profiles are discussed. No significant differences in average signal enhancement or contrast agent concentration were observed between patients with different degrees of white matter abnormality, although there was a trend towards greater signal enhancement with more abnormal white matter. Furthermore, the results suggest that many of the factors considered introduce uncertainty of a similar magnitude to expected effect sizes, making it unclear whether differences in signal enhancement are truly reflective of an underlying BBB abnormality or due to an unrelated effect. As the ultimate aim is to achieve a reliable quantification of BBB function in subtle disorders, this study highlights the factors which may influence signal enhancement and suggests that further work is required to address the challenging problems of quantifying contrast agent concentration in healthy and diseased living human tissue and of establishing a suitable model to enable quantification of relevant physiological parameters. Meanwhile, it is essential that future studies use an appropriate control group to minimize these influences. PMID:21030178

  15. The dynamic of FUS-induced BBB Opening in Mouse Brain assessed by contrast enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Maier, Florian; Krause, Marie N.; Kleber, Susanne; Huber, Peter E.; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Bock, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with the administration of gas-filled microbubbles, can induce a localized and reversible opening of the blood brain barrier (BBB). Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated as a precise tool to monitor such a local BBB disruption. However, the opening/closing mechanisms of the BBB with FUS are still largely unknown. In this ongoing project, we study the BBB opening dynamics in mouse brain comparing an interstitial and an intravascular MR contrast agent (CA). FUS in mouse brain was performed with an MRI compatible treatment setup (1.7 MHz fix-focus US transducer, f' = 68 mm, NA = 0.44; focus: 8.1 mm length; O/ = 1.1 mm) in a 1.5 T whole body MRI system. For BBB opening, forty 10 ms-long FUS-pulses were applied at a repetition rate of 1 Hz at 1 MPa. The i.v. administration of the micro bubbles (50 μl SonoVue®) was started simultaneously with FUS exposure. To analyze the BBB opening process, short-term and long-term MRI signal dynamics of the interstitial MR contrast agent Magnevist® and the intravascular CA Vasovist® (Bayer-Schering) were studied. To assess short-term signal dynamics, T1-weighted inversion recovery turbo FLASH images (1s) were repeatedly acquired. Repeated 3D FLASH acquisitions (90 s) were used to assess long-term MRI signal dynamics. The short-term MRI signal enhancements showed comparable time constants for both types of MR contrast agents: 1.1 s (interstitial) vs. 0.8 s (intravascular). This time constant may serve as a time constant of the BBB opening process with the given FUS exposure parameters. For the long-term signal dynamics the intravascular CA (62±10 min) showed a fife times greater time constant as the interstitial contrast agent (12±10 min). This might be explained by the high molecular weight (˜60 kDa) of the intravascular Vasovist due to its reversible binding to blood serum albumin resulting in a prolonged half-life in the blood stream compared to the interstitial CA. As the intravascular CA offers a much longer time window for therapy assessment, FUS-BBB therapy control with an intravascular CA might be favorable.

  16. Quantification of fibrosis in infarcted swine hearts by ex vivo late gadolinium-enhancement and diffusion-weighted MRI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Ramanan, Venkat; Morikawa, Lily; Stanisz, Greg; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-08-01

    Many have speculated that MRI signal characteristics can be used to identify regions of heterogeneous infarct associated with an arrhythmogenic substrate; however, direct evidence of this relationship is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the remodelling characteristics of fibrosis by means of histology and high-resolution MR imaging. For this purpose, we performed whole-mount histology in heart samples (n = 9) collected from five swine at six weeks post-infarction and compared the extent of fibrosis in the infarcted areas delineated in these histological images with that obtained ex vivo by MRI using late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) methods. All MR images were obtained at a submillimetre resolution (i.e., voxel size of 0.6×0.6×1.2 mm3). Specifically, in the histology images, we differentiated moderate fibrosis (consisting of a mixture of viable and non-viable myocytes, known as border zone, BZ) from severe fibrosis (i.e., the dense scar). Correspondingly, tissue heterogeneities in the MR images were categorized by a Gaussian mixture model into healthy, BZ and scar. Our results showed that (a) both MRI methods were capable of qualitatively distinguishing sharp edges between dense scar and healthy tissue from regions of heterogeneous BZ; (b) the BZ and dense scar areas had intermediate-to-high increased values of signal intensity in the LGE images and of apparent diffusion coefficient in the DWI, respectively. In addition, as demonstrated by the Picrosirius Red and immunohistochemistry stains, the viable bundles in the BZ were clearly separated by thin collagen strands and had reduced expression of Cx43, whereas the core scar was composed of dense fibrosis. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the comparison between BZ/scar extent in LGE and DWI to the corresponding areas identified in histology yielded very good correlations (i.e., for the scar identified by LGE, R2 was 0.96 compared to R2 = 0.93 for the scar identified in ADC maps, whereas the BZ had R2 = 0.95 for the correlation between LGE and histology compared to R2 = 0.91 obtained for ADC). This novel study represents an intermediate step in translating such research to the in vivo stages, as well as in establishing the best and most accurate MR method to help identify arrhythmia substrate in patients with structural heart disease.

  17. Simultaneous tDCS-fMRI Identifies Resting State Networks Correlated with Visual Search Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Callan, Daniel E.; Falcone, Brian; Wada, Atsushi; Parasuraman, Raja

    2016-01-01

    This study uses simultaneous transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate tDCS modulation of resting state activity and connectivity that underlies enhancement in behavioral performance. The experiment consisted of three sessions within the fMRI scanner in which participants conducted a visual search task: Session 1: Pre-training (no performance feedback), Session 2: Training (performance feedback given), Session 3: Post-training (no performance feedback). Resting state activity was recorded during the last 5 min of each session. During the 2nd session one group of participants underwent 1 mA tDCS stimulation and another underwent sham stimulation over the right posterior parietal cortex. Resting state spontaneous activity, as measured by fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF), for session 2 showed significant differences between the tDCS stim and sham groups in the precuneus. Resting state functional connectivity from the precuneus to the substantia nigra, a subcortical dopaminergic region, was found to correlate with future improvement in visual search task performance for the stim over the sham group during active stimulation in session 2. The after-effect of stimulation on resting state functional connectivity was measured following a post-training experimental session (session 3). The left cerebellum Lobule VIIa Crus I showed performance related enhancement in resting state functional connectivity for the tDCS stim over the sham group. The ability to determine the relationship that the relative strength of resting state functional connectivity for an individual undergoing tDCS has on future enhancement in behavioral performance has wide ranging implications for neuroergonomic as well as therapeutic, and rehabilitative applications. PMID:27014014

  18. Simultaneous tDCS-fMRI Identifies Resting State Networks Correlated with Visual Search Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Callan, Daniel E; Falcone, Brian; Wada, Atsushi; Parasuraman, Raja

    2016-01-01

    This study uses simultaneous transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate tDCS modulation of resting state activity and connectivity that underlies enhancement in behavioral performance. The experiment consisted of three sessions within the fMRI scanner in which participants conducted a visual search task: Session 1: Pre-training (no performance feedback), Session 2: Training (performance feedback given), Session 3: Post-training (no performance feedback). Resting state activity was recorded during the last 5 min of each session. During the 2nd session one group of participants underwent 1 mA tDCS stimulation and another underwent sham stimulation over the right posterior parietal cortex. Resting state spontaneous activity, as measured by fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF), for session 2 showed significant differences between the tDCS stim and sham groups in the precuneus. Resting state functional connectivity from the precuneus to the substantia nigra, a subcortical dopaminergic region, was found to correlate with future improvement in visual search task performance for the stim over the sham group during active stimulation in session 2. The after-effect of stimulation on resting state functional connectivity was measured following a post-training experimental session (session 3). The left cerebellum Lobule VIIa Crus I showed performance related enhancement in resting state functional connectivity for the tDCS stim over the sham group. The ability to determine the relationship that the relative strength of resting state functional connectivity for an individual undergoing tDCS has on future enhancement in behavioral performance has wide ranging implications for neuroergonomic as well as therapeutic, and rehabilitative applications. PMID:27014014

  19. Super-resolved enhancing and edge deghosting (SEED) for spatiotemporally encoded single-shot MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Li, Jing; Zhang, Miao; Cai, Shuhui; Zhang, Ting; Cai, Congbo; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) single-shot MRI is an ultrafast MRI technique proposed recently, which utilizes quadratic rather than linear phase profile to extract the spatial information. Compared to the echo planar imaging (EPI), this technique has great advantages in resisting field inhomogeneity and chemical shift effects. Super-resolved (SR) reconstruction is adopted to compensate the inherent low resolution of SPEN images. Due to insufficient sampling rate, the SR image is challenged by aliasing artifacts and edge ghosts. The existing SR algorithms always compromise in spatial resolution to suppress these undesirable artifacts. In this paper, we proposed a novel SR algorithm termed super-resolved enhancing and edge deghosting (SEED). Different from artifacts suppression methods, our algorithm aims at exploiting the relationship between aliasing artifacts and real signal. Based on this relationship, the aliasing artifacts can be eliminated without spatial resolution loss. According to the trait of edge ghosts, finite differences and high-pass filter are employed to extract the prior knowledge of edge ghosts. By combining the prior knowledge with compressed sensing, our algorithm can efficiently reduce the edge ghosts. The robustness of SEED is demonstrated by experiments under various situations. The results indicate that the SEED can provide better spatial resolution compared to state-of-the-art SR reconstruction algorithms in SPEN MRI. Theoretical analysis and experimental results also show that the SR images reconstructed by SEED have better spatial resolution than the images obtained with conventional k-space encoding methods under similar experimental condition. PMID:25910683

  20. DCE@urLAB: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI pharmacokinetic analysis tool for preclinical data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DCE@urLAB is a software application for analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data (DCE-MRI). The tool incorporates a friendly graphical user interface (GUI) to interactively select and analyze a region of interest (ROI) within the image set, taking into account the tissue concentration of the contrast agent (CA) and its effect on pixel intensity. Results Pixel-wise model-based quantitative parameters are estimated by fitting DCE-MRI data to several pharmacokinetic models using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA). DCE@urLAB also includes the semi-quantitative parametric and heuristic analysis approaches commonly used in practice. This software application has been programmed in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) and tested both with publicly available simulated data and preclinical studies from tumor-bearing mouse brains. Conclusions A user-friendly solution for applying pharmacokinetic and non-quantitative analysis DCE-MRI in preclinical studies has been implemented and tested. The proposed tool has been specially designed for easy selection of multi-pixel ROIs. A public release of DCE@urLAB, together with the open source code and sample datasets, is available at http://www.die.upm.es/im/archives/DCEurLAB/. PMID:24180558

  1. Quantifying heterogeneity of lesion uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahaliou, A.; Vassiou, K.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Kanavou, T.; Yiakoumelos, A.; Costaridou, L.

    2009-07-01

    The current study investigates whether texture features extracted from lesion kinetics feature maps can be used for breast cancer diagnosis. Fifty five women with 57 breast lesions (27 benign, 30 malignant) were subjected to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) on 1.5T system. A linear-slope model was fitted pixel-wise to a representative lesion slice time series and fitted parameters were used to create three kinetic maps (wash out, time to peak enhancement and peak enhancement). 28 grey level co-occurrence matrices features were extracted from each lesion kinetic map. The ability of texture features per map in discriminating malignant from benign lesions was investigated using a Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. Additional classification was performed by combining classification outputs of most discriminating feature subsets from the three maps, via majority voting. The combined scheme outperformed classification based on individual maps achieving area under Receiver Operating Characteristics curve 0.9600.029. Results suggest that heterogeneity of breast lesion kinetics, as quantified by texture analysis, may contribute to computer assisted tissue characterization in DCE-MRI.

  2. Combined Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Liver MRI and MRA Using Interleaved Variable Density Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Mahdi Salmani; Korosec, Frank R.; Wang, Kang; Holmes, James H.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Bannas, Peter; Reeder, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a method for volumetric contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the liver, with high spatial and temporal resolutions, for combined dynamic imaging and MR angiography using a single injection of contrast. Methods An interleaved variable density (IVD) undersampling pattern was implemented in combination with a real-time-triggered, time-resolved, dual-echo 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence. Parallel imaging autocalibration lines were acquired only once during the first time-frame. Imaging was performed in ten subjects with focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and compared with their clinical MRI. The angiographic phase of the proposed method was compared to a dedicated MR angiogram acquired during a second injection of contrast. Results A total of 21 FNH, 3 cavernous hemangiomas, and 109 arterial segments were visualized in 10 subjects. The temporally-resolved images depicted the characteristic arterial enhancement pattern of the lesions with a 4 s update rate. Images were graded as having significantly higher quality compared to the clinical MRI. Angiograms produced from the IVD method provided non-inferior diagnostic assessment compared to the dedicated MRA. Conclusion Using an undersampled IVD imaging method, we have demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging and simultaneous MRA of the liver. PMID:24639130

  3. Quantitative MRI of colonic mural enhancement: segmental differences exist in endoscopically proven normal colon

    PubMed Central

    Punwani, S; Hafeez, R; Bainbridge, A; Boulos, P; Halligan, S; Bloom, S; Taylor, S A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Abnormal contrast enhancement on MRI is advocated as a biomarker for inflammation in colitis, although the enhancement kinetics of normal colon are poorly described. Our purpose was to quantitatively assess mural enhancement in normal colon and test for intersegmental differences. Methods Eight patients without prior history of inflammatory bowel disease underwent standard MRI colonography followed by normal same-day colonoscopy. Acquired sequences included a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) to encompass the whole colonic volume, performed at 5°, 10° and 35° flip angles for T1 quantitation and then at a fixed 35° flip angle three times prior to and every 30 s following intravenous gadoterate meglumine for 220 s. Ascending colon, descending colon and rectal R1 (1/T1) was plotted against time. Mean pre-contrast R1, initial change of R1 (ΔR1), early and late “plateau phase” enhancement and the area under the R1–time (AUC–R1) curve were compared between segments using the Student's paired t-test. Results There was no significant difference of pre-contrast R1 between segments (p=0.49 to 0.62). ΔR1 was higher for ascending colon compared with descending colon (0.0023±0.0012 ms−1 vs 0.0010±0.0011 ms−1, p=0.03). There was no significant difference for early or late plateau phase R1 between colonic segments (p=0.08 to 1.00). AUC–R1 was greater for ascending than descending colon (0.54±0.19 vs 0.30±0.14, p=0.03). Conclusions Intersegmental differences in colonic enhancement are present and should be considered when interpreting differential segmental enhancement. PMID:22919009

  4. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  5. Water-dispersible ascorbic-acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles for contrast enhancement in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Jayaprabha, K. N.; Joy, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of size ~5 nm surface functionalized with ascorbic acid (vitamin C) form a stable dispersion in water with a hydrodynamic size of ~30 nm. The anti-oxidant property of ascorbic acid is retained after capping, as evidenced from the capability of converting methylene blue to its reduced leuco form. NMR relaxivity studies show that the ascorbic-acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide aqueous nanofluid is suitable as a contrast enhancement agent for MRI applications, coupled with the excellent biocompatibility and medicinal values of ascorbic acid.

  6. Reproducible imaging of rat corticothalamic pathway by longitudinal manganese-enhanced MRI (L-MEMRI).

    PubMed

    Soria, Guadalupe; Wiedermann, Dirk; Justicia, Carles; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-07-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been described as a powerful tool to depict the architecture of neuronal circuits. The aim of the present study was to optimize the experimental conditions of MEMRI that permits the study of insult-induced alterations of the somatosensory pathway in a longitudinal way, and to provide functional information on rat corticothalamic connectivity or disturbances thereof. A guidance screw was implanted in the skull of the rats, over the forelimb representation area of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1fl), allowing repetitive injections at the same stereotactic coordinates. MnCl2 (200 nL, 0.3 M) was injected 1.5 mm below the dura using a calibrated microcapillary. Animals received MnCl2 injections 3 times at 15 day intervals. Spatiotemporal patterns showed a significant hyperintensity on T1-weighted images induced by manganese transport in structures related to the somatosensory pathway, i.e. globus pallidus, caudate putamen, thalamus and substantia nigra. 7 days after MnCl2 injection hyperintensity was only evident at some points surrounding the injection site. Complete loss of manganese-induced contrast was achieved after 15 days after injection. Functional MRI (fMRI) experiments were performed under the same conditions, 24 h after MnCl2 injection. Activation of S1fl was observed showing that fMRI and MEMRI studies are compatible and can be performed in parallel in the same animals. The present study shows, for the first time, a robust and reproducible technique to perform longitudinal MEMRI (L-MEMRI) experiments and to study the time course of alterations of the corticothalamic connections following stroke in the rat. PMID:18445533

  7. Qualitative and quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging of the breast at 3T - A useful adjunct to contrast-enhanced MRI in characterization of breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Richa; Shah, Viral; Aggarwal, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To distinguish between benign and malignant breast lesions on the basis of their signal intensity on diffusion-weighted imaging and their apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values at 3 T MRI, along with histopathological correlation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 500 patients who underwent 3 T MRI between August 2011 and May 2013 was done. Of these, 226 patients with 232 lesions that were proved by histopathology were included in the study. ADC values were calculated at b values of 0, 1000, and 1500 s/mm2 after identification on contrast-enhanced images and appropriate ROI(Region of interest) placement. ADC value and histopathology correlation was analyzed. Results: Out of 232 lesions, 168 lesions were histologically malignant and 64 were histologically benign. With an ADC cut-off value of 1.1 ×10−3 mm2/s for malignant lesions, a sensitivity of 92.80% and specificity of 80.23% was obtained. Out of 12/232 false-negative lesions, 6 were mucinous carcinoma in which a high ADC value of 1.8-1.9 ×10−3 mm2/s was obtained. Purely DCIS (Ductal carcinoma in situ) lesions presenting as non-mass-like enhancement had a high ADC value of 1.2-1.5 ×10−3 mm2/s, thereby reducing specificity. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted Imaging and quantitative assessment by ADC values may act as an effective parameter in increasing the diagnostic accuracy and specificity of contrast-enhanced breast MRI in characterization of breast lesions. PMID:26751011

  8. The MRI Contrast Agent Gadoteridol Enhances Distribution of rAAV1 in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hullinger, Rikki; Ugalde, Jeanet; Purón-Sierra, Liliana; Osting, Sue; Burger, Corinna

    2013-01-01

    Contrast agents are commonly used in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor the distribution of molecules in the brain. Recent experiments conducted in our laboratory have shown that co-infusion of recombinant Adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (rAAV5) and the MRI contrast agent gadoteridol (Gd) enhances vector transduction of in the rat striatum. The goal of this study was to determine whether gadoteridol may also be used as a tool to enhance transduction efficiency of rAAV1 and rAAV5 within the rat hippocampus. We show that Gd/rAAV1-GFP but not Gd/rAAV5-GFP co-infusion results in significantly higher distribution of the transgene both in the injected hemisphere as well as in the contralateral side and adjacent areas of cortex along the injection track. We also show that Gd/rAAV1-GFP co-infusion has no deleterious effect on hippocampal function as assessed by two tests of spatial memory formation. This work indicates that gadoteridol can be exploited as a method to increase transduction efficiency of AAV1 in the hippocampus for animal studies. PMID:24048419

  9. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  10. Imaging Modalities for Assessment of Treatment Response to Nonsurgical Hepatocellular Carcinoma Therapy: Contrast-Enhanced US, CT, and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Yasunori; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Tumor response and time to progression have been considered pivotal for surrogate assessment of treatment efficacy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent advancements in imaging modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are playing an important role in assessing the therapeutic effects of HCC treatments. According to some HCC clinical guidelines, post-therapeutic evaluation of HCC patients is based exclusively on contrast-enhanced dynamic imaging criteria. The recommended techniques are contrast-enhanced CT or contrast-enhanced MRI. Contrast-enhanced US is employed more in the positive diagnosis of HCC than in post-therapeutic monitoring. Although contrast enhancement is an important finding on imaging, enhancement does not necessarily depict the same phenomenon across modalities. We need to become well acquainted with the characteristics of each modality, including not only contrast-enhanced CT and MRI but also contrast-enhanced US. Many nonsurgical treatment options are now available for unresectable HCC, and accurate assessment of tumor response is essential to achieve favorable outcomes. For the assessment of successful radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the achievement of a sufficient ablation margin as well the absence of tumor vascular enhancement is essential. To evaluate the response to transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), enhanced tumor shrinkage is relied on as a measure of antitumor activity. Here, we give an overview of the current status of imaging assessment of HCC response to nonsurgical treatments including RFA and TACE. PMID:26697413

  11. Calculation of intravascular signal in dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI using adaptive complex independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Chopra, Rajiv; Martel, Anne L

    2013-04-01

    Assessing tumor response to therapy is a crucial step in personalized treatments. Pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling provides quantitative information about tumor perfusion and vascular permeability that are associated with prognostic factors. A fundamental step in most PK analyses is calculating the signal that is generated in the tumor vasculature. This signal is usually inseparable from the extravascular extracellular signal. It was shown previously using in vivo and phantom experiments that independent component analysis (ICA) is capable of calculating the intravascular time-intensity curve in dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. A novel adaptive complex independent component analysis (AC-ICA) technique is developed in this study to calculate the intravascular time-intensity curve and separate this signal from the DCE-MR images of tumors. The use of the complex-valued DCE-MRI images rather than the commonly used magnitude images satisfied the fundamental assumption of ICA, i.e., linear mixing of the sources. Using an adaptive cost function in ICA through estimating the probability distribution of the tumor vasculature at each iteration resulted in a more robust and accurate separation algorithm. The AC-ICA algorithm provided a better estimate for the intravascular time-intensity curve than the previous ICA-based method. A simulation study was also developed in this study to realistically simulate DCE-MRI data of a leaky tissue mimicking phantom. The passage of the MR contrast agent through the leaky phantom was modeled with finite element analysis using a diffusion model. Once the distribution of the contrast agent in the imaging field of view was calculated, DCE-MRI data was generated by solving the Bloch equation for each voxel at each time point. The intravascular time-intensity curve calculation results were compared to the previously proposed ICA-based intravascular time-intensity curve calculation method that applied ICA to the magnitude of the DCE-MRI data (Mag-ICA) using both simulated and experimental tissue mimicking phantoms. The AC-ICA demonstrated superior performance compared to the Mag-ICA method. AC-ICA provided more accurate estimate of intravascular time-intensity curve, having smaller error between the calculated and actual intravascular time-intensity curves compared to the Mag-ICA. Furthermore, it showed higher robustness in dealing with datasets with different resolution by providing smaller variation between the results of each datasets and having smaller difference between the intravascular time-intensity curves of various resolutions. Thus, AC-ICA has the potential to be used as the intravascular time-intensity curve calculation method in PK analysis and could lead to more accurate PK analysis for tumors. PMID:23247848

  12. The correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in rabbit VX2 liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Liang, Qianwen; Liang, Changhong; Zhong, Guimian

    2014-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the value of liver cancer contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in liver cancer and the correlation between these two analysis methods. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was established in this study. CEUS was applied. Sono Vue was applied in rabbits by ear vein to dynamically observe and record the blood perfusion and changes in the process of VX2 liver cancer and surrounding tissue. MRI perfusion quantitative analysis was used to analyze the mean enhancement time and change law of maximal slope increasing, which were further compared with the pathological examination results. Quantitative indicators of liver cancer CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were compared, and the correlation between them was analyzed by correlation analysis. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was successfully established. CEUS showed that time-intensity curve of rabbit VX2 liver cancer showed "fast in, fast out" model while MRI perfusion quantitative analysis showed that quantitative parameter MTE of tumor tissue increased and MSI decreased: the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The diagnostic results of CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the quantitative parameter of them were significantly positively correlated (P < 0.05). CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis can both dynamically monitor the liver cancer lesion and surrounding liver parenchyma, and the quantitative parameters of them are correlated. The combined application of both is of importance in early diagnosis of liver cancer. PMID:25123838

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative susceptibility mapping with ultrashort echo time MRI for evaluating renal function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luke; Layton, Anita T; Wang, Nian; Larson, Peder E Z; Zhang, Jeff L; Lee, Vivian S; Liu, Chunlei; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can provide key insight into renal function. DCE MRI is typically achieved through an injection of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent, which has desirable T1 quenching and tracer kinetics. However, significant T2* blooming effects and signal voids can arise when Gd becomes very concentrated, especially in the renal medulla and pelvis. One MRI sequence designed to alleviate T2* effects is the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence. In the present study, we observed T2* blooming in the inner medulla of the mouse kidney, despite using UTE at an echo time of 20 microseconds and a low dose of 0.03 mmol/kg Gd. We applied quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and resolved the signal void into a positive susceptibility signal. The susceptibility values [in parts per million (ppm)] were converted into molar concentrations of Gd using a calibration curve. We determined the concentrating mechanism (referred to as the concentrating index) as a ratio of maximum Gd concentration in the inner medulla to the renal artery. The concentrating index was assessed longitudinally over a 17-wk course (3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 wk of age). We conclude that the UTE-based DCE method is limited in resolving extreme T2* content caused by the kidney's strong concentrating mechanism. QSM was able to resolve and confirm the source of the blooming effect to be the large positive susceptibility of concentrated Gd. UTE with QSM can complement traditional magnitude UTE and offer a powerful tool to study renal pathophysiology. PMID:26447222

  14. Prediction of background parenchymal enhancement on breast MRI using mammography, ultrasonography, and diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Akiko; Satake, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Kimura, Reiko; Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    This retrospective study assessed the effects of menopausal status and menstrual cycle on background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and investigated whether the degree of BPE can be predicted by findings of mammography, ultrasonography (US), and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). There were 160 study patients (80 premenopausal, 80 postmenopausal). Degree of BPE was classified into minimal, mild, moderate, or marked. Mammographic density was classified into fatty, scattered, heterogeneously dense, and extremely dense. BP echotexture on US and BP intensity on DWI were visually classified as homogeneous or heterogeneous. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal breast tissue were measured. Associations of the degree of BPE with menopausal status, menstrual cycle, or imaging features were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. No significant correlation was found between mammographic density and BPE (p=0.085), whereas menopausal status (p=0.000), BP echotexture (p=0.000), and BP intensity on DWI (p= 0.000), and ADC values (p=0.000) showed significant correlations with BPE. Multivariate analysis showed that postmenopausal status was an independent predictor of minimal BPE (p=0.002, OR=3.743). In premenopausal women, there was no significant correlation between menstrual cycle and BPE, whereas BP echotexture was an independent predictor of whether BPE was less than mild or greater than moderate (p=0.001, OR=26.575). BPE on breast MRI is associated with menopausal status and the findings of US and DWI. Because premenopausal women with heterogeneous BP echotexture may be predicted to show moderate or marked BPE, scheduling of breast MRI should preferentially be adjusted to the menstrual cycle. PMID:26412889

  15. Assessment of vessel permeability by combining dynamic contrast-enhanced and arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ho-Ling; Chang, Ting-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Li, Cheng-He; Lin, Yu-Shi; Wong, Alex M

    2015-06-01

    The forward volumetric transfer constant (K(trans)), a physiological parameter extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, is weighted by vessel permeability and tissue blood flow. The permeability × surface area product per unit mass of tissue (PS) in brain tumors was estimated in this study by combining the blood flow obtained through pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) and K(trans) obtained through DCE MRI. An analytical analysis and a numerical simulation were conducted to understand how errors in the flow and K(trans) estimates would propagate to the resulting PS. Fourteen pediatric patients with brain tumors were scanned on a clinical 3-T MRI scanner. PCASL perfusion imaging was performed using a three-dimensional (3D) fast-spin-echo readout module to determine blood flow. DCE imaging was performed using a 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence, and the K(trans) map was obtained with the extended Tofts model. The numerical analysis demonstrated that the uncertainty of PS was predominantly dependent on that of K(trans) and was relatively insensitive to the flow. The average PS values of the whole tumors ranged from 0.006 to 0.217 min(-1), with a mean of 0.050 min(-1) among the patients. The mean K(trans) value was 18% lower than the PS value, with a maximum discrepancy of 25%. When the parametric maps were compared on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the discrepancies between PS and K(trans) appeared to be heterogeneous within the tumors. The PS values could be more than two-fold higher than the K(trans) values for voxels with high K(trans) levels. This study proposes a method that is easy to implement in clinical practice and has the potential to improve the quantification of the microvascular properties of brain tumors. PMID:25880892

  16. Small increases in enhancement on MRI may predict survival post radiotherapy in patients with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gzell, Cecelia Elizabeth; Wheeler, Helen R; McCloud, Philip; Kastelan, Marina; Back, Michael

    2016-05-01

    To assess impact of volumetric changes in tumour volume post chemoradiotherapy in glioblastoma. Patients managed with chemoradiotherapy between 2008 and 2011 were included. Patients with incomplete MRI sets were excluded. Analyses were performed on post-operative MRI, and MRIs at 1 month (M+1), 3 months (M+3), 5 months (M+5), 7 months (M+7), and 12 months (M+12) post completion of RT. RANO definitions of response were used for all techniques. Modified RANO criteria and two volumetric analysis techniques were used. The two volumetric analysis techniques involved utility of the Eclipse treatment planning software to calculate the volume of delineated tissue: surgical cavity plus all surrounding enhancement (Volumetric) versus surrounding enhancement only (Rim). Retrospective analysis of 49 patients with median survival of 18.4 months. Using Volumetric analysis the difference in MS for patients who had a <5 % increase versus ≥5 % at M+3 was 23.1 versus 15.1 months (p = 0.006), and M+5 was 26.3 versus 15.1 months (p = 0.006). For patients who were classified as progressive disease using modified RANO criteria at M+1 and M+3 there was a difference in MS compared with those who were not (M+1: 13.1 vs. 19.4 months, p = 0.017, M+3: 13.2 vs. 20.1 months, p = 0.096). An increase in the volume of cavity and enhancement of ≥5 % at M+3 and M+5 post RT was associated with reduced survival, suggesting that increases in radiological abnormality of <25 % may predict survival. PMID:26879084

  17. Computerized breast lesions detection using kinetic and morphologic analysis for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Yan-Hao; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2014-06-01

    To facilitate rapid and accurate assessment, this study proposed a novel fully automatic method to detect and identify focal tumor breast lesions using both kinetic and morphologic features from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). After motion registration of all phases of the DCE-MRI study, three automatically generated lines were used to segment the whole breast region of each slice. The kinetic features extracted from the pixel-based time-signal intensity curve (TIC) by a two-stage detection algorithm was first used, and then three-dimensional (3-D) morphologic characteristics of the detected regions were applied to differentiate between tumor and non-tumor regions. In this study, 95 biopsy-confirmed lesions (28 benign and 67 malignant lesions) in 54 women were used to evaluate the detection efficacy of the proposed system. The detection performance was analyzed using the free-response operating characteristics (FROC) curve and detection rate. The proposed computer-aided detection (CADe) system had a detection rate of 92.63% (88/95) of all tumor lesions, with 6.15 false positives per case. Based on the results, kinetic features extracted by TIC can be used to detect tumor lesions and 3-D morphology can effectively reduce the false positives. PMID:24582545

  18. Deconvolution of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data by linear inversion: choice of the regularization parameter.

    PubMed

    Sourbron, Steven; Luypaert, Rob; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Dujardin, Martine; Stadnik, Tadeusz; Osteaux, Michel

    2004-07-01

    Truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is an effective method for the deconvolution of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two robust methods for the selection of the truncation threshold on a pixel-by-pixel basis--generalized cross validation (GCV) and the L-curve criterion (LCC)--were optimized and compared to paradigms in the literature. The methods lead to improvements in the estimate of the residue function and of its maximum and converge properly with SNR. The oscillations typically observed in the solution vanish entirely and perfusion is more accurately estimated at small mean transit times. This results in improved image contrast and increased sensitivity to perfusion abnormalities, at the cost of 1-2 min in calculation time and isolated instabilities in the image. It is argued that the latter problem may be resolved by optimization. Simulated results for GCV and LCC are equivalent in terms of performance, but GCV is faster. PMID:15236389

  19. Imaging corticospinal tract connectivity in injured rat spinal cord using manganese-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bilgen, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Background Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEI) offers a novel neuroimaging modality to trace corticospinal tract (CST) in live animals. This paper expands this capability further and tests the utility of MEI to image axonal fiber connectivity in CST of injured spinal cord (SC). Methods A rat was injured at the thoracic T4 level of the SC. The CST was labeled with manganese (Mn) injected intracortically at two weeks post injury. Next day, the injured SC was imaged using MEI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) modalities. Results In vivo MEI data obtained from cervical SC confirmed that CST was successfully labeled with Mn. Ex vivo MEI data obtained from excised SC depicted Mn labeling of the CST in SC sections caudal to the lesion, which meant that Mn was transported through the injury, possibly mediated by viable CST fibers present at the injury site. Examining the ex vivo data from the injury epicenter closely revealed a thin strip of signal enhancement located ventrally between the dorsal horns. This enhancement was presumably associated with the Mn accumulation in these intact fibers projecting caudally as part of the CST. Additional measurements with DTI supported this view. Conclusion Combining these preliminary results collectively demonstrated the feasibility of imaging fiber connectivity in experimentally injured SC using MEI. This approach may play important role in future investigations aimed at understanding the neuroplasticity in experimental SCI research. PMID:17112375

  20. Association between dynamic contrast enhanced MRI imaging features and WHO histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JUAN; YU, JIANQUN; PENG, YULAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and World Health Organization (WHO) histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. A retrospective analysis on the results of DCE-MRI of 92 patients, who were diagnosed with invasive ductal breast cancer following surgery or biopsy, and these results were correlated with WHO histopathological grade. The statistical analysis demonstrated that the tumor size, shape and characteristics of early enhancement were associated with the WHO histopathological grade: The larger the lesion's long diameter, the higher the WHO histopathological grade; the WHO histopathological grades of round and oval masses were relatively lower, while those of lobulated and irregular masses were higher; and tumors with heterogeneous and ring-like enhancement exhibited higher WHO histopathological grades, while those of homogeneous enhancement were lower. The lesion's margin shape was not associated with the WHO histopathological grade. The present study demonstrates that features of DCE-MRI and WHO histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer are correlated, and these MRI features could be used to evaluate the biological behavior and prognosis of lesions. PMID:27123145

  1. Nanoparticle-Enhanced MRI to Evaluate Radiation Delivery to the Regional Lymphatics for Patients With Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.; Katkar, Amol; Napolitano, Brian; Wolfgang, John; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: At present, radiation (RT) fields are based largely, and often solely, on bony anatomy. Recent efforts have been taken to better define lymphatic regions for RT planning. Lymphotrophic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI (LN-MRI) allows for accurate identification of malignant and benign lymph nodes. We sought to evaluate RT delivery to lymphatics for breast cancer using LN-MRI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with breast cancer underwent LN-MRI. MRIs were anatomically registered to a reference CT; benign and malignant lymph nodes were contoured. Standard RT fields were planned and dose calculated to prescribe 45-50 Gy. Lymphatic regions were contoured on CT. Coverage of LN-MRI lymph nodes by RT fields and contoured lymphatics were assessed. Results: Eighty-one percent of all lymph nodes defined by LN-MRI were covered by the 45-Gy isodose line; 82% of malignant and 79% of benign. The 50-Gy isodose line only encompassed 60% of LN-MRI defined lymph nodes-64% of malignant and 59% of benign. For nodal volumes contoured in the absence of a margin, 86% of actual lymph nodes were within contoured volumes. When a 5-mm expansion was added, 99% were included. Conclusions: LN-MRI is a useful tool to delineate the location of breast regional lymphatics. These results suggest less than desired coverage of lymph nodes using standard RT fields and that a margin may be advisable when defining nodal volumes by CT. The use of IMRT and RT in lieu of surgery makes accurate definition of the location of breast regional lymphatics of paramount importance.

  2. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis. PMID:25681072

  3. Enhancement and suppression in a lexical interference fMRI-paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Stefanie; Dressel, Katharina; Weiller, Cornelius; Huber, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Previous picture-word interference (PWI) fMRI-paradigms revealed ambiguous mechanisms underlying facilitation and inhibition in healthy subjects. Lexical distractors revealed increased (enhancement) or decreased (suppression) activation in language and monitoring/control areas. Performing a secondary examination and data analysis, we aimed to illuminate the relation between behavioral and neural interference effects comparing target-related distractors (REL) with unrelated distractors (UNREL). We hypothesized that interference involves both (A) suppression due to priming and (B) enhancement due to simultaneous distractor and target processing. Comparisons to UNREL should remain distractor unspecific even at a low threshold. (C) Distractor types with common characteristics should reveal overlapping brain areas. In a 3T MRI scanner, participants were asked to name pictures while auditory words were presented (stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA] = –200 msec). Associatively and phonologically related distractors speeded responses (facilitation), while categorically related distractors slowed them down (inhibition) compared to UNREL. As a result, (A) reduced brain activations indeed resembled previously reported patterns of neural priming. Each target-related distractor yielded suppressions at least in areas associated with vision and conflict/competition monitoring (anterior cingulate cortex [ACC]), revealing least priming for inhibitors. (B) Enhancements concerned language-related but distractor-unspecific regions. (C) Some wider brain regions were commonly suppressed for combinations of distractor types. Overlapping areas associated with conceptual priming were found for facilitatory distractors (inferior frontal gyri), and areas related to phonetic/articulatory processing (precentral gyri and left parietal operculum/insula) for distractors sharing feature overlap. Each distractor with semantic relatedness revealed nonoverlapping suppressions in lexical-phonological areas (superior temporal regions). To conclude, interference combines suppression of areas well known from neural priming and enhancement of language-related areas caused by dual activation from target and distractor. Differences between interference and priming need to be taken into account. The present interference paradigm has the potential to reveal the functioning of word-processing stages, cognitive control, and responsiveness to priming at the same time. PMID:22574280

  4. “Occult” post-contrast signal enhancement in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma is the MRI marker of angiogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Ashley E.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Li, Yimei; Yuan, Ying; Glass, John O.; Baker, Justin N.; Kun, Larry; Broniscer, Alberto; Patay, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE In diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), subtracting precontrast from postcontrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) occasionally reveals subtle, “occult” enhancement. We hypothesized that this represents intravascular enhancement related to angiogenesis and hence that these tumors should have greater blood volume fractions than do non-enhancing tumors. METHODS We retrospectively screened MR images of 66 patients initially diagnosed with DIPG and analyzed pretreatment conventional and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-MRI studies of 61.patients. To determine the incidence of occult enhancement, cerebral blood volume values were compared in areas of occult enhancement (OcE), no enhancement (NE), and normal-appearing deep cerebellar white matter (DCWM). RESULTS Tumors of 10 patients (16.4%) had occult enhancement; those of 6 patients (9.8%) had no enhancement at all. The average cerebral blood volume in areas of occult enhancement was significantly higher than that in non-enhancing areas of the same tumor (P=.03), within DCWM in the same patient (P=.03), and when compared to anatomically paired/similar regions of interest (ROI)s in patients with non-enhancing tumors (P=.005). CONCLUSIONS Areas of OcE correspond to areas of higher CBV in DIPG, which may be an MRI marker for angiogenesis,, but larger scale studies may be needed to determine its potential relevance to grading by imaging, treatment stratification, biopsy guidance, and evaluation of response to targeted therapy. PMID:24626721

  5. Time-delayed contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of brain metastases and apparent treatment volumes.

    PubMed

    Kushnirsky, Marina; Nguyen, Vinh; Katz, Joel S; Steinklein, Jared; Rosen, Lisa; Warshall, Craig; Schulder, Michael; Knisely, Jonathan P S

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT Contrast-enhanced MRI is the preeminent diagnostic test for brain metastasis (BM). Detection of BMs for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning may improve with a time delay following administration of a high-relaxivity agent for 1.5-T and 3-T imaging systems. Metastasis detection with time-delayed MRI was evaluated in this study. METHODS Fifty-three volumetric MRI studies from 38 patients undergoing SRS for BMs were evaluated. All studies used 0.1-mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance; Bracco Diagnostics) immediately after injection, followed by 2 more axial T1-weighted sequences after 5-minute intervals (final image acquisition commenced 15 minutes after contrast injection). Two studies were motion limited and excluded. Two hundred eighty-seven BMs were identified. The studies were randomized and examined separately by 3 radiologists, who were blinded to the temporal sequence. Each radiologist recorded the number of BMs detected per scan. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test compared BM numbers between scans. One radiologist determined the scan on which BMs were best defined. All confirmed, visible tumors were contoured using iPlan RT treatment planning software on each of the 3 MRI data sets. A linear mixed model was used to analyze volume changes. RESULTS The interclass correlations for Scans 1, 2, and 3 were 0.7392, 0.7951, and 0.7290, respectively, demonstrating excellent interrater reliability. At least 1 new lesion was detected in the second scan as compared with the first in 35.3% of subjects (95% CI 22.4%-49.9%). The increase in BM numbers between Scans 1 and 2 ranged from 1 to 10. At least 1 new lesion was detected in the third scan as compared with the second in 21.6% of subjects (95% CI 11.3%-35.3%). The increase in BM numbers between Scans 2 and 3 ranged from 1 to 9. Between Scans 1 and 3, additional tumors were seen on 43.1% of scans (increase ranged from 1 to 14). The median increase in tumor number for all comparisons was 1. There was a significant increase in number of BMs detected from Scan 1 to Scan 2 (p < 0.0367) and from Scan 1 to Scan 3 (p < 0.0264). In 34 of the 51 subjects (66.7%), the radiologist selected the third scan as the one providing the clearest tumor definition. There was an average 25.4% increase in BM volume between Scans 1 and 2 (p < 0.0001) and a 9% increase in BM volume between Scans 2 and 3 (p = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS In patients who are being prepared for SRS of BMs, delayed MRI after contrast injection revealed more targets that needed treatment. In addition, apparent treatment volumes increased with a time delay. To avoid missing tumors that could be treated at the time of planned SRS and resultant "treatment failures," the authors recommend that postcontrast MR images be acquired between 10 and 15 minutes after injection in patients undergoing SRS for treatment of BMs. PMID:26361281

  6. The Degree of Contrast Washout on Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Distinguishing Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma from Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Liu, Yubo; Han, Feng; Li, Qing; Yan, Cuiju; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Jianwei; Guo, Zhixing; Wang, Jun; Li, Anhua; Zhou, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    We aim to assess the role and degree of contrast washout in the differential diagnosis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). Fifty-six histopathology-confirmed ICC nodules and 184 HCC nodules were included in this study. The nodules' washout degree on CEUS at 1, 2 and 3 min was semi-quantitatively and qualitatively assessed using gray-scale video signal intensity. Semi-quantitative assessment showed that the washout degree of ICCs at 1, 2 and 3 min were significantly lower than those of HCCs (p < 0.001) and similar results were found in the same size range subgroups. There were no significant differences in the washout degree of ICCs between patients with chronic hepatitis and those without. The areas under receiver operating characteristic curves, using the nodules' washout degree at 1, 2 and 3 min to differentiate ICC from HCC, were 0.957, 0.979 and 0.982, respectively. The qualitative assessment showed the washout of ICCs was more rapid and obvious than that of HCCs. At 3 min, moderate and marked washout were observed in all ICCs, but in only 12.5% HCCs (p < 0.001). In conclusion, ICCs displayed much higher degree of contrast washout than HCCs on CEUS, which allowed for differentiation from HCCs. PMID:26386477

  7. Significance of Additional Non-Mass Enhancement in Patients with Breast Cancer on Preoperative 3T Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yun Hee; Cho, Kyu Ran; Park, Eun Kyung; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Cho, Sung Bum; Bae, Jeoung Won

    2016-01-01

    Background In preoperative assessment of breast cancer, MRI has been shown to identify more additional breast lesions than are detectable using conventional imaging techniques. The characterization of additional lesions is more important than detection for optimal surgical treatment. Additional breast lesions can be included in focus, mass, and non-mass enhancement (NME) on MRI. According to the fifth edition of the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS®), which includes several changes in the NME descriptors, few studies to date have evaluated NME in preoperative assessment of breast cancer. Objectives We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of BI-RADS descriptors in predicting malignancy for additional NME lesions detected on preoperative 3T dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Patients and Methods Between January 2008 and December 2012, 88 patients were enrolled in our study, all with NME lesions other than the index cancer on preoperative 3T DCE-MRI and all with accompanying histopathologic examination. The MRI findings were analyzed according to the BI-RADS MRI lexicon. We evaluated the size, distribution, internal enhancement pattern, and location of NME lesions relative to the index cancer (i.e., same quadrant, different quadrant, or contralateral breast). Results On histopathologic analysis of the 88 NME lesions, 73 (83%) were malignant and 15 (17%) were benign. Lesion size did not differ significantly between malignant and benign lesions (P = 0.410). Malignancy was more frequent in linear (P = 0.005) and segmental (P = 0.011) distributions, and benignancy was more frequent in focal (P = 0.004) and regional (P < 0.001) NME lesions. The highest positive predictive value (PPV) for malignancy occurred in segmental (96.8%), linear (95.1%), clustered ring (100%), and clumped (92.0%) enhancement. Asymmetry demonstrated a high positive predictive value of 85.9%. The frequency of malignancy was higher for NME lesions located in the same quadrant with the index cancer (P = 0.006), and benignancy was higher in the contralateral breast (P = 0.015). On multivariate analysis, linear (P = 0.001) and segmental (P = 0.005) distributions were significant predictors of malignancy. Conclusion The possibility of malignancy is strongly indicated when additional NME lesions show linear or segmental enhancement on preoperative 3T DCE-MRI in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer.

  8. Quantitative activation-induced manganese-enhanced MRI reveals severity of Parkinson’s disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kikuta, Satomi; Nakamura, Yukiyo; Yamamura, Yukio; Tamura, Atsushi; Homma, Noriyasu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Tamura, Hajime; Kasahara, Jiro; Osanai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that activation-induced manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with quantitative determination of the longitudinal relaxation time (qAIM-MRI) reveals the severity of Parkinson’s disease (PD) in mice. We first show that manganese ion-accumulation depends on neuronal activity. A highly active region was then observed by qAIM-MRI in the caudate-putamen in PD-model mice that was significantly correlated to the severity of PD, suggesting its involvement in the expression of PD symptoms. PMID:26255701

  9. Same-session functional assessment of rat retina and brain with manganese-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, David; Berkowitz, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is a powerful non-invasive approach for objectively measuring either retina or binocular visual brain activity in vivo. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of MEMRI to monocular stimulation using a new protocol for providing within-subject functional comparisons in the retina and brain in the same scanning session. Adult Sprague Dawley or Long–Evans rats had one eye covered with an opaque patch. After intraperitoneal Mn2+ administration on the following day, rats underwent visual stimulation for 8 h. Animals were then anesthetized, and the brain and each eye examined by MEMRI. Function was assessed through pairwise comparisons of the patched (dark-adapted) versus unpatched (light-exposed) eyes, and of differentially-stimulated brain structures – the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, and visual cortical regions – contralateral to the patched versus unpatched eye. As expected, Mn2+ uptake was greater in the outer retina of dark-adapted, relative to light-exposed, eyes (P<0.05). Contralateral to the unpatched eye, significantly more Mn2+ uptake was found throughout the visual brain regions than in the corresponding structures contralateral to the patched eye (P<0.05). Notably, this regional pattern of activity corresponded well to previous work with monocular stimulation. No stimulation-dependent differences in Mn2+ uptake were observed in negative control brain regions (P>0.05). Post-hoc assessment of functional data by animal age and strain revealed no significant effects. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the acquisition of functional MRI data from the eye and visual brain regions in a single scanning session. PMID:21749922

  10. Whole-body kinetic image of a redox probe in mice using Overhauser-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Kosem, Nuttavut; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Phumala Morales, Noppawan; Yasukawa, Keiji; Hyodo, Fuminori; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Utsumi, Hideo

    2012-07-15

    Overhauser-enhanced MRI (OMRI) enables visualization of free radicals in animals based on dynamic nuclear polarization. Real-time data of tissue redox status gathered from kinetic images of redox-sensitive nitroxyl radical probes using OMRI provided both anatomic and physiological information. Phantom experiments demonstrated the linear correlation between the enhancement factor and the concentration of a membrane-impermeable probe, carboxy-PROXYL (3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl- pyrrolidine-1-oxyl). Whole-body OMRI images illustrated the in vivo kinetics of carboxy-PROXYL for 25 min. Initial distribution was observed in lung, heart, liver, and kidney, but not brain, corresponding to its minimal lipophilicity. Based on these images (pixel size, 1.33 × 1.33 mm; slice thickness, 50mm), a time-concentration curve with low coefficient of variance (<0.21) was created to assess pharmacokinetic behaviors. A biexponential curve showed a distribution phase from 1 to 10 min and an elimination phase from 15 to 25 min. The α rate constant was greater than the β rate constant in ROIs, confirming that its pharmacokinetics obeyed a two-compartment model. As a noninvasive technique, combining OMRI imaging with redox probes to monitor tissue redox status may be useful in acquiring valuable information regarding organ function for preclinical and clinical studies of oxidative diseases. PMID:22579576

  11. Parametric mapping of the hepatic perfusion index with gadolinium-enhanced volumetric MRI.

    PubMed

    White, M J; O'Gorman, R L; Charles-Edwards, E M; Kane, P A; Karani, J B; Leach, M O; Totman, J J

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt the hepatic perfusion index (HPI) methodology previously developed for MRI to derive 3D parametric maps of HPI, and to investigate apparent differences in HPI maps between a group of colorectal cancer patients and controls. To achieve this, a new and simpler approach to HPI calculation which does not require measurements from the aorta or portal vein is introduced, and assessed with large liver regions of interest (ROIs) in patients and controls. Several example HPI maps showing localized variation are then presented. The subject group consisted of 12 patients with known colorectal metastases, and 13 control subjects referred for routine contrast-enhanced spine imaging with no history of neoplastic disease. HPI was evaluated from serial T1 volume acquisitions acquired over the course of a Gd-DTPA bolus injection. Regions of abnormal perfusion were visible on the HPI maps derived for the patient group, manifested as areas of locally increased HPI extending around the visible margins of known metastases evident on the conventional contrast-enhanced images. This method for MR voxel-based parametric mapping of HPI has the potential to demonstrate regional variations in perfusion at the segmental and subsegmental level. PMID:16854961

  12. Synergistic enhancement of MRI with Gd-DTPA and magnetization transfer.

    PubMed

    Tanttu, J I; Sepponen, R E; Lipton, M J; Kuusela, T

    1992-01-01

    Magnetization transfer (MT) between protons of macromolecules and protons of water molecules is a recently introduced mechanism for tissue contrast in MR imaging. The MT effect is strong in tissues where there is an efficient cross relaxation between macromolecular protons and water protons and where this interaction is the dominant source of relaxation. Paramagnetic ions shorten relaxation times and decrease the MT effect. These two facts led to the assumption that, in the case of contrast enhanced MRI, the combination of the T1-weighted imaging method and the MT technique may yield increased contrast, compared with standard methods. The synergistic effect is demonstrated in this work with studies of egg white samples and by imaging three patients with different brain pathologies. The lesion-to-white matter contrasts, with standard T1-weighted sequences with and without the MT effect, were compared before and after the introduction of Gd-DTPA. In each case the synergistic effect of T1 weighting and MT improved the contrast enhancement provided with Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. PMID:1729300

  13. Abnormal olfactory function demonstrated by manganese-enhanced MRI in mice with experimental neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shaye; Tsarfaty, Galia; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Blank, Miri; Manor, David; Konen, Eli; Chapman, Joab; Reichlin, Morris; Wasson, Craig; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Kushnir, Tammar

    2010-04-01

    Mice with experimental neuropsychiatric lupus (NPSLE), induced by anti-ribosomal-P antibodies, developed depression-like behavior and a diminished sense of smell. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) allows in vivo mapping of functional neuronal connections in the brain, including the olfactory tract. The aim of this study was to analyze and describe, via the MEMRI technique, the effect of the anti-ribosomal-P injection on the olfactory pathway. Twenty mice were intra-cerebra-ventricular injected to the right hemisphere: 10 with human anti-ribosomal-P antibodies and 10 with human IgG antibodies (control). Depression was addressed by forced swimming test and smell function was evaluated by smelling different concentrations of menthol. MEMRI was used to investigate the olfactory system in these mice. Passive transfer of anti-ribosomal-P to mice resulted in a depression-like behavior, accompanied with a significant deficit in olfactory function. MEMRI of these mice demonstrated significant reduction (P < 0.001) in normalized manganese enhancement ratios of olfactory structures, compared to control mice. We concluded that an impaired olfactory neuronal function in mice with experimental depression, mediated by passive transfer of human-anti-ribosomal-P, can be demonstrated by MEMRI. PMID:20398010

  14. Investigating the Influence of Flip Angle and k-Space Sampling on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Breast Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Ledger, Araminta E.W.; Borri, Marco; Pope, Romney J.E.; Scurr, Erica D.; Wallace, Toni; Richardson, Cheryl; Usher, Marianne; Allen, Steven; Wilson, Robin M.; Thomas, Karen; deSouza, Nandita M.; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To retrospectively investigate the effect of flip angle (FA) and k-space sampling on the performance of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) breast sequences. Materials and Methods Five DCE-MRI breast sequences were evaluated (10°, 14°, and 18° FAs; radial or linear k-space sampling), with 7–10 patients in each group (n = 45). All sequences were compliant with current technical breast screening guidelines. Contrast agent (CA) uptake curves were constructed from the right mammary artery for each examination. Maximum relative enhancement, Emax, and time-to-peak enhancement, Tmax, were measured and compared between protocols (analysis of variance and Mann–Whitney). For each sequence, calculated values of maximum relative enhancement, Ecalc, were derived from the Bloch equations and compared to Emax. Fat suppression performance (residual bright fat and chemical shift artifact) was rated for each examination and compared between sequences (Fisher exact tests). Results Significant differences were identified between DCE-MRI sequences. Emax increased significantly at higher FAs and with linear k-space sampling (P < .0001; P = .001). Radial protocols exhibited greater Tmax than linear protocols at FAs of both 14° (P = .025) and 18° (P < .0001), suggesting artificially flattened uptake curves. Good correlation was observed between Ecalc and Emax (r = 0.86). Fat suppression failure was more pronounced at an FA of 18° (P = .008). Conclusions This retrospective approach is validated as a tool to compare and optimize breast DCE-MRI sequences. Alterations in FA and k-space sampling result in significant differences in CA uptake curve shape which could potentially affect diagnostic interpretation. These results emphasize the need for careful parameter selection and greater standardization of breast DCE-MRI sequences. PMID:25179563

  15. Practical Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer: Data Acquisition, Data Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Loveless, Mary E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and is frequently employed in both preclinical and clinical investigations. However, the experimental and analytical subtleties of the technique are not frequently discussed in the literature, nor are its relationships to other commonly used quantitative imaging techniques. This review aims to provide practical information on the development, implementation, and validation of a DCE-MRI study in the context of a preclinical study (though we do frequently refer to clinical studies that are related to these topics). PMID:23105959

  16. Safety and Efficacy of Gadobutrol-Enhanced MRI in Patients Aged Under 2 Years—A Single-Center, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Ravi; Noga, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Gadobutrol is a 1-molar gadolinium-based contrast agent with well-characterized safety and efficacy for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adults and children ≥ 2 years old. This observational study assessed gadobutrol-enhanced MRI in children < 2 years of age. Sixty infants (mean age 11.1 months) underwent MRI using gadobutrol at standard dose of 0.1 mL/kg (0.1 mmol/kg) body weight. MRI examinations included brain, spine, and neck (n = 24), subcutaneous soft tissues (n = 14), chest, abdomen, and pelvis (n = 12), musculoskeletal system (n = 7) and vascular system (n = 3). No patients experienced adverse events related to gadobutrol injection. In 57 patients with confirmed diagnoses, gadobutrol-enhanced MRI provided findings consistent with confirmed pathologies. This study indicates that gadobutrol at a standard dose for MRI is safe in patients aged < 2 years and provides diagnostic information for multiple pathologies. PMID:25114540

  17. Correlation of histological findings from a large ciliochoroidal melanoma with CT perfusion and 3T MRI dynamic enhancement studies

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose S; Campeau, Norbert G; Klotz, Ernst; Primak, Andrew N; Saba, Osama; Gunduz, Kaan; Cantrill, Herbert; Salomão, Diva; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2008-01-01

    Background The initial use of a 64-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner for obtaining quantitative perfusion data from a large ciliochoroidal melanoma, and correlation with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dynamic enhancement and tumor histology. Methods The CT perfusion scan was performed using 80 kVp, 250 mA and 1-sec rotation time for 40 sec. The analysis was performed using commercial perfusion analysis software with a prototype 3-dimensional motion correction tool. Dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-Tesla MRI measured the kinetics of enhancement to estimate the vascular permeability. The time-dependent enhancement patterns were obtained using the average signal intensity using Functool analysis software. The involved globe was enucleated and microscopic evaluation of the tumor was performed. Results The perfusion parameters blood flow, blood volume and permeability surface area product in the affected eye determined by CT perfusion analysis were 118 ml/100 ml/min, 11.3 ml/100 ml and 48 ml/100 ml/min. Dynamic MRI enhancement showed maximal intensity increase of 111%. The neoplasm was a ciliochoroidal spindle cell melanoma which was mitotically active (13 mitoses/40 hpf). Vascular loops and arcades were present throughout the tumor. The patient developed metastases within 9 months of presentation. Conclusion Quantitative CT perfusion analysis of ocular tumors is feasible with motion correction software. PMID:19668716

  18. Corticospinal Tract Tracing in the Marmoset with a Clinical Whole-Body 3T Scanner Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Benjamin; Bolan, Faye; Boulanouar, Kader; Renaud, Luc; Darmana, Robert; Vaysse, Laurence; Vieu, Christophe; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been described as a powerful tool to depict the architecture of neuronal circuits. In this study we investigated the potential use of in vivo MRI detection of manganese for tracing neuronal projections from the primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy marmosets (Callithrix Jacchus). We determined the optimal dose of manganese chloride (MnCl2) among 800, 400, 40 and 8nmol that led to manganese-induced hyperintensity furthest from the injection site, as specific to the corticospinal tract as possible, and that would not induce motor deficit. A commonly available 3T human clinical MRI scanner and human knee coil were used to follow hyperintensity in the corticospinal tract 24h after injection. A statistical parametric map of seven marmosets injected with the chosen dose, 8 nmol, showed the corticospinal tract and M1 connectivity with the basal ganglia, substantia nigra and thalamus. Safety was determined for the lowest dose that did not induce dexterity and grip strength deficit, and no behavioral effects could be seen in marmosets who received multiple injections of manganese one month apart. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time in marmosets, a reliable and reproducible way to perform longitudinal ME-MRI experiments to observe the integrity of the marmoset corticospinal tract on a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:26398500

  19. Magic Angle–Enhanced MRI of Fibrous Microstructures in Sclera and Cornea With and Without Intraocular Pressure Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Leon C.; Sigal, Ian A.; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Squires, Alexander; Tse, Zion; Wu, Ed X.; Kim, Seong-Gi; Schuman, Joel S.; Chan, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The structure and biomechanics of the sclera and cornea are central to several eye diseases such as glaucoma and myopia. However, their roles remain unclear, partly because of limited noninvasive techniques to assess their fibrous microstructures globally, longitudinally, and quantitatively. We hypothesized that magic angle–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal the structural details of the corneoscleral shell and their changes upon intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation. Methods. Seven ovine eyes were extracted and fixed at IOP = 50 mm Hg to mimic ocular hypertension, and another 11 eyes were unpressurized. The sclera and cornea were scanned at different angular orientations relative to the main magnetic field inside a 9.4-Tesla MRI scanner. Relative MRI signal intensities and intrinsic transverse relaxation times (T2 and T2*) were determined to quantify the magic angle effect on the corneoscleral shells. Three loaded and eight unloaded tendon samples were scanned as controls. Results. At magic angle, high-resolution MRI revealed distinct scleral and corneal lamellar fibers, and light/dark bands indicative of collagen fiber crimps in the sclera and tendon. Magic angle enhancement effect was the strongest in tendon and the least strong in cornea. Loaded sclera, cornea, and tendon possessed significantly higher T2 and T2* than unloaded tissues at magic angle. Conclusions. Magic angle–enhanced MRI can detect ocular fibrous microstructures without contrast agents or coatings and can reveal their MR tissue property changes with IOP loading. This technique may open up new avenues for assessment of the biomechanical and biochemical properties of ocular tissues in aging and in diseases involving the corneoscleral shell. PMID:25103267

  20. Modified Wideband Three-Dimensional Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI for Patients with Implantable Cardiac Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shams; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Plotnik, Adam; Finn, J. Paul; Hu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of cardiac devices on three-dimensional (3D) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI and to develop a 3D LGE protocol for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients with reduced image artifacts. Theory and Methods The 3D LGE sequence was modified by implementing a wideband inversion pulse, which reduces hyperintensity artifacts, and by increasing bandwidth of the excitation pulse. The modified wideband 3D LGE sequence was tested in phantoms and evaluated in six volunteers and five patients with ICDs. Results Phantom and in vivo studies results demonstrated extended signal void and ripple artifacts in 3D LGE that were associated with ICDs. The reason for these artifacts was slab profile distortion and the subsequent aliasing in the slice-encoding direction. The modified wideband 3D LGE provided significantly reduced ripple artifacts than 3D LGE with wideband inversion only. Comparison of 3D and 2D LGE images demonstrated improved spatial resolution of the heart using 3D LGE. Conclusion Increased bandwidth of the inversion and excitation pulses can significantly reduce image artifacts associated with ICDs. Our modified wideband 3D LGE protocol can be readily used for imaging patients with ICDs given appropriate safety guidelines are followed. PMID:25772155

  1. DCEMRI.jl: a fast, validated, open source toolkit for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Welch, E. Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast, validated, open-source toolkit for processing dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data. We validate it against the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Standard and Extended Tofts-Kety phantoms and find near perfect recovery in the absence of noise, with an estimated 10–20× speedup in run time compared to existing tools. To explain the observed trends in the fitting errors, we present an argument about the conditioning of the Jacobian in the limit of small and large parameter values. We also demonstrate its use on an in vivo data set to measure performance on a realistic application. For a 192 × 192 breast image, we achieved run times of <1 s. Finally, we analyze run times scaling with problem size and find that the run time per voxel scales as O(N1.9), where N is the number of time points in the tissue concentration curve. DCEMRI.jl was much faster than any other analysis package tested and produced comparable accuracy, even in the presence of noise. PMID:25922795

  2. Enhanced cardio vascular image analysis by combined representation of results from dynamic MRI and anatomic CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, C.; Hennemuth, A.; Oeltze, S.; Boskamp, T.; Peitgen, H.-O.

    2008-03-01

    The diagnosis support in the field of coronary artery disease (CAD) is very complex due to the numerous symptoms and performed studies leading to the final diagnosis. CTA and MRI are on their way to replace invasive catheter angiography. Thus, there is a need for sophisticated software tools that present the different analysis results, and correlate the anatomical and dynamic image information. We introduce a new software assistant for the combined result visualization of CTA and MR images, in which a dedicated concept for the structured presentation of original data, segmentation results, and individual findings is realized. Therefore, we define a comprehensive class hierarchy and assign suitable interaction functions. User guidance is coupled as closely as possible with available data, supporting a straightforward workflow design. The analysis results are extracted from two previously developed software assistants, providing coronary artery analysis and measurements, function analysis as well as late enhancement data investigation. As an extension we introduce a finding concept directly relating suspicious positions to the underlying data. An affine registration of CT and MR data in combination with the AHA 17-segment model enables the coupling of local findings to positions in all data sets. Furthermore, sophisticated visualization in 2D and 3D and interactive bull's eye plots facilitate a correlation of coronary stenoses and physiology. The software has been evaluated on 20 patient data sets.

  3. Intravascular contrast agent-enhanced MRI measuring contrast clearance and tumor blood volume and the effects of vascular modifiers in an experimental tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Lise . E-mail: lise@oncology.dk; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Nielsen, Thomas; Overgaard, Jens; Bjornerud, Atle; Briley-Saebo, Karen; Horsman, Michael R.; Ostergaard, Leif

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of using the MRI blood pool agent NC100150 for evaluation of tumor blood volume (TBV) estimates by both dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and susceptibility contrast MRI assays in an experimental tumor. Contrast agent clearance (K{sup trans}; depends on perfusion and permeability) from the DCE-MRI time curves was estimated, and changes in TBV and K{sup trans} were measured after administration of two drugs that reduce perfusion by different mechanisms. Methods and materials: The DCE-MRI experiments were simulated with expected physiologic values for the C3H mouse mammary carcinoma. The C3H tumor was examined by DCE-MRI and susceptibility contrast MRI with NC100150 (NC100150 Injection, Clariscan; Amersham Health, Oslo, Norway) after treatment with either hydralazine or combretastatin (Oxigene, Boston, MA). Results: Simulations showed that reliable estimates of changes in TBV and K{sup trans} could be performed with DCE-MRI. Hydralazine was shown to reduce TBV as measured by both assays and to reduce K{sup trans}. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI also suggested that TBV and K{sup trans} were reduced in combretastatin-treated tumors, and the TBV reduction was confirmed by susceptibility contrast MRI. Data suggested the drug to affect mainly the total TBV, whereas microvessels as such seemed less altered. Conclusion: The study supports the use of the combined DCE-MRI and susceptibility contrast MRI assay with a blood pool agent in characterizing tumors and their response to treatment.

  4. Manganese-enhanced MRI reflects seizure outcome in a model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dedeurwaerdere, S; Fang, K; Chow, M; Shen, Y-T; Noordman, I; van Raay, L; Faggian, N; Porritt, M; Egan, G F; O'Brien, T J

    2013-03-01

    The neurobiological processes resulting in epilepsy, known as epileptogenesis, are incompletely understood. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) can potentially aide in this quest as it provides superior tissue contrast, particularly of the hippocampal subregions. This longitudinal study aims to characterise the changes in the hippocampus of the post kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (KASE) rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using MEMRI in vivo. Serial acquisition of T(1)-weighted MEMRI images were taken before, 2 days and 6 weeks after KASE (10-30 mg/kg, i.p.) in 14 rats and in 11 control rats, while a second cohort of control (N=6) and epileptic animals (N=10) was imaged at 2 months post KASE only. MnCl(2) (50 mM, 10 μl) was administered in the right lateral ventricle 1 day before scanning. Regions of interest were drawn around the hippocampus and several subregions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus). Markers of epilepsy such as spontaneous recurrent seizures, hippocampal neuronal loss and mossy fiber sprouting were quantified. A persistent increase in MEMRI signal intensity was found in the hippocampus, CA1 and dentate gyrus in the KASE group compared to the control group (ANOVA P<0.05). The intensity signal in the hippocampus and subregions correlated inversely with the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronic epileptic phase, however there was no relationship observed between histopathological changes such as cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting with seizures. This study demonstrates that MEMRI is able to detect imaging changes in the hippocampus during the course of epileptogenesis relevant for seizure expression. These data strongly indicate a relationship between manganese enhancement and spontaneous seizure outcome, suggesting that MEMRI could provide a preclinical biomarker for the severity of epileptogenesis in vivo in animal models. PMID:23220429

  5. Novel ways to noninvasively detect inflammation of the myocardium: contrast-enhanced MRI and myocardial contrast echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, M.R.; Geluk, C.A.; Lindner, J.R.; Velthuis, B.K.; Vonken, E.J.; Cramer, M.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Both contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) and myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) are promising tools to detect cardiac inflammation. CE-MRI can be used to characterise the location and extent of myocardial inflammation, since areas of abnormal signal enhancement associated with regional wall motion abnormalities reliably indicate areas of active myocarditis. In MCE, chemically composed microbubbles can be visualised by ultrasound and used to determine the status of the cardiac microvasculature. If there is any inflammation the microbubbles will be phagocytosed by neutrophils and monocytes, thus enabling the degree of inflammation to be assessed. These noninvasive techniques may allow early diagnosis and accurate evaluation of myocardial inflammation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696203

  6. Computer-aided diagnosis of breast DCE-MRI images using bilateral asymmetry of contrast enhancement between two breasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Li, Lihua; Zhang, Juan; Shao, Guoliang; Zhang, Chengjie; Zheng, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of breasts is an important imaging modality in breast cancer diagnosis with higher sensitivity but relatively lower specificity. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to help improve diagnostic performance of DCE-MRI examinations based on the automated detection and analysis of bilateral asymmetry of characteristic kinetic features between the left and right breast. An image dataset involving 130 DCE-MRI examinations was assembled and used in which 80 were biopsy-proved malignant and 50 were benign. A computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme was developed to segment breast areas depicted on each MR image, register images acquired from the sequential MR image scan series, compute average contrast enhancement of all pixels in one breast, and a set of kinetic features related to the difference of contrast enhancement between the left and right breast, and then use a multi-feature based Bayesian belief network to classify between malignant and benign cases. A leave-one-case-out validation method was applied to test CAD performance. The computed area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is 0.78 ± 0.04. The positive and negative predictive values are 0.77 and 0.64, respectively. The study indicates that bilateral asymmetry of kinetic features between the left and right breasts is a potentially useful image biomarker to enhance the detection of angiogenesis associated with malignancy. It also demonstrates the feasibility of applying a simple CAD approach to classify between malignant and benign DCE-MRI examinations based on this new image biomarker. PMID:24043592

  7. Reproducibility of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyi; Su, Zihua; Ye, Huiyi; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Duan, Feixue; Song, Yuanyuan; Lambrou, Tryphon; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the intra- and interobserver as well as scan–rescan reproducibility of quantitative parameters of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). A total of 21 patients with clear cell RCCs (17 men, 4 woman; age 37–69 years, mean age 54.6 years, mean size, 5.0 ± 2.2 cm) were prospectively recruited from September 2012 to November 2012. Patients underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system with an interval of 48 to 72 hours. The extended-Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters. Three observers defined the 2-dimensional whole-tumor region of interest at the slice with the maximum diameter of the RCC. Intraobserver and scan–rescan differences were assessed using paired t tests, whereas interobserver differences using two-way analysis of variance. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using within-subject coefficient of variation (wCoV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). There were no significant intra-, interobserver, or scan–rescan differences in parameters (all P > 0.05). All ICCs for intra- and interobserver agreements were >0.75 (P < 0.05), whereas the scan–rescan agreement was moderate to good; Ve (0.764, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.378–0.925) and Kep (0.906, 95% CI: 0.710–0.972) had higher ICC than Ktrans (0.686; 95% CI: 0.212–0.898) and Vp (0.657; 95% CI: 0.164–0.888). In intra- and interobserver variability analyses, all parameters except Vp had low wCoV values. Ktrans and Ve had slightly lower intraobserver wCoV (1.2% and 0.9%) compared with Kep (3.7%), whereas all 3 of these parameters had similar interobserver wCoV values (2.5%, 3.1%, and 2.9%, respectively). Regarding scan–rescan variability, Ktrans and Kep showed slightly higher variation (15.6% and 15.4%) than Ve (10.1%). Vp had the largest wCoV in all variability analyses (all >30%). DCE-MRI demonstrated good intra- and interobserver reproducibility and moderate to good scan–rescan performance in the assessment of RCC using Ktrans, Kep, and Ve as parameters under noncontinuous scanning mode. Vp showed poor reproducibility, and thus may not be suitable for this scanning protocol. PMID:26376399

  8. Does the Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced Liver MRI Impact on the Treatment of Patients with Colorectal Cancer? Comparison Study with 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji-Won; Oh, Soon Nam; Choi, Joon Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Lee, Myung Ah; Yoo, Young-Kyung; Oh, Seong Taek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the value of Gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer and estimated the clinical impact of liver MRI in the management plan of liver metastasis. Methods. We identified 108 patients who underwent PET/CT and liver MRI as preoperative evaluation of colorectal cancer, between January 2011 and December 2013. We evaluated the per nodule sensitivity of PET/CT and liver MRI for liver metastasis. Management plan changes were estimated for patients with metastatic nodules newly detected on liver MRI, to assess the clinical impact. Results. We enrolled 131 metastatic nodules (mean size 1.6 cm) in 41 patients (mean age 65 years). The per nodule sensitivities of PET/CT and liver MRI were both 100% for nodules measuring 2 cm or larger but were significantly different for nodules measuring less than 2 cm (59.8% and 95.1%, resp., P = 0.0001). At least one more metastatic nodule was detected on MRI in 16 patients. Among these, 7 patients indicated changes of management plan after performing MRI. Conclusions. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI detected more metastatic nodules compared with PET/CT, especially for small (<2 cm) nodules. The newly detected nodules induced management plan change in 43.8% (7/16) of patients. PMID:27022613

  9. Non-invasive visualization of in vivo drug delivery of poly(L-glutamic acid) using contrast enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Furong; Ke, Tianyi; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wang, Xuli; Sun, Yongen; Johnson, Melody; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is valuable for non-invasive investigation of in vivo drug delivery with polymer conjugates. It can provide real-time information on pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and drug delivery efficiency of the conjugates. Non-invasive visualization of in vivo drug delivery of polymer conjugates with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was studied with paramagnetically labeled poly(L-glutamic acid) in an animal tumor model. Poly(L-glutamic acid) is a biocompatible and biodegradable drug carrier for diagnostics and therapeutics. Poly(L-glutamic acid)-1,6-hexanediamine-(Gd-DO3A) conjugates with molecular weights of 87, 50 and 28 KDa and narrow molecular weight distributions were prepared and studied in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Contrast enhanced MRI resulted in real-time and three-dimensional visualization of blood circulation, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tumor accumulation of the conjugates, and the size effect on these pharmaceutics properties. The conjugate of 28 KDa rapidly cleared from the circulation and had a relatively lower tumor accumulation. The conjugates with higher molecular weights exhibited a more prolonged blood circulation and higher tumor accumulation. The difference between the conjugates of 87 and 50 KDa was not significant. Contrast enhanced MRI is effective for non-invasive real-time visualization of in vivo drug delivery of paramagnetically labeled polymer conjugates. PMID:17009849

  10. Differentiation of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions Using Magnetization Transfer Imaging and Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Samantha L.; Moy, Linda; Lavianlivi, Sherlin; Moccaldi, Melanie; Kim, Sungheon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate feasibility of using magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in conjunction with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for differentiation of benign and malignant breast lesions at 3 Tesla. Materials and Methods This prospective study was IRB and HIPAA compliant. DCE-MRI scans followed by MT imaging were performed on 41 patients. Region of interests (ROI’s) were drawn on co-registered MTR and DCE post-contrast images for breast structures, including benign lesions (BL) and malignant lesions (ML). Initial enhancement ratio (IER) and delayed enhancement ratio (DER) were calculated, as were normalized MTR, DER and IER (NMTR, NDER, NIER) values. Diagnostic accuracy analysis was performed. Results Mean MTR in ML was lower than in BL (p <0.05); mean DER and mean IER in ML were significantly higher than in BL (p<0.01, p<0.001). NMTR, NDER, and NIER were significantly lower in ML versus BL (p<0.007, p<0.001, p<0.001). IER had highest diagnostic accuracy (77.6%), sensitivity (86.2%), and area under the ROC curve (.879). MTR specificity was 100%. Logistic regression modeling with NMTR and NIER yielded best results for BL versus ML (sensitivity 93.1%, specificity 80%, AUC 0.884, accuracy 83.7%). Conclusion Isolated quantitative DCE analysis may increase specificity of breast MR for differentiating BL and ML. DCE-MRI with NMTR may produce a robust means of evaluating breast lesions. PMID:23097239

  11. Non-rigid alignment of preoperative MRI, fMRI, and DT-MRI with intra-operative MRI for enhanced visualization and navigation in image-guided neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Archip, Neculai; Clatz, Olivier; Whalen, Stephen; Kacher, Dan; Fedorov, Andriy; Kot, Andriy; Chrisochoides, Nikos; Jolesz, Ferenc; Golby, Alexandra; Black, Peter M.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The usefulness of neurosurgical navigation with current visualizations is seriously compromised by brain shift, which inevitably occurs during the course of the operation, significantly degrading the precise alignment between the preoperative MR data and the intra-operative shape of the brain. Our objectives were (i) to evaluate the feasibility of non-rigid registration that compensates for the brain deformations within the time constraints imposed by neurosurgery, and (ii) create augmented reality visualizations of critical structural and functional brain regions during neurosurgery using pre-operatively acquired fMRI and DT-MRI. Materials and Methods Eleven consecutive patients with supratentorial gliomas were included in our study. All underwent surgery at our intra-operative MR imaging–guided therapy facility and have tumors in eloquent brain areas (e.g. precentral gyrus and cortico-spinal tract). Functional MRI and DT-MRI, together with MPRAGE and T2w structural MRI were acquired at 3T prior to surgery. SPGR and T2w images were acquired with a 0.5T magnet during each procedure. Quantitative assessment of the alignment accuracy was carried out and compared with current state-of the-art systems based only on rigid-registration. Results Alignment between preoperative and intra-operative datasets was successfully carried out during surgery for all patients. Overall, the mean residual displacement remaining after non-rigid registration was 1.82 mm. There is a statistically significant improvement in alignment accuracy utilizing our non-rigid registration in comparison to the currently used technology (p<0.001). Conclusions We were able to achieve intra-operative rigid and non-rigid registration of (1) pre-operative structural MRI with intra-operative T1w MRI; (2) pre-operative FMRI with intra-operative T1w MRI, and (3) pre-operative DT-MRI with intra-operative T1w MRI. The registration algorithms as implemented were sufficiently robust and rapid to meet the hard real-time constraints of intra-operative surgical decision making. The validation experiments demonstrate that we can accurately compensate for the deformation of the brain and thus can construct an augmented reality visualization to aid the surgeon. PMID:17289403

  12. Development and characterization of a dynamic lesion phantom for the quantitative evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Melanie; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Hariharan, Prasanna; R. Myers, Matthew; Badano, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a dynamic lesion phantom that is capable of producing physiological kinetic curves representative of those seen in human dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data. The objective of this phantom is to provide a platform for the quantitative comparison of DCE-MRI protocols to aid in the standardization and optimization of breast DCE-MRI. Methods: The dynamic lesion consists of a hollow, plastic mold with inlet and outlet tubes to allow flow of a contrast agent solution through the lesion over time. Border shape of the lesion can be controlled using the lesion mold production method. The configuration of the inlet and outlet tubes was determined using fluid transfer simulations. The total fluid flow rate was determined using x-ray images of the lesion for four different flow rates (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ml∕s) to evaluate the resultant kinetic curve shape and homogeneity of the contrast agent distribution in the dynamic lesion. High spatial and temporal resolution x-ray measurements were used to estimate the true kinetic curve behavior in the dynamic lesion for benign and malignant example curves. DCE-MRI example data were acquired of the dynamic phantom using a clinical protocol. Results: The optimal inlet and outlet tube configuration for the lesion molds was two inlet molds separated by 30° and a single outlet tube directly between the two inlet tubes. X-ray measurements indicated that 1.0 ml∕s was an appropriate total fluid flow rate and provided truth for comparison with MRI data of kinetic curves representative of benign and malignant lesions. DCE-MRI data demonstrated the ability of the phantom to produce realistic kinetic curves. Conclusions: The authors have constructed a dynamic lesion phantom, demonstrated its ability to produce physiological kinetic curves, and provided estimations of its true kinetic curve behavior. This lesion phantom provides a tool for the quantitative evaluation of DCE-MRI protocols, which may lead to improved discrimination of breast cancer lesions. PMID:21992378

  13. Manganese-impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for signal enhancement in MRI cell labelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet-Nicolas, Rémy; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Nair, Mahesh M.; Chevallier, Pascale; Lagueux, Jean; Gossuin, Yves; Laurent, Sophie; Kleitz, Freddy; Fortin, Marc-André

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn2+ is already implemented as a ``positive'' cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(ii) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn2+ leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM-1 s-1 were measured at 60 MHz and 37 °C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness, while maintaining an open porosity and relatively high pore volume. Because these Mn-labelled M48SNs express strong ``positive'' contrast media properties at low concentrations, they are potentially applicable for cell tracking and drug delivery methodologies.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn2+ is already implemented as a ``positive'' cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(ii) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn2+ leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM-1 s-1 were measured at 60 MHz and 37 °C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness, while maintaining an open porosity and relatively high pore volume. Because these Mn-labelled M48SNs express strong ``positive'' contrast media properties at low concentrations, they are potentially applicable for cell tracking and drug delivery methodologies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images, particle size distributions, XRD, TPR, magnetometric profiles, T1 and T2 measurements at 60 MHz over time, NMRD profiles of materials, P388 cell proliferation assay after 4 h and T1-w. MR images of P388 cells incubated with a solution of M48SNs. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02969g

  14. Improved parameter extraction and classification for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Nandinee Fariah; Kozlowski, Piotr; Jones, Edward C.; Chang, Silvia D.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Moradi, Mehdi

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging, has shown great potential in prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The time course of the DCE images provides measures of the contrast agent uptake kinetics. Also, using pharmacokinetic modelling, one can extract parameters from the DCE-MR images that characterize the tumor vascularization and can be used to detect cancer. A requirement for calculating the pharmacokinetic DCE parameters is estimating the Arterial Input Function (AIF). One needs an accurate segmentation of the cross section of the external femoral artery to obtain the AIF. In this work we report a semi-automatic method for segmentation of the cross section of the femoral artery, using circular Hough transform, in the sequence of DCE images. We also report a machine-learning framework to combine pharmacokinetic parameters with the model-free contrast agent uptake kinetic parameters extracted from the DCE time course into a nine-dimensional feature vector. This combination of features is used with random forest and with support vector machine classi cation for cancer detection. The MR data is obtained from patients prior to radical prostatectomy. After the surgery, wholemount histopathology analysis is performed and registered to the DCE-MR images as the diagnostic reference. We show that the use of a combination of pharmacokinetic parameters and the model-free empirical parameters extracted from the time course of DCE results in improved cancer detection compared to the use of each group of features separately. We also validate the proposed method for calculation of AIF based on comparison with the manual method.

  15. Mn-alginate gels as a novel system for controlled release of Mn2+ in manganese-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Yrr A; Sandvig, Ioanna; Olsen, Oystein; Donati, Ivan; Thuen, Marte; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Haraldseth, Olav; Brekken, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test alginate gels of different compositions as a system for controlled release of manganese ions (Mn(2+)) for application in manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI), in order to circumvent the challenge of achieving optimal MRI resolution without resorting to high, potentially cytotoxic doses of Mn(2+). Elemental analysis and stability studies of Mn-alginate revealed marked differences in ion binding capacity, rendering Mn/Ba-alginate gels with high guluronic acid content most stable. The findings were corroborated by corresponding differences in the release rate of Mn(2+) from alginate beads in vitro using T(1)-weighted MRI. Furthermore, intravitreal (ivit) injection of Mn-alginate beads yielded significant enhancement of the rat retina and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons 24 h post-injection. Subsequent compartmental modelling and simulation of ivit Mn(2+) transport and concentration revealed that application of slow release contrast agents can achieve a significant reduction of ivit Mn(2+) concentration compared with bolus injection. This is followed by a concomitant increase in the availability of ivit Mn(2+) for uptake by RGC, corresponding to significantly increased time constants. Our results provide proof-of-concept for the applicability of Mn-alginate gels as a system for controlled release of Mn(2+) for optimized MEMRI application. PMID:22434640

  16. Noninvasive assessment of tumor microenvironment using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and 18F- fluoromisonidazole PET imaging in neck nodal metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; Schöder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang, Ya; Pfister, David. G.; Fury, Matthew G.; Stambuk, Hilda. E.; Humm, John L.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Pretreatment multimodality imaging can provide useful anatomical and functional data about tumors, including perfusion and possibly hypoxia status. The purpose of our study was to assess non-invasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head and neck (HN) cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) PET. Methods and Materials Thirteen newly diagnosed HN cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and 18F-FMISO PET imaging prior to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from 18F-FMISO PET, the non-parametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with 18F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no 18F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the 18F-FMISO SUV (ρ=0.74, p<0.001). There was a strong negative correlation between the median kep (ρ=−0.58, p=0.042) and the 18F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe 18F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median Ktrans (p=0.049) and median kep (p=0.027) values than did non-hypoxic nodes (no 18F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower kep and Ktrans values) compared to non-hypoxic nodes. PMID:19906496

  17. Suitability of Pharmacokinetic Models for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Vessel Wall: A Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, V. Lai; Kooi, M. Eline; Backes, Walter H.; van Hoof, Raf H. M.; Saris, Anne E. C. M.; Wishaupt, Mirthe C. J.; Hellenthal, Femke A. M. V. I.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Leiner, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Increased microvascularization of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) vessel wall has been related to AAA progression and rupture. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of three pharmacokinetic models to describe AAA vessel wall enhancement using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Materials and Methods Patients with AAA underwent DCE-MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The volume transfer constant (Ktrans), which reflects microvascular flow, permeability and surface area, was calculated by fitting the blood and aneurysm vessel wall gadolinium concentration curves. The relative fit errors, parameter uncertainties and parameter reproducibilities for the Patlak, Tofts and Extended Tofts model were compared to find the most suitable model. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient and coefficient of variation (CV). Further, the relationship between Ktrans and AAA size was investigated. Results DCE-MRI examinations from thirty-nine patients (mean age±SD: 72±6 years; M/F: 35/4) with an mean AAA maximal diameter of 49±6 mm could be included for pharmacokinetic analysis. Relative fit uncertainties for Ktrans based on the Patlak model (17%) were significantly lower compared to the Tofts (37%) and Extended Tofts model (42%) (p<0.001). Ktrans scan-rescan reproducibility for the Patlak model (ICC = 0.61 and CV = 22%) was comparable with the Tofts (ICC = 0.61, CV = 23%) and Extended Tofts model (ICC = 0.76, CV = 22%). Ktrans was positively correlated with maximal AAA diameter (Spearman’s ρ = 0.38, p = 0.02) using the Patlak model. Conclusion Using the presented imaging protocol, the Patlak model is most suited to describe DCE-MRI data of the AAA vessel wall with good Ktrans scan-rescan reproducibility. PMID:24098370

  18. Respiratory Motion-Compensated Radial Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced (DCE)-MRI of Chest and Abdominal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Guo, Junyu; Rosen, Mark A.; Song, Hee Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI is becoming an increasingly important tool for evaluating tumor vascularity and assessing the effectiveness of emerging antiangiogenic and antivascular agents. In chest and abdominal regions, however, respiratory motion can seriously degrade the achievable image quality in DCE-MRI studies. The purpose of this work is to develop a respiratory motion-compensated DCE-MRI technique that combines the self-gating properties of radial imaging with the reconstruction flexibility afforded by the golden-angle view-order strategy. Following radial data acquisition, the signal at k-space center is first used to determine the respiratory cycle, and consecutive views during the expiratory phase of each respiratory period (34–55 views, depending on the breathing rate) are grouped into individual segments. Residual intra-segment translation of lesion is subsequently compensated for by an autofocusing technique that optimizes image entropy, while intersegment translation (among different respiratory cycles) is corrected using 3D image correlation. The resulting motion-compensated, undersampled dynamic image series is then processed to reduce image streaking and to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) prior to perfusion analysis, using either the k-space-weighted image contrast (KWIC) radial filtering technique or principal component analysis (PCA). The proposed data acquisition scheme also allows for high framerate arterial input function (AIF) sampling and free-breathing baseline T1 mapping. The performance of the proposed radial DCE-MRI technique is evaluated in subjects with lung and liver lesions, and results demonstrate that excellent pixelwise perfusion maps can be obtained with the proposed methodology. PMID:18956465

  19. Evaluating regional blood spinal cord barrier dysfunction following spinal cord injury using longitudinal dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In vivo preclinical imaging of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rodent models provides clinically relevant information in translational research. This paper uses multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate neurovascular pathology and changes in blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability following SCI in a mouse model of SCI. Methods C57BL/6 female mice (n = 5) were subjected to contusive injury at the thoracic T11 level and scanned on post injury days 1 and 3 using anatomical, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The injured cords were evaluated postmortem with histopathological stains specific to neurovascular changes. A computational model was implemented to map local changes in barrier function from the contrast enhancement. The area and volume of spinal cord tissue with dysfunctional barrier were determined using semi-automatic segmentation. Results Quantitative maps derived from the acquired DCE-MRI data depicted the degree of BSCB permeability variations in injured spinal cords. At the injury sites, the damaged barriers occupied about 70% of the total cross section and 48% of the total volume on day 1, but the corresponding measurements were reduced to 55% and 25%, respectively on day 3. These changes implied spatio-temporal remodeling of microvasculature and its architecture in injured SC. Diffusion computations included longitudinal and transverse diffusivities and fractional anisotropy index. Comparison of permeability and diffusion measurements indicated regions of injured cords with dysfunctional barriers had structural changes in the form of greater axonal loss and demyelination, as supported by histopathologic assessments. Conclusion The results from this study collectively demonstrated the feasibility of quantitatively mapping regional BSCB dysfunction in injured cord in mouse and obtaining complementary information about its structural integrity using in vivo DCE-MRI and DTI protocols. This capability is expected to play an important role in characterizing the neurovascular changes and reorganization following SCI in longitudinal preclinical experiments, but with potential clinical implications. PMID:19519898

  20. Adaptive voxel, texture and temporal conditional random fields for detection of Gad-enhancing multiple sclerosis lesions in brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Rivaz, Hassan; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2013-01-01

    The detection of Gad-enhancing lesions in brain MRI of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients is of great clinical interest since they are important markers of disease activity. However, many of the enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures (i.e. blood vessels) or noise in the MRI, making the detection of Gad-enhancing lesions a challenging task. Furthermore, these lesions are typically small and in close proximity to vessels. In this paper, we present a probabilistic Adaptive Multi-level Conditional Random Field (AMCRF) framework, capable of leveraging spatial and temporal information, for detection of MS Gad-enhancing lesions. In the first level, a voxel based CRF with cliques of up to size three, is used to identify candidate lesions. In the second level, higher order potentials are incorporated leveraging robust textural features which are invariant to rotation and local intensity distortions. Furthermore, we show how to exploit temporal and longitudinal images, should they be available, into the AMCRF model. The proposed algorithm is tested on 120 multimodal clinical datasets acquired from Relapsing-Remitting MS patients during multi-center clinical trials. Results show a sensitivity of 93%, a positive predictive value of 70% and average False Positive (FP) counts of 0.77. Moreover, the temporal AMCRF results show the same sensitivity as the AMCRF model while decreasing the FP counts by 22%. PMID:24505804

  1. Design, manufacture, and analysis of customized phantoms for enhanced quality control in small animal MRI systems

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimaru, Eriko; Totenhagen, John; Alexander, Gene E.; Trouard, Theodore P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in human brain research to evaluate the effects of healthy aging and development, as well as neurological disorders. Although standardized methods for quality assurance of human MRI instruments have been established, such approaches have typically not been translated to small animal imaging. We present a method for the generation and analysis of customized phantoms for small animal MRI systems that allows rapid and accurate system stability monitoring. Methods Computer-aided design software was used to produce a customized phantom using a rapid prototyping printer. Automated registration algorithms were used on three dimensional images of the phantom to allow system stability to be easily monitored over time. Results The design of the custom phantom allowed reliable placement relative to the imaging g coil. Automated registration showed superior ability to detect gradient changes reflected in the images than with manual measurements. Registering images acquired over time allowed monitoring of gradient drifts of less than one percent. Conclusion A low cost, MRI compatible phantom was successfully designed using computer-aided design software and a 3D printer. Registering phantom images acquired over time allows monitoring of gradient stability of the MRI system. PMID:23440883

  2. Volumetry of [11C]-methionine PET uptake and MRI contrast enhancement in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Roland; Schroeter, Michael; Fink, Gereon R.; Kracht, Lutz W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the relationship between three-dimensional volumetric data of the metabolically active tumour volume assessed using [11C]-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) and the area of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancement assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Material and methods MET-PET and contrast-enhanced MRI with Gd-DTPA were performed in 12 uniformly pretreated patients with recurrent GBM. To calculate the volumes in cubic centimetres, a threshold-based volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis of the metabolically active tumour volume (MET uptake indexes of ≥1.3 and ≥1.5) and of the area of Gd-DTPA enhancement was performed after coregistration of all images. Results In all patients, the metabolically active tumour volume as shown using a MET uptake index of ≥1.3 was larger than the volume of Gd-DTPA enhancement (30.2 ± 22.4 vs. 13.7 ± 10.6 cm3; p = 0.04). Metabolically active tumour volumes as shown using MET uptake indexes of ≥1.3 and ≥1.5 and the volumes of Gd-DTPA enhancement showed a positive correlation (r = 0.76, p = 0.003, for an index of ≥1.3, and r = 0.74, p = 0.005, for an index of ≥1.5). Conclusion The present data suggest that in patients with recurrent GBM the metabolically active tumour volume may be substantially underestimated by Gd-DTPA enhancement. The findings support the notion that complementary information derived from MET uptake and Gd-DTPA enhancement may be helpful in developing individualized, patient-tailored therapy strategies in patients with recurrent GBM. PMID:19662410

  3. An Unusual Case of Mammary Paget's Disease Diagnosed Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Eleonora; Ricci, Aurora; Liberto, Valeria; Scarano, Angela Lia; Fornari, Maria; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Mammary Paget's disease is a rare presentation of breast cancer. At clinical examination, it is characterized by skin lesions of the nipple-areola complex, almost always a sign of malignancy. In fact, it is often associated with an underlying mammary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma. An underlying carcinoma is also common in women with negative mammography and ultrasound (US); in these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a diagnostic tool useful in the detection of occult cancer. We described an unusual case of mammary Paget's disease with underlying DCIS, in a patient without nipple-areola complex alterations and/or palpable lump. On suspicion of Paget's disease, the patient underwent MRI examination that proved useful for an accurate diagnosis. Biopsy confirmed dynamic MRI findings. PMID:23607031

  4. fMRI neurofeedback of amygdala response to aversive stimuli enhances prefrontal-limbic brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Paret, Christian; Ruf, Matthias; Gerchen, Martin Fungisai; Kluetsch, Rosemarie; Demirakca, Traute; Jungkunz, Martin; Bertsch, Katja; Schmahl, Christian; Ende, Gabriele

    2016-01-15

    Down-regulation of the amygdala with real-time fMRI neurofeedback (rtfMRI NF) potentially allows targeting brain circuits of emotion processing and may involve prefrontal-limbic networks underlying effective emotion regulation. Little research has been dedicated to the effect of rtfMRI NF on the functional connectivity of the amygdala and connectivity patterns in amygdala down-regulation with neurofeedback have not been addressed yet. Using psychophysiological interaction analysis of fMRI data, we present evidence that voluntary amygdala down-regulation by rtfMRI NF while viewing aversive pictures was associated with increased connectivity of the right amygdala with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in healthy subjects (N=16). In contrast, a control group (N=16) receiving sham feedback did not alter amygdala connectivity (Group×Condition t-contrast: p<.05 at cluster-level). Task-dependent increases in amygdala-vmPFC connectivity were predicted by picture arousal (β=.59, p<.05). A dynamic causal modeling analysis with Bayesian model selection aimed at further characterizing the underlying causal structure and favored a bottom-up model assuming predominant information flow from the amygdala to the vmPFC (xp=.90). The results were complemented by the observation of task-dependent alterations in functional connectivity of the vmPFC with the visual cortex and the ventrolateral PFC in the experimental group (Condition t-contrast: p<.05 at cluster-level). Taken together, the results underscore the potential of amygdala fMRI neurofeedback to influence functional connectivity in key networks of emotion processing and regulation. This may be beneficial for patients suffering from severe emotion dysregulation by improving neural self-regulation. PMID:26481674

  5. Contrast-enhanced MRI of right ventricular abnormalities in Cx43 mutant mouse embryos†

    PubMed Central

    Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Schneider, Amanda E; Gray, Emily N; Aristizabal, Orlando; Berrios, Cesar; Turnbull, Daniel H; Gutstein, David E

    2009-01-01

    Imaging of the mammalian cardiac right ventricle (RV) is particularly challenging, especially when a two-dimensional method such as conventional histology is used to evaluate the morphology of this asymmetric, crescent-shaped chamber. MRI may improve the characterization of mutants with RV phenotypes by allowing analysis of the samples in any plane and by facilitating three-dimensional image reconstruction. MRI was used to examine the conditional knockout Cx43-PCKO mouse line known to have RV malformations. To help delineate the cardiovascular system and facilitate identification of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), embryonic day (E) 17.5 embryos were perfusion fixed through the umbilical vein followed by a gadolinium-based contrast agent mixed in 7% gelatin. Micro-MRI experiments were performed at 7 T and followed by paraffin embedding of specimens, histological sectioning and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Imaging of up to four embryos simultaneously allowed for higher throughput than traditional individual imaging techniques, while intravascular contrast afforded excellent signal-to-noise characteristics. All control embryos (n=4) and heterozygous Cx43 knockout embryos (n=4) had normal-appearing right ventricular outflow tract contours by MRI. Obvious abnormalities in the RVOT, including abnormal bulging and infiltration of contrast into the wall of the RV, were seen in three out of four Cx43-PCKO mutants with MRI. Furthermore, three-dimensional reconstruction of MR images with orthogonal projections as well as maximum-intensity projection allowed for visualization of the relationship of infundibular bulging segments to the pulmonary trunk in Cx43-PCKO mutant hearts. The addition of MRI to standard histology in the characterization of RV malformations in mutant mouse embryos aids in the assessment and understanding of morphologic abnormalities. Flexibility in the viewing of MR images, which can be retrospectively sectioned in any desired orientation, is particularly useful in the investigation of the RV, an asymmetric chamber that is difficult to analyze with two-dimensional techniques. PMID:17451172

  6. The role of MRI in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Traboulsee, Anthony L; Li, David K B

    2006-01-01

    There is no single test that is diagnostic of MS, including MRI. The lesions detected with MRI are pathologically nonspecific. The principles of MS diagnosis are based on showing dissemination of white matter lesions in space and time. MRI is the most sensitive method for revealing asymptomatic dissemination of lesions in space and time. The pattern and evolution of MRI lesions, in the appropriate clinical setting, has made MRI abnormalities invaluable criteria for the early diagnosis of MS. The first important role for MRI in the diagnosis of MS allows for an early diagnosis of MS for CIS patients using the IP diagnostic criteria, including MRI for dissemination in space (DIS) and time (DIT). The sensitivity of diagnosing MS within the first year after a single attack is 94%, with a specificity of 83%. The MRI evidence required to support the diagnosis varies, depending on the strength of the clinical findings. Allowing a new MRI lesion to substitute for a clinical attack doubles the number of CIS patients who can be diagnosed as having MS within 1 year of symptom onset. Increasing the sensitivity of the test with more lenient criteria, as recommended by the AAN subcommittee, can result in decreased specificity. The second important role for MRI in the diagnostic work-up of suspected MS patients is to rule out alternative diagnoses obvious on MRI, such as spinal stenosis and most brain tumors. Characteristic lesions that favor MS include Dawson Fingers, ovoid lesions, corpus callosum lesions, and asymptomatic spinal cord lesions. However, other white matter diseases can have similar appearances on MRI. Persistent gadolinium enhancement greater than three months, lesions with mass effect, and meningeal enhancement suggest other disorders. A standardized MRI protocol for brain and spinal cord is crucial for comparing across studies or between centers. T2W MRI cannot distinguish between acute and chronic lesions. Gadolinium provides useful information about new lesion activity and is helpful in ruling out alternative diagnoses such as neoplasm, vascular malformations, and leptomeningeal disease. A single gadolinium-enhanced MRI can potentially provide evidence for dissemination in space and time. Spinal cord imaging is equally valuable to rule out spinal stenosis or tumor, and for detecting asymptomatic lesions when brain imaging is nondiagnostic in patients suspected of having MS. Precise criteria may be too suggestive that MS can be diagnosed by MRI and a negative MRI at the time of CIS does not rule out MS. MRI evidence plays a supportive role in what is ultimately a clinical diagnosis of MS, in the appropriate clinical situation, and always at the exclusion of alternative diagnoses. PMID:16400831

  7. Enhanced control of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex neurophysiology with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback training and working memory practice.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Matthew S; Kane, Jessica H; Weisend, Michael P; Parker, Jason G

    2016-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback can be used to train localized, conscious regulation of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals. As a therapeutic technique, rt-fMRI neurofeedback reduces the symptoms of a variety of neurologic disorders. To date, few studies have investigated the use of self-regulation training using rt-fMRI neurofeedback to enhance cognitive performance. This work investigates the utility of rt-fMRI neurofeedback as a tool to enhance human cognition by training healthy individuals to consciously control activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A cohort of 18 healthy participants in the experimental group underwent rt-fMRI neurofeedback from the left DLPFC in five training sessions across two weeks while 7 participants in the control group underwent similar training outside the MRI and without rt-fMRI neurofeedback. Working memory (WM) performance was evaluated on two testing days separated by the five rt-fMRI neurofeedback sessions using two computerized tests. We investigated the ability to control the BOLD signal across training sessions and WM performance across the two testing days. The group with rt-fMRI neurofeedback demonstrated a significant increase in the ability to self-regulate the BOLD signal in the left DLPFC across sessions. WM performance showed differential improvement between testing days one and two across the groups with the highest increases observed in the rt-fMRI neurofeedback group. These results provide evidence that individuals can quickly gain the ability to consciously control the left DLPFC, and this training results in improvements of WM performance beyond that of training alone. PMID:26348555

  8. Preliminary Study of Oxygen-Enhanced Longitudinal Relaxation in MRI: A Potential Novel Biomarker of Oxygenation Changes in Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, James P.B.; Naish, Josephine H.; Parker, Geoff J.M.; Waterton, John C.; Watson, Yvonne; Jayson, Gordon C.; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Cheung, Sue; Buckley, David L.; McGrath, Deirdre M.; West, Catharine M.L.; Davidson, Susan E.; Roberts, Caleb; Mills, Samantha J.; Mitchell, Claire L.; Hope, Lynn; Ton, N. Chan; Jackson, Alan

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing non-invasive methods of mapping tumor hypoxia. Changes in tissue oxygen concentration produce proportional changes in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) longitudinal relaxation rate (R{sub 1}). This technique has been used previously to evaluate oxygen delivery to healthy tissues and is distinct from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Here we report application of this method to detect alteration in tumor oxygenation status. Methods and materials: Ten patients with advanced cancer of the abdomen and pelvis underwent serial measurement of tumor R{sub 1} while breathing medical air (21% oxygen) followed by 100% oxygen (oxygen-enhanced MRI). Gadolinium-based dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was then performed to compare the spatial distribution of perfusion with that of oxygen-induced DELTAR{sub 1}. Results: DELTAR{sub 1} showed significant increases of 0.021 to 0.058 s{sup -1} in eight patients with either locally recurrent tumor from cervical and hepatocellular carcinomas or metastases from ovarian and colorectal carcinomas. In general, there was congruency between perfusion and oxygen concentration. However, regional mismatch was observed in some tumor cores. Here, moderate gadolinium uptake (consistent with moderate perfusion) was associated with low area under the DELTAR{sub 1} curve (consistent with minimal increase in oxygen concentration). Conclusions: These results provide evidence that oxygen-enhanced longitudinal relaxation can monitor changes in tumor oxygen concentration. The technique shows promise in identifying hypoxic regions within tumors and may enable spatial mapping of change in tumor oxygen concentration.

  9. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  10. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, F.; Tung, Y.-S.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the Ktrans values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that Ktrans in the BBB-opened region (0.02 ± 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 ± 0.0167 min-1 for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 × 10-4 ± 12 × 10-4 min-1, respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method.

  11. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, F; Tung, Y-S; Konofagou, E E

    2010-09-21

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the K(trans) values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that K(trans) in the BBB-opened region (0.02 +/- 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 +/- 0.0167 min(-1) for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 x 10(-4) +/- 12 x 10(-4) min(-1), respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R(2) = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method. PMID:20736501

  12. Retrieval of brain tumors with region-specific bag-of-visual-words representations in contrast-enhanced MRI images.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Yu, Mei; Lu, Zhentai; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    A content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system is proposed for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images of brain tumors. In this CBIR system, spatial information in the bag-of-visual-words model and domain knowledge on the brain tumor images are considered for the representation of brain tumor images. A similarity metric is learned through a distance metric learning algorithm to reduce the gap between the visual features and the semantic concepts in an image. The learned similarity metric is then used to measure the similarity between two images and then retrieve the most similar images in the dataset when a query image is submitted to the CBIR system. The retrieval performance of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain CE-MRI dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). The experimental results demonstrate that the mean average precision values of the proposed method range from 90.4% to 91.5% for different views (transverse, coronal, and sagittal) with an average value of 91.0%. PMID:23243462

  13. Retrieval of Brain Tumors with Region-Specific Bag-of-Visual-Words Representations in Contrast-Enhanced MRI Images

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Yu, Mei; Lu, Zhentai; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    A content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system is proposed for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images of brain tumors. In this CBIR system, spatial information in the bag-of-visual-words model and domain knowledge on the brain tumor images are considered for the representation of brain tumor images. A similarity metric is learned through a distance metric learning algorithm to reduce the gap between the visual features and the semantic concepts in an image. The learned similarity metric is then used to measure the similarity between two images and then retrieve the most similar images in the dataset when a query image is submitted to the CBIR system. The retrieval performance of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain CE-MRI dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). The experimental results demonstrate that the mean average precision values of the proposed method range from 90.4% to 91.5% for different views (transverse, coronal, and sagittal) with an average value of 91.0%. PMID:23243462

  14. Enhancing 4D PC-MRI in an aortic phantom considering numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Schoch, Nicolai; Weis, Christian; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Speidel, Stefanie; Farag, Mina; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    To date, cardiovascular surgery enables the treatment of a wide range of aortic pathologies. One of the current challenges in this field is given by the detection of high-risk patients for adverse aortic events, who should be treated electively. Reliable diagnostic parameters, which indicate the urge of treatment, have to be determined. Functional imaging by means of 4D phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) enables the time-resolved measurement of blood flow velocity in 3D. Applied to aortic phantoms, three dimensional blood flow properties and their relation to adverse dynamics can be investigated in vitro. Emerging "in silico" methods of numerical simulation can supplement these measurements in computing additional information on crucial parameters. We propose a framework that complements 4D PC-MRI imaging by means of numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The framework is developed on the basis of a prototypic aortic phantom and validated by 4D PC-MRI measurements of the phantom. Based on physical principles of biomechanics, the derived simulation depicts aortic blood flow properties and characteristics. The framework might help identifying factors that induce aortic pathologies such as aortic dilatation or aortic dissection. Alarming thresholds of parameters such as wall shear stress distribution can be evaluated. The combined techniques of 4D PC-MRI and numerical simulation can be used as complementary tools for risk-stratification of aortic pathology.

  15. Multimodal visualization of 3D enhanced MRI and CT of acoustic schwannoma and related structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2005-09-01

    According to the necessity of supporting vestibular schwannoma surgery, there is a demand to develop a convenient method of medical data visualization. The process of making choice of optimal operating access way has been uncomfortable for a surgeon so far, because there has been a necessity of analyzing two independent 3D images series (CT -bone tissues visible, MRI - soft tissues visible) in the region of ponto-cerebellar angle tumors. The authors propose a solution that will improve this process. The system used is equipped with stereoscopic helmet mounted display. It allows merged CT and MRI data representing tissues in the region of of ponto-cerebellar angle to be visualized in stereoscopic way. The process of data preparation for visualization includes: -automated segmentation algorithms, -different types of 3D images (CT, MRI) fusion. The authors focused on the development of novel algorithms for segmentation of vestibular schwannoma. It is important and difficult task due to different types of tumors and their inhomogeneous character dependent on growth models. The authors propose algorithms based on histogram spectrum and multimodal character of MRI imaging (T1 and T2 modes). However due to a variety of objects the library of algorithms with specific modifications matching to selected types of images is proposed. The applicability and functionality of the algorithms and library was proved on the series of data delivered by Warsaw Central Medical University Hospital.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI serves as a predictor of HIFU treatment outcome for uterine fibroids with hyperintensity in T2-weighted images

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, WEN-PENG; CHEN, JIN-YUN; CHEN, WEN-ZHI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in predicting the outcome of using ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) ablation for the treatment of uterine fibroids with T2 hyperintensity under MRI. A total of 131 uterine fibroids from 131 patients that appeared hyperintense under T2-weighted MRI were analyzed. The uterine fibroids were subjectively categorized into slight, irregular or regular enhancement groups, according to pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the arterial phase within 60 sec after the injection of gadolinium. The non-perfused volume (NPV), which is indicative of successful ablation, was represented as the non-perfused area inside the uterine fibroids on enhanced MRI scans following treatment. Additionally, the treatment duration, treatment efficiency, sonication duration, energy efficiency ratio and any adverse events were recorded. The results indicated that the average NPV ratio for all the treated fibroids was 68.5%, while the average NPV ratios for fibroids with slight, irregular or regular enhancement were 84.7, 70.6 and 57.1%, respectively. Fibroids with regular enhancement were associated with the lowest NPV ratio and the lowest treatment efficiency, but exhibited the highest energy effect ratio and an elevated risk of severe adverse effects. The results of the present study indicate that hyperintense uterine fibroids with slight and irregular enhancement in the arterial phase of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI are suitable for USgHIFU treatment. By contrast, uterine fibroids with regular enhancement were associated with the lowest treatment efficacy and safety. PMID:26889263

  17. Pharmacokinetic changes induced by focused ultrasound in glioma-bearing rats as measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Ko, Chia-En; Huang, Sheng-Yao; Chung, I-Fang; Chen, Gin-Shin

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles has been shown to be a noninvasive and targeted drug delivery technique for brain tumor treatment. The purpose of this study was to measure the kinetics of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) in glioma-bearing rats in the presence of FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB-D) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of ten glioma-bearing rats (9-12 weeks, 290-340 g) were used in this study. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, the spatial permeability of FUS-induced BBB-D was evaluated and the kinetic parameters were calculated by a general kinetic model (GKM). The results demonstrate that the mean Ktrans of the sonicated tumor (0.128±0.019 at 20 min and 0.103±0.023 at 24 h after sonication, respectively) was significantly higher than (2.46-fold at 20 min and 1.78-fold at 24 h) that of the contralateral (non-sonicated) tumor (0.052±0.019 at 20 min and 0.058±0.012 at 24 h after sonication, respectively). In addition, the transfer constant Ktrans in the sonicated tumor correlated strongly with tissue EB extravasation (R = 0.95), which suggests that DCE-MRI may reflect drug accumulation in the brain. Histological observations showed no macroscopic damage except for a few small erythrocyte extravasations. The current study demonstrates that DCE-MRI can monitor the dynamics of the FUS-induced BBB-D process and constitutes a useful tool for quantifying BBB permeability in tumors. PMID:24670992

  18. An aqueous method for the controlled manganese (Mn(2+)) substitution in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for contrast enhancement in MRI.

    PubMed

    Ereath Beeran, Ansar; Nazeer, Shaiju S; Fernandez, Francis Boniface; Muvvala, Krishna Surendra; Wunderlich, Wilfried; Anil, Sukumaran; Vellappally, Sajith; Ramachandra Rao, M S; John, Annie; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Varma, P R Harikrishna

    2015-02-14

    Despite the success in the use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) for various scientific applications, its potential in biomedical fields has not been exploited to its full potential. In this context, an in situ substitution of Mn(2+) was performed in SPION and a series of ferrite particles, MnxFe1-xFe2O4 with a varying molar ratio of Mn(2+) : Fe(2+) where 'x' varies from 0-0.75. The ferrite particles obtained were further studied in MRI contrast applications and showed appreciable enhancement in their MRI contrast properties. Manganese substituted ferrite nanocrystals (MnIOs) were synthesized using a novel, one-step aqueous co-precipitation method based on the use of a combination of sodium hydroxide and trisodium citrate (TSC). This approach yielded the formation of highly crystalline, superparamagnetic MnIOs with good control over their size and bivalent Mn ion crystal substitution. The presence of a TSC hydrophilic layer on the surface facilitated easy dispersion of the materials in an aqueous media. Primary characterizations such as structural, chemical and magnetic properties demonstrated the successful formation of manganese substituted ferrite. More significantly, the MRI relaxivity of the MnIOs improved fourfold when compared to SPION crystals imparting high potential for use as an MRI contrast agent. Further, the cytocompatibility and blood compatibility evaluations demonstrated excellent cell morphological integrity even at high concentrations of nanoparticles supporting the non-toxic nature of nanoparticles. These results open new horizons for the design of biocompatible water dispersible ferrite nanoparticles with good relaxivity properties via a versatile and easily scalable co-precipitation route. PMID:25586703

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI-based biomarkers of therapeutic response in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Daniel I; Lipson, Jafi A; Telli, Melinda L; Ford, James M; Rubin, Daniel L

    2013-01-01

    Objective To predict the response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using features derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Materials and methods 60 patients with triple-negative early-stage breast cancer receiving NAC were evaluated. Features assessed included clinical data, patterns of tumor response to treatment determined by DCE–MRI, MRI breast imaging-reporting and data system descriptors, and quantitative lesion kinetic texture derived from the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). All features except for patterns of response were derived before chemotherapy; GLCM features were determined before and after chemotherapy. Treatment response was defined by the presence of residual invasive tumor and/or positive lymph nodes after chemotherapy. Statistical modeling was performed using Lasso logistic regression. Results Pre-chemotherapy imaging features predicted all measures of response except for residual tumor. Feature sets varied in effectiveness at predicting different definitions of treatment response, but in general, pre-chemotherapy imaging features were able to predict pathological complete response with area under the curve (AUC)=0.68, residual lymph node metastases with AUC=0.84 and residual tumor with lymph node metastases with AUC=0.83. Imaging features assessed after chemotherapy yielded significantly improved model performance over those assessed before chemotherapy for predicting residual tumor, but no other outcomes. Conclusions DCE–MRI features can be used to predict whether triple-negative breast cancer patients will respond to NAC. Models such as the ones presented could help to identify patients not likely to respond to treatment and to direct them towards alternative therapies. PMID:23785100

  20. Pharmacokinetic Changes Induced by Focused Ultrasound in Glioma-Bearing Rats as Measured by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Ko, Chia-En; Huang, Sheng-Yao; Chung, I-Fang; Chen, Gin-Shin

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles has been shown to be a noninvasive and targeted drug delivery technique for brain tumor treatment. The purpose of this study was to measure the kinetics of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) in glioma-bearing rats in the presence of FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB-D) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of ten glioma-bearing rats (9–12 weeks, 290–340 g) were used in this study. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, the spatial permeability of FUS-induced BBB-D was evaluated and the kinetic parameters were calculated by a general kinetic model (GKM). The results demonstrate that the mean Ktrans of the sonicated tumor (0.128±0.019 at 20 min and 0.103±0.023 at 24 h after sonication, respectively) was significantly higher than (2.46-fold at 20 min and 1.78-fold at 24 h) that of the contralateral (non-sonicated) tumor (0.052±0.019 at 20 min and 0.058±0.012 at 24 h after sonication, respectively). In addition, the transfer constant Ktrans in the sonicated tumor correlated strongly with tissue EB extravasation (R = 0.95), which suggests that DCE-MRI may reflect drug accumulation in the brain. Histological observations showed no macroscopic damage except for a few small erythrocyte extravasations. The current study demonstrates that DCE-MRI can monitor the dynamics of the FUS-induced BBB-D process and constitutes a useful tool for quantifying BBB permeability in tumors. PMID:24670992

  1. Atrial Fibrosis Quantified Using Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI is Associated With Sinus Node Dysfunction Requiring Pacemaker Implant

    PubMed Central

    Akoum, Nazem; Mcgann, Christopher; Vergara, Gaston; Badger, Troy; Ranjan, Ravi; Mahnkopf, Christian; Kholmovski, Eugene; Macleod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sinus node dysfunction (SND) commonly manifests with atrial arrhythmias alternating with sinus pauses and sinus bradycardia. The underlying process is thought to be because of atrial fibrosis. We assessed the value of atrial fibrosis, quantified using Late Gadolinium Enhanced-MRI (LGE-MRI), in predicting significant SND requiring pacemaker implant. Methods Three hundred forty-four patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) presenting for catheter ablation underwent LGE-MRI. Left atrial (LA) fibrosis was quantified in all patients and right atrial (RA) fibrosis in 134 patients. All patients underwent catheter ablation with pulmonary vein isolation with posterior wall and septal debulking. Patients were followed prospectively for 329 ± 245 days. Ambulatory monitoring was instituted every 3 months. Symptomatic pauses and bradycardia were treated with pacemaker implantation per published guidelines. Results The average patient age was 65 ± 12 years. The average wall fibrosis was 16.7 ± 11.1% in the LA, and 5.3 ± 6.4% in the RA. RA fibrosis was correlated with LA fibrosis (R2 = 0.26; P < 0.01). Patients were divided into 4 stages of LA fibrosis (Utah I: <5%, Utah II: 5–20%, Utah III: 20–35%, Utah IV: >35%). Twenty-two patients (mean atrial fibrosis, 23.9%) required pacemaker implantation during follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified LA fibrosis stage (OR, 2.2) as a significant predictor for pacemaker implantation with an area under the curve of 0.704. Conclusions In patients with AF presenting for catheter ablation, LGE-MRI quantification of atrial fibrosis demonstrates preferential LA involvement. Significant atrial fibrosis is associated with clinically significant SND requiring pacemaker implantation. PMID:21806700

  2. Enhancing Motor Network Activity Using Real-Time Functional MRI Neurofeedback of Left Premotor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Marins, Theo F; Rodrigues, Erika C; Engel, Annerose; Hoefle, Sebastian; Basílio, Rodrigo; Lent, Roberto; Moll, Jorge; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of potential therapeutic relevance that allows individuals to be aware of their own neurophysiological responses and to voluntarily modulate the activity of specific brain regions, such as the premotor cortex (PMC), important for motor recovery after brain injury. We investigated (i) whether healthy human volunteers are able to up-regulate the activity of the left PMC during a right hand finger tapping motor imagery (MI) task while receiving continuous fMRI-neurofeedback, and (ii) whether successful modulation of brain activity influenced non-targeted motor control regions. During the MI task, participants of the neurofeedback group (NFB) received ongoing visual feedback representing the level of fMRI responses within their left PMC. Control (CTL) group participants were shown similar visual stimuli, but these were non-contingent on brain activity. Both groups showed equivalent levels of behavioral ratings on arousal and MI, before and during the fMRI protocol. In the NFB, but not in CLT group, brain activation during the last run compared to the first run revealed increased activation in the left PMC. In addition, the NFB group showed increased activation in motor control regions extending beyond the left PMC target area, including the supplementary motor area, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Moreover, in the last run, the NFB group showed stronger activation in the left PMC/inferior frontal gyrus when compared to the CTL group. Our results indicate that modulation of PMC and associated motor control areas can be achieved during a single neurofeedback-fMRI session. These results contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MI-based neurofeedback training, with direct implications for rehabilitation strategies in severe brain disorders, such as stroke. PMID:26733832

  3. Enhancing Motor Network Activity Using Real-Time Functional MRI Neurofeedback of Left Premotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Marins, Theo F.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Engel, Annerose; Hoefle, Sebastian; Basílio, Rodrigo; Lent, Roberto; Moll, Jorge; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of potential therapeutic relevance that allows individuals to be aware of their own neurophysiological responses and to voluntarily modulate the activity of specific brain regions, such as the premotor cortex (PMC), important for motor recovery after brain injury. We investigated (i) whether healthy human volunteers are able to up-regulate the activity of the left PMC during a right hand finger tapping motor imagery (MI) task while receiving continuous fMRI-neurofeedback, and (ii) whether successful modulation of brain activity influenced non-targeted motor control regions. During the MI task, participants of the neurofeedback group (NFB) received ongoing visual feedback representing the level of fMRI responses within their left PMC. Control (CTL) group participants were shown similar visual stimuli, but these were non-contingent on brain activity. Both groups showed equivalent levels of behavioral ratings on arousal and MI, before and during the fMRI protocol. In the NFB, but not in CLT group, brain activation during the last run compared to the first run revealed increased activation in the left PMC. In addition, the NFB group showed increased activation in motor control regions extending beyond the left PMC target area, including the supplementary motor area, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Moreover, in the last run, the NFB group showed stronger activation in the left PMC/inferior frontal gyrus when compared to the CTL group. Our results indicate that modulation of PMC and associated motor control areas can be achieved during a single neurofeedback-fMRI session. These results contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MI-based neurofeedback training, with direct implications for rehabilitation strategies in severe brain disorders, such as stroke. PMID:26733832

  4. Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the follow-up of laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT): trial to determine a useful examination schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Isbert, Christoph M.; Albrecht, Dirk; Ritz, Joerg-Peter; Schilling, Andreas; Roggan, Andre; Wolf, Karl J.; Mueller, Gerhard J.; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MRI for follow-up monitoring of laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and to determine of a useful examination schedule. Materials and Methods: LITT Of the liver was performed in 55 rabbits using a Nd:YAG laser (4 w power output, 840 s exposure time). Gd-DTPA MRI and histological examinations were performed at different times (0 - 168 days). Results: Laser- induced lesions underwent regeneration and volume size reduction (69% after 168 days). The correlation coefficient (MR vs macroscopic analysis) for the mean lesion diameter was r equals 0.96. Histology of lesions comprised the four zones that correlated best with MRI findings. Coagulation necroses immediately after LITT were seen as an area of no enhancement on Gd-DTPA MRI. Circular enhancement was first seen 72 - 96 hours after LITT, which was due to early mesenchymal proliferation. Conclusions: Gd-DTPA MRI is a good monitoring procedure for LITT. MRI should be performed 24 and 96 hours after LITT.

  5. Pretreatment Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Improves Prediction of Early Distant Metastases in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chin, Shy-Chyi; Lin, Chien-Yu; Huang, Bing-Shen; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Ku, Yi-Kang; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Li, Cheng-He; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Liao, Chun-Ta; Liu, Ho-Ling; Sung, Kyunghyun

    2016-02-01

    The identification of early distant metastases (DM) in patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) plays an important role in selecting the most appropriate treatment approach. Here, we sought to investigate the predictive value of distinct MRI parameters for the detection of early DM.Between November 2010 and June 2011, a total of 51 newly diagnosed NPC patients were included. All of the study participants were followed until December 2014 at a single institution after completion of therapy. DM was defined as early when they were detected on pretreatment FDG-PET scans or within 6 months after initial diagnosis. The following parameters were tested for their ability to predict early DM: pretreatment FDG-PET standardized uptake value (SUV), MRI-derived AJCC tumor staging, tumor volume, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) values. The DCE-derived ve was defined as the volume fraction of the extravascular, extracellular space.Compared with patients without early DM, patients with early DM had higher SUV, tumor volume, DCE mean (median) ve, ve skewness, ve kurtosis, and the largest mean ve selected among sequential slices (P < 0.05). No differences were identified when early DM were defined only according to the results of pretreatment FDG-PET. Among different quantitative DCE parameters, the mean ve had the highest area under curve (AUC, 0.765). However, the AUCs of SUV, tumor volume, mean ve, ve skewness, ve kurtosis, or the largest mean ve selected among the sequential slices did not differ significantly from one another (P = 0.82).Taken together, our results suggest that DCE-derived ve may be a useful parameter in combination with SUV and tumor volume for predicting early DM. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may be complementary to FDG-PET for selecting the most appropriate treatment approach in NPC patients. PMID:26871776

  6. Pretreatment Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Improves Prediction of Early Distant Metastases in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Shy-Chyi; Lin, Chien-Yu; Huang, Bing-Shen; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Ku, Yi-Kang; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Li, Cheng-He; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Liao, Chun-Ta; Liu, Ho-Ling; Sung, Kyunghyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The identification of early distant metastases (DM) in patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) plays an important role in selecting the most appropriate treatment approach. Here, we sought to investigate the predictive value of distinct MRI parameters for the detection of early DM. Between November 2010 and June 2011, a total of 51 newly diagnosed NPC patients were included. All of the study participants were followed until December 2014 at a single institution after completion of therapy. DM was defined as early when they were detected on pretreatment FDG-PET scans or within 6 months after initial diagnosis. The following parameters were tested for their ability to predict early DM: pretreatment FDG-PET standardized uptake value (SUV), MRI-derived AJCC tumor staging, tumor volume, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) values. The DCE-derived ve was defined as the volume fraction of the extravascular, extracellular space. Compared with patients without early DM, patients with early DM had higher SUV, tumor volume, DCE mean (median) ve, ve skewness, ve kurtosis, and the largest mean ve selected among sequential slices (P < 0.05). No differences were identified when early DM were defined only according to the results of pretreatment FDG-PET. Among different quantitative DCE parameters, the mean ve had the highest area under curve (AUC, 0.765). However, the AUCs of SUV, tumor volume, mean ve, ve skewness, ve kurtosis, or the largest mean ve selected among the sequential slices did not differ significantly from one another (P = 0.82). Taken together, our results suggest that DCE-derived ve may be a useful parameter in combination with SUV and tumor volume for predicting early DM. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may be complementary to FDG-PET for selecting the most appropriate treatment approach in NPC patients. PMID:26871776

  7. Gradient-enhanced volume rendering: an image processing strategy to facilitate whole small bowel imaging with MRI.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Michael; Froehlich, Johannes M; Patak, Michael A; Juli, Christoph F; Scheidegger, Markus B; Zollikofer, Christoph L; Wentz, Klaus U

    2007-04-01

    MRI of the small bowel with positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent is a promising non-invasive imaging method. The aim of our study was to introduce small bowel MRI in a display format that clinicians are accustomed to and that maximizes the amount of information visualized on a single image. Twelve healthy volunteers, median age 32 years (range 18-49 years) participated in the study. A mixture of 20 ml Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), 0.8 g/kg body weight psyllium fibre (Metamucil) and 1.2 l water were sequentially administered over a period of 4 h. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T unit (Philips Gyroscan, Intera). Fat-saturated, 3D, gradient echo imaging was performed while the patient was in apnea (30 s). Bowel motion was reduced with 40 mg intravenously administered scopolamine (Buscopan). A 3D, gradient-enhanced, volume rendering technique was applied to the 3D data sets. Standard projections [left anterior oblique (LAO), right anterior oblique (RAO), supine and prone] resembling conventional enteroclysis were successfully generated within fewer than 10 min processing time. Reconstructions were reproducible and provided an entire overview of the small bowel. In addition thin-slab volume rendering allowed an overlap-free display of individual structures. Positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent, combined with a gradient enhanced volume rendering method, allows the reconstruction of the small bowel in a pattern resembling conventional double-contrast enteroclysis. Segmental display without overlay is possible. PMID:17021699

  8. A New Approach Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI to Diagnose Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in a Rabbit Model: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Kuang, Lian-qin; Zhang, Yu-long; Cheng, Hai-yun; Min, Jia-yan; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been applied to a wide range of biological and disease research. The purpose of the study was to use MEMRI to diagnose the acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI). Methods. The institutional experimental animal ethics committee approved this study. To optimize the dose of Mn2+ infusion, a dose-dependent curve was obtained using Mn2+-enhanced T1 map MRI by an intravenous infusion 2.5–20 nmol/g body weight (BW) of 50 nmol/L MnCl2. The eighteen animals were divided into control, sham-operated, and AMI groups. AMI models were performed by ligating the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). T1 values were measured on T1 maps in regions of the small intestinal wall and relaxation rate (ΔR1) was calculated. Results. A nonlinear relationship between infused MnCl2 solution dose and increase in small intestinal wall ΔR1 was observed. Control animal exhibited significant Mn2+ clearance over time at the dose of 15 nmol/g BW. In the AMI model, ΔR1 values (0.95 ± 0.13) in the small intestinal wall were significantly lower than in control group (2.05 ± 0.19) after Mn2+ infusion (P < 0.01). Conclusion. The data suggest that MEMRI shows potential as a diagnostic technique that is directly sensitive to the poor or absent perfusion in AMI. PMID:26693487

  9. Sol and Gel States in Peptide Hydrogels Visualized by Gd(III)-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Weerasekare, Mahika; Taraban, Marc B.; Shi, Xianfeng; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Trewhella, Jill; Yu, Yihua Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogels assembled from a pair of self-repulsive but mutually-attractive decapeptides are visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. It is found that in the absence of Gd(III)-chelate, gelation has little effect on MRI signal intensity. In the presence of Gd(III)-chelate, gelation leads to significant changes in water relaxation and MR signal intensity. The sol to gel transition is best visualized by T2-weighted imaging using large echo time with the sol producing a bright spot and the gel producing a dark spot. MRI studies indicate high local Gd(III)-chelate concentration. Small-angle X-ray scattering study indicates that this local enrichment of Gd(III)-chelate has two contributing processes: first, the aggregation of peptides into fibers; second, within peptide fibers, Gd(III)-chelate further aggregate into clusters. This work demonstrates that the status of peptide-based hydrogels can be visualized by MRI with the aid of covalently linked Gd(III)-chelates. This result has implications for monitoring peptide scaffolds in vivo. PMID:22252424

  10. The Complementary Roles of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT for Imaging of Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Mani, Venkatesh; Millon, Antoine; Rosenbaum, David; Tawakol, Ahmed; Woodward, Mark; Bucerius, Jan; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Kallend, David; Farkouh, Michael E; Fuster, Valentin; Rudd, James HF; Fayad, Zahi A

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation and neovascularization in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are key risk factors for severe clinical events. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) are two non-invasive imaging techniques capable of quantifying plaque neovascularization and inflammatory infiltrate respectively. However, their mutual role in defining plaque vulnerability and their possible overlap has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we study the relationship between DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG PET in the carotid arteries of 40 subjects with coronary heart disease (CHD) or CHD equivalent, recruited as a substudy of the dal-PLAQUE trial (NCT00655473). Methods The dal-PLAQUE trial was a multicenter study that evaluated dalcetrapib, a cholesteryl ester transfer protein modulator. Subjects underwent anatomical MRI, DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG PET. Only baseline imaging and biomarkers data (before randomization) from dal-PLAQUE were used as part of this substudy. Our primary goal was to evaluate the relationship between DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG PET data. As secondary endpoints, we evaluated the relationship between a) PET data and whole vessel anatomical MRI data, and b) DCE-MRI and matching anatomical MRI data. All correlations were estimated using a mixed linear model. Results We found a significant inverse relationship between several perfusion indices by DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG uptake by PET. Regarding our secondary endpoints, there was a significant relationship between plaque burden measured by anatomical MRI with several perfusion indices by DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG uptake by PET. No relationship was found between plaque composition by anatomical MRI with DCEMRI or 18F-FDG PET metrics. Conclusions In this study we observed a significant, weak inverse relationship between inflammation measured as 18F-FDG uptake by PET and plaque perfusion by DCE-MRI. Our findings suggest that there may be a complex relationship between plaque inflammation and microvascularization during the different stages of plaque development. 18F-FDG PET and DCE-MRI may have complementary roles in identifying subjects at high risk for cardiovascular events in future clinical practice. PMID:23942908

  11. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  12. The use of error-category mapping in pharmacokinetic model analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data.

    PubMed

    Gill, Andrew B; Anandappa, Gayathri; Patterson, Andrew J; Priest, Andrew N; Graves, Martin J; Janowitz, Tobias; Jodrell, Duncan I; Eisen, Tim; Lomas, David J

    2015-02-01

    This study introduces the use of 'error-category mapping' in the interpretation of pharmacokinetic (PK) model parameter results derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data. Eleven patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma were enrolled in a multiparametric study of the treatment effects of bevacizumab. For the purposes of the present analysis, DCE-MRI data from two identical pre-treatment examinations were analysed by application of the extended Tofts model (eTM), using in turn a model arterial input function (AIF), an individually-measured AIF and a sample-average AIF. PK model parameter maps were calculated. Errors in the signal-to-gadolinium concentration ([Gd]) conversion process and the model-fitting process itself were assigned to category codes on a voxel-by-voxel basis, thereby forming a colour-coded 'error-category map' for each imaged slice. These maps were found to be repeatable between patient visits and showed that the eTM converged adequately in the majority of voxels in all the tumours studied. However, the maps also clearly indicated sub-regions of low Gd uptake and of non-convergence of the model in nearly all tumours. The non-physical condition ve ≥ 1 was the most frequently indicated error category and appeared sensitive to the form of AIF used. This simple method for visualisation of errors in DCE-MRI could be used as a routine quality-control technique and also has the potential to reveal otherwise hidden patterns of failure in PK model applications. PMID:25460333

  13. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing

    PubMed Central

    Budinsky, Lubos; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM) based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods. PMID:26656497

  14. Follow-up of breast lesions detected by MRI not biopsied due to absent enhancement of contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Hefler, L; Casselman, J; Amaya, B; Heinig, A; Alberich, T; Koelbl, H; Heywang-Köbrunner, S H

    2003-02-01

    Our objective was to follow-up patients in whom scheduled MR-guided vacuum biopsies for suspicious lesions were aborted due to absent enhancement of contrast medium. Thirty-seven of 291 scheduled MR-guided vacuum biopsies were aborted. Six cases were lost to follow-up. Two could be unequivocally identified and were nevertheless biopsied. In 25 of 29 patients absent enhancement was confirmed on subsequent studies without compression. Varying hormonal or inflammatory changes between initial MRI and MR-guided vacuum biopsy most probably explain the findings. Enhancement re-appeared on short-term follow-up <6 months without compression in 4 of the 29 patients. Too strong compression during MR-guided vacuum biopsy explains the absence of enhancement in these patients. Of note, on histology, three of these cases proved malignant. We conclude that short-term follow-up without compression is necessary and recommended for all lesions not visible during scheduled MR-guided vacuum biopsy. PMID:12599000

  15. Layer-Specific Manganese-Enhanced MRI of the Diabetic Rat Retina in Light and Dark Adaptation at 11.7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Eric R.; Chandra, Saurav B.; De La Garza, Bryan H.; Velagapudi, Chakradhar; Abboud, Hanna E.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To employ high-resolution manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to study abnormal calcium activity in different cell layers in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retinas, and to determine whether MEMRI detects changes at earlier time points than previously reported. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied 14 days (n = 8) and 30 days (n = 5) after streptozotocin (STZ) or vehicle (n = 7) injection. Manganese-enhanced MRI at 20 × 20 × 700 μm, in which contrast is based on manganese as a calcium analogue and an MRI contrast agent, was obtained in light and dark adaptation of the retina in the same animals in which one eye was covered and the fellow eye was not. The MEMRI activity encoding of the light and dark adaptation was achieved in awake conditions and imaged under anesthesia. Results. Manganese-enhanced MRI showed three layers, corresponding to the inner retina, outer retina, and the choroid. In normal animals, the outer retina showed higher MEMRI activity in dark compared to light; the inner retina displayed lower activity in dark compared to light; and the choroid showed no difference in activity. Manganese-enhanced MRI activity changed as early as 14 days after hyperglycemia and decreased with duration of hyperglycemia in the outer retina in dark relative to light adaptation. The choroid also had altered MEMRI activity at 14 days, which returned to normal by 30 days. No differences in MEMRI activity were detected in the inner retina. Conclusions. Manganese-enhanced MRI detects progressive reduction in calcium activity with duration of hyperglycemia in the outer retina as early as 14 days after hyperglycemia, earlier than any other time point reported in the literature. PMID:26098468

  16. Pilot study of non-contrast-enhanced MRI vs. ultrasound in renal transplant recipients with acquired cystic kidney disease: a prospective intra-individual comparison.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Anja S; Lange, Christian; Kroll, Gisela; Floege, Jürgen; Krombach, Gabriele A; Kuhl, Christiane; Eitner, Frank; Schrading, Simone

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after kidney transplantation is 15-fold increased. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) is one of the known risk factors. We performed a small pilot study to assess the role of non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for intensified screening in renal transplant recipients with ACKD. Renal ultrasound was used to assess the native kidneys of 215 renal transplant recipients. Thirty patients with 54 kidneys, fulfilling the criteria of ACKD, underwent non-enhanced MRI at 1.5T using T2- and T1-weighed as well as diffusion-weighted sequences with a high spatial resolution. Among the 54 kidneys assessed by both methods, three RCCs were identified (6%). Of those, one RCC was detected by both imaging methods (33%), while two RCCs were diagnosed by MRI alone (67%). MRI identified an additional four proteinaceous or hemorrhagic cysts that did not fulfill the criteria for RCC but were classified as suspicious. All of these lesions were stable in size and appearance in follow-up studies. In conclusion, non-enhanced MRI was more sensitive than ultrasound in identifying RCCs and lesions suspicious for RCC and thus appears to be a useful secondary screening tool in patients with ACKD after renal transplantation. PMID:24118352

  17. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  18. Enhancing the quantification of tissue sodium content by MRI: time-efficient sodium B1 mapping at clinical field strengths.

    PubMed

    Lommen, Jonathan; Konstandin, Simon; Krämer, Philipp; Schad, Lothar R

    2016-02-01

    Tissue sodium content (TSC) is a sensitive measure of pathological changes and can be detected non-invasively by MRI. For the absolute quantification of TSC, B1 inhomogeneities must be corrected, which is not well established beyond research applications. An in-depth analysis of B1 mapping methods which are suitable for application in TSC quantification is presented. On the basis of these results, a method for simultaneous B1 mapping and imaging is proposed in order to enhance accuracy and to reduce measurement time at clinical field strengths. The B1 mapping techniques used were phase-sensitive (PS), Bloch-Siegert shift (BSS), double-angle (DAM) and actual flip-angle imaging (AFI) methods. Experimental and theoretical comparisons demonstrated that the PS technique yields the most accurate field profiles and exhibits the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simultaneous B1 mapping and imaging was performed for the PS method, employing both degrees of freedom of the MR signal: the B1 field is encoded into signal phase and the amplitude provides the concentration information. In comparison with the more established DAM, a 13% higher SNR was obtained and field effects could be corrected more accurately without the need for additional measurement time. The protocol developed was applied to measure TSC in the healthy human head at an isotropic resolution of 4 mm. TSC was determined to be 35 ± 1 mM in white matter and 134 ± 3 mM in vitreous humor. By employing the proposed simultaneous characterization of the B1 field and acquisition of the spin density-weighted sodium signal, the accuracy of the non-invasive measurement of TSC is enhanced and the measurement time is reduced. This should allow (23) Na MRI to be better incorporated into clinical studies and routine. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25904161

  19. Tumor perfusion assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI correlates to the grading of renal cell carcinoma: initial results.

    PubMed

    Palmowski, Moritz; Schifferdecker, Isabel; Zwick, Stefan; Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan; Laue, Hendrik; Haferkamp, Axel; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Kiessling, Fabian; Hallscheidt, Peter

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we investigated whether assessment of the tumor perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) enables to estimate the morphologic grading of renal cell carcinomas. A total of 21 patients with suspected renal cell cancer were examined using a Gadobutrol-enhanced, dynamic saturation-recovery, turbo-fast, low-angle shot sequence. Tumor perfusion and the tissue-blood ratio within the entire tumor and the most highly vascularized part of the tumor were calculated according to the model of Miles. Immediately after examination, patients underwent surgery, and the results from imaging were compared with the morphological analysis of the histologic grading. Fourteen patients had G2 tumors, and seven patients had G3 tumors. Significantly higher perfusion values (p<0.05) were obtained in G3 tumors than in G2 tumors when the entire tumor area was considered (1.59+/-0.44(ml/g/min) vs. 1.08+/-0.38(ml/g/min)) or its most highly vascularized part (2.14+/-0.89(ml/g/min) vs. 1.40+/-0.49(ml/g/min)). By contrast, the tissue-blood ratios did not differ significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, unlike tissue-blood ratio, surrogate parameters of the tumor perfusion determined by DCE MRI seem to allow an estimation of the grading of renal cell carcinoma. However, further studies with high case numbers and including patients with G1 tumors are required to evaluate the full potential and clinical impact. PMID:19540690

  20. Multifunctional 1D magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticle chains for enhanced MRI, fluorescent cell imaging, and combined photothermal/chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Mararenko, Anton; Cao, Guixin; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-09-10

    While the assembled 1D magnetic nanoparticle (NP) chains have demonstrated synergistic magnetic effects from the individual NPs, it is essential to prepare new 1D NP chains that can combine the magnetism with other important material properties for multifunctional applications. This paper reports the fabrication and multifunctional investigation of a new type of 1D NP chains that combine the magnetic properties with fluorescent properties, photothermal conversion ability, and drug carrier function. The building block NPs are composed of magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanocrystals clustered in the core and fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the mesoporous carbon shell with hydroxyl/carboxyl groups anchored on their surface. These NPs can assemble under the induction of external magnetic field and form stable 1D NP chains of diameter ∼ 90 nm and length ∼ 3 μm via the hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking linkage of the carbon shell. The resulted 1D hybrid NP chains not only demonstrate much higher magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting ability than the dispersed building block NPs, but also enter into intracellular region and light up the B16F10 cells under a laser excitation with strong and stable fluorescence. While the mesoporous carbon shell provides high drug loading capacity, the embedded fluorescent carbon dots convert near-infrared (NIR) light to heat, and hence kill the tumor cells efficiently and enhance the drug release rate to further improve the therapeutic efficacy under NIR irradiation. Such designed 1D magnetic-fluorescent hybrid NP chains with enhanced MRI contrast, fluorescent imaging ability, and combined chemo-/photothermal therapeutic ability have great potential for various biomedical applications. PMID:25127411

  1. Core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles as excellent MRI contrast enhancement agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Chen, Hongwei; Li, Wanfeng; Mao, Hui; Machaidze, Revaz; Tzitzios, Vasilis; Hadjipanayis, George C.

    2013-04-01

    We report the use of metallic iron-based nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. Core/shell structured iron-based nanoparticles prepared by thermally decomposing organo-metallic compounds of iron at high temperature in the presence of hydrophobic surfactants were coated and stabilized in the aqueous solvent using the newly developed polysiloxane PEO-b-PγMPS (poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly (γ methacryloxypropyl trimethyl oxysilane)) diblock copolymers. Particles are well suspended in water and retain their core-shell morphology after coating with the copolymer. In comparison to the conventionally used iron-oxide nanoparticles, core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles offer a much stronger T2 shortening effect than that of iron-oxide with the same core size due to their better magnetic properties.

  2. Rationally Separating the Corona and Membrane Functions of Polymer Vesicles for Enhanced T₂ MRI and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jingya; Liu, Qiuming; Zhang, Junxue; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shuai; Zhao, Yao; Du, Jianzhong

    2015-07-01

    It is an important challenge to in situ grow ultrafine super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in drug carriers such as polymer vesicles (also called polymersomes) while keeping their biodegradability for enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and drug delivery. Herein, we present a new strategy by rationally separating the corona and membrane functions of polymer vesicles to solve the above problem. We designed a poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO43-b-PCL98-b-PAA25) triblock copolymer and self-assembled it into polymer vesicle. The PAA chains in the vesicle coronas are responsible for the in situ nanoprecipitation of ultrafine SPIONs, while the vesicle membrane composed of PCL is biodegradable. The SPIONs-decorated vesicle is water-dispersible, biocompatible, and slightly cytotoxic to normal human cells. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, energy disperse spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer revealed the formation of ultrafine super-paramagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (1.9 ± 0.3 nm) in the coronas of polymer vesicles. Furthermore, the CCK-8 assay revealed low cytotoxicity of vesicles against normal L02 liver cells without and with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The in vitro and in vivo MRI experiments confirmed the enhanced T2-weighted MRI sensitivity and excellent metastasis in mice. The loading and release experiments of an anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl), indicated that the Fe3O4-decorated magnetic vesicles have potential applications as a nanocarrier for anticancer drug delivery. Moreover, the polymer vesicle is degradable in the presence of enzyme such as Pseudomonas lipases, and the ultrafine Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the vesicle coronas are confirmed to be degradable under weakly acidic conditions. Overall, this decoration-in-vesicle-coronas strategy provides us with a new insight for preparing water-dispersible ultrafine super-paramagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with promising theranostic applications in biomedicine. PMID:26046951

  3. Hydrothermally synthesized PEGylated calcium phosphate nanoparticles incorporating Gd-DTPA for contrast enhanced MRI diagnosis of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Mi, Peng; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Cabral, Horacio; Kumagai, Michiaki; Nomoto, Takahiro; Aoki, Ichio; Terada, Yasuko; Kishimura, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-01-28

    Organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles with calcium phosphate (CaP) core and PEGylated shell were developed to incorporate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (III) (Gd-DTPA) for noninvasive diagnosis of solid tumors. A two-step preparation method was applied to elaborate hybrid nanoparticles with a z-average hydrodynamic diameter about 80nm, neutral surface ξ-potential and high colloidal stability in physiological environments by self-assembly of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(aspartic acid) block copolymer, Gd-DTPA, and CaP in aqueous solution, followed with hydrothermal treatment. Incorporation into the hybrid nanoparticles allowed Gd-DTPA to show significant enhanced retention ratio in blood circulation, leading to high accumulation in tumor positions due to enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Moreover, Gd-DTPA revealed above 6 times increase of relaxivity in the nanoparticle system compared to free form, and eventually, selective and elevated contrast enhancements in the tumor positions were observed. These results indicate the high potential of Gd-DTPA-loaded PEGylated CaP nanoparticles as a novel contrast agent for noninvasive cancer diagnosis. PMID:24211705

  4. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3.0-Tesla MRI findings for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions: Comparison with iodine-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyong-Hu; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Moon-Jib; Kwak, Byung-Joon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-12-01

    The safety of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic-acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) has been confirmed, but more study is needed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for whom surgical treatment is considered or with a metastatic hepatoma. Research is also needed to examine the rate of detection of hepatic lesions compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which is used most frequently to localize and characterize a HCC. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and iodine-enhanced MDCT imaging were compared for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions. The clinical usefulness of each method was examined. The current study enrolled 79 patients with focal liver lesions who preoperatively underwent MRI and MDCT. In these patients, there was less than one month between the two diagnostic modalities. Imaging data were taken before and after contrast enhancement in both methods. To evaluate the images, we analyzed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lesions and the liver parenchyma. To compare the sensitivity of the two methods, we performed a quantitative analysis of the percentage signal intensity of the liver (PSIL) on a high resolution picture archiving and communication system (PACS) monitor (paired-samples t-test, p < 0.05). The enhancement was evaluated based on a consensus of four observers. The enhancement pattern and the morphological features during the arterial and the delayed phases were correlated between the Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI findings and the iodine-enhanced MDCT by using an adjusted x2 test. The SNRs, CNRs, and PSIL all had a greater detection rate in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI than in iodine-enhanced MDCT. Hepatocyte-selective uptake was observed 20 minutes after the injection in the focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH, 9/9), adenoma (9/10), and highly-differentiated HCC (grade G1, 27/30). Rim enhancement was detected in all metastases (30/30). During the arterial and the delayed phases, good overall agreement between the gadoxetic-acid-enhanced MR and CT was observed (x2 test, p < 0.05). For the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI had a higher diagnostic value and higher detection rate than iodine-enhanced MDCT. The arterial and the delayed dynamic enhancement patterns, and the gadoxetic-acid-enhanced MR imaging can provide information on the possible degree of cellular differentiation of a HCC, adenoma or metastatic tumor.

  5. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Using a Macromolecular MR Contrast Agent (P792): Evaluation of Antivascular Drug Effect in a Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Sun; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Il; Woo, Sungmin; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Choi, Jin-Young; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. Materials and Methods This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. Results P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Conclusion Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent. PMID:26357497

  6. Pulmonary Embolism Originating from a Hepatic Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into the Inferior Vena Cava: CT and MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Poyraz, Necdet; Demirbaş, Soner; Korkmaz, Celalettin; Uzun, Kürşat

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism due to hydatid cysts is a very rare clinical entity. Hydatid pulmonary embolism can be distinguished from other causes of pulmonary embolism with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI especially displays the cystic nature of lesions better than CECT. Here we report a 45-year-old male patient with the pulmonary embolism due to ruptured hydatid liver cyst into the inferior vena cava. PMID:26904344

  7. Highly accelerated dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with temporal constrained reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huajun She; Rong-Rong Chen; DiBella, Edward V R; Schabel, Matthias; Ying, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    For DCE MRI applications, the images of adjacent time frames are often similar, especially when motion is minimal, in which case temporal TV is a reasonable regularization term. Temporal constraint reconstruction (TCR) has been developed to reconstruct dynamic images from undersampled k-t space data based on such prior information. However, the convergence speed of the algorithm highly depends on the initialization method. In this study, we study initialization using a composite high resolution image based on a jigsaw sampling pattern during pre-contrast frames. The proposed initialization method converges much faster than a conventional initialization method using low resolution images, especially at high reduction factors. In vivo breast imaging experiments were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Experiments show the new initialization method allows TCR to achieve a high reduction factor up to 40 without compromising much of the spatial or temporal resolution. The reconstruction errors are much lower than those using the low resolution initialization when the same number of measurements is used. PMID:25570475

  8. Additional Value of Diffusion-weighted MRI to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatic MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis: the Difference Depending on the Experience of the Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Iida, Makoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was to investigate whether adding diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (EOB-MRI) improved the detection of liver metastasis in radiology resident and board-certified radiologist groups. It was approved by our institutional review board. We selected 18 patients with 35 liver metastases and 12 patients without liver tumors. Five board-certified radiologists and 5 radiology residents participated in the observer performance study. Each observer first interpreted T1- and T2-weighted-, plain-, arterial phase-, and hepatobiliary phase images and specified the location of the liver metastases. The software subsequently displayed the DWI images simultaneously and all participants repeated the reading. We used Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis to compare the observer performance in detecting liver metastases. The mean values for the area under the curve (AUC) for EOB-MRI without and with DWI were 0.78 ± 0.13 [standard deviation: SD] and 0.87 ± 0.09, respectively, for the radiology residents, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.045). For the board- certified radiologists these values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.01, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.092). EOB-MRI with DWI significantly improved the performance of radiology residents in the identification of liver metastases. PMID:26211220

  9. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  10. Automatic detection of gadolinium-enhancing multiple sclerosis lesions in brain MRI using conditional random fields.

    PubMed

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Shah, Mohak; Francis, Simon J; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2012-06-01

    Gadolinium-enhancing lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are of great interest since they are markers of disease activity. Identification of gadolinium-enhancing lesions is particularly challenging because the vast majority of enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures, particularly blood vessels. Furthermore, these lesions are typically small and in close proximity to vessels. In this paper, we present an automatic, probabilistic framework for segmentation of gadolinium-enhancing lesions in MS using conditional random fields. Our approach, through the integration of different components, encodes different information such as correspondence between the intensities and tissue labels, patterns in the labels, or patterns in the intensities. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on 80 multimodal clinical datasets acquired from relapsing-remitting MS patients in the context of multicenter clinical trials. The experimental results exhibit a sensitivity of 98% with a low false positive lesion count. The performance of the proposed algorithm is also compared to a logistic regression classifier, a support vector machine and a Markov random field approach. The results demonstrate superior performance of the proposed algorithm at successfully detecting all of the gadolinium-enhancing lesions while maintaining a low false positive lesion count. PMID:22318484

  11. Computerized breast mass detection using multi-scale Hessian-based analysis for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Hao; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate a computer-aided system for detecting breast masses using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for clinical use. Detection performance of the system was analyzed on 61 biopsy-confirmed lesions (21 benign and 40 malignant lesions) in 34 women. The breast region was determined using the demons deformable algorithm. After the suspicious tissues were identified by kinetic feature (area under the curve) and the fuzzy c-means clustering method, all breast masses were detected based on the rotation-invariant and multi-scale blob characteristics. Subsequently, the masses were further distinguished from other detected non-tumor regions (false positives). Free-response operating characteristics (FROC) curve and detection rate were used to evaluate the detection performance. Using the combined features, including blob, enhancement, morphologic, and texture features with 10-fold cross validation, the mass detection rate was 100 % (61/61) with 15.15 false positives per case and 91.80 % (56/61) with 4.56 false positives per case. In conclusion, the proposed computer-aided detection system can help radiologists reduce inter-observer variability and the cost associated with detection of suspicious lesions from a large number of images. Our results illustrated that breast masses can be efficiently detected and that enhancement and morphologic characteristics were useful for reducing non-tumor regions. PMID:24687641

  12. Enhanced disease characterization through multi network functional normalization in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Mustafa S.; Khullar, Siddharth; Damaraju, Eswar; Michael, Andrew M.; Baum, Stefi A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, structural topology is used for spatial normalization during the pre-processing of fMRI. The co-existence of multiple intrinsic networks which can be detected in the resting brain are well-studied. Also, these networks exhibit temporal and spatial modulation during cognitive task vs. rest which shows the existence of common spatial excitation patterns between these identified networks. Previous work (Khullar et al., 2011) has shown that structural and functional data may not have direct one-to-one correspondence and functional activation patterns in a well-defined structural region can vary across subjects even for a well-defined functional task. The results of this study and the existence of the neural activity patterns in multiple networks motivates us to investigate multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization for multi groups of subjects. We extend the previous approach (Khullar et al., 2011) by co-registering multi group of subjects (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and by utilizing multiple resting-state networks (instead of just one) as a single fusion template for functional normalization. In this paper we describe the initial steps toward using multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization. A simple wavelet-based image fusion approach is presented in order to evaluate the feasibility of combining multiple functional networks. Our results showed improvements in both the significance of group statistics (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and the spatial extent of activation when a multiple resting-state network applied as a single fusion template for functional normalization after the conventional structural normalization. Also, our results provided evidence that the improvement in significance of group statistics lead to better accuracy results for classification of healthy controls and schizophrenia patients. PMID:25873853

  13. Enhanced disease characterization through multi network functional normalization in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Mustafa S; Khullar, Siddharth; Damaraju, Eswar; Michael, Andrew M; Baum, Stefi A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, structural topology is used for spatial normalization during the pre-processing of fMRI. The co-existence of multiple intrinsic networks which can be detected in the resting brain are well-studied. Also, these networks exhibit temporal and spatial modulation during cognitive task vs. rest which shows the existence of common spatial excitation patterns between these identified networks. Previous work (Khullar et al., 2011) has shown that structural and functional data may not have direct one-to-one correspondence and functional activation patterns in a well-defined structural region can vary across subjects even for a well-defined functional task. The results of this study and the existence of the neural activity patterns in multiple networks motivates us to investigate multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization for multi groups of subjects. We extend the previous approach (Khullar et al., 2011) by co-registering multi group of subjects (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and by utilizing multiple resting-state networks (instead of just one) as a single fusion template for functional normalization. In this paper we describe the initial steps toward using multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization. A simple wavelet-based image fusion approach is presented in order to evaluate the feasibility of combining multiple functional networks. Our results showed improvements in both the significance of group statistics (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and the spatial extent of activation when a multiple resting-state network applied as a single fusion template for functional normalization after the conventional structural normalization. Also, our results provided evidence that the improvement in significance of group statistics lead to better accuracy results for classification of healthy controls and schizophrenia patients. PMID:25873853

  14. Focal liver lesions detection and characterization: The advantages of gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI

    PubMed Central

    Palmucci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Since its clinical introduction, several studies in literature have investigated gadolinium ethoxybenzhyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid or gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) properties. Following contrast injection, it provides dynamic vascular phases (arterial, portal and equilibrium phases) and hepatobiliary phase, the latter due to its uptake by functional hepatocytes. The main advantages of Gd-EOB-DTPA of focal liver lesion detection and characterization are discussed in this paper. Namely, we focus on the possibility of distinguishing focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) from hepatic adenoma (HA), the identification of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the pre-operative assessment of metastasis in liver parenchyma. Regarding the differentiation between FNH and HA, adenoma typically appears hypointense in hepatobiliary phase, whereas FNH is isointense or hyperintense to the surrounding hepatic parenchyma. As for the identification of early HCCs, many papers recently published in literature have emphasized the contribution of hepatobiliary phase in the characterization of nodules without a typical hallmark of HCC. Atypical nodules (no hypervascularizaton observed on arterial phase and/or no hypovascular appearance on portal phase) with low signal intensity in the hepatobiliary phase, have a high probability of malignancy. Finally, regarding the evaluation of focal hepatic metastases, magnetic resonance pre-operative assessment using gadoxetic acid allows for more accurate diagnosis. PMID:25067999

  15. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-11-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans . Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25995102

  16. Molecular imaging of tumors and metastases using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Michal; Horev, Judith; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Navon, Gil

    2013-10-01

    The two glucose analogs 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) are preferentially taken up by cancer cells, undergo phosphorylation and accumulate in the cells. Owing to their exchangeable protons on their hydroxyl residues they exhibit significant chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effect in MRI. Here we report CEST-MRI on mice bearing orthotopic mammary tumors injected with 2-DG or FDG. The tumor exhibited an enhanced CEST effect of up to 30% that persisted for over one hour. Thus 2-DG/FDG CEST MRI can replace PET/CT or PET/MRI for cancer research in laboratory animals, but also has the potential to be used in the clinic for the detection of tumors and metastases, distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors and monitoring tumor response to therapy as well as tumors metabolism noninvasively by using MRI, without the need for radio-labeled isotopes.

  17. Distinguished Cooperating Teacher Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago State Univ., IL.

    The Distinguished Cooperating Teacher Program at Chicago State University was developed to train cooperating teachers to supervise student teachers. The program departs from traditional practice by changing the roles of the classroom teacher and the university field supervisor. The supervisor's role becomes that of coordinator while the teacher…

  18. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters as Biomarkers in Assessing Head and Neck Lesions After Chemoradiotherapy Using a Wide-Bore 3 Tesla Scanner.

    PubMed

    Lerant, Gergely; Sarkozy, Peter; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polony, Gabor; Tamas, Laszlo; Toth, Erika; Boer, Andras; Javor, Laszlo; Godeny, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Pilot studies have shown promising results in characterizing head and neck tumors (HNT) using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), differentiating between malignant and benign lesions and evaluating changes in response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Our aim was to find DCE-MRI parameters, biomarkers in evaluating the post-CRT status. Two hundred and five patients with head and neck lesions were examined with DCE-MRI sequences. The time intensity curves (TIC) were extracted and processed to acquire time-to-peak (TTP), relative maximum enhancement (RME), relative wash-out (RWO), and two new parameters attack and decay. These parameters were analyzed using univariate tests in SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17, SPSS Inc. Chicago, USA) to identify parameters that could be used to infer tumor malignancy and post-CRT changes. Multiple parameters of curve characteristics were significantly different between malignant tumors after CRT (MACRT) and changes caused by CRT. The best-performing biomarkers were the attack and the decay. We also found multiple significant (p < 0.05) parameters for both the benign and malignant status as well as pre- and post-CRT status. Our large cohort of data supports the increasing role of DCE-MRI in HNT differentiation, particularly for the assessment of post-CRT status along with accurate morphological imaging. PMID:25920367

  19. Therapeutic response assessment of RFA for HCC: Contrast-enhanced US, CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Yasunori; Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is commonly applied for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) because of the facile procedure, and the safety and effectiveness for the treatment of this type of tumor. On the other hand, it is believed that HCC cells should spread predominantly through the blood flow of the portal vein, which could lead to the formation of intrahepatic micrometastases. Therefore, monitoring tumor response after the treatment is quite important and accurate assessment of treatment response is critical to obtain the most favorable outcome after the RFA. Indeed, several reports suggested that even small HCCs of ≤ 3 cm in diameter might carry intrahepatic micrometastases and/or microvascular invasion. From this point of view, for preventing local recurrences, RFA should be performed ablating a main tumor as well as its surrounding non-tumorous liver tissue where micrometastases and microvascular invasion might exist. Recent advancement of imaging modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonic, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging are playing an important role on assessing the therapeutic effects of RFA. The local recurrence rate tends to be low in HCC patients who were proven to have adequate ablation margin after RFA; namely, not only disappearance of vascular enhancement of main tumor, but also an adequate ablation margin. Therefore, contrast enhancement gives important findings for the diagnosis of recurrent HCCs on each imaging. However, hyperemia of non-tumorous liver surrounding the ablated lesion, which could be attributed to an inflammation after RFA, may well obscure the findings of local recurrence of HCCs after RFA. Therefore, we need to carefully address to these imaging findings given the fact that diagnostic difficulties of local recurrence of HCC. Here, we give an overview of the current status of the imaging assessment of HCC response to RFA. PMID:24764654

  20. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  1. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marc E.; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G.; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  2. [Amyloid beta-related angiitis: brain lesions showing leptomeningeal gadolinium enhancement on MRI and characteristic surgical pathologic features].

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuka; Ouchi, Haruka; Sato, Tomoe; Shimbo, Junsuke; Sato, Aki; Sasaki, Osamu; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Igarashi, Shuichi

    2013-06-01

    Amyloid-β-related angiitis (ABRA) of the CNS occurs in association with vasculitis of small-and medium-sized leptomeningeal arteries. Here, we describe the clinicopathological features of a 76-year-old man with ABRA. The patient suffered progressive truncal oscillation, aphasia, and recent memory disturbance with a subacute disease onset. His cerebrospinal fluid showed a mild increase in protein levels (101 mg/dL) and pleocytosis (8/mm(3)). High-intensity brain lesion were detected on T(2)-weighted and FLAIR MRI scans, and prominent spread of gadolinium enhancement spreading was observed through the sulci of the left occipital and temporal lobes and left cerebellar hemisphere. A biopsy of the left temporal lesion showed a granulomatous and angiodestructive inflammation with infiltration of many CD4(+) T-lymphocytes and multinucleated giant cells and with fibrinoid necrosis of the arterial walls in the subarachnoid space. Immunolabeling for Aβ(1-40) revealed the abundant deposition of this protein in the affected arteries. On the basic of the diagnosis of ABRA, immunosuppressive therapy was conducted, and it ameliorated the clinical course. PMID:23735532

  3. Reduced hippocampal manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) signal during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus: edema or apoptosis?

    PubMed

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Persike, Daniele Suzete; Castro, Leticia Urbano Cardoso de; Sanches, Talita Rojas Cunha; Andrade, Lúcia da Conceição; Tannús, Alberto; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-05-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been considered a surrogate marker of Ca(+2) influx into activated cells and tracer of neuronal active circuits. However, the induction of status epilepticus (SE) by kainic acid does not result in hippocampal MEMRI hypersignal, in spite of its high cell activity. Similarly, short durations of status (5 or 15min) induced by pilocarpine did not alter the hippocampal MEMRI, while 30 min of SE even reduced MEMRI signal Thus, this study was designed to investigate possible explanations for the absence or decrease of MEMRI signal after short periods of SE. We analyzed hippocampal caspase-3 activation (to evaluate apoptosis), T2 relaxometry (tissue water content) and aquaporin 4 expression (water-channel protein) of rats subjected to short periods of pilocarpine-induced SE. For the time periods studied here, apoptotic cell death did not contribute to the decrease of the hippocampal MEMRI signal. However, T2 relaxation was higher in the group of animals subjected to 30min of SE than in the other SE or control groups. This result is consistent with higher AQP-4 expression during the same time period. Based on apoptosis and tissue water content analysis, the low hippocampal MEMRI signal 30min after SE can potentially be attributed to local edema rather than to cell death. PMID:24630048

  4. Connectivity-based fixel enhancement: Whole-brain statistical analysis of diffusion MRI measures in the presence of crossing fibres

    PubMed Central

    Raffelt, David A.; Smith, Robert E.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Tournier, J-Donald; Vaughan, David N.; Rose, Stephen; Henderson, Robert; Connelly, Alan

    2015-01-01

    In brain regions containing crossing fibre bundles, voxel-average diffusion MRI measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) are difficult to interpret, and lack within-voxel single fibre population specificity. Recent work has focused on the development of more interpretable quantitative measures that can be associated with a specific fibre population within a voxel containing crossing fibres (herein we use fixel to refer to a specific fibre population within a single voxel). Unfortunately, traditional 3D methods for smoothing and cluster-based statistical inference cannot be used for voxel-based analysis of these measures, since the local neighbourhood for smoothing and cluster formation can be ambiguous when adjacent voxels may have different numbers of fixels, or ill-defined when they belong to different tracts. Here we introduce a novel statistical method to perform whole-brain fixel-based analysis called connectivity-based fixel enhancement (CFE). CFE uses probabilistic tractography to identify structurally connected fixels that are likely to share underlying anatomy and pathology. Probabilistic connectivity information is then used for tract-specific smoothing (prior to the statistical analysis) and enhancement of the statistical map (using a threshold-free cluster enhancement-like approach). To investigate the characteristics of the CFE method, we assessed sensitivity and specificity using a large number of combinations of CFE enhancement parameters and smoothing extents, using simulated pathology generated with a range of test-statistic signal-to-noise ratios in five different white matter regions (chosen to cover a broad range of fibre bundle features). The results suggest that CFE input parameters are relatively insensitive to the characteristics of the simulated pathology. We therefore recommend a single set of CFE parameters that should give near optimal results in future studies where the group effect is unknown. We then demonstrate the proposed method by comparing apparent fibre density between motor neurone disease (MND) patients with control subjects. The MND results illustrate the benefit of fixel-specific statistical inference in white matter regions that contain crossing fibres. PMID:26004503

  5. Connectivity-based fixel enhancement: Whole-brain statistical analysis of diffusion MRI measures in the presence of crossing fibres.

    PubMed

    Raffelt, David A; Smith, Robert E; Ridgway, Gerard R; Tournier, J-Donald; Vaughan, David N; Rose, Stephen; Henderson, Robert; Connelly, Alan

    2015-08-15

    In brain regions containing crossing fibre bundles, voxel-average diffusion MRI measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) are difficult to interpret, and lack within-voxel single fibre population specificity. Recent work has focused on the development of more interpretable quantitative measures that can be associated with a specific fibre population within a voxel containing crossing fibres (herein we use fixel to refer to a specific fibre population within a single voxel). Unfortunately, traditional 3D methods for smoothing and cluster-based statistical inference cannot be used for voxel-based analysis of these measures, since the local neighbourhood for smoothing and cluster formation can be ambiguous when adjacent voxels may have different numbers of fixels, or ill-defined when they belong to different tracts. Here we introduce a novel statistical method to perform whole-brain fixel-based analysis called connectivity-based fixel enhancement (CFE). CFE uses probabilistic tractography to identify structurally connected fixels that are likely to share underlying anatomy and pathology. Probabilistic connectivity information is then used for tract-specific smoothing (prior to the statistical analysis) and enhancement of the statistical map (using a threshold-free cluster enhancement-like approach). To investigate the characteristics of the CFE method, we assessed sensitivity and specificity using a large number of combinations of CFE enhancement parameters and smoothing extents, using simulated pathology generated with a range of test-statistic signal-to-noise ratios in five different white matter regions (chosen to cover a broad range of fibre bundle features). The results suggest that CFE input parameters are relatively insensitive to the characteristics of the simulated pathology. We therefore recommend a single set of CFE parameters that should give near optimal results in future studies where the group effect is unknown. We then demonstrate the proposed method by comparing apparent fibre density between motor neurone disease (MND) patients with control subjects. The MND results illustrate the benefit of fixel-specific statistical inference in white matter regions that contain crossing fibres. PMID:26004503

  6. Sensitivity-enhanced chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI with least squares optimization of Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill multi-echo echo planar imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Lu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is a novel MRI technique that is sensitive to biomolecules, local pH and temperature, and offers considerable advantages for in vivo applications. However, the magnitude of CEST effect for dilute CEST agents undergoing slow or intermediate chemical exchange is typically small, requiring the use of signal averaging to enhance its sensitivity. Given that T2-induced signal loss can be normalized by asymmetry analysis, the magnitude of CEST effect is independent of echo time. Therefore, CEST imaging with multi-echo echo planar imaging (EPI) readout should yield the same CEST effect as conventional single echo acquisition. Importantly, CEST multi-echo (CESTme) EPI images can be averaged to enhance CEST MRI sensitivity. The goal of this study was to validate CESTme EPI using a creatine-agarose gel CEST phantom with similar T2 as biological tissue. Using least-squares optimization, we found that the sensitivity of CESTme sequence is significantly higher than that obtained by conventional single echo CEST-EPI acquisition. Specifically, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) from the proposed CESTme EPI were approximately equivalent to that obtained by doubling the number of signal averages of the standard single echo CEST MRI sequence. In summary, our results demonstrate CESTme EPI for sensitivity-enhanced CEST imaging. PMID:24523063

  7. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Gd-albumin Delivery to the Rat Hippocampus In Vivo by Convection-Enhanced Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Astary, Garrett W.; Nobrega, Tatiana L.; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Carney, Paul R.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2013-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) shows promise in treating neurological diseases due to its ability to circumvent the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and deliver therapeutics directly to the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS). Such a drug delivery method may be useful in treating CNS disorders involving the hippocampus such temporal lobe epilepsy and gliomas; however, the influence of anatomical structures on infusate distribution is not fully understood. As a surrogate for therapeutic agents, we used gadolinium-labeled-albumin (Gd-albumin) tagged with Evans blue dye to observe the time dependence of CED infusate distributions into the rat dorsal and ventral hippocampus in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). For finer anatomical detail, final distribution volumes (Vd) of the infusate were observed with high-resolution T1-weighted MR imaging and light microscopy of fixed brain sections. Dynamic images demonstrated that Gd-albumin preferentially distributed within the hippocampus along neuroanatomical structures with less fluid resistance and less penetration was observed in dense cell layers. Furthermore, significant leakage into adjacent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces such as the hippocampal fissure, velum interpositum and midbrain cistern occurred toward the end of infusion. Vd increased linearly with infusion volume (Vi) at a mean Vd/Vi ratio of 5.51 ± 0.55 for the dorsal hippocampus infusion and 5.30 ± 0.83 for the ventral hippocampus infusion. This study demonstrated the significant effects of tissue structure and CSF space boundaries on infusate distribution during CED. PMID:22687936

  8. Dynamic Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI measurement of tissue cell volume fraction.

    PubMed

    Donahue, K M; Weisskoff, R M; Parmelee, D J; Callahan, R J; Wilkinson, R A; Mandeville, J B; Rosen, B R

    1995-09-01

    A new technique for measuring tissue cellular volume fraction, based on an improved modeling of the dynamic distribution of Gd-DTPA and the effect of proton exchange, is described. This technique uses peak T1 enhancement and blood Gd-DTPA concentration to compute tissue cellular volume fraction. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated with computer simulations that explore the limits of the simplifying assumptions (small vascular space, slow vascular-extravascular proton exchange), and by direct comparison of MR and radionuclide cell fraction measurements made in muscle, liver, and tumor tissue in a rat model. The computer simulations demonstrate that with slow to intermediate vascular proton exchange and vascular fractions less than 10% the error in our cell fraction measurements typically remains less than 10%. Consistent with this prediction, a direct comparison between MR and radionuclide measurements of cell fraction demonstrates mean percent differences of less than 10%:1.9% in muscle (n = 4); 9% in liver (n = 1) and 9.5% in tumor (n = 4). Similarly, for all rats studied, the MR-measured cell fractions (muscle (0.92 +/- 0.04, n = 20); liver (0.76 +/- 0.11, n = 9); whole tumor (0.69 +/- 0.15, n = 22)) agree with the cell fraction values reported in the literature. In general, the authors' results demonstrate the feasibility of a simple method for measuring tissue cell fraction that is robust across a broad range of vascular volume, flow, and exchange conditions. Consequently, this method may prove to be an important means for evaluating the response of tumors to therapy. PMID:7500882

  9. Methanol poisoning: characteristic MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nirdesh; Himanshu, Dandu; Verma, Shailendra Prasad; Parihar, Anit

    2013-01-01

    Acute methanol intoxication is not an unusual poisoning. It can have serious neurological sequelae. We emphasize how neuroimaging can help in distinguishing methanol poisoning from other causes of acute unconsciousness in alcoholic patients such as hypoglycemic brain damage and carbon monoxide poisoning or head injury, which are frequently observed in alcoholic patients and are also responsible for altered sensorium. The most important findings in MR brain imaging in methanol poisoning have been bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis. Other less common findings are subcortical and deep white matter lesions, cerebral and cerebellar cortical lesions, and midbrain lesions, cerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, and even enhancement of necrotic lesions, we found almost the entire spectrum of MRI findings in this patient with methanol poisoning. Neurological sequelae can entail the course and prognosis in methanol poisoning. The patient died because of ventilator-associated pneumonia that developed in the course of prolonged hospitalization. PMID:22634487

  10. Cardiac MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe, noninvasive test that creates detailed ... and no instruments are inserted into your body. MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  11. MRI of pulmonary embolism using Gd-DTPA-polyethylene glycol polymer enhanced 3D fast gradient echo technique in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Li, K C; Pelc, L R; Napel, S A; Goris, M L; Lin, D T; Song, C K; Leung, A N; Rubin, G D; Hollett, M D; Harris, D P

    1997-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the accuracy of MR angiography (MRA) using a Gd-DTPA-polyethylene glycol polymer (Gd-DTPA-PEG) with a 3D fast gradient echo (3D fgre) technique in diagnosing pulmonary embolism in a canine model. Pulmonary emboli were created in six mongrel dogs (20-30 kg) by injecting tantalum oxide-doped autologous blood clots into the femoral veins via cutdowns. MRI was performed with a 1.5 T GE Signa imager using a 3D fgre sequence (11.9/2.3/15 degrees) following intravenous injection of 0.06 mmol Gd/kg of Gd-DTPA-PEG. The dogs were euthanized and spiral CT of the lungs were then obtained on the deceased dogs. The MRI images were reviewed independently and receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves were used for statistical analysis using spiral CT results as the gold standard. The pulmonary emboli were well visualized on spiral CT. Out of 108 pulmonary segments in the six dogs, 24 contained emboli >2 mm and 27 contained emboli < or = 2 mm. With unblinded review, MRI detected 79% of emboli >2 mm and only 48% of emboli < or = 2 mm. The blinded review results were significantly worse. Gd-DTPA-PEG enhanced 3D fgre MRI is potentially able to demonstrate pulmonary embolism with fairly high degree of accuracy, but specialized training for the interpretations will be required. PMID:9253998

  12. Chance and limit of imaging of articular cartilage in vitro in healthy and arthritic joints: DEI (diffraction enhanced imaging) in comparison with MRI, CT, and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Andreas F.; Aurich, Matthias; Stoessel, Marco; Sieber, Norbert; Wetzel, Wolf-Dieter; Mollenhauer, Jurgen; Schmuck, Klaus; Muehleman, Carol; Lohmann, Michael; Reime, Bernd; Metge, Joachim; Coan, Paola; Bravin, Alberto; Arfelli, Fulvia; Rigon, Luigi; Menk, Ralf-Henrik

    2005-04-01

    Description of purpose: Treatment of osteoarthritis in stages of reversible disease requires high resolution visualization of early cartilage damage and of subchondral bone. Here, DEI (Diffraction Enhanced Imaging) is compared to MRI, computed X-ray tomography (CT) and ultrasound (UI) in its ability to detect early degeneration of articular cartilage. In contrast to conventional absorptive X-ray examination where cartilage is poorly visible DEI captures cartilage by detection of selected refraction. Methods: Human femoral heads were investigated by macroscopic inspection, conventional X-ray examination, DEI, MRI, CT, UI and histology. DEI is an imaging technique applying a monochromatic parallel synchrotron X-ray beam. Image features were verified by histology. Results: DEI, MRI and ultrasound lead to interpretable images of cartilage. Of all techniques, DEI provided highest image resolution revealing the structural tissue architecture. MRI needs a very long exposure time (more than 5 hours) to achieve comparable quality. Application of ultrasound is limited because of joint geometry and, at high sound frequency, the necessity of close contact between cartilage and transducer. DEI is an experimental technique which needs synchrotron radiation. Conclusion: DEI is a very promising imaging technique for visualization of cartilage and bone. It may serve as an excellent analytical tool for experimental studies. Our pictures show a part of future of optimised techniques for imaging. Synchrotron based DEI may lead the way towards optimisation of improved techniques for imaging. Upon development of adequate small scale X-ray sources, DEI will also be an important supplementation for medical imaging.

  13. Monitoring dynamic alterations in calcium homeostasis by T1-mapping manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in the early stage of small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Da-wei; Zhang, Le-tian; Cheng, Hai-yun; Zhang, Yu-long; Min, Jia-yan; Xiao, Hua-liang; Wang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI studies have proven to be useful in monitoring physiological activities associated with calcium ions (Ca(2+)) due to the paramagnetic property of the manganese ion (Mn(2+)), which makes it an excellent probe of Ca(2+) . In this study, we developed a method in which a Mn(2+)-enhanced T1 -map MRI could enable the monitoring of Ca(2+) influx during the early stages of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. The Mn(2+) infusion protocol was optimized by obtaining dose-dependent and time-course wash-out curves using a Mn(2+)-enhanced T1-map MRI of rabbit abdomens following an intravenous infusion of 50 mmol/l MnCl2 (5-10 nmol/g body weight (BW)). In the rabbit model of intestinal I/R injury, T1 values were derived from the T1 maps in the intestinal wall region and revealed a relationship between the dose of the infused MnCl2 and the intestinal wall relaxation time. Significant Mn(2+) clearance was also observed over time in control animals after the infusion of Mn(2+) at a dose of 10 nmol/g BW. This technique was also shown to be sensitive enough to monitor variations in calcium ion homeostasis in vivo after small intestinal I/R injury. The T1 values of the intestinal I/R group were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of the control group at 5, 10, and 15 min after Mn(2+) infusion. Our data suggest that MnCl2 has the potential to be an MRI contrast agent that can be effectively used to monitor changes in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis during the early stages of intestinal I/R injury. PMID:26086648

  14. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  15. Cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats correlates with nucleus accumbens activity on manganese-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Desai, Kirtan; Kohler, Robert J; Eapen, Ajay T; Lisieski, Michael J; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Bosse, Kelly E; Conti, Alana C; Bissig, David; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    A long-standing goal of substance abuse research has been to link drug-induced behavioral outcomes with the activity of specific brain regions to understand the neurobiology of addiction behaviors and to search for drug-able targets. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cocaine produces locomotor (behavioral) sensitization that correlates with increased calcium channel-mediated neuroactivity in brain regions linked with drug addiction, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAC), anterior striatum (AST) and hippocampus, as measured using manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Rats were treated with cocaine for 5 days, followed by a 2-day drug-free period. The following day, locomotor sensitization was quantified as a metric of cocaine-induced neuroplasticity in the presence of manganese. Immediately following behavioral testing, rats were examined for changes in calcium channel-mediated neuronal activity in the NAC, AST, hippocampus and temporalis muscle, which was associated with behavioral sensitization using MEMRI. Cocaine significantly increased locomotor activity and produced behavioral sensitization compared with saline treatment of control rats. A significant increase in MEMRI signal intensity was determined in the NAC, but not AST or hippocampus, of cocaine-treated rats compared with saline-treated control rats. Cocaine did not increase signal intensity in the temporalis muscle. Notably, in support of our hypothesis, behavior was significantly and positively correlated with MEMRI signal intensity in the NAC. As neuronal uptake of manganese is regulated by calcium channels, these results indicate that MEMRI is a powerful research tool to study neuronal activity in freely behaving animals and to guide new calcium channel-based therapies for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence. PMID:26411897

  16. Self-Gated CINE MRI for Combined Contrast-Enhanced Imaging and Wall-Stiffness Measurements of Murine Aortic Atherosclerotic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    den Adel, Brigit; van der Graaf, Linda M.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Poelmann, Robert E.; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Background High-resolution contrast-enhanced imaging of the murine atherosclerotic vessel wall is difficult due to unpredictable flow artifacts, motion of the thin artery wall and problems with flow suppression in the presence of a circulating contrast agent. Methods and Results We applied a 2D-FLASH retrospective-gated CINE MRI method at 9.4T to characterize atherosclerotic plaques and vessel wall distensibility in the aortic arch of aged ApoE−/− mice after injection of a contrast agent. The method enabled detection of contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch after I.V. injection of micelles and iron oxides resulting in reproducible plaque enhancement. Both contrast agents were taken up in the plaque, which was confirmed by histology. Additionally, the retrospective-gated CINE method provided images of the aortic wall throughout the cardiac cycle, from which the vessel wall distensibility could be calculated. Reduction in plaque size by statin treatment resulted in lower contrast enhancement and reduced wall stiffness. Conclusions The retrospective-gated CINE MRI provides a robust and simple way to detect and quantify contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic wall of ApoE−/− mice. From the same scan, plaque-related changes in stiffness of the aortic wall can be determined. In this mouse model, a correlation between vessel wall stiffness and atherosclerotic lesions was found. PMID:23472079

  17. Study of relapsing remitting experimental allergic encephalomyelitis SJL mouse model using MION-46L enhanced in vivo MRI: early histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Jordan, E K; Brocke, S; Bulte, J W; Quigley, L; Tresser, N; Ostuni, J L; Yang, Y; McFarland, H F; Frank, J A

    1998-06-01

    MION-46L, a superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent, was investigated for its ability to increase the sensitivity of in vivo 3D MRI in the detection of brain lesions in a chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (crEAE) mouse model. Lesion conspicuity on postcontrast 3D MRI was dramatically enhanced as compared to precontrast images corresponding to areas of inflammatory and demyelinating lesions. MION-46L could be detected on Prussian blue iron stain in the vascular endothelium, the perivascular space, and in macrophages within perivascular cuffs and areas of inflammation and demyelination. By taking advantage of the MION-46L induced macroscopic susceptibility effect, acute early lesions measuring only 100 microm in diameter could be detected. MION-46L enhanced MRI may be used to 1) provide a unique sensitivity in EAE lesion detection and correlate imaging to histopathology; 2) help to understand EAE lesion development and its underlying pathophysiology; and 3) eventually assist in preclinical screening of new experimental therapies directed at patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). PMID:9632311

  18. rf enhancement and shielding in MRI caused by conductive implants: dependence on electrical parameters for a tube model.

    PubMed

    Graf, Hansjörg; Steidle, Günter; Lauer, Ulrike A; Schick, Fritz

    2005-02-01

    Radio frequency (rf) eddy-currents induced in implants made of conductive material might cause significant image artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) such as shielding of the lumen of vascular stents. rf alteration near metal parts was assessed theoretically in the approximation of alternating current electrodynamics: The implant was modeled as tube with diameter d(o), resistance R, and reactance Y, constituting the secondary winding of a transformer. The transmitter coil of the scanner acted as primary winding and generated the linearly polarized rf field B1,app. Tube axis was assumed parallel to B1,app. The results of the calculations were as follows: Ninety percent of the applied rf-field amplitude is reached in the lumen at a ratio chi=R/Y approximately 2. A rapid drop occurs with the reduction of chi, whereas a further increase of chi causes only a small effect. With chi approximately 1/d(o)(Y approximately d2o,R approximately d(o)), conditions for rf alteration clearly depend on the diameter of the tube. Inside tubes with smaller diameter, rf shielding is less pronounced. rf alteration increases in good approximation with the square root of the strength of the static field B0. The following experiments were carried out: Tubes of similar diameter (d(o) approximately 8 mm) made of material of different conductivity (Cu, Nitinol, carbon fiber reinforced plastic with three different fiber structures) were examined at B0=0.2 and 1.5 T in water phantoms. Tube axis was aligned perpendicular to B0 and spin-echo technique was applied. Local rf enhancement near the outer surface of the metal tubes was detected applying manual reduction of the transmitter amplitude. Shielding inside a carbon fiber tube with d(o) approximately 8 mm and inside a smaller tube with d(o)=3.3 mm was compared. Both tubes showed the same wall structure and thickness (d(w)=0.4 mm). All measurements confirmed the theoretical results. Consequences for the construction of vascular stents are discussed, as well as problems with image artifacts due to rf enhancement near solid conductive implants. PMID:15789577

  19. Quantitative assessment of regional cerebral blood flow by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI, without the need for arterial blood signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Yamamoto, Akihide; Iguchi, Satoshi; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Hori, Yuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Shah, Nadim Jon; Yamada, Naoaki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2012-12-01

    In dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI), an arterial input function (AIF) is usually obtained from a time-concentration curve (TCC) of the cerebral artery. This study was aimed at developing an alternative technique for reconstructing AIF from TCCs of multiple brain regions. AIF was formulated by a multi-exponential function using four parameters, and the parameters were determined so that the AIF curves convolved with a model of tissue response reproduced the measured TCCs for 20 regions. Systematic simulations were performed to evaluate the effects of possible error sources. DSC-MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies were performed on 14 patients with major cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) images were calculated from DSC-MRI data, using our novel method alongside conventional AIF estimations, and compared with those from 15O-PET. Simulations showed that the calculated CBF values were sensitive to variations in the assumptions regarding cerebral blood volume. Nevertheless, AIFs were reasonably reconstructed for all patients. The difference in CBF values between DSC-MRI and PET was -2.2 ± 7.4 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.55, p < 0.01) for our method, versus -0.2 ± 8.2 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.47, p = 0.01) for the conventional method. The difference in the ratio of affected to unaffected hemispheres between DSC-MRI and PET was 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for our method, versus 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.83, p < 0.01) for the conventional method. The contrasts in CBF images from our method were the same as those from the conventional method. These findings suggest the feasibility of assessing CBF without arterial blood signals.

  20. Multi-Parametric MRI and Texture Analysis to Visualize Spatial Histologic Heterogeneity and Tumor Extent in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Leland S.; Ning, Shuluo; Eschbacher, Jennifer M.; Gaw, Nathan; Dueck, Amylou C.; Smith, Kris A.; Nakaji, Peter; Plasencia, Jonathan; Ranjbar, Sara; Price, Stephen J.; Tran, Nhan; Loftus, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert; O’Neill, Brian P.; Elmquist, William; Baxter, Leslie C.; Gao, Fei; Frakes, David; Karis, John P.; Zwart, Christine; Swanson, Kristin R.; Sarkaria, Jann; Wu, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic profiling represents the future of neuro-oncology but suffers from inadequate biopsies in heterogeneous tumors like Glioblastoma (GBM). Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) targets enhancing core (ENH) but yields adequate tumor in only ~60% of cases. Further, CE-MRI poorly localizes infiltrative tumor within surrounding non-enhancing parenchyma, or brain-around-tumor (BAT), despite the importance of characterizing this tumor segment, which universally recurs. In this study, we use multiple texture analysis and machine learning (ML) algorithms to analyze multi-parametric MRI, and produce new images indicating tumor-rich targets in GBM. Methods We recruited primary GBM patients undergoing image-guided biopsies and acquired pre-operative MRI: CE-MRI, Dynamic-Susceptibility-weighted-Contrast-enhanced-MRI, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Following image coregistration and region of interest placement at biopsy locations, we compared MRI metrics and regional texture with histologic diagnoses of high- vs low-tumor content (≥80% vs <80% tumor nuclei) for corresponding samples. In a training set, we used three texture analysis algorithms and three ML methods to identify MRI-texture features that optimized model accuracy to distinguish tumor content. We confirmed model accuracy in a separate validation set. Results We collected 82 biopsies from 18 GBMs throughout ENH and BAT. The MRI-based model achieved 85% cross-validated accuracy to diagnose high- vs low-tumor in the training set (60 biopsies, 11 patients). The model achieved 81.8% accuracy in the validation set (22 biopsies, 7 patients). Conclusion Multi-parametric MRI and texture analysis can help characterize and visualize GBM’s spatial histologic heterogeneity to identify regional tumor-rich biopsy targets. PMID:26599106

  1. Protein composition alters in vivo resorption of PEG-based hydrogels as monitored by contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Berdichevski, Alexandra; Shachaf, Yonatan; Wechsler, Roni; Seliktar, Dror

    2015-02-01

    We report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based non-invasive monitoring to document the role of protein adjuvants in hydrogel implant integration in vivo. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels were formed with different protein constituents, including albumin, fibrinogen and gelatin. The hydrogels were designed to exhibit similar material properties, including modulus, swelling and hydrolytic degradation kinetics. The in vivo resorption properties of these PEG-based hydrogels, which contained a tethered gadolinium contrast agent, were characterized by MRI and histology, and compared to their in vitro characteristics. MRI data revealed that PEG-Albumin implants remained completely intact throughout the experiments, PEG-Fibrinogen implants lost about 10% of their volume and PEG-Gelatin implants underwent prominent swelling and returned to their initial volume by day 25. Fully synthetic PEG-diacrylate (PEG-DA) control hydrogels lost about half of their volume after 25 days in vivo. Transverse MRI cross-sections of the implants revealed distinct mechanisms of the hydrogel's biodegradation: PEG-Fibrinogen and PEG-Albumin underwent surface erosion, whereas PEG-Gelatin and PEG-DA hydrogels mainly underwent bulk degradation. Histological findings substantiated the MRI data and demonstrated significant cellular response towards PEG-DA and PEG-Gelatin scaffolds with relatively low reaction towards PEG-Fibrinogen and PEG-Albumin hydrogels. These findings demonstrate that PEG-protein hydrogels can degrade via a different mechanism than PEG hydrogels, and that this difference can be linked to a reduced foreign body response. PMID:25542788

  2. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  3. Noninvasive monitoring of radiotherapy-induced microvascular changes using dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in a colorectal tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Ceelen, Wim . E-mail: Wim.ceelen@ugent.be; Smeets, Peter; Backes, Walter; Van Damme, Nancy; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Bouckenooghe, Isabel; De Visschere, Marieke; Peeters, Marc; Pattyn, Piet

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To examine dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with a macromolecular contrast agent (P792) to visualize effects of radiotherapy (RT) on microvascular leakage in a colorectal cancer model. Methods and Materials: CC531 tumors were induced in WAG/Rij rats. DCE-MRI was performed before and 5 days after 5 x 5 Gy of RT and parametric maps generated of the endothelial transfer constant (K{sup trans} ) and the fractional interstitial space (V{sub e} ) according to the Tofts model. Tissue pO{sub 2} mapping was performed in each tumor core and rim before and after RT. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and pimonidazole hypoxia staining were compared with a control group of tumor-bearing rats. Results: Mean K{sup trans} and v{sub e} were significantly reduced after RT in all tumor regions. Mean pO{sub 2} was 6.8 mm Hg before RT vs. 7.7 mm Hg after RT (p < 0.001) in the tumor rim and 3.5 mm Hg before RT vs. 4.4 mm Hg after RT (p < 0.001) in the tumor core. Mean MVD in the tumor rim was 10.4 in the RT treated group vs. 16.9 in the control group (p = 0.061). VEGF expression was significantly higher in RT-treated rats. After RT, no correlation was found between DCE-MRI parameters and histologic parameters. A correlation was seen after RT between pO{sub 2} and K{sup trans} (r -0.57, p = 0.08) and between pO{sub 2} and v{sub e} (r = -0.65, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI with P792 allows quantification of microvascular changes in this colorectal model. RT significantly reduces neovascular leakage and enhances tissue oxygenation and VEGF expression. After RT, DCE-MRI parameters are related to tumor pO{sub 2}, but not to MVD or VEGF expression.

  4. Can silicene distinguish nucleobases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheicher, Ralph Hendrik; Amorim, Rodrigo G.

    2014-03-01

    The third generation of DNA sequencing devices are on the drawing board of industry and solid-state devices appear to be most promising for this task. In view of the silicon-based semiconductor industry it is noteworthy that a 2D allotrope of silicon was recently discovered, silicene, which resembles graphene in certain aspects. Given the prevalence of proposals to utilize graphene for DNA sequencing, we therefore chose to investigate the hypothesis whether a solid-state device based on silicene (which might be more straightforward to integrate with existing semiconductor technology) could electrically distinguish the four nucleobases in DNA. For this purpose, we used ab initio calculations based on density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function method to study the electronic transport properties of a silicene sheet interacting with the constituents of DNA. We will present a detailed study of the physisorption process of the nucleobases on top of silicene, as well as how the adsorbed nucleobases would appear in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) image. The key result that we will discuss is how the zero-bias transmittance of pristine silicene is altered when a specific nucleobase is adsorbed on its surface.

  5. 7T MRI in natalizumab-associated PML and ongoing MS disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Sinnecker, Tim; Othman, Jalal; Kühl, Marc; Mekle, Ralf; Selbig, Inga; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kunkel, Annett; Wienecke, Peter; Kern, Peter; Faiss, Juergen; Wuerfel, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the ability of ultra-high-field MRI to distinguish early progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) from multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in a rare case of simultaneous presentation of natalizumab–associated PML and ongoing MS activity. Methods: Advanced neuroimaging including 1.5T, 3T, and 7T MRI with a spatial resolution of up to 0.08 mm3 was performed. Results: 7T MRI differentiated between PML-related and MS-related brain damage in vivo. Ring-enhancing MS plaques displayed a central vein, whereas confluent PML lesions were preceded by punctate or milky way–like T2 lesions. Conclusions: Given the importance of early diagnosis of treatment-associated PML, future systematic studies are warranted to assess the value of highly resolving MRI in differentiating between early PML- and MS-induced brain parenchymal lesions. PMID:26568970

  6. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  7. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI as a predictor of vascular-targeted photodynamic focal ablation therapy outcome in prostate cancer post-failed external beam radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tristan; Davidson, Sean R.H.; Wilson, Brian C.; Weersink, Robert A.; Trachtenberg, John; Haider, Masoom A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be employed as a focal therapy for prostate cancer. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially help identify tumour recurrence after failed external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of DCE-MRI to predict early response to PDT salvage treatment. Methods: Patients with post-EBRT prostate cancer recurrence were prospectively enrolled into a Phase I/II trial of PDT using WST09. A 15-patient subgroup of this cohort undergoing 1.5T DCE-MRI at baseline and 1-week post-PDT was retrospectively analyzed. The reference standard was prostate biopsy obtained 6 months post-PDT. Analysis was performed on a patient-by-patient basis, by prostate gland halves, and by prostate sextants. Results: Biopsy 6 months post-PDT identified cancer in 10/15 patients (66.7%), and in 24/90 sextants (26.7%). Residual cancer was identified in 22/37 sextants (59.5%) identified as being involved at baseline. DCE-MRI at 1 week correctly predicted recurrent disease with a sensitivity of 100% (10/10), specificity of 60% (3/5), positive predictive value of 83.3% (10/12), negative predictive value of 100% (3/3), and an overall accuracy of 86.7%, (13/15). When analysis was performed on prostate halves, the sensitivity and negative predictive value remained at 100%, with an improvement in specificity to 88.2% (15/17). The overall accuracy of DCE-MRI was similar regardless of analysis method: 86.7% on a patient-by-patient basis, 86.7% by prostate half and 83.3% by sextant. Changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) did not correlate to response. Conclusion: DCE-MRI shows promise as a tool to predict successful outcome when performed 1 week post-PDT and could potentially be used to inform the need for re-treatment at an early time-point. PMID:25408811

  8. Visual spatial attention enhances the amplitude of positive and negative fMRI responses to visual stimulation in an eccentricity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bressler, David W; Fortenbaugh, Francesca C; Robertson, Lynn C; Silver, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous visual spatial attention improves perception and enhances neural responses to visual stimuli at attended locations. Although many aspects of visual processing differ significantly between central and peripheral vision, little is known regarding the neural substrates of the eccentricity dependence of spatial attention effects. We measured amplitudes of positive and negative fMRI responses to visual stimuli as a function of eccentricity in a large number of topographically-organized cortical areas. Responses to each stimulus were obtained when the stimulus was attended and when spatial attention was directed to a stimulus in the opposite visual hemifield. Attending to the stimulus increased both positive and negative response amplitudes in all cortical areas we studied: V1, V2, V3, hV4, VO1, LO1, LO2, V3A/B, IPS0, TO1, and TO2. However, the eccentricity dependence of these effects differed considerably across cortical areas. In early visual, ventral, and lateral occipital cortex, attentional enhancement of positive responses was greater for central compared to peripheral eccentricities. The opposite pattern was observed in dorsal stream areas IPS0 and putative MT homolog TO1, where attentional enhancement of positive responses was greater in the periphery. Both the magnitude and the eccentricity dependence of attentional modulation of negative fMRI responses closely mirrored that of positive responses across cortical areas. PMID:23562388

  9. Visual spatial attention enhances the amplitude of positive and negative fMRI responses to visual stimulation in an eccentricity-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, David W.; Fortenbaugh, Francesca C.; Robertson, Lynn C.; Silver, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous visual spatial attention improves perception and enhances neural responses to visual stimuli at attended locations. Although many aspects of visual processing differ significantly between central and peripheral vision, little is known regarding the neural substrates of the eccentricity dependence of spatial attention effects. We measured amplitudes of positive and negative fMRI responses to visual stimuli as a function of eccentricity in a large number of topographically-organized cortical areas. Responses to each stimulus were obtained when the stimulus was attended and when spatial attention was directed to a stimulus in the opposite visual hemifield. Attending to the stimulus increased both positive and negative response amplitudes in all cortical areas we studied: V1, V2, V3, hV4, VO1, LO1, LO2, V3A/B, IPS0, TO1, and TO2. However, the eccentricity dependence of these effects differed considerably across cortical areas. In early visual, ventral, and lateral occipital cortex, attentional enhancement of positive responses was greater for central compared to peripheral eccentricities. The opposite pattern was observed in dorsal stream areas IPS0 and putative MT homolog TO1, where attentional enhancement of positive responses was greater in the periphery. Both the magnitude and the eccentricity dependence of attentional modulation of negative fMRI responses closely mirrored that of positive responses across cortical areas. PMID:23562388

  10. MRI findings and pathological features in early-stage glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Makoto; Kajiwara, Koji; Goto, Hisaharu; Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Nomura, Sadahiro; Ikeda, Eiji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important diagnostic tool for glioblastoma, with almost all cases showing characteristic imaging findings such as a heterogeneous-ring enhanced pattern associated with significant edema. However, MRI findings for early-stage glioblastoma are less clear. In this study, a retrospective review of MRI findings in five patients showed slight T2WI signal changes on initial scans that developed into typical imaging findings of a ring-like or heterogeneously enhanced bulky tumor within 6 months. The diagnoses based on initial MRI were low grade glioma in three cases, venous thrombosis in one case, and uncertain in one case. Four cases were treated with gross total resection, while one case underwent biopsy. Immunohistochemical examinations showed that two cases were p53-positive, and that all cases were IDH1 R132H-negative and had overexpression of EGFR. FISH analysis showed that all cases were 1p19q LOH-negative. De novo glioblastoma was the final diagnosis in all cases. Our results show that initial MRI findings in early-stage glioblastoma of small ill-defined T2WI hyperintense lesions with poor contrast develop to bulky mass lesions with typical findings for glioblastoma in as short a period as 2.5 months. The early MRI findings are difficult to distinguish from those for non-neoplastic conditions, including ischemic, degenerative or demyelinating processes. Thus, there is a need for proactive diagnosis of glioblastoma using short-interval MRI scans over several weeks, other imaging modalities, and biopsy or resection, particularly given the extremely poor prognosis of this disease. PMID:25939441

  11. Alertness in Young Healthy Subjects: An fMRI Study of Brain Region Interactivity Enhanced by a Warning Signal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perin, B.; Godefroy, O.; Fall, S.; de Marco, G.

    2010-01-01

    An effective connectivity study was carried out on 16 young, healthy subjects performing an alertness task. The objective of this study was to develop and to evaluate a putative network model of alertness by adapting structural equation modeling to fMRI data. This study was designed to evaluate the directed interactivity of an attentional network…

  12. Alertness in Young Healthy Subjects: An fMRI Study of Brain Region Interactivity Enhanced by a Warning Signal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perin, B.; Godefroy, O.; Fall, S.; de Marco, G.

    2010-01-01

    An effective connectivity study was carried out on 16 young, healthy subjects performing an alertness task. The objective of this study was to develop and to evaluate a putative network model of alertness by adapting structural equation modeling to fMRI data. This study was designed to evaluate the directed interactivity of an attentional network

  13. Hepatoblastoma imaging with gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI--typical, atypical, pre- and post-treatment evaluation.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Arthur B; Towbin, Alexander J; Geller, James I; Podberesky, Daniel J

    2012-07-01

    Gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a hepatobiliary MRI contrast agent widely used in adults for characterization of liver tumors and increasingly used in children. Hepatoblastoma is the most common primary hepatic malignancy of childhood. In this review, we describe our experience with this agent both before and after initiating therapy in children with hepatoblastoma. PMID:22419052

  14. Preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI correlates with molecular markers of hypoxia and vascularity in specific areas of intratumoral microenvironment and is predictive of patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Randy L.; Mumert, Michael L.; Gillespie, David L.; Kinney, Anita Y.; Schabel, Matthias C.; Salzman, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Measures of tumor vascularity and hypoxia have been correlated with glioma grade and outcome. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can noninvasively map tumor blood flow, vascularity, and permeability. In this prospective observational cohort pilot study, preoperative imaging was correlated with molecular markers of hypoxia, vascularity, proliferation, and progression-free and overall patient survival. Methods Pharmacokinetic modeling methods were used to generate maps of tumor blood flow, extraction fraction, permeability-surface area product, transfer constant, washout rate, interstitial volume, blood volume, capillary transit time, and capillary heterogeneity from preoperative DCE-MRI data in human glioma patients. Tissue was obtained from areas of peritumoral edema, active tumor, hypoxic penumbra, and necrotic core and evaluated for vascularity, proliferation, and expression of hypoxia-regulated molecules. DCE-MRI parameter values were correlated with hypoxia-regulated protein expression at tissue sample sites. Results Patient survival correlated with DCE parameters in 2 cases: capillary heterogeneity in active tumor and interstitial volume in areas of peritumoral edema. Statistically significant correlations were observed between several DCE parameters and tissue markers. In addition, MIB-1 index was predictive of overall survival (P = .044) and correlated with vascular endothelial growth factor expression in hypoxic penumbra (r = 0.7933, P = .0071) and peritumoral edema (r = 0.4546). Increased microvessel density correlated with worse patient outcome (P = .026). Conclusions Our findings suggest that DCE-MRI may facilitate noninvasive preoperative predictions of areas of tumor with increased hypoxia and proliferation. Both imaging and hypoxia biomarkers are predictive of patient outcome. This has the potential to allow unprecedented prognostic decisions and to guide therapies to specific tumor areas. PMID:24305704

  15. Phase I Trial of Preoperative Chemoradiation Plus Sorafenib for High Risk Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcomas with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Janelle M.; Perlewitz, Kelly S.; Hayden, James B.; Doung, Yee-Cheen; Hung, Arthur Y.; Vetto, John T.; Pommier, Rodney F.; Mansoor, Atiya; Beckett, Brooke R.; Tudorica, Alina; Mori, Motomi; Holtorf, Megan L.; Afzal, Aneela; Woodward, William J.; Rodler, Eve T.; Jones, Robin L.; Huang, Wei; Ryan, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We performed a phase I trial of the addition of sorafenib to a chemoradiotherapy regimen in patients with high-risk (intermediate/high grade, >5 cm) extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) undergoing limb salvage surgery. We conducted a correlative study of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to assess response to treatment. Experimental Design Patients were treated at increasing dose levels of sorafenib (200 mg daily, 400 mg daily, 400 mg BID) initiated 14 days prior to 3 preoperative and 3 postoperative cycles of epirubicin/ifosfamide. 28 Gy of radiation was administered during cycle 2 with epirubicin omitted. The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of sorafenib. DCE-MRI was performed at baseline, after 2 weeks of sorafenib, and prior to surgery. The imaging data were subjected to quantitative pharmacokinetic analyses. Results 18 subjects were enrolled, of which 16 were evaluable. The MTD of sorafenib was 400 mg daily. Common grade 3–4 adverse events included neutropenia (94%), hypophosphatemia (75%), anemia (69%), thrombocytopenia (50%), and neutropenic fever/infection (50%). 38% developed wound complications requiring surgical intervention. The rate of ≥95% histopathologic tumor necrosis was 44%. Changes in DCE-MRI biomarker ΔKtrans after 2 weeks sorafenib correlated with histologic response (R2=0.67, p = 0.012) at surgery. Conclusion The addition of sorafenib to preoperative chemoradiotherapy is feasible and warrants further investigation in a larger trial. DCE-MRI detected changes in tumor perfusion after 2 weeks of sorafenib and may be a minimally-invasive tool for rapid assessment of drug effect in STS. PMID:24132922

  16. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Head-and-Neck Cancer: The Impact of Region of Interest Selection on the Intra- and Interpatient Variability of Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, Oana I.; Yoo, David S.; Cleland, Esi; Muradyan, Naira; Carroll, Madeline D.; MacFall, James R.; Barboriak, Daniel P.; Brizel, David M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI-extracted parameters measure tumor microvascular physiology and are usually calculated from an intratumor region of interest (ROI). Optimal ROI delineation is not established. The valid clinical use of DCE-MRI requires that the variation for any given parameter measured within a tumor be less than that observed between tumors in different patients. This work evaluates the impact of tumor ROI selection on the assessment of intra- and interpatient variability. Method and Materials: Head and neck cancer patients received initial targeted therapy (TT) treatment with erlotinib and/or bevacizumab, followed by radiotherapy and concurrent cisplatin with synchronous TT. DCE-MRI data from Baseline and the end of the TT regimen (Lead-In) were analyzed to generate the vascular transfer function (K{sup trans}), the extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}), and the initial area under the concentration time curve (iAUC{sub 1min}). Four ROI sampling strategies were used: whole tumor or lymph node (Whole), the slice containing the most enhancing voxels (SliceMax), three slices centered in SliceMax (Partial), and the 5% most enhancing contiguous voxels within SliceMax (95Max). The average coefficient of variation (aCV) was calculated to establish intrapatient variability among ROI sets and interpatient variability for each ROI type. The average ratio between each intrapatient CV and the interpatient CV was calculated (aRCV). Results: Baseline primary/nodes aRCVs for different ROIs not including 95Max were, for all three MR parameters, in the range of 0.14-0.24, with Lead-In values between 0.09 and 0.2, meaning a low intrapatient vs. interpatient variation. For 95Max, intrapatient CVs approximated interpatient CVs, meaning similar data dispersion and higher aRCVs (0.6-1.27 for baseline) and 0.54-0.95 for Lead-In. Conclusion: Distinction between different patient's primary tumors and/or nodes cannot be made using 95Max ROIs. The other three strategies are viable and equivalent for using DCE-MRI to measure head and neck cancer physiology.

  17. Enhanced cellular uptake and long-term retention of chitosan-modified iron-oxide nanoparticles for MRI-based cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Bakhru, Sasha H; Altiok, Eda; Highley, Christopher; Delubac, Daniel; Suhan, Joseph; Hitchens, T Kevin; Ho, Chien; Zappe, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Tracking cells after therapeutic transplantation is imperative for evaluation of implanted cell fate and function. In this study, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO NPs) were surface functionalized with water-soluble chitosan, a cationic polysaccharide that mediates enhanced endocytic uptake, endosomal escape into the cytosol, and subsequent long-term retention of nanoparticles. NP surface and chitosan were independently fluorescently labeled. Our NPs enable NP trafficking studies and determination of fate beyond uptake by fluorescence microscopy as well as tracking of labeled cells as localized regions of hypointensity in T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images. Adult rat neural stem cells (NSCs) were labeled with NPs, and assessment of NSC proliferation rates and differentiation potential revealed no significant differences between labeled and unlabeled NSCs. Significantly enhanced uptake of chitosan NPs in comparison to native NPs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and in vitro cellular MRI at 11.7 Tesla. While only negligible fractions of native NPs enter cells, chitosan NPs appear within membranous vesicles within 2 hours of exposure. Additionally, chitosan-functionalized NPs escaped from membrane-bound vesicles within days, circumventing NP endo-lysosomal trafficking and exocytosis and hence enabling long-term tracking of labeled cells. Finally, our labeling strategy does not contain any NSC-specific reagents. To demonstrate general applicability across a variety of primary and immortalized cell types, embryonic mouse NSCs, mouse embryonic stem cells, HEK 293 kidney cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells were additionally exposed to chitosan-USPIO NPs and exhibited similarly efficient loading as verified by NMR relaxometry. Our efficient and versatile labeling technology can support cell tracking with close to single cell resolution by MRI in vitro, for example, in complex tissue models not optically accessible by confocal or multi-photon fluorescence microscopy, and potentially in vivo, for example, in animal models of human disease or injury. PMID:22942643

  18. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  19. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions to the substance rarely occur. However, gadolinium can ...

  20. A facile synthesis of versatile Cu2-xS nanoprobe for enhanced MRI and infrared thermal/photoacoustic multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Mou, Juan; Liu, Chengbo; Li, Pei; Chen, Yu; Xu, Huixiong; Wei, Chenyang; Song, Liang; Shi, Jianlin; Chen, Hangrong

    2015-07-01

    A novel type of intelligent nanoprobe by using single component of Cu2-xS for multimodal imaging has been facilely and rapidly synthesized in scale via thermal decomposition followed by biomimetic phospholipid modification, which endows them with uniform and small nanoparticle size (ca.15 nm), well phosphate buffer saline (PBS) dispersity, high stability, and excellent biocompatibility. The as-synthesized Cu2-xS nanoprobes (Cu2-xS NPs) are capable of providing contrast enhancement for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as demonstrated by the both in vitro and in vivo imaging investigations for the first time. In addition, due to their strong near infrared (NIR) optical absorption, they can also serve as a candidate contrast agent for enhanced infrared thermal/photoacoustic imaging, to meet the shortfalls of MRI. Hence, complementary and potentially more comprehensive information can be acquired for the early detection and accurate diagnosis of cancer. Furthermore, negligible systematic side effects to the blood and tissue were observed in a relatively long period of 3 months. The distinctive multimodal imaging capability with excellent hemo/histocompatibility of the Cu2-xS NPs could open up a new molecular imaging possibility for detecting and diagnosing cancer or other diseases in the future. PMID:25956193

  1. Facile non-hydrothermal synthesis of oligosaccharides coated sub-5 nm magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with dual MRI contrast enhancement effect

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Wang, Liya; Zhong, Xiaodong; Li, Yuancheng; Yang, Lily

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine sub-5 nm magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oligosaccharides (SIO) with dual T1-T2 weighted contrast enhancing effect and fast clearance has been developed as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Excellent water solubility, biocompatibility and high stability of such sub-5 nm SIO nanoparticles were achieved by using the “in-situ polymerization” coating method, which enables glucose forming oligosaccharides directly on the surface of hydrophobic iron oxide nanocrystals. Reported ultrafine SIO nanoparticles exhibit a longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 4.1 mM−1s−1 and a r1/r2 ratio of 0.25 at 3 T (clinical field strength), rendering improved T1 or “brighter” contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MRI in addition to typical T2 or “darkening” contrast of conventional iron oxide nanoparticles. Such dual contrast effect can be demonstrated in liver imaging with T2 “darkening” contrast in the liver parenchyma but T1 “bright” contrast in the hepatic vasculature. More importantly, this new class of ultrafine sub-5 nm iron oxide nanoparticles showed much faster body clearance than those with larger sizes, promising better safety for clinical applications. PMID:25181490

  2. Accurate High-Resolution Measurements of 3-D Tissue Dynamics With Registration-Enhanced Displacement Encoded MRI

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Samer S.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  3. Enhanced Sympathetic Arousal in Response to fMRI Scanning Correlates with Task Induced Activations and Deactivations

    PubMed Central

    Muehlhan, Markus; Lueken, Ulrike; Siegert, Jens; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Smolka, Michael N.; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) triggers distress and neuroendocrine response systems. Prior studies have revealed that sympathetic arousal increases, particularly at the beginning of the examination. Against this background it appears likely that those stress reactions during the scanning procedure may influence task performance and neural correlates. However, the question how sympathetic arousal elicited by the scanning procedure itself may act as a potential confounder of fMRI data remains unresolved today. Thirty-seven scanner naive healthy subjects performed a simple cued target detection task. Levels of salivary alpha amylase (sAA), as a biomarker for sympathetic activity, were assessed in samples obtained at several time points during the lab visit. SAA increased two times, immediately prior to scanning and at the end of the scanning procedure. Neural activation related to motor preparation and timing as well as task performance was positively correlated with the first increase. Furthermore, the first sAA increase was associated with task induced deactivation (TID) in frontal and parietal regions. However, these effects were restricted to the first part of the experiment. Consequently, this bias of scanner related sympathetic activation should be considered in future fMRI investigations. It is of particular importance for pharmacological investigations studying adrenergic agents and the comparison of groups with different stress vulnerabilities like patients and controls or adolescents and adults. PMID:23967320

  4. Pioglitazone modulates vascular inflammation in atherosclerotic rabbits monitored non-invasively with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and black blood dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Vucic, Esad; Dickson, Stephen D.; Calcagno, Claudia; Rudd, James H.F.; Moshier, Erin; Hayashi, Katsumi; Mounessa, Jessica S.; Roytman, Michelle; Moon, Matthew J.; Lin, James; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Fisher, Edward A.; Nicolay, Klaas; Fuster, Valentin; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine the anti-atherosclerotic properties of pioglitazone using multi-modality non-invasive imaging techniques. Background Inflammation is an essential component of vulnerable or high risk atheromas. Pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ)agonist possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. We aimed to non-invasively to quantify the anti-inflammatory effects of pioglitazone on atheroma using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods Atherosclerotic plaques were induced in the aorta of fifteen New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits by a combination of hyperlipidemic diet and two balloon endothelial denudations. Nine rabbits continued the same diet whereas six received pioglitazone (10mg/kg orally) in addition to the diet. Twelve animals underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and fifteen animals underwent DCE-MRI at baseline, one and three months after treatment initiation. Concomitantly, serum metabolic parameters were monitored. After imaging was completed aortic histological analysis and correlation analysis was performed. Results 18F-FDG-PET/CT detected an increase in average standardized uptake value (SUV) in the control group (p<0.01), indicating progressive inflammation, while stable SUV values were observed in the treatment group, indicating no progression. DCE-MRI detected a significant decrease in area under the curve (AUC) for the pioglitazone group (p<0.01). Immunohistology of the aortas demonstrated a significant decrease in macrophage and oxidized phospholipid immunoreactivity in the pioglitazone group (p=0.04 and p=0.01, respectively) with respect to control animals, underlining the imaging results. Serum metabolic parameters showed no difference between groups. A strong positive correlation between SUV and macrophage density and AUC and neovessels was detected ( r2=0.86, p<0.0001 and r2=0.66, p=0.004, respectively). Conclusions 18F-FDG-PET/CT and DCE-MRI demonstrate non-invasively the anti-inflammatory effects of pioglitazone on atheroma. Both imaging modalities appear suited to monitor inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:21999870

  5. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  6. Distinguishing modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2015-10-01

    Modified gravity models with screening in local environments appear in three different guises: chameleon, K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms. We propose to look for differences between these classes of models by considering cosmological observations at low redshift. In particular, we analyse the redshift dependence of the fine structure constant and the proton to electron mass ratio in each of these scenarios. When the absorption lines belong to unscreened regions of space such as dwarf galaxies, a time variation would be present for chameleons. For both K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms, the cosmological time variation of the scalar field is not suppressed in both unscreened and screened environments, therefore enhancing the variation of constants and their detection prospect. We also consider the time variation of the redshift of distant objects using their spectrocopic velocities. We find that models of the K-mouflage and Vainshtein types have very different spectroscopic velocities as a function of redshift and that their differences with the Λ-CDM template should be within reach of the future ELT-HIRES observations.

  7. Decision tree analysis as a supplementary tool to enhance histomorphological differentiation when distinguishing human from non-human cranial bone in both burnt and unburnt states: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Simmons, T; Goodburn, B; Singhrao, S K

    2016-01-01

    This feasibility study was undertaken to describe and record the histological characteristics of burnt and unburnt cranial bone fragments from human and non-human bones. Reference series of fully mineralized, transverse sections of cranial bone, from all variables and specimen states, were prepared by manual cutting and semi-automated grinding and polishing methods. A photomicrograph catalogue reflecting differences in burnt and unburnt bone from human and non-humans was recorded and qualitative analysis was performed using an established classification system based on primary bone characteristics. The histomorphology associated with human and non-human samples was, for the main part, preserved following burning at high temperature. Clearly, fibro-lamellar complex tissue subtypes, such as plexiform or laminar primary bone, were only present in non-human bones. A decision tree analysis based on histological features provided a definitive identification key for distinguishing human from non-human bone, with an accuracy of 100%. The decision tree for samples where burning was unknown was 96% accurate, and multi-step classification to taxon was possible with 100% accuracy. The results of this feasibility study strongly suggest that histology remains a viable alternative technique if fragments of cranial bone require forensic examination in both burnt and unburnt states. The decision tree analysis may provide an additional but vital tool to enhance data interpretation. Further studies are needed to assess variation in histomorphology taking into account other cranial bones, ontogeny, species and burning conditions. PMID:26130749

  8. Detecting blood-brain barrier disruption within minimal hemorrhage following transcranial focused ultrasound: a correlation study with contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jun-Cheng; Wu, Sheng-Kai; Lin, Win-Li; Tseng, Wen-Yih I

    2011-03-01

    Focused ultrasound combined with an intravascular ultrasound contrast agent can induce transient disruption of the blood-brain barrier, and the blood-brain barrier disruption can be detected by contrast-enhanced MRI. There is, however, no study investigating the ability of various MR methods to detect focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption within minimal hemorrhage. Sonication was applied to 15 rat brains with four different doses of ultrasound contrast agent (0, 10, 30, or 50 μL/kg), and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin echo, gradient echo images, and longitudinal relaxation rate mapping along with effective transverse relaxation time-weighted and susceptibility-weighted images were acquired. Volume-of-interest-based and threshold-based analyses were performed to quantify the contrast enhancement, which was then correlated with the ultrasound contrast agent dose and with the amount of Evans blue extravasation. Both effective transverse relaxation time-weighted and susceptibility-weighted images did not detect histology-proved intracranial hemorrhage at 10 μL/kg, but MRI failed to detect mild intracranial hemorrhage at 30 μL/kg. All tested sequences showed detectable contrast enhancement increasing with ultrasound contrast agent dose. In correlating with Evans blue extravasation, the gradient echo sequence was slightly better than the spin echo sequence and was comparable to longitudinal relaxation rate mapping. In conclusion, both gradient echo and spin echo sequences were all reliable in indicating the degree of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption within minimal hemorrhage. PMID:20941741

  9. Enhanced multi-protocol analysis via intelligent supervised embedding (EMPrAvISE): detecting prostate cancer on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Chappelow, Jonathan; Patel, Pratik; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Currently, there is significant interest in developing methods for quantitative integration of multi-parametric (structural, functional) imaging data with the objective of building automated meta-classifiers to improve disease detection, diagnosis, and prognosis. Such techniques are required to address the differences in dimensionalities and scales of individual protocols, while deriving an integrated multi-parametric data representation which best captures all disease-pertinent information available. In this paper, we present a scheme called Enhanced Multi-Protocol Analysis via Intelligent Supervised Embedding (EMPrAvISE); a powerful, generalizable framework applicable to a variety of domains for multi-parametric data representation and fusion. Our scheme utilizes an ensemble of embeddings (via dimensionality reduction, DR); thereby exploiting the variance amongst multiple uncorrelated embeddings in a manner similar to ensemble classifier schemes (e.g. Bagging, Boosting). We apply this framework to the problem of prostate cancer (CaP) detection on 12 3 Tesla pre-operative in vivo multi-parametric (T2-weighted, Dynamic Contrast Enhanced, and Diffusion-weighted) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, in turn comprising a total of 39 2D planar MR images. We first align the different imaging protocols via automated image registration, followed by quantification of image attributes from individual protocols. Multiple embeddings are generated from the resultant high-dimensional feature space which are then combined intelligently to yield a single stable solution. Our scheme is employed in conjunction with graph embedding (for DR) and probabilistic boosting trees (PBTs) to detect CaP on multi-parametric MRI. Finally, a probabilistic pairwise Markov Random Field algorithm is used to apply spatial constraints to the result of the PBT classifier, yielding a per-voxel classification of CaP presence. Per-voxel evaluation of detection results against ground truth for CaP extent on MRI (obtained by spatially registering pre-operative MRI with available whole-mount histological specimens) reveals that EMPrAvISE yields a statistically significant improvement (AUC=0.77) over classifiers constructed from individual protocols (AUC=0.62, 0.62, 0.65, for T2w, DCE, DWI respectively) as well as one trained using multi-parametric feature concatenation (AUC=0.67).

  10. Enhanced Multi-Protocol Analysis via Intelligent Supervised Embedding (EMPrAvISE): Detecting Prostate Cancer on Multi-Parametric MRI.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B Nicolas; Chappelow, Jonathan; Patel, Pratik; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elisabeth; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Currently, there is significant interest in developing methods for quantitative integration of multi-parametric (structural, functional) imaging data with the objective of building automated meta-classifiers to improve disease detection, diagnosis, and prognosis. Such techniques are required to address the differences in dimensionalities and scales of individual protocols, while deriving an integrated multi-parametric data representation which best captures all disease-pertinent information available. In this paper, we present a scheme called Enhanced Multi-Protocol Analysis via Intelligent Supervised Embedding (EMPrAvISE); a powerful, generalizable framework applicable to a variety of domains for multi-parametric data representation and fusion. Our scheme utilizes an ensemble of embeddings (via dimensionality reduction, DR); thereby exploiting the variance amongst multiple uncorrelated embeddings in a manner similar to ensemble classifier schemes (e.g. Bagging, Boosting). We apply this framework to the problem of prostate cancer (CaP) detection on 12 3 Tesla pre-operative in vivo multi-parametric (T2-weighted, Dynamic Contrast Enhanced, and Diffusion-weighted) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, in turn comprising a total of 39 2D planar MR images. We first align the different imaging protocols via automated image registration, followed by quantification of image attributes from individual protocols. Multiple embeddings are generated from the resultant high-dimensional feature space which are then combined intelligently to yield a single stable solution. Our scheme is employed in conjunction with graph embedding (for DR) and probabilistic boosting trees (PBTs) to detect CaP on multi-parametric MRI. Finally, a probabilistic pairwise Markov Random Field algorithm is used to apply spatial constraints to the result of the PBT classifier, yielding a per-voxel classification of CaP presence. Per-voxel evaluation of detection results against ground truth for CaP extent on MRI (obtained by spatially registering pre-operative MRI with available whole-mount histological specimens) reveals that EMPrAvISE yields a statistically significant improvement (AUC=0.77) over classifiers constructed from individual protocols (AUC=0.62, 0.62, 0.65, for T2w, DCE, DWI respectively) as well as one trained using multi-parametric feature concatenation (AUC=0.67). PMID:25301991

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI texture analysis for pretreatment prediction of clinical and pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Teruel, Jose R; Heldahl, Mariann G; Goa, Pål E; Pickles, Martin; Lundgren, Steinar; Bathen, Tone F; Gibbs, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of texture analysis, applied to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), to predict the clinical and pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) before NAC is started. Fifty-eight patients with LABC were classified on the basis of their clinical response according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guidelines after four cycles of NAC, and according to their pathological response after surgery. T1 -weighted DCE-MRI with a temporal resolution of 1 min was acquired on a 3-T Siemens Trio scanner using a dedicated four-channel breast coil before the onset of treatment. Each lesion was segmented semi-automatically using the 2-min post-contrast subtracted image. Sixteen texture features were obtained at each non-subtracted post-contrast time point using a gray level co-occurrence matrix. Appropriate statistical analyses were performed and false discovery rate-based q values were reported to correct for multiple comparisons. Statistically significant results were found at 1-3 min post-contrast for various texture features for the prediction of both the clinical and pathological response. In particular, eight texture features were found to be statistically significant at 2 min post-contrast, the most significant feature yielding an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.77 for response prediction for stable disease versus complete responders after four cycles of NAC. In addition, four texture features were found to be significant at the same time point, with an AUC of 0.69 for response prediction using the most significant feature for classification based on the pathological response. Our results suggest that texture analysis could provide clinicians with additional information to increase the accuracy of prediction of an individual response before NAC is started. PMID:24840393

  12. Enhancement of Odor-Induced Activity in the Canine Brain by Zinc Nanoparticles: A Functional MRI Study in Fully Unrestrained Conscious Dogs.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hao; Pustovyy, Oleg M; Wang, Yun; Waggoner, Paul; Beyers, Ronald J; Schumacher, John; Wildey, Chester; Morrison, Edward; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Using noninvasive in vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we demonstrate that the enhancement of odorant response of olfactory receptor neurons by zinc nanoparticles leads to increase in activity in olfaction-related and higher order areas of the dog brain. To study conscious dogs, we employed behavioral training and optical motion tracking for reducing head motion artifacts. We obtained brain activation maps from dogs in both anesthetized state and fully conscious and unrestrained state. The enhancement effect of zinc nanoparticles was higher in conscious dogs with more activation in higher order areas as compared with anesthetized dogs. In conscious dogs, voxels in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus showed higher activity to odorants mixed with zinc nanoparticles as compared with pure odorants, odorants mixed with gold nanoparticles as well as zinc nanoparticles alone. These regions have been implicated in odor intensity processing in other species including humans. If the enhancement effect of zinc nanoparticles observed in vivo are confirmed by future behavioral studies, zinc nanoparticles may provide a way for enhancing the olfactory sensitivity of canines for detection of target substances such as explosives and contraband substances at very low concentrations, which would otherwise go undetected. PMID:26464498

  13. In Vivo Tracking of Phagocytic Immune Cells Using a Dual Imaging Probe with Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI and Near-Infrared Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joong; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Hyun Min; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-04-27

    A novel dual imaging probe for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging was developed by combining gadolinium (Gd)-chelating MR probe and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore, aza-BODIPY (AB; BODIPY = boron-dipyrromethene). This aza-BODIPY-based bimodal contrast agent (AB-BCA) showed a significant fluorescence emission around the NIR range and an enhanced longitudinal relaxivity in MR modality. The probe was easily delivered to phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, together with macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), and presented high-performance fluorescence and MR imaging without obvious cytotoxicity. For in vivo visualization of AB-BCA using MRI and optical imaging, bone marrow-derived DCs were labeled and injected into the footpad of mice, and labeled DCs were tracked in vivo. We observed the migration of AB-BCA-labeled DCs into the lymph nodes via lymphatic vessels using NIR fluorescence and T1-weighted MR images. This dual-modality imaging probe was used for noninvasive monitoring of DC migration into lymph nodes and could be useful for investigating advanced cellular immunotherapy. PMID:27058603

  14. Resting-state fMRI reveals enhanced functional connectivity in spatial navigation networks after transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Venkatagiri; Gopinath, Kaundinya; Brown, Gregory S; Hampstead, Benjamin M

    2015-09-14

    A number of studies have established that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates cortical excitability. We previously demonstrated polarity dependent changes in parietal lobe blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI in a group of young adults during a spatial navigation task [15]. Here we used resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) to examine whether analogous changes were also evident during the resting state. Participants were randomized to either a parietal-anodal, frontal-cathodal (P+F-) or the opposite montage (P-F+) and received 20min of tDCS (2mA) before undergoing resting-state fMRI. rsFC was evaluated between the groups by placing a seed in the medial superior parietal lobule (mSPL), which was under the target electrode. rsFC between the mSPL and a number of other areas involved in spatial navigation, scene processing, and sensorimotor processing was significantly higher in the P+F- than the P-F+ group. Thus, the modulatory effects of tDCS were evident during rest and suggest that stimulation primes not just the underlying neocortex but an extended network that can be recruited as necessary during active task performance. PMID:26240994

  15. Distinguishing Pseudoprogression From Progression in High-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Oborski, Matthew J.; Laymon, Charles M.; Lieberman, Frank S.; Mountz, James M.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case in which 18F-FDG PET was able to discriminate pseudoprogression from progression observed on contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI (CE-MRI). A 56-year-old male patient with anaplastic oligodendroglioma demonstrated markedly increased tumor enhancement on CE-MRI 1 month after completing radiation therapy (RT), suggesting radiological progression. However, the patient was clinically improved and therefore received an early-therapy response assessment PET to assess for pseudoprogression. PET showed low tumor uptake indicating stable disease. Follow-up CE-MRI at 3 and 4 months post-RT confirmed stable disease. This case emphasizes the value of 18F-FDG PET when pseudoprogression is clinically suspected. PMID:23510887

  16. Validation of 10-Minute Delayed Hepatocyte Phase Imaging with 30° Flip Angle in Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dahye; Cho, Eun-Suk; Kim, Dae Jung; Kim, Joo Hee; Yu, Jeong-Sik; Chung, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare 10-minute delayed hepatocyte phase imaging using a 30° flip angle (10min-FA30) and 20-minute hepatocyte phase imaging using a 10° FA (20min-FA10) in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI of patients with possible liver metastases, regarding lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and focal hepatic lesion (FHL) detection to evaluate whether 10min-FA30 would be superior to 20min-FA10. Materials and Methods Eighty-three patients with 248 liver metastases and 78 benign FHLs who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with 10min-FA30 and 20min-FA10 were enrolled. Lesion-to-liver CNRs were compared between the two image groups. Two radiologists independently assessed the presence of FHLs using a four-point scale and detection sensitivity was calculated. Results The mean CNR for liver metastases on the 10min-FA30 (248.5 ± 101.6) were significantly higher than that of the 20min-FA10 (187.4 ± 77.4) (p < 0.001). The mean CNR difference between the two image groups was 61.2 ± 56.8. There was no significant difference in detection sensitivity of FHLs for two readers between 10min-FA30 (mean 97.7%) and 20min-FA10 (mean 97.9%), irrespective of the lesion size or malignancy. Conclusion 10min-FA30 yielded higher CNR with similar sensitivity compared to 20min-FA10. This finding indicates that 10min-FA30 can potentially replace 20min-FA10 with higher diagnostic performance and save 10 minutes of time. PMID:26444677

  17. Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) for the treatment of liver metastases: the correlation of Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histomorphological findings in the chronic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbert, Christoph M.; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Albrecht, Dirk; Schilling, Andreas; Heiniche, Antje; Roggan, Andre; Wolf, Karl J.; Mueller, Gerhard J.; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI for the follow-up of laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in the treatment of liver metastases. Interstitial laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was performed in 55 chinchilla bastard rabbits with a Nd:YAG laser and a specially developed diffuser tip applicator. The animals were examined at different times using MRI and histological methods. T1-weighted spin-echo sequences were made with gadolinium-DTPA and submitted to correlation analysis. The analysis yielded a good correlation (r equals 0.96) between the largest lesion diameters. Lesions showed discontinuous regeneration kinetics with a 41% volume reduction 1 month after LITT. MRI of the lesion directly after LITT showed a hyperintense transition zone. Following the application of intravenous contrast medium, transition zone enhancement was first seen 72 - 96 hours after LITT. Even after 6 months, the laser-induced lesion is visualized as a non-enhanced area. Lesion regeneration followed the principles of wound healing. It is concluded that gadolinium-DTPA- enhanced MRI yielded definitive criteria for the follow-up assessment of LITT.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print ... MRI Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of ...

  19. Effects of cortical activations on enhancement of handgrip force during teeth clenching: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Naomi; Miyamoto, Jun J; Katsuyama, Narumi; Ono, Takashi; Honda, Ei-Ichi; Kurabayashi, Tohru; Taira, Masato; Moriyama, Keiji

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the effect of teeth clenching on handgrip force behaviorally, and investigated cortical activity during the occurrence of facilitatory effects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-three participants were assessed as to whether they had habitual teeth clenching during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exertion, and 21 of them were identified to have such a habit. For those participants, behavioral testing showed that MVC with clenching was greater compared with without clenching (approximately 108% greater on average). Next, cortical activity was measured under gripping with clenching (GwC), gripping without clenching (GwoC), and teeth clenching (C) conditions. We found that the activity of the hand region in primary motor cortex (M1), cingulate motor area/supplementary motor area (CMA/SMA) and anterior cerebellum (AC) was greater in contrast of GwC vs. (GwoC+C). Furthermore, significant correlation was observed between the increasing ratio of the handgrip force and the % signal change in the hand region of M1 and AC, but not in CMA/SMA. These results suggest that the activation in the hand region of M1 and AC may facilitate the spinal motoneurons, and the activation in the hand region in M1 by clenching may be due to a signal from CMA/SMA. PMID:24326095

  20. A model-constrained Monte Carlo method for blind arterial input function estimation in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: I. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schabel, Matthias C.; Fluckiger, Jacob U.; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2010-08-01

    Widespread adoption of quantitative pharmacokinetic modeling methods in conjunction with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has led to increased recognition of the importance of obtaining accurate patient-specific arterial input function (AIF) measurements. Ideally, DCE-MRI studies use an AIF directly measured in an artery local to the tissue of interest, along with measured tissue concentration curves, to quantitatively determine pharmacokinetic parameters. However, the numerous technical and practical difficulties associated with AIF measurement have made the use of population-averaged AIF data a popular, if sub-optimal, alternative to AIF measurement. In this work, we present and characterize a new algorithm for determining the AIF solely from the measured tissue concentration curves. This Monte Carlo blind estimation (MCBE) algorithm estimates the AIF from the subsets of D concentration-time curves drawn from a larger pool of M candidate curves via nonlinear optimization, doing so for multiple (Q) subsets and statistically averaging these repeated estimates. The MCBE algorithm can be viewed as a generalization of previously published methods that employ clustering of concentration-time curves and only estimate the AIF once. Extensive computer simulations were performed over physiologically and experimentally realistic ranges of imaging and tissue parameters, and the impact of choosing different values of D and Q was investigated. We found the algorithm to be robust, computationally efficient and capable of accurately estimating the AIF even for relatively high noise levels, long sampling intervals and low diversity of tissue curves. With the incorporation of bootstrapping initialization, we further demonstrated the ability to blindly estimate AIFs that deviate substantially in shape from the population-averaged initial guess. Pharmacokinetic parameter estimates for Ktrans, kep, vp and ve all showed relative biases and uncertainties of less than 10% for measurements having a temporal sampling rate of 4 s and a concentration measurement noise level of σ = 0.04 mM. A companion paper discusses the application of the MCBE algorithm to DCE-MRI data acquired in eight patients with malignant brain tumors.

  1. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  2. Differential microstructure and physiology of brain and bone metastases in a rat breast cancer model by diffusion and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Budde, Matthew D; Gold, Eric; Jordan, E Kay; Frank, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological approaches to treat breast cancer metastases in the brain have been met with limited success. In part, the impermeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) has hindered delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to metastatic tumors in the brain. BBB-permeable chemotherapeutic drugs are being developed, and noninvasively assessing the efficacy of these agents will be important in both preclinical and clinical settings. In this regard, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to monitor tumor vascular permeability and cellularity, respectively. In a rat model of metastatic breast cancer, we demonstrate that brain and bone metastases develop with distinct physiological characteristics as measured with MRI. Specifically, brain metastases have limited permeability of the BBB as assessed with DCE and an increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured with DWI compared to the surrounding brain. Microscopically, brain metastases were highly infiltrative, grew through vessel co-option, and caused extensive edema and injury to the surrounding neurons and their dendrites. By comparison, metastases situated in the leptomenengies or in the bone had high vascular permeability and significantly lower ADC values suggestive of hypercellularity. On histological examination, tumors in the bone and leptomenengies were solid masses with distinct tumor margins. The different characteristics of these tissue sites highlight the influence of the microenvironment on metastatic tumor growth. In light of these results, the suitability of DWI and DCE to evaluate the response of chemotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic agents used to treat co-opted brain metastases, respectively, remains a formidable challenge. PMID:22042553

  3. Differentiation of Leptomeningeal and Vascular Enhancement on Post-contrast FLAIR MRI Sequence: Role in Early Detection of Infectious Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Armeen; Azad, Sheenam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To qualitatively and quantitatively differentiate leptomeningeal and vascular enhancement on Post-contrast Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (PCFLAIR) sequence compared to post-contrast T1-weighted (PCT1W) sequence with fat suppression (FS) and evaluate its role in early detection of infectious meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients with diagnosis of meningitis were evaluated with pre and post-contrast FLAIR and T1-weighted sequences with fat suppression (FS). Qualitative assessment was done by two observers for presence, absence or equivocal status of leptomeningeal enhancement. Further, quantitative estimation of single pixel signal intensities (SPSI) for meningeal and vascular enhancement was undertaken. A statistical comparison was performed using Kappa coefficient and t-test. Results: The overall qualitative accuracy was 90.3% for PCFLAIR compared to 54.8% for PCT1W with FS sequence. PCFLAIR was found to be 100% accurate in the detection of tubercular and pyogenic meningitis and 70% accurate in the detection of viral meningitis while PCT1W with FS sequence showed the corresponding accuracy to be 76.2% and 0% respectively. Both observers rated PCFLAIR images better than PCT1W with FS at detecting meningitis (p<0.05). The quantitative assessment revealed that the SPSI difference between the average meningeal and vascular enhancement on PCFLAIR was significantly greater than that on PCT1W with FS sequence (t= 6.31, p<0.01). Conclusion: PCFLAIR sequence has insignificant component of vascular enhancement compared to meningeal enhancement. This makes meningeal inflammation easily discernable and aids in early detection of infectious meningitis. PMID:25738054

  4. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter. PMID:26928749

  5. Repeat Targeted Prostate Biopsy under Guidance of Multiparametric MRI-Correlated Real-Time Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Patients with Previous Negative Biopsy and Elevated Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Ryul; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik; Noh, Songmi; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Kiwook; Rha, Koon-Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively determine whether multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) - contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) correlated, imaging-guided target biopsy (TB) method could improve the detection of prostate cancer in re-biopsy setting of patients with prior negative biopsy. Methods From 2012 to 2014, a total of 42 Korean men with a negative result from previous systematic biopsy (SB) and elevated prostate-specific antigen underwent 3T mpMRI and real-time CEUS guided TB. Target lesions were determined by fusion of mpMRI and CEUS. Subsequently, 12-core SB was performed by a different radiologist. We compared core-based cancer detection rates (CaDR) using the generalized linear mixed model (GLIMMIX) for each biopsy method. Results Core-based CaDR was higher in TB (17.92%, 38 of 212 cores) than in SB (6.15%, 31 of 504 cores) (p < 0.0001; GLIMMIX). In the cancer-positive TB cores, CaDR with suspicious lesions by mpMRI was higher than that by CEUS (86.8% vs. 60.5%, p= 0.02; paired t-test) and concordant rate between mpMRI and CEUS was significantly different with discordant rate (48% vs. 52%, p=0.04; McNemar’s test). Conclusion The mpMRI-CEUS correlated TB technique for the repeat prostate biopsy of patients with prior negative biopsy can improve CaDR based on the number of cores taken. PMID:26083348

  6. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a ... in a separate room from the scanner. Some facilities use smaller extremity scanners to image the joints ...

  7. CAD-system based on kinetic analysis for non-mass-enhancing lesions in DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebl, Sebastian; Plant, Claudia; Lobbes, Marc; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2013-05-01

    Non-mass enhancing lesions represent one of the most challenging types of lesions for both the clinician as well as current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Differently from the well-studied mass-enhancing tumors these lesions do not exhibit a typical kinetic behavior that can be further easily categorized into benign or malignant based on feature descriptors. Furthermore, the poorly defined tumor borders pose a difficulty to even the most sophisticated segmentation algorithms. To address these challenges in terms of segmentation and atypical contrast enhancement dynamics, we apply an ICA-based segmentation on these lesions and extract from the average signal intensity curve of the most representative independent component (IC). Subsequently the dynamics of this IC is modeled based on mathematical models such as the empirical mathematical model and the phenomenological universalities. An automated computer-aided diagnosis system evaluates the atypical behavior of these lesions, and additionally compares the benefit of ICA-segmentation versus active contour segmentation.

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Macromolecular Concentration during Direct Infusion into an Agarose Hydrogel Phantom using Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoming; Astary, Garrett W.; Sepulveda, Hector; Mareci, Thomas H.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2011-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED), i.e., direct tissue infusion, has emerged as a promising local drug delivery method for treating diseases of the nervous system. Determination of the spatial distribution of therapeutic agents after infusion is important in evaluating the efficacy of treatment, optimizing infusion protocols, and improving the understanding of drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, we provide a methodology to determine the concentration distribution of Gd-labeled tracers during infusion using contrast-enhanced MR imaging. To the best of our knowledge, MR studies that quantify concentration profiles for CED have not been previously reported. The methodology utilizes intrinsic material properties (T1 and R1) and reduces the effect of instrumental factors (e.g., inhomogeneity of MR detection field). As a methodology investigation, this study used an agarose hydrogel phantom as a tissue substitute for infusion. An 11.1 T magnet system was used to image infusion of Gd-DTPA labeled albumin (Gd-albumin) into the hydrogel. By using data from preliminary scans, Gd-albumin distribution was determined from the signal intensity of the MR images. As a validation test, MR-derived concentration profiles were found comparable to both results measured directly using quantitative optical imaging and results from a computational transport model in porous media. In future studies, the developed methodology will be used to quantitatively monitor the distribution of Gd-tracer following infusion directly into tissues. PMID:18583082

  9. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Vinh, Nguyen Quoc; Naka, Shigeyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Murayama, Hiroyuki; Kaida, Sachiko; Kataoka, Kazunori; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Tani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt)] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or saline controls. Our results suggest that Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles are a promising approach for effective diagnosis and treatment of advanced HCC. PMID:26203241

  10. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Nguyen Quoc; Naka, Shigeyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Murayama, Hiroyuki; Kaida, Sachiko; Kataoka, Kazunori; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Tani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt)] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or saline controls. Our results suggest that Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles are a promising approach for effective diagnosis and treatment of advanced HCC. PMID:26203241

  11. fMRI evidence of degeneration-induced neuropathic pain in diabetes: enhanced limbic and striatal activations.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2013-10-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve degeneration in diabetes is a stressful symptom; however, the underlying neural substrates remain elusive. This study attempted to explore neuroanatomical substrates of thermal hyperalgesia and burning pain in a diabetic cohort due to pathologically proven cutaneous nerve degeneration (the painful group). By applying noxious 44°C heat stimuli to the right foot to provoke neuropathic pain symptoms, brain activation patterns were compared with those of healthy control subjects and patients with a similar degree of cutaneous nerve degeneration but without pain (the painless group). Psychophysical results showed enhanced affective pain ratings in the painful group. After eliminating the influence of different pain intensity ratings on cerebral responses, the painful group displayed augmented responses in the limbic and striatal structures, including the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), superior frontal gyrus, medial thalamus, anterior insular cortex, lentiform nucleus (LN), and premotor area. Among these regions, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the ACC and LN were correlated with pain ratings to thermal stimulations in the painful group. Furthermore, activation maps of a simple regression analysis as well as a region of interest analysis revealed that responses in these limbic and striatal circuits paralleled the duration of neuropathic pain. However, in the painless group, BOLD signals in the primary somatosensory cortex and ACC were reduced. These results suggest that enhanced limbic and striatal activations underlie maladaptive responses after cutaneous nerve degeneration, which contributed to the development and maintenance of burning pain and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetes. PMID:22522975

  12. Augmenting atypical antipsychotics with a cognitive enhancer (donepezil) improves regional brain activity in schizophrenia patients: a pilot double-blind placebo controlled BOLD fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Ziad; George, Mark S; Horner, Michael D; Markowitz, John S; Li, Xingbao; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P; Owens, Susan D; McGurk, Susan; DeVane, Lindsay; Risch, S Craig

    2003-06-01

    Cognitive impairments are cardinal features of schizophrenia and predictors of poor vocational and social outcome. Imaging studies with verbal fluency tasks (VFT) lead some to suggest that in schizophrenia, the combination of a failure to deactivate the left temporal lobe and a hypoactive frontal lobe reflects a functional disconnectivity between the left prefrontal cortex and temporal lobe. Others have theorized that an abnormal cingulate gyrus modulates such fronto-temporal connectivity. Thus addition of a cognitive enhancing medication to current antipsychotic therapy might improve functionality of networks necessary in working memory and internal concept generation. To test this hypothesis, we serially measured brain activity in 6 subjects on stable atypical antipsychotics performing a VFT, using BOLD fMRI. Measurements were made at baseline and again after groups were randomized to receive 12 weeks of donepezil (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and placebo in a blind cross-over design. Donepezil addition provided a functional normalization with an increase in left frontal lobe and cingulate activity when compared to placebo and from baseline scans. This pilot study supports the cingulate's role in modulating cognition and neuronal connectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:12925933

  13. Error estimation for perfusion parameters obtained using the two-compartment exchange model in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luypaert, R.; Sourbron, S.; Makkat, S.; de Mey, J.

    2010-11-01

    In theory, the application of the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM) to data from a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI exam allows the estimation of the plasma flow, plasma volume, extraction flow and extravascular-extracellular volume. The aim of this paper was to explore whether simulations based on the 2CXM could provide useful information on the trustworthiness of the results. The deviations from the input values of the haemodynamic quantities were estimated for a 'reference tissue' with a clear bi-phasic response and four 'limit tissues' with more challenging 2CXM fitting properties. The impact of the instrumental factors sampling step (Ts), acquisition window (Tacq) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was investigated. Each factor was varied separately, while keeping the other ones at a value above concern. Measurement guidelines to ensure that all deviations fell within a predefined range (±20%) could not be derived, but simulations for fixed Ts and Tacq were found to provide a practical tool for studying the error behaviour to be expected from a given experimental set-up and for comparing measurement protocols. At the level of an individual DCE exam, a bootstrap version of the simulation approach was shown to lead to a useful estimate of the errors on the fitted parameters.

  14. Assessment of synovitis in the osteoarthritic knee: Comparison between manual segmentation, semiautomated segmentation, and semiquantitative assessment using contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Fotinos-Hoyer, Amber Kassel; Guermazi, Ali; Jara, Hernán; Eckstein, Felix; Ozonoff, Al; Khard, Hussain; Norbash, Alexander; Bohndorf, Klaus; Roemer, Frank W

    2010-08-01

    Osteoarthritic joints regularly exhibit synovitis, which is ideally assessed on contrast-enhanced MRI. Manual segmentation is the reference standard for volumetric analysis but is labor intensive. The aim was to evaluate alternative semiautomated approaches of targeted thresholding and gaussian deconvolution. Volumetric and semiquantitative synovitis assessment was compared in addition. Thirty-two knees with osteoarthritis were scanned on a 1.5-T system. Synovitis volumes were plotted against each other and distributions fit with linear functions. The relationship between semiquantitative scores and synovitis volumes was assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Semiautomated volume measurement was more time efficient than manual segmentation and showed a high correlation with manual analysis (R(2) = 0.88 and 0.82). Manual segmentation was correlated with summed and with maximum semiquantitative synovitis scores (rho = 0.71 and 0.47). In conclusion, semiautomated analysis provides comparable quantitative results when compared to manual segmentation but is approximately five times more time efficient. Semiquantitative assessment adds anatomic information on synovitis distribution. PMID:20665803

  15. Combined Application of Gadoxetic Acid Disodium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) in the Diagnosis of Chronic Liver Disease-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Li, Chenxia; Wang, Rong; Ren, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gadoxetic acid disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent to target the liver cells with normal function. In clinical practice, the Gd-EOB-DTPA produces high quality hepatocyte specific image 20 minutes after intravenous injection, so DWI sequence is often performed after the conventional dynamic scanning. However, there are still some disputes about whether DWI sequence will provide more effective diagnostic information in clinical practice. This study aimed to explore the diagnostic value of combining Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and DWI in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic liver disease. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed and Cochrane library database up to March 2015. The quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS) was used to evaluate the quality of studies. Heterogeneous test on the included literature was performed by using the software Review Manager 5.3. The MetaDiSc 1.4 software was used to calculate the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio; meanwhile the summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC) curve was drawn to compare the diagnostic performance. Results A total of 13 literatures were included in this study. In 8 literatures regarding HCC diagnosis based on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI, the pooled sensitivity: 0.90 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–0.93); specificity: 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85–0.92); positive likelihood ratio: 8.60 (95% CI: 6.20–11.92); negative likelihood ratio: 0.10 (95% CI: 0.08–0.14) were obtained. The area under curve (AUC) and Q values were 0.96 and 0.90, respectively. In 5 literatures relating to HCC diagnosis by combination of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and DWI sequence, the pooled sensitivity: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85–0.91), specificity: 0.96 (0.94–0.97), positive likelihood ratio: 19.63 (12.77–30.16), negative likelihood ratio: 0.10 (0.07–0.14) were obtained. The AUC value was 0.9833 and Q value was 0.9436. The AUC value of comprehensive evaluation method was significantly higher than that of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI alone(P<0.05). Conclusion Combination of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and DWI sequence significantly improves in both the diagnostic accuracy and specificity of chronic liver disease-associated HCC. PMID:26629904

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with retrograde intralumen contrast enhancement of the rectum in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer. Experience of application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usova, A.; Frolova, I.; Afanasev, S.; Tarasova, A.; Molchanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiment of use of MRI in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer is shown on clinical examples. We used retrograde contrasting of a rectum with 150ml ultrasonic gel to make MRI more informative in case of low diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound, colonoscopy and gynecological examination.

  17. Shape-based motion correction in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for quantitative assessment of renal function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenyang; Sung, Kyunghyun; Ruan, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To incorporate a newly developed shape-based motion estimation scheme into magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and verify its efficacy in facilitating quantitative functional analysis. Methods: The authors propose a motion compensation scheme in MRU that consists of three sequential modules: MRU image acquisition, motion compensation, and quantitative functional analysis. They designed two sets of complementary experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. In the first experiment, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR images were acquired from three sedated subjects, from which clinically valid estimates were derived and served as the “ground truth.” Physiologically sound motion was then simulated to synthesize image sequences influenced by respiratory motion. Quantitative assessment and comparison were performed on functional estimates of Patlak number, glomerular filtration rate, and Patlak differential renal function without and with motion compensation against the ground truth. In the second experiment, the authors acquired a temporal series of noncontrast MR images under free breathing from a healthy adult subject. The performance of the proposed method on compensating real motion was evaluated by comparing the standard deviation of the obtained temporal intensity curves before and after motion compensation. Results: On DCE-MR images with simulated motion, the generated relative enhancement curves exhibited large perturbations and the Patlak numbers of the left and right kidney were significantly underestimated up to 35% and 34%, respectively, compared with the ground truth. After motion compensation, the relative enhancement curves exhibited much less perturbations and Patlak estimation errors reduced within 3% and 4% for the left and right kidneys, respectively. On clinical free-breathing MR images, the temporal intensity curves exhibited significantly reduced variations after motion compensation, with standard deviation decreased from 30.3 and 38.2 to 8.3 and 11.7 within two manually selected regions of interest, respectively. Conclusions: The developed motion compensation method has demonstrated its ability to facilitate quantitative MRU functional analysis, with improved accuracy of pharmacokinetic modeling and quantitative parameter estimations. Future work will consider performing more intensive clinical verifications with sophisticated pharmacokinetic models and generalizing the proposed method to other quantitative DCE analysis, such as on liver or prostate function. PMID:25471978

  18. Manganese-Enhanced MRI Reflects Both Activity-Independent and Activity-Dependent Uptake within the Rat Habenulomesencephalic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P. Leon; Rea, William; Vaupel, Bruce; Yang, Yihong; Stein, Elliot; Shepard, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a powerful technique for assessing the functional connectivity of neurons within the central nervous system. Despite the widely held proposition that MEMRI signal is dependent on neuronal activity, few studies have directly tested this implicit hypothesis. In the present series of experiments, MnCl2 was injected into the habenula of urethane-anesthetized rats alone or in combination with drugs known to alter neuronal activity by modulating specific voltage- and/or ligand-gated ion channels. Continuous quantitative T1 mapping was used to measure Mn2+ accumulation in the interpeduncular nucleus, a midline structure in which efferents from the medial habenula terminate. Microinjection of MnCl2 into the habenular complex using a protocol that maintained spontaneous neuronal activity resulted in a time-dependent increase in MEMRI signal intensity in the interpeduncular nucleus consistent with fast axonal transport of Mn2+ between these structures. Co-injection of the excitatory amino-acid agonist AMPA, increased the Mn2+-enhanced signal intensity within the interpeduncular nucleus. AMPA-induced increases in MEMRI signal were attenuated by co-injection of either the sodium channel blocker, TTX, or broad-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker, Ni2+, and were occluded in the presence of both channel blockers. However, neither Ni2+ nor TTX, alone or in combination, attenuated the increase in signal intensity following injection of Mn2+ into the habenula. These results support the premise that changes in neuronal excitability are reflected by corresponding changes in MEMRI signal intensity. However, they also suggest that basal rates of Mn2+ uptake by neurons in the medial habenula may also occur via activity-independent mechanisms. PMID:26009889

  19. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Detects Early Response to Adoptive NK Cellular Immunotherapy Targeting the NG2 Proteoglycan in a Rat Model of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Thuen, Marte; Gras Navarro, Andrea; Huuse, Else Marie; Thorsen, Frits; Poli, Aurelie; Zimmer, Jacques; Haraldseth, Olav; Lie, Stein Atle; Enger, Per Øyvind; Chekenya, Martha

    2014-01-01

    There are currently no established radiological parameters that predict response to immunotherapy. We hypothesised that multiparametric, longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of physiological parameters and pharmacokinetic models might detect early biological responses to immunotherapy for glioblastoma targeting NG2/CSPG4 with mAb9.2.27 combined with natural killer (NK) cells. Contrast enhanced conventional T1-weighted MRI at 7±1 and 17±2 days post-treatment failed to detect differences in tumour size between the treatment groups, whereas, follow-up scans at 3 months demonstrated diminished signal intensity and tumour volume in the surviving NK+mAb9.2.27 treated animals. Notably, interstitial volume fraction (ve), was significantly increased in the NK+mAb9.2.27 combination therapy group compared mAb9.2.27 and NK cell monotherapy groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.017 respectively) in cohort 1 animals treated with 1 million NK cells. ve was reproducibly increased in the combination NK+mAb9.2.27 compared to NK cell monotherapy in cohort 2 treated with increased dose of 2 million NK cells (p<0.0001), indicating greater cell death induced by NK+mAb9.2.27 treatment. The interstitial volume fraction in the NK monotherapy group was significantly reduced compared to mAb9.2.27 monotherapy (p<0.0001) and untreated controls (p = 0.014) in the cohort 2 animals. NK cells in monotherapy were unable to kill the U87MG cells that highly expressed class I human leucocyte antigens, and diminished stress ligands for activating receptors. A significant association between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water and ve in combination NK+mAb9.2.27 and NK monotherapy treated tumours was evident, where increased ADC corresponded to reduced ve in both cases. Collectively, these data support histological measures at end-stage demonstrating diminished tumour cell proliferation and pronounced apoptosis in the NK+mAb9.2.27 treated tumours compared to the other groups. In conclusion, ve was the most reliable radiological parameter for detecting response to intralesional NK cellular therapy. PMID:25268630

  20. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Amato, Daniela Maria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination) in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI. PMID:26339597

  1. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  2. Endolymphatic Hydrops Reversal following Acetazolamide Therapy: Demonstration with Delayed Intravenous Contrast-Enhanced 3D-FLAIR MRI.

    PubMed

    Sepahdari, A R; Vorasubin, N; Ishiyama, G; Ishiyama, A

    2016-01-01

    Endolymphatic hydrops, the primary pathologic alteration in Menière disease, can be visualized by using delayed intravenous contrast-enhanced 3D-FLAIR MR imaging. It is not known whether MR imaging-demonstrable changes of hydrops fluctuate with disease activity or are fixed. We describe the results of baseline and posttreatment MR imaging studies in a group of subjects with Menière disease with hydrops who were treated with acetazolamide. Seven subjects with untreated Menière disease with MR imaging evidence of hydrops had repeat MR imaging during acetazolamide treatment. Symptoms and imaging findings were assessed at each time point. Five subjects showed symptom improvement, of whom 3 had improvement or resolution of hydrops. One subject had recurrent symptoms with recurrent hydrops after discontinuing therapy. Two had unchanged hydrops despite symptom improvement. Subjects with unchanged symptoms had unchanged hydrops. Hydrops reversal may be seen with acetazolamide treatment in Menière disease. MR imaging may provide an additional biomarker of disease. PMID:26381561

  3. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results

    PubMed Central

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. Material/Methods The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. Conclusions For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful. PMID:26445625

  4. Myocardial scar identification based on analysis of Look-Locker and 3D late gadolinium enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qian; Lamb, Hildo J; Zeppenfeld, Katja; van der Geest, Rob J

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce and evaluate an approach for objective and reproducible scar identification from late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) MR by analysis of LGE data with post-contrast T(1) mapping from a routinely acquired T(1) scout Look-Locker (LL) sequence. In 90 post-infarction patients, a LL sequence was acquired prior to a three-dimensional LGE sequence covering the entire left ventricle. In 60/90 patients (training set), the T(1) relaxation rates of remote myocardium and dense myocardial scar were linearly regressed to that of blood. The learned linear relationship was applied to 30/90 patients (validation set) to identify the remote myocardium and dense scar, and to normalize the LGE signal intensity to a range from 0 to 100 %. A 50 % threshold was applied to identify myocardial scar. In the validation set, two observers independently performed manual scar identification, annotated reference regions for the full-width-half-maxima (FWHM) and standard deviation (SD) method, and analyzed the LL sequence for the proposed method. Compared with the manual, FWHM, and SD methods, the proposed method demonstrated the highest inter-class correlation coefficient (0.997) and Dice overlap index (98.7 ± 1.3 %) between the two observers. The proposed method also showed excellent agreement with the gold-standard manual scar identification, with a Dice index of 89.8 ± 7.5 and 90.2 ± 6.6 % for the two observers, respectively. Combined analysis of LL and LGE sequences leads to objective and reproducible myocardial scar identification in post-infarction patients. PMID:24643328

  5. Optimization of rs-fMRI Pre-processing for Enhanced Signal-Noise Separation, Test-Retest Reliability, and Group Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Shirer, William R; Jiang, Heidi; Price, Collin M; Ng, Bernard; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-08-15

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has become an increasingly important tool in mapping the functional networks of the brain. This tool has been used to examine network changes induced by cognitive and emotional states, neurological traits, and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, noise that remains in the rs-fMRI data after preprocessing has limited the reliability of individual-subject results, wherein scanner artifacts, subject movements, and other noise sources induce non-neural temporal correlations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) timeseries. Numerous preprocessing methods have been proposed to isolate and remove these confounds; however, the field has not coalesced around a standard preprocessing pipeline. In comparisons, these preprocessing methods are often assessed with only a single metric of rs-fMRI data quality, such as reliability, without considering other aspects in tandem, such as signal-to-noise ratio and group discriminability. The present study seeks to identify the data preprocessing pipeline that optimizes rs-fMRI data across multiple outcome measures. Specifically, we aim to minimize the noise in the data and maximize result reliability, while retaining the unique features that characterize distinct groups. We examine how these metrics are influenced by bandpass filter selection and noise regression in four datasets, totaling 181 rs-fMRI scans and 38 subject-driven memory scans. Additionally, we perform two different rs-fMRI analysis methods - dual regression and region-of-interest based functional connectivity - and highlight the preprocessing parameters that optimize both approaches. Our results expand upon previous reports of individual-scan reliability, and demonstrate that preprocessing parameter selection can significantly change the noisiness, reliability, and heterogeneity of rs-fMRI data. The application of our findings to rs-fMRI data analysis should improve the validity and reliability of rs-fMRI results, both at the individual-subject level and the group level. PMID:25987368

  6. Efficient Hilbert transform-based alternative to Tofts physiological models for representing MRI dynamic contrast-enhanced images in computer-aided diagnosis of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Kevin M.; Wang, Shijun; Burtt, Karen E.; Turkbey, Baris; Weisenthal, Samuel; Pinto, Peter; Choyke, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    In computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for prostate cancer, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging is useful for distinguishing cancerous and benign tissue. The Tofts physiological model is a commonly used representation of the DCE image data, but the parameters require extensive computation. Hence, we developed an alternative representation based on the Hilbert transform of the DCE images. The time maximum of the Hilbert transform, a binary metric of early enhancement, and a pre-DCE value was assigned to each voxel and appended to a standard feature set derived from T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. A cohort of 40 patients was used for training the classifier, and 20 patients were used for testing. The AUC was calculated by pooling the voxel-wise prediction values and comparing with the ground truth. The resulting AUC of 0.92 (95% CI [0.87 0.97]) is not significantly different from an AUC calculated using Tofts physiological models of 0.92 (95% CI [0.87 0.97]), as validated by a Wilcoxon signed rank test on each patient's AUC (p = 0.19). The time required for calculation and feature extraction is 11.39 seconds (95% CI [10.95 11.82]) per patient using the Hilbert-based feature set, two orders of magnitude faster than the 1319 seconds (95% CI [1233 1404]) required for the Tofts parameter-based feature set (p<0.001). Hence, the features proposed herein appear useful for CAD systems integrated into clinical workflows where efficiency is important.

  7. Prelinguistic vocalizations distinguish pointing acts.

    PubMed

    Grünloh, Thomas; Liszkowski, Ulf

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigated whether point-accompanying characteristics, like vocalizations and hand shape, differentiate infants' underlying motives of prelinguistic pointing. We elicited imperative (requestive) and declarative (expressive and informative) pointing acts in experimentally controlled situations, and analyzed accompanying characteristics. Experiment 1 revealed that prosodic characteristics of point-accompanying vocalizations distinguished requestive from both expressive and informative pointing acts, with little differences between the latter two. In addition, requestive points were more often realized with the whole hand than the index finger, while this was the opposite for expressive and informative acts. Experiment 2 replicated Experiment 1, revealing distinct prosodic characteristics for requestive pointing also when the referent was distal and when it had an index-finger shape. Findings reveal that beyond the social context, point-accompanying vocalizations give clues to infants' underlying intentions when pointing. PMID:26435081

  8. Tightness and distinguished Frechet spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, J. C.; Kakol, J.; Lopez Pellicer, M.; Saxon, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    Valdivia invented a nondistinguished Frechet space whose weak bidual is quasi-Suslin but not K-analytic. We prove that Grothendieck/Kothe's original nondistinguished Frechet space serves the same purpose. Indeed, a Frechet space is distinguished if and only if its strong dual has countable tightness, a corollary to the fact that a (DF)-space is quasibarrelled if and only if its tightness is countable. This answers a Cascales/Kakol/Saxon question and leads to a rich supply of (DF)-spaces whose weak duals are quasi-Suslin but not K-analytic, including the spaces Cc([kappa]) for [kappa] a cardinal of uncountable cofinality. Our level of generality rises above (DF)- or even dual metric spaces to Cascales/Orihuela's class . The small cardinals and invite a novel analysis of the Grothendieck/Kothe example, and are useful throughout.

  9. MR-Guided Near-Infrared Spectral Tomography Increases Diagnostic Performance of Breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Xu, Junqing; El-Ghussein, Fadi; Jiang, Shudong; Yin, Hong; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Ke; Ren, Fang; Gui, Jiang; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostically most important molecular biomarkers quantified by magnetic resonance-guided (MR) near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) that distinguish malignant breast lesions from benign abnormalities when combined with outcomes from clinical breast MRI. Experimental Design The study was HIPAA compliant and approved by the Dartmouth Institutional Review Board, the NIH, the United States State Department, and Xijing Hospital. MR-guided NIRST evaluated hemoglobin, water, and lipid content in regions of interest defined by concurrent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in the breast. MRI plus NIRST was performed in 44 subjects (median age, 46, age range, 20–81 years), 28 of whom had subsequent malignant pathologic diagnoses, and 16 had benign conditions. A subset of 30 subject examinations yielded optical data that met minimum sensitivity requirements to the suspicious lesion and were included in the analyses of diagnostic performance. Results In the subset of 30 subject examinations meeting minimum optical data sensitivity criterion, the MR-guided NIRST separated malignant from benign lesions using total hemoglobin (HbT; P < 0.01) and tissue optical index (TOI; P < 0.001). Combined MRI plus TOI data caused one false positive and 1 false negative, and produced the best diagnostic performance, yielding an AUC of 0.95, sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 89%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 89%, respectively. Conclusions MRI plus NIRST results correlated well with histopathologic diagnoses and could provide additional information to reduce the number of MRI-directed biopsies. PMID:26019171

  10. Multimodality Computer-Aided Breast Cancer Diagnosis with FFDM and DCE-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yading; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Bhooshan, Neha; Sennett, Charlene A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To investigate a multimodality computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme that combines image information from full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for computerized breast cancer classification. Materials and Methods From a retrospective FFDM database with 432 lesions (255 malignant, 177 benign) and a retrospective DCE-MRI database including 476 lesions (347 malignant, 129 benign), we constructed a multimodality dataset of 213 lesions (168 malignant, 45 benign). Each lesion was present on both FFDM and DCE-MRI images and deemed to be a difficult case given the necessity of having both clinical imaging exams. Using a manually indicated lesion location (ie, a seed point on FFDM images or a region of interest on DCE-MRI images, the computer automatically segmented the mass lesions and extracted lesion features). A subset of features was selected using linear stepwise feature selection and merged by a Bayesian artificial neural network to yield an estimate of the probability of malignancy. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the performance of the selected features in distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. Results With leave-one-lesion-out cross-validation on the multimodality dataset, the mammography-only features yielded an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.74 0.04, and the DCE-MRI-only features yielded an AUC of 0.78 0.04. The combination of these two modalities, which included a spiculation feature from mammography and two kinetic features from DCE-MRI, yielded an AUC of 0.87 0.03. The improvement of combining multimodality information was statistically significant as compared to the use of single modality information alone. Conclusions A CAD scheme that combines features extracted from FFDM and DCE-MRI images may be advantageous to single-modality CAD in the task of differentiating between malignant and benign lesions. PMID:20692620

  11. High-resolution magnetic resonance colonography and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in a murine model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Dougherty, Urszula; Bissonnette, Marc; Karczmar, Gregory S; Oto, Aytekin; Hart, John; Markiewicz, Erica; Zamora, Marta

    2010-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis, is characterized by persistent or recurrent inflammation and can progress to colon cancer. Colitis is difficult to detect and monitor noninvasively. The goal of this work was to develop a preclinical imaging method for evaluating colitis. Herein, we report improved MRI methods for detecting and characterizing colitis noninvasively in mice, using high-resolution in vivo MR images and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI studies, which were confirmed by histologic studies in a murine model of colitis. C57Bl6/J male mice were treated with 2.5% dextran sulfate sodium in their drinking water for 5 days to induce colitis. MR images were acquired using a 9.4-T Bruker scanner from 5-25 days following dextran sulfate sodium treatment. In dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI studies, Gd uptake (K(trans)) and its distribution (v(e)) were measured in muscle and normal and inflamed colons after administering Gd-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). T(2)-weighted MR images distinguished normal colon from diffusely thickened colonic wall occurring in colitis (P <0.0005) and correlated with histologic features. Values of K(trans) and v(e) obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI were also significantly different in inflamed colons compared to normal colon (P < 0.0005). The results demonstrate that both T(2)-weighted anatomic imaging and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data can successfully distinguish colitis from normal colon in mice. PMID:20373393

  12. A comparison of radial keyhole strategies for high spatial and temporal resolution 4D contrast-enhanced MRI in small animal tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Subashi, Ergys; Moding, Everett J.; Cofer, Gary P.; MacFall, James R.; Kirsch, David G.; Qi, Yi; Allan Johnson, G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI has been widely used as a quantitative imaging method for monitoring tumor response to therapy. The simultaneous challenges of increasing temporal and spatial resolution in a setting where the signal from the much smaller voxel is weaker have made this MR technique difficult to implement in small-animal imaging. Existing protocols employed in preclinical DCE-MRI acquire a limited number of slices resulting in potentially lost information in the third dimension. This study describes and compares a family of four-dimensional (3D spatial + time), projection acquisition, radial keyhole-sampling strategies that support high spatial and temporal resolution. Methods: The 4D method is based on a RF-spoiled, steady-state, gradient-recalled sequence with minimal echo time. An interleaved 3D radial trajectory with a quasi-uniform distribution of points in k-space was used for sampling temporally resolved datasets. These volumes were reconstructed with three different k-space filters encompassing a range of possible radial keyhole strategies. The effect of k-space filtering on spatial and temporal resolution was studied in a 5 mM CuSO4 phantom consisting of a meshgrid with 350-μm spacing and in 12 tumors from three cell lines (HT-29, LoVo, MX-1) and a primary mouse sarcoma model (three tumors/group). The time-to-peak signal intensity was used to assess the effect of the reconstruction filters on temporal resolution. As a measure of heterogeneity in the third dimension, the authors analyzed the spatial distribution of the rate of transport (Ktrans) of the contrast agent across the endothelium barrier for several different types of tumors. Results: Four-dimensional radial keyhole imaging does not degrade the system spatial resolution. Phantom studies indicate there is a maximum 40% decrease in signal-to-noise ratio as compared to a fully sampled dataset. T1 measurements obtained with the interleaved radial technique do not differ significantly from those made with a conventional Cartesian spin-echo sequence. A bin-by-bin comparison of the distribution of the time-to-peak parameter shows that 4D radial keyhole reconstruction does not cause significant temporal blurring when a temporal resolution of 9.9 s is used for the subsamples of the keyhole data. In vivo studies reveal substantial tumor heterogeneity in the third spatial dimension that may be missed with lower resolution imaging protocols. Conclusions: Volumetric keyhole imaging with projection acquisition provides a means to increase spatiotemporal resolution and coverage over that provided by existing 2D Cartesian protocols. Furthermore, there is no difference in temporal resolution between the higher spatial resolution keyhole reconstruction and the undersampled projection data. The technique allows one to measure complex heterogeneity of kinetic parameters with isotropic, microscopic spatial resolution. PMID:23387766

  13. Wigner-Araki-Yanase theorem on distinguishability

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2006-08-15

    The presence of an additive-conserved quantity imposes a limitation on the measurement process. According to the Wigner-Araki-Yanase theorem, perfect repeatability and distinguishability of the apparatus cannot be attained simultaneously. Instead of repeatability, in this paper, the distinguishability in both systems is examined. We derive a trade-off inequality between the distinguishability of the final states on the system and the one on the apparatus. An inequality shows that perfect distinguishability of both systems cannot be attained simultaneously.

  14. Distinguishing cell type using epigenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wytock, Thomas; Motter, Adilson E.

    Recently, researchers have proposed that unique cell types are attractors of their epigenetic dynamics including gene expression and chromatin conformation patterns. Traditionally, cell types have been classified by their function, morphology, cytochemistry, and other macroscopically observable properties. Because these properties are the result of many proteins working together, it should be possible to predict cell types from gene expression or chromatin conformation profiles. In this talk, I present a maximum entropy approach to identify and distinguish cell type attractors on the basis of correlations within these profiles. I will demonstrate the flexibility of this method through its separate application to gene expression and chromatin conformation datasets. I show that our method out-performs other machine-learning techniques and uncorrelated benchmarks. We adapt our method to predict growth rate from gene expression in E. coli and S. cerevisiae and compare our predictions with those from metabolic models. In addition, our method identifies a nearly convex region of state-space associated with each cell type attractor basin. Estimates of the growth rate and attractor basin make it possible to rationally control gene regulatory networks independent of a model. This research was supported by NSF-GRFP, NSF-GK12, GAANN, and Northwestern's NIH-NIGMS Molecular Biophysics Training Grant.

  15. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  16. In vivo transport of Gd-DTPA2- into human meniscus and cartilage assessed with delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired stability is a risk factor in knee osteoarthritis (OA), where the whole joint and not only the joint cartilage is affected. The meniscus provides joint stability and is involved in the early pathological progress of OA. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) has been used to identify pre-radiographic changes in the cartilage in OA, but has been used less commonly to examine the meniscus, and then using only a double dose of the contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to enable improved early OA diagnosis by investigate the temporal contrast agent distribution in the meniscus and femoral cartilage simultaneously, in healthy volunteers, using 3D dGEMRIC at two different doses of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA2-. Methods The right knee in 12 asymptomatic volunteers was examined using a 3D Look-Locker sequence on two occasions after an intravenous injection of a double or triple dose of Gd-DTPA2- (0.2 or 0.3 mmol/kg body weight). The relaxation time (T1) and relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) were measured in the meniscus and femoral cartilage before, and 60, 90, 120 and 180 minutes after injection, and the change in relaxation rate (ΔR1) was calculated. Paired t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical evaluation. Results The triple dose yielded higher concentrations of Gd-DTPA2- in the meniscus and cartilage than the double dose, but provided no additional information. The observed patterns of ΔR1 were similar for double and triple doses of the contrast agent. ΔR1 was higher in the meniscus than in femoral cartilage in the corresponding compartments at all time points after injection. ΔR1 increased until 90-180 minutes in both the cartilage and the meniscus (p < 0.05), and was lower in the medial than in the lateral meniscus at all time points (p < 0.05). A faster increase in ΔR1 was observed in the vascularized peripheral region of the posterior medial meniscus, than in the avascular central part of the posterior medial meniscus during the first 60 minutes (p < 0.05). Conclusion It is feasible to examine undamaged meniscus and cartilage simultaneously using dGEMRIC, preferably 90 minutes after the injection of a double dose of Gd-DTPA2- (0.2 mmol/kg body weight). PMID:25005036

  17. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) Shows No Change in Cartilage Structural Composition after Viscosupplementation in Patients with Early-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Tiel, Jasper; Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Hermans, Job; van Buul, Gerben M.; Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan; Verhaar, Jan A. N.; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Weinans, Harrie; Kotek, Gyula; Oei, Edwin H. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) of osteoarthritic (OA) knee joints has a well-established positive effect on clinical symptoms. This effect, however, is only temporary and the working mechanism of HA injections is not clear. It was suggested that HA might have disease modifying properties because of its beneficial effect on cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a highly reproducible, non-invasive surrogate measure for sGAG content and hence composition of cartilage. The aim of this study was to assess whether improvement in cartilage structural composition is detected using dGEMRIC 14 weeks after 3 weekly injections with HA in patients with early-stage knee OA. Methods In 20 early-stage knee OA patients (KLG I-II), 3D dGEMRIC at 3T was acquired before and 14 weeks after 3 weekly injections with HA. To evaluate patient symptoms, the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and a numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain were recorded. To evaluate cartilage composition, six cartilage regions in the knee were analyzed on dGEMRIC. Outcomes of dGEMRIC, KOOS and NRS before and after HA were compared using paired t-testing. Since we performed multiple t-tests, we applied a Bonferroni-Holm correction to determine statistical significance for these analyses. Results All KOOS subscales (‘pain’, ‘symptoms’, ‘daily activities’, ‘sports’ and ’quality of life’) and the NRS pain improved significantly 14 weeks after Viscosupplementation with HA. Outcomes of dGEMRIC did not change significantly after HA compared to baseline in any of the cartilage regions analyzed in the knee. Conclusions Our results confirm previous findings reported in the literature, showing persisting improvement in symptomatic outcome measures in early-stage knee OA patients 14 weeks after Viscosupplementation. Outcomes of dGEMRIC, however, did not change after Viscosupplementation, indicating no change in cartilage structural composition as an explanation for the improvement of clinical symptoms. PMID:24223194

  18. Assessment of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Glycosaminoglycan Content by Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI before and after 21-Days of Head-Down-Tilt Bedrest

    PubMed Central

    Koy, Timmo; Zange, Jochen; Rittweger, Jörn; Pohle-Fröhlich, Regina; Hackenbroch, Matthias; Eysel, Peer; Ganse, Bergita

    2014-01-01

    During spaceflight, it has been shown that intervertebral discs (IVDs) increase in height, causing elongation of the spine up to several centimeters. Astronauts frequently report dull lower back pain that is most likely of discogenic origin and may result from IVD expansion. It is unknown whether disc volume solely increases by water influx, or if the content of glycosaminoglycans also changes in microgravity. Aim of this pilot study was to investigate effects of the spaceflight analog of bedrest on the glycosaminoglycan content of human lumbar IVDs. Five healthy, non-smoking, male human subjects of European descent were immobilized in 6° head-down-tilt bedrest for 21 days. Subjects remained in bed 24 h a day with at least one shoulder on the mattress. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans were taken according to the delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dGEMRIC) protocol before and after bedrest. The outcome measures were T1 and ΔT1. Scans were performed before and after administration of the contrast agent Gd-DOTA, and differences between T1-values of both scans (ΔT1) were computed. ΔT1 is the longitudinal relaxation time in the tissue and inversely related to the glycosaminoglycan-content. For data analysis, IVDs L1/2 to L4/5 were semi-automatically segmented. Zones were defined and analyzed separately. Results show a highly significant decrease in ΔT1 (p<0.001) after bedrest in all IVDs, and in all areas of the IVDs. The ΔT1-decrease was most prominent in the nucleus pulposus and in L4/5, and was expressed slightly more in the posterior than anterior IVD. Unexpected negative ΔT1-values were found in Pfirrmann-grade 2-discs after bedrest. Significantly lower T1 before contrast agent application was found after bedrest compared to before bedrest. According to the dGEMRIC-literature, the decrease in ΔT1 may be interpreted as an increase in glycosaminoglycans in healthy IVDs during bedrest. This interpretation seems contradictory to previous findings in IVD unloading. PMID:25380233

  19. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  20. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  1. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates. PMID:26117690

  2. Neurosarcoidosis: evaluation with MRI.

    PubMed

    Pickuth, D; Heywang-Köbrunner, S H

    2000-09-01

    Clinical studies report a rate of 5% and autopsy results a rate of 25% of brain involvement in sarcoidosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of patients with neurosarcoidosis. The MRI brain scans of 22 patients with sarcoidosis were retrospectively reviewed, along with the clinical information that was provided in the request form. All patients had signs and symptoms referable to the head and were examined with gadolinium enhancement. Cranial (facial) nerve paralysis was the most common clinical manifestation identified in 10 patients. A wide spectrum of MR findings was noted: Periventricular and white matter lesions on T2W spin echo images, mimicking multiple sclerosis (46%); multiple supratentorial and infratentorial brain lesions, mimicking metastases (36%); solitary intraaxial mass, mimicking high grade astrocytoma (9%); solitary extraaxial mass, mimicking meningioma (5%); leptomeningeal enhancement (36%). These findings are not specific for sarcoidosis and one must consider appropriate clinical circumstances in arriving at the correct diagnosis. In selected cases with isolated brain involvement, meningeal or cerebral biopsy may be required. PMID:11104966

  3. Comparison of the hepatic perfusion index measured with gadolinium-enhanced volumetric MRI in controls and in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Totman, J J; O'gorman, R L; Kane, P A; Karani, J B

    2005-02-01

    The aim of the study was to adapt the methodology established for dynamic CT measurements of the hepatic perfusion index (HPI) to MRI, and to assess the potential role of MRI measurements of the HPI in detecting regional alterations in liver perfusion between patients with colorectal liver metastases and normal controls. The HPI was evaluated from serial T(1) volume acquisitions acquired over the course of a Gd-DTPA bolus injection. Time-course data from regions of interest in the liver, spleen and aorta were used to calculate the HPI; and HPI data from control subjects were compared with data from patients with known colorectal metastases. Significant differences were found between the relative portal perfusion and hepatic perfusion indices calculated for the patient and control groups (p<0.005). These results suggest that hepatic perfusion indices can be derived using MRI-based methods, and that these perfusion indices are sensitive to differences in liver perfusion associated with established metastatic liver disease on imaging. This technique may contribute to the early detection of liver metastases, allowing early surgical intervention and improved patient survival. PMID:15681320

  4. Competitive Advantage of PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. PMID:23791129

  5. Environmentally responsive MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gemma-Louise; Kramberger, Iris; Davis, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical imaging techniques can provide a vast amount of anatomical information, enabling diagnosis and the monitoring of disease and treatment profile. MRI uniquely offers convenient, non-invasive, high resolution tomographic imaging. A considerable amount of effort has been invested, across several decades, in the design of non toxic paramagnetic contrast agents capable of enhancing positive MRI signal contrast. Recently, focus has shifted towards the development of agents capable of specifically reporting on their local biochemical environment, where a switch in image contrast is triggered by a specific stimulus/biochemical variable. Such an ability would not only strengthen diagnosis but also provide unique disease-specific biochemical insight. This feature article focuses on recent progress in the development of MRI contrast switching with molecular, macromolecular and nanoparticle-based agents. PMID:24040650

  6. Displacement-encoded and manganese-enhanced cardiac MRI reveal that nNOS, not eNOS, plays a dominant role in modulating contraction and calcium influx in the mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Vandsburger, Moriel H; French, Brent A; Kramer, Christopher M; Zhong, Xiaodong; Epstein, Frederick H

    2012-01-01

    Within cardiomyocytes, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) are thought to modulate L-type calcium channel (LTCC) function and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium cycling, respectively. However, divergent results from mostly invasive prior studies suggest more complex roles. To elucidate the roles of nNOS and eNOS in vivo, we applied noninvasive cardiac MRI to study wild-type (WT), eNOS(-/-), and nNOS(-/-) mice. An in vivo index of LTCC flux (LTCCI) was measured at baseline (Bsl), dobutamine (Dob), and dobutamine + carbacholamine (Dob + CCh) using manganese-enhanced MRI. Displacement-encoded MRI assessed contractile function by measuring circumferential strain (E(cc)) and systolic (dE(cc)/dt) and diastolic (dE(cc)/dt(diastolic)) strain rates at Bsl, Dob, and Dob + CCh. Bsl LTCCI was highest in nNOS(-/-) mice (P < 0.05 vs. WT and eNOS(-/-)) and increased only in WT and eNOS(-/-) mice with Dob (P < 0.05 vs. Bsl). LTCCI decreased significantly from Dob levels with Dob + CCh in all mice. Contractile function, as assessed by E(cc), was similar in all mice at Bsl. With Dob, E(cc) increased significantly in WT and eNOS(-/-) but not nNOS(-/-) mice (P < 0.05 vs. WT and eNOS(-/-)). With Dob + CCh, E(cc) returned to baseline levels in all mice. Systolic blood pressure, measured via tail plethysmography, was highest in eNOS(-/-) mice (P < 0.05 vs. WT and nNOS(-/-)). Mice deficient in nNOS demonstrate increased Bsl LTCC function and an attenuated contractile reserve to Dob, whereas eNOS(-/-) mice demonstrate normal LTCC and contractile function under all conditions. These results suggest that nNOS, not eNOS, plays the dominant role in modulating Ca(2+) cycling in the heart. PMID:22058155

  7. RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS DISTINGUISH ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Basidiomycetous fungi, two saprophytes and three mycorrhizal, were used to assess the specificity of DNA hybridization for distinguishing genera from one another. nterspecific comparisons were done with several isolates of mycorrhizal fungi, Laccaria bicolor and L. laccata, colle...

  8. Accurate determination of bloodbrain barrier permeability using dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI: a simulation and in vivo study on healthy subjects and multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Stig P; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) is increasingly used to estimate permeability in situations with subtle bloodbrain barrier (BBB) leakage. However, the method's ability to differentiate such low values from zero is unknown, and no consensus exists on optimal selection of total measurement duration, temporal resolution, and modeling approach under varying physiologic circumstances. To estimate accuracy and precision of the DCEMRI method we generated simulated data using a two-compartment model and progressively down-sampled and truncated the data to mimic low temporal resolution and short total measurement duration. Model fit was performed with the Patlak, the extended Tofts, and the Tikhonov two-compartment (Tik-2CM) models. Overall, 17 healthy controls were scanned to obtain in vivo data. Long total measurement duration (15 minutes) and high temporal resolution (1.25 seconds) greatly improved accuracy and precision for all three models, enabling us to differentiate values of permeability as low as 0.1?ml/100?g/min from zero. The Patlak model yielded highest accuracy and precision for permeability values <0.3?ml/100?g/min, but for higher values the Tik-2CM performed best. Our results emphasize the importance of optimal parameter setup and model selection when characterizing low BBB permeability. PMID:25074746

  9. Post-treatment with cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript enhances infarct resolution, reinnervation, and angiogenesis in stroke rats - an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-S; Shen, H; Luo, Y; Hoffer, B J; Wang, Y; Yang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that post-treatment with cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has neuroregenerative effects in animal models of stroke. The purpose of this study was to characterize CART-mediated neuronal and vascular repairments using non-invasive MRI techniques. Adult male rats were subjected to a 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Animals were separated into two groups with similar infarction sizes, measured by T2 -weighted MRI on Day 2 after MCAo, and were treated with CART or vehicle intranasally from Day 3 to Day 12. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to examine changes in plasticity of white matter elements. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) was used to measure angiogenesis. Post-treatment with CART significantly increased fractional anisotropy (FA) in lesioned cortex on Days 10 and 25 post stroke. A significant correlation between the behavioral recovery in body asymmetry and the change in FA was shown, suggesting that behavioral recovery was associated with reinnervation to the lesioned hemisphere. CART also increased the intensity of SWI and the immunoreactivity of the vascular marker alpha-smooth muscle actin in lesioned cortex. Together, our data support a non-invasive treatment strategy for stroke through angiogenesis and reinnervation by CART. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26915794

  10. Intra voxel analysis in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosanio, Michele; Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    A new application of Compressive Sensing (CS) in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) field is presented. In particular, first results of the Intra Voxel Analysis (IVA) technique are reported. The idea is to exploit CS peculiarities in order to distinguish different contributions inside the same resolution cell, instead of reconstructing images from not fully sampled k-space acquisition. Applied to MRI field, this means the possibility of estimating the presence of different tissues inside the same voxel, i.e. in one pixel of the obtained image. In other words, the method is the first attempt, as far as we know, of achieving Spectroscopy-like results starting from each pixel of MR images. In particular, tissues are distinguished each others by evaluating their spin-spin relaxation times. Within this manuscript, first results on clinical dataset, in particular a phantom made by aqueous solution and oil and an occipital brain lesion corresponding to a metastatic breast cancer nodule, are reported. Considering the phantom dataset, in particular focusing on the slice where the separation between water and oil occurs, the methodology is able to distinguish the two components with different spin-spin relaxation times. With respect to clinical dataset,focusing on a voxel of the lesion area, the approach is able to detect the presence of two tissues, namely the healthy and the cancer related ones, while in other location outside the lesion only the healthy tissue is detected. Of course, these are the first results of the proposed methodology, further studies on different types of clinical datasets are required in order to widely validate the approach. Although few datasets have been considered, results seem both interesting and promising.

  11. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM). PMID:19381963

  12. Multimodality Molecular Imaging (FDG-PET/CT, US Elastography, and DWI-MRI) as Complimentary Adjunct for Enhancing Diagnostic Confidence in Reported Intermediate Risk Category Thyroid Nodules on Bethesda Thyroid Cytopathology Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip; Mahajan, Abhishek; Arya, Supreeta

    2016-01-01

    The potential complimentary role of various molecular imaging modalities [fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT), ultrasound (US)-elastography, and diffusion weighted imaging-magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI)] in characterizing thyroid nodules, which have been designated as “intermediate risk category” on the Bethesda thyroid cytopathology reporting system (BTCRS), is illustrated in this communication. The clinical cases described (category III thyroid nodules on BTCRS) show the imaging features and the final diagnostic impressions rendered by the interpreting physicians with the modalities that have been independently compared in a tabular format at the end; of particular note is the high negative predictive value of these (specifically FDG-PET/CT), which could aid in enhancing the diagnostic confidence in the reported “intermediate risk category” thyroid nodules, a “gray zone” from the patient management viewpoint.

  13. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the lower part of ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  14. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  15. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pelvis; MRI - hips; Pelvic MRI with prostate probe; Magnetic resonance imaging - pelvis ... nih.gov/pubmed/18381118 . Wilkinson ID, Graves MJ. Magnetic resonance imaging: basic principles In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard ...

  16. Outcome Classification of Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Mri Brain Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Lord, Catherine; Lincoln, Alan J.; Courchesne, Rachel Y.; Carper, Ruth A.; Townsend, Jeanne; Courchesne, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain measures obtained during early childhood distinguish children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) from typically developing children and is associated with functional outcome. Method: Quantitative MRI technology was used to measure gray and white matter…

  17. High-Speed Real-Time Resting-State fMRI Using Multi-Slab Echo-Volumar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Zhang, Tongsheng; Hummatov, Ruslan; Akhtari, Massoud; Chohan, Muhammad; Fisch, Bruce; Yonas, Howard

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that ultra-high-speed real-time fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (MEVI) significantly increases sensitivity for mapping task-related activation and resting-state networks (RSNs) compared to echo-planar imaging (Posse et al., 2012). In the present study we characterize the sensitivity of MEVI for mapping RSN connectivity dynamics, comparing independent component analysis (ICA) and a novel seed-based connectivity analysis (SBCA) that combines sliding-window correlation analysis with meta-statistics. This SBCA approach is shown to minimize the effects of confounds, such as movement, and CSF and white matter signal changes, and enables real-time monitoring of RSN dynamics at time scales of tens of seconds. We demonstrate highly sensitive mapping of eloquent cortex in the vicinity of brain tumors and arterio-venous malformations, and detection of abnormal resting-state connectivity in epilepsy. In patients with motor impairment, resting-state fMRI provided focal localization of sensorimotor cortex compared with more diffuse activation in task-based fMRI. The fast acquisition speed of MEVI enabled segregation of cardiac-related signal pulsation using ICA, which revealed distinct regional differences in pulsation amplitude and waveform, elevated signal pulsation in patients with arterio-venous malformations and a trend toward reduced pulsatility in gray matter of patients compared with healthy controls. Mapping cardiac pulsation in cortical gray matter may carry important functional information that distinguishes healthy from diseased tissue vasculature. This novel fMRI methodology is particularly promising for mapping eloquent cortex in patients with neurological disease, having variable degree of cooperation in task-based fMRI. In conclusion, ultra-high-real-time speed fMRI enhances the sensitivity of mapping the dynamics of resting-state connectivity and cerebro-vascular pulsatility for clinical and neuroscience research applications. PMID:23986677

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI) What is an MRI? MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is an important tool used in many fields of medicine, and is capable of generating a detailed image of any part of the human body. As an analogy, think about a loaf of ...

  19. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  20. MRI mimics of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Esther Sánchez; Barkhof, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) is based on the demonstration of dissemination of lesions in space (DIS) and in time (DIT), as well as on the exclusion of an alternative neurologic disorder. As a paraclinical tool brain and/or spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), showing typical lesion morphology, characteristic distribution of lesions, or involvement or specific anatomic structures, can support the diagnosis of MS. But from an imaging perspective a considerable amount of inherited and acquired disorders may manifest with radiologic evidence of DIT, DIS, or both. Hypoxic-ischemic vasculopathy, specially small-vessel disease, inflammatory disorders, vasculitis, and non-MS idiopathic inflammatory disorders, as well as some toxic, metabolic, and infectious disorders, may present mimicking MS on MR examinations and should be included in the differential diagnosis of MS-like lesions. Careful evaluation of associated findings on MRI, the so-called MRI red flags, such as the presence of infarcts, microbleeds, meningeal enhancement, and calcifications among others, are very helpful in suggesting a diagnosis other than MS. Complement MRI findings to patient's history, demographics, and serologic findings are crucial to achieve the correct diagnosis. We will review the most frequent radiologic appearance and differential features from the most frequent MS mimickers. PMID:24507523

  1. Hornbills can distinguish between primate alarm calls.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Hugo J; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Slater, Peter J B

    2004-04-01

    Some mammals distinguish between and respond appropriately to the alarm calls of other mammal and bird species. However, the ability of birds to distinguish between mammal alarm calls has not been investigated. Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce different alarm calls to two predators: crowned eagles (Stephanoaetus coronatus) and leopards (Panthera pardus). Yellow-casqued hornbills (Ceratogymna elata) are vulnerable to predation by crowned eagles but are not preyed on by leopards and might therefore be expected to respond to the Diana monkey eagle alarm call but not to the leopard alarm call. We compared responses of hornbills to playback of eagle shrieks, leopard growls, Diana monkey eagle alarm calls and Diana monkey leopard alarm calls and found that they distinguished appropriately between the two predator vocalizations as well as between the two Diana monkey alarm calls. We discuss possible mechanisms leading to these responses. PMID:15209110

  2. The Attentional Field Revealed by Single-Voxel Modeling of fMRI Time Courses

    PubMed Central

    DeYoe, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    The spatial topography of visual attention is a distinguishing and critical feature of many theoretical models of visuospatial attention. Previous fMRI-based measurements of the topography of attention have typically been too crude to adequately test the predictions of different competing models. This study demonstrates a new technique to make detailed measurements of the topography of visuospatial attention from single-voxel, fMRI time courses. Briefly, this technique involves first estimating a voxel's population receptive field (pRF) and then “drifting” attention through the pRF such that the modulation of the voxel's fMRI time course reflects the spatial topography of attention. The topography of the attentional field (AF) is then estimated using a time-course modeling procedure. Notably, we are able to make these measurements in many visual areas including smaller, higher order areas, thus enabling a more comprehensive comparison of attentional mechanisms throughout the full hierarchy of human visual cortex. Using this technique, we show that the AF scales with eccentricity and varies across visual areas. We also show that voxels in multiple visual areas exhibit suppressive attentional effects that are well modeled by an AF having an enhancing Gaussian center with a suppressive surround. These findings provide extensive, quantitative neurophysiological data for use in modeling the psychological effects of visuospatial attention. PMID:25810532

  3. Distinguishing grade I meningioma from higher grade meningiomas without biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Varlotto, John; Flickinger, John; Pavelic, Martin T.; Specht, Charles S.; Sheehan, Jonas M.; Timek, Dana T.; Glantz, Michael J.; Sogge, Steven; Dimaio, Christopher; Moser, Richard; Yunus, Shakeeb; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Upadhyay, Urvashi; Rava, Paul; Tangel, Matthew; Yao, Aaron; Kanekar, Sangam

    2015-01-01

    Background Many meningiomas are identified by imaging and followed, with an assumption that they are WHO Grade I tumors. The purpose of our investigation is to find clinical or imaging predictors of WHO Grade II/III tumors to distinguish them from Grade I meningiomas. Methods Patients with a pathologic diagnosis of meningioma from 2002–2009 were included if they had pre-operative MRI studies and pathology for review. A Neuro-Pathologist reviewed and classified all tumors by WHO 2007. All Brain MRI imaging was reviewed by a Neuro-radiologist. Pathology and Radiology reviews were blinded from each other and clinical course. Recursive partitioning was used to create predictive models for identifying meningioma grades. Results Factors significantly correlating with a diagnosis of WHO Grade II-III tumors in univariate analysis: prior CVA (p = 0.005), CABG (p = 0.010), paresis (p = 0.008), vascularity index = 4/4: (p = 0.009), convexity vs other (p = 0.014), metabolic syndrome (p = 0.025), non-skull base (p = 0.041) and non-postmenopausal female (p = 0.045). Recursive partitioning analysis identified four categories: 1. prior CVA, 2. vascular index (vi) = 4 (no CVA), 3. premenopausal or male, vi < 4, no CVA. 4. Postmenopausal, vi < 4, no CVA with corresponding rates of 73, 54, 35 and 10% of being Grade II-III meningiomas. Conclusions Meningioma patients with prior CVA and those grade 4/4 vascularity are the most likely to have WHO Grade II-III tumors while post-menopausal women without these features are the most likely to have Grade I meningiomas. Further study of the associations of clinical and imaging factors with grade and clinical behavior are needed to better predict behavior of these tumors without biopsy. PMID:26472106

  4. Beyond Benford's Law: Distinguishing Noise from Chaos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinglei; Fu, Zuntao; Yuan, Naiming

    2015-01-01

    Determinism and randomness are two inherent aspects of all physical processes. Time series from chaotic systems share several features identical with those generated from stochastic processes, which makes them almost undistinguishable. In this paper, a new method based on Benford's law is designed in order to distinguish noise from chaos by only information from the first digit of considered series. By applying this method to discrete data, we confirm that chaotic data indeed can be distinguished from noise data, quantitatively and clearly. PMID:26030809

  5. Children distinguish between positive pride and hubris.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole L; Russell, James A

    2015-11-01

    Adults distinguish expressions of hubris from those of positive pride. To determine whether children (N = 183; 78-198 months old) make a similar distinction, we asked them to attribute emotion labels and a variety of social characteristics to dynamic expressions intended to convey hubris and positive pride. Like adults, children attributed different emotion labels to the expressions, and this tendency increased with age. Girls were more likely to distinguish between the expressions than boys were. Children also associated more positive social characteristics with the expression of positive pride and more negative characteristics with the expression of hubris. PMID:26347987

  6. Stanislas Dehaene: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Stanislas Dehaene, who received this award for "outstanding empirical and theoretical contributions to not just one but three fields that are central to the enterprises of psychology and cognitive neuroscience." Dehaene's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26618941

  7. Michael Tomasello: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Michael Tomasello, who received this award for "outstanding empirical and theoretical contributions to understanding what makes the human mind unique. Michael Tomasello's pioneering research on the origins of social cognition has led to revolutionary insights in both developmental psychology and primate cognition." Tomasello's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26618943

  8. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  9. Identification of High-Risk Plaques by MRI and Fluorescence Imaging in a Rabbit Model of Atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ning; Baik, Fred; Pham, Tuan; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Giordano, Nick; Friedman, Beth; Whitney, Michael; Nguyen, Quyen T.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Hamilton, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The detection of atherosclerotic plaques at risk for disruption will be greatly enhanced by molecular probes that target vessel wall biomarkers. Here, we test if fluorescently-labeled Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptides (ACPPs) could differentiate stable plaques from vulnerable plaques that disrupt, forming a luminal thrombus. Additionally, we test the efficacy of a combined ACPP and MRI technique for identifying plaques at high risk of rupture. Methods and Results In an atherothrombotic rabbit model, disrupted plaques were identified with in vivo MRI and co-registered in the same rabbit aorta with the in vivo uptake of ACPPs, cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or thrombin. ACPP uptake, mapped ex vivo in whole aortas, was higher in disrupted compared to non-disrupted plaques. Specifically, disrupted plaques demonstrated a 4.5~5.0 fold increase in fluorescence enhancement, while non-disrupted plaques showed only a 2.2~2.5 fold signal increase. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicates that both ACPPs (MMP and thrombin) show high specificity (84.2% and 83.2%) and sensitivity (80.0% and 85.7%) in detecting disrupted plaques. The detection power of ACPPs was improved when combined with the MRI derived measure, outward remodeling ratio. Conclusions Our targeted fluorescence ACPP probes distinguished disrupted plaques from stable plaques with high sensitivity and specificity. The combination of anatomic, MRI-derived predictors for disruption and ACPP uptake can further improve the power for identification of high-risk plaques and suggests future development of ACPPs with molecular MRI as a readout. PMID:26448434

  10. Using Quantitative Image Analysis to Classify Axillary Lymph Nodes on Breast MRI: A New Application for the Z 0011 Era

    PubMed Central

    Schacht, David V.; Drukker, Karen; Pak, Iris; Abe, Hiroyuki; Giger, Maryellen L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the performance of computer extracted feature analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance images (MRI) of axillary lymph nodes. To determine which quantitative features best predict nodal metastasis. Methods This institutional board-approved HIPAA compliant study, in which informed patient consent was waived, collected enhanced T1 images of the axilla from patients with breast cancer. Lesion segmentation and feature analysis were performed on 192 nodes using a laboratory-developed quantitative image analysis (QIA) workstation. The importances of 28 features were assessed. Classification used the features as input to a neural net classifier in a leave-one-case-out cross-validation and evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results The area under the ROC curve (AUC) values for features in the task of distinguishing between positive and negative nodes ranged from just over 0.50 to 0.70. Five features yielded AUCs greater than 0.65: two morphological and three textural features. In cross-validation, the neural net classifier obtained an AUC of 0.88 (SE 0.03) for the task of distinguishing between positive and negative nodes. Conclusion QIA of DCE MRI demonstrated promising performance in discriminating between positive and negative axillary nodes. PMID:25547328

  11. Development of MRI Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachiya, Mahiro; Arimura, Kyohei; Ueno, Tomohiro; Matsubara, Akira

    2010-02-01

    We have been developing an ultra high spatial resolution MRI, “MRI Microscope”, especially for 3He physics at ultra low temperature. The ultimate goal of our MRI Microscope is to achieve 1 μm×1 μm two dimensional spatial resolution comparable to optical microscopes. We constructed the MRI Microscope using a magnetic field of 7.2 T, with tri-axial magnetic field gradients of 2.0 T/m. We visualized the pure liquid 3He in a 230 μm diameter tube to study the effect of nonlinearity on the MRI Microscope at low temperature and in high magnetic fields. An MRI image was obtained at 0.22 MPa, 1 K with 1.8 μm×1.8 μm pixel size. At 65 mK, the MRI image became more blurred. We speculate that it was caused by large spin diffusion and nonlinearity.

  12. Distinguishing the Spending Preferences of Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Zachary; Chappell, Neena L.

    1996-01-01

    The consumer spending preferences of 1,406 senior Canadians were surveyed. Age distinguished those who had product-specific preferences. Income and health status separated those interested in recreational spending from those more interested in basic needs. Diversity of health and social characteristics in this population extends to their…

  13. Repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes

    PubMed Central

    Eller, C. Daniel; Regelson, Moira; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stan; Horvath, Steve; Marahrens, York

    2007-01-01

    Housekeeping genes are expressed across a wide variety of tissues. Since repetitive sequences have been reported to influence the expression of individual genes, we employed a novel approach to determine whether housekeeping genes can be distinguished from tissue-specific genes their repetitive sequence context. We show that Alu elements are more highly concentrated around housekeeping genes while various longer (>400-bp) repetitive sequences ("repeats"), including Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 (LINE-1) elements, are excluded from these regions. We further show that isochore membership does not distinguish housekeeping genes from tissue-specific genes and that repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes from tissue-specific genes in every isochore. The distinct repetitive sequence environment, in combination with other previously published sequence properties of housekeeping genes, were used to develop a method of predicting housekeeping genes on the basis of DNA sequence alone. Using expression across tissue types as a measure of success, we demonstrate that repetitive sequence environment is by far the most important sequence feature identified to date for distinguishing housekeeping genes. PMID:17141428

  14. Entropy of Mixing of Distinguishable Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozliak, Evguenii I.

    2014-01-01

    The molar entropy of mixing yields values that depend only on the number of mixing components rather than on their chemical nature. To explain this phenomenon using the logic of chemistry, this article considers mixing of distinguishable particles, thus complementing the well-known approach developed for nondistinguishable particles, for example,

  15. Distinguishing the hitchhiking and background selection models.

    PubMed Central

    Innan, Hideki; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    A simple method to distinguish hitchhiking and background selection is proposed. It is based on the observation that these models make different predictions about the average level of nucleotide diversity in regions of low recombination. The method is applied to data from Drosophila melanogaster and two highly selfing tomato species. PMID:14704207

  16. Children Distinguish between Positive Pride and Hubris

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Nicole L.; Russell, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Adults distinguish expressions of hubris from those of positive pride. To determine whether children (N = 183; 78-198 months old) make a similar distinction, we asked them to attribute emotion labels and a variety of social characteristics to dynamic expressions intended to convey hubris and positive pride. Like adults, children attributed

  17. Distinguishing Disability: Parents, Privilege, and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong-Dean, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Students in special education programs can have widely divergent experiences. For some, special education amounts to a dumping ground where schools unload their problem students, while for others, it provides access to services and accommodations that drastically improve chances of succeeding in school and beyond. "Distinguishing Disability"…

  18. Local distinguishability of generic unentangled orthonormal bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebl, Jiří; Shakeel, Asif; Wallach, Nolan

    2016-01-01

    An orthonormal basis consisting of unentangled (pure tensor) elements in a tensor product of Hilbert spaces is an unentangled orthonormal basis (UOB). In general, for n qubits, we prove that in its natural structure as a real variety, the space of UOB is a bouquet of products of Riemann spheres parametrized by a class of edge colorings of hypercubes. Its irreducible components of maximum dimension are products of 2n-1 two spheres. Using a theorem of Walgate and Hardy, we observe that the UOB whose elements are distinguishable by local operations and classical communication (called locally distinguishable or LOCC distinguishable UOB) are exactly those in the maximum dimensional components. Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. A 59, 1070 (1999)., 10.1103/PhysRevA.59.1070], in their in-depth study of quantum nonlocality without entanglement, include a specific three-qubit example UOB which is not LOCC distinguishable; we construct certain generalized counterparts of this UOB in n qubits.

  19. Characteristics of Distinguished Programs of Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkenholz, Robert J.; Simonsen, Jon C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic program rankings are highly anticipated by many university administrators, faculty, and alumni. This study analyzed the perceptions of agricultural education departmental contact persons to identify esteemed post-secondary agricultural education programs and the distinguishing characteristics of each program. The ten most distinguished…

  20. Entropy of Mixing of Distinguishable Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozliak, Evguenii I.

    2014-01-01

    The molar entropy of mixing yields values that depend only on the number of mixing components rather than on their chemical nature. To explain this phenomenon using the logic of chemistry, this article considers mixing of distinguishable particles, thus complementing the well-known approach developed for nondistinguishable particles, for example,…

  1. The Humanity of English. 1972 Distinguished Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of English, Urbana, IL.

    This is a collection of lectures by distinguished members of the English profession who were invited to lecture to schools located far from large urban and cultural centers. Included are papers by: John H. Fisher, "Truth Versus Beauty: An Inquiry into the Function of Language and Literature in an Articulate Society"; Walter Loban, "The Green

  2. Predictive Value of Imaging Markers at Multiple Sclerosis Disease Onset Based on Gadolinium- and USPIO-Enhanced MRI and Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Crimi, Alessandro; Commowick, Olivier; Maarouf, Adil; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Bannier, Elise; Tourbah, Ayman; Berry, Isabelle; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Edan, Gilles; Barillot, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A novel characterization of Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) patients according to lesion patterns is proposed. More specifically, patients are classified according to the nature of inflammatory lesions patterns. It is expected that this characterization can infer new prospective figures from the earliest imaging signs of Multiple Sclerosis (MS), since it can provide a classification of different types of lesions across patients. Methods The method is based on a two-tiered classification. Initially, the spatio-temporal lesion patterns are classified. The discovered lesion patterns are then used to characterize groups of patients. The patient groups are validated using statistical measures and by correlations at 24-month follow-up with hypointense lesion loads. Results The methodology identified 3 statistically significantly different clusters of lesion patterns showing p-values smaller than 0.01. Moreover, these patterns defined at baseline correlated with chronic hypointense lesion volumes by follow-up with an score of . Conclusions The proposed methodology is capable of identifying three major different lesion patterns that are heterogeneously present in patients, allowing a patient classification using only two MRI scans. This finding may lead to more accurate prognosis and thus to more suitable treatments at early stage of MS. PMID:24691080

  3. 10 CFR 1002.22 - Use of distinguishing flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of distinguishing flag. 1002.22 Section 1002.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICIAL SEAL AND DISTINGUISHING FLAG Distinguishing Flag § 1002.22 Use of distinguishing flag. (a) DOE distinguishing flags may be used only: (1) In the offices of...

  4. Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) and functional MRI in awake rabbits during somatosensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Matthew P; Weiss, Craig; Procissi, Daniel; Wang, Lei; Disterhoft, John F

    2016-02-01

    Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) is a powerful tool to track system-wide neural activity using high resolution, quantitative T1-weighted MRI in animal models and has significant advantages for investigating neural activity over other modalities including BOLD fMRI. With AIM-MRI, Mn(2+) ions enter neurons via voltage-gated calcium channels preferentially active during the time of experimental exposure. A broad range of AIM-MRI studies using different species studying different phenomena have been performed, but few of these studies provide a systematic evaluation of the factors influencing the detection of Mn(2+) such as dosage and the temporal characteristics of Mn(2+) uptake. We identified an optimal dose of Mn(2+) (25mg/kg, s.c.) in order to characterize the time-course of Mn(2+) accumulation in active neural regions in the rabbit. T1-weighted MRI and functional MRI were collected 0-3, 6-9, and 24-27h post-Mn(2+) injection while the vibrissae on the right side were vibrated. Significant BOLD activation in the left somatosensory (SS) cortex and left ventral posteromedial (VPM) thalamic nucleus was detected during whisker vibration. T1-weighted signal intensities were extracted from these regions, their corresponding contralateral regions and the visual cortex (to serve as controls). A significant elevation in T1-weighted signal intensity in the left SS cortex (relative to right) was evident 6-9 and 24-27h post-Mn(2+) injection while the left VPM thalamus showed a significant enhancement (relative to the right) only during the 24-27h session. Visual cortex showed no hemispheric difference at any timepoint. Our results suggest that studies employing AIM-MRI would benefit by conducting experimental manipulations 6-24h after subcutaneous MnCl2 injections to optimize the concentration of contrast agent in the regions active during the exposure. PMID:26589332

  5. MRI-Guided Vascular Access with an Active Visualization Needle

    PubMed Central

    Saikus, Christina E.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Barbash, Israel M.; Colyer, Jessica H.; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop an approach to vascular access under MRI, as a component of comprehensive MRI-guided cardiovascular catheterization and intervention. Materials and Methods We attempted jugular vein access in healthy pigs as a model of “difficult” vascular access. Procedures were performed under real-time MRI guidance using reduced field of view imaging. We developed an “active” MRI antenna-needle having an open-lumen, distinct tip appearance and indicators of depth and trajectory, in order to enhance MRI visibility during the procedure. We compared performance of the active needle against an unmodified commercial passively-visualized needle, measured by procedure success among operators with different levels of experience. Results MRI-guided central vein access was feasible using both the active needle and the unmodified passive needle. The active needle required less time (88 vs. 244 sec, p=0.022) and fewer needle passes (4.5 vs. 9.1, p=0.028), irrespective of operator experience. Conclusion MRI-guided access to central veins is feasible in our animal model. When image guidance is necessary for vascular access, performing this component under MRI will allow wholly MRI-guided catheterization procedures that do not require adjunctive imaging facilities such as X-ray or ultrasound. The active needle design showed enhanced visibility, as expected. These capabilities may permit more complex catheter-based cardiovascular interventional procedures enabled by enhanced image guidance. PMID:22006552

  6. T1-Weighted Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI as a Noninvasive Biomarker of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor vIII Status

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo-Perez, J.; Thomas, A.A.; Kaley, T.; Lyo, J.; Peck, K.K.; Holodny, A.I.; Mellinghoff, I.K.; Shi, W.; Zhang, Z.; Young, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III is a common mutation in glioblastoma, found in approximately 25% of tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III may accelerate angiogenesis in malignant gliomas. We correlated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion parameters with epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighty-two consecutive patients with glioblastoma and known epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status who had dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging before surgery were evaluated. Volumes of interest were drawn around the entire enhancing tumor on contrast T1-weighted images and then were transferred onto coregistered dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion maps. Histogram analysis with normalization was performed to determine the relative mean, 75th percentile, and 90th percentile values for plasma volume and contrast transfer coefficient. A Wilcoxon rank sum test was applied to assess the relationship between baseline perfusion parameters and positive epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. The receiver operating characteristic method was used to select the cutoffs of the dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion parameters. RESULTS Increased relative plasma volume and increased relative contrast transfer coefficient parameters were both significantly associated with positive epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. For epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–positive tumors, relative plasma volume mean was 9.3 and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean was 6.5; for epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–negative tumors, relative plasma volume mean was 3.6 and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean was 3.7 (relative plasma volume mean, P < .001, and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean, P = .008). The predictive powers of relative plasma volume histogram metrics outperformed those of the relative contrast transfer coefficient histogram metrics (P < = .004). CONCLUSIONS Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging shows greater perfusion and leakiness in epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–positive glioblastomas than in epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–negative glioblastomas, consistent with the known effect of epidermal growth factor receptor variant III on angiogenesis. Quantitative evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging may be useful as a noninvasive tool for correlating epidermal growth factor receptor variant III expression and related tumor neoangiogenesis. This potential may have implications for monitoring response to epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–targeted therapies. PMID:26338913

  7. Duality of quantum coherence and path distinguishability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Manabendra Nath; Qureshi, Tabish; Siddiqui, Mohd Asad; Pati, Arun Kumar

    2015-07-01

    We derive a generalized wave-particle duality relation for arbitrary multipath quantum interference phenomena. Beyond the conventional notion of the wave nature of a quantum system, i.e., the interference fringe visibility, we introduce a quantifier as the normalized quantum coherence, recently defined in the framework of quantum information theory. To witness the particle nature, we quantify the path distinguishability or the which-path information based on unambiguous quantum state discrimination. Then, the Bohr complementarity principle for multipath quantum interference can be stated as a duality relation between the quantum coherence and the path distinguishability. For two-path interference, the quantum coherence is identical to the interference fringe visibility, and the relation reduces to the well-known complementarity relation. The duality relation continues to hold in the case where mixedness is introduced due to possible decoherence effects.

  8. Gamma Oscillations Distinguish True From False Memories

    PubMed Central

    Sederberg, Per B.; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Madsen, Joseph R.; Bromfield, Edward B.; Litt, Brian; Brandt, Armin; Kahana, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    To test whether distinct patterns of electrophysiological activity prior to a response can distinguish true from false memories, we analyzed intracranial electroencephalographic recordings while 52 patients undergoing treatment for epilepsy performed a verbal free-recall task. These analyses revealed that the same pattern of gamma-band (28–100 Hz) oscillatory activity that predicts successful memory formation at item encoding—increased gamma power in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and left temporal lobe—reemerges at retrieval to distinguish correct from incorrect responses. The timing of these oscillatory effects suggests that self-cued memory retrieval begins in the hippocampus and then spreads to the cortex. Thus, retrieval of true, as compared with false, memories induces a distinct pattern of gamma oscillations, possibly reflecting recollection of contextual information associated with past experience. PMID:17958703

  9. Distinguishing Provenance Equivalence of Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Ye; Halem, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reproducibility of scientific research relies on accurate and precise citation of data and the provenance of that data. Earth science data are often the result of applying complex data transformation and analysis workflows to vast quantities of data. Provenance information of data processing is used for a variety of purposes, including understanding the process and auditing as well as reproducibility. Certain provenance information is essential for producing scientifically equivalent data. Capturing and representing that provenance information and assigning identifiers suitable for precisely distinguishing data granules and datasets is needed for accurate comparisons. This paper discusses scientific equivalence and essential provenance for scientific reproducibility. We use the example of an operational earth science data processing system to illustrate the application of the technique of cascading digital signatures or hash chains to precisely identify sets of granules and as provenance equivalence identifiers to distinguish data made in an an equivalent manner.

  10. Familial Identification: Population Structure and Relationship Distinguishability

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfs, Rori V.; Fullerton, Stephanie Malia; Weir, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    With the expansion of offender/arrestee DNA profile databases, genetic forensic identification has become commonplace in the United States criminal justice system. Implementation of familial searching has been proposed to extend forensic identification to family members of individuals with profiles in offender/arrestee DNA databases. In familial searching, a partial genetic profile match between a database entrant and a crime scene sample is used to implicate genetic relatives of the database entrant as potential sources of the crime scene sample. In addition to concerns regarding civil liberties, familial searching poses unanswered statistical questions. In this study, we define confidence intervals on estimated likelihood ratios for familial identification. Using these confidence intervals, we consider familial searching in a structured population. We show that relatives and unrelated individuals from population samples with lower gene diversity over the loci considered are less distinguishable. We also consider cases where the most appropriate population sample for individuals considered is unknown. We find that as a less appropriate population sample, and thus allele frequency distribution, is assumed, relatives and unrelated individuals become more difficult to distinguish. In addition, we show that relationship distinguishability increases with the number of markers considered, but decreases for more distant genetic familial relationships. All of these results indicate that caution is warranted in the application of familial searching in structured populations, such as in the United States. PMID:22346758

  11. MRI Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Related to Biologic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play a crucial role in the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several recent studies reveal a large number of MRI features related to the prognosis of HCC. In this review, we discuss various MRI features of HCC and their implications for the diagnosis and prognosis as imaging biomarkers. As a whole, the favorable MRI findings of HCC are small size, encapsulation, intralesional fat, high apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, and smooth margins or hyperintensity on the hepatobiliary phase of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI. Unfavorable findings include large size, multifocality, low ADC value, non-smooth margins or hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images. MRI findings are potential imaging biomarkers in patients with HCC. PMID:25995679

  12. MRI as a tool for the study of waterflooding processes in heterogeneous cores.

    PubMed

    Maddinelli, G; Brancolini, A

    1996-01-01

    NMR imaging has shown itself to be an important tool for improving analysis of flow behaviour during waterflooding in heterogeneous cores. Waterflooding is a widely employed technique in enhancing oil and gas recovery. However the success of such a process could be considerably reduced by instability of the displacing front with negative effects on production efficiency. MRI can be easily applied in evaluating the flow advancement because of its ability to distinguish different phases during dynamic experiments. In our study we have evaluated the shape of the displacing front during water injection in highly heterogeneous reservoir carbonates. The effect of petrographical heterogeneities which strongly characterize the rocks, revealed a marked influence on flow behaviour. Viscosity increase by polymer addition, in spite of a more favourable mobility ratio, resulted in a poorer performance because of higher channelling effects. The results of selected simulation experiments are discussed. PMID:8970109

  13. Detectability of MRI Turbulence in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, Richard; Semenov, Dmitry; Flock, Mario; Henning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the nurseries of planet formation. Within them, turbulence acts as a stirring mechanism, combining the large population of small grains successively into pebbles, planetesimals and eventually planetary cores. There are many tuburbulent mechanisms proposed to fulfil this role, however, current observations are not sufficient to distinguish one mechanism from the other.This poster looks at the hallmarks of magneto-rotational instabilities (MRI), which relies on the coupling of the gas to the magnetic fields of the disk. Previous attempts to determine the electron fraction necessary for MRI to be present are hampered by the lack of atomic ions observed in disks and a large uncertainty when scaling abundance molecualr ions which are readily observed.It has been shown with global-MHD models, however, that MRI turbulence can incite distinct azimuthal dependent strucutres in the gas of the disk. We explore the possibility of identifying this non-Keplerian nature of a disk's kinematical structure and discuss whether, through a mode analysis of the kinematic structure, one can isolate MRI tuburlence from other forms with full ALMA capabilities.

  14. Pharmacological enhancement of disc diffusion and differentiation of healthy, ageing and degenerated discs : Results from in-vivo serial post-contrast MRI studies in 365 human lumbar discs.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, S; Venkatadass, K; Naresh Babu, J; Ganesh, K; Shetty, Ajoy P

    2008-05-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is still a poorly understood phenomenon because of the lack of availability of precise definition of healthy, ageing and degenerated discs. Decreased nutrition is the final common pathway for DDD and the status of the endplate (EP) plays a crucial role in controlling the extent of diffusion, which is the only source of nutrition. The vascular channels in the subchondral plate have muscarinic receptors but the possibility of enhancing diffusion pharmacologically by dilation of these vessels has not been probed. Although it is well accepted that EP damage will affect diffusion and thereby nutrition, there is no described method to quantify the extent of EP damage. Precise definitions with an objective method of differentiating healthy, ageing and degenerated discs on the basis of anatomical integrity of the disc and physiological basis of altered nutrition will be useful. This information is an urgent necessity for better understanding of DDD and also strategizing prevention and treatment. Seven hundred and thirty endplates of 365 lumbar discs from 73 individuals (26 healthy volunteers and 47 patients) with age ranging from 10-64 years were evaluated by pre-contrast and 10 min, 2, 4, 6 and 12 h post contrast MRI after IV injection of 0.3 mmol/kg of Gadodiamide. End plates were classified according to the extent of damage into six grades and an incremental score was given for each category. A total endplate score (TEPS) was derived by adding the EP score of the two endplates for each concerned disc. The base line value (SI(base)) and the signal intensity at particular time periods were used to derive the enhancement percentage for each time period (Enhancement (%) = SI(tp) - SI(base)/SI(base) x 100). The enhancement percentage for each time period, the time for peak enhancement (T-max) and the time intensity curve (TIC) over 12 h were used to study and compare the diffusion characteristics. The differences in pattern of diffusion were obvious visually at 4 h which was categorized into five patterns-Pattern A representing normal diffusion to Pattern E representing a total abnormality in diffusion. Degeneration was classified according to Pfirrmann's grading and this was correlated to the TEPS and the alterations in diffusion patterns. The relationship of TEPS on the increase in DDD was evaluated by a logistic curve and the cut point for severe DDD was found by ROC curve. The influence of the variables of age, level, Modic changes, instability, annulus fibrosis defect (DEBIT), TEPS and diffusion patterns on DDD was analyzed by multiple and stepwise regression analysis. Oral nimodipine study: Additional forty lumbar end-plates from four young healthy volunteers were studied to document the effect of oral nimodipine. Pre-drug diffusion levels were studied by pre and post contrast MRI (0.3 mmol/kg of gadodiamide) at 10 min, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h. Oral nimodipine was administered (30 mg QID) for 5 days and post-contrast MRI studies were performed similarly. Enhancement was calculated at vertebral body-VB; subchondral bone-SCB; Endplate Zone-EPZ and at superior and inferior peripheral nucleus pulposus-PNP and central nucleus pulposus-CNP, using appropriate cursors by a blinded investigator. Paired sample t test and area under curve (AUC) measurements were done.The incidence of disc degeneration had a significant correlation with increasing TEPS (Trend Chi-square, P < 0.01). Only one out of 83 (1.2%) disc had either Pfirrmann Grade IV or V when the score was 4 or below when compared to 34/190 (17.9%) for scores 5-7; 41 of 72 (56.9%) for scores 8-10 and 18 of 20 (90%) for scores 11 and 12 (P < 0.001 for all groups). Pearson's correlation between TEPS and DDD was statistically significant, irrespective of the level of disc or different age groups (r value was above 0.6 and P < 0.01 for all age groups). Logistic curve fit analysis and ROC curve analysis showed that the incidence of DDD increased abruptly when the TEPS crossed six. With a progressive increase of end plate damage, five different patterns of diffusion were visualized. Pattern D and E represented totally altered diffusion pattern questioning the application of biological method of treatment in such situations. Four types of time intensity curves (TIC) were noted which helped to differentiate between healthy, aged and degenerated discs. Multiple and stepwise regression analysis indicated that pattern of disc diffusion and TEPS to be the most significant factors influencing DDD, irrespective of age. Nimodipine increased the average signal intensity for all regions-by 7.6% for VB, 8% for SCB and EPZ and 11% for CNP at all time intervals (P < 0.01 for all cases). Although the increase was high at all time intervals, the maximum increase was at 2 h for VB, SCB and EPZ; 4 h for PNP and 12 h for CNP. It was also interesting that post-nimodipine, the peak signal intensity was attained early, was higher and maintained longer compared to pre-nimodipine values. Our study has helped to establish that EP damage as a crucial event leading to structural failure thereby precipitating DDD. An EP damage score has been devised which had a good correlation to DDD and discs with a score of six and above can be considered 'at risk' for severe DDD. New data on disc diffusion patterns were obtained which may help to differentiate healthy, ageing and degenerated discs in in-vivo conditions. This is also the first study to document an increase in diffusion of human lumbar discs by oral nimodipine and poses interesting possibility of pharmacological enhancement of lumbar disc nutrition. PMID:18357472

  15. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Spehner, Dominique

    2014-07-15

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  16. Characteristics that distinguish types of epithermal deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.; Foley, N.K.; Heald-Wetlaufer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Three distinctive groupings of epithermal deposits were recognized from a literature study of fifteen well-described precious- and base-metal epithermal districts, supplemented by L. J. Buchanan's 1981 compilation of data from 47 less completely documented deposits. The three groups are distinguished primarily by the type of alteration and the sulfur fugacity indicated by the vein mineral assemblage. Additional discriminating criteria include composition of the host rock, timing of ore deposition relative to emplacement of the host, and relative abundances of gold, silver, and base metals.

  17. Can cosmic parallax distinguish between anisotropic cosmologies?

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanini, Michele; West, Eric J.; Trodden, Mark

    2009-12-15

    In an anisotropic universe, observers not positioned at a point of special symmetry should observe cosmic parallax--the relative angular motion of test galaxies over cosmic time. It was recently argued that the nonobservance of this effect in upcoming precision astrometry missions such as GAIA may be used to place strong bounds on the position of off-center observers in a void-model universe described by the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. We consider the analogous effect in anisotropic cosmological models described by an axisymmetric homogeneous Bianchi type I metric and discuss whether any observation of cosmic parallax would distinguish between different anisotropic evolutions.

  18. Hybrid-SPRITE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2013-10-01

    In a FID based frequency encoding MRI experiment the central part of k-space is not generally accessible due to the probe dead time. This portion of k-space is however crucial for image reconstruction. SPRITE (Single Point Ramped Imaging with T1 Enhancement), SPI with a linearly ramped phase encode gradient, has been employed to image short relaxation time systems for many years with great success. It is a robust imaging method in significant measure because it provides acquisition of high quality k-space origin data. We propose a new sampling scheme, termed hybrid-SPRITE, combining phase and frequency encoding to ensure high quality images with reduced acquisition times, reduced gradient duty cycle and increased sensitivity. In hybrid-SPRITE, numerous time domain points are collected to assist image reconstruction. An Inverse Non-uniform Discrete Fourier Transform (INDFT) is employed in 1D applications. A pseudo-polar grid is exploited in 2D hybrid-SPRITE for rapid and accurate image reconstruction.

  19. Ex vivo MRI evaluation of breast tumors: a novel tool for verifying resection of nonpalpable only MRI detected lesions.

    PubMed

    Agresti, Roberto; Trecate, Giovanna; Ferraris, Cristina; Valeri, Barbara; Maugeri, Ilaria; Pellitteri, Cristina; Martelli, Gabriele; Migliavacca, Silvana; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Bohm, Silvia; Maffioli, Lorenzo; Vergnaghi, Daniele; Panizza, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental question in surgery of only magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected breast lesions is to ensure their removal when they are not palpable by clinical examination and surgical exploration. This is especially relevant in the case of small tumors, carcinoma in situ or lobular carcinoma. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled in the study, 21 patients with breast lesions detected by both conventional imaging and breast MRI (bMRI) and 18 patients with bMRI findings only. Preoperative bMRI allowed staging the disease and localizing the lesion. In the operating theater, contrast medium was injected 1 minute before skin incision. After removal, surgical specimens were submitted to ex vivo MRI, performed using a dedicated surface coil and Spair inversion recovery sequences for suppression of fat signal intensity. All MRI enhancing lesions were completely included within the surgical specimen and visualized by ex vivo MRI. In the first 21 patients, bMRI was able to visualize branching margins or satellite nodules around the core lesion, and allowed for better staging of the surrounding in situ carcinoma; in the last 18 patients, eight of whom were breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA) mutation carriers, bMRI identified 12 malignant tumors, otherwise undetectable, that were all visualized by ex vivo MRI. This is the first description of a procedure that re-enhances breast lesions within a surgical specimen, demonstrating the surgical removal of nonpalpable breast lesions diagnosed only with bMRI. This new strategy reproduces the morphology and the entire extension of the primary lesion on the specimen, with potentially better local surgical control, reducing additional unplanned surgery. PMID:24102850

  20. Direct MRI detection of impending plaque development in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Absinta, Martina; Nair, Govind; Sati, Pascal; Cortese, Irene C.M.; Filippi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To detect and localize MRI signal changes prior to the parenchymal contrast enhancement that classically defines the radiologic onset of the developing white matter lesion in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We reviewed 308 high-resolution (≤1 mm3 voxels) MRI scans at 3T and 7T in 29 patients with active MS. The presence of pre-parenchymal enhancement abnormalities before the appearance of parenchymal enhancement was evaluated in all available scans. Results: Pre-enhancement signal changes were noted in 26 of 162 enhancing lesions (16%) as linear enhancement of the central vein and/or perivenular hyperintense signal on T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery or T2* images. They occur up to 2 months before focal enhancement within the parenchyma in 10% of cases. Conclusions: In some lesions, the abrupt opening of the blood-brain barrier, detected by contrast enhancement on MRI, can have directly visible antecedent MRI changes centered on the central vein. We propose that these findings might be the basis for prior reports of subtle pre-parenchymal enhancement changes in quantitative MRI indices. In line with the venulocentric model of lesion development, our findings are consistent with the centrality of early perivenular events in lesion formation in vivo. PMID:26401516

  1. Distinguished trajectories in time-dependent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Madrid, José Antonio; Mancho, Ana Maria

    2007-11-01

    The theory of dynamical systems has provided recently a good framework to describe transport in time dependent aperiodic flows. It was first applied to Lagrangian transport in the context of 2D time-periodic flows and stationary 3D flows. Recently these techniques have been extended to describe aperiodic flows. Mathematical theory for aperiodic time dependent flows is far from being completely developed. In the context of stationary flows the idea of fixed point is a keystone to describe geometrically the solutions. It is extended to time periodic flows, as periodic orbits become fixed points on the Poincar'e map. Recent articles by Ide et al. and Ju et al. provide an important step-forwards to extend the concept of hyperbolic fixed point to aperiodic dynamical systems. Following these ideas, we propose a new formal definition of Distinguished trajectory (DT) in aperiodic flows. We numerically test this definition in forced Duffing type flows with known exact distinguished trajectories. The definition accurately locates these trajectories. We also check the defintion for examples of aperiodic flows in oceanographic contexts and we find that it overcomes some technical difficulties of former approaches.

  2. Techniques to Distinguish Apoptosis from Necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Feoktistova, Maria; Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Geserick, Peter; Leverkus, Martin; Meier, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The processes by which cells die are as tightly regulated as those that govern cell growth and proliferation. Recent studies of the molecular pathways that regulate and execute cell death have uncovered a plethora of signaling cascades that lead to distinct modes of cell death, including "apoptosis," "necrosis," "autophagic cell death," and "mitotic catastrophe." Cells can readily switch from one form of death to another; therefore, it is vital to have the ability to monitor the form of death that cells are undergoing. A number of techniques are available that allow the detection of cell death and when combined with either knockdown approaches or inhibitors of specific signaling pathways, such as caspase or RIP kinase pathways, they allow the rapid dissection of divergent cell death pathways. However, techniques that reveal the end point of cell death cannot reconstruct the sequence of events that have led to death; therefore, they need to be complemented with methods that can distinguish all forms of cell death. Apoptotic cells frequently undergo secondary necrosis under in vitro culture conditions; therefore, novel methods relying on high-throughput time-lapse fluorescence video microscopy are necessary to provide temporal resolution to cell death events. Further, visualizing the assembly of multiprotein signaling hubs that can execute apoptosis or necroptosis helps to explore the underlying processes. Here we introduce a suite of techniques that reliably distinguish necrosis from apoptosis and secondary necrosis, and that enable investigation of signaling platforms capable of instructing apoptosis or necroptosis. PMID:27037077

  3. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss - A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms. PMID:27078034

  4. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of folate-receptor-targeted SPION-polymer micelle hybrids for MRI contrast enhancement in cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Shveta; Koul, Veena; Choudhary, Veena; Shishodia, Gauri; Bharti, Alok C.

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-SPION hybrids were investigated for receptor-mediated localization in tumour tissue. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prepared by high-temperature decomposition of iron acetylacetonate were monodisperse (9.27 ± 3.37 nm), with high saturation magnetization of 76.8 emu g-1. Amphiphilic copolymers prepared from methyl methacrylate and PEG methacrylate by atom transfer radical polymerization were conjugated with folic acid (for folate-receptor specificity). The folate-conjugated polymer had a low critical micellar concentration (0.4 mg l-1), indicating stability of the micellar formulation. SPION-polymeric micelle clusters were prepared by desolvation of the SPION dispersion/polymer solution in water. Magnetic resonance imaging of the formulation revealed very good contrast enhancement, with transverse (T2) relaxivity of 260.4 mM-1 s-1. The biological evaluation of the SPION micelles included cellular viability assay (MTT) and uptake in HeLa cells. These studies demonstrated the potential use of these nanoplatforms for imaging and targeting.

  5. Spatial memory training induces morphological changes detected by manganese-enhanced MRI in the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminal zone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Binbin; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Tjio, Ci'en; Chen, Way Cherng; Sheu, Fwu-Shan; Routtenberg, Aryeh

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs) can show plasticity of their axon terminal arbor consequent to learning a spatial memory task. Such plasticity is seen as translaminar sprouting from the stratum lucidum (SL) of CA3 into the stratum pyramidale (SP) and the stratum oriens (SO). However, the functional role of this presynaptic remodeling is still obscure. In vivo imaging that allows longitudinal observation of such remodeling could provide a deeper understanding of this presynaptic growth phenomenon as it occurs over time. Here we used manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), which shows a high-contrast area that co-localizes with the MFs. This technique was applied in the detection of learning-induced MF plasticity in two strains of rats. Quantitative analysis of a series of sections in the rostral dorsal hippocampus showed increases in the CA3a' area in MEMRI of trained Wistar rats consistent with the increased SO+SP area seen in the Timm's staining. MF plasticity was not seen in the trained Lister-Hooded rats in either MEMRI or in Timm's staining. This indicates the potential of MEMRI for revealing neuro-architectures and plasticity of the hippocampal MF system in vivo in longitudinal studies. PMID:26254115

  6. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss - A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms. PMID:27078034

  7. Hyperpolarized xenon in NMR and MRI.

    PubMed

    Oros, Ana-Maria; Shah, N Jon

    2004-10-21

    Hyperpolarized gases have found a steadily increasing range of applications in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NMR imaging (MRI). They can be regarded as a new class of MR contrast agent or as a way of greatly enhancing the temporal resolution of the measurement of processes relevant to areas as diverse as materials science and biomedicine. We concentrate on the properties and applications of hyperpolarized xenon. This review discusses the physics of producing hyperpolarization, the NMR-relevant properties of 129Xe, specific MRI methods for hyperpolarized gases, applications of xenon to biology and medicine, polarization transfer to other nuclear species and low-field imaging. PMID:15566166

  8. Inequality indicators and distinguishability in economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblatt, J.; Martinás, K.

    2008-03-01

    Money has a material counterpart, such as banknotes or coins, and an ideal expression, monetary units. In the latter case, it is boson-like: individual incomes have no a priori limit, and their units are not distinguishable from each other in economic processes. Individuals, on the other hand, usually occupy one job at a time which makes them akin to fermions. We apply to individual incomes down-to-earth statistical calculations, similar to those for quantum particles, and obtain expressions for the cumulative distribution function, probability density and Lorenz function resulting from the simultaneous use of both statistics. They provide extremely good fits to corresponding data on French income distributions. On this basis, we propose a new entropic inequality indicator.

  9. Distinguishing Asthma Phenotypes Using Machine Learning Approaches.

    PubMed

    Howard, Rebecca; Rattray, Magnus; Prosperi, Mattia; Custovic, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is not a single disease, but an umbrella term for a number of distinct diseases, each of which are caused by a distinct underlying pathophysiological mechanism. These discrete disease entities are often labelled as 'asthma endotypes'. The discovery of different asthma subtypes has moved from subjective approaches in which putative phenotypes are assigned by experts to data-driven ones which incorporate machine learning. This review focuses on the methodological developments of one such machine learning technique-latent class analysis-and how it has contributed to distinguishing asthma and wheezing subtypes in childhood. It also gives a clinical perspective, presenting the findings of studies from the past 5 years that used this approach. The identification of true asthma endotypes may be a crucial step towards understanding their distinct pathophysiological mechanisms, which could ultimately lead to more precise prevention strategies, identification of novel therapeutic targets and the development of effective personalized therapies. PMID:26143394

  10. Distinguishing Feedback Mechanisms in Clock Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Alexander; Lubensky, David

    Biological oscillators are very diverse but can be classified based on dynamical motifs such as type of feedback. The S. Elongatus circadian oscillator is a novel circadian oscillator that can operate at constant protein number by modifying covalent states. It can be reproduced in vitro with only 3 different purified proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. We use computational and analytic techniques to compare models of the S. Elongatus post-translational oscillator that rely on positive feedback with models that rely on negative feedback. We show that introducing a protein that binds competitively with KaiA to the KaiB-KaiC complex can distinguish between positive and negative feedback as the primary driver of the rhythm, which has so far been difficult to address experimentally. NSF Grant DMR-1056456.

  11. Non-invasive breast biopsy method using GD-DTPA contrast enhanced MRI series and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso William

    This study was undertaken to develop a nonsurgical breast biopsy from Gd-DTPA Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance (CE-MR) images and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. A five-step process was developed to accomplish this. (1) Dynamic PET series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using a finite element method (FEM) based registration that requires fiducial skin markers to sample the displacement field between image frames. A commercial FEM package (ANSYS) was used for meshing and FEM calculations. Dynamic PET image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements SAVD and NCC. (2) Dynamic CE-MR series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using two registration methods: a multi-resolution free-form deformation (FFD) registration driven by normalized mutual information, and a FEM-based registration method. Dynamic CE-MR image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements, localization measurements, and qualitative comparison of motion artifacts. FFD registration was found to be superior to FEM-based registration. (3) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the PET/CT volume of activity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartmental Patlak model. Three parameters for this model were fitted; two of them describe the activity levels in the blood and in the cellular compartment, while the third characterizes the washout rate of F-18-FDG from the cellular compartment. (4) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the MR volume of signal intensity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartment Brix model. Three parameters for this model were fitted: rate of Gd exiting the compartment, representing the extracellular space of a lesion; rate of Gd exiting a blood compartment; and a parameter that characterizes the strength of signal intensities. Curve fitting used for PET/CT and MR series was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt nonlinear regression algorithm. The best-fit parameters were used to create 3D parametric images. Compartmental modeling evaluation was based on the ability of parameter values to differentiate between tissue types. This evaluation was used on registered and unregistered image series and found that registration improved results. (5) PET and MR parametric images were registered through FEM- and FFD-based registration. Parametric image registration was evaluated using similarity measurements, target registration error, and qualitative comparison. Comparing FFD and FEM-based registration results showed that the FEM method is superior. This five-step process constitutes a novel multifaceted approach to a nonsurgical breast biopsy that successfully executes each step. Comparison of this method to biopsy still needs to be done with a larger set of subject data.

  12. Misleading FLAIR imaging pattern after glioma surgery with intraoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Lescher, Stephanie; Jurcoane, Alina; Schniewindt, Sonja; Senft, Christian; Hattingen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) allows a more detailed appreciation of the extent of resection than does conventional neurosurgery and results in longer overall survival in patients with malignant glioma. However, it is unknown whether the intraoperative application of contrast agent influences the early postsurgical MRI. The preceding iMRI could alter the signals of MR sequences in the early postsurgical MRI, especially in sequences influenced by T1 contrast. Hereby, we investigate such iMRI-induced influences on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. We retrospectively analyzed postsurgical T2w, T1w, and FLAIR images by visual inspection and by signal measurements in 46 patients with malignant gliomas after tumor resection. Of these, n = 25 patients were operated with conventional microsurgery, and n = 21 patients were operated with contrast-enhanced iMRI-guided microsurgery. We measured signal intensity in the resection cavity, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the ventricles, and in the normal brain tissue contralateral to the tumor-bearing hemisphere on axial FLAIR images and T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. In 18 patients, the FLAIR sequence revealed hyperintense signal changes of the CSF in the subarachnoid or ventricular spaces. Seventeen of these 18 patients had received intraoperative MRI. In both FLAIR and T1-weighted images, the signal of the CSF in the ventricles was significantly higher in patients with iMRI than in patients without iMRI. The intraoperative application of contrast agent that is used for iMRI significantly influences postsurgical MRI within the first 72 h. We found hyperintense signal changes of the CSF in the FLAIR sequence in the subarachnoid and intraventricular spaces mimicking subarachnoid hemorrhage. The findings may result in a misdiagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in these patients. PMID:26201972

  13. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  14. Benchmarking the ERG valve tip and MRI Interventions Smart Flow neurocatheter convection-enhanced delivery system's performance in a gel model of the brain: employing infusion protocols proposed for gene therapy for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillay, Karl; Schomberg, Dominic; Hinchman, Angelica; Kumbier, Lauren; Ross, Chris; Kubota, Ken; Brodsky, Ethan; Miranpuri, Gurwattan

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an advanced infusion technique used to deliver therapeutic agents into the brain. CED has shown promise in recent clinical trials. Independent verification of published parameters is warranted with benchmark testing of published parameters in applicable models such as gel phantoms, ex vivo tissue and in vivo non-human animal models to effectively inform planned and future clinical therapies. In the current study, specific performance characteristics of two CED infusion catheter systems, such as backflow, infusion cloud morphology, volume of distribution (mm3) versus the infused volume (mm3) (Vd/Vi) ratios, rate of infusion (µl min-1) and pressure (mmHg), were examined to ensure published performance standards for the ERG valve-tip (VT) catheter. We tested the hypothesis that the ERG VT catheter with an infusion protocol of a steady 1 µl min-1 functionality is comparable to the newly FDA approved MRI Interventions Smart Flow (SF) catheter with the UCSF infusion protocol in an agarose gel model. In the gel phantom models, no significant difference was found in performance parameters between the VT and SF catheter. We report, for the first time, such benchmark characteristics in CED between these two otherwise similar single-end port VT with stylet and end-port non-stylet infusion systems. Results of the current study in agarose gel models suggest that the performance of the VT catheter is comparable to the SF catheter and warrants further investigation as a tool in the armamentarium of CED techniques for eventual clinical use and application.

  15. MRI 3D tissue temperature distribution measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yichao; Gnyawali, Surya C.; Liu, Hong; Tesiram, Yasvir A.; Abbott, Andrew; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    A highly accurate, fast three-dimensional in vivo temperature mapping method is developed using MRI water photon chemical shift. It is important to have the precise temperature distribution information during laser-tissue thermal treatment. Several methods can be used for temperature measurement including thermal couple, optical fiber sensor, and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) methods. MRI is the only feasible method for 3D in vivo, non-invasive temperature distribution measurement for laser-tissue interaction. The water proton chemical shift method is used in 3D MRI mapping. Varies MRI parameters, such as flip angle, TE, TR, spatial resolution, and temporal repetition, were optimized for the temperature mapping. The laser radiation of 805nm wavelength and a light-absorbing dye, indocyanine green (ICG) was used for temperature elevation. The measurement was conducted using gel phantom, chicken tissue and rats. The phantom system was constructed with a dye-enhanced spherical gel embedded in uniform gel phantom, simulating a tumor within normal tissue. The normal temperature elevation within ex vivo tissue such as chicken breast can reach up to 45-50 degree C with a power density of 1.3W/cm2 (with laser power of 3W and 1.7cm beam size). The temperature resolution is 0.37 degree C with a 0.2-mm spatial resolution and repetition rate of around 40 seconds. The external magnetic field drift effect is also evaluated.

  16. Abdominal MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... such as too much radiation exposure and allergic reactions to iodine. In some cases it can give ...

  17. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  18. MRI of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI may examine water molecules motion (called water diffusion) and blood flow (called perfusion imaging) within the ... can be helpful in identifying prostate cancer. MR diffusion and MR perfusion imaging can evaluate other tissue ...

  19. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  20. Separating subjective emotion from the perception of emotion-inducing stimuli: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Amy S; Maddock, Richard J

    2006-10-15

    fMRI was used to dissociate neural responses temporally associated with the subjective experience of emotion from those associated with the perception of emotion-inducing stimuli in order to better define the emotion-related functions of the amygdala, lateral orbital frontal cortex (OFC), and hippocampus. Subjects viewed aversive pictures followed by an extended post-stimulus period of sustained subjective emotion. Brain regions showing activation paralleling the period of sustained subjective emotion were distinguished from those showing activation limited to the period of aversive picture presentation. Behavioral results showed that subjective ratings of emotion remained elevated for 20 s after offset of the aversive pictures. fMRI results showed that viewing aversive pictures activated the amygdala, lateral OFC, and hippocampus. Subjective emotion (present both during and after aversive pictures) was temporally associated with activation in the right lateral OFC and left hippocampus but not the amygdala. Ratings of subjective emotion were correlated with activation in the right lateral OFC and left hippocampus. The results support direct amygdala involvement in emotion perception but suggest that amygdala activation is not temporally associated with subjective emotion that occurs after the offset of emotion-related stimuli. The results are consistent with a general role for the lateral OFC in monitoring or reflecting on internal experience and show that hippocampal activation is sustained during a period of subjective emotion, possibly related to enhanced memory encoding for the aversive pictures. PMID:16908199

  1. Optogenetic Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  2. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Robert E. Ployhart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Robert E. Ployhart, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for innovative work in examining reactions to staffing practices and efforts to enhance the acceptability of recruitment and staffing practices; for exemplary use of applied statistical models in examining multilevel effects…

  3. Distinguishing Solar Cycle Effects in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2008-12-01

    As solar radiation decreases with distance from the Sun, other sources of energy, such as ionization from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), assume a greater relative importance than at the terrestrial planets. Charged particle effects could therefore be more relevant to the formation of clouds and haze at the outer planets. The long-term solar modulation of Neptune's albedo is thought to be caused by either ion-induced nucleation of cloud-forming particles, or ultraviolet (UV) radiation effects on the colour of the clouds. On the basis of the 11 year solar cycle, the statistical evidence was slightly in favour of the UV mechanism, however distinguishing unambiguously between the two mechanisms will require more than the solar cycle variation alone. A 1.68 year quasi-periodicity, uniquely present at some times from heliospheric modulation of GCR, has previously been used to discriminate between solar UV and GCR effects in terrestrial data. The cosmic ray proton monitor data from both the Voyager spacecraft show this 1.68 year modulation during the 1980s when the spacecraft were close to the outer planets, indicating the possibility for applying a similar technique as far out as Neptune.

  4. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Tapan, mit; zbayrak, Mustafa; Tatl?, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  5. Diffusion-Weighted and Gd-EOB-DTPA–Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Characterization of Tumor Necrosis in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Josephina A.; Buijs, Manon; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.; Liap, Eleni; Ventura, Veronica Prieto; Lee, Kwang Hun; Bluemke, David A; Kamel, Ihab R

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining tumor necrosis and contrast-enhanced MRI using gadoxetic acid disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) in determining maximum tumor size measurement and tumor delineation compared with criterion-standard histologic measurements in the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Materials and Methods VX2 tumors were implanted in the livers of 13 rabbits. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner and an extremity coil. The imaging protocol included T2-weighted fast spin-echo images, 3-dimensional T1-weighted spoiled gradient-echo with and without fat suppression after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA, and diffusion-weighted echo planar images. Rabbits were killed, and the tumor was harvested and sliced at 4-mm intervals in the axial plane. The MRI parameters evaluated were tumor size, tumor delineation, and tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Histologic sections were evaluated to quantify tumor necrosis. Results On contrast-enhanced MRI (obtained from 11 rabbits), the mean tumor sizes were 20, 19, and 20 mm in the arterial, portal venous, and delayed phases, respectively. Tumor delineation was most distinguishable in the delayed phase. On diffusion-weighted MRI (acquired in 13 rabbits), the mean tumor ADC value was 1.84 × 10−3 mm2/s. The mean tumor size at pathology was 16 mm. The mean percent necrosis at the tumor’s pathologic condition was 36%. The correlation between ADC value and percent necrosis showed an R value of 0.68. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA may provide additional information about tumor outline in the liver. More-over, we showed a remarkable correlation between ADC values and tumor necrosis. Thus, diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful to assess tumor necrosis; nevertheless, the search for new modalities remains important. PMID:19638862

  6. Double Meniscal Ossicle, the First Description: CT and MRI Findings—Different Etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Puneeth; Dey, Amit Kumar; Mittal, Kartik; Sharma, Rajaram; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 2 ossicles in the medial meniscus with emphasis on MRI and CT findings. Meniscal ossicle is a rare entity and is quite uncommon on the medial side. By showing the typical signal characteristics and intrameniscal location, MRI can be helpful in distinguishing this from other more clinically significant abnormalities. It should be kept as differential from synovial chondromatosis or sesamoid bones like fabella as management is different for all of these entities. PMID:26788396

  7. MRI of common and uncommon pathologies involving the periportal space: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine U; Glockner, James F

    2016-01-01

    Imaging detection and differential diagnoses of pathology involving the periportal space can be challenging. MRI is a useful technique for assessment of the periportal space since it readily distinguishes normal and abnormal vascular and biliary anatomy, and the excellent soft tissue discrimination allows for detection of subtle lesions. This pictorial essay describes the anatomy of the periportal space and illustrates the MRI appearance of a variety of pathologies that can affect this region. PMID:26830621

  8. LDRD 149045 final report distinguishing documents.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott A.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD 149045 final report describes work that Sandians Scott A. Mitchell, Randall Laviolette, Shawn Martin, Warren Davis, Cindy Philips and Danny Dunlavy performed in 2010. Prof. Afra Zomorodian provided insight. This was a small late-start LDRD. Several other ongoing efforts were leveraged, including the Networks Grand Challenge LDRD, and the Computational Topology CSRF project, and the some of the leveraged work is described here. We proposed a sentence mining technique that exploited both the distribution and the order of parts-of-speech (POS) in sentences in English language documents. The ultimate goal was to be able to discover 'call-to-action' framing documents hidden within a corpus of mostly expository documents, even if the documents were all on the same topic and used the same vocabulary. Using POS was novel. We also took a novel approach to analyzing POS. We used the hypothesis that English follows a dynamical system and the POS are trajectories from one state to another. We analyzed the sequences of POS using support vector machines and the cycles of POS using computational homology. We discovered that the POS were a very weak signal and did not support our hypothesis well. Our original goal appeared to be unobtainable with our original approach. We turned our attention to study an aspect of a more traditional approach to distinguishing documents. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) turns documents into bags-of-words then into mixture-model points. A distance function is used to cluster groups of points to discover relatedness between documents. We performed a geometric and algebraic analysis of the most popular distance functions and made some significant and surprising discoveries, described in a separate technical report.

  9. Distinguishing between active and passive euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Gert, B; Culver, C M

    1986-02-01

    The standard ways of distinguishing between active and passive euthanasia, act versus omission, and removal of ordinary versus removal of extraordinary care, do not have any clear moral significance. We have used particular aspects of the physician-patient relationship to make a morally significant distinction between active and passive euthanasia. Passive euthanasia is defined as the physician's abiding by the rational valid refusal of life-sustaining treatment of a patient or his surrogate decision-maker. Understanding passive euthanasia in this way makes it clear why, everything else being equal, there is no morally significant difference between discontinuing a treatment and not starting it, for example, taking a patient off a respirator versus not putting him on in the first place. It also makes clear why stopping the feeding and hydration of some patients is not merely morally permissible but is morally required. Patients may make a rational valid refusal of food and fluids just as they may of other kinds of life support, and what patients rationally refuse when competent holds its force when they become incompetent. By basing the distinction between active and passive euthanasia on the universally recognized moral force of a rational valid refusal, we have provided a clear foundation for the moral significance of this distinction. Our way of making the distinction preserves for patients the control over their lives that has sometimes been unjustifiably taken from them. It also eases the burden on doctors who no longer are forced to make use of ad hoc and confused distinctions in which they justifiably have little faith.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3082503

  10. Distinguishing dynamical dark matter at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Su, Shufang; Thomas, Brooks

    2012-09-01

    Dynamical dark matter (DDM) is a new framework for dark-matter physics in which the dark sector comprises an ensemble of individual component fields which collectively conspire to act in ways that transcend those normally associated with dark matter. Because of its nontrivial structure, this DDM ensemble—unlike most traditional dark-matter candidates—cannot be characterized in terms of a single mass, decay width, or set of scattering cross sections, but must instead be described by parameters which describe the collective behavior of its constituents. Likewise, the components of such an ensemble need not be stable so long as lifetimes are balanced against cosmological abundances across the ensemble as a whole. In this paper, we investigate the prospects for identifying a DDM ensemble at the LHC and for distinguishing such a dark-matter candidate from the candidates characteristic of traditional dark-matter models. In particular, we focus on DDM scenarios in which the component fields of the ensemble are produced at colliders alongside some number of standard-model particles via the decays of additional heavy fields. The invariant-mass distributions of these standard-model particles turn out to possess several unique features that cannot be replicated in most traditional dark-matter models. We demonstrate that in many situations it is possible to differentiate between a DDM ensemble and a traditional dark-matter candidate on the basis of such distributions. Moreover, many of our results also apply more generally to a variety of other extensions of the standard model which involve multiple stable or metastable neutral particles.

  11. How do recovery definitions distinguish recovering individuals?

    PubMed Central

    Witbrodt, Jane; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Grella, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Six percent of American adults say they are “in recovery” from an alcohol or drug problem yet only a scant emergent literature has begun to ask how they define “recovery” or explored whether there is heterogeneity among their definitions. Methods Secondary analysis of the What Is Recovery? online survey employed Latent Class Analysis (LCA) to identify typologies of study participants based on their actual endorsement of 39 recovery elements and to compare the composition of these typologies in terms of distinguishing personal characteristics. Results A 5-class solution provided the best fit and conceptual representation for the recovery definitions. Classes were labeled 12-Step Traditionalist (n=4912); 12-Step Enthusiast (n=2014); Secular (n=980); Self-Reliant (n=1040); and Atypical (n=382) based on patterns of endorsement of the recovery elements. Abstinence, spiritual, and social interaction elements differentiated the classes most (as did age and recovery duration but to a lesser extent). Although levels and patterns of endorsement to the elements varied by class, a rank-ordering of the top 10 elements indicated that four elements were endorsed by all five classes: being honest with myself, handling negative feelings without using, being able to enjoy life, and process of growth and development. Conclusions The results of the LCA demonstrate the diversity of meanings, and varying degrees of identification with, specific elements of recovery. As others have found, multiple constituents are invested in how recovery is defined and this has ramifications for professional, personal, and cultural processes related to how strategies to promote recovery are implemented. PMID:25630961

  12. Hopx distinguishes hippocampal from lateral ventricle neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Deqiang; Takeda, Norifumi; Jain, Rajan; Manderfield, Lauren J; Liu, Feiyan; Li, Li; Anderson, Stewart A; Epstein, Jonathan A

    2015-11-01

    In the adult dentate gyrus (DG) and in the proliferative zone lining the lateral ventricle (LV-PZ), radial glia-like (RGL) cells are neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate granule neurons. A number of molecular markers including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Sox2 and nestin, can identify quiescent NSCs in these two niches. However, to date, there is no marker that distinguishes NSC origin of DG versus LV-PZ. Hopx, an atypical homeodomain only protein, is expressed by adult stem cell populations including those in the intestine and hair follicle. Here, we show that Hopx is specifically expressed in RGL cells in the adult DG, and these cells give rise to granule neurons. Assessed by non-stereological quantitation, Hopx-null NSCs exhibit enhanced neurogenesis evident by an increased number of BrdU-positive cells and doublecortin (DCX)-positive neuroblasts. In contrast, Sox2-positive, quiescent NSCs are reduced in the DG of Hopx-null animals and Notch signaling is reduced, as evidenced by reduced expression of Notch targets Hes1 and Hey2, and a reduction of the number of cells expressing the cleaved, activated form of the Notch1 receptor, the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) in Hopx-null DG. Surprisingly, Hopx is not expressed in RGL cells of the adult LV-PZ, and Hopx-expressing cells do not give rise to interneurons of the olfactory bulb (OB). These findings establish that Hopx expression distinguishes NSCs of the DG from those of the LV-PZ, and suggest that Hopx potentially regulates hippocampal neurogenesis by modulating Notch signaling. PMID:26451648

  13. MRI evaluation of bone marrow changes in the diabetic foot: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Talya R; Fatone, Eliana A; Weis, Adina; Cotten, Anne; Beltran, Javier

    2011-07-01

    One of the most important roles of magnetic resonance (MR) in imaging of the diabetic foot is to differentiate between the common and often comorbid pathologies that present with abnormal bone marrow signal. The primary diagnostic challenges in this setting are to distinguish osteomyelitis from reactive bone marrow edema, neuroarthropathy from osteomyelitis, and the sterile from the superinfected neuropathic joint. Whereas both osteomyelitis and reactive marrow edema share increased T2 signal, osteomyelitis is confirmed by T1 hypointensity in the bone marrow and reactive edema demonstrates isolated T2 signal hyperintensity. In distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, a localized or contiguously spreading forefoot focus of abnormal bone marrow away from the subchondral surface and adjacent to a skin ulcer, cellulitis, abscess, or sinus tract would be indicative of osteomyelitis. A midfoot, subchondral, periarticular, or polyarticular distribution of findings in the absence of a contiguous focus of skin disruption would strongly support neuroarthropathy. Parameters that have been successfully correlated with acute infection superimposed on neuroarthropathy include diffuse bone marrow signal abnormality, progressive subarticular enhancement, loss of subchondral cysts, and the presence of the MRI "ghost sign." PMID:21644199

  14. Sparse Representation of Brain Aging: Extracting Covariance Patterns from Structural MRI

    PubMed Central

    Su, Longfei; Wang, Lubin; Chen, Fanglin; Shen, Hui; Li, Baojuan; Hu, Dewen

    2012-01-01

    An enhanced understanding of how normal aging alters brain structure is urgently needed for the early diagnosis and treatment of age-related mental diseases. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a reliable technique used to detect age-related changes in the human brain. Currently, multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) enables the exploration of subtle and distributed changes of data obtained from structural MRI images. In this study, a new MVPA approach based on sparse representation has been employed to investigate the anatomical covariance patterns of normal aging. Two groups of participants (group 1∶290 participants; group 2∶56 participants) were evaluated in this study. These two groups were scanned with two 1.5 T MRI machines. In the first group, we obtained the discriminative patterns using a t-test filter and sparse representation step. We were able to distinguish the young from old cohort with a very high accuracy using only a few voxels of the discriminative patterns (group 1∶98.4%; group 2∶96.4%). The experimental results showed that the selected voxels may be categorized into two components according to the two steps in the proposed method. The first component focuses on the precentral and postcentral gyri, and the caudate nucleus, which play an important role in sensorimotor tasks. The strongest volume reduction with age was observed in these clusters. The second component is mainly distributed over the cerebellum, thalamus, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These regions are not only critical nodes of the sensorimotor circuitry but also the cognitive circuitry although their volume shows a relative resilience against aging. Considering the voxels selection procedure, we suggest that the aging of the sensorimotor and cognitive brain regions identified in this study has a covarying relationship with each other. PMID:22590522

  15. Studies of MRI relaxivities of gadolinium-labeled dendrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongmu; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    In cancer detection, imaging techniques have a great importance in early diagnosis. The more sensitive the imaging technique and the earlier the tumor can be detected. Contrast agents have the capability to increase the sensitivity in imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Until now, gadolinium-based contrast agents are mainly used for MRI, and show good enhancement. But improvement is needed for detection of smaller tumors at the earliest stage possible. The dendrons complexed with Gd(DOTA) were synthesized and evaluated as a new MRI contrast agent. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation effects were tested and compared with commercial drug Magnevist, Gd(DTPA).

  16. Distinguishing Chordoid Meningiomas From Their Histologic Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Sangoi, Ankur R.; Dulai, Mohanpal S.; Beck, Andrew H.; Brat, Daniel J.; Vogel, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Chordoid meningioma, World Health Organization grade II, is an uncommon variant of meningioma with a propensity for aggressive behavior and increased likelihood of recurrence. As such, recognition of this entity is important in cases that show similar morphologic overlap with other chondroid/myxoid neoplasms that can arise within or near the central nervous system. A formal comparison of the immunohistochemical features of chordoid meningioma versus tumors with significant histologic overlap has not been previously reported. In this study, immunohistochemical staining was performed with antibodies against D2-40, S100, pankeratin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), brachyury, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in 4 cases of chordoid glioma, 6 skeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, 10 chordoid meningiomas, 16 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, 18 chordomas, 22 low-grade chondrosarcomas, and 27 enchondromas. Staining extent and intensity were evaluated semiquantitatively and mean values for each parameter were calculated. Immunostaining with D2-40 showed positivity in 100% of skeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, 96% of enchondromas, 95% of low-grade chondrosarcomas, 80% of chordoid meningiomas, and 75% of chordoid gliomas. Staining with S100 demonstrated diffuse, strong positivity in all (100%) chordoid gliomas, skeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, low-grade chondrosarcomas, and enchondromas, 94% of chordomas, and 81% of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, with focal, moderate staining in 40% of chordoid meningiomas. Pankeratin highlighted 100% of chordoid gliomas and chordomas, 38% of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, and 20% of chordoid meningiomas. EMA staining was positive in 100% of chordoid gliomas, 94% of chordomas, 90% of chordoid meningiomas, and 25% of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas. Brachyury was positive only in the chordomas (100%), whereas GFAP was positive only in the chordoid gliomas (100%). EMA was the most effective antibody for differentiating chordoid meningioma from skeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, low-grade chondrosarcoma, and enchondroma, whereas D2-40 was the most effective antibody for differentiating chordoid meningioma from extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma and chordoma. Our findings demonstrate that in conjunction with clinical and radiographic findings, immunohistochemical evaluation with a panel of D2-40, EMA, brachyury, and GFAP is most useful in distinguishing chordoid meningioma from chordoid glioma, skeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, chordoma, low-grade chondrosarcoma, and enchondroma. A lack of strong, diffuse S100 reactivity may also be useful in excluding chordoid meningioma. Among the neoplasms evaluated, brachyury and GFAP proved to be both sensitive and specific markers for chordoma and chordoid glioma, respectively. Of note, this study is the first to characterize the D2-40 immunoprofile in extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, results that could be of utility in differential diagnostic assessment. PMID:19194275

  17. Role Of Cardiac Mri In The Assessment Of Nonischemic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Nabi, Faisal

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we will highlight the role of late gadolinium enhancement, along with other strengths available by cardiac MRI, in determining the underlying etiology of various nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Furthermore, we will also emphasize how late gadolinium enhancement may serve as a novel risk stratification tool to further impact patient care. PMID:24066198

  18. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  19. Techniques for fast stereoscopic MRI.

    PubMed

    Guttman, M A; McVeigh, E R

    2001-08-01

    Stereoscopic MRI can impart 3D perception with only two image acquisitions. This economy over standard multiplanar 3D volume renderings allows faster frame rates, which are needed for real-time imaging applications. Real-time 3D perception may enhance the appreciation of complex anatomical structures, and may improve hand-eye coordination while manipulating a medical device during an image-guided interventional procedure. To this goal, a system is being developed to acquire and display stereoscopic MR images in real-time. A clinically used, fast gradient-recalled echo-train sequence has been modified to produce stereo image pairs. Features have been added for depth cueing, view sharing, and bulk signal suppression. A workstation was attached to a clinical MR scanner for fast data extraction, image reconstruction and stereoscopic image display. PMID:11477636

  20. Microtesla MRI with dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Owens, Tuba; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Savukov, Igor M.; Gomez, John J.; Espy, Michelle A.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at microtesla fields is a promising imaging method that combines the pre-polarization technique and broadband signal reception by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors to enable in vivo MRI at microtesla-range magnetic fields similar in strength to the Earth magnetic field. Despite significant advances in recent years, the potential of microtesla MRI for biomedical imaging is limited by its insufficient signal-to-noise ratio due to a relatively low sample polarization. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used approach that allows polarization enhancement by 2-4 orders of magnitude without an increase in the polarizing field strength. In this work, the first implementation of microtesla MRI with Overhauser DNP and SQUID signal detection is described. The first measurements of carbon-13 NMR spectra at microtesla fields are also reported. The experiments were performed at the measurement field of 96 μT, corresponding to Larmor frequency of 4 kHz for protons and 1 kHz for carbon-13. The Overhauser DNP was carried out at 3.5-5.7 mT fields using rf irradiation at 120 MHz. Objects for imaging included water phantoms and a cactus plant. Aqueous solutions of metabolically relevant sodium bicarbonate, pyruvate, alanine, and lactate, labeled with carbon-13, were used for NMR studies. All the samples were doped with TEMPO free radicals. The Overhauser DNP enabled nuclear polarization enhancement by factor as large as -95 for protons and as large as -200 for carbon-13, corresponding to thermal polarizations at 0.33 T and 1.1 T fields, respectively. These results demonstrate that SQUID-based microtesla MRI can be naturally combined with Overhauser DNP in one system, and that its signal-to-noise performance is greatly improved in this case. They also suggest that microtesla MRI can become an efficient tool for in vivo imaging of hyperpolarized carbon-13, produced by low-temperature dissolution DNP.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it work? ... order to follow special procedures to ensure your safety. Items that need to be removed by patients ...

  2. MRI in thorotrastosis.

    PubMed

    Ono, N; Hirai, K; Ijyuin, H; Itano, S; Noguchi, H; Sakata, K; Aoki, Y; Aritaka, T; Abe, H; Tanikawa, K

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed in four patients with thorotrastosis. On CT scan, Thorotrast (thorium oxide) deposition was shown as high-density areas in the liver and spleen and the abdominal lymph nodes. These deposits were not found on MRIs. Splenic volume was significantly small due to atrophy. The contrast-noise ratio in the spleen on T1-weighted images was significantly lower. Thorotrast deposition does not affect MRI appearance; therefore it may be useful for the early detection of malignant tumors as a complication of thorotrastosis. PMID:8564863

  3. Assessment of radiofrequency ablation margin by MRI-MRI image fusion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Kai; Su, Zhong-Zhen; Huang, Ze-Ping; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Rong-Qin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility and clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-MRI image fusion in assessing the ablative margin (AM) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: A newly developed ultrasound workstation for MRI-MRI image fusion was used to evaluate the AM of 62 tumors in 52 HCC patients after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The lesions were divided into two groups: group A, in which the tumor was completely ablated and 5 mm AM was achieved (n = 32); and group B, in which the tumor was completely ablated but 5 mm AM was not achieved (n = 29). To detect local tumor progression (LTP), all patients were followed every two months by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, contrast-enhanced MRI or computed tomography (CT) in the first year after RFA. Then, the follow-up interval was prolonged to every three months after the first year. RESULTS: Of the 62 tumors, MRI-MRI image fusion was successful in 61 (98.4%); the remaining case had significant deformation of the liver and massive ascites after RFA. The time required for creating image fusion and AM evaluation was 15.5 ± 5.5 min (range: 8-22 min) and 9.6 ± 3.2 min (range: 6-14 min), respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 1-23 mo (14.2 ± 5.4 mo). In group A, no LTP was detected in 32 lesions, whereas in group B, LTP was detected in 4 of 29 tumors, which occurred at 2, 7, 9, and 15 mo after RFA. The frequency of LTP in group B (13.8%; 4/29) was significantly higher than that in group A (0/32, P = 0.046). All of the LTPs occurred in the area in which the 5 mm AM was not achieved. CONCLUSION: The MRI-MRI image fusion using an ultrasound workstation is feasible and useful for evaluating the AM after RFA for HCC. PMID:25954109

  4. Development of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.

    1998-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using the MR signal from hyperpolarized noble gases 129Xe and 3He may become an important new diagnostic technique. Alex Pines (adapting the hyperpolarization technique pioneered by William Happer) presented MR spectroscopy studies using hyperpolarized 129Xe. The current authors recognized that the enormous enhancement in the detectability of 129Xe, promised by hyperpolarization, would solve the daunting SNR problems impeding their attempts to use 129Xe as an in vivo MR probe, especially in order to study the action of general anesthetics. It was hoped that hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI would yield resolutions equivalent to that achievable with conventional 1H 2O MRI, and that xenon's solubility in lipids would facilitate investigations of lipid-rich tissues that had as yet been hard to image. The publication of hyperpolarized 129Xe images of excised mouse lungs heralded the emergence of hyperpolarized noble-gas MRI. Using hyperpolarized 3He, researchers have obtained images of the lung gas space of guinea pigs and of humans. Lung gas images from patients with pulmonary disease have recently been reported. 3He is easier to hyperpolarize than 129Xe, and it yields a stronger MR signal, but its extremely low solubility in blood precludes its use for the imaging of tissue. Xenon, however, readily dissolves in blood, and the T1 of dissolved 129Xe is long enough for sufficient polarization to be carried by the circulation to distal tissues. Hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved-phase tissue spectra from the thorax and head of rodents and humans have been obtained, as have chemical shift 129Xe images from the head of rats. Lung gas 129Xe images of rodents, and more recently of humans, have been reported. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) may elucidate the link between the structure of the lung and its function. The technique may also be useful in identifying ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with pulmonary embolism, in staging and tracking the success of therapeutic approaches in patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases, and in identifying candidates for lung transplantation or reduction surgery. The high lipophilicity of xenon may allow MR investigations of the integrity and function of excitable lipid membranes. Eventually, HypX-MRI may permit better imaging of the lipid-rich structures of the brain. Cortical brain function is one perfusion-dependent phenomena that may be explored with hyperpolarized 129Xe MR. This leads to the exciting possibility of conducting hyperpolarized 129Xe functional MRI (HypX-fMRI) studies.

  5. Challenges for Molecular Neuroimaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lelyveld, Victor S.; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Jasanoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MRI)-based molecular imaging methods are beginning to have impact in neuroscience. A growing number of molecular imaging agents have been synthesized and tested in vitro, but so far relatively few have been validated in the brains of live animals. Here, we discuss key challenges associated with expanding the repertoire of successful molecular neuroimaging approaches. The difficulty of delivering agents past the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a particular obstacle to molecular imaging in the central nervous system. We review established and emerging techniques for trans-BBB delivery, including intracranial infusion, BBB disruption, and transporter-related methods. Improving the sensitivity with which MRI-based molecular agents can be detected is a second major challenge. Better sensitivity would in turn reduce the requirements for delivery and alleviate potential side effects. We discuss recent efforts to enhance relaxivity of conventional longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agents, as well as strategies that involve amplifying molecular signals or reducing endogenous background influences. With ongoing refinement of imaging approaches and brain delivery methods, MRI-based techniques for molecular-level neuroscientific investigation will fall increasingly within reach. PMID:20808721

  6. Acoustic variability and distinguishability among mouse ultrasound vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Robert C.; Miller, Kenneth D.; Merzenich, Michael M.; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2003-12-01

    Auditory neurobiology has benefited significantly from ethological approaches using acoustic communication signals. Developing an ethological model in a genetically manipulable system such as the mouse would enhance the ability to investigate the processing, learning, and recognition of sounds. Characterizing the basic acoustic structure of mouse vocalizations would help lay a foundation for such a future study. Towards this goal, ultrasound vocalizations emitted by isolated mouse pups and pairs of adult males and females have been digitally recorded and examined. Previous work suggests that these calls may have communicative significance. An analysis of the natural variability in their spectral content, median frequency, duration, and repetition period reveals acoustic structure that could be used for recognizing the calls. Other parameters, like the rate of frequency modulation, may also be informative, but have not been examined. Pup isolation calls develop systematically between postnatal day 5 and 12 towards a more stereotyped vocalization-contracting from a wide range of values into narrower clusters of frequency and duration, and shifting from longer to shorter repetition periods. Most significantly, pup isolation and adult encounter calls fall into two distinct spectral and temporal categories, making it possible for a receiver to acoustically distinguish between them, and to potentially categorically perceive them along those dimensions.

  7. Words matter: distinguishing "personalized medicine" and "biologically personalized therapeutics".

    PubMed

    Cherny, Nathan I; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Emanuel, Linda; Fallowfield, Lesley; Francis, Prudence A; Gabizon, Alberto; Piccart, Martine J; Sidransky, David; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2014-12-01

    "Personalized medicine" has become a generic term referring to techniques that evaluate either the host or the disease to enhance the likelihood of beneficial patient outcomes from treatment interventions. There is, however, much more to personalization of care than just identifying the biotherapeutic strategy with the highest likelihood of benefit. In its new meaning, "personalized medicine" could overshadow the individually tailored, whole-person care that is at the bedrock of what people need and want when they are ill. Since names and definitional terms set the scope of the discourse, they have the power to define what personalized medicine includes or does not include, thus influencing the scope of the professional purview regarding the delivery of personalized care. Taxonomic accuracy is important in understanding the differences between therapeutic interventions that are distinguishable in their aims, indications, scope, benefits, and risks. In order to restore the due emphasis to the patient and his or her needs, we assert that it is necessary, albeit belated, to deconflate the contemporary term "personalized medicine" by taxonomizing this therapeutic strategy more accurately as "biologically personalized therapeutics" (BPT). The scope of truly personalized medicine and its relationship to biologically personalized therapeutics is described, emphasizing that the best of care must give due recognition and emphasis to both BPT and truly personalized medicine. PMID:25293984

  8. Echocardiographic criteria to distinguish reversible from irreversible myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Corday, E; Hajduczki, I; O'Byrne, G T; Kar, S; Areeda, J; Corday, S R

    1988-04-01

    This treatise reviews two-dimensional echocardiographic criteria which have been developed to describe and distinguish reversible vs irreversible myocardial ischaemia. It also discusses the new pathophysiologic concepts such as 'hibernating' and 'decapitated' myocardium, and also 'reperfusion injury' and 'stunned' myocardium, complications which may supervene following reperfusion of jeopardized ischaemic myocardium. Computerized regional and global wall-motion analysis is now usually measured from enhanced endocardial edges. Provocative interventions can contribute information regarding viability of jeopardized ischaemic regions by testing contractile response of the myocardium to afterload reducing agents such as nitroglycerine or nitroprusside. They can also validate viability by demonstrating that post-extrasystolic beats can still cause potentiation. Ultrasonic contrast washout half-life of the myocardium which is compromised by stenotic coronary arteries provides a promising method for supplying information about the coronary perfusion defects and flow reserve. The decrease in global or regional ejection fraction following exercise echocardiography may show if jeopardized ischaemic myocardium is irreversibly damaged. A new hypercontractility phenomenon is described following brief coronary occlusions such as during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, or after sudden release of angiospasm, and this should be considered a sign of viability. Increase in end-diastolic wall thickness and echo amplitudes immediately after reperfusion of ischaemic segments is often associated with reversibly damaged myocardium. PMID:3134240

  9. DNA-methylation profiling distinguishes malignant melanomas from benign nevi

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Kathleen; Edmiston, Sharon N; Khondker, Zakaria S; Groben, Pamela A; Zhou, Xin; Chu, Haitao; Kuan, Pei Fen; Hao, Honglin; Carson, Craig; Berwick, Marianne; Olilla, David W; Thomas, Nancy E

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation, an epigenetic alteration typically occurring early in cancer development, could aid in the molecular diagnosis of melanoma. We determined technical feasibility for high-throughput DNA-methylation array-based profiling using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues for selection of candidate DNA-methylation differences between melanomas and nevi. Promoter methylation was evaluated in 27 common benign nevi and 22 primary invasive melanomas using a 1505 CpG site microarray. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering distinguished melanomas from nevi; 26 CpG sites in 22 genes were identified with significantly different methylation levels between melanomas and nevi after adjustment for age, sex, and multiple comparisons and with β-value differences of ≥0.2. Prediction analysis for microarrays identified 12 CpG loci that were highly predictive of melanoma, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curves of >0.95. Of our panel of 22 genes, 14 were statistically significant in an independent sample set of 29 nevi (including dysplastic nevi) and 25 primary invasive melanomas after adjustment for age, sex, and multiple comparisons. This first report of a DNA-methylation signature discriminating melanomas from nevi indicates that DNA methylation appears promising as an additional tool for enhancing melanoma diagnosis. PMID:21375697

  10. MRI driven magnetic microswimmers

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, Péter; Székely, Gábor; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a promising technique for diagnosing diseases in the digestive system. Here we design and characterize a miniature swimming mechanism that uses the magnetic fields of the MRI for both propulsion and wireless powering of the capsule. Our method uses both the static and the radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inherently available in MRI to generate a propulsive force. Our study focuses on the evaluation of the propulsive force for different swimming tails and experimental estimation of the parameters that influence its magnitude. We have found that an approximately 20 mm long, 5 mm wide swimming tail is capable of producing 0.21 mN propulsive force in water when driven by a 20 Hz signal providing 0.85 mW power and the tail located within the homogeneous field of a 3 T MRI scanner. We also analyze the parallel operation of the swimming mechanism and the scanner imaging. We characterize the size of artifacts caused by the propulsion system. We show that while the magnetic micro swimmer is propelling the capsule endoscope, the operator can locate the capsule on the image of an interventional scene without being obscured by significant artifacts. Although this swimming method does not scale down favorably, the high magnetic field of the MRI allows self propulsion speed on the order of several millimeter per second and can propel an endoscopic capsule in the stomach. PMID:22037673

  11. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible. PMID:24094150

  12. FDG and (82)Rb PET/MRI features of brain metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang

    2015-06-01

    A 64-year-old woman with stage IV breast cancer underwent an FDG and Rb PET brain studies. The PET brain images were fused with MRI brain T1 post-contrast images. The known enhancing left superoposterior frontal brain metastasis is positive on both FDG Rb PET/MRI images. The Rb PET/MRI showed better target-to-noise ratio, but showed nonspecific uptake in the superior sagittal sinus. PMID:25674864

  13. MRI features of breast lymphoma: preliminary experience in seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Dengbin; Chai, Weimin; Fei, Xiaochun; Luo, Ran; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the imaging features of breast lymphoma using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS This retrospective study consisted of seven patients with pathologically confirmed breast lymphoma. The breast lymphomas were primary in six patients and secondary in one patient. All patients underwent preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and one underwent additional diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b value of 600 s/mm2. Morphologic characteristics, enhancement features, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were reviewed. RESULTS On MRI, three patients presented with a single mass, one with two masses, two with multiple masses, and one with a single mass and a contralateral focal enhancement. The MRI features of the eight biopsied masses in seven patients were analyzed. On MRI, the margins were irregular in six masses (75%) and spiculated in two (25%). Seven masses (87.5%) displayed homogeneous internal enhancement, while one (12.5%) showed rim enhancement. Seven masses (87.5%) showed a washout pattern and one (12.5%) showed a plateau pattern. The penetrating vessel sign was found in two masses (25%). One patient with two masses underwent DWI. Both masses showed hyperintense signal on DWI with ADC values of 0.867×10−3 mm2/s and 0.732×10−3 mm2/s, respectively. CONCLUSION Breast lymphoma commonly presents as a homogeneously enhancing mass with irregular margins and displays a washout curve pattern on dynamic MRI. A low ADC value may also indicate a possible diagnosis of breast lymphoma. PMID:26380896

  14. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION Compensation for Work-Related Physical Impairment or Death § 301.318 Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated...

  15. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION Compensation for Work-Related Physical Impairment or Death § 301.318 Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated...

  16. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION Compensation for Work-Related Physical Impairment or Death § 301.318 Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated...

  17. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is William Buskist. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Teaching Award at the 117th…

  18. 29 CFR 779.328 - Retail and wholesale distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Retail and wholesale distinguished. 779.328 Section 779.328... AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Exemptions for Certain Retail or Service Establishments ârecognizedâ As Retail âin the Particular Industryâ § 779.328 Retail and wholesale distinguished. (a)...

  19. The Washington State Distinguished Professorship Program. Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    Since its inception in 1985, and through 1992, Washington state's Distinguished Professorship Program has succeeded in establishing 32 prestigious professorships at its four-year institutions with 3 more in process. Also in 1985, the state legislature enacted the Distinguished Professorship Trust Fund Program to strengthen partnerships between…

  20. 29 CFR 1977.6 - Unprotected activities distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unprotected activities distinguished. 1977.6 Section 1977.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 General § 1977.6 Unprotected activities distinguished. (a)...

  1. 29 CFR 1977.6 - Unprotected activities distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unprotected activities distinguished. 1977.6 Section 1977.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 General § 1977.6 Unprotected activities distinguished. (a)...

  2. 29 CFR 1977.6 - Unprotected activities distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unprotected activities distinguished. 1977.6 Section 1977.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 General § 1977.6 Unprotected activities distinguished. (a)...

  3. 29 CFR 1977.6 - Unprotected activities distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unprotected activities distinguished. 1977.6 Section 1977.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 General § 1977.6 Unprotected activities distinguished. (a)...

  4. Distinguishing between Knowledge and Beliefs: Students' Epistemic Criteria for Differentiating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldrin, Angela; Mason, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    "I believe that he/she is telling the truth", "I know about the solar system": what epistemic criteria do students use to distinguish between knowledge and beliefs? If knowing and believing are conceptually distinguishable, do students of different grade levels use the same criteria to differentiate the two constructs? How do students understand…

  5. 29 CFR 779.328 - Retail and wholesale distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Retail and wholesale distinguished. 779.328 Section 779.328... AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Exemptions for Certain Retail or Service Establishments ârecognizedâ As Retail âin the Particular Industryâ § 779.328 Retail and wholesale distinguished. (a)...

  6. 29 CFR 779.328 - Retail and wholesale distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Retail and wholesale distinguished. 779.328 Section 779.328... AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Exemptions for Certain Retail or Service Establishments ârecognizedâ As Retail âin the Particular Industryâ § 779.328 Retail and wholesale distinguished. (a)...

  7. 29 CFR 779.328 - Retail and wholesale distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Retail and wholesale distinguished. 779.328 Section 779.328... AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Exemptions for Certain Retail or Service Establishments ârecognizedâ As Retail âin the Particular Industryâ § 779.328 Retail and wholesale distinguished. (a)...

  8. 29 CFR 779.328 - Retail and wholesale distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retail and wholesale distinguished. 779.328 Section 779.328... AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Exemptions for Certain Retail or Service Establishments ârecognizedâ As Retail âin the Particular Industryâ § 779.328 Retail and wholesale distinguished. (a)...

  9. Astronaut Alan Shepard receives MASA Distinguished Service award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard recieves the NASA Distinguished Service Award from President John F. Kennedy in May 1961, days after his history making MR-3 flight (31387); Alan Shepard and his wife wave to the crowd after Shepard received the NASA Distinguished Service Award from President John F. Kennedy (31388).

  10. John Glenn: Presented with NASA Distinguished Service Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John Glenn tours with his family, meets JFK and is presented with the NASA distinguished Service Medal. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  11. Distinguishability of Biological Material Using Ultraviolet Multi-Spectral Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.C.; Heinen, R.J.; Rigdon, L.D.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Shokair, I.R.; Siragusa, G.R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-14

    Recent interest in the detection and analysis of biological samples by spectroscopic methods has led to questions concerning the degree of distinguishability and biological variability of the ultraviolet (W) fluorescent spectra from such complex samples. We show that the degree of distinguishability of such spectra is readily determined numerically.

  12. Excellence in Teacher Education. 1973 Distinguished Achievement Awards Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Washington, DC.

    The State University of New York College of Cortland received the 1973 Distinguished Achievement Award for its Project Change, a performance-based early childhood teacher education program. Also cited for distinguished achievement were a) Teachers College of Ball State University, Indiana for an experimental program designed to include…

  13. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers. PMID:23712842

  14. Item Memory, Context Memory and the Hippocampus: fMRI Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugg, Michael D.; Vilberg, Kaia L.; Mattson, Julia T.; Yu, Sarah S.; Johnson, Jeffrey D.; Suzuki, Maki

    2012-01-01

    Dual-process models of recognition memory distinguish between the retrieval of qualitative information about a prior event (recollection), and judgments of prior occurrence based on an acontextual sense of familiarity. fMRI studies investigating the neural correlates of memory encoding and retrieval conducted within the dual-process framework have…

  15. Item Memory, Context Memory and the Hippocampus: fMRI Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugg, Michael D.; Vilberg, Kaia L.; Mattson, Julia T.; Yu, Sarah S.; Johnson, Jeffrey D.; Suzuki, Maki

    2012-01-01

    Dual-process models of recognition memory distinguish between the retrieval of qualitative information about a prior event (recollection), and judgments of prior occurrence based on an acontextual sense of familiarity. fMRI studies investigating the neural correlates of memory encoding and retrieval conducted within the dual-process framework have

  16. [MRI visualization of multiple sclerosis lesions].

    PubMed

    Berry, I; Ranjeva, J P; Manelfe, C; Clanet, M

    1998-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging represents voxels (volume elements) of the body placed in a magnet, by their magnetization determined under various acquisition conditions weighting the contrast of the image by the density of free water protons and their relaxation times T1 and T2. Thus, the sensitivity in depicting lesions is high but pathological specificity is poor. Efforts are made to increase the diagnosis powerfulness of M.R.I. in multiple sclerosis: a careful correlation with the clinical presentation and the use of better M.R.I. criteria increase the specificity of the conventional T2 sequences. New sequences such as fast spin echo (F.S.E.), turbo spin echo (T.S.E.) or derived from inversion recovery (F.L.A.I.R.: fluid attenuated inversion recovery) improve the detection of lesions. Under specific conditions M.R.I. can be used to monitor the evolution of M.S. Acute phase monitoring focuses on changes in disease activity, new, recurring, enlarging, gadolinium (Gd) enhancing lesions, and chronic phase monitoring appreciate the burden of the disease. However M.R.I. is always considered as a secondary outcome in the phase III trials because insufficient correlations with the clinical disability. In the neurological daily practice conventional M.R.I. is of poor interest in the follow up of individual M.S. patients considering the weakness of prognosis value and the problems in the measurement of the lesions load which is emphasized in the methodology of the clinical trials. Nevertheless, there is a continuing search for techniques which correlate better with clinical measures of the disease such as the quantification of "black holes" on T1 w images or the cerebral and spinal atrophy. New techniques allow to weight the signal by the movement (diffusion imaging), by the complexity of the molecular architecture (magnetization transfer imaging), by the chemical shift (chemical shift imaging) or by the local status of oxygenation (functional M.R.I.). The basic aspects of the pathological lesions in M.S., edema, membrane disruption, demyelination, gliosis, cellular infiltration and axonal loss can be studied more precisely by these new M.R. techniques which should better describe the actual clinical impact of the destructive process. In the last year the importance of axonal loss has simultaneously been confirmed by M. R. spectroscopy and pathological findings. However, magnetization transfer imaging, M.R. diffusion imaging and functional M.R.I. are intensively under investigation for a better analysis of these different factors conditioning the reversibility of the patient disability. PMID:9809376

  17. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic. PMID:24195023

  18. Automated localization of breast cancer in DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Martí, Robert; Melendez, Jaime; Hauth, Jakob L; Mann, Ritse M; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is increasingly being used for the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Compared to mammography, DCE-MRI provides higher sensitivity, however its specificity is variable. Moreover, DCE-MRI data analysis is time consuming and depends on reader expertise. The aim of this work is to propose a novel automated breast cancer localization system for DCE-MRI. Such a system can be used to support radiologists in DCE-MRI analysis by marking suspicious areas. The proposed method initially corrects for motion artifacts and segments the breast. Subsequently, blob and relative enhancement voxel features are used to locate lesion candidates. Finally, a malignancy score for each lesion candidate is obtained using region-based morphological and kinetic features computed on the segmented lesion candidate. We performed experiments to compare the use of different classifiers in the region classification stage and to study the effect of motion correction in the presented system. The performance of the algorithm was assessed using free-response operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. For this purpose, a dataset of 209 DCE-MRI studies was collected. It is composed of 95 DCE-MRI studies with 105 breast cancers (55 mass-like and 50 non-mass-like malignant lesions) and 114 DCE-MRI studies from women participating in a screening program which were diagnosed to be normal. At 4 false positives per normal case, 89% of the breast cancers (91% and 86% for mass-like and non-mass-like malignant lesions, respectively) were correctly detected. PMID:25532510

  19. Distinguishing Between Site Waste, Natural, and Other Sources of Contamination at Uranium and Thorium Contaminated Sites - 12274

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, David C.

    2012-07-01

    Uranium and thorium processing and milling sites generate wastes (source, byproduct, or technically enhanced naturally occurring material), that contain contaminants that are similar to naturally occurring radioactive material deposits and other industry wastes. This can lead to mis-identification of other materials as Site wastes. A review of methods used by the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency to distinguish Site wastes from potential other sources, enhanced materials, and natural deposits, at three different thorium mills was conducted. Real case examples demonstrate the importance of understanding the methods of distinguishing wastes. Distinguishing between Site wastes and enhanced Background material can be facilitated by establishing and applying a formal process. Significant project cost avoidance may be realized by distinguishing Site wastes from enhanced NORM. Collection of information on other potential sources of radioactive material and physical information related to the potential for other radioactive material sources should be gathered and reported in the Historical Site Assessment. At a minimum, locations of other such information should be recorded. Site decision makers should approach each Site area with the expectation that non site related radioactive material may be present and have a process in place to distinguish from Site and non Site related materials. (authors)

  20. Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training and Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training awards are given by the Board of Educational Affairs in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education…

  1. Myelin and iron concentration in the human brain: a quantitative study of MRI contrast.

    PubMed

    Stüber, Carsten; Morawski, Markus; Schäfer, Andreas; Labadie, Christian; Wähnert, Miriam; Leuze, Christoph; Streicher, Markus; Barapatre, Nirav; Reimann, Katja; Geyer, Stefan; Spemann, Daniel; Turner, Robert

    2014-06-01

    During the last five years ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled an unprecedented view of living human brain. Brain tissue contrast in most MRI sequences is known to reflect mainly the spatial distributions of myelin and iron. These distributions have been shown to overlap significantly in many brain regions, especially in the cortex. It is of increasing interest to distinguish and identify cortical areas by their appearance in MRI, which has been shown to be feasible in vivo. Parcellation can benefit greatly from quantification of the independent contributions of iron and myelin to MRI contrast. Recent studies using susceptibility mapping claim to allow such a separation of the effects of myelin and iron in MRI. We show, using post-mortem human brain tissue, that this goal can be achieved. After MRI scanning of the block with appropriate T1 mapping and T2* weighted sequences, we section the block and apply a novel technique, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE), to spatially map iron, phosphorus and sulfur elemental concentrations, simultaneously with 1μm spatial resolution. Because most brain phosphorus is located in myelin phospholipids, a calibration step utilizing element maps of sulfur enables semi-quantitative ex vivo mapping of myelin concentration. Combining results for iron and myelin concentration in a linear model, we have accurately modeled MRI tissue contrasts. Conversely, iron and myelin concentrations can now be estimated from appropriate MRI measurements in post-mortem brain samples. PMID:24607447

  2. Markers of Cochlear Inflammation Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Floc’h, Johann Le; Tan, Winston; Telang, Ravindra S.; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M.; Nuttall, Alfred; Rooney, William D.; Pontré, Beau; Thorne, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify spatial and temporal inflammation-induced changes in vascular permeability and macrophage infiltration in guinea-pig (GP) cochlea using MRI. Materials and Methods: GPs were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cochlear inflammation. One group was injected with a gadolinium based contrast agent (GBCA) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI was performed at 4, 7, and 10 days after LPS treatment. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to determine the apparent rate constant of GBCA extravasation (Ktrans). A second group was injected with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIOs) and studied at 2, 3, and 7 days after LPS treatment to detect tissue USPIO uptake and correlate with histology. For both groups, control GPs were scanned similarly. Results: The signal enhancement increased substantially and more rapidly at day 4 in LPS-treated than in control cochlea shortly following GBCA injection. Ktrans of LPS-treated cochlea was maximum on day 4 at 0.0218±0.0032 min−1 and then decreased to control level at 0.0036±0.0004 min−1 by day 10. In the second group, the relative signal intensity and T2 in cochlear perilymphatic spaces on day 2 decreased, on average, by 54% and 45%, respectively, compared with baseline and then remained under control levels by day 7. This suggests the infiltration of inflammatory cells, although unconfirmed by histology. Conclusion: This provides the first measurement of cochlear vascular permeability using MRI and a quantitative evaluation of the development of cochlear inflammation. MRI holds considerable potential for the assessment of disease processes such as clinical diagnosis of conditions such as labyrinthitis. PMID:23589173

  3. MRI characterization of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in the maxillofacial region

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, De-Ling; Liu, Xue-Wen; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) in the maxillofacial region in order to improve diagnostic quality and resection efficacy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten cases of pathologically identified IMTs were analyzed by MRI. The MRI features were examined, including tumor location, tumor shape, tumor margins, and involvement of the surrounding tissues. RESULTS Of ten masses investigated in this study, eight masses were irregular neoplasms with unclear margins and two masses, in the parotid gland, were regular neoplasms with clear margins. Precontrast T1-weighted images of all ten masses exhibited isointense signals compared to the adjacent tissue, while contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed strong enhancement. Six masses were hypointense and four masses were slightly hyperintense in T2-weighted images. Involvement of the adjacent structures was observed in eight of ten cases. Meanwhile, two patients experienced intracranial involvement. CONCLUSION IMTs are rare tumors in the maxillofacial region, displaying a number of distinct MRI characteristics. Most importantly, they display low T2 signal intensity and strong enhancement, and they frequently invade surrounding structures. Thus, MRI can improve the accuracy of IMT diagnoses and provide critical information for surgical planning. PMID:24808436

  4. Distinguishing bias from sensitivity effects in multialternative detection tasks

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Devarajan; Steinmetz, Nicholas A.; Moore, Tirin; Knudsen, Eric I.

    2014-01-01

    Studies investigating the neural bases of cognitive phenomena increasingly employ multialternative detection tasks that seek to measure the ability to detect a target stimulus or changes in some target feature (e.g., orientation or direction of motion) that could occur at one of many locations. In such tasks, it is essential to distinguish the behavioral and neural correlates of enhanced perceptual sensitivity from those of increased bias for a particular location or choice (choice bias). However, making such a distinction is not possible with established approaches. We present a new signal detection model that decouples the behavioral effects of choice bias from those of perceptual sensitivity in multialternative (change) detection tasks. By formulating the perceptual decision in a multidimensional decision space, our model quantifies the respective contributions of bias and sensitivity to multialternative behavioral choices. With a combination of analytical and numerical approaches, we demonstrate an optimal, one-to-one mapping between model parameters and choice probabilities even for tasks involving arbitrarily large numbers of alternatives. We validated the model with published data from two ternary choice experiments: a target-detection experiment and a length-discrimination experiment. The results of this validation provided novel insights into perceptual processes (sensory noise and competitive interactions) that can accurately and parsimoniously account for observers' behavior in each task. The model will find important application in identifying and interpreting the effects of behavioral manipulations (e.g., cueing attention) or neural perturbations (e.g., stimulation or inactivation) in a variety of multialternative tasks of perception, attention, and decision-making. PMID:25146574

  5. Distinguishing pseudoprogression from progression in high-grade gliomas: a brief review of current clinical practice and demonstration of the potential value of 18F-FDG PET.

    PubMed

    Oborski, Matthew J; Laymon, Charles M; Lieberman, Frank S; Mountz, James M

    2013-05-01

    We report a case in which 18F-FDG PET was able to discriminate pseudoprogression from progression observed on contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI (CE-MRI). A 56-year-old male patient with anaplastic oligodendroglioma demonstrated markedly increased tumor enhancement on CE-MRI 1 month after completing radiation therapy (RT), suggesting radiological progression. However, the patient was clinically improved and therefore received an early-therapy response assessment PET to assess for pseudoprogression. PET showed low tumor uptake indicating stable disease. Follow-up CE-MRI at 3 and 4 months post-RT confirmed stable disease. This case emphasizes the value of 18F-FDG PET when pseudoprogression is clinically suspected. PMID:23510887

  6. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Watts, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the 2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:26981069

  7. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  8. Distinguishability in EIT using a hypothesis-testing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Andy; Gaggero, Pascal; Maimaitijiang, Yasheng

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we propose a novel formulation for the distinguishability of conductivity targets in electrical impedance tomography (EIT). It is formulated in terms of a classic hypothesis test to make it directly applicable to experimental configurations. We test to distinguish conductivity distributions σ2 from σ1, from which EIT measurements are obtained with added white Gaussian noise with covariance Σn. In order to distinguish the distributions, we must reject the null hypothesis , which has a probability based on the z-score: . This result shows that distinguishability is a product of the impedance change amplitude, the measurement strategy and the inverse of the noise amplitude. This approach is used to explore different current stimulation strategies.

  9. Astronaut Alan Shepard recieves NASA Distinguished Service Award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard recieves the NASA Distinguished Service Award from President John F. Kennedy in May 1961, days after his history making MR-3 flight. Shepard's wife and mother on left and other six Mercury astronauts are in background.

  10. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article announces the 2007 recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Baron Perlman. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Perlman's work, is provided.

  11. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim; Kondziella, Daniel; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kerrn-Jespersen, Bjørg Morell; Lindelof, Mette; Lassmann, Hans; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. Methods: We performed a detailed neuropathologic examination in 4 cases, including 1 autopsy case, and studied 2 additional patients by MRI at 7.0T to examine (1) extension of inflammation to areas appearing normal on 3.0T MRI, (2) potential advantages of 7.0T MRI compared to 3.0T MRI in reflecting widespread inflammation, perivascular pathology, and axonal damage, and (3) the possibility of lymphoma. Results: In the autopsy case, perivascular inflammation dominated by CD4+ T cells was not only detected in the brainstem and cerebellum but also in brain areas with normal appearance on 3.0T MRI, including supratentorial regions and cranial nerve roots. There was no evidence of lymphoma in any of the 4 patients. The 7.0T MRI in clinical remission also revealed supratentorial lesions and perivascular pathology in vivo with contrast-enhancing lesions centered around a small venous vessel. Ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T disclosed prominent T1 hypointensities in the brainstem, which were not seen on 3.0T MRI. This corresponded to neuropathologic detection of axonal injury in the autopsy case. Conclusion: Our findings suggest more widespread perivascular inflammation and postinflammatory axonal injury in patients with CLIPPERS. PMID:27144217

  12. Edna B. Foa: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Edna B. Foa, who received this award for "her outstanding and innovative research on the nature, measurement, and treatment of anxiety." Foa's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26618942

  13. Usefulness of cardiac MRI in the prognosis and follow-up of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Pons-Lladó, G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool that makes it possible to evaluate patients with cardiovascular disease; in addition to infarction and alterations in myocardial perfusion, cardiac MRI is useful for evaluating other phenomena such as microvascular obstruction and ischemia. The main prognostic factors in cardiac MRI are ventricular dysfunction, necrosis in late enhancement sequences, and ischemia in stress sequences. In acute myocardial infarction, cardiac MRI can evaluate the peri-infarct zone and quantify the size of the infarct. Furthermore, cardiac MRI's ability to detect and evaluate microvascular obstruction makes it a fundamental tool for establishing the prognosis of ischemic heart disease. In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI can detect ischemia induced by pharmacological stress and can diagnose infarcts that can be missed on other techniques. PMID:25648795

  14. First soluble M@C60 derivatives provide enhanced access to metallofullerenes and permit in vivo evaluation of Gd@C60[C(COOH)2]10 as a MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D; Benedetto, Angelo F; Husebo, Lars O; Price, Roger E; Jackson, Edward F; Wallace, Sidney; Wilson, Lon J; Alford, J Michael

    2003-05-01

    M@C(60) and related endohedral metallofullerenes comprise a significant portion of the metallofullerene yield in the traditional arc synthesis, but their chemistry and potential applications have been largely overlooked because of their sparse solubility. In this work, procedures are described to solublize Gd@C(60) species for the first time by forming the derivative, Gd@C(60)[C(COOCH(2)CH(3))(2)](10), and its hydrolyzed water-soluble form, Gd@C(60)[C(COOH)(2)](10). Imparting water solubility to Gd@C(60) permits its evaluation as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Relaxometry measurements for Gd@C(60)[C(COOH)(2)](10) reveal it to possess a relaxivity (4.6 mM(-1) s(-1) at 20 MHz and 40 degrees C) comparable to that of commercially available Gd(III) chelate-based MRI agents. An in vivo MRI biodistribution study in a rodent model reveals Gd@C(60)[C(COOH)(2)](10) to possess the first non-reticuloendothelial system (RES) localizing behavior for a water-soluble endohedral metallofullerene species, consistent with its lack of intermolecular aggregation in solution as determined by light-scattering measurements. This first derivatization and use of a M@C(60) species suggests new potential for metallofullerene technologies by reducing reliance on the chromatographic purification procedures normally employed for the far less abundant M@C(82) and related endohedrals. The recognition that water-soluble fullerene derivatives can be designed to avoid high levels of RES uptake is an important step toward fullerene-based pharmaceutical development. PMID:12720461

  15. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le problème multiobjectif est traité avec la méthode des pénalités. Il s'ensuit que le MRI à écran actif utilise une plus grande quantité de conducteur et produit une énergie magnétique plus élevée que le MRI à écran en fer.

  16. Cerebral blood volume MRI with intravascular superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Harel, Noam; Jin, Tao; Kim, Tae; Lee, Phil; Zhao, Fuqiang

    2013-08-01

    The cerebral blood volume (CBV) is a crucial physiological indicator of tissue viability and vascular reactivity. Thus, noninvasive CBV mapping has been of great interest. For this, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles, including monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles, can be used as long-half-life, intravascular susceptibility agents of CBV MRI measurements. Moreover, CBV-weighted functional MRI (fMRI) with USPIO nanoparticles provides enhanced sensitivity, reduced large vessel contribution and improved spatial specificity relative to conventional blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI, and measures a single physiological parameter that is easily interpretable. We review the physiochemical and magnetic properties, and pharmacokinetics, of USPIO nanoparticles in brief. We then extensively discuss quantifications of baseline CBV, vessel size index and functional CBV change. We also provide reviews of dose-dependent sensitivity, vascular filter function, specificity, characteristics and impulse response function of CBV fMRI. Examples of CBV fMRI specificity at the laminar and columnar resolution are provided. Finally, we briefly review the application of CBV measurements to functional and pharmacological studies in animals. Overall, the use of USPIO nanoparticles can determine baseline CBV and its changes induced by functional activity and pharmacological interventions. PMID:23208650

  17. Nanoformulations for molecular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale contrast agents have shown the ability to increase the detection sensitivity of MRI by several orders of magnitude, endowing this traditionally macroscopic modality with the ability to observe unique molecular signatures. Herein, we describe three types of nanoparticulate contrast agents: iron oxide nanoparticles, gadolinium-based nanoparticles, and bio-essential manganese, cobalt, nickel, and copper ion-containing nanoformulations. Some of these agents have been approved for clinical use, but more are still under development for medical imaging. The advantages and disadvantages of each nanoformulation, in terms of intrinsic magnetism, ease of synthesis, and biodistribution, etc. are discussed. PMID:22488901

  18. Nanoformulations for molecular MRI.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale contrast agents have shown the ability to increase the detection sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by several orders of magnitude, endowing this traditionally macroscopic modality with the ability to observe unique molecular signatures. Herein, we describe three types of nanoparticulate contrast agents: iron oxide nanoparticles, gadolinium-based nanoparticles, and bio-essential manganese, cobalt, nickel, and copper ion-containing nanoformulations. Some of these agents have been approved for clinical use, but more are still under development for medical imaging. The advantages and disadvantages of each nanoformulation, in terms of intrinsic magnetism, ease of synthesis, biodistribution, etc. are discussed. PMID:22488901

  19. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  20. PARACEST MRI With Improved Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanshu; Ali, M. Meser; Yoo, Byunghee; Griswold, Mark A.; Tkach, Jean A.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) is a novel contrast mechanism for MRI. A PARACEST MRI methodology with high temporal resolution is highly desired for in vivo MRI applications of molecular imaging. To address this need, a strategy has been developed that includes a long selective saturation period before each repetition of a Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence. This strategy is suitable for the application of PARACEST contrast agents to environments with long T1 relaxation times. An alternative strategy uses short selective saturation periods before the acquisition of each k-space trajectory to maintain steady state conditions, which can be implemented with a Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) pulse sequence. These short saturation periods lengthen the total scan time as compared to the first approach but compensate for the loss in PARACEST contrast related to T1 relaxation. Both approaches have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo with significantly improved temporal resolutions as compared to a conventional gradient-echo PARACEST method without sacrificing CNR efficiency. These demonstrations also adopted a strategy for measuring the PARACEST effect that only requires selective saturation at a single MR frequency, which further improves temporal resolution for PARACEST detection. PMID:19165903

  1. Advances in MRI for the evaluation of carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Makris, G C; Teng, Z; Patterson, A J; Lin, J-M; Young, V; Graves, M J; Gillard, J H

    2015-08-01

    Carotid artery atherosclerosis is an important source of mortality and morbidity in the Western world with significant socioeconomic implications. The quest for the early identification of the vulnerable carotid plaque is already in its third decade and traditional measures, such as the sonographic degree of stenosis, are not selective enough to distinguish those who would really benefit from a carotid endarterectomy. MRI of the carotid plaque enables the visualization of plaque composition and specific plaque components that have been linked to a higher risk of subsequent embolic events. Blood suppressed T1 and T2 weighted and proton density-weighted fast spin echo, gradient echo and time-of-flight sequences are typically used to quantify plaque components such as lipid-rich necrotic core, intraplaque haemorrhage, calcification and surface defects including erosion, disruption and ulceration. The purpose of this article is to review the most important recent advances in MRI technology to enable better diagnostic carotid imaging. PMID:25826233

  2. Microtesla MRI with dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Owens, Tuba; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Savukov, Igor M.; Gomez, John J.; Espy, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at microtesla fields is a promising imaging method that combines the pre-polarization technique and broadband signal reception by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors to enable in vivo MRI at microtesla-range magnetic fields similar in strength to the Earth magnetic field. Despite significant advances in recent years, the potential of microtesla MRI for biomedical imaging is limited by its insufficient signal-to-noise ratio due to a relatively low sample polarization. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used approach that allows polarization enhancement by two-four orders of magnitude without an increase in the polarizing field strength. In this work, the first implementation of microtesla MRI with Overhauser DNP and SQUID signal detection is described. The first measurements of carbon-13 NMR spectra at microtesla fields are also reported. The experiments were performed at the measurement field of 96 microtesla, corresponding to Larmor frequency of 4 kHz for protons and 1 kHz for carbon-13. The Overhauser DNP was carried out at 3.5 –5.7 mT field using rf irradiation at 120 MHz. Objects for imaging included water phantoms and a cactus plant. Aqueous solutions of metabolically relevant sodium bicarbonate, pyruvate, alanine, and lactate, labeled with carbon-13, were used for NMR studies. All the samples were doped with TEMPO free radicals. The Overhauser DNP enabled nuclear polarization enhancement by factor as high as −95 for protons and as high as −200 for carbon-13, corresponding to thermal polarizations at 0.33 T and 1.1 T fields, respectively. These results demonstrate that SQUID-based microtesla MRI can be naturally combined with Overhauser DNP in one system, and that its signal-to-noise performance is greatly improved in this case. They also suggest that microtesla MRI can become an efficient tool for in vivo imaging of hyperpolarized carbon-13, produced by the low-temperature dissolution DNP. PMID:20843715

  3. Typical CT and MRI signs of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    GAN, LU; CHANG, RUIPING; JIN, HUALAN; YANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) features of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEH), the CT and MRI findings of 14 histopathologically confirmed cases of HEH were retrospectively analyzed. Non-contrast and dynamic contrast-enhanced scans were conducted in all cases. A total of 229 lesions were detected in the 14 cases. All cases were classified as one of three types: (i) Solitary nodular type (1 case, 7%); (ii) multifocal nodular type (11 cases, 79%); or (iii) diffuse type (2 cases, 14%). The diameter of the lesions ranged from 5 to 105 mm. For the first two types (solitary and multifocal nodular types), the CT findings included low density lesions with clear margins on non-contrast scans, centripetal enhancement in arterial phase, and homogeneous enhancement in the portal venous and delay phases. The findings of non-contrast MRI scans for these two types included low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, heterogeneous high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and heterogeneous high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images. The lesions were predominantly located in submarginal areas. On contrast-enhanced MRI, the findings for the first two types included peripheral ring-like enhancement with a central low signal intensity (‘black target-like’ sign) and a central enhanced core surrounded by a low signal intensity halo (‘white target-like’ sign). The findings for the third HEH type (diffuse type) on CT and MRI scans included low density or heterogeneous signal intensity lesions involving regions of part or the whole liver, coalescent lesions (‘strip-like’ sign), and gradual enhancement along central vessels (‘lollipop’ sign). Collectively, these findings indicate that the ‘white target-like’ sign, ‘black target-like’ sign, ‘lollipop’ sign and ‘strip-like’ sign, in addition to capsular contraction and submarginal location, on CT and MRI imaging may have implications for the diagnosis of HEH. Furthermore, a variety of MRI sequences may provide additional information for the differential diagnosis of HEH. PMID:26998064

  4. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  5. Belief in a Just What? Demystifying Just World Beliefs by Distinguishing Sources of Justice

    PubMed Central

    Stroebe, Katherine; Postmes, Tom; Täuber, Susanne; Stegeman, Alwin; John, Melissa-Sue

    2015-01-01

    People’s Belief in a Just World (BJW) plays an important role in coping with misfortune and unfairness. This paper demonstrates that understanding of the BJW concept, and its consequences for behavior, is enhanced if we specify what (or who) the source of justice might be. We introduce a new scale, the 5-Dimensional Belief in a Just Treatment Scale (BJT5), which distinguishes five causal dimensions of BJW (God, Nature, Other People, Self, Chance). We confirm the 5-factor structure of the BJT5. We then address whether the BJW should be considered a uni- and/or multi-dimensional construct and find support for our multi-dimensional approach. Finally, we demonstrate convergent and discriminant validity with respect to important correlates of BJW as well as action in response to important negative life events and societal attitudes. This work illustrates the importance of distinguishing causal dimensions with regard to who distributes justice. PMID:25803025

  6. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994. Report To Accompany S. 2104. 103D Congress, 2d Session, Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    This document contains the text of the "Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994" (S. 2104) along with related analysis. The bill establishes a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that provides them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and communication…

  7. RF HEATING OF MRI-ASSISTED CATHETER STEERING COILS FOR INTERVENTIONAL MRI

    PubMed Central

    Settecase, Fabio; Hetts, Steven W.; Martin, Alastair J.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Evans, Lee; Malba, Vincent; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L.; Kucharzyk, Walter; Wilson, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radiofrequency (RF) related heating of conductive wire coils used in magnetically steerable endovascular catheters. MATERIALS AND METHODS A 3-axis microcoil was fabricated onto a 1.8 Fr catheter tip. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MRI system using an agarose gel filled vessel phantom, a transmit/receive body RF coil and a steady state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence, and a fluoroptic thermometry system. Temperature was measured without simulated blood flow at varying distances from magnet isocenter and varying flip angles. Additional experiments were performed with laser-lithographed single-axis microcoil-tipped microcatheters in air and in a saline bath with varied grounding of the microcoil wires. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of RF heating was performed in pigs at 1.5 T with coil-tipped catheters in various positions in the common carotid arteries with SSFP pulse sequence on and off, and under physiologic flow and zero flow conditions. RESULTS In tissue-mimicking agarose gel, RF heating resulted in a maximal temperature increase of 0.35°C after 15 minutes of imaging, 15 cm from magnet isocenter. For a single axis microcoil, maximal temperature increases were 0.73-1.91°C in air and 0.45-0.55°C in saline. In vivo, delayed contrast enhanced MRI revealed no evidence of vascular injury and histopathological sections from the common carotid arteries confirmed the lack of vascular damage. CONCLUSIONS Microcatheter tip microcoils for endovascular catheter steering in MRI experience minimal RF heating under the conditions tested. These data provide the basis for further in vivo testing of this promising technology for endovascular interventional MRI. PMID:21075019

  8. Developing water change spectra and distinguishing change drivers worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Fernando; Destouni, Georgia

    2014-12-01

    The separate and combined effects of different drivers of change to water fluxes and resources on land (CWOL) remain difficult to distinguish and largely unknown, particularly at a global scale. Our study analyzes CWOL during the period 1901-2008, based on available hydroclimatic data for up to 859 hydrological basins. We develop a worldwide spectrum of change magnitudes and directions in Budyko space, from which we distinguish climate and landscape drivers of CWOL. We find that landscape drivers (e.g., changes in land and water use, water storage or water phase) are needed to explain CWOL in at least 74% of the basins studied. The water change effects of such landscape drivers are mostly opposite to those of atmospheric climate change. The change spectrum approach we developed provides a useful tool for quantifying and visualizing CWOL and for distinguishing the effects of climate and landscape drivers across regions and scales.

  9. Classification algorithms with multi-modal data fusion could accurately distinguish neuromyelitis optica from multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Eshaghi, Arman; Riyahi-Alam, Sadjad; Saeedi, Roghayyeh; Roostaei, Tina; Nazeri, Arash; Aghsaei, Aida; Doosti, Rozita; Ganjgahi, Habib; Bodini, Benedetta; Shakourirad, Ali; Pakravan, Manijeh; Ghana'ati, Hossein; Firouznia, Kavous; Zarei, Mojtaba; Azimi, Amir Reza; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) exhibits substantial similarities to multiple sclerosis (MS) in clinical manifestations and imaging results and has long been considered a variant of MS. With the advent of a specific biomarker in NMO, known as anti-aquaporin 4, this assumption has changed; however, the differential diagnosis remains challenging and it is still not clear whether a combination of neuroimaging and clinical data could be used to aid clinical decision-making. Computer-aided diagnosis is a rapidly evolving process that holds great promise to facilitate objective differential diagnoses of disorders that show similar presentations. In this study, we aimed to use a powerful method for multi-modal data fusion, known as a multi-kernel learning and performed automatic diagnosis of subjects. We included 30 patients with NMO, 25 patients with MS and 35 healthy volunteers and performed multi-modal imaging with T1-weighted high resolution scans, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, subjects underwent clinical examinations and cognitive assessments. We included 18 a priori predictors from neuroimaging, clinical and cognitive measures in the initial model. We used 10-fold cross-validation to learn the importance of each modality, train and finally test the model performance. The mean accuracy in differentiating between MS and NMO was 88%, where visible white matter lesion load, normal appearing white matter (DTI) and functional connectivity had the most important contributions to the final classification. In a multi-class classification problem we distinguished between all of 3 groups (MS, NMO and healthy controls) with an average accuracy of 84%. In this classification, visible white matter lesion load, functional connectivity, and cognitive scores were the 3 most important modalities. Our work provides preliminary evidence that computational tools can be used to help make an objective differential diagnosis of NMO and MS. PMID:25610795

  10. Classification algorithms with multi-modal data fusion could accurately distinguish neuromyelitis optica from multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Eshaghi, Arman; Riyahi-Alam, Sadjad; Saeedi, Roghayyeh; Roostaei, Tina; Nazeri, Arash; Aghsaei, Aida; Doosti, Rozita; Ganjgahi, Habib; Bodini, Benedetta; Shakourirad, Ali; Pakravan, Manijeh; Ghana'ati, Hossein; Firouznia, Kavous; Zarei, Mojtaba; Azimi, Amir Reza; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) exhibits substantial similarities to multiple sclerosis (MS) in clinical manifestations and imaging results and has long been considered a variant of MS. With the advent of a specific biomarker in NMO, known as anti-aquaporin 4, this assumption has changed; however, the differential diagnosis remains challenging and it is still not clear whether a combination of neuroimaging and clinical data could be used to aid clinical decision-making. Computer-aided diagnosis is a rapidly evolving process that holds great promise to facilitate objective differential diagnoses of disorders that show similar presentations. In this study, we aimed to use a powerful method for multi-modal data fusion, known as a multi-kernel learning and performed automatic diagnosis of subjects. We included 30 patients with NMO, 25 patients with MS and 35 healthy volunteers and performed multi-modal imaging with T1-weighted high resolution scans, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, subjects underwent clinical examinations and cognitive assessments. We included 18 a priori predictors from neuroimaging, clinical and cognitive measures in the initial model. We used 10-fold cross-validation to learn the importance of each modality, train and finally test the model performance. The mean accuracy in differentiating between MS and NMO was 88%, where visible white matter lesion load, normal appearing white matter (DTI) and functional connectivity had the most important contributions to the final classification. In a multi-class classification problem we distinguished between all of 3 groups (MS, NMO and healthy controls) with an average accuracy of 84%. In this classification, visible white matter lesion load, functional connectivity, and cognitive scores were the 3 most important modalities. Our work provides preliminary evidence that computational tools can be used to help make an objective differential diagnosis of NMO and MS. PMID:25610795

  11. Multiparametric MRI and targeted prostate biopsy: Improvements in cancer detection, localization, and risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bjurlin, Marc A.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Wysock, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that increases the accurate localization of prostate cancer at the time of MRI targeted biopsy, thereby enhancing clinical risk assessment, and improving the ability to appropriately counsel patients regarding therapy. Material and methods We used MEDLINE/PubMed to conduct a comprehensive search of the English medical literature. Articles were reviewed, data was extracted, analyzed, and summarized. In this review, we discuss the mp-MRI prostate exam, its role in targeted prostate biopsy, along with clinical applications and outcomes of MRI targeted biopsies. Results Mp-MRI, consisting of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and possibly MR spectroscopy, has demonstrated improved specificity in prostate cancer detection as compared to conventional T2-weighted images alone. An MRI suspicion score has been developed and is depicted using an institutional Likert or, more recently, a standardized reporting scale (PI-RADS). Techniques of MRI-targeted biopsy include in-gantry MRI guided biopsy, TRUS-guided visual estimation biopsy, and software co-registered MRI-US guided biopsy (