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Sample records for enhances clot susceptibility

  1. Polyphosphate enhances fibrin clot structure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Polyphosphate, a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate, is present in platelet dense granules and is secreted on platelet activation. We recently reported that polyphosphate is a potent hemostatic regulator, serving to activate the contact pathway of blood clotting and accelerate factor V activation. Because polyphosphate did not alter thrombin clotting times, it appeared to exert all its procoagulant actions upstream of thrombin. We now report that polyphosphate enhances fibrin clot structure in a calcium-dependent manner. Fibrin clots formed in the presence of polyphosphate had up to 3-fold higher turbidity, had higher mass-length ratios, and exhibited thicker fibers in scanning electron micrographs. The ability of polyphosphate to enhance fibrin clot turbidity was independent of factor XIIIa activity. When plasmin or a combination of plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activators were included in clotting reactions, fibrin clots formed in the presence of polyphosphate exhibited prolonged clot lysis times. Release of polyphosphate from activated platelets or infectious microorganisms may play an important role in modulating fibrin clot structure and increasing its resistance to fibrinolysis. Polyphosphate may also be useful in enhancing the structure of surgical fibrin sealants. PMID:18544683

  2. T2* “Susceptibility Vessel Sign” Demonstrates Clot Location and Length in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Naggara, Olivier; Raymond, Jean; Domingo Ayllon, Montserrat; Al-Shareef, Fawaz; Touzé, Emmanuel; Chenoufi, Meriem; Gerber, Sophie; Mellerio, Charles; Zuber, Matthieu; Meder, Jean Francois; Mas, Jean-Louis; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of our study was to evaluate, in acute ischemic stroke patients, the diagnostic accuracy of the MRI susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) against catheter angiography (DSA) for the detection of the clot and its value in predicting clot location and length. Materials and Methods We identified consecutive patients (2006–2012) admitted to our center, where 1.5 T MRI is systematically implemented as first-line diagnostic work-up, with: (1) pre-treatment 6-mm-thick multislice 2D T2* sequence; (2) delay from MRI-to-DSA <3 hrs; (3) no fibrinolysis between MRI and DSA. The location and length of SVS on T2* was independently assessed by three readers, and compared per patient, per artery and per segment, to DSA findings, obtained by two different readers. Clot length measured on T2* and DSA were compared using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland & Altman test and Passing & Bablok regression analysis. Results On DSA, a clot was present in 85 patients, in 126 of 1190 (10.6%) arteries and 175 of 1870 (9.4%) segments. Sensitivity of the SVS, as sensed by the used protocol at 1.5 T, was 81.1% (69 of 85 patients) and was higher in anterior (55 of 63, 87.3%), than in posterior circulation stroke (14 of 22, 63.6%, p=0.02). Sensitivity/specificity was 69.8/99.6% (per artery) and 76.6/99.7% (per segment). Positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were all >94%. Inter- and intra-observer ICC was excellent for clot length as measured on T2* (ĸ ≥0.97) and as measured on DSA (ĸ ≥0.94). Correlation between T2* and DSA for clot length was excellent (ICC: 0.88, 95%CI: 0.81–0.92; Bland & Altman: mean bias of 1.6% [95%CI: -4.7 to 7.8%], Passing & Bablok: 0.91). Conclusions SVS is a specific marker of clot location in the anterior and posterior circulation. Clot length greater than 6 mm can be reliably measured on T2*. PMID:24146915

  3. Adhesion of Blood Clots Can Be Enhanced When Copolymerized with a Macromer That Is Crosslinked by Coagulation Factor XIIIa.

    PubMed

    Chan, Karen Y T; Zhao, Chunyi; Siren, Erika M J; Chan, Jeanne C Y; Boschman, Jeffrey; Kastrup, Christian J

    2016-06-13

    The adhesion of blood clots to blood vessels, such as through the adhesion of fibrin, is essential in hemostasis. While numerous strategies for initiating clot formation and preventing clot lysis are being developed to create improved hemostatic agents, strategies for enhancing clot adhesion have not been widely explored. Here, we show that adhesion of blood clots can be increased by adding a previously characterized synthetic polymer that is crosslinked by coagulation factor XIIIa during clotting. Addition of the polymer to normal plasma increased the adhesive strength of clots by 2-fold. It also recovered the adhesive strength of nonadhesive fibrinogen-deficient whole blood clots from <0.06 kPa to 1.9 ± 0.14 kPa, which is similar to the adhesive strength of a fibrinogen-rich clot (1.8 ± 0.64 kPa). The polymer also enabled plasma clots to remain adhered under fibrinolytic conditions. By demonstrating that the adhesive strength of clots can be increased with a synthetic material, this provides a potential strategy for creating advanced hemostatic materials, such as treatments for fibrinogen deficiency in trauma-induced coagulopathy. PMID:27140446

  4. SMTP (Stachybotrys microspora triprenyl phenol) enhances clot clearance in a pulmonary embolism model in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stachybotrys microspora triprenyl phenols (SMTPs) are a novel family of small molecules that enhance both activation and fibrin-binding of plasminogen. While their effects on fibrinolysis have been characterized in vitro, little is known about their activity in vivo with respect to plasminogen activation and blood clot clearance. Results To select a potent SMTP congener for the evaluation of its action in vitro and in vivo, we tested several SMTP congeners with distinct structural properties for their effects on plasminogen activation. As a result, SMTP-7 (orniplabin) was found to have distinguished activity. Several lines of biochemical evidence supported the idea that SMTP-7 acted as a plasminogen modulator. SMTP-7 elevated plasma level of plasmin-α2-antiplasmin complex, an index of plasmin formation in vivo, 1.5-fold in mice after the intravenous injections at doses of 5 and 10 mg kg-1. In a rat pulmonary embolism model, SMTP-7 (5 mg kg-1) enhanced the rate of clot clearance ~3-fold in the absence of exogenous plasminogen activator. Clot clearance was enhanced further by 5 mg kg-1 of SMTP-7 in combination with single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Conclusions Our results show that SMTP-7 is a superior plasminogen modulator among the SMTP family compounds and suggest that the agent enhances plasmin generation in vivo, leading to clearance of thrombi in a model of pulmonary embolism. PMID:22230042

  5. Clot retraction affects the extent of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis in an ex vivo porcine thrombosis model

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jonathan T.; Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Perrin, Stephen R.; Vela, Deborah C.; Holland, Christy K.

    2013-01-01

    Using an FDA-approved contrast agent (Definity®) and thrombolytic drug (rt-PA), we investigated ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis in two whole-blood clot models. Porcine venous blood was collected from donor hogs and coagulated in two different materials. This method produced clots with differing compositional properties, as determined by routine scanning electron microscopy and histology. Clots were deployed in an ex vivo porcine thrombolysis model, while an intermittent ultrasound scheme previously developed to maximize stable cavitation was applied and acoustic emissions were detected. Exposure of clots to 3.15 μg/mL rt-PA promoted lysis in both clot models, compared to exposure to plasma alone. However, in the presence of rt-PA, Definity®, and ultrasound, only unretracted clots experienced significant enhancement of thrombolysis compared to treatment with rt-PA. In these clots, microscopy studies revealed loose erythrocyte aggregates, a significantly less extensive fibrin network, and a higher porosity, which may facilitate increase penetration of thrombolytics by cavitation. PMID:23453629

  6. Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Blood Clots Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood that can be stationary (thrombosis) and block blood flow or break loose ( ...

  7. Blood clotting

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... matter of several minutes. When a small artery is cut, the collagen fibers in its tissue are ... attract even more platelets. Eventually a platelet plug is formed, and the external bleeding stops. Clotting factors ...

  8. Bidirectional functions of thrombin on fibrinolysis: Evidence of thrombin-dependent enhancement of fibrinolysis provided by spontaneous plasma clot lysis.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Martyna; Suzuki, Yuko; Sano, Hideto; Brzoska, Tomasz; Tanaka, Hiroki; Urano, Tetsumei

    2016-07-01

    Besides procoagulant activity, thrombin exhibits anticoagulant and profibrinolytic activities. We demonstrated that the euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT) was shortened by endogenously generated thrombin as a result of the inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). In contrast, thrombin suppressed fibrinolytic activity through the activation of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI). Here, using three different clot lysis assays of the ECLT, the tissue plasminogen activator supplemented plasma clot lysis time (tPA-PCLT) and the spontaneous plasma clot lysis time (s-PCLT), we analyzed how the coagulation process modifies fibrinolysis. The ECLT was shortened by exogenously supplemented thrombin in a dose-dependent manner in the absence of calcium ion (Ca(++)), whereas this shortening was not observed in the presence of Ca(++) where endogenous prothrombin was effectively activated to thrombin. This shortening was also not observed for the tPA-PCLT, in which tPA is supplemented in excess and PAI-1 activity is mostly lost. On the contrary, thrombin dose-dependently prolonged the tPA-PCLT, which was mostly abolished by inhibitors of carboxypeptidase and activated FXIII, suggesting that the prolongation is TAFI- and Factor XIII-dependent. The s-PCLT was shortened when thrombin generation was boosted by supplementing tissue factor and phosphatidylserine together with Ca(++), which was more apparent in the presence of inhibitors of activated FXIII and activated TAFI. Thus, thrombin appeared to express its enhancing effect on fibrinolysis even in plasma, in addition to its inhibiting effect. These bidirectional functions of thrombin on fibrinolysis seem to take place on demand under different environments to maintain adequate vascular blood flow. PMID:27179129

  9. Blood clotting

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The body contains a natural process to stop bleeding from minor cuts in a matter of several minutes. When a small artery is cut, the collagen fibers ... its tissue are exposed, which signals the clotting process to begin. As platelets begin to adhere to ...

  10. Fibrinolytic enzyme production by newly isolated Bacillus cereus SRM-001 with enhanced in-vitro blood clot lysis potential.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Manoj Kumar; Chandrasekaran, Muthukumaran; Rajesh, Mathur

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of plasmin-like microbial fibrinolytic enzymes having high specificity and negligible side effects is crucial for thrombolytic therapy. Herein, we report one such extra-cellular fibrinolytic enzyme producing Bacillus cereus SRM-001 isolated from the blood-laden soil of a chicken dump yard. The potency of the enzyme was established with fibrin plate assay and in-vitro blood clot lysis assay. The shake-flask operating parameters and media composition were optimized for maximizing the productivity of the enzyme. The operating parameters, pH 7, 37°C, 1% inoculum volume and 24 h inoculum age, were found to be the optimum. The levels of media components, corn flour (0.3% w/v), soyabean powder (1.9% w/v) and MnSO4 (11.5 mM) were optimized by statistical analysis using Box-Behnken design derived RSM. This resulted in an almost 1.8 fold increase in fibrinolytic enzyme productivity. The 3D response surface plots showed soyabean powder and MnSO4 to be the key ingredients for enhancing the enzyme productivity, whereas corn flour had a marginal effect. The in-vitro blood clot lysis assay conducted at near physiological pH 7 at 37°C showed the enzyme to be a potential therapeutic thrombolytic agent. PMID:26582284

  11. Histotripsy Thrombolysis on Retracted Clots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Owens, Gabe E; Cain, Charles A; Gurm, Hitinder S; Macoskey, Jonathan; Xu, Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Retracted blood clots have been previously recognized to be more resistant to drug-based thrombolysis methods, even with ultrasound and microbubble enhancements. Microtripsy, a new histotripsy approach, has been investigated as a non-invasive, drug-free and image-guided method that uses ultrasound to break up clots with improved treatment accuracy and a lower risk of vessel damage compared with the traditional histotripsy thrombolysis approach. Unlike drug-mediated thrombolysis, which is dependent on the permeation of the thrombolytic agents into the clot, microtripsy controls acoustic cavitation to fractionate clots. We hypothesize that microtripsy thrombolysis is effective on retracted clots and that the treatment efficacy can be enhanced using strategies incorporating electronic focal steering. To test our hypothesis, retracted clots were prepared in vitro and the mechanical properties were quantitatively characterized. Microtripsy thrombolysis was applied on the retracted clots in an in vitro flow model using three different strategies: single-focus, electronically-steered multi-focus and dual-pass multi-focus. Results show that microtripsy was used to successfully generate a flow channel through the retracted clot and the flow was restored. The multi-focus and the dual-pass treatments incorporating the electronic focal steering significantly increased the recanalized flow channel size compared to the single-focus treatments. The dual-pass treatments achieved a restored flow rate up to 324 mL/min without cavitation contacting the vessel wall. The clot debris particles generated from microtripsy thrombolysis remained within the safe range. The results of this study show the potential of microtripsy thrombolysis for retracted clot recanalization with the enhancement of electronic focal steering. PMID:27166017

  12. Postpartum Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Infection Postpartum Blood Clots Postpartum Thyroid Disorders Postpartum Depression The risk of developing blood clots (thrombophlebitis) is ... Breast Infection Postpartum Blood Clots Postpartum Thyroid Disorders Postpartum Depression NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. CONSUMERS: Click ...

  13. Pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound enhanced tPA mediated thrombolysis in a novel in vivo clot model, a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael J.; Frenkel, Victor; Dromi, Sergio; Thomas, Peter; Lewis, Ryan P.; Li, King CP; Horne, McDonald; Wood, Bradford J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Thrombotic disease continues to account for significant morbidity and mortality. Ultrasound energy has been investigated as a potential primary and adjunctive treatment for thrombotic disease. We have previously shown that pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enhances thrombolysis induced by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in vitro, including describing the non-destructive mechanism by which tPA availability and consequent activity is increased. In this study we aimed to determined if the same effects could be achieved in vivo. Materials and Methods In this study, pulsed-HIFU exposures combined with tPA boluses was compared to treatment with tPA alone, HIFU alone and control in a novel in vivo clot model. Clots were formed in the rabbit marginal ear vein and verified using venography and infrared imaging. The efficacy of thrombolytic treatment was monitored via high resolution ultrasonography for five hours post treatment. The cross-sectional area of clots at 4 points along the vein was measured and normalized to the pre-treatment size. Results At five hours the complete recanalization of clots treated with pulsed-HIFU and tPA was significantly different from the partial recanalization seen with tPA treatment alone. tPA treatment alone showed a significant decrease in clot versus control, where HIFU was not significantly different than control. Histological analysis of the vessel walls in the treated veins showed no apparent irreversible damage to endothelial cells or extravascular tissue. Conclusions This study demonstrates that tPA mediated thrombolysis can be significantly enhanced when combined with non-invasive pulsed-HIFU exposures. PMID:17481699

  14. Diastolic timed Vibro-Percussion at 50 Hz delivered across a chest wall sized meat barrier enhances clot dissolution and remotely administered Streptokinase effectiveness in an in-vitro model of acute coronary thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low Frequency Vibro-Percussion (LFVP) assists clearance of thrombi in catheter systems and when applied to the heart and timed to diastole is known to enhance coronary flow. However LFVP on a clotted coronary like vessel given engagement over a chest wall sized barrier (to resemble non-invasive heart attack therapy) requires study. Methods One hour old clots (n=16) were dispensed within a flexible segment of Soft-Flo catheter (4 mm lumen), weighted, interfaced with Heparinized Saline (HS), secured atop a curved dampening base, and photographed. A ~4 cm meat slab was placed over the segment and randomized to receive intermittent LFVP (engaged, - disengaged at 1 second intervals), or no LFVP for 20 minutes. HS was pulsed (~120/80 mmHg), with the diastolic phase coordinated to match LFVP delivery. The segment was then re-photographed and aspirated of fluid to determine post clot weight. The trial was then repeated with 0.5 mls of Streptokinase (15,000 IU/100 microlitre) delivered ~ 2 cm upstream from the clot. Results LFVP - HS only samples (vs. controls) showed; a) development of clot length fluid channels absent in the control group (p < 0.0002); b) enhanced dissolved clot mixing scores ( 5.0 vs. 0.8, p < 2.8 E – 6); and c) increased percent clot dissolution (23.0% vs. 1.8% respectively, p < 8.5 E-6). LFVP - SK samples had a similar comparative clot disruptive profile, however fluid channels developed faster and percent clot dissolution more than doubled (51.0% vs. 3.0%, p< 9.8 E- 6). Conclusion Diastolic timed LFVP (50 Hz) engaged across a chest wall sized barrier enhances clot disruptive effects to an underlying coronary like system. PMID:23146079

  15. Low-Dose rt-PA Enhances Clot Resolution in Brain Hemorrhage: The Intraventricular Hemorrhage Thrombolysis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Naff, Neal; Williams, Michael; Keyl, Penelope M.; Tuhrim, Stanley; Bullock, M. Ross; Mayer, Stephan; Coplin, William; Narayan, Raj; Haines, Stephen; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Zuccarello, Mario; Brock, David; Awad, Issam; Ziai, Wendy C.; Marmarou, Anthony; Rhoney, Denise; McBee, Nichol; Lane, Karen; Hanley, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) have a reported mortality of 50–80%. We evaluated a clot lytic treatment strategy for these patients in terms of mortality, ventricular infection, and bleeding safety events and for its effect on the rate of intraventricular clot lysis. Methods 48 Patients were enrolled at 14 centers and randomized to treatment with 3mg recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) or placebo. Demographic characteristics, severity factors, safety outcomes (mortality, infection, bleeding), and clot resolution rates were compared in the two groups. Results Severity factors, including admission GCS, ICH volume, IVH volume and blood pressure, were evenly distributed, as were adverse events except for an increased frequency of respiratory system events in the placebo-treated group. Neither ICP nor Cerebral Perfusion pressure (CPP) differed substantially between treatment groups on presentation, with EVD closure, or during the active treatment phase. Frequency of death and ventriculitis was substantially lower than expected and bleeding events remained below the pre-specified threshold: mortality (18%, rt-PA; 23%, placebo); ventriculitis (8%, rt-PA; 9%, placebo); symptomatic bleeding (23%, rt-PA; 5% placebo, which approached statistical significance (p=0.1)). The median duration of dosing was 7.5 days for rt-PA and 12 days for placebo. There was a significant beneficial effect of rt-PA on rate of clot resolution Conclusions Low-dose rt-PA for the treatment of ICH with IVH has an acceptable safety profile compared to placebo and prior historical controls. Data from a well-designed Phase III clinical trial, such as CLEAR III, will be needed to fully evaluate this treatment. Clinical Trial Registration Information Participant enrollment began prior to July 1, 2005. PMID:21868730

  16. Parasitism enhances tilapia susceptibility to Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of columnaris disease. Many commercially important freshwater fish worldwide are susceptible to columnaris disease that can result in high fish mortality. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is a protozoan parasite in many ...

  17. The development of a blood clotting response test for discriminating between difenacoum-resistant and susceptible Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus, Berk.).

    PubMed

    Gill, J E; Kerins, G M; Langton, S D; MacNicoll, A D

    1993-01-01

    1. A new test for identifying levels of difenacoum resistance in the Norway rat is described, based upon the differential physiological response to difenacoum administration. 2. This test is based on changes in blood clotting activity over 4 days, following administration of the rodenticide difenacoum in conjunction with menadione (vitamin K3). 3. The anticoagulant effect is reduced only in rats that are resistant or tolerant to difenacoum. 4. This test procedure is quicker than traditional feeding tests, and identifies the degree of resistance in both laboratory and wild rats that have difenacoum resistance genes. PMID:8097452

  18. Insect hemolymph clotting.

    PubMed

    Dushay, Mitchell S

    2009-08-01

    The clot's appearance in different large-bodied insects has been described, but until recently, little was known about any insect clot's molecular makeup, and few experiments could directly test its function. Techniques have been developed in Drosophila (fruit fly) larvae to identify clotting factors that can then be tested for effects on hemostasis, healing, and immunity. This has revealed unanticipated complexity in the hemostatic mechanisms in these larvae. While the clot's molecular structure is not yet fully understood, progress is being made, and the loss of clotting factors has been shown to cause subtle immune defects. The few similarities between coagulation in different insect species and life stages, and the current state of knowledge about coagulation in insects are discussed. PMID:19418022

  19. Preventing and Treating Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treating Blood Clots Request Permissions Download PDF Preventing and Treating Blood Clots January 20, 2015 To ... 2013, ASCO updated the clinical practice guideline about preventing and treating blood clots for people with cancer ...

  20. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Jul 12,2016 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  1. Synthetic Hormones and Clot Formation.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, Albe C; Visagie, Amcois; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2016-08-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs), colloquially referred to as "the pill," have been regarded as a medical breakthrough, as they have improved the lives of countless women, from simplifying family planning to the treatment of acne, endometriosis, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and dysmenorrhea. Unfortunately, COC usage has been associated with an increased occurrence of venous thrombosis and therefore a systemic hypercoagulable state in susceptible females. Here we discuss the health risks of COC usage and use viscoelastic and morphological techniques to investigate the effect of different COC constituents on clot formation, particularly fibrin network packaging and whole blood viscoelasticity. Viscoelastic properties of whole blood showed gender-specific changes while morphological alterations were person-specific, regardless of gender. Using scanning electron microscopy and thromboelastography provides great insight regarding fibrin packaging and the development of a hypercoagulable state in high-risk individuals. We proposed a three-step approach where (1) an individual's coagulation profile baseline is determined, after which (2) the "ideal" combination of constituents is prescribed, and (3) the coagulation profile of the individual is monitored to assess possible risk of thrombosis. Only in following such an individualized patient-oriented approach will we be able to avoid the many health issues due to COC usage in susceptible females. PMID:27515365

  2. Circulating Microparticles Alter Formation, Structure, and Properties of Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Zubairova, Laily D.; Nabiullina, Roza M.; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Zuev, Yuriy F.; Mustafin, Ilshat G.; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Weisel, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of circulating microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis, there is limited evidence for potential causative effects of naturally produced cell-derived microparticles on fibrin clot formation and its properties. We studied the significance of blood microparticles for fibrin formation, structure, and susceptibility to fibrinolysis by removing them from platelet-free plasma using filtration. Clots made in platelet-free and microparticle-depleted plasma samples from the same healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Microparticles accelerate fibrin polymerisation and support formation of more compact clots that resist internal and external fibrinolysis. These variations correlate with faster thrombin generation, suggesting thrombin-mediated kinetic effects of microparticles on fibrin formation, structure, and properties. In addition, clots formed in the presence of microparticles, unlike clots from the microparticle-depleted plasma, contain 0.1–0.5-μm size granular and CD61-positive material on fibres, suggesting that platelet-derived microparticles attach to fibrin. Therefore, the blood of healthy individuals contains functional microparticles at the levels that have a procoagulant potential. They affect the structure and stability of fibrin clots indirectly through acceleration of thrombin generation and through direct physical incorporation into the fibrin network. Both mechanisms underlie a potential role of microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis as modulators of fibrin formation, structure, and resistance to fibrinolysis. PMID:26635081

  3. Laser interaction with pseudoblood clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Stahl, David B.

    1997-05-01

    In recent years lasers have become a common tool for medical procedures. Lasers are typically used to deliver energy/power to a biological specimen to alter its characteristics, fuse tissue or destroy a particular structure. Under a Los Alamos CRADA, we have been working with a medical laser company and a laser medical center to study the laser interaction with pseudo-blood clots that are typical of those found in human coronary arteries. A 577-nm flash lamp pumped dye laser beam is pulsed through a 300- micron optical fiber to deliver the laser energy on the surface of a pseudo-clot material. The fiber and pseudo-clot are surrounded by water or x-ray contrast fluid transparent at 577 and 514 nm. The laser-pulse/clot interaction creates a bubble at the water-clot interface. The bubble expands out and collapses back on the pseudo-clot resulting part of the clot being removed. Using a backlight technique with an electronic framing camera we record the bubble growth, expansion, and collapse, and the debris generated by the interaction.

  4. Fibrin Architecture in Clots: A Quantitative Polarized Light Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Peter; Przyklenk, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Fibrin plays a vital structural role in thrombus integrity. Thus, the ability to assess fibrin architecture has potential to provide insight into thrombosis and thrombolysis. Fibrin has an anisotropic molecular structure, which enables it to be seen with polarized light. Therefore, we aimed to determine if automated polarized light microscopy methods of quantifying two structural parameters; fibrin fiber bundle orientation and fibrin's optical retardation (OR: a measure of molecular anisotropy) could be used to assess thrombi. To compare fibrin fiber bundle orientation we analyzed picrosirius red-stained sections obtained from clots formed: (A) in vitro, (B) in injured and stenotic coronary arteries, and (C) in surgically created aortic aneurysms (n = 6 for each group). To assess potential changes in OR, we examined fibrin in picrosirius red-stained clots formed after ischemic preconditioning (10 minutes ischemia + 10 minutes reflow; a circumstance shown to enhance lysability) and in control clots (n = 8 each group). The degree of fibrin organization differed significantly according to the location of clot formation; fibrin was most aligned in the aneurysms and least aligned in vitro whereas fibrin in the coronary clots had an intermediate organization. The OR of fibrin in the clots formed after ischemic preconditioning was lower than that in controls (2.9 ± 0.5 nm versus 5.4 ± 1.0 nm, P < 0.05). The automated polarized light analysis methods not only enabled fibrin architecture to be assessed, but also revealed structural differences in clots formed under different circumstances. PMID:19054699

  5. Altered fibrin clot structure/function in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome: association with thrombotic manifestation.

    PubMed

    Celińska-Lowenhoff, M; Iwaniec, T; Padjas, A; Musiał, J; Undas, A

    2014-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that plasma fibrin clot structure/function is unfavourably altered in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Ex vivo plasma clot permeability, turbidity and susceptibility to lysis were determined in 126 consecutive patients with APS enrolled five months or more since thrombotic event vs 105 controls. Patients with both primary and secondary APS were characterised by 11% lower clot permeability (p<0.001), 4.8% shorter lag phase (p<0.001), 10% longer clot lysis time (p<0.001), and 4.7% higher maximum level of D-dimer released from clots (p=0.02) as compared to the controls. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed denser fibrin networks composed of thinner fibres in APS. Clots from patients with "triple-antibody positivity" were formed after shorter lag phase (p=0.019) and were lysed at a slower rate (p=0.004) than in the remainder. Clots from APS patients who experienced stroke and/or myocardial infarction were 8% less permeable (p=0.01) and susceptible to lysis (10.4% longer clot lysis time [p=0.006] and 4.5% slower release of D-dimer from clots [p=0.01]) compared with those following venous thromboembolism alone. Multivariate analysis adjusted for potential confounders showed that in APS patients, lupus anticoagulant and "triple-positivity" were the independent predictors of clot permeability, while "triple-positivity" predicted lysis time. We conclude that APS is associated with prothrombotic plasma fibrin clot phenotype, with more pronounced abnormalities in arterial thrombosis. Molecular background for this novel prothrombotic mechanism in APS remains to be established. PMID:24652596

  6. The Arachidonate 15-Lipoxygenase Enzyme Product 15-HETE Is Present in Heart Tissue from Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease and Enhances Clot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lundqvist, Annika; Sandstedt, Mikael; Sandstedt, Joakim; Wickelgren, Ruth; Hansson, Göran I.; Jeppsson, Anders; Hultén, Lillemor Mattsson

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is a major cause of death and morbidity and the search for novel therapeutic targets is still required. We have previously shown that the enzyme arachidonate 15 lipoxygenase (ALOX15), which catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to 15-hydroxy eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), is highly expressed in ischemic heart tissue, but its role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease is unclear. Here we showed that expression of ALOX15, but not ALOX12 or ALOX15B, was increased in ischemic versus non-ischemic human heart biopsy samples. A similar ALOX expression pattern was found in hypoxic human cardiomyocytes and cardiac endothelial cells. We also showed that levels of 15-HETE were significantly higher in ischemic versus non-ischemic human heart biopsy samples and showed a tendency to increase in serum from the patients with ischemic heart disease. Moreover, hypoxia increased the production of 15-HETE levels from human cardiomyocytes and cardiac endothelial cells. The hypoxia-induced increase in 15-HETE levels from human cardiomyocytes was inhibited by the ALOX15 inhibitor baicalein. Finally, by using intrinsic rotational thromboelastometry, we showed that human whole blood clotted faster in the presence of 15-HETE. In summary, we propose that increased ALOX15 expression in heart tissue under ischemic conditions may lead to increased production of 15-HETE, potentially contributing to thrombosis. PMID:27552229

  7. Visualization of Clot Lysis in a Rat Embolic Stroke Model: Application to Comparative Lytic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Walvick, Ronn P.; Bråtane, Bernt T.; Henninger, Nils; Sicard, Kenneth M.; Bouley, James; Yu, Zhanyang; Lo, Eng; Wang, Xiaoying; Fisher, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a novel MRI method for imaging clot lysis in a rat embolic stroke model, and to compare tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) based clot lysis with and without recombinant Annexin-2 (rA2). Methods Experiment 1: In vitro optimization of clot visualization using multiple MRI contrast agents in concentrations ranging from 5 to 50μL in 250μL blood. Experiment 2: In vivo characterization of the time course of clot lysis using the clot developed in the previous experiment. Diffusion, perfusion, angiography, and T1-weighted MRI for clot imaging were conducted prior to and during treatment with vehicle (n=6), tPA (n=8) or rA2+tPA (n=8) at multiple time-points. Brains were removed for ex vivo clot localization. Results Clots created with 25μL Magnevist© were the most stable and provided the highest contrast-to-noise ratio. In the vehicle group, clot length as assessed by T1-weighted imaging correlated with histology (r=0.93). Clot length and CBF-derived ischemic lesion volume were significantly smaller than vehicle at 15 minutes post-treatment initiation in the rA2+tPA group, while in the tPA group no significant reduction from vehicle was observed until 30 minutes post-treatment initiation. The rA2+tPA group had a significantly shorter clot length than the tPA group at 60 and 90 minutes post-treatment initiation, and significantly smaller CBF deficit than the tPA group at 90 minutes post-treatment initiation. Conclusions We introduce a novel MRI based clot imaging method for in vivo monitoring of clot lysis. Lytic efficacy of tPA was enhanced by rA2. PMID:21372305

  8. Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Deep Vein Thrombosis Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of ... More "Deep Vein Thrombosis" Articles Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT / Skater Tara Lipinski Speaks Out About ...

  9. Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting

    MedlinePlus

    ... excessive blood clotting in the heart and brain: Atherosclerosis is a disease in which a waxy substance ... is considered healthy. These conditions can lead to atherosclerosis, which increases the risk of clots. Metabolic syndrome ...

  10. Enhanced Total Ionizing Dose Susceptibility in Narrow Channel Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhang-Li; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan; Shao, Hua; Ning, Bing-Xu; Bi, Da-Wei; Chen, Ming; Zou, Shi-Chang

    2011-07-01

    Total ionizing dose effects of different transistor sizes in a 0.18 μm technology are studied by 60Co γ-ray irradiation. Significant threshold voltage shift is observed for the narrow channel devices, which is called the radiation induced narrow channel effect (RINCE). A charge sharing model is introduced to understand the phenomenon. The devices' characteristic degradations after irradiation, such as threshold voltage shift, increase in on-state current under different drain biases and substrate biases, are discussed in detail. Radiation induced oxide trapped charge at the edges of shallow trench isolation plays an important role in the RINCE. Narrow channel devices are susceptible to the total ionizing dose effect.

  11. Enhanced susceptibility to predation in corals of compromised condition

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Caitlin M.; Miller, Margaret W.

    2015-01-01

    The marine gastropod, Coralliophila abbreviata, is an obligate corallivore that causes substantial mortality in Caribbean Acropora spp. Considering the imperiled status of Acropora cervicornis and A. palmata, a better understanding of ecological interactions resulting in tissue loss may enable more effective conservation strategies. We examined differences in susceptibility of A. cervicornis to C. abbreviata predation based on coral tissue condition. Coral tissue condition was a strong determinant of snail prey choice, with snails preferring A. cervicornis fragments that were diseased or mechanically damaged over healthy fragments. In addition, snails always chose fragments undergoing active predation by another snail, while showing no preference for a non-feeding snail when compared with an undisturbed prey fragment. These results indicate that the condition of A. cervicornis prey influenced foraging behavior of C. abbreviata, creating a potential feedback that may exacerbate damage from predation in coral populations compromised by other types of disturbance. PMID:26734500

  12. Enhanced brain susceptibility to negative stimuli in adolescents: ERP evidences

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiajin; Ju, Enxia; Meng, Xianxin; Chen, Xuhai; Zhu, Siyu; Yang, Jiemin; Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies investigated neural substrates of emotional face processing in adolescents and its comparison with adults. As emotional faces elicit more of emotional expression recognition rather than direct emotional responding, it remains undetermined how adolescents are different from adults in brain susceptibility to emotionally stressful stimuli. Methods: Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded for highly negative (HN), moderately negative (MN), and neutral pictures in 20 adolescents and 20 adults while subjects performed a standard/deviant distinction task by pressing different keys, irrespective of the emotionality of deviant stimuli. Results: Adolescents exhibited more negative amplitudes for HN vs. neutral pictures in N1 (100–150 ms), P2 (130–190 ms), N2 (210–290 ms), and P3 (360–440 ms) components. In addition, adolescents showed more negative amplitudes for MN compared to neutral pictures in N1, P2, and N2 components. By contrast, adults exhibited significant emotion effects for HN stimuli in N2 and P3 amplitudes but not in N1 and P2 amplitudes, and they did not exhibit a significant emotion effect for MN stimuli at all these components. In the 210–290 ms time interval, the emotion effect for HN stimuli was significant across frontal and central regions in adolescents, while this emotion effect was noticeable only in the central region for adults. Conclusions: Adolescents are more emotionally sensitive to negative stimuli compared to adults, regardless of the emotional intensity of the stimuli, possibly due to the immature prefrontal control system over the limbic emotional inputs during adolescence. PMID:25972790

  13. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  14. Role of clot-associated (-derived) thrombin in cell proliferation induced by fibrin clots in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gandossi, E; Lunven, C; Berry, C N

    2000-01-01

    Thrombin is a potent mitogenic agent. Clot-associated thrombin retains its amidolytic and pro-aggregant activity. We therefore studied the ability of fibrin clots to induce proliferation in CCL39 cells (Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts), in the absence and presence of the thrombin inhibitors PPACK, recombinant hirudin (rHV2 Lys47) and heparin:antithrombin III. Fibrin clots incubated for 48 h with CCL39 cells led to significant cell proliferation, which was dependent on the concentration of thrombin used to prepare the clots. Thus, clots prepared with 91 nmol l−1 thrombin produced a similar proliferation (231±21%) to that obtained with 50 nmol l−1 thrombin in solution (213±29%). Rabbit plasma clots led to a 499±41% increase in cell number under identical conditions. Fibrin clot-induced cell proliferation was inhibited by all three thrombin inhibitors with no difference in IC50 values compared to those obtained against thrombin in solution, suggesting that cell proliferation be due to thrombin leaching from the clots. We found a time-dependent increase in thrombin release from the clots attaining a plateau at 24 h (∼61% of the total thrombin used in clot formation). Clots separated from the cells using porous cell culture chamber inserts led to similar proliferation to that of clots in contact with the cells. Thus fibrin-clot induced CCL39 proliferation is due to thrombin released from the clots. PMID:10696104

  15. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  16. Platelet Rich Plasma Clot Releasate Preconditioning Induced PI3K/AKT/NFκB Signaling Enhances Survival and Regenerative Function of Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Hostile Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yan; Huang, Sha; Wu, Yan; Nie, Xiaohu; Liu, Hongwei; Ma, Kui; Zhou, Jiping; Gao, Dongyun; Feng, Changjiang; Yang, Siming

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been optimal targets in the development of cell based therapies, but their limited availability and high death rate after transplantation remains a concern in clinical applications. This study describes novel effects of platelet rich clot releasate (PRCR) on rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs), with the former driving a gene program, which can reduce apoptosis and promote the regenerative function of the latter in hostile microenvironments through enhancement of paracrine/autocrine factors. By using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence and western blot analyses, we showed that PRCR preconditioning could alleviate the apoptosis of BM-MSCs under stress conditions induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and serum deprivation by enhancing expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) via stimulation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)/PI3K/AKT/NF-κB signaling pathways. Furthermore, the effects of PRCR preconditioned GFP-BM-MSCs subcutaneously transplanted into rats 6 h after wound surgery were examined by histological and other tests from days 0–22 after transplantation. Engraftment of the PRCR preconditioned BM-MSCs not only significantly attenuated apoptosis and wound size but also improved epithelization and blood vessel regeneration of skin via regulation of the wound microenvironment. Thus, preconditioning with PRCR, which reprograms BM-MSCs to tolerate hostile microenvironments and enhance regenerative function by increasing levels of paracrine factors through PDGFR-α/PI3K/AKT/NF-κB signaling pathways would be a safe method for boosting the effectiveness of transplantation therapy in the clinic. PMID:23885779

  17. Fluid Mechanics of Blood Clot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelson, Aaron L.; Neeves, Keith B.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular blood clots form in an environment in which hydrodynamic forces dominate and in which fluid-mediated transport is the primary means of moving material. The clotting system has evolved to exploit fluid dynamic mechanisms and to overcome fluid dynamic challenges to ensure that clots that preserve vascular integrity can form over the wide range of flow conditions found in the circulation. Fluid-mediated interactions between the many large deformable red blood cells and the few small rigid platelets lead to high platelet concentrations near vessel walls where platelets contribute to clotting. Receptor-ligand pairs with diverse kinetic and mechanical characteristics work synergistically to arrest rapidly flowing cells on an injured vessel. Variations in hydrodynamic stresses switch on and off the function of key clotting polymers. Protein transport to, from, and within a developing clot determines whether and how fast it grows. We review ongoing experimental and modeling research to understand these and related phenomena.

  18. Fluid Mechanics of Blood Clot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fogelson, Aaron L.; Neeves, Keith B.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular blood clots form in an environment in which hydrodynamic forces dominate and in which fluid-mediated transport is the primary means of moving material. The clotting system has evolved to exploit fluid dynamic mechanisms and to overcome fluid dynamic challenges to ensure that clots that preserve vascular integrity can form over the wide range of flow conditions found in the circulation. Fluid-mediated interactions between the many large deformable red blood cells and the few small rigid platelets lead to high platelet concentrations near vessel walls where platelets contribute to clotting. Receptor-ligand pairs with diverse kinetic and mechanical characteristics work synergistically to arrest rapidly flowing cells on an injured vessel. Variations in hydrodynamic stresses switch on and off the function of key clotting polymers. Protein transport to, from, and within a developing clot determines whether and how fast it grows. We review ongoing experimental and modeling research to understand these and related phenomena. PMID:26236058

  19. Molecular mechanisms of the shrimp clotting system.

    PubMed

    Maningas, Mary Beth B; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2013-04-01

    Shrimp, like other invertebrates, relies solely on its innate immune system, to combat invading pathogens. The invertebrate immune system has ancient origins that involve cellular and humoral responses. The clotting system of the humoral immune response is the first line of defense against pathogens and also serves to prevent blood loss during injury and wound healing. Tranglutaminase and clotting protein are molecules involved in the blood clotting system of crayfish and shrimp. Studies have shown that the shrimp clotting system is linked with the activation of antimicrobial peptides, similar to that of the horseshoe crab. Unlike the horseshoe crab and crayfish blood coagulation which are well studied systems, blood clotting in shrimp remains poorly understood. Here we review the shrimp clotting system and its involvement in innate immunity. PMID:23044383

  20. Genetically Determined Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Mice Causally Involves Accelerated and Enhanced Recruitment of Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christine; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Lang, Roland; Brandau, Sven; Hermann, Corinna; Ehlers, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classical twin studies and recent linkage analyses of African populations have revealed a potential involvement of host genetic factors in susceptibility or resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to identify the candidate genes involved and test their causal implication, we capitalized on the mouse model of tuberculosis, since inbred mouse strains also differ substantially in their susceptibility to infection. Two susceptible and two resistant mouse strains were aerogenically infected with 1,000 CFU of M. tuberculosis, and the regulation of gene expression was examined by Affymetrix GeneChip U74A array with total lung RNA 2 and 4 weeks postinfection. Four weeks after infection, 96 genes, many of which are involved in inflammatory cell recruitment and activation, were regulated in common. One hundred seven genes were differentially regulated in susceptible mouse strains, whereas 43 genes were differentially expressed only in resistant mice. Data mining revealed a bias towards the expression of genes involved in granulocyte pathophysiology in susceptible mice, such as an upregulation of those for the neutrophil chemoattractant LIX (CXCL5), interleukin 17 receptor, phosphoinositide kinase 3 delta, or gamma interferon-inducible protein 10. Following M. tuberculosis challenge in both airways or peritoneum, granulocytes were recruited significantly faster and at higher numbers in susceptible than in resistant mice. When granulocytes were efficiently depleted by either of two regimens at the onset of infection, only susceptible mice survived aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis significantly longer than control mice. We conclude that initially enhanced recruitment of granulocytes contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:16790804

  1. [THROMBIN-MEDIATED EFFECTS OF BLOOD MICROPARTICLES ON FORMATION, STRUCTURE, AND STABILITY OF FIBRIN CLOTS].

    PubMed

    Nabiullina, R M; Mustafin, I G; Ataullakhanov, F I; Litvinov, R I; Zubairova, L D

    2015-07-01

    The effects of blood microparticles (MPs) on the dynamics of fibrin polymerization, clot structure and susceptibility to fibrinolysis were studied. Kinetics of fibrin polymerization, fibrinolysis, thrombin generation in platelet-free, microparticle-depleted and microparticle-depleted plasma replenished with cephalin, from healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. MPs have profound effects on all stages of fibrin formation, decrease its turbidity. All parameters obtained in the absence of MPs were recovered after reconstitution of phospholipids. Thrombin generation rates were reduced in the absence of MPs. In the presence of MPs the fibrin networks had less poro us structures with thinner fibers, while clots formed in the absence of MPs had larger pores and were built of thicker fibers. Clots formed in the presence of MPs were significantly more resistant to fibrinolysis. Results show that normally circulating MPs can support the formation of stable clots at the sites of vascular injury. PMID:26591054

  2. Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test based on simple surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Han, Yin-Yi; Shih, Po-Han; Lian, Wei-Nan; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Lin, Chi-Hung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurement are important to help reduce the widespread misuse of antibiotics and alleviate the growing drug-resistance problem. We discovered that, when a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli is exposed to an antibiotic, the intensity of specific biomarkers in its surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra drops evidently in two hours. The discovery has been exploited for rapid AST and MIC determination of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and wild-type E. coli as well as clinical isolates. The results obtained by this SERS-AST method were consistent with that by the standard incubation-based method, indicating its high potential to supplement or replace existing time-consuming methods and help mitigate the challenge of drug resistance in clinical microbiology. PMID:26997474

  3. Procoagulant activity on platelets adhered to collagen or plasma clot.

    PubMed

    Ilveskero, S; Siljander, P; Lassila, R

    2001-04-01

    In a new 2-stage assay of platelet procoagulant activity (PCA), we first subjected gel-filtered platelets to adhesion on collagen (as a model of primary hemostasis) or plasma clots (as a model of preformed thrombus) for 30 minutes, and then the adherent platelets were supplemented with pooled, reptilase-treated, diluted plasma. Defibrinated plasma provided coagulation factors for assembly on platelet membranes without uncontrolled binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen). Platelet adhesion to both surfaces showed modest individual variation, which increased at platelet densities that allowed aggregation. However, adhesion-induced PCA varied individually and surface-independently >3-fold, suggesting a uniform platelet procoagulant mechanism. Permanently adhered platelets showed markedly enhanced PCA when compared with the platelet pool in suspension, even after strong activation. The rate of thrombin generation induced by clot-adherent platelets was markedly faster than on collagen-adherent platelets during the initial phase of coagulation, whereas collagen-induced PCA proceeded slowly, strongly promoted by tissue thromboplastin. Therefore at 10 minutes, after adjustment for adhered platelets, collagen supported soluble thrombin formation as much as 5 times that of the thrombin-retaining clots. Activation of platelets by their firm adhesion was accompanied by formation of microparticles, representing about one third of the total soluble PCA. Collagen-adhered platelets provide soluble thrombin and microparticles, whereas the preformed clot serves to localize and accelerate hemostasis at the injury site, with the contribution of retained thrombin and microparticles. PMID:11304482

  4. Coherent interference in multiplex CARS measurements: nonresonant susceptibility enhancement due to laser breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Beiting, E.J.

    1985-09-15

    A coherent interference with multiplex CARS signals is observed. This effect appears when coal fly ash particles are injected into the combustion flow being probed. The interference has the same spectral characteristics of the Stokes broadband dye laser shifted to anti-Stokes frequencies and is correlated with weak particle-induced laser breakdown. Analysis indicates the phenomenon is due to the enhancement of the nonresonant susceptibility in the small volume of the discharge plasma.

  5. Blood Clotting Inspired Polymer Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles Edward

    The blood clotting process is one of the human body's masterpieces in targeted molecular manipulation, as it requires the activation of the clotting cascade at a specific place and a specific time. Recent research in the biological sciences have discovered that one of the protein molecules involved in the initial stages of the clotting response, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), exhibits counterintuitive and technologically useful properties that are driven in part by the physical environment in the bloodstream at the site of a wound. In this thesis, we take inspiration from initial observations of the vWF in experiments, and aim to describe the behaviors observed in this process within the context of polymer physics. By understanding these physical principles, we hope to harness nature's ability to both direct molecules in both spatial and conformational coordinates. This thesis is presented in three complementary sections. After an initial introduction describing the systems of interest, we first describe the behavior of collapsed Lennard-Jones polymers in the presence of an infinite medium. It has been shown that simple bead-spring homopolymer models describe vWF quite well in vitro. We build upon this previous work to first describe the behavior of a collapsed homopolymer in an elongational fluid flow. Through a nucleation-protrusion mechanism, scaling relationships can be developed to provide a clear picture of a first-order globule-stretch transition and its ramifications in dilute-solution rheology. The implications of this behavior and its relation to the current literature provides qualitative explanations for the physiological process of vasoconstriction. In an effort to generalize these observations, we present an entire theory on the behavior of polymer globules under influence of any local fluid flow. Finally, we investigate the internal dynamics of these globules by probing their pulling response in an analogous fashion to force spectroscopy. We elucidate

  6. Experimental hypercalcaemia and whole blood clotting

    PubMed Central

    Hilgard, P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental hypercalcaemia was induced in rats by (1) transplantation of the solid Walker 256 tumour, and (2) intraperitoneal injections of calcium gluconate. Whole blood clotting was studied by means of thromboelastography and whole blood clotting times in polystyrene and glass test tubes. At serum calcium levels between 10·3 and 11·5 m-equiv/l a slight delay in clot formation was found which was reversible by the addition of EDTA to whole blood. Acute, calcium-gluconate-induced hypercalcaemia, however, leads to a significant shortening of the clotting time in the polystyrene tube and to a lesser degree in the glass tube. Maximal factor XII activation in vitro with ellagic acid levels the difference of clotting times again. From these experiments it is concluded that acute hypercalcaemia induces a hypercoagulable state, possibly by partial contact activation, and thus may favour thrombus formation in vivo. PMID:4200324

  7. Reduced expression IRF7 in nasal epithelial cells from smokers as a potential mechanism mediating enhanced susceptibility to influenza

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Smokers are more susceptible to viral infections, including influenza virus, yet the mechanisms mediating this effect are not known. Methods: We have established an in vitro model of differentiated nasal epithelial cells from smokers, which maintain enhanced levels...

  8. Blood Clotting Inspired Polymer Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles Edward

    The blood clotting process is one of the human body's masterpieces in targeted molecular manipulation, as it requires the activation of the clotting cascade at a specific place and a specific time. Recent research in the biological sciences have discovered that one of the protein molecules involved in the initial stages of the clotting response, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), exhibits counterintuitive and technologically useful properties that are driven in part by the physical environment in the bloodstream at the site of a wound. In this thesis, we take inspiration from initial observations of the vWF in experiments, and aim to describe the behaviors observed in this process within the context of polymer physics. By understanding these physical principles, we hope to harness nature's ability to both direct molecules in both spatial and conformational coordinates. This thesis is presented in three complementary sections. After an initial introduction describing the systems of interest, we first describe the behavior of collapsed Lennard-Jones polymers in the presence of an infinite medium. It has been shown that simple bead-spring homopolymer models describe vWF quite well in vitro. We build upon this previous work to first describe the behavior of a collapsed homopolymer in an elongational fluid flow. Through a nucleation-protrusion mechanism, scaling relationships can be developed to provide a clear picture of a first-order globule-stretch transition and its ramifications in dilute-solution rheology. The implications of this behavior and its relation to the current literature provides qualitative explanations for the physiological process of vasoconstriction. In an effort to generalize these observations, we present an entire theory on the behavior of polymer globules under influence of any local fluid flow. Finally, we investigate the internal dynamics of these globules by probing their pulling response in an analogous fashion to force spectroscopy. We elucidate

  9. Susceptibility to enhanced chemical migration from depression-focused preferential flow, High Plains aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurdak, J.J.; Walvoord, M.A.; McMahon, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    Aquifer susceptibility to contamination is controlled in part by the inherent hydrogeologic properties of the vadose zone, which includes preferential-flow pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of seasonal ponding near leaky irrigation wells as a mechanism for depression-focused preferential flow and enhanced chemical migration through the vadose zone of the High Plains aquifer. Such a mechanism may help explain the widespread presence of agrichemicals in recently recharged groundwater despite estimates of advective chemical transit times through the vadose zone from diffuse recharge that exceed the historical period of agriculture. Using a combination of field observations, vadose zone flow and transport simulations, and probabilistic neural network modeling, we demonstrated that vadose zone transit times near irrigation wells range from 7 to 50 yr, which are one to two orders of magnitude faster than previous estimates based on diffuse recharge. These findings support the concept of fast and slow transport zones and help to explain the previous discordant findings of long vadose zone transit times and the presence of agrichemicals at the water table. Using predictions of aquifer susceptibility from probabilistic neural network models, we delineated approximately 20% of the areal extent of the aquifer to have conditions that may promote advective chemical transit times to the water table of <50 yr if seasonal ponding and depression-focused flow exist. This aquifer-susceptibility map may help managers prioritize areas for groundwater monitoring or implementation of best management practices.

  10. High Susceptibility of Bt Maize to Aphids Enhances the Performance of Parasitoids of Lepidopteran Pests

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Cristina A.; Wäckers, Felix L.; Pritchard, Jeremy; Barrett, David A.; Turlings, Ted C.J.

    2007-01-01

    Concerns about possible undesired environmental effects of transgenic crops have prompted numerous evaluations of such crops. So-called Bt crops receive particular attention because they carry bacteria-derived genes coding for insecticidal proteins that might negatively affect non-target arthropods. Here we show a remarkable positive effect of Bt maize on the performance of the corn leaf aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis, which in turn enhanced the performance of parasitic wasps that feed on aphid honeydew. Within five out of six pairs that were evaluated, transgenic maize lines were significantly more susceptible to aphids than their near-isogenic equivalents, with the remaining pair being equally susceptible. The aphids feed from the phloem sieve element content and analyses of this sap in selected maize lines revealed marginally, but significantly higher amino acid levels in Bt maize, which might partially explain the observed increased aphid performance. Larger colony densities of aphids on Bt plants resulted in an increased production of honeydew that can be used as food by beneficial insects. Indeed, Cotesia marginiventris, a parasitoid of lepidopteran pests, lived longer and parasitized more pest caterpillars in the presence of aphid-infested Bt maize than in the presence of aphid-infested isogenic maize. Hence, depending on aphid pest thresholds, the observed increased susceptibility of Bt maize to aphids may be either a welcome or an undesirable side effect. PMID:17622345

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative susceptibility mapping with ultrashort echo time MRI for evaluating renal function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luke; Layton, Anita T; Wang, Nian; Larson, Peder E Z; Zhang, Jeff L; Lee, Vivian S; Liu, Chunlei; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can provide key insight into renal function. DCE MRI is typically achieved through an injection of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent, which has desirable T1 quenching and tracer kinetics. However, significant T2* blooming effects and signal voids can arise when Gd becomes very concentrated, especially in the renal medulla and pelvis. One MRI sequence designed to alleviate T2* effects is the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence. In the present study, we observed T2* blooming in the inner medulla of the mouse kidney, despite using UTE at an echo time of 20 microseconds and a low dose of 0.03 mmol/kg Gd. We applied quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and resolved the signal void into a positive susceptibility signal. The susceptibility values [in parts per million (ppm)] were converted into molar concentrations of Gd using a calibration curve. We determined the concentrating mechanism (referred to as the concentrating index) as a ratio of maximum Gd concentration in the inner medulla to the renal artery. The concentrating index was assessed longitudinally over a 17-wk course (3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 wk of age). We conclude that the UTE-based DCE method is limited in resolving extreme T2* content caused by the kidney's strong concentrating mechanism. QSM was able to resolve and confirm the source of the blooming effect to be the large positive susceptibility of concentrated Gd. UTE with QSM can complement traditional magnitude UTE and offer a powerful tool to study renal pathophysiology. PMID:26447222

  12. Equal pain—Unequal fear response: enhanced susceptibility of tooth pain to fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Michael L.; de Matos, Nuno M. P.; Brügger, Mike; Ettlin, Dominik A.; Lukic, Nenad; Cheetham, Marcus; Jäncke, Lutz; Lutz, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Experimental fear conditioning in humans is widely used as a model to investigate the neural basis of fear learning and to unravel the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. It has been observed that fear conditioning depends on stimulus salience and subject vulnerability to fear. It is further known that the prevalence of dental-related fear and phobia is exceedingly high in the population. Dental phobia is unique as no other body part is associated with a specific phobia. Therefore, we hypothesized that painful dental stimuli exhibit an enhanced susceptibility to fear conditioning when comparing to equal perceived stimuli applied to other body sites. Differential susceptibility to pain-related fear was investigated by analyzing responses to an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) applied to the right maxillary canine (UCS-c) vs. the right tibia (UCS-t). For fear conditioning, UCS-c and USC-t consisted of painful electric stimuli, carefully matched at both application sites for equal intensity and quality perception. UCSs were paired to simple geometrical forms which served as conditioned stimuli (CS+). Unpaired CS+ were presented for eliciting and analyzing conditioned fear responses. Outcome parameter were (1) skin conductance changes and (2) time-dependent brain activity (BOLD responses) in fear-related brain regions such as the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, thalamus, orbitofrontal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. A preferential susceptibility of dental pain to fear conditioning was observed, reflected by heightened skin conductance responses and enhanced time-dependent brain activity (BOLD responses) in the fear network. For the first time, this study demonstrates fear-related neurobiological mechanisms that point toward a superior conditionability of tooth pain. Beside traumatic dental experiences our results offer novel evidence that might explain the high prevalence of dental-related fears in the population. PMID:25100974

  13. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  14. LTP3 contributes to disease susceptibility in Arabidopsis by enhancing abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Guo, Wenya; Feng, Wen; Liu, Liang; Song, Xiaorui; Chen, Jian; Hou, Wei; Zhu, Hongxia; Tang, Saijun; Hu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Several plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) act positively in plant disease resistance. Here, we show that LTP3 (At5g59320), a pathogen and abscisic acid (ABA)-induced gene, negatively regulates plant immunity in Arabidopsis. The overexpression of LTP3 (LTP3-OX) led to an enhanced susceptibility to virulent bacteria and compromised resistance to avirulent bacteria. On infection of LTP3-OX plants with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, NCED3 and AAO3, were highly induced, whereas salicylic acid (SA)-related genes, ICS1 and PR1, were down-regulated. Accordingly, in LTP3-OX plants, we observed increased ABA levels and decreased SA levels relative to the wild-type. We also showed that the LTP3 overexpression-mediated enhanced susceptibility was partially dependent on AAO3. Interestingly, loss of function of LTP3 (ltp3-1) did not affect ABA pathways, but resulted in PR1 gene induction and elevated SA levels, suggesting that LTP3 can negatively regulate SA in an ABA-independent manner. However, a double mutant consisting of ltp3-1 and silent LTP4 (ltp3/ltp4) showed reduced susceptibility to Pseudomonas and down-regulation of ABA biosynthesis genes, suggesting that LTP3 acts in a redundant manner with its closest homologue LTP4 by modulating the ABA pathway. Taken together, our data show that LTP3 is a novel negative regulator of plant immunity which acts through the manipulation of the ABA-SA balance. PMID:26123657

  15. Prenatal bupropion exposure enhances the cocaine reward and stress susceptibility in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, S Y; Cherng, C F G; Yang, Y K; Yeh, T L; Yu, L

    2005-12-31

    Although a growing body of evidence supports the notion that certain antidepressant treatments in pregnancy produce earlier delivery and minor behavioral teratogenesis in infants, the long-term effects of such treatments in adulthood remain ill-defined. Recently, postnatal exposure to psychotropic drugs was found to affect the emotional development and susceptibility to abused drugs. Thus, this study aimed to examine whether prenatal exposure of four frequently-used antidepressants, bupropion, fluvoxamine, citalopram, and trazodone, altered the responsiveness to stress and cocaine in the adulthood. Dams received daily injection of bupropion (25 or 12.5 mg/kg), citalopram (5 mg/kg), fluvoxamine (10 mg/kg), trazodone (20 mg/kg) or saline throughout their third trimester of gestation, and several birth outcome indices were then examined. Locomotor activity, naive anxiety levels, and the sensitivity to the cocaine reinforcing effects were observed in pups at their day 56-60 post partum. We found that trazodone treatment produced a high mortality rate in pups after weaning. Mice, prenatally treated with bupropion at 25 mg/kg, exhibited lower rearing numbers and ambulatory activity as compared to the saline-treated mice. More importantly, such treatment enhanced the mouse sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine. Taken together, these results suggest that use of bupropion in the late pregnancy may run a risk of enhancing the offspring's susceptibility to stress and cocaine reward in adulthood. PMID:16548425

  16. Clot dissolution is better with ultrasound assisted thrombolysis for fresh clots with higher cholesterol content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Murugappan, Kanna Suresh; Ahmad, Aftab

    2012-11-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only drug for recanalization in acute ischemic stroke, and the dose is determined by the patient's body-weight. Properties of the blood clot as well as ultrasound exposure might affect the thrombolysis outcome. In this study, clot was prepared by mixing horse blood with CaCl2 solution and cholesterin up to 1.0 mg/ml. To simulate the aging effect serum was replaced by fresh blood periodically. 225 IU/ml of tPA was used to initiate lysis. Clot was exposed to continuous 2 MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasound at acoustic intensity of 340 mW/cm2. The weight of the blood clot increased with its age (from 37.28±2.87 mg at 2 hrs to 51.56±5.34 mg at 10 hrs, p < 0.05). Although no difference between clot-cholesterol levels and thrombolysis with ultrasound or tPA alone was found, combination of these modalities induced significant lysis in the clots with cholesterol levels of more than 0.5 mg/ml (clot-weight reduced by 41.68±2.3%) as compared to clots with normal cholesterol (30.60±4.10%; p < 0.05). Altogether, sonothrombolysis seems to work better in fresh thrombi with high-cholesterol levels.

  17. An In-Depth Characterization of the Major Psoriasis Susceptibility Locus Identifies Candidate Susceptibility Alleles within an HLA-C Enhancer Element

    PubMed Central

    Clop, Alex; Bertoni, Anna; Spain, Sarah L.; Simpson, Michael A.; Pullabhatla, Venu; Tonda, Raul; Hundhausen, Christian; Di Meglio, Paola; De Jong, Pieter; Hayday, Adrian C.; Nestle, Frank O.; Barker, Jonathan N.; Bell, Robert J. A.; Capon, Francesca; Trembath, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated skin disorder that is inherited as a complex genetic trait. Although genome-wide association scans (GWAS) have identified 36 disease susceptibility regions, more than 50% of the genetic variance can be attributed to a single Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus, known as PSORS1. Genetic studies indicate that HLA-C is the strongest PSORS1 candidate gene, since markers tagging HLA-Cw*0602 consistently generate the most significant association signals in GWAS. However, it is unclear whether HLA-Cw*0602 is itself the causal PSORS1 allele, especially as the role of SNPs that may affect its expression has not been investigated. Here, we have undertaken an in-depth molecular characterization of the PSORS1 interval, with a view to identifying regulatory variants that may contribute to disease susceptibility. By analysing high-density SNP data, we refined PSORS1 to a 179 kb region encompassing HLA-C and the neighbouring HCG27 pseudogene. We compared multiple MHC sequences spanning this refined locus and identified 144 candidate susceptibility variants, which are unique to chromosomes bearing HLA-Cw*0602. In parallel, we investigated the epigenetic profile of the critical PSORS1 interval and uncovered three enhancer elements likely to be active in T lymphocytes. Finally we showed that nine candidate susceptibility SNPs map within a HLA-C enhancer and that three of these variants co-localise with binding sites for immune-related transcription factors. These data indicate that SNPs affecting HLA-Cw*0602 expression are likely to contribute to psoriasis susceptibility and highlight the importance of integrating multiple experimental approaches in the investigation of complex genomic regions such as the MHC. PMID:23990973

  18. Antiplatelet Usage Impacts Clot Density in Acute Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Pikija, Slaven; Magdic, Jozef; Lukic, Anita; Schreiber, Catharina; Mutzenbach, Johannes Sebastian; McCoy, Mark R; Sellner, Johann

    2016-01-01

    We explored whether clot density in middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion is related to clinical variables, stroke etiology, blood constituents, and prestroke medication. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with acute ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation admitted to two Central European stroke centers. The acquisition of non-contrast enhanced CT (NECT) and CT angiography (CTA) within 4.5 h of symptom onset was obligatory. We assessed the site of MCA occlusion as well as density, area, and length of the clot in 150 patients. The Hounsfield unit values for the clot were divided with contralateral MCA segment to yield relative Hounsfield Unit ratio (rHU). The site of the vessel occlusion (M1 vs. M2) and antiplatelet usage, but not stroke etiology, significantly influenced rHU. We found an inverse correlation of rHU with erythrocyte count (p < 0.001). The multivariate analysis revealed that a higher rHU (i.e., clot being more hyperdense) was more likely with the use of antiplatelets (OR 4.24, CI 1.10-16.31, p = 0.036). Erythrocyte (OR 0.18, CI 0.05-0.55, p = 0.003), and thrombocyte counts (OR 0.99, CI 0.98-0.99, p = 0.029) were associated with odds for more hypodense clots (lower rHU). Our study disclosed that antiplatelet therapy impacts the composition of intracranial clots of the anterior circulation. PMID:27563874

  19. Filamentation-induced third-harmonic generation in air via plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Suntsov, S.; Abdollahpour, D.; Tzortzakis, S.; Papazoglou, D. G.

    2010-03-15

    We study, both experimentally and theoretically, the underlying physics of third-harmonic generation in air by a filamented infrared femtosecond laser pulse propagating through a thin plasma channel. It is shown that the recently observed more than two-order-of-magnitude increase of the efficiency of third-harmonic generation occurs due to the plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility. An estimate of the effective value of this susceptibility is given.

  20. Cavitation damage in blood clots under HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Ahadi, Golnaz; Hoelscher, Thilo; Szeri, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to accelerate thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, in vitro and in vivo, for treatment of ischemic stroke. Cavitation in sonothrombolysis is thought to play an important role, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. The damage to a blood clot associated with bubble collapses in a HIFU field is studied. The region of damage caused by a bubble collapse on the fibrin network of the blood clot exposed to HIFU is estimated, and compared with experimental assessment of the damage. The mechanical damage to the network caused by a bubble is probed using two independent approaches, a strain based method and an energy based method. Immunoflourescent fibrin staining is used to assess the region of damage experimentally.

  1. Correlation between the enhancement of flunitrazepam binding by GABA and seizure susceptibility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.; Wehner, J.M.

    1987-06-08

    Various populations of mice exhibit differential sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents. The relationship of seizure susceptibility to alterations in the GABA receptor complex was investigated in six different populations of mice consisting of four inbred strains (C57BL, DBA, C3H, and BALB) and two selected lines (long sleep and short sleep). Seizure activity was induced by intraperitoneal administration of the GAD inhibitor, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and latencies to seizure onset and tonus were measured. In naive mice of the same populations, GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding was measured in extensively washed whole brain membranes at several GABA concentrations. Both differential seizure sensitivity to 3-mercaptopropionic acid and differential enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding by GABA were observed in these six populations of mice. Correlational analyses indicated a positive correlation between the degree of GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding and resistance to the seizure-inducing properties of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. These data suggest that genetic differences in sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents that disrupt the GABAergic system may be related to differences in coupling between the various receptors associated with the GABA receptor complex.

  2. Polyphosphate exerts differential effects on blood clotting, depending on polymer size

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie A.; Choi, Sharon H.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca; Huyck, Jillian; Boettcher, John; Reinstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Polyphosphate, a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate, is secreted by activated platelets and accumulates in many infectious microorganisms. We recently showed that polyphosphate modulates the blood coagulation cascade at 3 steps: it triggers the contact pathway, it accelerates factor V activation, and it enhances fibrin polymerization. We now report that polyphosphate exerts differential effects on blood clotting, depending on polymer length. Very long polymers (≥ 500mers, such as those present in microorganisms) were required for optimal activation of the contact pathway, while shorter polymers (∼ 100mers, similar to the polymer lengths released by platelets) were sufficient to accelerate factor V activation and abrogate the anticoagulant function of the tissue factor pathway inhibitor. Optimal enhancement of fibrin clot turbidity by polyphosphate required ≥ 250mers. Pyrophosphate, which is also secreted by activated platelets, potently blocked polyphosphate-mediated enhancement of fibrin clot structure, suggesting that pyrophosphate is a novel regulator of fibrin function. In conclusion, polyphosphate of the size secreted by platelets is very efficient at accelerating blood clotting reactions but is less efficient at initiating them or at modulating clot structure. Microbial polyphosphate, which is highly procoagulant, may function in host responses to pathogens. PMID:20709905

  3. Interactions between ultrasound stimulated microbubbles and fibrin clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Christopher; Leung, Ben Y. C.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David E.

    2013-07-01

    While it is well established that ultrasound stimulated microbubbles (USMBs) can potentiate blood clot lysis, the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we examine the interaction between USMBs and fibrin clots, which are comprised of fibrin networks that maintain the mechanical integrity of blood clots. High speed camera observations demonstrated that USMBs can penetrate fibrin clots. Two-photon microscopy revealed that penetrating bubbles can leave behind patent "tunnels" along their paths and that fluid can be transported into the clots. Finally, it is observed that primary radiation forces associated with USMBs can induce local deformation and macroscopic translation of clot boundaries.

  4. In vivo quantification of clot formation in extracorporeal circuits.

    PubMed

    Gerrah, Rabin; David, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Clot formation is a common complication in extracorporeal circuits. In this paper we describe a novel method for clot formation analysis using image processing. We assembled a closed extracorporeal circuit and circulated blood at varying speeds. Blood filters were placed in downstream of the flow, and clotting agents were added to the circuit. Digital images of the filter were subsequently taken, and image analysis was applied to calculate the density of the clot. Our results show a significant correlation between the cumulative size of the clots, the density measure of the clot based on image analysis, and flow duration in the system. PMID:23400147

  5. Disruption of Nrf2 enhances susceptibility to severe airway inflammation and asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Guo, Jia; Mitzner, Wayne A; Roman, Jessica; Singh, Anju; Fryer, Allison D; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Kensler, Thomas W; Tuder, Rubin M; Georas, Steve N; Biswal, Shyam

    2005-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been postulated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma; although a defect in antioxidant responses has been speculated to exacerbate asthma severity, this has been difficult to demonstrate with certainty. Nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive basic leucine zipper transcription factor that is involved in the transcriptional regulation of many antioxidant genes. We show that disruption of the Nrf2 gene leads to severe allergen-driven airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in mice. Enhanced asthmatic response as a result of ovalbumin sensitization and challenge in Nrf2-disrupted mice was associated with more pronounced mucus cell hyperplasia and infiltration of eosinophils into the lungs than seen in wild-type littermates. Nrf2 disruption resulted in an increased expression of the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in splenocytes after allergen challenge. The enhanced severity of the asthmatic response from disruption of the Nrf2 pathway was a result of a lowered antioxidant status of the lungs caused by lower basal expression, as well as marked attenuation, of the transcriptional induction of multiple antioxidant genes. Our studies suggest that the responsiveness of Nrf2-directed antioxidant pathways may act as a major determinant of susceptibility to allergen-mediated asthma. PMID:15998787

  6. Local orthorhombic distortion and enhanced susceptibility in LaNiO3 paramagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Yano, Shinichiro; Louca, Despina; Marshall, Luke; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Jorg

    2014-03-01

    The perovskite LaNiO3 is metallic, and unlike other systems in this class of materials, it remains paramagnetic where only an enhancement in the magnetic susceptibility (χ) is observed below 200 K. Other rare earth nickelates are antiferromagnetic with an enhancement of χ in paramagnetic metallic state. Using neutron powder diffraction and the pair density function analysis, it is observed that the temperature dependence of the local atomic structure cannot be reproduced assuming the average crystal symmetry which is rhombohedral with the R 3 c space group. With rising temperature, octahedral distortions involving displacements of oxygen set in, and the symmetry is reduced to Pbnm . In this symmetry, the equivalent O site in the R 3 c splits into two and can account for all the features observed in the local lattice. The structural changes occur gradually, between 100 and 200 K. The local Ni-O-Ni bond angles are reduced from 164.5 to 163.5 ° during this transition. Such reduction of Ni-O-Ni bond angles may facilitate antiferromagnetic coupling and responsible for the temperature dependence of χ observed in LaNiO3 below 200 K.

  7. Enhanced Susceptibility of Ago1/3 Double-Null Mice to Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Van Stry, Melanie; Oguin, Thomas H.; Cheloufi, Sihem; Vogel, Peter; Watanabe, Makiko; Pillai, Meenu R.; Dash, Pradyot; Thomas, Paul G.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a critical component of many cellular antiviral responses in plants, invertebrates, and mammals. However, its in vivo role in host protection from the negative-sense RNA virus influenza virus type A (flu) is unclear. Here we have examined the role of RNAi in host defense to flu by analyzing Argonaute 1 and 3 double-knockout mice deficient in components of the RNA-induced silencing complex. Compared to littermate controls, flu-infected double-knockout mice exhibited increased mortality, consistent with more severe alveolitis and pneumonitis. These data indicate that optimal resistance to flu requires Argonaute 1 and/or 3. Enhanced mortality of double-knockout mice was not associated either with increased viral replication or with differential pulmonary recruitment or function of innate and adaptive immune cells. Given the absence of detectable immune defects, our results support the notion that the enhanced flu susceptibility of double-knockout mice arises from an intrinsic impairment in the ability of lung cells to tolerate flu-elicited inflammation. PMID:22318144

  8. Enhanced susceptibility of Ago1/3 double-null mice to influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Van Stry, Melanie; Oguin, Thomas H; Cheloufi, Sihem; Vogel, Peter; Watanabe, Makiko; Pillai, Meenu R; Dash, Pradyot; Thomas, Paul G; Hannon, Gregory J; Bix, Mark

    2012-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a critical component of many cellular antiviral responses in plants, invertebrates, and mammals. However, its in vivo role in host protection from the negative-sense RNA virus influenza virus type A (flu) is unclear. Here we have examined the role of RNAi in host defense to flu by analyzing Argonaute 1 and 3 double-knockout mice deficient in components of the RNA-induced silencing complex. Compared to littermate controls, flu-infected double-knockout mice exhibited increased mortality, consistent with more severe alveolitis and pneumonitis. These data indicate that optimal resistance to flu requires Argonaute 1 and/or 3. Enhanced mortality of double-knockout mice was not associated either with increased viral replication or with differential pulmonary recruitment or function of innate and adaptive immune cells. Given the absence of detectable immune defects, our results support the notion that the enhanced flu susceptibility of double-knockout mice arises from an intrinsic impairment in the ability of lung cells to tolerate flu-elicited inflammation. PMID:22318144

  9. A PAX1 enhancer locus is associated with susceptibility to idiopathic scoliosis in females

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Swarkar; Londono, Douglas; Eckalbar, Walter L.; Gao, Xiaochong; Zhang, Dongping; Mauldin, Kristen; Kou, Ikuyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Morio; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Murphy, Karl K.; Cornelia, Reuel; Karol, L.; Rathjen, K.; Sucato, D.; Birch, J.; Johnston, C.; Richards, B. S.; Milbrandt, T.; Talwakar, V.; Iwinski, H.; Muchow, R.; Tassone, J. C.; Liu, X. -C.; Shindell, R.; Schrader, W.; Eberson, C.; Lapinsky, A.; Loder, R.; Davey, J.; Hosogane, Naobumi; Ogura, Yoji; Takahashi, Yohei; Miyake, Atushi; Watanabe, Kota; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Kono, Katsuki; Kawakami, Noriaki; Tsuji, Taichi; Uno, Koki; Suzuki, Teppei; Ito, Manabu; Sudo, Hideki; Minami, Shohei; Kotani, Toshiaki; Yanagida, Haruhisa; Taneichi, Hiroshi; Yonezawa, Ikuho; Kaneko, Kazuo; Herring, John A.; Burns, Dennis; Ahituv, Nadav; Ikegawa, Shiro; Gordon, Derek; Wise, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a common paediatric musculoskeletal disease that displays a strong female bias. By performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 3,102 individuals, we identify significant associations with 20p11.22 SNPs for females (P=6.89 × 10−9) but not males (P=0.71). This association with IS is also found in independent female cohorts from the United States of America and Japan (overall P=2.15 × 10−10, OR=1.30 (rs6137473)). Unexpectedly, the 20p11.22 IS risk alleles were previously associated with protection from early-onset alopecia, another sexually dimorphic condition. The 174-kb associated locus is distal to PAX1, which encodes paired box 1, a transcription factor involved in spine development. We identify a sequence in the associated locus with enhancer activity in zebrafish somitic muscle and spinal cord, an activity that is abolished by IS-associated SNPs. We thus identify a sexually dimorphic IS susceptibility locus, and propose the first functionally defined candidate mutations in an enhancer that may regulate expression in specific spinal cells. PMID:25784220

  10. Influenza-induced type I interferon enhances susceptibility to gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial pneumonia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benjamin; Robinson, Keven M.; McHugh, Kevin J.; Scheller, Erich V.; Mandalapu, Sivanarayana; Chen, Chen; Di, Y. Peter; Clay, Michelle E.; Enelow, Richard I.; Dubin, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of type 17 immunity by type I interferon (IFN) during influenza A infection has been shown to enhance susceptibility to secondary bacterial pneumonia. Although this mechanism has been described in coinfection with gram-positive bacteria, it is unclear whether similar mechanisms may impair lung defense against gram-negative infections. Furthermore, precise delineation of the duration of type I IFN-associated susceptibility to bacterial infection remains underexplored. Therefore, we investigated the effects of preceding influenza A virus infection on subsequent challenge with the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the temporal association between IFN expression with susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus challenge in a mouse model of influenza and bacterial coinfection. Here we demonstrate that preceding influenza A virus led to increased lung E. coli and P. aeruginosa bacterial burden, which was associated with suppression of type 17 immunity and attenuation of antimicrobial peptide expression. Enhanced susceptibility to S. aureus coinfection ceased at day 14 of influenza infection, when influenza-associated type I IFN levels had returned to baseline levels, further suggesting a key role for type I IFN in coinfection pathogenesis. These findings further implicate type I IFN-associated suppression of type 17 immunity and antimicrobial peptide production as a conserved mechanism for enhanced susceptibility to both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial coinfection during influenza infection. PMID:26001778

  11. G6PD Deficiency Does Not Enhance Susceptibility for Acquiring Helicobacter pylori Infection in Sardinian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may be more susceptible to infections due to impaired leukocyte bactericidal activity. The disorder is common in the Mediterranean area. The aim of this study was to investigate whether G6PD deficiency may be a risk factor for acquiring H. pylori infection. Methods We performed a retrospective study. Data from clinical records of 6565 patients (2278 men and 4287 women, median age 51, range 7‒94) who underwent upper endoscopy between 2002 and 2014 were collected. H. pylori status, assessed by histology plus rapid urease test or 13C-urea breath test, and G6PD status were also reported. A multiple logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between G6PD deficiency and H. pylori infection. Results Enzyme deficiency was detected in 12% (789/6565) of the entire cohort, and more specifically in 8.3% of men and in 14.0% of women. Overall, the proportion of patients positive for H. pylori was 50.6% and 51.5% among G6PD deficient and non-deficient patients (χ² = 0.271; p = 0.315). Moreover, among G6PD-deficient and normal patients the frequency of previous H. pylori infection was similar. After adjustment for age and gender the risk for acquiring H. pylori infection was similar in G6PD-deficient and normal patients. Only age was a strong statistically significant risk predictor. Conclusions These results demonstrate for the first time that G6PD deficiency does not enhance patients’ susceptibility to acquire H. pylori infection in Sardinia. PMID:27467818

  12. Visual scoring of clots in foremilk.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten D

    2005-11-01

    The necessary unequivocal and generally accepted definitions of normal and abnormal milk are not available. A precise definition is needed in order for companies to develop sensors to detect and sort abnormal milk at the time of milking. Experts at a workshop defined abnormal milk to be that from cows whose foremilk had changed in homogeneity or was coloured by blood. The objectives of this paper were: firstly, to explore how different groups of people scored the appearance of foremilk; and secondly, to develop a method suitable as an objective reference for testing of manual and automatic detection systems. Consumers, farmers and advisors did not agree on the visual appearance of normal, watery, clotty milk, or milk with blood, and experience is needed to score the visual appearance of foremilk correctly. It seems reasonable to expect a sensitivity of at least 70% for detection of abnormal milk during foremilking. Filter sizes 0.05, 0.07, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mm were used to filter milk from cows with visually abnormal foremilk. If clots appeared in the foremilk, clots appeared on all size filters, but the filter with pore size 0.1 mm was the easiest to read and work with. The filter method is not reliable in identifying quarters with watery, yellowish, or bloody milk, whereas the method seems consistent, and at least as good as scoring of visual appearance in finding clots in the milk. Clots should show clearly on the filter to be counted as abnormal milk. All clinical cases with clots in the foremilk can be found on the filter and such cases have high somatic cell count (SCC). Both trained and untrained persons using the filter method can score normal and abnormal foremilk with a high specificity (>90%) and a high sensitivity (>80%). The filter method is recommended as a reference for scoring the homogeneity of foremilk. PMID:16223455

  13. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section... (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by...

  14. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by pure-culture fermentation process may be safely used in the...

  15. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by pure-culture fermentation process may be safely used in the...

  16. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by pure-culture fermentation process may be safely used in the...

  17. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by pure-culture fermentation process may be safely used in the...

  18. Too much TV causes lung blood clot deaths.

    PubMed

    2016-08-10

    Lung blood clots - also known as pulmonary embolisms - usually stem from clots in the leg or pelvis after inactivity has slowed blood flow. It is particularly dangerous if the clot travels to the lung and lodges in a small blood vessel. PMID:27507368

  19. Effect of Low Frequency Ultrasound on Combined rt-PA and Eptifibatide Thrombolysis in Human Clots

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Jason M.; Holland, Christy K.; Pancioli, Arthur M.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Shaw, George J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Fibrinolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) are used to treat thrombotic disease such as acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and ischemic stroke. Interest in increasing efficacy and reducing side effects has led to the study of adjuncts such as GP IIb-IIIa inhibitors and ultrasound (US) enhanced thrombolysis. Currently, GP IIb-IIIa inhibitor and fibrinolytic treatment are often used in AMI, and are under investigation for stroke treatment. However, little is known of the efficacy of combined GP IIb-IIIa inhibitor, fibrinolytic and ultrasound treatment. We measure the lytic efficacy of rt-PA, eptifibatide (Epf) and 120 kHz ultrasound treatment in an in-vitro human clot model. Materials and Methods Blood was drawn from 15 subjects after IRB approval. Clots were made in 20 μL pipettes, and placed in a water tank for microscopic visualization during lytic treatment. Clots were exposed to control, rt-PA (rt-PA), eptifibatide (Epf), or rt-PA+eptifibatide (rt-PA+Epf), with or without ultrasound for 30 minutes at 37°C in human plasma. Clot lysis was measured over time, using a microscopic imaging technique. The fractional clot loss (FCL) and initial lytic rate (LR) were used to quantify lytic efficacy. Results and Conclusions LR values for (−US) treated clots were 0.8±0.1(control), 1.8±0.3 (Epf), 1.5±0.2 (rt-PA), and 1.3±0.4 (rt-PA+Epf) (% clot width/minute) respectively. In comparison, the (+US) group exhibited LR values of 1.6±0.2 (control), 4.3±0.4 (Epf), 6.3±0.4 (rt-PA), and 4.6±0.6 (rt-PA+Epf). For (−US) treated clots, FCL was 6.0±0.8 (control), 9.2±2.5 (Epf), 15.6±1.7 (rt-PA), and 28.0±2.2% (rt-PA+Epf) respectively. FCL for (+US) clots was 13.5±2.4 (control), 20.7±6.4 (Epf), 44.4±3.6 (rt-PA) and 30.3±3.6% (rt-PA+Epf) respectively. Although the addition of eptifibatide enhances the in-vitro lytic efficacy of rt-PA in the absence of ultrasound, the efficacy of ultrasound and rt-PA is greater than that of

  20. Enhanced susceptibility of mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes to type II group B streptococcal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, M S; Fuselier, P A

    1983-01-01

    Since diabetes mellitus predisposes adults to group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteremia, a murine model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and type II GBS bacteremia was developed to assess certain immune factors which might influence susceptibility to infection. In diabetic mice, the 50% lethal dose for two strains of type II GBS was significantly lower (greater than 1 log10 decrease in CFU per milliliter) than in control animals. This enhanced virulence of GBS for diabetic animals was associated with prolonged bacteremia, persistent sequestration of organisms in the splanchnic reticuloendothelial system, and a shift from splenic to hepatic clearance. Although immunization of control and diabetic animals resulted in high concentrations of type-specific serum antibody, it had no effect on late reticuloendothelial system sequestration in diabetics. In contrast, depletion of complement by treatment of mice with cobra venom factor blocked reticuloendothelial system clearance and resulted in fatal infection in both diabetic and control mice. These results indicate that neither type-specific antibody nor an intact complement system is adequate for effective clearance of type II GBS bacteremia in mice with experimentally induced diabetes. This clearance deficit could be the result of a defect in hepatocyte membrane receptors necessary for removal of this encapsulated microorganism. PMID:6339383

  1. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Geetika S; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  2. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  3. ULTRASOUND-INDUCED THERMAL ELEVATION IN CLOTTED BLOOD AND CRANIAL BONE

    PubMed Central

    Nahirnyak, Volodymyr; Mast, T. Douglas; Holland, Christy K.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound thermal effects have been hypothesized to contribute to ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis. To explore the thermal mechanism of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) for the treatment of ischemic stroke, a detailed investigation is needed of the heating produced in skull, brain and blood clots. A theoretical model is developed to provide an estimate for the worst-case scenario of the temperature increase in blood clots and on the surface of cranial bone exposed to 0.12- to 3.5-MHz ultrasound. Thermal elevation was also assessed experimentally in human temporal bone, human clots and porcine clots exposed to 0.12 to 3.5-MHz pulsed ultrasound in vitro with a peak-to-peak pressure of 0.25 MPa and 80% duty cycle. Blood clots exposed to 0.12-MHz pulsed ultrasound exhibited a small temperature increase (0.25° C) and bone exposed to 1.0-MHz pulsed ultrasound exhibited the highest temperature increase (1.0° C). These experimental results were compared with the predicted temperature elevations. PMID:17490808

  4. Shrimp Alpha-2-Macroglobulin Prevents the Bacterial Escape by Inhibiting Fibrinolysis of Blood Clots

    PubMed Central

    Chaikeeratisak, Vorrapon; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2012-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of the hemocytic proteins of Penaeus monodon (Pm) has previously shown that alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M) was among the proteins that showed substantially altered expression levels upon Vibrio harveyi infection. Therefore, in this study its potentially important role in the response of shrimp to bacterial infection was further characterized. The yeast two-hybrid system revealed that the receptor binding domain of PmA2M interacted with the carboxyl-terminus of one or both of the transglutaminase type II isoforms, which are key enzymes involved in the shrimp clotting system. In accord with this, PmA2M was found to be localized on the extracellular blood clots and to colocalize with clottable proteins. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of A2M transcript levels reduced the PmA2M transcript levels (∼94%) and significantly reduced the bacterial seizing ability of the clotting system, resulting in an up to 3.3-fold higher number of V. harveyi that systemically disseminated into the circulatory system at 5 min post-infection before subsequent clearance by the immune system. Furthermore, an appearance of PmA2M depleted clots in the presence of V. harveyi strikingly demonstrated fibrinolysis zones surrounding the bacteria. This study provides the first evidence of the vital role of PmA2M in enhancing bacterial sequestration by protecting blood clots against fibrinolysis. PMID:23082160

  5. Limitations of using synthetic blood clots for measuring in vitro clot capture efficiency of inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ronald A; Herbertson, Luke H; Sarkar Das, Srilekha; Malinauskas, Richard A; Pritchard, William F; Grossman, Laurence W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the clot capture efficiency and capture location of six currently-marketed vena cava filters in a physiological venous flow loop, using synthetic polyacrylamide hydrogel clots, which were intended to simulate actual blood clots. After observing a measured anomaly for one of the test filters, we redirected the focus of the study to identify the cause of poor clot capture performance for large synthetic hydrogel clots. We hypothesized that the uncharacteristic low clot capture efficiency observed when testing the outlying filter can be attributed to the inadvertent use of dense, stiff synthetic hydrogel clots, and not as a result of the filter design or filter orientation. To study this issue, sheep blood clots and polyacrylamide (PA) synthetic clots were injected into a mock venous flow loop containing a clinical inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, and their captures were observed. Testing was performed with clots of various diameters (3.2, 4.8, and 6.4 mm), length-to-diameter ratios (1:1, 3:1, 10:1), and stiffness. By adjusting the chemical formulation, PA clots were fabricated to be soft, moderately stiff, or stiff with elastic moduli of 805 ± 2, 1696 ± 10 and 3295 ± 37 Pa, respectively. In comparison, the elastic moduli for freshly prepared sheep blood clots were 1690 ± 360 Pa. The outlying filter had a design that was characterized by peripheral gaps (up to 14 mm) between its wire struts. While a low clot capture rate was observed using large, stiff synthetic clots, the filter effectively captured similarly sized sheep blood clots and soft PA clots. Because the stiffer synthetic clots remained straight when approaching the filter in the IVC model flow loop, they were more likely to pass between the peripheral filter struts, while the softer, physiological clots tended to fold and were captured by the filter. These experiments demonstrated that if synthetic clots are used as a surrogate for animal or human blood

  6. Limitations of using synthetic blood clots for measuring in vitro clot capture efficiency of inferior vena cava filters

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Ronald A; Herbertson, Luke H; Das, Srilekha Sarkar; Malinauskas, Richard A; Pritchard, William F; Grossman, Laurence W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the clot capture efficiency and capture location of six currently-marketed vena cava filters in a physiological venous flow loop, using synthetic polyacrylamide hydrogel clots, which were intended to simulate actual blood clots. After observing a measured anomaly for one of the test filters, we redirected the focus of the study to identify the cause of poor clot capture performance for large synthetic hydrogel clots. We hypothesized that the uncharacteristic low clot capture efficiency observed when testing the outlying filter can be attributed to the inadvertent use of dense, stiff synthetic hydrogel clots, and not as a result of the filter design or filter orientation. To study this issue, sheep blood clots and polyacrylamide (PA) synthetic clots were injected into a mock venous flow loop containing a clinical inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, and their captures were observed. Testing was performed with clots of various diameters (3.2, 4.8, and 6.4 mm), length-to-diameter ratios (1:1, 3:1, 10:1), and stiffness. By adjusting the chemical formulation, PA clots were fabricated to be soft, moderately stiff, or stiff with elastic moduli of 805 ± 2, 1696 ± 10 and 3295 ± 37 Pa, respectively. In comparison, the elastic moduli for freshly prepared sheep blood clots were 1690 ± 360 Pa. The outlying filter had a design that was characterized by peripheral gaps (up to 14 mm) between its wire struts. While a low clot capture rate was observed using large, stiff synthetic clots, the filter effectively captured similarly sized sheep blood clots and soft PA clots. Because the stiffer synthetic clots remained straight when approaching the filter in the IVC model flow loop, they were more likely to pass between the peripheral filter struts, while the softer, physiological clots tended to fold and were captured by the filter. These experiments demonstrated that if synthetic clots are used as a surrogate for animal or human blood

  7. Effects of exercise and conditioning on clotting and fibrinolytic activity in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Earl W.; Bernier, Lani L.; Banta, Guy R.; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Schoomaker, Eric B.

    1987-01-01

    Blood clotting and fibrinolytic activity in three groups of nonsmoking, nonobese, healthy men ranging from 19 to 59 years are studied. The groups consisted of (1) marathoners (men running more than 50 miles/week); (2) joggers (men running 5-15 miles/week; and (3) sedentary subjects (men who did not exercise routinely). It is observed that the rate of blood clotting is accelerated by exercise; marathoners had greater increases in fibrinolytic activity than the other two groups; and fibrin degradation products increased with exercise. The data reveal that the changes in clotting assays with exercise do not correlate with changes in whole blood lactate, blood pyruvate, or rectal temperatures. It is noted that the level of acceleration for fibrinolytic activity is directly related to the maximum aerobic capacity and work load of the individual, and that conditioning enhances the fibrinolytic response to exercise.

  8. Enhanced susceptibility to spontaneous seizures of noda epileptic rats by loss of synaptic zn(2+).

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Iida, Masashi; Ando, Masaki; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Tamano, Haruna; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Zinc homeostasis in the brain is associated with the etiology and manifestation of epileptic seizures. Adult Noda epileptic rats (NER, >12-week-old) exhibit spontaneously generalized tonic-clonic convulsion about once a day. To pursue the involvement of synaptic Zn(2+) signal in susceptibility to spontaneous seizures, in the present study, the effect of zinc chelators on epileptogenesis was examined using adult NER. Clioquinol (CQ) and TPEN are lipophilic zinc chelotors, transported into the brain and reduce the levels of synaptic Zn(2+). The incidence of tonic-clonic convulsion was markedly increased after i.p. injection of CQ (30-100 mg/kg) and TPEN (1 mg/kg). The basal levels of extracellular Zn(2+) measured by ZnAF-2 were decreased before tonic-clonic convulsion was induced with zinc chelators. The hippocampal electroencephalograms during CQ (30 mg/kg)-induced convulsions were similar to those during sound-induced convulsions in NER reported previously. Exocytosis of hippocampal mossy fibers, which was measured with FM4-64, was significantly increased in hippocampal slices from CQ-injected NER that did not show tonic-clonic convulsion yet. These results indicate that the abnormal excitability of mossy fibers is induced prior to epileptic seizures by injection of zinc chelators into NER. The incidence of tonic-clonic convulsion induced with CQ (30 mg/kg) was significantly reduced by co-injection with aminooxyacetic acid (5-10 mg/kg), an anticonvulsant drug enhancing GABAergic activity, which did not affect locomotor activity. The present paper demonstrates that the abnormal excitability in the brain, especially in mossy fibers, which is potentially associated with the insufficient GABAergic neuron activity, may be a factor to reduce the threshold for epileptogenesis in NER. PMID:23951148

  9. Impaired neutrophil function in 24p3 null mice contributes to enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuoming; Petersen, Robert; Devireddy, L.

    2013-01-01

    Lipocalin 24p3 (24p3) is a neutrophil secondary granule protein. 24p3 is also a siderocalin, which binds several bacterial siderophores. It was therefore proposed that synthesis and secretion of 24p3 by stimulated macrophages or release of 24p3 upon neutrophil degranulation sequesters iron-laden siderophores to attenuate bacterial growth. Accordingly, 24p3-deficient mice are susceptible to bacterial pathogens whose siderophores would normally be chelated by 24p3. Specific granule deficiency (SGD) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by complete absence of proteins in secondary granules. Neutrophils from SGD patients, who are prone to bacterial infections, lack normal functions but the potential role of 24p3 in neutrophil dysfunction in SGD is not known. Here we show that neutrophils from 24p3−/− mice are defective in many neutrophil functions. Specifically, neutrophils in 24p3−/− mice do not extravasate to sites of infection and are defective for chemotaxis. A transcriptome analysis revealed that genes that control cytoskeletal reorganization are selectively suppressed in 24p3−/− neutrophils. Additionally, small regulatory RNAs (miRNAs) that control upstream regulators of cytoskeletal proteins are also increased in 24p3−/− neutrophils. Further, 24p3−/− neutrophils failed to phagocytose bacteria, which may account for the enhanced sensitivity of 24p3−/− mice to both intracellular (Listeria monocytogenes) and extracellular (Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus) pathogens. Listeria does not secrete siderophores and additionally, the siderophore secreted by Candida is not sequestered by 24p3. Therefore, the heightened sensitivity of 24p3−/− mice to these pathogens is not due to sequestration of siderophores limiting iron availability, but is a consequence of impaired neutrophil function. PMID:23543755

  10. Enhanced Susceptibility to Spontaneous Seizures of Noda Epileptic Rats by Loss of Synaptic Zn2+

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Atsushi; Iida, Masashi; Ando, Masaki; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Tamano, Haruna; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Zinc homeostasis in the brain is associated with the etiology and manifestation of epileptic seizures. Adult Noda epileptic rats (NER, >12-week-old) exhibit spontaneously generalized tonic-clonic convulsion about once a day. To pursue the involvement of synaptic Zn2+ signal in susceptibility to spontaneous seizures, in the present study, the effect of zinc chelators on epileptogenesis was examined using adult NER. Clioquinol (CQ) and TPEN are lipophilic zinc chelotors, transported into the brain and reduce the levels of synaptic Zn2+. The incidence of tonic-clonic convulsion was markedly increased after i.p. injection of CQ (30–100 mg/kg) and TPEN (1 mg/kg). The basal levels of extracellular Zn2+ measured by ZnAF-2 were decreased before tonic-clonic convulsion was induced with zinc chelators. The hippocampal electroencephalograms during CQ (30 mg/kg)-induced convulsions were similar to those during sound-induced convulsions in NER reported previously. Exocytosis of hippocampal mossy fibers, which was measured with FM4-64, was significantly increased in hippocampal slices from CQ-injected NER that did not show tonic-clonic convulsion yet. These results indicate that the abnormal excitability of mossy fibers is induced prior to epileptic seizures by injection of zinc chelators into NER. The incidence of tonic-clonic convulsion induced with CQ (30 mg/kg) was significantly reduced by co-injection with aminooxyacetic acid (5–10 mg/kg), an anticonvulsant drug enhancing GABAergic activity, which did not affect locomotor activity. The present paper demonstrates that the abnormal excitability in the brain, especially in mossy fibers, which is potentially associated with the insufficient GABAergic neuron activity, may be a factor to reduce the threshold for epileptogenesis in NER. PMID:23951148

  11. FXIa and platelet polyphosphate as therapeutic targets during human blood clotting on collagen/tissue factor surfaces under flow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Travers, Richard J; Morrissey, James H; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-09-17

    Factor XIIa (FXIIa) and factor XIa (FXIa) contribute to thrombosis in animal models, whereas platelet-derived polyphosphate (polyP) may potentiate contact or thrombin-feedback pathways. The significance of these mediators in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions on tissue factor (TF) -bearing surfaces remains inadequately resolved. Human blood (corn trypsin inhibitor treated [4 μg/mL]) was tested by microfluidic assay for clotting on collagen/TF at TF surface concentration ([TF]wall) from ∼0.1 to 2 molecules per μm(2). Anti-FXI antibodies (14E11 and O1A6) or polyP-binding protein (PPXbd) were used to block FXIIa-dependent FXI activation, FXIa-dependent factor IX (FIX) activation, or platelet-derived polyP, respectively. Fibrin formation was sensitive to 14E11 at 0 to 0.1 molecules per µm(2) and sensitive to O1A6 at 0 to 0.2 molecules per µm(2). However, neither antibody reduced fibrin generation at ∼2 molecules per µm(2) when the extrinsic pathway became dominant. Interestingly, PPXbd reduced fibrin generation at low [TF]wall (0.1 molecules per µm(2)) but not at zero or high [TF]wall, suggesting a role for polyP distinct from FXIIa activation and requiring low extrinsic pathway participation. Regardless of [TF]wall, PPXbd enhanced fibrin sensitivity to tissue plasminogen activator and promoted clot retraction during fibrinolysis concomitant with an observed PPXbd-mediated reduction of fibrin fiber diameter. This is the first detection of endogenous polyP function in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions. When triggered by low [TF]wall, thrombosis may be druggable by contact pathway inhibition, although thrombolytic susceptibility may benefit from polyP antagonism regardless of [TF]wall. PMID:26136249

  12. Enhancement of MS2D Bartington point measurement of soil magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabijańczyk, Piotr; Zawadzki, Jarosław

    2015-04-01

    Field magnetometry is fast method used to assess the potential soil pollution. The most popular device used to measure the soil magnetic susceptibility on the soil surface is a MS2D Bartington. Single reading using MS2D device of soil magnetic susceptibility is low time-consuming but often characterized by considerable errors related to the instrument or environmental and lithogenic factors. Typically, in order to calculate the reliable average value of soil magnetic susceptibility, a series of MS2D readings is performed in the sample point. As it was analyzed previously, such methodology makes it possible to significantly reduce the nugget effect of the variograms of soil magnetic susceptibility that is related to the micro-scale variance and measurement errors. The goal of this study was to optimize the process of taking a series of MS2D readings, whose average value constitutes a single measurement, in order to take into account micro-scale variations of soil magnetic susceptibility in proper determination of this parameter. This was done using statistical and geostatistical analyses. The analyses were performed using field MS2D measurements that were carried out in the study area located in the direct vicinity of the Katowice agglomeration. At 150 sample points 10 MS2D readings of soil magnetic susceptibility were taken. Using this data set, series of experimental variograms were calculated and modeled. Firstly, using single random MS2D reading for each sample point, and next using the data set increased by adding one more MS2D reading, until their number reached 10. The parameters of variogram: nugget effect, sill and range of correlation were used to determine the most suitable number of MS2D readings at sample point. The distributions of soil magnetic susceptibility at sample point were also analyzed in order to determine adequate number of readings enabling to calculate reliable average soil magnetic susceptibility. The research leading to these results has

  13. Effects of unidirectional flow shear stresses on the formation, fractal microstructure and rigidity of incipient whole blood clots and fibrin gels

    PubMed Central

    Badiei, N.; Sowedan, A.M.; Curtis, D.J.; Brown, M.R.; Lawrence, M.J.; Campbell, A.I.; Sabra, A.; Evans, P.A.; Weisel, J.W.; Chernysh, I.N.; Nagaswami, C.; Williams, P.R.; Hawkins, K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Incipient clot formation in whole blood and fibrin gels was studied by the rheometric techniques of controlled stress parallel superposition (CSPS) and small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS). The effects of unidirectional shear stress on incipient clot microstructure, formation kinetics and elasticity are reported in terms of the fractal dimension (df) of the fibrin network, the gel network formation time (TGP) and the shear elastic modulus, respectively. The results of this first haemorheological application of CSPS reveal the marked sensitivity of incipient clot microstructure to physiologically relevant levels of shear stress, these being an order of magnitude lower than have previously been studied by SAOS. CSPS tests revealed that exposure of forming clots to increasing levels of shear stress produces a corresponding elevation in df, consistent with the formation of tighter, more compact clot microstructures under unidirectional flow. A corresponding increase in shear elasticity was recorded. The scaling relationship established between shear elasticity and df for fibrin clots and whole blood confirms the fibrin network as the dominant microstructural component of the incipient clot in terms of its response to imposed stress. Supplementary studies of fibrin clot formation by rheometry and microscopy revealed the substantial additional network mass required to increase df and provide evidence to support the hypothesis that microstructural changes in blood clotted under unidirectional shear may be attributed to flow enhanced thrombin generation and activation. CSPS also identified a threshold value of unidirectional shear stress above which no incipient clot formation could be detected. CSPS was shown to be a valuable haemorheological tool for the study of the effects of physiological and pathological levels of shear on clot properties. PMID:25624413

  14. Assessment of blood clot formation and platelet receptor function ex vivo in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Collins, K S; Balasubramaniam, K; Viswanathan, G; Natasari, A; Tarn, J; Lendrem, D; Mitchell, S; Zaman, A; Ng, W F

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) shares clinical features and pathogenetic mechanisms with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is associated with an increased thromboembolic risk; however, it is unclear whether pSS patients are susceptible to thromboembolic diseases. In this study, we examined ex vivo blood clot formation (clot strength, rates of clot formation and lysis) in pSS using thromboelastography (TEG) and platelet aggregation to common agonists using multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA). We also investigated the relationship between TEG/MEA parameters and clinical/laboratory features of pSS. Design Case control. Setting Secondary care, single centre. Participants 34 pSS patients, 11 SLE patients and 13 healthy volunteers (all women) entered and completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes: TEG and MEA parameters between three subject groups. Secondary outcomes: The relationships between TEG/MEA and clinical/laboratory parameters analysed using bivariate correlation analysis with corrections for multiple testing. Results All TEG and MEA parameters were similar for the three subject groups. After corrections for multiple testing, interleukin (IL)-1α and Macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP)-1α remain correlated inversely with clot strength (r=−0.686, p=0.024 and r=−0.730, p=0.012, respectively) and overall coagulability (r=−0.640, p=0.048 and r=−0.648, p=0.048). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that several cytokines such as MIP-1α, IL-17a, IL-1α and Interferon (IFN)-γ may be key predictors of clot strength and overall coagulability in pSS. Conclusions Clot kinetics and platelet receptor function are normal in pSS. Several cytokines correlate with clot strength and overall coagulability in pSS. PMID:23793707

  15. Combinatorial effects of multiple enhancer variants in linkage disequilibrium dictate levels of gene expression to confer susceptibility to common traits.

    PubMed

    Corradin, Olivia; Saiakhova, Alina; Akhtar-Zaidi, Batool; Myeroff, Lois; Willis, Joseph; Cowper-Sal lari, Richard; Lupien, Mathieu; Markowitz, Sanford; Scacheri, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    DNA variants (SNPs) that predispose to common traits often localize within noncoding regulatory elements such as enhancers. Moreover, loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) often contain multiple SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD), any of which may be causal. Thus, determining the effect of these multiple variant SNPs on target transcript levels has been a major challenge. Here, we provide evidence that for six common autoimmune disorders (rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and ulcerative colitis), the GWAS association arises from multiple polymorphisms in LD that map to clusters of enhancer elements active in the same cell type. This finding suggests a "multiple enhancer variant" hypothesis for common traits, where several variants in LD impact multiple enhancers and cooperatively affect gene expression. Using a novel method to delineate enhancer-gene interactions, we show that multiple enhancer variants within a given locus typically target the same gene. Using available data from HapMap and B lymphoblasts as a model system, we provide evidence at numerous loci that multiple enhancer variants cooperatively contribute to altered expression of their gene targets. The effects on target transcript levels tend to be modest and can be either gain- or loss-of-function. Additionally, the genes associated with multiple enhancer variants encode proteins that are often functionally related and enriched in common pathways. Overall, the multiple enhancer variant hypothesis offers a new paradigm by which noncoding variants can confer susceptibility to common traits. PMID:24196873

  16. Homocysteine influences blood clot properties alone and in combination with total fibrinogen but not with fibrinogen γ' in Africans.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; de Lange, Zelda; Pieters, Marlien

    2015-06-01

    Simultaneously increased fibrinogen and homocysteine (Hcy) in blood are believed to elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved are unknown. We sought to determine whether Hcy or its genetic determinants influence blood clot properties alone or in combination with fibrinogen. In addition, we investigated, for the first time, the gamma prime (γ') isoform of fibrinogen with Hcy in relation to clot architecture and lysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms, Hcy and hemostatic variables, including clot lysis, determined with a global fibrinolytic assay [giving lag time, slope, maximum absorbance and clot lysis time (CLT)], were measured in 1867 healthy black South Africans and cross-sectionally analyzed. Increasing Hcy did not affect fiber cross-sectional area (maximum absorbance). However, it decreased the time needed to initiate the coagulation cascade and for fibrin fibers to grow (lag time), it increased the tempo of lateral aggregation (slope) and reduced CLT. None of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms measured had effects on clot properties. Combined effects were observed between Hcy and total fibrinogen in predicting CLT. Fibrinogen γ', which affected markers of the fibrinolytic assay, did not have conjoint effects with Hcy. We believe that there is value in recognizing the combined effects of Hcy and fibrinogen, but not its γ' isoform in relation to clot structure and lysis. The enhanced fibrinolysis rate observed in patients with low fibrinogen and high Hcy may have adverse consequences for health if it disturbs hemostasis and results in a bleeding tendency. PMID:25688462

  17. Heterogeneous Host Susceptibility Enhances Prevalence of Mixed-Genotype Micro-Parasite Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vlak, Just M.; Zwart, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Dose response in micro-parasite infections is usually shallower than predicted by the independent action model, which assumes that each infectious unit has a probability of infection that is independent of the presence of other infectious units. Moreover, the prevalence of mixed-genotype infections was greater than predicted by this model. No probabilistic infection model has been proposed to account for the higher prevalence of mixed-genotype infections. We use model selection within a set of four alternative models to explain high prevalence of mixed-genotype infections in combination with a shallow dose response. These models contrast dependent versus independent action of micro-parasite infectious units, and homogeneous versus heterogeneous host susceptibility. We specifically consider a situation in which genome differences between genotypes are minimal, and highly unlikely to result in genotype-genotype interactions. Data on dose response and mixed-genotype infection prevalence were collected by challenging fifth instar Spodoptera exigua larvae with two genotypes of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), differing only in a 100 bp PCR marker sequence. We show that an independent action model that includes heterogeneity in host susceptibility can explain both the shallow dose response and the high prevalence of mixed-genotype infections. Theoretical results indicate that variation in host susceptibility is inextricably linked to increased prevalence of mixed-genotype infections. We have shown, to our knowledge for the first time, how heterogeneity in host susceptibility affects mixed-genotype infection prevalence. No evidence was found that virions operate dependently. While it has been recognized that heterogeneity in host susceptibility must be included in models of micro-parasite transmission and epidemiology to account for dose response, here we show that heterogeneity in susceptibility is also a fundamental principle explaining

  18. Platelets and fibrin strands during clot retraction.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, E; Korell, U; Richter, J

    1984-03-15

    The ultrastructure of platelet fibrin contacts (PFC) and the course of the strands was investigated in serial sections of retracted clots with the help of specimen tilting. We found after retraction in a test tube as well as under isometric conditions in the resonance thrombograph, after HARTERT, an uniform type of PFC. The side to side contact between platelet surface and fibrin strands displayed a 15 nm wide space which was bridged of 10 - 30 nm by filamentary structure. In each case the direction of the fibrin strands changed on contact with the platelet surface (bend). These bends recurred if the adhering strands ran over a longer distance on the platelet surface. The bends can be explained by non-directional movement of the platelets or of their pseudopodia. Microfilaments (actomyosin) which run straight in pseudopodia and often also twisted in the platelet body support this assumption. The described mechanism - contact of the thrombin activated platelets with fibrin strands and simultaneous nondirectional movement of the platelets which bind further sections of the adhering strands to their surface - would provide a more satisfactory explanation for the retraction of the clot to 1/10 of its original volume. PMID:6539004

  19. Enhanced susceptibility of hybrid tilapia to Flavobacterium columnare after parasitism by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterium Flavobacterium columnare and protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis are two common pathogens of cultured fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) to the bacterium F. columnare, including fish mortality and bacterial loads in ...

  20. Cardiovascular Disease as a Risk Factor for Enhanced Susceptibility to Air Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse health effects caused by airborne particular matter (PM) are restricted primarily to susceptible populations. The actual risk of anyone individual is quite small, but because of the large number of exposed people, the overall population risk is significant. Ferreting out ...

  1. FORMAMIDINE PESTICIDES ENHANCE SUSCEPTIBILITY TO KINDLED SEIZURES IN AMYGDALA AND HIPPOCAMPUS OF THE RAT (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical kindling of the amygdala and hippocampus was used to evaluate the effects of two formamidines, chlordimeform (CDF) and amitraz (AMZ), upon seizure susceptibility in the rat. Male Long-Evans rats were implanted with electrodes in the amygdala or dorsal dentate gyrus, an...

  2. Effect of heparin on TAFI-dependent inhibition of fibrinolysis: relative importance of TAFIa generated by clot-bound and fluid phase thrombin.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Mario; Pentimone, Anna; Binetti, Bianca M; Cramarossa, Marialisa; Piro, Donatella; Semeraro, Nicola

    2002-08-01

    Heparin has been proposed to enhance thrombolysis by inhibiting thrombin-dependent generation of activated TAFI (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor), a carboxypeptidase that inhibits fibrinolysis. We evaluated the effect of heparin in an in vitro thrombolysis model consisting of a radiolabelled blood clot submerged in defibrinated plasma. Fibrinolysis was induced by adding t-PA (250 ng/ml) and calcium to the plasma bath. Control experiments indicated that thrombin generation induced by recalcification caused significant TAFI activation and inhibited clot lysis. Heparin (up to 1 U/ml), added to the plasma bath, failed to enhance clot lysis. Thrombin generation in the fluid phase was totally inhibited by heparin at concentrations > 0.5 U/ml. In contrast, thrombin generation on the clot surface was not inhibited by heparin (1 U/ml). TAFIa generation did occur in heparin-containing samples (1 U/ml) and amounted to about 10% of TAFIa formed in control samples. This low amount of TAFIa did exert antifibrinolytic activity as indicated by the observation that the addition of a specific TAFIa inhibitor (PTI) along with heparin enhanced clot lysis. Hirudin (10 micrograms/ml), at variance with heparin, inhibited clot-bound thrombin and enhanced clot lysis. These data show that heparin is unable to stimulate fibrinolysis through a TAFI-dependent mechanism, most likely because of its inefficiency in inhibiting thrombin generation on the clot surface. Moreover, they suggest that clot-bound thrombin plays a major role in TAFI-mediated inhibition of fibrinolysis through "localized" TAFIa generation. PMID:12195701

  3. A Synthetic Fibrin-Crosslinking Polymer for Modulating Clot Properties and Inducing Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leslie W.-G.; Wang, Xu; Wei, Hua; Pozzo, Lilo D.; White, Nathan J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    Clotting factor replacement is the standard management of acute bleeding in congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. We present a synthetic approach to hemostasis using an engineered hemostatic polymer (PolySTAT) that circulates innocuously in the blood, identifies sites of vascular injury, and promotes clot formation to stop bleeding. PolySTAT induces hemostasis by crosslinking the fibrin matrix within clots, mimicking the function of the transglutaminase Factor XIII. Furthermore, synthetic PolySTAT binds specifically to fibrin monomers and is uniformly integrated into fibrin fibers during fibrin polymerization, resulting in a fortified, hybrid polymer network with enhanced resistance to enzymatic degradation. In vivo hemostatic activity was confirmed in a rat model of trauma and fluid resuscitation in which intravenous administration of PolySTAT improved survival by reducing blood loss and resuscitation fluid requirements. PolySTAT-induced fibrin crosslinking is a novel approach to hemostasis utilizing synthetic polymers for non-invasive modulation of clot architecture with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic applications. PMID:25739763

  4. Anomalously large spin susceptibility enhancement in n-doped CdMnTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Cheikh, Z.; Cronenberger, S.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Boujdaria, K.; Baboux, F.; Perez, F.

    2013-12-04

    We report on time-resolved Kerr rotation (TRKR) experiments done on n-doped CdMnTe quantum wells (QWs), in the regime where strong coupling between the electron and the Mn spin-flip excitations shows up. It has been proposed previously to deduce the 2D electron gas spin susceptibility from the coupling energy between these spin excitations. Here we measure the coupling energy on a high mobility sample down to very low excitation density, and compare the results with spin-flip Raman scattering (SFRS) on the same sample. The electron spin polarizations measured by TRKR and SFRS are found in relatively good agreement. However the spin susceptibility measured by TRKR exceeds systematically the values predicted by many-body theory. This could be an indication that the two-oscillator model used to describe mixed electron-Mn spin excitations needs to be improved.

  5. Triazole-Linked Glycolipids Enhance the Susceptibility of MRSA to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We show here that a series of triazolyl glycolipid derivatives modularly synthesized by a “click” reaction have the ability to increase the susceptibility of a drug-resistant bacterium to β-lactam antibiotics. We determine that the glycolipids can suppress the minimal inhibitory concentration of a number of ineffective β-lactams, upward of 256-fold, for methicillin-resistant Staphylococuss aureus (MRSA). The mechanism of action has been preliminarily probed and discussed. PMID:26191368

  6. Triazole-Linked Glycolipids Enhance the Susceptibility of MRSA to β-Lactam Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xi-Le; Li, Dan; Shao, Lei; Dong, Xiaojing; He, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Guo-Rong; Chen, Daijie

    2015-07-01

    We show here that a series of triazolyl glycolipid derivatives modularly synthesized by a "click" reaction have the ability to increase the susceptibility of a drug-resistant bacterium to β-lactam antibiotics. We determine that the glycolipids can suppress the minimal inhibitory concentration of a number of ineffective β-lactams, upward of 256-fold, for methicillin-resistant Staphylococuss aureus (MRSA). The mechanism of action has been preliminarily probed and discussed. PMID:26191368

  7. Enhanced Susceptibility to Pulmonary Infection with Burkholderia cepacia in Cftr−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Uma; Thanassoulis, George; Cherapanov, Vera; Lu, Annie; Sjolin, Carola; Steer, Brent; Wu, Yi Jun; Rotstein, Ori D.; Kent, Geraldine; McKerlie, Colin; Forstner, Janet; Downey, Gregory P.

    2001-01-01

    Progressive pulmonary infection is the dominant clinical feature of cystic fibrosis (CF), but the molecular basis for this susceptibility remains incompletely understood. To study this problem, we developed a model of chronic pneumonia by repeated instillation of a clinical isolate of Burkholderia cepacia (genomovar III, ET12 strain), an opportunistic gram-negative bacterium, from a case of CF into the lungs of Cftr m1unc−/− (Cftr−/−) and congenic Cftr+/+ controls. Nine days after the last instillation, the CF transmembrane regulator knockout mice showed persistence of viable bacteria with chronic severe bronchopneumonia while wild-type mice remained healthy. The histopathological changes in the lungs of the susceptible Cftr−/− mice were characterized by infiltration of a mixed inflammatory-cell population into the peribronchiolar and perivascular spaces, Clara cell hyperplasia, mucus hypersecretion in airways, and exudation into alveolar airspaces by a mixed population of macrophages and neutrophils. An increased proportion of neutrophils was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the Cftr−/− mice, which, despite an increased bacterial load, demonstrated minimal evidence of activation. Alveolar macrophages from Cftr−/− mice also demonstrated suboptimal activation. These observations suggest that the pulmonary host defenses are compromised in lungs from animals with CF, as manifested by increased susceptibility to bacterial infection and lung injury. This murine model of chronic pneumonia thus reflects, in part, the situation in human patients and may help elucidate the mechanisms leading to defective host defense in CF. PMID:11447196

  8. Platelet factor XIII increases the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by accelerating the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin to fibrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. L.; Matsueda, G. R.; Haber, E.

    1992-01-01

    Platelet clots resist fibrinolysis by plasminogen activators. We hypothesized that platelet factor XIII may enhance the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by catalyzing the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2AP) to fibrin. Analysis of plasma clot structure by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting revealed accelerated alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinking in platelet-rich compared with platelet-depleted plasma clots. A similar study of clots formed with purified fibrinogen (depleted of factor XIII activity), isolated platelets, and specific factor XIII inhibitors indicated that this accelerated crosslinking was due to the catalytic activity of platelet factor XIII. Moreover, when washed platelets were aggregated by thrombin, there was evidence of platelet factor XIII-mediated crosslinking between platelet alpha 2AP and platelet fibrin(ogen). Specific inhibition (by a monoclonal antibody) of the alpha 2AP associated with washed platelet aggregates accelerated the fibrinolysis of the platelet aggregate. Thus in platelet-rich plasma clots, and in thrombin-induced platelet aggregates, platelet factor XIII actively formed alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinks, which appeared to enhance the resistance of platelet-rich clots to fibrinolysis.

  9. Antithrombin, an Important Inhibitor in Blood Clots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qing-Wei; Liu, Yue; Wan, Chun-Ling; Yu, Tao; He, Guang; He, Lin; Cai, Lei; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Blood coagulation is healthy and lifesaving because it can stop bleeding. It can, however, be a troublemaker as well, causing serious medical problems including heart attack and stroke. Body has complex blood coagulation cascade to modulate the blood clots. In the environment of plasma, the blood coagulation cascade is regulated by antithrombin, which is deemed one of the most important serine protease inhibitors. It inhibits thrombin; it can inhibit factors IXa and Xa as well. Interestingly, its inhibitory ability will be significantly increased with the existence of heparin. In this minireview paper, we are to summarize the structural features of antithrombin, as well as its heparin binding modes and anti-coagulation mechanisms, in hopes that the discussion and analysis presented in this paper can stimulate new strategies to find more effective approaches or compounds to modulate the antithrombin. PMID:26411319

  10. Involvement of Src kinases and PLCγ2 in clot retraction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Hughes, Craig E.; Inoue, Osamu; Kaneko, Makoto; Cuyun-Lira, Olga; Takafuta, Toshiro; Watson, Steve P.; Ozaki, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    The integrin αIIbβ3 plays a critical role in mediating clot retraction by platelets which is important in vivo in consolidating thrombus formation. Actin–myosin interaction is essential for clot retraction. In the present study, we demonstrate that the structurally distinct Src kinase inhibitors, PP2 and PD173952, significantly reduced the rate of clot retraction, but did not prevent it reaching completion. This effect was accompanied by abolition of αIIbβ3-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation, including PLCγ2. A role for PLCγ2 in mediating clot retraction was demonstrated using PLCγ2-deficient murine platelets. Furthermore, platelet adhesion to fibrinogen leads to MLC phosphorylation through a pathway that is inhibited by PP2 and by the PLC inhibitor, U73122. These results demonstrate a partial role for Src kinase-dependent activation of PLCγ2 and MLC phosphorylation in mediating clot retraction downstream of integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:17055557

  11. Clot Retraction: A Miniaturized Hemoretractometer for Blood Clot Retraction Testing (Small 29/2016).

    PubMed

    Li, Zida; Li, Xiang; McCracken, Brendan; Shao, Yue; Ward, Kevin; Fu, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    Whole blood coagulation testing provides valuable diagnostic information on diseases such as bleeding disorders, heart attack, deep venous thrombosis, etc. On page 3926, J. Fu and co-workers develop a miniaturized hemoretractometer to measure clot contraction upon blood coagulation with good reproducibility and robustness. This device design shows great application potential in point-of-care testing. Photo credit: David Peyer from University of Michigan. PMID:27477258

  12. Fibrin Clot Structure and Platelet Aggregation in Patients with Aspirin Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ajjan, Ramzi; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Hess, Katharina; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspirin is a cornerstone in prevention of cardiovascular events and modulates both platelet aggregation and fibrin clot formation. Some patients experience cardiovascular events whilst on aspirin, often termed aspirin treatment failure (ATF). This study evaluated both platelet aggregation and fibrin clot structure in patients with ATF. Methods We included 177 stable coronary artery disease patients on aspirin monotherapy. Among these, 116 (66%) had ATF defined as myocardial infarction (MI) whilst on aspirin. Platelet aggregation was assessed by Multiplate® aggregometry and VerifyNow®, whereas turbidimetric assays and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study fibrin clot characteristics. Results Enhanced platelet aggregation was observed in patients with ATF compared with non-MI patients following stimulation with arachidonic acid 1.0 mM (median 161 (IQR 95; 222) vs. 97 (60; 1776) AU*min, p = 0.005) and collagen 1.0 µg/mL (293 (198; 427) vs. 220 (165; 370) AU*min, p = 0.03). Similarly, clot maximum absorbance, a measure of fibrin network density, was increased in patients with ATF (0.48 (0.41; 0.52) vs. 0.42 (0.38; 0.50), p = 0.02), and this was associated with thinner fibres (mean ± SD: 119.7±27.5 vs. 127.8±31.1 nm, p = 0.003) and prolonged lysis time (552 (498; 756) vs. 519 (468; 633) seconds; p = 0.02). Patients with ATF also had increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (1.34 (0.48; 2.94) and 0.88 (0.32; 1.77) mg/L, p = 0.01) compared with the non-MI group. Clot maximum absorbance correlated with platelet aggregation (r = 0.31–0.35, p-values<0.001) and CRP levels (r = 0.60, p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with aspirin treatment failure showed increased platelet aggregation and altered clot structure with impaired fibrinolysis compared with stable CAD patients without previous MI. These findings suggest that an increased risk of aspirin treatment failure may be identified by measuring both platelet

  13. Influence of Interleukin-1 Beta on Platelet-Poor Plasma Clot Formation: A Potential Impact on Early Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Masci, Paul P.; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hematoma quality (especially the fibrin matrix) plays an important role in the bone healing process. Here, we investigated the effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) on fibrin clot formation from platelet-poor plasma (PPP). Methods Five-milliliter of rat whole-blood samples were collected from the hepatic portal vein. All blood samples were firstly standardized via a thrombelastograph (TEG), blood cell count, and the measurement of fibrinogen concentration. PPP was prepared by collecting the top two-fifths of the plasma after centrifugation under 400 × g for 10 min at 20°C. The effects of IL-1β cytokines on artificial fibrin clot formation from PPP solutions were determined by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), confocal microscopy (CM), turbidity, and clot lysis assays. Results The lag time for protofibril formation was markedly shortened in the IL-1β treatment groups (243.8 ± 76.85 in the 50 pg/mL of IL-1β and 97.5 ± 19.36 in the 500 pg/mL of IL-1β) compared to the control group without IL-1β (543.8 ± 205.8). Maximal turbidity was observed in the control group. IL-1β (500 pg/mL) treatment significantly decreased fiber diameters resulting in smaller pore sizes and increased density of the fibrin clot structure formed from PPP (P < 0.05). The clot lysis assay revealed that 500 pg/mL IL-1β induced a lower susceptibility to dissolution due to the formation of thinner and denser fibers. Conclusion IL-1β can significantly influence PPP fibrin clot structure, which may affect the early bone healing process. PMID:26909757

  14. Enhanced meta-analysis and replication studies identify five new psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Tsoi, Lam C; Spain, Sarah L; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stuart, Philip E; Capon, Francesca; Knight, Jo; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Kang, Hyun M; Allen, Michael H; Lambert, Sylviane; Stoll, Stefan; Weidinger, Stephan; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Koks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli; Esko, Tonu; Das, Sayantan; Metspalu, Andres; Weichenthal, Michael; Enerback, Charlotta; Krueger, Gerald G.; Voorhees, John J; Chandran, Vinod; Rosen, Cheryl F; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D; Reis, Andre; Nair, Rajan P; Franke, Andre; Barker, Jonathan NWN; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Trembath, Richard C; Elder, James T

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease with complex genetic architecture. Previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) and a recent meta-analysis using Immunochip data have uncovered 36 susceptibility loci. Here, we extend our previous meta-analysis of European ancestry by refined genotype calling and imputation and by the addition of 5,033 cases and 5,707 controls. The combined analysis, consisting of over 15,000 cases and 27,000 controls, identifies five new psoriasis susceptibility loci at genomewide significance (p < 5 × 10−8). The newly identified signals include two that reside in intergenic regions (1q31.1 and 5p13.1) and three residing near PLCL2 (3p24.3), NFKBIZ (3q12.3), and CAMK2G (10q22.2). We further demonstrate that NFKBIZ is a TRAF3IP2–dependent target of IL-17 signaling in human skin keratinocytes, thereby functionally linking two strong candidate genes. These results further integrate the genetics and immunology of psoriasis, suggesting new avenues for functional analysis and improved therapies. PMID:25939698

  15. Enhanced Susceptibility to Citrobacter rodentium Infection in MicroRNA-155-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    John, Victoria; Walker, Alan W.; Hill, Jennifer L.; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Lawley, Trevor D.; Mastroeni, Pietro; Frankel, Gadi; Enright, Anton J.; Vigorito, Elena; Dougan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding molecules that control gene expression posttranscriptionally, with microRNA-155 (miR-155) one of the first to be implicated in immune regulation. Here, we show that miR-155-deficient mice are less able to eradicate a mucosal Citrobacter rodentium infection than wild-type C57BL/6 mice. miR-155-deficient mice exhibited prolonged colonization associated with a higher C. rodentium burden in gastrointestinal tissue and spread into systemic tissues. Germinal center formation and humoral immune responses against C. rodentium were severely impaired in infected miR-155-deficient mice. A similarly susceptible phenotype was observed in μMT mice reconstituted with miR-155-deficient B cells, indicating that miR-155 is required intrinsically for mediating protection against this predominantly luminal bacterial pathogen. PMID:23264052

  16. Enhanced cardiac perception is associated with increased susceptibility to framing effects.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schulz, Stefan M; Stumpf, Theresa; Pauli, Paul; Vögele, Claus

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies suggest in line with dual process models that interoceptive skills affect controlled decisions via automatic or implicit processing. The "framing effect" is considered to capture implicit effects of task-irrelevant emotional stimuli on decision-making. We hypothesized that cardiac awareness, as a measure of interoceptive skills, is positively associated with susceptibility to the framing effect. Forty volunteers performed a risky-choice framing task in which the effect of loss versus gain frames on decisions based on identical information was assessed. The results show a positive association between cardiac awareness and the framing effect, accounting for 24% of the variance in the framing effect. These findings demonstrate that good interoceptive skills are linked to poorer performance in risky choices based on ambivalent information when implicit bias is induced by task-irrelevant emotional information. These findings support a dual process perspective on decision-making and suggest that interoceptive skills mediate effects of implicit bias on decisions. PMID:23607678

  17. Removal of Chronic Intravascular Blood Clots using Liquid Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Chul; Choi, Myeong; Koo, Il; Yu, Zengqi; Collins, George

    2011-10-01

    An electrical embolectomy device for removing chronic intravascular blood clots using liquid plasma under saline environment was demonstrated. We employed a proxy experimental blood clot model of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and actual equine blood clot. Thermal damage to contiguous tissue and the collagen denaturing via the plasma irradiation were investigated by histological analysis using birefringence of the tissue and verified by FT-IR spectroscopic study, respectively, which showed the high removal rate up to 2 mm per minute at room temperature and small thermal damage less than 200 μm.

  18. [Assessment of DNAse activity by the rivanol clot method].

    PubMed

    Generalova, A G; Generalov, I I

    1997-11-01

    A method for assessing DNAse activity in various biological substrata is offered. It is based on the capacity of rivanol to form a clot with DNA inversely proportionate to depolymeraization of DNAse under the effect of nucleases of different origin. The sensitivity of the method is more than 10 times higher than of viscosimetry and the alcohol clot formation test. In addition, the new method permits quantitative assessment of the clot, with the detection performed by any colorimetric or fluorimetric method. The method is adapted to measurement of the activities of commercial DNAse preparations, serum and immunoglobulin DNAse, and bacterial nuclease activities. PMID:9471317

  19. Bleeding and clotting in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Dittus, Christopher; Streiff, Michael; Ansell, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a relatively common inherited vascular disorder that was first described in 1864, and is notable for epistaxis, telangiectasia, and arterial venous malformations. While genetic tests are available, the diagnosis remains clinical, and is based on the Curacao criteria. Patients with HHT are at increased risk for both bleeding and clotting events. Because of these competing complications, hematologists are often faced with difficult clinical decisions. While the majority of management decisions revolve around bleeding complications, it is not infrequent for these patients to require anticoagulation for thrombosis. Any anticoagulation recommendations must take into account the bleeding risks associated with HHT. Recent reviews have found that HHT patients can be safely anticoagulated, with the most frequent complication being worsened epistaxis. Large clinical trials have shown that factor IIa and Xa inhibitors have less intracranial bleeding than warfarin, and basic coagulation research has provided a possible mechanism. This article describes the anticoagulation dilemma posed when a 62-year-old female patient with a history of bleeding events associated with HHT was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism. The subsequent discussion focuses on the approach to anticoagulation in the HHT patient, and addresses the role of the new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25879004

  20. Blood-clotting-inspired reversible polymer-colloid composite assembly in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Huck, Volker; Angerer, Jennifer I.; Reininger, Armin J.; Schneider, Stefan W.; Schneider, Matthias F.; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Blood clotting is a process by which a haemostatic plug is assembled at the site of injury. The formation of such a plug, which is essentially a (bio)polymer-colloid composite, is believed to be driven by shear flow in its initial phase, and contrary to our intuition, its assembly is enhanced under stronger flowing conditions. Here, inspired by blood clotting, we show that polymer-colloid composite assembly in shear flow is a universal process that can be tailored to obtain different types of aggregates including loose and dense aggregates, as well as hydrodynamically induced ‘log’-type aggregates. The process is highly controllable and reversible, depending mostly on the shear rate and the strength of the polymer-colloidbinding potential. Our results have important implications for the assembly of polymer-colloid composites, an important challenge of immense technological relevance. Furthermore, flow-driven reversible composite formation represents a new paradigm in non-equilibrium self-assembly.

  1. Enhancing Asphalt Binder's Rheological Behavior and Aging Susceptibility Using Nano-Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Renaldo C.

    The life expectancy of Asphalt Binder (AB) has been negatively impacted by the harsh bombardment of UV rays. UV rays cause asphalt to oxidize faster which results in deterioration of asphalt rheological characteristics that can lead to pavement distresses. This study investigates the impact that nano-particles and bio modification have on the aging susceptibility of asphalt binder. As such, the following hypothesis was investigated: Introduction of nano particles to asphalt binder will reduce asphalt oxidation aging by increasing the inter layer spacing of the nano particles. Two nano scale materials were used for this study, nano-clay and bio-char as well as one micro scale material, silica fume. Nano-clay (Cloisite 30B) is a naturally occurring inorganic mineral. Bio-char is the waste product from bio-binder production. Bio-binder is produced from swine manure using a thermochemical conversion process. This process is then followed by a filtration procedure where the bio-char is produced. Chemical and physical properties of bio-char showed a significant presence of carbon which could in turn reduce the rate of asphalt oxidation. Silica Fume is an ultra-fine powder collected as a by-product of silicon and ferrosilicon alloy production and consists of spherical particles. In this study several mixtures are designed and evaluated using RV testing (Rotational Viscometer), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Nano-clay is blended at 2% and 4% by weight of dry mass, with and without bio-binder (5% by weight of dry mass). Bio-char is grinded to nano scale and added to the virgin asphalt binder (PG 64-22) at 2%, 5% and 10% by weight of dry mass. Silica Fume is added to virgin asphalt binder (PG 64-22) at 2%, 4% and 8% by weight of dry mass. The optimum percent of nano scale material that is added to virgin asphalt binder is expected to reduce aging susceptibility of asphalt binder, extending its service life.

  2. Fetal Immune Activation to Malaria Antigens Enhances Susceptibility to In Vitro HIV Infection in Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Kevin; Myrie, Latoya; Malhotra, Indu; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric; Dent, Arlene; King, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a significant cause of new HIV infections in many countries. To examine whether fetal immune activation as a consequence of prenatal exposure to parasitic antigens increases the risk of MTCT, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) from Kenyan and North American newborns were examined for relative susceptibility to HIV infection in vitro. Kenyan CBMCs were 3-fold more likely to be infected with HIV than were North American CBMCs (P = .03). Kenyan CBMCs with recall responses to malaria antigens demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to HIV when compared with Kenyan CBMCs lacking recall responses to malaria (P = .03). CD4+ T cells from malaria-sensitized newborns expressed higher levels of CD25 and human leukocyte antigen DR ex vivo, which is consistent with increased immune activation. CD4+ T cells were the primary reservoir of infection at day 4 after virus exposure. Thus, prenatal exposure and in utero priming to malaria may increase the risk of MTCT. PMID:20687848

  3. Assessment of texture measures susceptibility to noise in conventional and contrast enhanced computed tomography lung tumour images.

    PubMed

    Al-Kadi, Omar Sultan

    2010-09-01

    Noise is one of the major problems that hinder an effective texture analysis of disease in medical images, which may cause variability in the reported diagnosis. In this paper seven texture measurement methods (two wavelet, two model and three statistical based) were applied to investigate their susceptibility to subtle noise caused by acquisition and reconstruction deficiencies in computed tomography (CT) images. Features of lung tumours were extracted from two different conventional and contrast enhanced CT image data-sets under filtered and noisy conditions. When measuring the noise in the background open-air region of the analysed CT images, noise of Gaussian and Rayleigh distributions with varying mean and variance was encountered, and Fishers' distance was used to differentiate between an original extracted lung tumour region of interest (ROI) with the filtered and noisy reconstructed versions. It was determined that the wavelet packet (WP) and fractal dimension measures were the least affected, while the Gaussian Markov random field, run-length and co-occurrence matrices were the most affected by noise. Depending on the selected ROI size, it was concluded that texture measures with fewer extracted features can decrease susceptibility to noise, with the WP and the Gabor filter having a stable performance in both filtered and noisy CT versions and for both data-sets. Knowing how robust each texture measure under noise presence is can assist physicians using an automated lung texture classification system in choosing the appropriate feature extraction algorithm for a more accurate diagnosis. PMID:20060263

  4. Deficiency of interleukin-15 enhances susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsein-San; Liao, Ching-Len; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Liao, Nan-Shih; Huang, Tien-Yu; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Heng-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocytes have a direct necrotic role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI), prolonged secondary inflammatory response through innate immune cells and cytokines also significantly contributes to APAP hepatotoxicity. Interleukin 15 (IL-15), a multifunction cytokine, regulates the adaptive immune system and influences development and function of innate immune cells. To better understand the role of IL-15 in liver injury, we treated wild-type (WT) and IL-15-knockout (Il15⁻/⁻) mice with a hepatotoxic dose of APAP to induce AILI and evaluated animal survival, liver damage, APAP metabolism in livers and the inflammatory response. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines was greater in Il15⁻/⁻ than WT mice. Subanalysis of hepatic infiltrated monocytes revealed greater neutrophil influx, along with greater hepatic induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), in Il15⁻/⁻ than WT mice. In addition, the level of hepatic hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) was partially suppressed in Il15⁻/⁻ mice, but not in WT mice. Interestingly, elimination of Kupffer cells and neutrophils did not alter the vulnerability to excess APAP in Il15⁻/⁻ mice. However, injection of galactosamine, a hepatic transcription inhibitor, significantly reduced the increased APAP sensitivity in Il15⁻/⁻ mice but had minor effect on WT mice. We demonstrated that deficiency of IL-15 increased mouse susceptibility to AILI. Moreover, Kupffer cell might affect APAP hepatotoxicity through IL-15. PMID:23028657

  5. FOXO1 Deletion Reduces Dendritic Cell Function and Enhances Susceptibility to Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenmei; Dong, Guangyu; Pacios, Sandra; Alnammary, Maher; Barger, Laura A.; Wang, Yu; Wu, Yingying; Graves, Dana T.

    2016-01-01

    The host response plays both protective and destructive roles in periodontitis. FOXO1 is a transcription factor that is activated in dendritic cells (DCs), but its function in vivo has not been examined. We investigated the role of FOXO1 in activating DCs in experimental (CD11c.Cre+.FOXO1L/L) compared with matched control mice (CD11c.Cre−.FOXO1L/L) in response to oral pathogens. Lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion reduced the recruitment of DCs to oral mucosal epithelium by approximately 40%. FOXO1 was needed for expression of genes that regulate migration, including integrins αν and β3 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Ablation of FOXO1 in DCs significantly decreased IL-12 produced by DCs in mucosal surfaces. Moreover, FOXO1 deletion reduced migration of DCs to lymph nodes, reduced capacity of DCs to induce formation of plasma cells, and reduced production of bacteria-specific antibody. The decrease in DC function in the experimental mice led to increased susceptibility to periodontitis through a mechanism that involved a compensatory increase in osteoclastogenic factors, IL-1β, IL-17, and RANKL. Thus, we reveal a critical role for FOXO1 in DC recruitment to oral mucosal epithelium and activation of adaptive immunity induced by oral inoculation of bacteria. PMID:25794707

  6. Reducing CBC Clotting Rates in the Neonatal Patient Care Areas.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jennifer; Tichon, Tanya; Narvey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Performing a complete blood count (CBC) is a common test performed in neonatal intensive care. Samples reported as "clotted" are not able to be analyzed and require redraw. A perceived "high" clotting rate elicits frustration among team members and has negative effects on patient flow and patient satisfaction. Process mapping and a root cause analysis determined that an educational intervention was required to optimize blood collection skills of front-line nurses. Through four rapid PDSA cycles over a three year period, the neonatal patient care areas were able to decrease their CBC clotting rates from 30% (monthly rate when the problem was identified) to 16% (yearly average at the end of the project). The CBC clotting rates continue to decease over time due to the integration of a multi-faceted educational plan into biannual education days designed for current staff nurses, as well as into the orientation plan for newly hired and student nurses. PMID:27493749

  7. Blood Clots and Travel: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... More than 300 million people travel on long-distance flights (generally more than four hours) each year. ... can be a serious risk for some long-distance travelers. Most information about blood clots and long- ...

  8. Adenosine diphosphate-decorated chitosan nanoparticles shorten blood clotting times, influencing the structures and varying the mechanical properties of the clots.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tze-Wen; Lin, Pei-Yi; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Chen, Yen-Fung

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) decorated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) (ANPs) or fibrinogen (FNPs) were used to fabricate hemostatic NPs that can shorten blood clotting time and prevent severe local hemorrhage. The structure and mechanical properties of the blood clot induced with ANP (clot/ANP) or FNP (clot/FNP) were also investigated. The NPs, ANPs, and FNPs, which had particle sizes of 245.1 ± 14.0, 251.0 ± 9.8, and 326.5 ± 14.5 nm and zeta potentials of 24.1 ± 0.5, 20.6 ± 1.9, and 15.3 ± 1.5 mV (n=4), respectively, were fabricated by ionic gelation and then decorated with ADP and fibrinogen. The zeta potentials and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of the NPs confirmed that their surfaces were successfully coated with ADP and fibrinogen. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs of the structure of the clot induced with "undecorated" chitosan NPs (clot/NP), clot/ANP, and clot/FNP (at 0.05 wt%) were different, after citrated bloods had been recalcified by a calcium chloride solution containing NPs, ANPs, or FNPs. This indicated that many NPs adhered on the membrane surfaces of red blood cells, that ANPs induced many platelet aggregates, and that FNPs were incorporated into the fibrin network in the clots. Measurements of the blood clotting times (Tc) of blood clot/NPs, clot/ANPs, and clot/FNPs, based on 90% of ultimate frequency shifts measured on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), were significantly (P<0.05) (n=4) shorter than that of a clot induced by a phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) (clot/PBS) (63.6% ± 3.1%, 48.3% ± 6.2%, and 63.2% ± 4.7%, respectively). The ΔF2 values in the spectra of frequency shifts associated with the propagation of fibrin networks in the clot/ANPs and clot/FNPs were significantly lower than those of clot/PBS. Interestingly, texture profile analysis of the compressional properties showed significantly lower hardness and compressibility in clot/NPs and clot/ANPs (P<0.05 or better) (n=4) compared with

  9. Resonant enhancement of third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of Cd-free chalcopyrite nanocrystals within quantum confinement regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamanaka, Yasushi; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Tsuzuki, Masakazu; Kuzuya, Toshihiro; Sumiyama, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities (χ(3)) have been investigated for chalcopyrite CuInS2 and AgInS2 nanocrystals within a strong confinement regime. The imaginary part of χ(3) (Imχ(3)) of 2.0- and 4.9-nm-sized CuInS2 nanocrystals and 2.6- and 4.3-nm-sized AgInS2 nanocrystals are negative and exhibit resonant enhancement around the absorption between the highest quantized levels of valence band and the lowest conduction band due to the state-filling effect. Figure of merit of |Imχ(3)| ranges 10-20-10-19 m3/V2, which is comparable to those of CdSSe nanocrystals.

  10. Activation of the salicylic acid signaling pathway enhances Clover yellow vein virus virulence in susceptible pea cultivars.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Go; Kagaya, Uiko; Kitazawa, Hiroaki; Nakahara, Kenji Suto; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2009-02-01

    The wild-type strain (Cl-WT) of Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) systemically induces cell death in pea cv. Plant introduction (PI) 118501 but not in PI 226564. A single incompletely dominant gene, Cyn1, controls systemic cell death in PI 118501. Here, we show that activation of the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway enhances ClYVV virulence in susceptible pea cultivars. The kinetics of virus accumulation was not significantly different between PI 118501 (Cyn1) and PI 226564 (cyn1); however, the SA-responsive chitinase gene (SA-CHI) and the hypersensitive response (HR)-related gene homologous to tobacco HSR203J were induced only in PI 118501 (Cyn1). Two mutant viruses with mutations in P1/HCPro, which is an RNA-silencing suppressor, reduced the ability to induce cell death and SA-CHI expression. The application of SA and of its analog benzo (1,2,3) thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH) partially complemented the reduced virulence of mutant viruses. These results suggest that high activation of the SA signaling pathway is required for ClYVV virulence. Interestingly, BTH could enhance Cl-WT symptoms in PI 226564 (cyn1). However, it could not enhance symptoms induced by White clover mosaic virus and Bean yellow mosaic virus. Our report suggests that the SA signaling pathway has opposing functions in compatible interactions, depending on the virus-host combination. PMID:19132869

  11. [Determination of hyaluronidase activity by the rivanol clot method].

    PubMed

    Azarenok, K S; Generalov, I I

    1994-01-01

    A method for hyaluronidase activity measurement in various biologic samples is suggested, based on rivanol capacity to form a clot with hyaluronic acid inversely proportional to this acid depolymerization under the effect of hyaluronidase. This method sensitivity is ten times higher than that of the mucin clot method; any colorimetric or fluorometric method can be used for detection. The method has been adapted to measurements of commercial hyaluronidase preparations and of blood serum hyaluronidase activity. PMID:7850237

  12. Chondrogenic differentiation of marrow clots after microfracture with BMSC-derived ECM scaffold in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Jin, Chengzhe; Xu, Yan; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Tang, Cheng; Ansari, Mujtaba; Wang, Liming

    2014-10-01

    Repairing articular cartilage by combining microfracture and various scaffolds has been extensively performed in in vivo animal models. We previously described a novel extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells-derived ECM (BMSC-dECM) scaffold on the chondrogenic differentiation of marrow clots following microfracture in vitro. In this study, we manufactured the BMSC-dECM scaffold using a freeze-drying method. To obtain the marrow clots, a full-thickness cartilage defect was established and microholes were created in the trochlear groove of New Zealand white rabbits. The samples were divided and cultured in vitro for 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The samples included a culture of the marrow clot alone (Group 1), a culture of the marrow clot with transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β3) (Group 2), a culture of the composite of the BMSC-dECM scaffold and the marrow clot alone (Group 3), and a culture of the composite with TGF-β3 (Group 4). A smooth and glossy surface was observed in Group 2 and Group 4 over time, but the surface for Group 4 was larger from week 1 onward. Compressive strength gradually increased in Groups 2 and 4, and greater increases were observed in Group 4 during the 8-week culture period. Enhanced cartilage-like matrix deposition of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and type II collagen were confirmed by Safranin O and immunohistochemistry staining, respectively, in Groups 2 and 4. The GAG and collagen contents also gradually increased over time in Groups 2 and 4; the increase was greater in Group 4. In addition, real-time-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the expression of chondrogenic genes, such as COL2, ACAN, and SOX9, was gradually upregulated in Groups 2 and 4. However, greater increases in the expression of these cartilage-like genes were observed in Group 4 from week 4 onward. Our results suggest that the BMSC

  13. Defective polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in dairy cows showing enhanced susceptibility to intramammary infections.

    PubMed

    Cooray, R; Håkansson, L

    1995-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear-neutrophil (PMN) oxidative-burst activity, chemotactic and chemokinetic migratory responses, and surface-adhesion protein expression in a mastitis-prone group of dairy cows were compared with corresponding variables in healthy cows. The cows had a well-documented history of udder infection caused by major mastitis pathogens. Analysis of PMN functions revealed a deficiency in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence responses that seemed to be associated with the mobilization of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the PMN of the patient group, as compared with the healthy controls. The migratory capacity of the PMN in response to a variety of chemotactic substances was enhanced in the patients. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the expression of surface-adhesion proteins (CD11a/CD18). It is proposed that the migratory activity of PMN cells was enhanced in order to compensate for their depressed respiratory-burst activity. Studies are under way to assess whether the defective mobilization of MPO in PMN of mastitis-prone cows is an acquired transient defect or a permanent hereditary defect. PMID:8594848

  14. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions... clotting factors: Conditions. Effective July 18, 1984, blood clotting factors to control bleeding...

  15. Clotting Mimicry from Robust Hemostatic Bandages Based on Self-Assembling Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled bleeding from traumatic wounds is a major factor in deaths resulting from military conflict, accidents, disasters and crime. Self-assembling peptide nanofibers have shown superior hemostatic activity, and herein, we elucidate their mechanism by visualizing the formation of nanofiber-based clots that aggregate blood components with a similar morphology to fibrin-based clots. Furthermore, to enhance its direct application to a wound, we developed layer-by-layer assembled thin film coatings onto common materials used for wound dressings—gauze and gelatin sponges. We find these nanofibers elute upon hydration under physiological conditions and generate nanofiber-based clots with blood. After exposure to a range of harsh temperature conditions (−80 to 60 °C) for a week and even 5 months at 60 °C, these hemostatic bandages remain capable of releasing active nanofibers. In addition, the application of these nanofiber-based films from gauze bandages was found to accelerate hemostasis in porcine skin wounds as compared to plain gauze. The thermal robustness, in combination with the self-assembling peptide’s potent hemostatic activity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and low cost of production, makes this a promising approach for a cheap yet effective hemostatic bandage. PMID:26284753

  16. Fine mapping of type 1 diabetes susceptibility loci and evidence for colocalization of causal variants with lymphoid gene enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Burren, Oliver; Cooper, Nick J.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Farber, Emily; Bonnie, Jessica K.; Szpak, Michal; Schofield, Ellen; Achuthan, Premanand; Guo, Hui; Fortune, Mary D.; Stevens, Helen; Walker, Neil M.; Ward, Luke D.; Kundaje, Anshul; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Cooper, Jason D.; Deloukas, Panos; Todd, John A.; Wallace, Chris; Concannon, Patrick; Rich, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies of type 1 diabetes (T1D) have identified 50 susceptibility regions1,2 (www.T1DBase.org) revealing major pathways contributing to risk3, with some loci shared across immune disorders4–6. In order to make genetic comparisons across autoimmune disorders as informative as possible a dense genotyping array, the ImmunoChip, was developed, from which four novel T1D regions were identified (P < 5 × 10−8). A comparative analysis with 15 immune diseases (www.ImmunoBase.org) revealed that T1D is more similar genetically to other autoantibody-positive diseases, most significantly to juvenile idiopathic arthritis and least to ulcerative colitis, and provided support for three additional novel T1D loci. Using a Bayesian approach, we defined credible sets for the T1D SNPs. These T1D SNPs localized to enhancer sequences active in thymus, T and B cells, and CD34+ stem cells. Enhancer-promoter interactions can now be analyzed in these cell types to identify which particular genes and regulatory sequences are causal. PMID:25751624

  17. Fine mapping of type 1 diabetes susceptibility loci and evidence for colocalization of causal variants with lymphoid gene enhancers.

    PubMed

    Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Burren, Oliver; Cooper, Nick J; Quinlan, Aaron R; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Farber, Emily; Bonnie, Jessica K; Szpak, Michal; Schofield, Ellen; Achuthan, Premanand; Guo, Hui; Fortune, Mary D; Stevens, Helen; Walker, Neil M; Ward, Lucas D; Kundaje, Anshul; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Cooper, Jason D; Deloukas, Panos; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris; Concannon, Patrick; Rich, Stephen S

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies of type 1 diabetes (T1D) have identified 50 susceptibility regions, finding major pathways contributing to risk, with some loci shared across immune disorders. To make genetic comparisons across autoimmune disorders as informative as possible, a dense genotyping array, the Immunochip, was developed, from which we identified four new T1D-associated regions (P < 5 × 10(-8)). A comparative analysis with 15 immune diseases showed that T1D is more similar genetically to other autoantibody-positive diseases, significantly most similar to juvenile idiopathic arthritis and significantly least similar to ulcerative colitis, and provided support for three additional new T1D risk loci. Using a Bayesian approach, we defined credible sets for the T1D-associated SNPs. The associated SNPs localized to enhancer sequences active in thymus, T and B cells, and CD34(+) stem cells. Enhancer-promoter interactions can now be analyzed in these cell types to identify which particular genes and regulatory sequences are causal. PMID:25751624

  18. Specialized proresolving lipid mediators in patients with coronary artery disease and their potential for clot remodeling.

    PubMed

    Elajami, Tarec K; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N; Welty, Francine K

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation in arterial walls leads to coronary artery disease (CAD). Because specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPMs; lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins) stimulate resolution of inflammation in animal models, we tested whether n-3 fatty acids impact SPM profiles in patients with CAD and promote clot remodeling. Six patients with stable CAD were randomly assigned to either treatment with daily 3.36 g Lovaza for 1 yr or without. Targeted lipid mediator-metabololipidomics showed that both groups had absence of resolvin D1 (RvD1), RvD2, RvD3, RvD5 and resolvin E1-all of which are present in healthy patients. Those not taking Lovaza had an absence of aspirin-triggered resolvin D3 (AT-RvD3) and aspirin-triggered lipoxin B4 (AT-LXB4). Lovaza treatment restored AT-RvD3 and AT-LXB4 and gave levels of RvD6 and aspirin-triggered protectin D1 (AT-PD1) twice as high (resolvin E2 ∼5 fold) as well as lower prostaglandins. Principal component analysis indicated positive relationships for patients with CAD who were receiving Lovaza with increased AT-RvD3, RvD6, AT-PD1, and AT-LXB4 SPMs identified in Lovaza-treated patients with CAD enhanced ∼50% at 1 nM macrophage uptake of blood clots. These results indicate that patients with CAD have lower levels and/or absence of specific SPMs that were restored with Lovaza; these SPMs promote macrophage phagocytosis of blood clots. Together, they suggest that low vascular SPMs may enable progression of chronic vascular inflammation predisposing to coronary atherosclerosis and to thrombosis.-Elajami, T. K., Colas, R. A., Dalli, J., Chiang, N., Serhan, C. N., Welty, F. K. Specialized proresolving lipid mediators in patients with coronary artery disease and their potential for clot remodeling. PMID:27121596

  19. Nanobubble-Enhanced Sonothrombolysis: From Benchtop to Bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Evan C.

    2006-05-01

    Microbubbles have been shown to enhance the rate of clot dissolution with ultrasound. In vivo work in a canine model has shown good efficacy for clot dissolution with ultrasound and intravenously administered MRX-815 nanobubbles (1,2). In this abstract we describe results in an in vitro clot lysis model with and without lytic drugs and also describe early results of clinical trials.

  20. Increased Oxidation as an Additional Mechanism Underlying Reduced Clot Permeability and Impaired Fibrinolysis in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lados-Krupa, Anna; Konieczynska, Malgorzata; Chmiel, Artur; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We sought to investigate whether enhanced oxidation contributes to unfavorable fibrin clot properties in patients with diabetes. Methods. We assessed plasma fibrin clot permeation (Ks, a measure of the pore size in fibrin networks) and clot lysis time induced by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (CLT) in 163 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients (92 men and 71 women) aged 65 ± 8.8 years with a mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of 6.8%. We also measured oxidative stress markers, including nitrotyrosine, the soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), and advanced glycation end products (AGE). Results. There were inverse correlations between Ks and nitrotyrosine, sRAGE, 8-iso-PGF2α, and oxLDL. CLT showed a positive correlation with oxLDL and nitrotyrosine but not with other oxidation markers. All these associations remained significant for Ks after adjustment for fibrinogen, disease duration, and HbA1c (all P < 0.05), while oxLDL was the only independent predictor of CLT. Conclusions. Our study shows that enhanced oxidative stress adversely affects plasma fibrin clot properties in type 2 diabetic patients, regardless of disease duration and glycemia control. PMID:26357663

  1. C60(Nd) nanoparticles enhance chemotherapeutic susceptibility of cancer cells by modulation of autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pengfei; Zhang, Li; Lu, Yang; Man, Na; Wen, Longping

    2010-12-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionally conserved intracellular process degrading cytoplasmic proteins and organelles for recycling, has become one of the most remarkable strategies applied in cancer research. The fullerene C60 nanoparticle (nC60) has been shown to induce autophagy and sensitize chemotherapeutic killing of cancer cells, but the details still remain unknown. Here we show that a water-dispersed nanoparticle solution of derivatized fullerene C60, C60(Nd) nanoparticles (nC60(Nd)), has greater potential in inducing autophagy and sensitizing chemotherapeutic killing of both normal and drug-resistant cancer cells than nC60 does in an autophagy-dependent fashion. Additionally we further demonstrated that autophagy induced by nC60/C60(Nd) and Rapamycin had completely different roles in cancer chemotherapy. Our results, for the first time, revealed a novel and more potent derivative of the C60 nanoparticle in enhancing the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents and reducing drug resistance through autophagy modulation, which may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer therapy.

  2. European Corn Borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) Induced Responses Enhance Susceptibility in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Dafoe, Nicole J.; Thomas, James D.; Shirk, Paul D.; Legaspi, Michelle E.; Vaughan, Martha M.; Huffaker, Alisa; Teal, Peter E.; Schmelz, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant responses have been widely described following attack on leaves; however, less attention has been paid to analogous local processes that occur in stems. Early studies of maize (Zea mays) responses to stem boring by European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinianubilalis) larvae revealed the presence of inducible acidic diterpenoid phytoalexins, termed kauralexins, and increases in the benzoxazinoid 2-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one-glucose (HDMBOA-Glc) after 24 h of herbivory. Despite these rapidly activated defenses, larval growth was not altered in short-term feeding assays. Unexpectedly, ECB growth significantly improved in assays using stem tissue preconditioned by 48 h of larval tunneling. Correspondingly, measures of total soluble protein increased over 2.6-fold in these challenged tissues and were accompanied by elevated levels of sucrose and free linoleic acid. While microarray analyses revealed up-regulation of over 1100 transcripts, fewer individual protein increases were demonstrable. Consistent with induced endoreduplication, both wounding and ECB stem attack resulted in similar significant expansion of the nucleus, nucleolus and levels of extractable DNA from challenged tissues. While many of these responses are triggered by wounding alone, biochemical changes further enhanced in response to ECB may be due to larval secreted effectors. Unlike other Lepidoptera examined, ECB excrete exceedingly high levels of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in their frass which is likely to contact and contaminate the surrounding feeding tunnel. Stem exposure to a metabolically stable auxin, such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), promoted significant protein accumulation above wounding alone. As a future testable hypothesis, we propose that ECB-associated IAA may function as a candidate herbivore effector promoting the increased nutritional content of maize stems. PMID:24023868

  3. EEG Oscillation Evidences of Enhanced Susceptibility to Emotional Stimuli during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianxin; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Ling; Li, Xiang; Yao, Bo; Ding, Xinsheng; Yuan, JiaJin; Yang, Jiemin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our recent event-related potential (ERP) study showed that adolescents are more emotionally sensitive to negative events compared to adults, regardless of the valence strength of the events. The current work aimed to confirm this age-related difference in response to emotional stimuli of diverse intensities by examining Electroencephalography (EEG) oscillatory power in time-frequency analysis. Methods: Time-frequency analyses were performed on the EEG data recorded for highly negative (HN), moderately negative (MN) and Neutral pictures in 20 adolescents and 20 adults during a covert emotional task. The results showed a significant age by emotion interaction effect in the theta and beta oscillatory power during the 500–600 ms post stimulus. Results: Adolescents showed significantly less pronounced theta synchronization (ERS, 5.5–7.5 Hz) for HN stimuli, and larger beta desynchronization (ERD; 18–20 Hz) for both HN and MN stimuli, in comparison with neutral stimuli. By contrast, adults exhibited no significant emotion effects in theta and beta frequency bands. In addition, the analysis of the alpha spectral power (10.5–12 Hz; 850–950 ms) showed a main effect of emotion, while the emotion by age interaction was not significant. Irrespective of adolescents or adults, HN and MN stimuli elicited enhanced alpha suppression compared to Neutral stimuli, while the alpha power was similar across HN and MN conditions. Conclusions: These results confirmed prior findings that adolescents are more sensitive to emotionally negative stimuli compared to adults, regardless of emotion intensity, possibly due to the developing prefrontal control system during adolescence. PMID:27242568

  4. European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) induced responses enhance susceptibility in maize.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, Nicole J; Thomas, James D; Shirk, Paul D; Legaspi, Michelle E; Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Teal, Peter E; Schmelz, Eric A

    2013-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant responses have been widely described following attack on leaves; however, less attention has been paid to analogous local processes that occur in stems. Early studies of maize (Zea mays) responses to stem boring by European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinianubilalis) larvae revealed the presence of inducible acidic diterpenoid phytoalexins, termed kauralexins, and increases in the benzoxazinoid 2-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one-glucose (HDMBOA-Glc) after 24 h of herbivory. Despite these rapidly activated defenses, larval growth was not altered in short-term feeding assays. Unexpectedly, ECB growth significantly improved in assays using stem tissue preconditioned by 48 h of larval tunneling. Correspondingly, measures of total soluble protein increased over 2.6-fold in these challenged tissues and were accompanied by elevated levels of sucrose and free linoleic acid. While microarray analyses revealed up-regulation of over 1100 transcripts, fewer individual protein increases were demonstrable. Consistent with induced endoreduplication, both wounding and ECB stem attack resulted in similar significant expansion of the nucleus, nucleolus and levels of extractable DNA from challenged tissues. While many of these responses are triggered by wounding alone, biochemical changes further enhanced in response to ECB may be due to larval secreted effectors. Unlike other Lepidoptera examined, ECB excrete exceedingly high levels of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in their frass which is likely to contact and contaminate the surrounding feeding tunnel. Stem exposure to a metabolically stable auxin, such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), promoted significant protein accumulation above wounding alone. As a future testable hypothesis, we propose that ECB-associated IAA may function as a candidate herbivore effector promoting the increased nutritional content of maize stems. PMID:24023868

  5. How it all starts: initiation of the clotting cascade

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie A.; Travers, Richard J.; Morrissey, James H.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma coagulation system in mammalian blood consists of a cascade of enzyme activation events in which serine proteases activate the proteins (proenzymes and procofactors) in the next step of the cascade via limited proteolysis. The ultimate outcome is the polymerization of fibrin and the activation of platelets, leading to a blood clot. This process is protective, as it prevents excessive blood loss following injury (normal hemostasis). Unfortunately, the blood clotting system can also lead to unwanted blood clots inside blood vessels (pathologic thrombosis), which is a leading cause of disability and death in the developed world. There are two main mechanisms for triggering the blood clotting, termed the tissue factor pathway and the contact pathway. Only one of these pathways (the tissue factor pathway) functions in normal hemostasis. Both pathways, however, are thought to contribute to thrombosis. An emerging concept is that the contact pathway functions in host pathogen-defenses. This review focuses on how the initiation phase of the blood clotting cascade is regulated in both pathways, with a discussion of the contributions of these pathways to hemostasis versus thrombosis. PMID:26018600

  6. Investigating the interaction between acoustically stimulated microbubbles and fibrin clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Christopher; Leung, Ben; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David

    2012-11-01

    While it is well established that ultrasound stimulated microbubbles can potentiate thrombolysis, the mechanisms of action are poorly understood. The objective of this work was to gain a more fundamental understanding of how acoustically stimulated microbubbles interact with and potentially degrade fibrin clots. Owing to their optical transparency, the use of fibrin clots allowed to optically observe microbubbles interacting with the clot boundary and any resultant disruption of the fluorescently tagged fibrin network. It was found that microbubbles could readily penetrate into fibrin clots with velocities up to 0.2 m/s and to depths related to the number of pulses applied. At lower pressures (0.2-0.55 MPa), microbubbles as small as 3μm were observed to penetrate, whereas higher pressures (>0.9 MPa) caused the penetration of larger microbubbles (10-30μm), formed by coalescence prior to entry. In some cases, patent 'tunnels' remained along the path taken by penetrating microbubbles. Tunnel diameters ranged between 9-35μm depending largely on pressure and pulse duration. Two-photon microscopy indicated either patent tunnels or paths of disrupted fibers consistent with collapsed tunnel. Fluid flow within the clot was observed to accompany penetrating microbubbles, which may have implications for lytic enzyme penetration.

  7. Transcranial Clot Lysis Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Zadicario, Eyal; Fisher, David J.; Bradley, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is the third common cause of death worldwide. The majority of strokes are caused by sudden vessel occlusion, due to a blood clot. Vessel recanalization is the primary goal of all acute stroke treatment strategies. Initial data using ultrasound in combination with a therapeutic agent for clot lysis in stroke are promising. However, sound absorption and defocusing of the ultrasound beam occur during transskull insonation, limiting the efficiency of this approach to high extent. Using a transskull High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) head system we were able to lyse blood clots within seconds and in absence of further lytic agents. We could show that any correction for the distortion might be negligible to focus the ultrasound beam after transskull insonation. The use of transskull HIFU for immediate clot lysis in the human brain without the need of further drugs and disregarding individual skull bone characteristics could become a successful strategy in early stroke treatment. Using magnetic resonance tomography for neuronavigation MRI Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has the potential to open new avenues for therapeutic applications in the brain including Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhages, Braintumors, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Thalamic Pain, BBB opening, and local drug delivery. First results in transcranial clot lysis will be presented in this paper.

  8. A Miniaturized Hemoretractometer for Blood Clot Retraction Testing.

    PubMed

    Li, Zida; Li, Xiang; McCracken, Brendan; Shao, Yue; Ward, Kevin; Fu, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    Blood coagulation is a critical hemostatic process that must be properly regulated to maintain a delicate balance between bleeding and clotting. Disorders of blood coagulation can expose patients to the risk of either bleeding disorders or thrombotic diseases. Coagulation diagnostics using whole blood is very promising for assessing the complexity of the coagulation system and for global measurements of hemostasis. Despite the clinic values that existing whole blood coagulation tests have demonstrated, these systems have significant limitations that diminish their potential for point-of-care applications. Here, recent advancements in device miniaturization using functional soft materials are leveraged to develop a miniaturized clot retraction force assay device termed mHemoRetractoMeter (mHRM). The mHRM is capable of precise measurements of dynamic clot retraction forces in real time using minute amounts of whole blood. To further demonstrate the clinical utility of the mHRM, systematic studies are conducted using the mHRM to examine the effects of assay temperature, treatments of clotting agents, and pro- and anti-coagulant drugs on clot retraction force developments of whole blood samples. The mHRM's low fabrication cost, small size, and consumption of only minute amounts of blood samples make the technology promising as a point-of-care tool for future coagulation monitoring. PMID:27248117

  9. Some Important Milestones in the Field of Blood Clotting.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F

    2016-01-01

    Several different kinds of 'milestone' in the field of blood coagulation are described from the middle decades of the 20th century. Although viewed from the standpoint of clotting per se, attention is also given to implications for innate immunity. The first milestone considered is the protracted saga of clotting dependence on vitamin K, an adventure that spanned more than five decades beginning in the 1920s. The second has to do with the discovery of a half-dozen 'new' clotting factors during the period immediately following World War II. A third pursues a narrower focus and examines the once mysterious transformation of fibrinogen into fibrin. Finally, the clinical treatment of classical hemophilia had a remarkable turning point in the 1960s as the result of simple but sensible measures. PMID:26667674

  10. Impaired clot lysis in copper-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, S.M.; Klevay, L.M. )

    1991-03-15

    Cu-deficient mice exhibit atrial thrombosis but have significantly lowered plasma coagulation factor V and VIII activities. To investigate the effects of a dietary Cu deficiency on clot lysis, groups of adult male and female Swiss-Webster mice were fed Cu-supplemented or -deficient diets with deionized water for 49 days. Animals were exsanguinated under pentobarbital anesthesia; platelet-poor plasma prepared and assayed for euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT) and antithrombin III activity. A protamine sulfate test was also performed. The highly significant ECLT prolongation in Cu-deficient mice clearly demonstrates that critical components of the physiological clot-lysing mechanism must be severely impaired in these animals. These results may help to explain the thrombotic sequelae of a dietary Cu deficiency in mice.

  11. Reducing CBC Clotting Rates in the Neonatal Patient Care Areas

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jennifer; Tichon, Tanya; Narvey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Performing a complete blood count (CBC) is a common test performed in neonatal intensive care. Samples reported as “clotted” are not able to be analyzed and require redraw. A perceived “high” clotting rate elicits frustration among team members and has negative effects on patient flow and patient satisfaction. Process mapping and a root cause analysis determined that an educational intervention was required to optimize blood collection skills of front-line nurses. Through four rapid PDSA cycles over a three year period, the neonatal patient care areas were able to decrease their CBC clotting rates from 30% (monthly rate when the problem was identified) to 16% (yearly average at the end of the project). The CBC clotting rates continue to decease over time due to the integration of a multi-faceted educational plan into biannual education days designed for current staff nurses, as well as into the orientation plan for newly hired and student nurses. PMID:27493749

  12. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Hemodynamics Using Individualized Time Thresholds for Assessment of Peak Enhancement Parameters Derived from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nasel, Christian; Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland; Moser, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assessment of cerebral ischemia often employs dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with evaluation of various peak enhancement time parameters. All of these parameters use a single time threshold to judge the maximum tolerable peak enhancement delay that is supposed to reliably differentiate sufficient from critical perfusion. As the validity of this single threshold approach still remains unclear, in this study, (1) the definition of a threshold on an individual patient-basis, nevertheless (2) preserving the comparability of the data, was investigated. Methods The histogram of time-to-peak (TTP) values derived from DSC-MRI, the so-called TTP-distribution curve (TDC), was modeled using a double-Gaussian model in 61 patients without severe cerebrovascular disease. Particular model-based zf-scores were used to describe the arterial, parenchymal and venous bolus-transit phase as time intervals Ia,p,v. Their durations (delta Ia,p,v), were then considered as maximum TTP-delays of each phase. Results Mean-R2 for the model-fit was 0.967. Based on the generic zf-scores the proposed bolus transit phases could be differentiated. The Ip-interval reliably depicted the parenchymal bolus-transit phase with durations of 3.4 s–10.1 s (median = 4.3s), where an increase with age was noted (∼30 ms/year). Conclusion Individual threshold-adjustment seems rational since regular bolus-transit durations in brain parenchyma obtained from the TDC overlap considerably with recommended critical TTP-thresholds of 4 s–8 s. The parenchymal transit time derived from the proposed model may be utilized to individually correct TTP-thresholds, thereby potentially improving the detection of critical perfusion. PMID:25521121

  13. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E; Rigby, Neil M; Mackie, Alan R; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39-40, 56-57 and 79-80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  14. Piezoelectric Field Enhanced Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibilities in Wurtzite GaN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Chuang, S.-L.; Ning, C. Z.; Woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical processes including second-harmonic generation, optical rectification, and difference-frequency generation associated with intersubband transitions in wurtzite GaN/AlGaN quantum well (QW) are investigated theoretically. Taking into account the strain-induced piezoelectric (PZ) effects, we solve the electronic structure of the QW from coupled effective-mass Schrodinger equation and Poisson equation including the exchange-correlation effect under the local-density approximation. We show that the large PZ field in the QW breaks the symmetry of the confinement potential profile and leads to large second-order susceptibilities. We also show that the interband optical pump-induced electron-hole plasma results in an enhancement in the maximum value of the nonlinear coefficients and a redshift of the peak position in the nonlinear optical spectrum. By use of the difference-frequency generation, THz radiation can be generated from a GaN/Al(0.75)Ga(0.25)N with a pump laser of 1.55 micron.

  15. NLRP3 Deficiency Reduces Macrophage Interleukin-10 Production and Enhances the Susceptibility to Doxorubicin-induced Cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motoi; Usui, Fumitake; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Kimura, Hiroaki; Mizushina, Yoshiko; Shirasuna, Koumei; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 inflammasomes recognize non-microbial danger signals and induce release of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β, leading to sterile inflammation in cardiovascular disease. Because sterile inflammation is involved in doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cardiotoxicity, we investigated the role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. Cardiac dysfunction and injury were induced by low-dose Dox (15 mg/kg) administration in NLRP3-deficient (NLRP3(-/-)) mice but not in wild-type (WT) and IL-1β(-/-) mice, indicating that NLRP3 deficiency enhanced the susceptibility to Dox-induced cardiotoxicity independent of IL-1β. Although the hearts of WT and NLRP3(-/-) mice showed no significant difference in inflammatory cell infiltration, macrophages were the predominant inflammatory cells in the hearts, and cardiac IL-10 production was decreased in Dox-treated NLRP3(-/-) mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments showed that bone marrow-derived cells contributed to the exacerbation of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity in NLRP3(-/-) mice. In vitro experiments revealed that NLRP3 deficiency decreased IL-10 production in macrophages. Furthermore, adeno-associated virus-mediated IL-10 overexpression restored the exacerbation of cardiotoxicity in the NLRP3(-/-) mice. These results demonstrated that NLRP3 regulates macrophage IL-10 production and contributes to the pathophysiology of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity, which is independent of IL-1β. Our findings identify a novel role of NLRP3 and provided new insights into the mechanisms underlying Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27225830

  16. Surfactant protein B gene variations enhance susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung in German patients

    PubMed Central

    Seifart, C; Seifart, U; Plagens, A; Wolf, M; von Wichert, P

    2002-01-01

    Genetic factors are thought to influence the risk for lung cancer. Since pulmonary surfactant mediates the response to inhaled carcinogenic substances, candidate genes may be among those coding for pulmonary surfactant proteins. In the present matched case–control study a polymorphism within intron 4 of the gene coding for surfactant specific protein B was analysed in 357 individuals. They were divided into 117 patients with lung cancer (40 patients with small cell lung cancer, 77 patients with non small cell lung cancer), matched controls and 123 healthy individuals. Surfactant protein B gene variants were analysed using specific PCR and cloned surfactant protein B sequences as controls. The frequency of the intron 4 variation was similar in both control groups (13.0% and 9.4%), whereas it was increased in the small cell lung cancer group (17.5%) and the non small cell lung cancer group (16.9%). The gene variation was found significantly more frequently in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (25.0%, P=0.016, odds ratio=3.2, 95%CI=1.24–8.28) than in the controls. These results indicate an association of the surfactant protein B intron 4 variants and/or its flanking loci with mechanisms that may enhance lung cancer susceptibility, especially to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 37, 212–217. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600353 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12107845

  17. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  18. Pro blood clotting activity of Scoparia dulcis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ediriweera, E R H S S; Jayakody, J R A C; Ratnasooriya, W D

    2011-04-01

    Scoparia dulcis Linn (Family: Scrophulariaceae, Sinhala: WalKoththamalli) is a perennial herb growing in many tropical countries including Sri Lanka. Traditional Physicians in rural down south areas apply crushed S. dulcis plant on cuts and bruises to stop bleeding. S. dulcis may also have Rakta Sthambhana property. The study on effect of decoction (water extract) of S. dulcis on blood clotting time in rats was carried out to investigate this. Two groups of rats, 12 males and 42 females were used in this experimental study. Forty-two female rats were assigned into seven equal groups (n = 6/gp). Different doses of DE (25, 50, 100, 1000, 1500 mg/kg) (group 1-5) or 2 ml of distilled water (DW) (group 6) were orally administered. 0.1 ml of vitamin K was injected intramuscularly (group 7) as reference drug to seventh the group. Twelve male rats were assigned into two equal groups (n = 6/gp), 2 ml of distilled water (DW) and doses of DE (1500 mg/kg) were orally administered. Clotting time was determined on the Days 1, 2, and 7 using Lee and White method. In the DE treated groups with all doses, there was no reduction in clotting time on the Day 1 but a significant reduction of clotting time (P < 0.05) was observed on the Days 2 and 7. In the group treated with vitamin K, there was no significant reduction in clotting time on Day 1 or 2, but there was a significant reduction in clotting time on Day 7. It is concluded that S. dulcis has proclotting activity (rakthasthambhana property) and this was faster than vitamin K. PMID:22408315

  19. Effects of manufacturing oral contraceptives on blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Poller, L; Thomson, J M; Otridge, B W; Yee, K F; Logan, S H

    1979-06-30

    In monitoring the effects of industrial exposure resulting from the pharmaceutical manufacture of oestrogen-progestogen combinations by coagulation studies acceleration of some clotting tests was found. The most pronounced changes were in workers most closely associated with the industrial process. Less pronounced changes were found in women employees not closely concerned with the processing and may have been secondary to the postmenopausal bleeding to which they were prone. A safer work procedure elaborated by the Employment Medical Advisory Service was monitored by clotting studies for over a year but the three most highly exposed subjects showed no substantial improvement. PMID:466212

  20. Assessing the Methodology for Calculating Platelet Contribution to Clot Strength (Platelet Component) in Thromboelastometry and Thrombelastography

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Marco; Hochleitner, Gerald; Schöchl, Herbert; Schlimp, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood clot have been studied most commonly using thrombelastography (TEG®) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM®). ROTEM®-based bleeding treatment algorithms recommend administering platelets to patients with low EXTEM clot strength (e.g., clot amplitude at 10 minutes [A10] <40 mm) once clot strength of the ROTEM® fibrin-based test (FIBTEM) is corrected. Algorithms based on TEG® typically use a low value of maximum amplitude (e.g., <50 mm) as a trigger for administering platelets. However, this parameter reflects the contributions of various blood components to the clot, including platelets and fibrin/fibrinogen. The platelet component of clot strength may provide a more sensitive indication of platelet deficiency than clot amplitude from a whole blood TEG® or ROTEM® assay. The platelet component of the formed clot is derived from the results of TEG®/ROTEM® tests performed with and without platelet inhibition. In this article, we review the basis for why this calculation should be based on clot elasticity (e.g., the E parameter with TEG® and the CE parameter with ROTEM®) as opposed to clot amplitude (e.g., the A parameter with TEG® or ROTEM®). This is because clot elasticity, unlike clot amplitude, reflects the force with which the blood clot resists rotation within the device, and the relationship between clot amplitude (variable X) and clot elasticity (variable Y) is nonlinear. A specific increment of X (ΔX) will be associated with different increments of Y (ΔY), depending on the initial value of X. When calculated correctly, using clot elasticity data, the platelet component of the clot can provide a valuable insight into platelet deficiency in emergency bleeding. PMID:26378699

  1. An optical approach for non-invasive blood clot testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brill, Alexander; Fine, Ilya; Harmelin, Alon

    2007-02-01

    Physiological blood coagulation is an essential biological process. Current tests for plasma coagulation (clotting) need to be performed ex vivo and require fresh blood sampling for every test. A recently published work describes a new, noninvasive, in vivo approach to assess blood coagulation status during mechanical occlusion1. For this purpose, we have tested this approach and applied a controlled laser beam to blood micro-vessels of the mouse ear during mechanical occlusion. Standard setup for intravital transillumination videomicroscopy and laser based imaging techniques were used for monitoring the blood clotting process. Temporal mechanical occlusion of blood vessels in the observed area was applied to ensure blood flow cessation. Subsequently, laser irradiation was used to induce vascular micro-injury. Changes in the vessel wall, as well as in the pattern of blood flow, predispose the area to vascular thrombosis, according to the paradigm of Virchow's triad. In our experiments, two elements of Virchow's triad were used to induce the process of clotting in vivo, and to assess it optically. We identified several parameters that can serve as markers of the blood clotting process in vivo. These include changes in light absorption in the area of illumination, as well as changes in the pattern of the red blood cells' micro-movement in the vessels where blood flow is completely arrested. Thus, our results indicate that blood coagulation status can be characterized by non-invasive, in vivo methodologies.

  2. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  3. Wound-induced pectin methylesterases enhance banana (Musa spp. AAA) susceptibility to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Jiang, Shuang; Lin, Guimei; Cai, Jianghua; Ye, Xiaoxi; Chen, Houbin; Li, Minhui; Li, Huaping; Takác, Tomás; Samaj, Jozef; Xu, Chunxiang

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that plant pectin methylesterases (PMEs) are directly involved in plant defence besides their roles in plant development. However, the molecular mechanisms of PME action on pectins are not well understood. In order to understand how PMEs modify pectins during banana (Musa spp.)-Fusarium interaction, the expression and enzyme activities of PMEs in two banana cultivars, highly resistant or susceptible to Fusarium, were compared with each other. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of PMEs and their effect on pectin methylesterification of 10 individual homogalacturonan (HG) epitopes with different degrees of methylesterification (DMs) were also examined. The results showed that, before pathogen treatment, the resistant cultivar displayed higher PME activity than the susceptible cultivar, corresponding well to the lower level of pectin DM. A significant increase in PME expression and activity and a decrease in pectin DM were observed in the susceptible cultivar but not in the resistant cultivar when plants were wounded, which was necessary for successful infection. With the increase of PME in the wounded susceptible cultivar, the JIM5 antigen (low methyestrified HGs) increased. Forty-eight hours after pathogen infection, the PME activity and expression in the susceptible cultivar were higher than those in the resistant cultivar, while the DM was lower. In conclusion, the resistant and the susceptible cultivars differ significantly in their response to wounding. Increased PMEs and thereafter decreased DMs acompanied by increased low methylesterified HGs in the root vascular cylinder appear to play a key role in determination of banana susceptibility to Fusarium. PMID:23580752

  4. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  5. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E.; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A. Corina

    2014-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  6. NLRP3 Deficiency Reduces Macrophage Interleukin-10 Production and Enhances the Susceptibility to Doxorubicin-induced Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Motoi; Usui, Fumitake; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Kimura, Hiroaki; Mizushina, Yoshiko; Shirasuna, Koumei; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 inflammasomes recognize non-microbial danger signals and induce release of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β, leading to sterile inflammation in cardiovascular disease. Because sterile inflammation is involved in doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cardiotoxicity, we investigated the role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. Cardiac dysfunction and injury were induced by low-dose Dox (15 mg/kg) administration in NLRP3-deficient (NLRP3−/−) mice but not in wild-type (WT) and IL-1β−/− mice, indicating that NLRP3 deficiency enhanced the susceptibility to Dox-induced cardiotoxicity independent of IL-1β. Although the hearts of WT and NLRP3−/− mice showed no significant difference in inflammatory cell infiltration, macrophages were the predominant inflammatory cells in the hearts, and cardiac IL-10 production was decreased in Dox-treated NLRP3−/− mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments showed that bone marrow-derived cells contributed to the exacerbation of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity in NLRP3−/− mice. In vitro experiments revealed that NLRP3 deficiency decreased IL-10 production in macrophages. Furthermore, adeno-associated virus-mediated IL-10 overexpression restored the exacerbation of cardiotoxicity in the NLRP3−/− mice. These results demonstrated that NLRP3 regulates macrophage IL-10 production and contributes to the pathophysiology of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity, which is independent of IL-1β. Our findings identify a novel role of NLRP3 and provided new insights into the mechanisms underlying Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27225830

  7. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  8. Altered plasma fibrin clot properties in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Małecki, Rafał; Gacka, Małgorzata; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, Małgorzata; Jakobsche-Policht, Urszula; Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Adamiec, Rajmund; Undas, Anetta

    2016-03-01

    Patients with increased thromboembolic risk tend to form denser fibrin clots which are relatively resistant to lysis. We sought to investigate whether essential thrombocythemia (ET) is associated with altered fibrin clot properties in plasma. Ex vivo plasma fibrin clot permeability coefficient (Ks), turbidimetry and clot lysis time (CLT) were measured in 43 consecutive patients with ET (platelet count from 245 to 991 × 10(3)/µL) and 50 control subjects matched for age, sex and comorbidities. Fibrinolysis proteins and inhibitors together with platelet activation markers were determined. Reduced Ks (-38%, p < 0.0001) and prolonged CLT (+34%, p < 0.0001) were observed in ET. The differences remained significant after adjustment for fibrinogen and platelet count. ET was associated with a slightly shorter lag phase (-5%, p = 0.01) and higher maximum absorbency of the turbidimetric curve (+6%, p < 0.001). The ET patients had higher plasma P-selectin by 193% (p < 0.00001) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) by 173% (p < 0.00001), with higher P-selectin observed in 19 (44%) patients with JAK-2 gene V617F mutation. Higher t-PA (+20%, p < 0.001), 23% higher plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, PAI-1 (+23%, p < 0.01) and unaltered thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, plasminogen and α2-antiplasmin activity were found in the ET group. Ks inversely correlated with fibrinogen, PF4 and C-reactive protein. CLT positively correlated only with PAI-1. Patients with ET display prothrombotic plasma fibrin clot phenotype including impaired fibrinolysis, which represents a new prothrombotic mechanism in this disease. PMID:25989112

  9. A French National Survey on Clotting Disorders in Mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Carvalhosa, Ana B; Aouba, Achille; Damaj, Gandhi; Canioni, Danielle; Brouzes, Chantal; Gyan, Emmanuel; Durupt, Stéphane; Durieu, Isabelle; Cathebras, Pascal; Costédoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Launay, David; Pilmis, Benoit; Barete, Stephane; Frenzel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Hermans, Cedric; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia

    2015-10-01

    Mastocytosis is characterized by a clonal mast cell proliferation with organ infiltration and uncontrolled degranulation. Although not characteristic and poorly explained, some patients develop clotting abnormalities. We retrospectively identified patients with established diagnosis of mastocytosis and related clotting abnormalities (clinical and/or biological) using the national French Reference Centre for Mastocytosis database. From our cohort of 14 adult patients with clotting abnormalities (median age 46 years [range 26-75]), 4 had a presentation suggestive of a primary hemostasis disorder alone (by their symptoms and/or abnormal clotting tests [PFA, von Willebrand's disease [vWD] screening]) and 10 had a laboratory impairment of secondary hemostasis. Among these, 7 had bleeds characteristic of a coagulation cascade disorder (severe/life-threatening in 5 and mild in 2 patients). Clotting abnormalities were of variable severity, typically related to intense crisis of degranulation, such as anaphylactic reactions, and/or to severe organ infiltration by mast cells. Importantly, classical hemostatic management with platelet transfusion, fresh frozen plasma, or vitamin K infusions was unsuccessful, as opposed to the use of agents inhibiting mast cell activity, particularly steroids. This illustrates the crucial role of mast cell mediators such as tryptase and heparin, which interfere both with primary (mainly via inhibition of von Willebrand factor) and secondary hemostasis. There was interestingly an unusually high number of aggressive mastocytosis (particularly mast cell leukemia) and increased mortality in the group with secondary hemostasis disorders (n = 5, 36% of the whole cohort). Mast cell degranulation and/or high tumoral burden induce both specific biologic antiaggregant and anticoagulant states with a wide clinical spectrum ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening bleeds. Hemostatic control is achieved by mast cell inhibitors such as steroids. PMID

  10. A French National Survey on Clotting Disorders in Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhosa, Ana B.; Aouba, Achille; Damaj, Gandhi; Canioni, Danielle; Brouzes, Chantal; Gyan, Emmanuel; Durupt, Stéphane; Durieu, Isabelle; Cathebras, Pascal; Costédoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Launay, David; Pilmis, Benoit; Barete, Stephane; Frenzel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Hermans, Cedric; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mastocytosis is characterized by a clonal mast cell proliferation with organ infiltration and uncontrolled degranulation. Although not characteristic and poorly explained, some patients develop clotting abnormalities. We retrospectively identified patients with established diagnosis of mastocytosis and related clotting abnormalities (clinical and/or biological) using the national French Reference Centre for Mastocytosis database. From our cohort of 14 adult patients with clotting abnormalities (median age 46 years [range 26–75]), 4 had a presentation suggestive of a primary hemostasis disorder alone (by their symptoms and/or abnormal clotting tests [PFA, von Willebrand's disease [vWD] screening]) and 10 had a laboratory impairment of secondary hemostasis. Among these, 7 had bleeds characteristic of a coagulation cascade disorder (severe/life-threatening in 5 and mild in 2 patients). Clotting abnormalities were of variable severity, typically related to intense crisis of degranulation, such as anaphylactic reactions, and/or to severe organ infiltration by mast cells. Importantly, classical hemostatic management with platelet transfusion, fresh frozen plasma, or vitamin K infusions was unsuccessful, as opposed to the use of agents inhibiting mast cell activity, particularly steroids. This illustrates the crucial role of mast cell mediators such as tryptase and heparin, which interfere both with primary (mainly via inhibition of von Willebrand factor) and secondary hemostasis. There was interestingly an unusually high number of aggressive mastocytosis (particularly mast cell leukemia) and increased mortality in the group with secondary hemostasis disorders (n = 5, 36% of the whole cohort). Mast cell degranulation and/or high tumoral burden induce both specific biologic antiaggregant and anticoagulant states with a wide clinical spectrum ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening bleeds. Hemostatic control is achieved by mast cell inhibitors such as

  11. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions... for antibodies to hepatitis B. (b) Blood clotting factors: Conditions. Effective July 18, 1984,...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions... antibodies to hepatitis B. (b) Blood clotting factors: Conditions. Effective July 18, 1984, blood...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions... for antibodies to hepatitis B. (b) Blood clotting factors: Conditions. Effective July 18, 1984,...

  16. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions... antibodies to hepatitis B. (b) Blood clotting factors: Conditions. Effective July 18, 1984, blood...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. Capture of lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) by the blood clot: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Margaret T; Rickles, Frederick R; Armstrong, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates and arthropods, blood clotting involves the establishment of a plug of aggregated thrombocytes (the cellular clot) and an extracellular fibrillar clot formed by the polymerization of the structural protein of the clot, which is fibrin in mammals, plasma lipoprotein in crustaceans, and coagulin in the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. Both elements of the clot function to staunch bleeding. Additionally, the extracellular clot functions as an agent of the innate immune system by providing a passive anti-microbial barrier and microbial entrapment device, which functions directly at the site of wounds to the integument. Here we show that, in addition to these passive functions in immunity, the plasma lipoprotein clot of lobster, the coagulin clot of Limulus, and both the platelet thrombus and the fibrin clot of mammals (human, mouse) operate to capture lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). The lipid A core of LPS is the principal agent of gram-negative septicemia, which is responsible for more than 100,000 human deaths annually in the United States and is similarly toxic to arthropods. Quantification using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test shows that clots capture significant quantities of LPS and fluorescent-labeled LPS can be seen by microscopy to decorate the clot fibrils. Thrombi generated in the living mouse accumulate LPS in vivo. It is suggested that capture of LPS released from gram-negative bacteria entrapped by the blood clot operates to protect against the disease that might be caused by its systemic dispersal. PMID:24282521

  19. Capture of Lipopolysaccharide (Endotoxin) by the Blood Clot: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Margaret T.; Rickles, Frederick R.; Armstrong, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates and arthropods, blood clotting involves the establishment of a plug of aggregated thrombocytes (the cellular clot) and an extracellular fibrillar clot formed by the polymerization of the structural protein of the clot, which is fibrin in mammals, plasma lipoprotein in crustaceans, and coagulin in the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. Both elements of the clot function to staunch bleeding. Additionally, the extracellular clot functions as an agent of the innate immune system by providing a passive anti-microbial barrier and microbial entrapment device, which functions directly at the site of wounds to the integument. Here we show that, in addition to these passive functions in immunity, the plasma lipoprotein clot of lobster, the coagulin clot of Limulus, and both the platelet thrombus and the fibrin clot of mammals (human, mouse) operate to capture lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). The lipid A core of LPS is the principal agent of gram-negative septicemia, which is responsible for more than 100,000 human deaths annually in the United States and is similarly toxic to arthropods. Quantification using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test shows that clots capture significant quantities of LPS and fluorescent-labeled LPS can be seen by microscopy to decorate the clot fibrils. Thrombi generated in the living mouse accumulate LPS in vivo. It is suggested that capture of LPS released from gram-negative bacteria entrapped by the blood clot operates to protect against the disease that might be caused by its systemic dispersal. PMID:24282521

  20. Imatinib enhances human melanoma cell susceptibility to TRAIL-induced cell death: Relationship to Bcl-2 family and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Hamaï, A; Richon, C; Meslin, F; Faure, F; Kauffmann, A; Lecluse, Y; Jalil, A; Larue, L; Avril, M F; Chouaib, S; Mehrpour, M

    2006-12-01

    In order to define genetic determinants of primary and metastatic melanoma cell susceptibility to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), we have applied oligonucleotide microarrays to TRAIL-sensitive primary T1 cells and TRAIL-resistant metastatic G1 cells treated or not with TRAIL. T1 and G1 cells are isogenic melanoma cell subclones. We examined 22 000 spots, 4.2% of which displayed differential expression in G1 and T1 cells. Cell susceptibility to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis was found to be correlated with gene expression signatures in this model. Some of the differentially expressed genes were identified as involved in ATP-binding and signaling pathways, based on previously published data. Further analysis provided evidences that c-kit was overexpressed in G1 cells while it was absent in T1 cells. The c-kit inhibitor, imatinib, did not restore TRAIL sensitivity, excluding a role for c-kit in TRAIL resistance in G1 cells. Surprisingly, imatinib inhibited cell proliferation and TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in melanoma cells. We investigated the possible involvement of several molecules, including c-ABL, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), cellular FADD-like interleukin-1 alpha-converting enzyme-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP)(L/S), Fas-associated DD kinase, p53, p21(WAF1), proteins of B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family and cytochrome c. Imatinib did not modulate the expression or activation of its own targets, such as c-ABL, PDGFRalpha and PDGFRbeta, but it did affect the expression of c-FLIP(L), BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2. Moreover, c-FLIP(L) knockdown sensitized T1 cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, with a sensitivity similar to that of cells previously treated with imatinib. More notably, we found that the resistance to TRAIL in G1 cells was correlated with constitutive c-FLIP(L) recruitment to the DISC and the inhibition of caspase 8, 3 and 9 processing. Moreover, c-FLIP(L) knockdown partly restored TRAIL

  1. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; ...

  2. Momordica charantia seed extract exhibits strong anticoagulant effect by specifically interfering in intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation and dissolves fibrin clot.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Bhagyalakshmi; Gangaraju, Sowmyashree; Girish, Kesturu S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Gonchigar, Sathish J; Shankar, Rohit L; Shinde, Manohar; Sannaningaiah, Devaraja

    2015-03-01

    The current study explores the anticoagulant and fibrin clot-hydrolyzing properties of Momordica charantia seed extract (MCSE). MCSE hydrolyzed casein with the specific activity of 0.780 units/mg per min. Interestingly, it enhanced the clot formation process of citrated human plasma from control 146 to 432 s. In addition, the intravenous injection of MCSE significantly prolonged the bleeding time in a dose-dependent manner from control 150 to more than 800 s, and strengthened its anticoagulant activity. Interestingly, MCSE specifically prolonged the clotting time of only activated partial thromboplastin time, but not prothrombin time, and revealed the participation of MCSE in the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Furthermore, MCSE completely hydrolyzed both Aα and Bβ chains of the human fibrinogen and partially hydrolyzed the γ chain. However, it hydrolyzed all the chains (α polymer, α chain, β chain and γ-γ dimmers) of partially cross-linked human fibrin clot. The proteolytic activity followed by the anticoagulant effect of the MCSE was completely abolished by the 1,10-phenanthroline and phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride, but iodoacetic acid, EDTA, and ethylene glycol-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid did not. Curiously, MCSE did not hydrolyze any other plasma proteins except the plasma fibrinogen. Moreover, MCSE was devoid of RBC lysis, edema and hemorrhagic properties, suggesting its nontoxic nature. Taken together, MCSE may be a valuable candidate in the treatment of blood clot/thrombotic disorders. PMID:25192240

  3. Combining bioaccumulation and coping mechanism to enhance long-term site-specific risk assessment for zinc susceptibility of bivalves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Ju, Yun-Ru; Tsai, Jeng-Wei; Jou, Li-John; Singh, Sher; Liao, Chung-Min

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to conduct a long-term site-specific risk assessment for zinc (Zn) susceptibility of bivalves, green mussel Perna viridis and hard clam Ruditapes philippinarum, based on published experimental data by linking the biologically-based damage assessment model with the subcellular partitioning concept. A comprehensive risk modeling framework was developed to predict susceptibility probability of two bivalve species exposed to waterborne Zn. The results indicated that P. viridis accumulates more Zn toxicity, whereas both toxic potency and the recovery rate of Zn are higher for R. philippinarum. We found that negative linear correlations exist in elimination-recovery and elimination-detoxification relationships, whereas a positive linear correlation was observed in recovery-detoxification relationships for bivalves exposed to waterborne Zn. Simulation results showed that the spatial differences of susceptibility primarily resulted from the variation of waterborne Zn concentration under field conditions. We found that R. philippinarum is more susceptible of Zn than P. viridis under the same exposure condition. Results also suggested that Zn posed no significant susceptibility risk to two bivalve species in Taiwan. We suggested that these two species can be used to biomonitor the water quality on Taiwan coastal areas. PMID:21486676

  4. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  5. Grow with the Flow: A Dynamic Tale of Blood Clot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiderman, Karin; Fogelson, Aaron

    2008-11-01

    The body heals injured blood vessels and prevents bleeding by clotting the blood. Clots are primarily made of blood-borne cells and a fibrous material that is assembled at the site of injury in flowing blood. Clot composition and structure change with local chemistry and fluid dynamics, which in turn alter the flow. To better understand this fluid-structure coupling, we have created a mathematical model to simulate the formation of a blood clot in a dynamic fluid environment. The growing clot is represented as a mixed porous medium whose permeability is dependent on the coagulation chemistry within it. The flow field resulting from a clot with specific calculated permeability and size can then be recovered by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an added friction term. We report on how this complex fluid-structure interaction affects the limiting factor(s) of blood clot growth.

  6. Selective light-triggered release of DNA from gold nanorods switches blood clotting on and off.

    PubMed

    de Puig, Helena; Cifuentes Rius, Anna; Flemister, Dorma; Baxamusa, Salmaan H; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Blood clotting is a precise cascade engineered to form a clot with temporal and spatial control. Current control of blood clotting is achieved predominantly by anticoagulants and thus inherently one-sided. Here we use a pair of nanorods (NRs) to provide a two-way switch for the blood clotting cascade by utilizing their ability to selectively release species on their surface under two different laser excitations. We selectively trigger release of a thrombin binding aptamer from one nanorod, inhibiting blood clotting and resulting in increased clotting time. We then release the complementary DNA as an antidote from the other NR, reversing the effect of the aptamer and restoring blood clotting. Thus, the nanorod pair acts as an on/off switch. One challenge for nanobiotechnology is the bio-nano interface, where coronas of weakly adsorbed proteins can obscure biomolecular function. We exploit these adsorbed proteins to increase aptamer and antidote loading on the nanorods. PMID:23894311

  7. Selective Light-Triggered Release of DNA from Gold Nanorods Switches Blood Clotting On and Off

    PubMed Central

    de Puig, Helena; Cifuentes Rius, Anna; Flemister, Dorma; Baxamusa, Salmaan H.; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Blood clotting is a precise cascade engineered to form a clot with temporal and spatial control. Current control of blood clotting is achieved predominantly by anticoagulants and thus inherently one-sided. Here we use a pair of nanorods (NRs) to provide a two-way switch for the blood clotting cascade by utilizing their ability to selectively release species on their surface under two different laser excitations. We selectively trigger release of a thrombin binding aptamer from one nanorod, inhibiting blood clotting and resulting in increased clotting time. We then release the complementary DNA as an antidote from the other NR, reversing the effect of the aptamer and restoring blood clotting. Thus, the nanorod pair acts as an on/off switch. One challenge for nanobiotechnology is the bio-nano interface, where coronas of weakly adsorbed proteins can obscure biomolecular function. We exploit these adsorbed proteins to increase aptamer and antidote loading on the nanorods. PMID:23894311

  8. Altered clot microstructure detected in obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    D׳Silva, Lindsay; Wilczynska, Maria; Lewis, Keir; Lawrence, Matthew; Hawkins, Karl; Williams, Rhodri; Stanford, Sophia; Davidson, Simon; Morris, Keith; Evans, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal clot microstructure plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of thromboembolic diseases. Assessing the viscoelastic properties of clot microstructure using novel parameters, Time to Gel Point (TGP), Fractal Dimension (df) and clot elasticity (G׳GP) could explain the increased cardiovascular and thromboembolic events in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS). We wanted to compare TGP, df, and G׳GP and their diurnal variation in OSAHS and symptomatic comparators. thirty six patients attending a sleep disturbed breathing clinic with symptoms of OSAHS were recruited. TGP, df and G׳GP were measured alongside standard coagulation screening, thrombin generation assays, and platelet aggregometry at 16:00 h and immediately after an in-patient sleep study at 07:30 h. OSAHS group had significantly lower afternoon df than comparators (1.705±0.033 vs. 1.731±0.031, p<0.05). df showed diurnal variation and only in the OSAHS group, being significantly lower in the afternoon than morning (p<0.05). Diurnal changes in df correlated with 4% DR, even after controlling for BMI (r=0.37, p=0.02). The lower df in the afternoon in OSAHS suggests a partial compensatory change that may make up for other pro-clotting abnormalities/hypertension during the night. The change to the thrombotic tendency in the afternoon is biggest in severe OSAHS. df Shows promise as a new microstructural indicator for abnormal haemostasis in OSAHS. PMID:27226818

  9. Blocking GluN2B subunits reverses the enhanced seizure susceptibility after prolonged febrile seizures with a wide therapeutic time-window.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Feng, Bo; Tang, Yangshun; You, Yi; Wang, Yi; Hou, Weiwei; Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Febrile seizures (FSs), the most common type of convulsive events in infants, are closely associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in adulthood. It is urgent to investigate how FSs promote epileptogenesis and find the potential therapeutic targets. In the present study, we showed that the phosphorylation of GluN2B Tyr1472 gradually reached peak level at 24h after prolonged FSs and remained elevated during 7days thereafter. IL-1β treatment alone, which in previous study mimicked the effect of prolonged FSs on adult seizure susceptibility, increased GluN2B Tyr1472 phosphorylation. Both IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-1R1 deletion were sufficient to reverse the prolonged FSs induced hyper-phosphorylation of GluN2B Tyr1472. GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil showed a wide therapeutic time-window (3days) to reverse the enhanced seizure susceptibility after prolonged FSs or IL-1β treatment. Our study demonstrated that GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472 site mediated by the transient increase of IL-1β was involved in the enhanced adult seizure susceptibility after prolonged FSs, implicating GluN2B-containing NMDAR is a new potential drug target with a wide therapeutic time window to prevent epileptogenesis in patients with infantile FSs. PMID:27240522

  10. Mesoscopic Modeling of Blood Clotting: Coagulation Cascade and Platelets Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    The process of clot formation and growth at a site on a blood vessel wall involve a number of multi-scale simultaneous processes including: multiple chemical reactions in the coagulation cascade, species transport and flow. To model these processes we have incorporated advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) of multiple species into an extended version of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method which is considered as a coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics method. At the continuum level this is equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation plus one advection-diffusion equation for each specie. The chemistry of clot formation is now understood to be determined by mechanisms involving reactions among many species in dilute solution, where reaction rate constants and species diffusion coefficients in plasma are known. The role of blood particulates, i.e. red cells and platelets, in the clotting process is studied by including them separately and together in the simulations. An agonist-induced platelet activation mechanism is presented, while platelets adhesive dynamics based on a stochastic bond formation/dissociation process is included in the model.

  11. Milk-clotting mechanism of Dregea sinensis Hemsl. protease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yali; Wang, Hongyan; Tao, Liang; Huang, Ai-xiang

    2015-12-01

    Dregea sinensis Hemsl. is used as a milk coagulant to produce goat milk cakes in Yunnan, China. However, the composition of milk-clotting compounds and the related mechanism have not been reported. Crude protease was extracted from the stem, purified, and then separated with a Millipore ultrafiltration centrifuge tube. Cysteine protease (procerain B) was identified as the main milk-clotting protein through electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and its molecular weight was 23.8 kDa. The protease can partially degrade α-casein (CN) and completely degrade β- and κ-CN, and κ-CN degradation resulted in milk clotting. The molecular weight and AA sequence of the peptide fractions were determined through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a peptide sequencer, respectively. The enzyme cleaved κ-CN at Ala90-Gln91 and produced deputy κ-CN and caseinomacropeptide with molecular weights of 12 and 6.9 kDa, respectively. This cleavage site differed from the majority of chymosins cleaved at Phe105-Met106. PMID:26506540

  12. Analysis of clot formation with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Longo, Diane M.; Lawrence, Michael B.; Walker, William F.

    2002-04-01

    Inappropriate blood coagulation plays an important role in diseases including stroke, heart attack, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT arises when a blood clot forms in a large vein of the leg. DVT is detrimental because the blood flow may be partially or completely obstructed. More importantly, a potentially fatal situation may arise if part of the clot travels to the arteries in the lungs, forming a pulmonary embolism (PE). Characterization of the mechanical properties of DVT could improve diagnosis and suggest appropriate treatment. We are developing a technique to assess mechanical properties of forming thrombi. The technique uses acoustic radiation force as a means to produce small, localized displacements within the sample. Returned ultrasound echoes are processed to estimate the time dependent displacement of the sample. Appropriate mechanical modeling and signal processing produce plots depicting relative mechanical properties (relative elasticity and relative viscosity) and force-free parameters (time constant, damping ratio, and natural frequency). We present time displacement curves of blood samples obtained during coagulation, and show associated relative and force-free parameter plots. These results show that the Voigt model with added mass accurately characterizes blood behavior during clot formation.

  13. Tissue plasminogen activator-based clot busting: Controlled delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Elkholi, Islam E.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Thrombosis, the formation of blood clot (thrombus) in the circulatory system obstructing the blood flow, is one of the main causes behind various ischemic arterial syndromes such as ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction, as well as vein syndromes such as deep vein thrombosis, and consequently, pulmonary emboli. Several thrombolytic agents have been developed for treating thrombosis, the most common being tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), administrated systemically or locally via IV infusion directly proximal to the thrombus, with the aim of restoring and improving the blood flow. TPA triggers the dissolution of thrombi by inducing the conversion of plasminogen to protease plasmin followed by fibrin digestion that eventually leads to clot lysis. Although tPA provides powerful thrombolytic activity, it has many shortcomings, including poor pharmacokinetic profiles, impairment of the reestablishment of normal coronary flow, and impairment of hemostasis, leading to life-threatening bleeding consequences. The bleeding consequence is ascribed to the ability of tPA to circulate throughout the body and therefore can lysis all blood clots in the circulation system, even the good ones that prevent the bleeding and promote injury repair. This review provides an overview of the different delivery approaches for tPA including: liposomes, ultrasound-triggered thrombolysis, anti-fibrin antibody-targeted tPA, camouflaged-tPA, tpA-loaded microcarriers, and nano-modulated delivery approaches. PMID:25780787

  14. Molecular Signatures of Immune Activation and Epithelial Barrier Remodeling Are Enhanced during the Luteal Phase of the Menstrual Cycle: Implications for HIV Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Kelly B.; Novak, Richard M.; McCorrister, Stuart; Shaw, Souradet; Westmacott, Garrett R.; Ball, Terry B.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Burgener, Adam

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The variable infectivity and transmissibility of HIV/SHIV has been recently associated with the menstrual cycle, with particular susceptibility observed during the luteal phase in nonhuman primate models and ex vivo human explant cultures, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we performed an unbiased, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis to better understand the mucosal immunological processes underpinning this observed susceptibility to HIV infection. Cervicovaginal lavage samples (n = 19) were collected, characterized as follicular or luteal phase using days since last menstrual period, and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Biological insights from these data were gained using a spectrum of computational methods, including hierarchical clustering, pathway analysis, gene set enrichment analysis, and partial least-squares discriminant analysis with LASSO feature selection. Of the 384 proteins identified, 43 were differentially abundant between phases (P < 0.05, ≥2-fold change). Cell-cell adhesion proteins and antiproteases were reduced, and leukocyte recruitment (interleukin-8 pathway, P = 1.41E–5) and extravasation proteins (P = 5.62E–4) were elevated during the luteal phase. LASSO/PLSDA identified a minimal profile of 18 proteins that best distinguished the luteal phase. This profile included cytoskeletal elements and proteases known to be involved in cellular movement. Gene set enrichment analysis associated CD4+ T cell and neutrophil gene set signatures with the luteal phase (P < 0.05). Taken together, our findings indicate a strong association between proteins involved in tissue remodeling and leukocyte infiltration with the luteal phase, which may represent potential hormone-associated mechanisms of increased susceptibility to HIV. IMPORTANCE Recent studies have discovered an enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection during the progesterone-dominant luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. However, the mechanism responsible for

  15. The Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma is due to Impaired Initial Thrombin Generation but not Clot Formation or Clot Strength

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Droz, Nathan; Fragoso, Miguel; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    The Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma (ACOT) has been described as a very early hypocoagulable state, but the mechanism remains controversial. One proposed mechanism is tissue hypoperfusion leading to protein C activation, with subsequent inhibition of Factors V and VIII. Variability in trauma has impeded the use of clinical data towards the elucidation of the mechanisms of ACOT, but thrombelastography (TEG) may provide insight by assessing hemostatic function from initial thrombin activation to fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that, in a controlled animal model of trauma/hemorrhagic shock, clotting factor dysfunction is the predominant mechanism in early ACOT. Methods Rats anesthetized by inhaled isoflurane (n=6) underwent laparotomy, and hemorrhage was induced to maintain a MAP of 35 mmHg for 30 minutes. Rats were then resuscitated with twice their shed blood volume in normal saline. TEG was performed at baseline, shock, and post-resuscitation periods. No heparin was given. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA with post-hoc Fisher’s test. Results Coagulation factor function was significantly impaired in the early stages of trauma/hemorrhagic shock. TEG R and SP-values were significantly increased from baseline to shock (p<0.001) and from shock to post-resuscitation periods (p<0.05). Delta (R-SP), a measure of thrombin generation, showed a significant increase (p<0.05) from baseline to shock. No significant changes were found in K, Angle, MA, and LY30 values. Conclusion Clotting factor derangement leading to impaired thrombin generation is the principle etiology of ACOT in this model and not the dynamics of clot formation, fibrin cross-linking, clot strength/platelet function, or fibrinolysis. PMID:21550061

  16. Enhanced susceptibility in LNiO3 perovskites ( L = La,Pr,Nd,Nd0.5Sm0. 5)

    PubMed

    Zhou; Goodenough; Dabrowski; Klamut; Bukowski

    2000-01-17

    The temperature dependence of the resistivity rho(T) and of the dc magnetic susceptibility chi(T) were measured on high-quality LNiO3 (L = La,Pr,Nd,Nd0.5Sm0.5) samples synthesized under high oxygen pressure. Subtraction of the rare-earth contribution to chi(T) allows the presentation of the evolution of the susceptibility of the NiO3 array from Pauli to Curie-Weiss paramagnetism with decreasing bandwidth. A metal-insulator transition occurring at a temperature T(t) = T(N) is first order for L = Pr and Nd; it becomes second order and produces no anomaly in chi(-1)(T) at a T(t)>T(N) for L = Nd0.5Sm0.5. In the antiferromagnetic domain T

  17. In-vitro clot lytic potential of Fagonia arabica: a comparative study of two methods.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, Sweta R; Kashyap, Rajpal Singh; Purohit, Hemant J; Deopujari, Jayant Y; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F

    2011-06-01

    The tube method developed in our laboratory is a simple, inexpensive and a classical whole blood clot lytic procedure through which clot lytic potential of Fagonia arabica was found to be significant. Microtiter plate clot lysis (MPCL) assay is a rapid and precise turbidimetric clot lysis method which includes measurements of maximum absorbance (Max Abs), area under the curve (AUC) along with the standard clot lysis time. In the present study we have compared and validated clot lytic potential of F. arabica extract by tube method and MPCL assay. Percentage of clot lysis was calculated by measuring the difference of the absorbance taken at 0 and 240 min in the case of MPCL assay, whereas with the tube method according to the weight difference. Fagonia arabica (50 ug/ml) was capable of clot lysis by MPCL assay and showed clot lysis pattern similar to 60 U/ml streptokinase (positive control). The clot lysis times were significantly different from one another (P value ≤0.001). When Max Abs and AUC were compared to the clot lysis time the correlation coefficient (r value) was significant too (P value ≤0.001). Moreover, we have also found that both the methods showed almost the same clot lysis percentage by streptokinase as well as F. arabica. The correlation coefficient between streptokinase, and F. arabica done by tube method and MPCL assay was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Fagonia arabica had the clot lytic potential checked by in-vitro methods, namely MPCL assay and the method. PMID:21427565

  18. Transgenerational inheritance of enhanced susceptibility to radiation-induced medulloblastoma in newborn Ptch1+/− mice after paternal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanno, Barbara; Meschini, Roberta; Cordelli, Eugenia; Benassi, Barbara; Longobardi, Maria Grazia; Izzotti, Alberto; Pulliero, Alessandra; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of transgenerational induction of increased cancer susceptibility after paternal radiation exposure has long been controversial because of inconsistent results and the lack of a mechanistic interpretation. Here, exploiting Ptch1 heterozygous knockout mice, susceptible to spontaneous and radiation-induced medulloblastoma, we show that exposure of paternal germ cells to 1 Gy X-rays, at the spermatogonial stage, increased by a considerable 1.4-fold the offspring susceptibility to medulloblastoma induced by neonatal irradiation. This effect gained further biological significance thanks to a number of supporting data on the immunohistochemical characterization of the target tissue and preneoplastic lesions (PNLs). These results altogether pointed to increased proliferation of cerebellar granule cell precursors and PNLs cells, which favoured the development of frank tumours. The LOH analysis of tumor DNA showed Ptch1 biallelic loss in all tumor samples, suggesting that mechanisms other than interstitial deletions, typical of radiation-induced medulloblastoma, did not account for the observed increased cancer risk. This data was supported by comet analysis showing no differences in DNA damage induction and repair in cerebellar cells as a function of paternal irradiation. Finally, we provide biological plausibility to our results offering evidence of a possible epigenetic mechanism of inheritance based on radiation-induced changes of the microRNA profile of paternal sperm. PMID:26452034

  19. Interference of silica nanoparticles with the traditional Limulus amebocyte lysate gel clot assay.

    PubMed

    Kucki, Melanie; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette

    2014-04-01

    Endotoxin contaminations of engineered nanomaterials can be responsible for observed biological responses, especially for misleading results in in vitro test systems, as well as in vivo studies. Therefore, endotoxin testing of nanomaterials is necessary to benchmark their influence on cells. Here, we tested the traditional Limulus amebocyte lysate gel clot assay for the detection of endotoxins in nanoparticle suspensions with a focus on possible interference of the particles with the test system. We systematically investigated the effects of nanomaterials made of, or covered by, the same material. Different types of bare or PEGylated silica nanoparticles, as well as iron oxide-silica core shell nanoparticles, were tested. Detailed inhibition/enhancement controls revealed enhanced activity in the Limulus coagulation cascade for all particles with bare silica surface. In comparison, PEGylation led to a lower degree of enhancement. These results indicate that the protein-particle interactions are the basis for the observed inhibition and enhancement effects. The enhancement activity of a particle type was positively related to the calculated particle surface area. For most silica particles tested, a dilution of the sample within the maximum valid dilution was sufficient to overcome non-valid enhancement, enabling semi-quantification of the endotoxin contamination. PMID:23884096

  20. Fibrin Clots Are Equilibrium Polymers That Can Be Remodeled Without Proteolytic Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysh, Irina N.; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Purohit, Prashant K.; Weisel, John W.

    2012-11-01

    Fibrin polymerization is a necessary part of hemostasis but clots can obstruct blood vessels and cause heart attacks and strokes. The polymerization reactions are specific and controlled, involving strong knob-into-hole interactions to convert soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin. It has long been assumed that clots and thrombi are stable structures until proteolytic digestion. On the contrary, using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we demonstrate here that there is turnover of fibrin in an uncrosslinked clot. A peptide representing the knobs involved in fibrin polymerization can compete for the holes and dissolve a preformed fibrin clot, or increase the fraction of soluble oligomers, with striking rearrangements in clot structure. These results imply that in vivo clots or thrombi are more dynamic structures than previously believed that may be remodeled as a result of local environmental conditions, may account for some embolization, and suggest a target for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Transcription Factor SP2 Enhanced the Expression of Cd14 in Colitis-Susceptible C3H/HeJBir

    PubMed Central

    Zschemisch, Nils-Holger; Brüsch, Inga; Hambusch, Anne-Sophie; Bleich, André

    2016-01-01

    Genetic analysis in the IL10-deficient mouse model revealed a modifier locus of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on chromosome 18, with the allele of the strain C3H/HeJBir (C3Bir) conferring resistance and the allele of C57BL/6J (B6) conferring susceptibility. Differential Cd14 expression was associated with this background specific susceptibility to intestinal inflammation. Polymorphisms of the Cd14 promoter were found to be likely causative for strain specific expression, and Cd14-knockout mice revealed a protective role of this gene-product in experimental IBD. In this study, luciferase reporter assays confirmed an increased activity of the C3Bir derived Cd14 promoter compared to the one of B6. Promoter truncation experiments and site-directed mutagenesis in both strains resulted in reduced Cd14 promoter activity and confirmed that a central AP1 and the proximal SP1 transcription factor binding sites mediated the basal activity of the Cd14 promoter in the mouse. Moreover, a T to C exchange at position -259 replaced putative STAT1 and CDX1 sites in the Cd14 promoter from B6 by a SP2 site in C3Bir. Ablation of the Sp2 site through truncation was associated with a decreased promoter activity. Site-directed mutagenesis also demonstrated that the inactivation of SP2 led to a substantial loss of promoter activity in C3Bir. Performing electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays demonstrated interaction of SP2 with its potential binding site. In addition, retroviral—mediated overexpression of the SP2 transcription factor in primary bone marrow macrophages derived from C3Bir mice caused a significant increase in Cd14 transcription. These data characterized SP2 as important factor responsible for higher Cd14 expression and reduced IBD susceptibility mediated by the C3Bir allele. PMID:27191968

  2. Arf6 controls platelet spreading and clot retraction via integrin αIIbβ3 trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunjie; Joshi, Smita; Xiang, Binggang; Kanaho, Yasunori; Li, Zhenyu; Bouchard, Beth A.; Moncman, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet and megakaryocyte endocytosis is important for loading certain granule cargo (ie, fibrinogen [Fg] and vascular endothelial growth factor); however, the mechanisms of platelet endocytosis and its functional acute effects are understudied. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate–ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a small guanosine triphosphate–binding protein that regulates endocytic trafficking, especially of integrins. To study platelet endocytosis, we generated platelet-specific Arf6 knockout (KO) mice. Arf6 KO platelets had less associated Fg suggesting that Arf6 affects αIIbβ3-mediated Fg uptake and/or storage. Other cargo was unaffected. To measure Fg uptake, mice were injected with biotinylated- or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–labeled Fg. Platelets from the injected Arf6 KO mice showed lower accumulation of tagged Fg, suggesting an uptake defect. Ex vivo, Arf6 KO platelets were also defective in FITC-Fg uptake and storage. Immunofluorescence analysis showed initial trafficking of FITC-Fg to a Rab4-positive compartment followed by colocalization with Rab11-positive structures, suggesting that platelets contain and use both early and recycling endosomes. Resting and activated αIIbβ3 levels, as measured by flow cytometry, were unchanged; yet, Arf6 KO platelets exhibited enhanced spreading on Fg and faster clot retraction. This was not the result of alterations in αIIbβ3 signaling, because myosin light-chain phosphorylation and Rac1/RhoA activation were unaffected. Consistent with the enhanced clot retraction and spreading, Arf6 KO mice showed no deficits in tail bleeding or FeCl3-induced carotid injury assays. Our studies present the first mouse model for defining the functions of platelet endocytosis and suggest that altered integrin trafficking may affect the efficacy of platelet function. PMID:26738539

  3. Effects of vancomycin versus nafcillin in enhancing killing of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus causing bacteremia by human cathelicidin LL-37.

    PubMed

    Le, J; Dam, Q; Schweizer, M; Thienphrapa, W; Nizet, V; Sakoulas, G

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that anti-staphylococcal beta-lactam antibiotics, like nafcillin, render methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) more susceptible to killing by innate host defense peptides (HDPs), such as cathelicidin LL-37. We compared the effects of growth in 1/4 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nafcillin or vancomycin on the LL-37 killing of 92 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. For three randomly selected strains among these, we examined the effects of nafcillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid on LL-37 killing and autolysis. Growth in the presence of subinhibitory nafcillin significantly enhanced LL-37 killing of MSSA compared to vancomycin and antibiotic-free controls. Nafcillin also reduced MSSA production of the golden staphylococcal pigment staphyloxanthin in 39 % of pigmented strains vs. 14 % for vancomycin. Among the antibiotics tested, only nafcillin resulted in significantly increased MSSA autolysis. These studies point to additional mechanisms of anti-staphylococcal activity of nafcillin beyond direct bactericidal activity, properties that vancomycin and other antibiotic classes do not exhibit. The ability of nafcillin to enhance sensitivity to innate HDPs may contribute to its superior effectiveness against MSSA, as suggested by studies comparing clinical outcomes to vancomycin treatment. PMID:27234592

  4. Unexpected link between iron and drug resistance of Candida spp.: iron depletion enhances membrane fluidity and drug diffusion, leading to drug-susceptible cells.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Tulika; Chandra, Aparna; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K; Prasad, Rajendra

    2006-11-01

    Inthis study, we show that iron depletion in Candida albicans with bathophenanthrolene disulfonic acid and ferrozine as chelators enhanced its sensitivity to several drugs, including the most common antifungal, fluconazole (FLC). Several other species of Candida also displayed increased sensitivity to FLC because of iron restriction. Iron uptake mutations, namely, Deltaftr1 and Deltaftr2, as well as the copper transporter mutation Deltaccc2, which affects high-affinity iron uptake in Candida, produced increased sensitivity to FLC compared to that of the wild type. The effect of iron depletion on drug sensitivity appeared to be independent of the efflux pump proteins Cdr1p and Cdr2p. We found that iron deprivation led to lowering of membrane ergosterol by 15 to 30%. Subsequently, fluorescence polarization measurements also revealed that iron-restricted Candida cells displayed a 29 to 40% increase in membrane fluidity, resulting in enhanced passive diffusion of the drugs. Northern blot assays revealed that the ERG11 gene was considerably down regulated in iron-deprived cells, which might account for the lowered ergosterol content. Our results show a close relationship between cellular iron and drug susceptibilities of C. albicans. Considering that multidrug resistance is a manifestation of multifactorial phenomena, the influence of cellular iron on the drug susceptibilities of Candida suggests iron as yet another novel determinant of multidrug resistance. PMID:16954314

  5. Concomitant enhancement of spin susceptibility and pairing interaction in the reduced carrier-density regime of LixZrNCl superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Yuichi; Kishiume, Tsukasa; Takano, Takumi; Kobayashi, Katsuki; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Eiichi; Onodera, Hideya; Taguchi, Yasujiro

    2009-03-01

    Li-intercalated layered nitrides LixZrNCl are novel superconductors, in which superconductivity emerges at relatively high transition temperature Tc˜12 - 15 K with very low carrier density ˜10^21 cm-3. The pristine β-ZrNCl is a simple band insulator, and electron doping is achieved by Li intercalation. Insulator-to-superconductor (IS) transition takes place at x˜0.05 with maximum Tc value of ˜15 K and Tc decreases with further doping, which is opposite trend to the other superconductors in doped band insulators. Here we show the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements on LixZrNCl with systematically controlled x. Estimated spin susceptibility χs is almost temperature-independent without substantial anisotropy. With decreasing x, χs evolves strongly, same as Tc. On the other hand, specific heat study revealed that the density of states is reduced but the pairing interaction is enhanced on the verge of IS transition. Therefore, our results may indicate that magnetic fluctuations are enhanced toward a band-insulator and that they are possibly responsible to superconductivity even in the present small carrier-density system.

  6. Pathological Type-2 Immune Response, Enhanced Tumor Growth, and Glucose Intolerance in Retnlβ (RELMβ) Null Mice: A Model of Intestinal Immune System Dysfunction in Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Kim-Muller, Ja Young; Rutkowski, Joseph M; Crewe, Clair; Tao, Caroline; Scherer, Philipp E

    2016-09-01

    Resistin, and its closely related homologs, the resistin-like molecules (RELMs) have been implicated in metabolic dysregulation, inflammation, and cancer. Specifically, RELMβ, expressed predominantly in the goblet cells in the colon, is released both apically and basolaterally, and is hence found in both the intestinal lumen in the mucosal layer as well as in the circulation. RELMβ has been linked to both the pathogenesis of colon cancer and type 2 diabetes. RELMβ plays a complex role in immune system regulation, and the impact of loss of function of RELMβ on colon cancer and metabolic regulation has not been fully elucidated. We therefore tested whether Retnlβ (mouse ortholog of human RETNLβ) null mice have an enhanced or reduced susceptibility for colon cancer as well as metabolic dysfunction. We found that the lack of RELMβ leads to increased colonic expression of T helper cell type-2 cytokines and IL-17, associated with a reduced ability to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This defect leads to an enhanced susceptibility to the development of inflammation, colorectal cancer, and glucose intolerance. In conclusion, the phenotype of the Retnlβ null mice unravels new aspects of inflammation-mediated diseases and strengthens the notion that a proper intestinal barrier function is essential to sustain a healthy phenotype. PMID:27397737

  7. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus: Clotting time in tick-infested skin varies according to local inflammation and gene expression patterns in tick salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Wanessa Araújo; Maruyama, Sandra Regina; Franzin, Alessandra Mara; Abatepaulo, Antônio Roberto Rodrigues; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Ferreira, Beatriz Rossetti; Ribeiro, José Marcos Chaves; Moré, Daniela Dantas; Maia, Antonio Augusto Mendes; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Garcia, Gustavo Rocha; de Miranda Santos, Isabel K. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Ticks deposit saliva at the site of their attachment to a host in order to inhibit haemostasis, inflammation and innate and adaptive immune responses. The anti-haemostatic properties of tick saliva have been described by many studies, but few show that tick infestations or its anti-haemostatic components exert systemic effects in vivo. In the present study, we extended these observations and show that, compared with normal skin, bovine hosts that are genetically susceptible to tick infestations present an increase in the clotting time of blood collected from the immediate vicinity of haemorrhagic feeding pools in skin infested with different developmental stages of Rhipicepahlus microplus; conversely, we determined that clotting time of tick-infested skin from genetically resistant bovines was shorter than that of normal skin. Coagulation and inflammation have many components in common and we determined that in resistant bovines, eosinophils and basophils, which are known to contain tissue factor, are recruited in greater numbers to the inflammatory site of tick bites than in susceptible hosts. Finally, we correlated the observed differences in clotting times with the expression profiles of transcripts for putative anti-haemostatic proteins in different developmental stages of R. microplus fed on genetically susceptible and resistant hosts: we determined that transcripts coding for proteins similar to these molecules are overrepresented in salivary glands from nymphs and males fed on susceptible bovines. Our data indicate that ticks are able to modulate their host’s local haemostatic reactions. In the resistant phenotype, larger amounts of inflammatory cells are recruited and expression of anti-coagulant molecules is decreased tick salivary glands, features that can hamper the tick’s blood meal. PMID:20045690

  8. Clot contraction: compression of erythrocytes into tightly packed polyhedra and redistribution of platelets and fibrin.

    PubMed

    Cines, Douglas B; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Hayes, Vincent; Massefski, Walter; Litvinov, Rustem I; Rauova, Lubica; Lowery, Thomas J; Weisel, John W

    2014-03-01

    Contraction of blood clots is necessary for hemostasis and wound healing and to restore flow past obstructive thrombi, but little is known about the structure of contracted clots or the role of erythrocytes in contraction. We found that contracted blood clots develop a remarkable structure, with a meshwork of fibrin and platelet aggregates on the exterior of the clot and a close-packed, tessellated array of compressed polyhedral erythrocytes within. The same results were obtained after initiation of clotting with various activators and also with clots from reconstituted human blood and mouse blood. Such close-packed arrays of polyhedral erythrocytes, or polyhedrocytes, were also observed in human arterial thrombi taken from patients. The mechanical nature of this shape change was confirmed by polyhedrocyte formation from the forces of centrifugation of blood without clotting. Platelets (with their cytoskeletal motility proteins) and fibrin(ogen) (as the substrate bridging platelets for contraction) are required to generate the forces necessary to segregate platelets/fibrin from erythrocytes and to compress erythrocytes into a tightly packed array. These results demonstrate how contracted clots form an impermeable barrier important for hemostasis and wound healing and help explain how fibrinolysis is greatly retarded as clots contract. PMID:24335500

  9. A simple and efficient method for DNA purification from samples of highly clotted blood.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruyi; Ye, Ping; Luo, Leiming; Wu, Hongmei; Dong, Jin; Deng, Xinxin

    2010-11-01

    Rapid purification of DNA from samples of highly clotted blood is a challenging problem due to the difficulty in recovering and dispersing blood clots. We developed a new method for discarding the serum-separator gel and rapidly dispersing the blood clots. A special disposable tip was inserted into the serum-separator gel so that the serum-separator gel could be discarded. The blood clot obtained was dispersed into small pieces through a copper mesh (pore size, 250 μm) in a special dispersing instrument by centrifugation. After lysis of red blood cells and white blood cells, genomic DNA was concentrated and desalted by isopropanol precipitation. The mean yield of DNA purified from a 0.3-ml blood clot was 22.70 μg in 173 samples of clotted blood cryopreserved for 1 month, and 19.02 μg in 1,372 samples of clotted blood cryopreserved for >6 months. DNA samples were successfully performed through polymerase chain reaction, real time polymerase chain reaction, and melt curve analysis. Their quality was comparable with that purified directly from EDTA-anticoagulated blood. The new method overcomes the difficulties in recovering and dispersing blood clots, allowing efficient purification of DNA from samples of highly clotted blood. PMID:20549389

  10. Clot contraction: compression of erythrocytes into tightly packed polyhedra and redistribution of platelets and fibrin

    PubMed Central

    Cines, Douglas B.; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Hayes, Vincent; Massefski, Walter; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Rauova, Lubica; Lowery, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Contraction of blood clots is necessary for hemostasis and wound healing and to restore flow past obstructive thrombi, but little is known about the structure of contracted clots or the role of erythrocytes in contraction. We found that contracted blood clots develop a remarkable structure, with a meshwork of fibrin and platelet aggregates on the exterior of the clot and a close-packed, tessellated array of compressed polyhedral erythrocytes within. The same results were obtained after initiation of clotting with various activators and also with clots from reconstituted human blood and mouse blood. Such close-packed arrays of polyhedral erythrocytes, or polyhedrocytes, were also observed in human arterial thrombi taken from patients. The mechanical nature of this shape change was confirmed by polyhedrocyte formation from the forces of centrifugation of blood without clotting. Platelets (with their cytoskeletal motility proteins) and fibrin(ogen) (as the substrate bridging platelets for contraction) are required to generate the forces necessary to segregate platelets/fibrin from erythrocytes and to compress erythrocytes into a tightly packed array. These results demonstrate how contracted clots form an impermeable barrier important for hemostasis and wound healing and help explain how fibrinolysis is greatly retarded as clots contract. PMID:24335500

  11. Suppression of the auxin response pathway enhances susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi while phosphite-mediated resistance stimulates the auxin signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Phytophthora cinnamomi is a devastating pathogen worldwide and phosphite (Phi), an analogue of phosphate (Pi) is highly effective in the control of this pathogen. Phi also interferes with Pi starvation responses (PSR), of which auxin signalling is an integral component. In the current study, the involvement of Pi and the auxin signalling pathways in host and Phi-mediated resistance to P. cinnamomi was investigated by screening the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Col-0 and several mutants defective in PSR and the auxin response pathway for their susceptibility to this pathogen. The response to Phi treatment was also studied by monitoring its effect on Pi- and the auxin response pathways. Results Here we demonstrate that phr1-1 (phosphate starvation response 1), a mutant defective in response to Pi starvation was highly susceptible to P. cinnamomi compared to the parental background Col-0. Furthermore, the analysis of the Arabidopsis tir1-1 (transport inhibitor response 1) mutant, deficient in the auxin-stimulated SCF (Skp1 − Cullin − F-Box) ubiquitination pathway was also highly susceptible to P. cinnamomi and the susceptibility of the mutants rpn10 and pbe1 further supported a role for the 26S proteasome in resistance to P. cinnamomi. The role of auxin was also supported by a significant (P < 0.001) increase in susceptibility of blue lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) to P. cinnamomi following treatment with the inhibitor of auxin transport, TIBA (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid). Given the apparent involvement of auxin and PSR signalling in the resistance to P. cinnamomi, the possible involvement of these pathways in Phi mediated resistance was also investigated. Phi (especially at high concentrations) attenuates the response of some Pi starvation inducible genes such as AT4, AtACP5 and AtPT2 in Pi starved plants. However, Phi enhanced the transcript levels of PHR1 and the auxin responsive genes (AUX1, AXR1and AXR2), suppressed the primary root

  12. Strategies to reduce intraluminal clot formation in endoscopically harvested saphenous veins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Emile N.; Kon, Zachary N.; Tran, Richard; Burris, Nicholas S.; Gu, Junyen; Laird, Patrick; Brazio, Philip S.; Kallam, Seeta; Schwartz, Kimberly; Bechtel, Lisa; Joshi, Ashish; Zhang, Shaosong; Poston, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Residual clot strands within the excised saphenous vein are an increasingly recognized sequela of endoscopic vein harvest. We hypothesized that endoscopic visualization facilitated by sealed carbon dioxide insufflation causes stagnation of blood within the saphenous vein. In the absence of prior heparin administration, this stasis provokes clot formation. Methods Forty consecutive patients having coronary artery bypass grafting underwent endoscopic vein harvest using sealed (Guidant VasoView, n = 30; Guidant Corp, Minneapolis, Minn) or open (Datascope ClearGlide, n = 10; Datascope Corp, Montvale, NJ) carbon dioxide insufflation followed by ex vivo assessment of intraluminal saphenous vein clot via optical coherence tomography. In the sealed carbon dioxide insufflation groups, clot formation was compared with (preheparinized, n = 20) and without (control, n = 10) heparin administration before endoscopic vein harvest, either at a fixed dose or titrated to an activated clotting time greater than 300 seconds. Risk factors for clot formation were assessed. Results Residual saphenous vein clot was a universal finding in control veins (sealed carbon dioxide insufflation endoscopic vein harvest without preheparinization). At either dose used, heparin given before endoscopic vein harvest significantly decreased saphenous vein clot burden. A similar reduction in clot was observed when using open carbon dioxide insufflation endoscopic vein harvest without preheparinization. Intraoperative blood loss and blood product requirements were similar in all groups. Patient age and preoperative maximum amplitude of the thrombelastography tracing showed a linear correlation with saphenous vein clot volume. Conclusion By enabling the quantification of this issue as never before possible, optical coherence tomography screening revealed that intraluminal saphenous vein clot is frequently found after endoscopic vein harvest. Systemic heparinization before harvest or an open

  13. Three phase partitioning of zingibain, a milk-clotting enzyme from Zingiber officinale Roscoe rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Gagaoua, Mohammed; Hoggas, Naouel; Hafid, Kahina

    2015-02-01

    The present work describes for the first time an elegant non-chromatographic method, the three phase partitioning for the purification and recovery of zingibain, a milk-clotting enzyme, from Zingiber officinale rhizomes. Factors affecting partitioning efficiency such as (NH4)2SO4 saturation, crude extract to t-butanol ratio and pH on zingibain partitioning were investigated. Optimal purification parameters were 50% (NH4)2SO4 saturation with 1.0:1.0 ratio of crude extract:t-butanol at pH 7.0, which gave 14.91 purification fold with 215% recovery of zingibain. The enzyme was found to be exclusively partitioned in the aqueous phase. The enzyme showed a prominent single band on SDS-PAGE. It is a monomeric protein of 33.8 kDa and its isoelectric point is 4.38. The enzyme exhibited maximal proteolytic activity at a temperature of 60 °C and pH 7.0. It was found to be stable at 40-65 °C during 2 h. The enzyme was found to be highly stable against numerous metal ions and its activity was enhanced by Ca(2+), K(+) and Na(+). It was completely inhibited by heavy metal ions such as Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) and partially by Cd(+). Zingibain milk-clotting activity (MCA) was found to be highly stable when stored under freezing (-20 °C) for 30 days compared at 4 °C. PMID:25475843

  14. Meniscal Repair of Degenerative Horizontal Cleavage Tears Using Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Tamiko; Kimura, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presently, the treatment options available for patients with horizontal degenerative cleavage tears of the meniscus are limited. These tears are considered an indication for partial or subtotal meniscectomy because when the tear is located within an avascular area, it is difficult to induce healing. However, meniscectomy is not ideal because it disrupts the normal anatomical structure and function of the meniscus. Purpose: To examine the clinical and arthroscopic outcomes following meniscal repair of degenerative horizontal cleavage tears using fibrin clots. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Vertical sutures were placed in the meniscal tear, and the cleft was filled with fibrin clots before the sutures were tightened. We repaired 18 menisci in 18 consecutive eligible patients using a previously described technique. Three patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury who underwent simultaneous ACL reconstruction and 5 patients who did not undergo follow-up arthroscopy within 12 months were excluded. The remaining 10 menisci in 10 patients were evaluated in this study. The mean age of the patients was 35.8 ± 16.5 years, and the mean postoperative follow-up time was 40.8 ± 5.4 months. Pre- and postoperative Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective scores, and Tegner activity levels were compared. The arthroscopy findings were evaluated at a mean postoperative time of 6.7 ± 2.9 months. Results: The mean Lysholm score improved significantly from 69.3 ± 16.3 points preoperatively to 95.4 ± 3.6 points postoperatively (P < .005). The mean IKDC subjective score also improved significantly from 26.5% ± 19.0% preoperatively to 87.8% ± 7.5% postoperatively (P < .001). The Tegner activity level recovered to the preinjury level in 6 patients and to 1 level below the preinjury level in 4 patients. The follow-up arthroscopies showed complete healing in 7 patients (70%) and incomplete healing in

  15. Impaired Antiviral Stress Granule and IFN-β Enhanceosome Formation Enhances Susceptibility to Influenza Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Alan C-Y; Parsons, Kristy; Moheimani, Fatemeh; Knight, Darryl A; Hansbro, Philip M; Fujita, Takashi; Wark, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that progressively worsens lung function. Those affected are highly susceptible to influenza virus infections that result in exacerbations with exaggerated symptoms with increased mortality. The mechanisms underpinning this increased susceptibility to infection in COPD are unclear. In this study, we show that primary bronchial epithelial cells (pBECs) from subjects with COPD have impaired induction of type I IFN (IFN-β) and lead to heightened viral replication after influenza viral infection. COPD pBECs have reduced protein levels of protein kinase (PK) R and decreased formation of PKR-mediated antiviral stress granules, which are critical in initiating type I IFN inductions. In addition, reduced protein expression of p300 resulted in decreased activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and subsequent formation of IFN-β enhanceosome in COPD pBECs. The decreased p300 induction was the result of enhanced levels of microRNA (miR)-132. Ectopic expression of PKR or miR-132 antagomiR alone failed to restore IFN-β induction, whereas cotreatment increased antiviral stress granule formation, induction of p300, and IFN-β in COPD pBECs. This study reveals that decreased induction of both PKR and p300 proteins contribute to impaired induction of IFN-β in COPD pBECs upon influenza infection. PMID:26807508

  16. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864.7140 Section 864.7140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests....

  17. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864.7140 Section 864.7140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests....

  18. Thermal Blood Clot Formation and use in Microfluidic Device Valving Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Shi, Wendian (Inventor); Guo, Luke (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of forming a blood-clot microvalve by heating blood in a capillary tube of a microfluidic device. Also described are methods of modulating liquid flow in a capillary tube by forming and removing a blood-clot microvalve.

  19. Endothelial Cells Organize Fibrin Clots into Structures That Are More Resistant to Lysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray Jerome, W.; Handt, Stefan; Hantgan, Roy R.

    2005-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a major cause of death and disability in the United States. Introducing thrombolytic agents into the clot to dissolve occlusive coronary artery thrombi is one method of treatment. However, despite advances in our knowledge of thrombosis and thrombolysis, survival rates following thrombolytic therapy have not improved substantially. This failure highlights the need for further study of the factors mediating clot stabilization. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy of clots formed from fluorescein-labeled fibrinogen, we investigated what effect binding of fibrin to the endothelial surface has on clot structure and resistance to lysis. Fluorescent fibrin clots were produced over human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the clot structure analyzed. In the presence of HUVEC, fibrin near the endothelial surface was more organized and occurred in tighter bundles compared to fibrin just 50 [mu]m above. The HUVEC influence on fibrin architecture was blocked by inhibitory concentrations of antibodies to [alpha]V or [beta]3 integrin subunits. The regions of the clots associated with endothelial cells were more resistant to lysis than the more homogenous regions distal to endothelium. Thus, our data show that binding of fibrin to integrins on endothelial surfaces produces clots that are more resistant to lysis.

  20. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  1. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  2. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  3. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  4. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  5. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  6. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  7. Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... clot than normal. Certain inherited conditions (such as factor V Leiden) increase blood’s tendency to clot. This also is true of treatment with hormone therapy or birth control pills. Sometimes, blood ... Risk Many factors increase your risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). ...

  8. Autophagy-deficiency in hepatic progenitor cells leads to the defects of stemness and enhances susceptibility to neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Hu, Lei; Ge, Ruiliang; Yang, Lixue; Liu, Kai; Li, Yunyun; Sun, Yanfu; Wang, Kui

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved and lysosome-dependent degradation process which assists in cell survival and tissue homeostasis. Although previous reports have shown that deletion of the essential autophagy gene disturbs stem cell maintenance in some cell types such as hematopoietic and neural cells, it remains unclear how autophagy-deficiency influences hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs). Here we report that Atg5-deficiency in HPCs delays HPC-mediated rat liver regeneration in vivo. In vitro researches further demonstrate that loss of autophagy decreases the abilities of colony and spheroid formations, and disrupts the induction of hepatic differentiation in HPCs. Meanwhile, autophagy-deficiency increases the accumulations of damaged mitochondria and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and suppresses homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA damage repair in HPCs. Moreover, in both diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and CCl4 models, autophagy-deficiency accelerates neoplastic transformation of HPCs. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that autophagy contributes to stemness maintenance and reduces susceptibility to neoplastic transformation in HPCs. PMID:26607902

  9. β-Aescin at subinhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) enhances susceptibility of Candida glabrata clinical isolates to nystatin.

    PubMed

    Franiczek, Roman; Gleńsk, Michał; Krzyżanowska, Barbara; Włodarczyk, Maciej

    2015-11-01

    Aescin (escin) derived from the seeds of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) is a natural mixture of triterpene saponins exhibiting a wide variety of pharmacological properties, including antiinflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities. However, data concerning antifungal activities of these compounds are limited. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida glabrata clinical isolates to α-aescin sodium, β-aescin crystalline and β-aescin sodium using the disk diffusion (DD) and broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Moreover, the influence of subinhibitory concentration (0.5×MIC) of β-aescins on the nystatin MIC was also studied. In general, the results obtained by the DD assay correlated well with those obtained by the BMD method. Both β-aescins effectively inhibited the growth of all 24 strains tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 8 to 32 μg/ml for β-aescin crystalline, whereas those of β-aescin sodium were slightly lower and ranged from 4 to 16 μg/ml. In contrast, α-aescin sodium was found to be completely ineffective against the strains studied. MIC values of nystatin were reduced 2-16-fold and 2-4-fold in the presence of subinhibitory concentration of β-aescin crystalline and β-aescin sodium, respectively. Results of the present study may suggest the additive interaction between β-aescin and nystatin. PMID:26092104

  10. Polyphosphate Deficiency in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Associated with Enhanced Drug Susceptibility and Impaired Growth in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mamta; Arora, Garima; Kumar, Santosh; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Kidwai, Saqib

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), a linear polymer of hundreds of phosphate residues linked by ATP-like phosphoanhydride bonds, is found in all organisms and performs a wide variety of functions. This study shows that polyP accumulation occurs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis upon exposure to various stress conditions. M. tuberculosis possesses a single homolog of ppk-1, and we have disrupted ppk-1 in the M. tuberculosis genome by allelic replacement. The mutant strain exhibited negligible levels of intracellular polyP, decreased expression of sigF and phoP, and reduced growth in the stationary phase and displayed a survival defect in response to nitrosative stress and in THP-1 macrophages compared to the wild-type strain. We report that reduction in polyP levels is associated with increased susceptibility of M. tuberculosis to certain TB drugs and impairs its ability to cause disease in guinea pigs. These results suggest that polyP contributes to persistence of M. tuberculosis in vitro and plays an important role in the physiology of bacteria residing within guinea pigs. PMID:23585537

  11. Western diet induces a shift in microbiota composition enhancing susceptibility to Adherent-Invasive E. coli infection and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Agus, Allison; Denizot, Jérémy; Thévenot, Jonathan; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Massier, Sébastien; Sauvanet, Pierre; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Denis, Sylvain; Hofman, Paul; Bonnet, Richard; Billard, Elisabeth; Barnich, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances have shown that the abnormal inflammatory response observed in CD involves an interplay among intestinal microbiota, host genetics and environmental factors. The escalating consumption of fat and sugar in Western countries parallels an increased incidence of CD during the latter 20th century. The impact of a HF/HS diet in mice was evaluated for the gut micro-inflammation, intestinal microbiota composition, function and selection of an E. coli population. The HF/HS diet created a specific inflammatory environment in the gut, correlated with intestinal mucosa dysbiosis characterized by an overgrowth of pro-inflammatory Proteobacteria such as E. coli, a decrease in protective bacteria, and a significantly decreased of SCFA concentrations. The expression of GPR43, a SCFA receptor was reduced in mice treated with a HF/HS diet and reduced in CD patients compared with controls. Interestingly, mice treated with an agonist of GPR43 were protected against DSS-induced colitis. Finally, the transplantation of feces from HF/HS treated mice to GF mice increased susceptibility to AIEC infection. Together, our results demonstrate that a Western diet could aggravate the inflammatory process and that the activation of the GPR43 receptor pathway could be used as a new strategy to treat CD patients. PMID:26742586

  12. Blood Clotting Factor VIII: From Evolution to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, N. A.; Kovnir, S. V.; Vorobiev, I. I.; Gabibov, A. G.; Vorobiev, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant blood clotting factor VIII is one of the most complex proteins for industrial manufacturing due to the low efficiency of its gene transcription, massive intracellular loss of its proprotein during post-translational processing, and the instability of the secreted protein. Improvement in hemophilia A therapy requires a steady increase in the production of factor VIII drugs despite tightening standards of product quality and viral safety. More efficient systems for heterologous expression of factor VIII can be created on the basis of the discovered properties of its gene transcription, post-translational processing, and behavior in the bloodstream. The present review describes the deletion variants of factor VIII protein with increased secretion efficiency and the prospects for the pharmaceutical development of longer acting variants and derivatives of factor VIII. PMID:23819034

  13. Longer-acting clotting factor concentrates for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Powell, J S

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia, when severe, leads to spontaneous life-threatening bleeding episodes. Current therapy requires frequent intravenous infusions. Most patients must limit their physical activities to avoid bleeding when the factor activity levels are below normal. In 2014, new therapeutic factor VIII and IX products were approved in Canada and the U.S. Over the next couple of years, other new factor products will likely be approved. These new factors have been engineered to have improved pharmacokinetic properties, including extended half-life in circulation, thus providing major therapeutic advances for patients with hemophilia. In the completed clinical trials, over 700 patients have successfully used these longer acting products regularly for more than one year. These promising new therapies should allow patients with hemophilia to use fewer infusions to prevent spontaneous bleeding or to treat bleeding episodes, and to provide appropriate clotting factor levels for different physical activities. PMID:26149018

  14. Rheometrical Studies of Blood Clot Formation by Oscillatory Shear, Thromboelastography, Sonoclot Analysis and Free Oscillation Rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. Adrian; Hawkins, Karl M.; Lawrence, Matthew J.; Williams, P. Rhodri; Williams, Rhodri L.

    2008-07-01

    We report studies of the coagulation of samples of whole human blood by oscillatory shear techniques, including Fourier Transform Mechanical Spectroscopy (FTMS). These techniques are used herein to identify the Gel Point of coagulating blood in terms of the Chambon-Winter Gel Point criterion which provides a rheometrical basis for detecting the establishment of an incipient clot. A comparison of the results of FTMS with those obtained from measurements involving a Thromboelastograph (TEG), a Sonoclot Analyzer and a Free Oscillation Rheometer (FOR) indicate that the latter techniques are not capable of detecting the incipient clot, whose establishment occurs several minutes prior to TEG or FOR-based assessments of clot formation time. The results of the present study suggest that FTMS is a useful tool in blood clotting research, being capable of providing a global coagulation profile in addition to detecting the instant of incipient clot formation.

  15. Flow-dependent channel formation in clots by an erythrocyte-bound fibrinolytic agent

    PubMed Central

    Gersh, Kathryn C.; Zaitsev, Sergei; Cines, Douglas B.; Muzykantov, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that plasminogen activators bound to erythrocytes (RBC-PA) have an extended lifetime in the circulation and are safer than free PAs. RBC-PAs incorporate into nascent thrombi, which are focally lysed from within, an attractive thromboprophylactic option. In static systems, RBC-PAs cleave surrounding fibrin fibers, forming pores larger than the cells themselves, and move around the pore edges, enlarging them until eventual clot dissolution. We hypothesized that under flow in blood vessels, RBC-PAs form functional patent channels before clot dissolution. Here we used perfusion chambers to study clot lysis by RBC-PAs under static versus arterial and venous flow conditions. We found that flow decelerates bulk clot lysis but quickly generates patent channels filled with passing RBCs, via pore enlargement and merging in the direction of flow. Formation of such channels by RBC-PAs may help rescue ischemic tissue before bulk dissolution of potentially occlusive clots. PMID:21389322

  16. Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 Mediates Pathogen Resistance and Virulence Function of a Bacterial Effector in Soybean1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jialin; Shine, M.B.; Gao, Qing-Ming; Navarre, Duroy; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Qingshan; Hu, Guohua; Kachroo, Aardra

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced disease susceptibility1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient4 (PAD4) are well-known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1-like (GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b) proteins and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean (Glycine max). Consistent with their significant structural conservation to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) counterparts, constitutive expression of GmEDS1 or GmPAD4 complemented the pathogen resistance defects of Arabidopsis eds1 and pad4 mutants, respectively. Interestingly, however, the GmEDS1 and GmPAD4 did not complement pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation in the eds1/pad4 mutants. Furthermore, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins were unable to complement the turnip crinkle virus coat protein-mediated activation of the Arabidopsis R protein Hypersensitive reaction to Turnip crinkle virus (HRT), even though both interacted with HRT. Silencing GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b or GmPAD4 reduced basal and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation and enhanced soybean susceptibility to virulent pathogens. The GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b and GmPAD4 genes were also required for Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv glycinea2 (Rpg2)-mediated resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Notably, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins interacted with the cognate bacterial effector AvrA1 and were required for its virulence function in rpg2 plants. Together, these results show that despite significant structural similarities, conserved defense signaling components from diverse plants can differ in their functionalities. In addition, we demonstrate a role for GmEDS1 in regulating the virulence function of a bacterial effector. PMID:24872380

  17. Inhibition of SlMPK1, SlMPK2, and SlMPK3 Disrupts Defense Signaling Pathways and Enhances Tomato Fruit Susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanyan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Can; Chen, Lin; Sheng, Jiping; Shen, Lin

    2015-06-10

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are major components of defense signaling pathways that transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular responses in plants. Our previous study indicated that SlMPK1/2/3 were associated with nitric oxide-induced defense response in tomato fruit. In this study, we determine whether SlMPK1/2/3 influence the tomato fruit's innate immunity and whether plant hormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in SlMPK1/2/3 defense signaling pathways. Treatment with 10 μM U0126 significantly inhibited the relative expression of SlMPK1, SlMPK2, and SlMPK3 (P < 0.05). U0126-treated fruit showed higher concentrations of auxin indole acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA), and gibberellic acid (GA), but a lower concentration of methyl jasmonate (MeJA). The activities of defense enzymes, including β-1,3-glucanases (GLU), chitinase (CHI), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO), decreased after U0126 treatment. Meanwhile, H2O2 content increased, and catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and peroxidase (POD) activities decreased after U0126 treatment. U0126 treatment enhanced the susceptibility of tomato fruit to Botrytis cinerea and resulted in more severe gray mold rot. These results demonstrate that inhibition of SlMPK1/2/3 disrupts tomato fruit defense signaling pathways and enhances the susceptibility to B. cinerea and also that plant hormones and ROS are associated with SlMPK1/2/3 defense signaling pathways. PMID:25910076

  18. Identification of differentially expressed genes associated with the enhancement of X-ray susceptibility by RITA in a hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (FaDu)

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Jinwei; Li, Xianglan; Guo, Rutao; Liu, Shanshan; Luo, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Next generation sequencing and bio-informatic analyses were conducted to investigate the mechanism of reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis (RITA)-enhancing X-ray susceptibility in FaDu cells. Materials and methods The cDNA was isolated from FaDu cells treated with 0 X-ray, 8 Gy X-ray, or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA. Then, cDNA libraries were created and sequenced using next generation sequencing, and each assay was repeated twice. Subsequently, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using Cuffdiff in Cufflinks and their functions were predicted by pathway enrichment analyses. Genes that were constantly up- or down-regulated in 8 Gy X-ray-treated FaDu cells and 8 Gy X-ray + RITA-treated FaDu cells were obtained as RITA genes. Afterward, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) relationships were obtained from the STRING database and a PPI network was constructed using Cytoscape. Furthermore, ClueGO was used for pathway enrichment analysis of genes in the PPI network. Results Total 2,040 and 297 DEGs were identified in FaDu cells treated with 8 Gy X-ray or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA, respectively. PARP3 and NEIL1 were enriched in base excision repair, and CDK1 was enriched in p53 signaling pathway. RFC2 and EZH2 were identified as RITA genes. In the PPI network, many interaction relationships were identified (e.g., RFC2-CDK1, EZH2-CDK1 and PARP3-EZH2). ClueGO analysis showed that RFC2 and EZH2 were related to cell cycle. Conclusions RFC2, EZH2, CDK1, PARP3 and NEIL1 may be associated, and together enhance the susceptibility of FaDu cells treated with RITA to the deleterious effects of X-ray. PMID:27247549

  19. Clotting of mammalian fibrinogens by papain: a re-examination.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F

    2014-10-28

    Papain has long been known to cause the gelation of mammalian fibrinogens. It has also been reported that papain-fibrin is insoluble in dispersing solvents like strong urea or sodium bromide solutions, similar to what is observed with thrombin-generated clots in the presence of factor XIIIa and calcium. In those old studies, both the gelation and subsequent clot stabilization were attributed to papain, although the possibility that the second step might be due to contaminating factor XIII in fibrinogen preparations was considered. I have revisited this problem in light of knowledge acquired over the past half-century about thiol proteases like papain, which mostly cleave peptide bonds, and transglutaminases like factor XIIIa that catalyze the formation of ε-lysyl-γ-glutamyl cross-links. Recombinant fibrinogen, inherently free of factor XIII and other plasma proteins, formed a stable gel when treated with papain alone. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the intermolecular cross-linking in papain-fibrin leads to γ-chain dimers, trimers, and tetramers, just as is the case with thrombin-factor XIIIa-stabilized fibrin. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from gels showed that the cross-linked material is quite different from what occurs with factor XIIIa, however. With papain, the cross-linking occurs between γ chains in neighboring protofibrils becoming covalently linked in a "head-to-tail" fashion by a transpeptidation reaction involving the α-amino group of γ-Tyr1 and a papain cleavage site at γ-Gly403 near the carboxy terminus, rather than by the (reciprocal) "tail-to-tail" manner that occurs with factor XIIIa and that depends on cross-links between γ-Lys406 and γ-Gln398. PMID:25283163

  20. Clotting Factor Deficiency in Early Trauma-Associated Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rizoli, Sandro B.; Scarpelini, Sandro; Callum, Jeannie; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Mann, Kenneth G.; Pinto, Ruxandra; Jansen, Jan; Tien, Homer

    2011-01-01

    Background Coagulopathic bleeding is a leading cause of in-hospital death after injury. A recently proposed transfusion strategy calls for early and aggressive frozen plasma transfusion to bleeding trauma patients, thus addressing trauma-associated coagulopathy (TAC) by transfusing clotting factors (CF). This strategy may dramatically improve survival of bleeding trauma patients. However, other studies suggest that early TAC occurs by protein C activation and is independent of CF deficiency. The present study investigated whether CF deficiency is associated with early trauma-associated coagulopathy. Methods Prospective observational cohort study of severely traumatized patients (ISS ≥16) admitted shortly after injury, receiving minimal fluids and no prehospital blood. Blood was assayed for CF levels, thromboelastography and routine coagulation tests. Critical CF deficiency was defined as ≤30% activity of any CF. Results Of 110 patients, 22 (20%) had critical CF deficiency: critically low factor V level was evident in all these patients. INR, aPTT and TEG were abnormal in 32%, 36% and 35% respectively of patients with any critically low CF. Patients with critical CF deficiency suffered more severe injuries, were more acidotic, received more blood transfusions and showed a trend towards higher mortality (32% vs. 18% p=.23). Computational modelling showed coagulopathic patients had pronounced delays and quantitative deficits in generating thrombin. Conclusions 20% of all severely injured patients had critical clotting factor deficiency on admission, particularly of factor V. The observed factor V deficit aligns with current understanding of the mechanisms underlying early TAC. Critical deficiency of factor V impairs thrombin generation and profoundly affects hemostasis. PMID:22071999

  1. Acute, but not resolved, influenza A infection enhances susceptibility to house dust mite-induced allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Garawi, Amal A; Fattouh, Ramzi; Walker, Tina D; Jamula, Erin B; Botelho, Fernando; Goncharova, Susanna; Reed, Jennifer; Stampfli, Martin R; O'Byrne, Paul M; Coyle, Anthony J; Jordana, Manel

    2009-03-01

    The impact of respiratory viral infections on the emergence of the asthmatic phenotype is a subject of intense investigation. Most experimental studies addressing this issue have used the inert Ag OVA with controversial results. We examined the consequences of exposure to a low dose of the common aeroallergen house dust mite (HDM) during the course of an influenza A infection. First, we delineated the kinetics of the immune-inflammatory response in the lung of mice following intranasal infection with influenza A/PR8/34. Our data demonstrate a peak response during the first 10 days, with considerable albeit not complete resolution at day 39 postinfection (p.i.). At day 7 p.i., mice were exposed, intranasally, to HDM for 10 consecutive days. We observed significantly enhanced eosinophilic inflammation, an expansion in Th2 cells, enhanced HDM-specific IgE and IgG1 responses and increased mucous production. Furthermore, lung mononuclear cells produced enhanced IFN-gamma and IL-5, unchanged IL-13, and reduced IL-4. These immunologic and structural changes lead to marked lung dysfunction. This allergic phenotype occurs at a time when there is a preferential increase in plasmacytoid dendritic cells over myeloid dendritic cells, activated CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-gamma production, all of which have been proposed to inhibit allergic responses. In contrast, the inflammatory response elicited by HDM was reduced when exposure occurred during the resolution phase (day 40 p.i.). Interestingly, this was not associated with a reduction in sensitization. Thus, the proinflammatory environment established during an acute influenza A infection enhances Th2-polarized immunity to a low dose of HDM and precipitates marked lung dysfunction. PMID:19234206

  2. The influence of type 2 diabetes on fibrin clot properties in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Neergaard-Petersen, S; Hvas, A-M; Kristensen, S D; Grove, E L; Larsen, S B; Phoenix, F; Kurdee, Z; Grant, P J; Ajjan, R A

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases the risk of coronary thrombosis and both conditions are associated with altered fibrin clot properties. However, the influence of T2DM on fibrin clot properties in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the influence of T2DM on fibrin clot properties in patients with CAD. Fibrin clot structure and fibrinolysis were investigated in 581 CAD patients (148 with T2DM) using turbidimetric assays, confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Clots made from plasma and plasma-purified fibrinogen were studied, and plasma levels of inflammatory markers were analysed. T2DM patients had increased clot maximum absorbance compared with non-diabetic patients (0.36 ± 0.1 vs 0.33 ± 0.1 au; p=0.01), displayed longer lysis time (804 [618;1002] vs 750 [624;906] seconds; p=0.03) and showed more compact fibrin structure assessed by confocal and electron microscopy. Fibrinogen levels were elevated in T2DM (p< 0.001), but clots made from purified fibrinogen showed no differences in fibrin properties in the two populations. Adjusting for fibrinogen levels, T2DM was associated with C-reactive protein and complement C3 plasma levels, with the former correlating with clot maximum absorbance (r=0.24, p< 0.0001) and the latter with lysis time (r=0.30, p< 0.0001). Independent of fibrinogen levels, females had more compact clots with prolonged lysis time compared with males (all p-values< 0.001). In conclusion, T2DM is associated with prothrombotic changes in fibrin clot properties in patients with CAD. This is related to quantitative rather than qualitative changes in fibrinogen with a possible role for inflammatory proteins. PMID:25187394

  3. The Hydraulic Permeability of Blood Clots as a Function of Fibrin and Platelet Density

    PubMed Central

    Wufsus, A.R.; Macera, N.E.; Neeves, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow within blood clots is a biophysical mechanism that regulates clot growth and dissolution. Assuming that a clot can be modeled as a porous medium, the physical property that dictates interstitial fluid flow is the hydraulic permeability. The objective of this study was to bound the possible values of the hydraulic permeability in clots formed in vivo and present relationships that can be used to estimate clot permeability as a function of composition. A series of clots with known densities of fibrin and platelets, the two major components of a clot, were formed under static conditions. The permeability was calculated by measuring the interstitial fluid velocity through the clots at a constant pressure gradient. Fibrin gels formed with a fiber volume fraction of 0.02–0.54 had permeabilities of 1.2 × 10−1–1.5 × 10−4μm2. Platelet-rich clots with a platelet volume fraction of 0.01–0.61 and a fibrin volume fraction of 0.03 had permeabilities over a range of 1.1 × 10−2–1.5 × 10−5μm2. The permeability of fibrin gels and of clots with platelet volume fraction of <0.2 were modeled as an array of disordered cylinders with uniform diameters. Clots with a platelet volume fraction of >0.2 were modeled as a Brinkman medium of coarse solids (platelets) embedded in a mesh of fine fibers (fibrin). Our data suggest that the permeability of clots formed in vivo can vary by up to five orders of magnitude, with pore sizes that range from 4 to 350 nm. These findings have important implications for the transport of coagulation zymogens/enzymes in the interstitial spaces during clot formation, as well as the design of fibrinolytic drug delivery strategies. PMID:23601328

  4. Potential for Differentiation of Pseudoprogression From True Tumor Progression With Dynamic Susceptibility-Weighted Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Ferumoxytol vs. Gadoteridol: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Raslan, Ahmed M.; Muldoon, Leslie L.; Hamilton, Bronwyn E.; Rooney, William D.; Varallyay, Csanad G.; Njus, Jeffrey M.; Haluska, Marianne; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) using gadoteridol in comparison to the iron oxide nanoparticle blood pool agent, ferumoxytol, in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who received standard radiochemotherapy (RCT). Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with GBM received standard RCT and underwent 19 MRI sessions that included DSC-MRI acquisitions with gadoteridol on Day 1 and ferumoxytol on Day 2. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were calculated from DSC data obtained from each contrast agent. T1-weighted acquisition post-gadoteridol administration was used to identify enhancing regions. Results: In seven MRI sessions of clinically presumptive active tumor, gadoteridol-DSC showed low rCBV in three and high rCBV in four, whereas ferumoxytol-DSC showed high rCBV in all seven sessions (p = 0.002). After RCT, seven MRI sessions showed increased gadoteridol contrast enhancement on T1-weighted scans coupled with low rCBV without significant differences between contrast agents (p = 0.9). Based on post-gadoteridol T1-weighted scans, DSC-MRI, and clinical presentation, four patterns of response to RCT were observed: regression, pseudoprogression, true progression, and mixed response. Conclusion: We conclude that DSC-MRI with a blood pool agent such as ferumoxytol may provide a better monitor of tumor rCBV than DSC-MRI with gadoteridol. Lesions demonstrating increased enhancement on T1-weighted MRI coupled with low ferumoxytol rCBV are likely exhibiting pseudoprogression, whereas high rCBV with ferumoxytol is a better marker than gadoteridol for determining active tumor. These interesting pilot observations suggest that ferumoxytol may differentiate tumor progression from pseudoprogression and warrant further investigation.

  5. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances the susceptibility of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ravid, A; Rocker, D; Machlenkin, A; Rotem, C; Hochman, A; Kessler-Icekson, G; Liberman, U A; Koren, R

    1999-02-15

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the hormonal form of vitamin D, has anticancer activity in vivo and in vitro. Doxorubicin exerts its cytotoxic effect on tumor cells mainly by two mechanisms: (a) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); and (b) inhibition of topoisomerase II. We studied the combined cytotoxic action of 1,25(OH)2D3 and doxorubicin on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Pretreatement with 1,25(OH)2D3 resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity of doxorubicin. The average enhancing effect after a 72-h pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 (10 nM) followed by a 24-h treatment with 1 microg/ml doxorubicin was 74+/-9% (mean +/- SE). Under these experimental conditions, 1,25(OH)2D3 on its own did not affect cell number or viability. 1,25(OH)2D3 also enhanced the cytotoxic activity of another ROS generating quinone, menadione, but did not affect cytotoxicity induced by the topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine slightly reduced the cytotoxic activity of doxorubicin but had a marked protective effect against the combined action of 1,25(OH)2D3 and doxorubicin. These results indicate that ROS are involved in the interaction between 1,25(OH)2D3 and doxorubicin. 1,25(OH)2D3 also increased doxorubicin cytotoxicity in primary cultures of rat cardiomyocytes. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 alone markedly reduced the activity, protein, and mRNA levels of the cytoplasmic antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, which indicated that the hormone inhibits its biosynthesis. This reduction in the antioxidant capacity of the cells could account for the synergistic interaction between 1,25(OH)2D3 and doxorubicin and may also suggest increased efficacy of 1,25(OH)2D3 or its analogues in combination with other ROS-generating anticancer therapeutic modalities. PMID:10029076

  6. Increased cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein expression promotes protrusion extension and enhances migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Liao, Ching-Fong; Deng, Win-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Chen, Ching-Shyang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Li, Li-Tzu; Lin, Chuang-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Jiang, Ming-Chung

    2010-10-15

    Microtubules are part of cell structures that play a role in regulating the migration of cancer cells. The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is highly expressed in cancer. We report here that CSE1L regulates the association of {alpha}-tubulin with {beta}-tubulin and promotes the migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. CSE1L was associated with {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin in GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. CSE1L-GFP (green fluorescence protein) fusion protein experiments showed that the N-terminal of CSE1L interacted with microtubules. Increased CSE1L expression resulted in decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin, increased {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin association, and enhanced assembly of microtubules. Cell protrusions or pseudopodia are temporary extensions of the plasma membrane and are implicated in cancer cell migration and invasion. Increased CSE1L expression increased the extension of MCF-7 cell protrusions. In vitro migration assay showed that enhanced CSE1L expression increased the migration of MCF-7 cells. Our results indicate that CSE1L plays a role in regulating the extension of cell protrusions and promotes the migration of cancer cells.

  7. How to Assess Fibrinogen Levels and Fibrin Clot Properties in Clinical Practice?

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta

    2016-06-01

    Fibrin formed from fibrinogen is the main component of thrombi. Clot structure is characterized by fiber thickness and pore size, which differs within a given clot and between individuals. Plasma clot architecture is largely determined by the quantity and quality of fibrinogen. Plasma fibrinogen concentrations are most commonly measured in citrated plasma using the Clauss method. However, several factors, including instrument type and reagent, may affect results. Other approaches to express the ability of fibrinogen to clot involve prothrombin time-derived or clottable protein assays, while fibrinogen antigen levels in clinical settings are measured using immunological or precipitation assays. Fibrin clot permeability (reflected by the Darcy constant, K s) being proportional to a buffer volume percolating through a clot under a given hydrostatic pressure is now the most commonly used measure of clot structure. Low K s values indicating tightly packed fibrin structure have been shown to be associated with venous and arterial thrombotic complications, while high K s might contribute to bleeding disorders. The measurement of K s, however, is not standardized and validated. This review summarizes the current knowledge on practical aspects of the measurement of fibrinogen levels and K s in patients. PMID:27071050

  8. Modification of shear modulus and creep compliance of fibrin clots by fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Kamykowski, G W; Mosher, D F; Lorand, L; Ferry, J D

    1981-02-01

    Shear moduli and creep compliances have been measured for four types of clots of human fibrin (about 7 mg/ml) clotted with and without human plasma fibronectin (usually 1.2 mg/ml). Fine clots (with little lateral aggregation of the fibrin protofibrils) were found at pH 8.5, ionic strength 0.45; coarse clots (with substantial lateral aggregation) were formed at pH 7.5, ionic strength 0.15; in both cases with and without ligation by fibrinoligase. In fine clots, the addition of fibronectin without ligation scarcely affected the shear modulus; with ligation, the modulus was decreased by a factor of 0.48. In coarse clots, the shear modulus was increased by addition of fibronectin. The increase was by a factor of 2.0 without ligation and by a factor of 2.4 with ligation. Creep and creep recovery in clots formed with and without fibronectin were similar except for the scale factor represented by the change in modulus. PMID:7260326

  9. In vivo flow cytometry of circulating clots using negative phototothermal and photoacoustic contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Keyrouz, Salah G.; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional photothermal (PT) and photoacousic (PA) imaging, spectroscopy, and cytometry are preferentially based on positive PT/PA effects, when signals are above background. Here, we introduce PT/PA technique based on detection of negative signals below background. Among various new applications, we propose label-free in vivo flow cytometry of circulating clots. No method has been developed for the early detection of clots of different compositions as a source of severe thromboembolisms including ischemia at strokes and myocardial dysfunction at heart attack. When a low-absorbing, platelet-rich clot passes a laser-irradiated vessel volume, a transient decrease in local absorption results in an ultrasharp negative PA hole in blood background. Using this phenomenon alone or in combination with positive contrasts, we demonstrated identification of white, red and mixed clots on a mouse model of myocardial infarction and human blood. The concentration and size of clots were measured with threshold down to few clots in the entire circulation with size as low as 20 µm. This multiparameter diagnostic platform using portable personal high-speed flow cytometer with negative dynamic contrast mode has potential to real-time defining risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and for prognosis and prevention of stroke or use clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy. Possibility for label-free detection of platelets, leukocytes, tumor cells or targeting them by negative PA probes (e.g., nonabsorbing beads or bubbles) is also highlighted. PMID:21976458

  10. EXTRACTION OF DNA FROM CRYOPRESERVED CLOTTED HUMAN BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clinical and epidemiologic investigations into the etiology of cancer and other chronic diseases are increasingly reliant on laboratory analyses to characterize exposures, susceptibilities, and biological effects in human populations. btaining these data for sizeable human popula...

  11. Increased hepatic CD36 expression with age is associated with enhanced susceptibility to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Sung, Miranda My; Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Kloosterhuis, Niels J; Miquilena-Colina, Maria Eugenia; Vargas-Castrillón, Javier; Febbraio, Maria; Jacobs, René L; de Bruin, Alain; Vinciguerra, Manlio; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Hofker, Marten H; Dyck, Jason Rb; Koonen, Debby P Y

    2014-04-01

    CD36 has been associated with obesity and diabetes in human liver diseases, however, its role in age-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Therefore, liver biopsies were collected from individuals with histologically normal livers (n=30), and from patients diagnosed with simple steatosis (NAS; n=26). Patients were divided into two groups according to age and liver biopsy samples were immunostained for CD36. NAFLD parameters were examined in young (12-week) and middle-aged (52-week) C57BL/6J mice, some fed with chow-diet and some fed with low-fat (LFD; 10% kcal fat) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal fat) for 12-weeks. CD36 expression was positively associated with age in individuals with normal livers but not in NAS patients. However, CD36 was predominantly located at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes in aged NAS patients as compared to young. In chow-fed mice, aging, despite an increase in hepatic CD36 expression, was not associated with the development of NAFLD. However, middle-aged mice did exhibit the development of HFD-induced NAFLD, mediated by an increase of CD36 on the membrane. Enhanced CD36-mediated hepatic fat uptake may contribute to an accelerated progression of NAFLD in mice and humans. Therapies to prevent the increase in CD36 expression and/or CD36 from anchoring at the membrane may prevent the development of NAFLD. PMID:24751397

  12. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance CD4 T Cell Susceptibility to NK Cell Killing but Reduce NK Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Matthew; Williams, James; Kurioka, Ayako; Gerry, Andrew B.; Jakobsen, Bent; Klenerman, Paul; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie

    2016-01-01

    In the search for a cure for HIV-1 infection, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being investigated as activators of latently infected CD4 T cells to promote their targeting by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). However, HDACi may also inhibit CTL function, suggesting different immunotherapy approaches may need to be explored. Here, we study the impact of different HDACi on both Natural Killer (NK) and CTL targeting of HIV-1 infected cells. We found HDACi down-regulated HLA class I expression independently of HIV-1 Nef which, without significantly compromising CTL function, led to enhanced targeting by NK cells. HDACi-treated HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells were also more effectively cleared than untreated controls during NK co-culture. However, HDACi impaired NK function, reducing degranulation and killing capacity. Depending on the HDACi and dose, this impairment could counteract the benefit gained by treating infected target cells. These data suggest that following HDACi-induced HLA class I down-regulation NK cells kill HIV-1-infected cells, although HDACi-mediated NK cell inhibition may negate this effect. Our data emphasize the importance of studying the effects of potential interventions on both targets and effectors. PMID:27529554

  13. Comprehensive transcript profiling of two grapevine rootstock genotypes contrasting in drought susceptibility links the phenylpropanoid pathway to enhanced tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Massimiliano; Vannozzi, Alessandro; Maza, Elie; Vitulo, Nicola; Meggio, Franco; Pitacco, Andrea; Telatin, Andrea; D’Angelo, Michela; Feltrin, Erika; Negri, Alfredo Simone; Prinsi, Bhakti; Valle, Giorgio; Ramina, Angelo; Bouzayen, Mondher; Bonghi, Claudio; Lucchin, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    In light of ongoing climate changes in wine-growing regions, the selection of drought-tolerant rootstocks is becoming a crucial factor for developing a sustainable viticulture. In this study, M4, a new rootstock genotype that shows tolerance to drought, was compared from a genomic and transcriptomic point of view with the less drought-tolerant genotype 101.14. The root and leaf transcriptome of both 101.14 and the M4 rootstock genotype was analysed, following exposure to progressive drought conditions. Multifactorial analyses indicated that stress treatment represents the main factor driving differential gene expression in roots, whereas in leaves the genotype is the prominent factor. Upon stress, M4 roots and leaves showed a higher induction of resveratrol and flavonoid biosynthetic genes, respectively. The higher expression of VvSTS genes in M4, confirmed by the accumulation of higher levels of resveratrol in M4 roots compared with 101.14, was coupled to an up-regulation of several VvWRKY transcription factors. Interestingly, VvSTS promoter analyses performed on both the resequenced genomes highlighted a significantly higher number of W-BOX elements in the tolerant genotype. It is proposed that the elevated synthesis of resveratrol in M4 roots upon water stress could enhance the plant’s ability to cope with the oxidative stress usually associated with water deficit. PMID:26038306

  14. Dynamic evaluation and control of blood clotting using a microfluidic platform for high-throughput diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combariza, Miguel E.; Yu, Xinghuo; Nesbitt, Warwick; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco; Rabus, Dominik G.; Mitchell, Arnan

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic technology has the potential to revolutionise blood-clotting diagnostics by incorporating key physiological blood flow conditions like shear rate. In this paper we present a customised dynamic microfluidic system, which evaluates the blood clotting response to multiple conditions of shear rate on a single microchannel. The system can achieve high-throughput testing through use of an advanced fluid control system, which provides with rapid and precise regulation of the blood flow conditions in the platform. We present experimental results that demonstrate the potential of this platform to develop into a high-throughput, low-cost, blood-clotting diagnostics device.

  15. Identification of the major lipoproteins in crayfish hemolymph as proteins involved in immune recognition and clotting.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; van Heusden, M C; Söderhäll, K

    1995-11-22

    Lipid-containing hemolymph proteins from males of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two major lipoproteins, one high density lipoprotein (HDL) and one very high density lipoprotein (VHDL), were characterized. The HDL and the VHDL were found to be identical to two proteins previously studied for their roles in immune recognition and hemolymph clotting, namely the beta-1,3-glucan binding protein and the clotting protein. These results imply that crayfish lipoproteins have dual functions, and that they are involved in immunity, hemolymph clotting, and lipid transport in these animals. Also, the oxygen-transporting protein hemocyanin was found to have a small lipid content. PMID:7488215

  16. Silencing OsHI-LOX makes rice more susceptible to chewing herbivores, but enhances resistance to a phloem feeder.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoxin; Qi, Jinfeng; Ren, Nan; Cheng, Jiaan; Erb, Matthias; Mao, Bizeng; Lou, Yonggen

    2009-11-01

    The jasmonic acid (JA) pathway plays a central role in plant defense responses against insects. Some phloem-feeding insects also induce the salicylic acid (SA) pathway, thereby suppressing the plant's JA response. These phenomena have been well studied in dicotyledonous plants, but little is known about them in monocotyledons. We cloned a chloroplast-localized type 2 13-lipoxygenase gene of rice, OsHI-LOX, whose transcripts were up-regulated in response to feeding by the rice striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis and the rice brown planthopper (BPH) Niaparvata lugens, as well as by mechanical wounding and treatment with JA. Antisense expression of OsHI-LOX (as-lox) reduced SSB- or BPH-induced JA and trypsin protease inhibitor (TrypPI) levels, improved the larval performance of SBB as well as that of the rice leaf folder (LF) Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, and increased the damage caused by SSB and LF larvae. In contrast, BPH, a phloem-feeding herbivore, showed a preference for settling and ovipositing on WT plants, on which they consumed more and survived better than on as-lox plants. The enhanced resistance of as-lox plants to BPH infestation correlated with higher levels of BPH-induced H(2)O(2) and SA, as well as with increased hypersensitive response-like cell death. These results imply that OsHI-LOX is involved in herbivore-induced JA biosynthesis, and plays contrasting roles in controlling rice resistance to chewing and phloem-feeding herbivores. The observation that suppression of JA activity results in increased resistance to an insect indicates that revision of the generalized plant defense models in monocotyledons is required, and may help develop novel strategies to protect rice against insect pests. PMID:19656341

  17. HTLV-1-associated adult T cell leukemia is highly susceptible to Navitoclax due to enhanced Bax expression.

    PubMed

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Giaisi, Marco; Köhler, Rebecca; Krammer, Peter H; Li-Weber, Min

    2016-01-15

    Over-expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w is frequently associated with cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Navitoclax (ABT-263), an orally bio-available small-molecule mimetic of the Bcl-2 homology domain 3, specifically inhibits Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w. Despite promising results obtained from the clinical trials, the use of Navitoclax in patients is dose-limited due to induction of death of platelets via inhibition of Bcl-xL and subsequent thrombocytopenia. This side effect limits the use of Navitoclax in low doses and to very sensitive tumors. In this study, we show that HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells, which over-express Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w, show a 10- to 20-fold higher sensitivity (EC50 = ∼ 25-50 nM) to Navitoclax compared to non-HTLV-1-associated leukemic cells (EC50 = ∼ 1 μM). Investigation of the molecular mechanisms revealed that the HTLV-1 oncogenic protein Tax up-regulates expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax which enhances the therapeutic efficacy of Navitoclax. In addition, we show that agents that inhibit the transcription elongation or translation initiation such as Wogonin and Roc-A can further decrease the effective dose of Navitoclax. Our study suggests that HTLV-1 ATL may be a good candidate disease for low dose Navitoclax therapy and probably with less risk of thrombocytopenia. PMID:26260669

  18. MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN THE ENHANCED SUSCEPTIBILITY OF SENESCENT RATS TO THE HEPATOCARCINOGENIC EFFECT OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATORS: ROLE OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA (PPARA), CELL PROLIFERATION AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanisms involved in the ENHANCED SUSCEPTIBILITY of SENESCENT Rats TO THE HEPATOCARCINOGENIC EFFECT OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATORS: Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa), cell proliferation and oxidative stress

    Jihan A. Youssef1, Pierre Ammann2, B...

  19. Viscoelastic Methods of Blood Clotting Assessment – A Multidisciplinary Review

    PubMed Central

    Benes, Jan; Zatloukal, Jan; Kletecka, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic methods (VEM) made available the bedside assessment of blood clotting. Unlike standard laboratory tests, the results are based on the whole blood coagulation and are available in real time at a much faster turnaround time. In combination with our new knowledge about pathophysiology of the trauma-induced coagulopathy, the goal-oriented treatment protocols have been recently proposed for the initial management of bleeding in trauma victims. Additionally, the utility of viscoelastic monitoring devices has been proved even outside this setting in cardiosurgical patients or those undergoing liver transplantation. Many other situations were described in literature showing the potential use of bedside analysis of coagulation for the management of bleeding or critically ill patients. In the near future, we may expect further improvement in current bedside diagnostic tools enabling not only the assessment of secondary hemostasis but also the platelet aggregation. More sensitive assays for new anticoagulants are underway. Aim of this review is to offer the reader a multidisciplinary overview of VEM and their potential use in anesthesiology and critical care. PMID:26442265

  20. Micro-elastometry on whole blood clots using actuated surface-attached posts (ASAPs)

    PubMed Central

    Judith, Robert M.; Fisher, Jay K.; Spero, Richard Chasen; Fiser, Briana L.; Turner, Adam; Oberhardt, Bruce; Taylor, R.M.; Falvo, Michael R.; Superfine, Richard

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel technology for microfluidic elastometry and demonstrate its ability to measure stiffness of blood clots as they form. A disposable micro-capillary strip draws small volumes (20 μL) of whole blood into a chamber containing a surface-mounted micropost array. The posts are magnetically actuated, thereby applying a shear stress to the blood clot. The posts’ response to magnetic field changes as the blood clot forms; this response is measured by optical transmission. We show that a quasi-static model correctly predicts the torque applied to the microposts. We experimentally validate the ability of the system to measure clot stiffness by correlating our system with a commercial thromboelastograph. We conclude that actuated surface-attached post (ASAP) technology addresses a clinical need for point-of-care and small-volume elastic haemostatic assays. PMID:25592158

  1. Imaging and Elastometry of Blood Clots Using Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography and Labeled Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Wu, Gongting; Spivak, Dmitry; Tsui, Frank; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Fischer, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods for imaging and assessment of vascular defects are needed for directing treatment of cardiovascular pathologies. In this paper, we employ magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MMOCT) as a platform both to detect and to measure the elasticity of blood clots. Detection is enabled through the use of rehydrated, lyophilized platelets loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO-RL platelets) that are functional infusion agents that adhere to sites of vascular endothelial damage. Evidence suggests that the sensitivity for detection is improved over threefold by magnetic interactions between SPIOs inside RL platelets. Using the same MMOCT system, we show how elastometry of simulated clots, using resonant acoustic spectroscopy, is correlated with the fibrin content of the clot. Both methods are based upon magnetic actuation and phase-sensitive optical monitoring of nanoscale displacements using MMOCT, underscoring its utility as a broad-based platform to detect and measure the molecular structure and composition of blood clots. PMID:23833549

  2. Micro-elastometry on whole blood clots using actuated surface-attached posts (ASAPs).

    PubMed

    Judith, Robert M; Fisher, Jay K; Spero, Richard Chasen; Fiser, Briana L; Turner, Adam; Oberhardt, Bruce; Taylor, R M; Falvo, Michael R; Superfine, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel technology for microfluidic elastometry and demonstrate its ability to measure stiffness of blood clots as they form. A disposable micro-capillary strip draws small volumes (20 μL) of whole blood into a chamber containing a surface-mounted micropost array. The posts are magnetically actuated, thereby applying a shear stress to the blood clot. The posts' response to magnetic field changes as the blood clot forms; this response is measured by optical transmission. We show that a quasi-static model correctly predicts the torque applied to the microposts. We experimentally validate the ability of the system to measure clot stiffness by correlating our system with a commercial thromboelastograph. We conclude that actuated surface-attached post (ASAP) technology addresses a clinical need for point-of-care and small-volume elastic haemostatic assays. PMID:25592158

  3. In vitro sonothrombolysis of human blood clots with BR38 microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Yannick; Gaud, Emmanuel; Arditi, Marcel; Bettinger, Thierry; Tranquart, François; Yan, Feng

    2012-11-01

    Sonothrombolysis (STL) is a promising new treatment for ischemic stroke combining microbubbles and ultrasound (US), which relies on the dissolution of blood clots causing occlusions of vessels. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the thrombolysis efficacy of BR38, a new microbubble (MB) formulation of Bracco Suisse. For the assessment of clot dissolution, a non-contacting method based on optical imaging of clots and image processing has been developed. For clot lysis, BR38 combined with US at 400 kPa (peak-negative pressure) was as efficient as a low dose of rt-PA (0.3 μg/mL). The roles of pulse length (10 ms to 1000 ms) and acoustic pressure (400, 500 and 600 kPa) for promoting thrombolysis were assessed.

  4. Factor XIIIa-dependent retention of red blood cells in clots is mediated by fibrin α-chain crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, James R; Duval, Cédric; Wang, Yiming; Hansen, Caroline E; Ahn, Byungwook; Mooberry, Micah J; Clark, Martha A; Johnsen, Jill M; Lord, Susan T; Lam, Wilbur A; Meijers, Joost C M; Ni, Heyu; Ariëns, Robert A S; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2015-10-15

    Factor XIII(a) [FXIII(a)] stabilizes clots and increases resistance to fibrinolysis and mechanical disruption. FXIIIa also mediates red blood cell (RBC) retention in contracting clots and determines venous thrombus size, suggesting FXIII(a) is a potential target for reducing thrombosis. However, the mechanism by which FXIIIa retains RBCs in clots is unknown. We determined the effect of FXIII(a) on human and murine clot weight and composition. Real-time microscopy revealed extensive RBC loss from clots formed in the absence of FXIIIa activity, and RBCs exhibited transient deformation as they exited the clots. Fibrin band-shift assays and flow cytometry did not reveal crosslinking of fibrin or FXIIIa substrates to RBCs, suggesting FXIIIa does not crosslink RBCs directly to the clot. RBCs were retained in clots from mice deficient in α2-antiplasmin, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, or fibronectin, indicating RBC retention does not depend on these FXIIIa substrates. RBC retention in clots was positively correlated with fibrin network density; however, FXIIIa inhibition reduced RBC retention at all network densities. FXIIIa inhibition reduced RBC retention in clots formed with fibrinogen that lacks γ-chain crosslinking sites, but not in clots that lack α-chain crosslinking sites. Moreover, FXIIIa inhibitor concentrations that primarily block α-, but not γ-, chain crosslinking decreased RBC retention in clots. These data indicate FXIIIa-dependent retention of RBCs in clots is mediated by fibrin α-chain crosslinking. These findings expose a newly recognized, essential role for fibrin crosslinking during whole blood clot formation and consolidation and establish FXIIIa activity as a key determinant of thrombus composition and size. PMID:26324704

  5. Validation of research trajectory 1 of an Exposome framework: Exposure to benzo(a)pyrene confers enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ryan S; Pellom, Samuel T; Booker, Burthia; Ramesh, Aramandla; Zhang, Tongwen; Shanker, Anil; Maguire, Mark; Juarez, Paul D; Patricia, Matthews-Juarez; Langston, Michael A; Lichtveld, Maureen Y; Hood, Darryl B

    2016-04-01

    The exposome provides a framework for understanding elucidation of an uncharacterized molecular mechanism conferring enhanced susceptibility of macrophage membranes to bacterial infection after exposure to the environmental contaminant benzo(a)pyrene, [B(a)P]. The fundamental requirement in activation of macrophage effector functions is the binding of immunoglobulins to Fc receptors. FcγRIIa (CD32a), a member of the Fc family of immunoreceptors with low affinity for immunoglobulin G, has been reported to bind preferentially to IgG within lipid rafts. Previous research suggested that exposure to B(a)P suppressed macrophage effector functions but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The goal of this study was to elucidate the mechanism(s) of B(a)P-exposure induced suppression of macrophage function by examining the resultant effects of exposure-induced insult on CD32-lipid raft interactions in the regulation of IgG binding to CD32. The results demonstrate that exposure of macrophages to B(a)P alters lipid raft integrity by decreasing membrane cholesterol 25% while increasing CD32 into non-lipid raft fractions. This robust diminution in membrane cholesterol and 30% exclusion of CD32 from lipid rafts causes a significant reduction in CD32-mediated IgG binding to suppress essential macrophage effector functions. Such exposures across the lifespan would have the potential to induce immunosuppressive endophenotypes in vulnerable populations. PMID:26765097

  6. NH4+ rather than NO3- production and retention processes are susceptible to enhanced NH4+ deposition in a subtropical plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenlong; Kou, Liang; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Jinbo; Muller, Christoph; Li, Shenggong

    2016-04-01

    It remains largely unknown how increasing N depositions may alter soil N cycling and N retention capacity of subtropical/tropical forest ecosystem functions. Here we report results from a 15N tracing study on soil from a subtropical forest plantation in China. Nitrogen fertilizer was applied monthly for more than 2.5 years at a rate of 40 (low) and 120 (high) kg NH4Cl-N hm‑2 yr‑1, respectively. High NH4+ input significantly retarded gross N mineralization, with a greater inhibition on mineralization of recalcitrant organic N than labile organic N which can possibly be related to a decreased fungal biomass. With increasing NH4+ inputs, rates of NH4+ immobilization into recalcitrant organic-N showed a trend of rise first and then fall. Interestingly, microbial NH4+ cycling moved toward to be a more open N cycling under low NH4+ input conditions, but was driven to be a tightly coupled N cycling under high NH4+ input conditions. On the contrary, microbial NO3- production (heterotrophic nitrification and autotrophic nitrification) and retention (NO3- immobilization and DNRA) processes showed insensitivity to elevated NH4+ input. Our results highlight that in acid subtropical/tropical forest soil, NH4+ rather than NO3- production and retention processes are susceptible to enhanced NH4+ deposition.

  7. Lesion simulating disease 1 and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 differentially regulate UV-C-induced photooxidative stress signalling and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wituszyńska, Weronika; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Sobczak, Mirosław; Rusaczonek, Anna; Kozłowska-Makulska, Anna; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-02-01

    As obligate photoautotrophs, plants are inevitably exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Because of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV has become more and more dangerous to the biosphere. Therefore, it is important to understand UV perception and signal transduction in plants. In the present study, we show that lesion simulating disease 1 (LSD1) and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) are antagonistic regulators of UV-C-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. This regulatory dependence is manifested by a complex deregulation of photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, antioxidative enzyme activity and UV-responsive genes expression. We also prove that a UV-C radiation episode triggers apoptotic-like morphological changes within the mesophyll cells. Interestingly, chloroplasts are the first organelles that show features of UV-C-induced damage, which may indicate their primary role in PCD development. Moreover, we show that Arabidopsis Bax inhibitor 1 (AtBI1), which has been described as a negative regulator of plant PCD, is involved in LSD1-dependent cell death in response to UV-C. Our results imply that LSD1 and EDS1 regulate processes extinguishing excessive energy, reactive oxygen species formation and subsequent PCD in response to different stresses related to impaired electron transport. PMID:24471507

  8. Overexpression of cotton GhMKK4 enhances disease susceptibility and affects abscisic acid, gibberellin and hydrogen peroxide signalling in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhen; Zhang, Liang; Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Xiuling; Wu, Chang-Ai; Guo, Xingqi

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are involved in plant development, stress responses and hormonal signal transduction. MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), as the key nodes in these cascades, link MAPKs and MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs). In this study, GhMKK4, a novel group C MAPKK gene from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), was isolated and identified. Its expression can be induced by various stresses and signalling molecules. The overexpression of GhMKK4 in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced its susceptibility to bacterial and fungal pathogens, but had no significant effects on salt or drought tolerance. Notably, the overexpressing plants showed increased sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), and ABA and gibberellin (GA) signalling were affected on infection with Ralstonia solanacearum bacteria. Furthermore, the overexpressing plants showed more reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and stronger inhibition of catalase (CAT), a ROS-scavenging enzyme, than control plants after salicylic acid (SA) treatment. Interestingly, two genes encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), the key enzymes in polyamine synthesis, exhibited reduced R. solanacearum-induced expression in overexpressing plants. These findings broaden our knowledge about the functions of MAPKKs in diverse signalling pathways and the negative regulation of disease resistance in the cotton crop. PMID:23980654

  9. AEG-1/MTDH-activated autophagy enhances human malignant glioma susceptibility to TGF-β1-triggered epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Meijuan; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Li; Shi, Lei; Gao, Rui; Ou, Yingwei; Chen, Xuguan; Wang, Zhongchang; Jiang, Aiqin; Liu, Kunmei; Xiao, Ming; Ni, Ping; Wu, Dandan; He, Wenping; Sun, Geng; Li, Ping; Zhai, Sulan; Wang, Xuerong; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a tightly regulated process activated in response to metabolic stress and other microenvironmental changes. Astrocyte elevated gene 1 (AEG-1) reportedly induces protective autophagy. Our results indicate that AEG-1 also enhances the susceptibility of malignant glioma cells to TGF-β1-triggered epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through induction of autophagy. TGF-β1 induced autophagy and activated AEG-1 via Smad2/3 phosphorylation in malignant glioma cells. Also increased was oncogene cyclin D1 and EMT markers, which promoted tumor progression. Inhibition of autophagy using siRNA-BECN1 and siRNA-AEG-1 suppressed EMT. In tumor samples from patients with malignant glioma, immunohistochemical assays showed that expression levels of TGF-β1, AEG-1, and markers of autophagy and EMT, all gradually increase with glioblastoma progression. In vivo siRNA-AEG-1 administration to rats implanted with C6 glioma cells inhibited tumor growth and increased the incidence of apoptosis among tumor cells. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying the invasiveness and progression of malignant gliomas. PMID:26909607

  10. Plants expressing tomato golden mosaic virus AL2 or beet curly top virus L2 transgenes show enhanced susceptibility to infection by DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Sunter, G; Sunter, J L; Bisaro, D M

    2001-06-20

    The AL2 gene of the geminivirus tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) encodes a transcriptional activator protein (TrAP) that is required for efficient expression of the viral coat protein (CP) and BR1 gene promoters. In contrast, L2, the positional homolog of AL2 in the related beet curly top virus (BCTV), is not required for CP expression, raising questions about the functional relationship between the AL2 and L2 gene products. In this study, transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum var. Samsun plants expressing a truncated AL2 gene (AL2(1-100), lacking the activation domain) or full-length L2 were prepared. These transgenic plants showed a novel enhanced susceptibility (ES) phenotype following inoculation with TGMV, BCTV, or tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), an unrelated RNA virus. ES is characterized by a reduction in the mean latent period (from 1 to 9 days) and by a decrease in the inoculum concentration required to infect transgenic plants (ID50 reduced 6- to 60-fold). However, ES does not result in an enhancement of disease symptoms, and viral nucleic acids do not accumulate to substantially greater levels in infected transgenic plants. That both viral transgenes condition ES suggests that their products share the ability to suppress a host stress or defense response that acts against DNA and RNA viruses. The data further indicate that the transcriptional activation activity of AL2 protein is not required for suppression. The nature of the response targeted by the AL2 and L2 gene products is discussed. PMID:11414806

  11. Optimized Preload Leakage-Correction Methods to Improve the Diagnostic Accuracy of Dynamic Susceptibility-Weighted Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MR Imaging in Posttreatment Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L.S.; Baxter, L.C.; Pinnaduwage, D.S.; Paine, T.L.; Karis, J.P.; Feuerstein, B.G.; Schmainda, K.M.; Dueck, A.C.; Debbins, J.; Smith, K.A.; Nakaji, P.; Eschbacher, J.M.; Coons, S.W.; Heiserman, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) accuracy can vary substantially depending on the dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) acquisition and postprocessing methods, due to blood-brain barrier disruption and resulting T1-weighted leakage and T2-and/or T2*-weighted imaging (T2/T2*WI) residual effects. We set out to determine optimal DSC conditions that address these errors and maximize rCBV accuracy in differentiating posttreatment radiation effect (PTRE) and tumor. MATERIALS AND METHODS We recruited patients with previously treated high-grade gliomas undergoing image-guided re-resection of recurrent contrast-enhancing MR imaging lesions. Thirty-six surgical tissue samples were collected from 11 subjects. Preoperative 3T DSC used 6 sequential evenly timed acquisitions, each by using a 0.05-mmol/kg gadodiamide bolus. Preload dosing (PLD) and baseline subtraction (BLS) techniques corrected T1-weighted leakage and T2/T2*WI residual effects, respectively. PLD amount and incubation time increased with each sequential acquisition. Corresponding tissue specimen stereotactic locations were coregistered to DSC to measure localized rCBV under varying PLD amounts, incubation times, and the presence of BLS. rCBV thresholds were determined to maximize test accuracy (average of sensitivity and specificity) in distinguishing tumor (n = 21) and PTRE (n = 15) samples under the varying conditions. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) areas under the curve (AUCs) were statistically compared. RESULTS The protocol that combined PLD (0.1-mmol/kg amount, 6-minute incubation time) and BLS correction methods maximized test AUC (0.99) and accuracy (95.2%) compared with uncorrected rCBV AUC (0.85) and accuracy (81.0%) measured without PLD and BLS (P = .01). CONCLUSIONS Combining PLD and BLS correction methods for T1-weighted and T2/T2*WI errors, respectively, enables highly accurate differentiation of PTRE and tumor growth. PMID:19749223

  12. Cloning and Expression of clt Genes Encoding Milk-Clotting Proteases from Myxococcus xanthus 422

    PubMed Central

    Poza, M.; Prieto-Alcedo, M.; Sieiro, C.; Villa, T. G.

    2004-01-01

    The screening of a gene library of the milk-clotting strain Myxococcus xanthus 422 constructed in Escherichia coli allowed the description of eight positive clones containing 26 open reading frames. Only three of them (cltA, cltB, and cltC) encoded proteins that exhibited intracellular milk-clotting ability in E. coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pichia pastoris expression systems. PMID:15466588

  13. Acute toxicity of diphacinone in Northern bobwhite: Effects on survival and blood clotting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Johnston, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was slightly toxic (acute oral LD50 2014 mg/kg) to Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in a 14-day acute toxicity trial. Precise and sensitive assays of blood clotting (prothrombin time, Russell?s Viper venom time, and thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in quail, and this combination of assays is recommended to measure the effects of anticoagulant rodenticides. A single oral sublethal dose of diphacinone (434 mg/kg body weight) prolonged clotting time at 48 h post-dose compared to controls. At 783 mg/kg (approximate LD02), clotting time was prolonged at both 24 and 48 h post-dose. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and was detected before overt signs of toxicity were apparent at the greatest dosages (2868 and 3666 mg/kg) in the acute toxicity trial. These clotting time assays and toxicity data will assist in the development of a pharmacodynamic model to predict toxicity, and also facilitate rodenticide hazard and risk assessments in avian species.

  14. Experimental and Imaging Techniques for Examining Fibrin Clot Structures in Normal and Diseased States

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Natalie K.; Keegan, Philip M.; Platt, Manu O.; Averett, Rodney D.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin is an extracellular matrix protein that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of blood clots. Much research has been done on fibrin in the past years to include the investigation of synthesis, structure-function, and lysis of clots. However, there is still much unknown about the morphological and structural features of clots that ensue from patients with disease. In this research study, experimental techniques are presented that allow for the examination of morphological differences of abnormal clot structures due to diseased states such as diabetes and sickle cell anemia. Our study focuses on the preparation and evaluation of fibrin clots in order to assess morphological differences using various experimental assays and confocal microscopy. In addition, a method is also described that allows for continuous, real-time calculation of lysis rates in fibrin clots. The techniques described herein are important for researchers and clinicians seeking to elucidate comorbid thrombotic pathologies such as myocardial infarctions, ischemic heart disease, and strokes in patients with diabetes or sickle cell disease. PMID:25867016

  15. Use of the activated clotting time in anticoagulation monitoring of intravascular procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, J; Ferguson, J J

    1993-01-01

    The activated clotting time first came into clinical use in the mid-1970s to guide the administration and reversal of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The explosive growth of cardiopulmonary bypass led to the development of automated techniques for measuring activated clotting times. Recent advances in the field of interventional cardiology have emphasized the importance of the coagulation cascade and the need for the prevention of thrombosis with anticoagulant drugs. The activated clotting time has emerged as an important means of monitoring and guiding heparin therapy during invasive intravascular procedures. This review focuses on the following topics: 1) the development of anticoagulation monitoring techniques; 2) current alternatives in bedside anticoagulation monitoring; and 3) the clinical application of activated clotting times outside surgery. Until prospective studies can establish appropriate "target" activated-clotting-time values for interventional procedures, procedural anticoagulation must be guided empirically. Nevertheless, the activated clotting time is extremely useful in the catheterization laboratory, for monitoring heparin therapy and the adequacy of anticoagulation. PMID:8298321

  16. In vitro sonothrombolysis of human blood clots with BR38 microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Petit, Bénédicte; Gaud, Emmanuel; Colevret, Delphine; Arditi, Marcel; Yan, Feng; Tranquart, François; Allémann, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Microbubble-mediated sonothrombolysis is a promising approach for ischemic stroke treatment. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate a new microbubble (MB) formulation (BR38) for sonothrombolysis and to investigate the involved mechanisms. Human whole-blood clots were exposed to different combinations of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), ultrasound (US) and MB. Ultrasound at 1.6 MHz was used at 150, 300, 600 and 1000 kPa (peak-negative pressure). Thrombolysis efficacy was assessed by measuring clot diameter changes during 60-min US exposure. The rate of clot diameter loss (RDL) in μm/min was determined and clot lysis profiles were analyzed. The most efficient clot lysis (5.9 μm/min) was obtained at acoustic pressures of 600 and 1000 kPa in combination with MB and a low concentration of rtPA (0.3 μg/mL). This is comparable with the rate obtained with rtPA at 3 μg/mL alone (6.6 μm/min, p > 0.05). Clot lysis profiles were shown to be related to US beam profiles and microbubble cavitation. PMID:22542261

  17. Evaluation of Potential Clinical Surrogate Markers of a Trauma Induced Alteration of Clotting Factor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Payas, Arzu; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Wegner, Alexander; Kauther, Max Daniel; Lendemans, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify routinely available clinical surrogate markers for potential clotting factor alterations following multiple trauma. Methods. In 68 patients admitted directly from the scene of the accident, all soluble clotting factors were analyzed and clinical data was collected prospectively. Ten healthy subjects served as control group. Results. Patients showed reduced activities of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X and calcium levels (all P < 0.0001 to 0.01). Levels of hemoglobin and base deficit correlated moderately to highly with the activities of a number of clotting factors. Nonsurvivors and patients who needed preclinical intubation or hemostatic therapy showed significantly reduced factor activities at admission. In contrast, factor VIII activity was markedly elevated after injury in general (P < 0.0001), but reduced in nonsurvivors (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Multiple trauma causes an early reduction of the activities of nearly all soluble clotting factors in general. Initial hemoglobin and, with certain qualifications, base deficit levels demonstrated a potential value in detecting those underlying clotting factor deficiencies. Nevertheless, their role as triggers of a hemostatic therapy as well as the observed response of factor VIII to multiple trauma and also its potential prognostic value needs further evaluation. PMID:27433474

  18. Cationic PAMAM Dendrimers Aggressively Initiate Blood Clot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clinton F.; Campbell, Robert A.; Brooks, Amanda E.; Assemi, Shoeleh; Tadjiki, Soheyl; Thiagarajan, Giridhar; Mulcock, Cheyanne; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Brooks, Benjamin D.; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Grainger, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers are increasingly studied as model nanoparticles for a variety of biomedical applications, notably in systemic administrations. However, with respect to blood contacting applications, amine-terminated dendrimers have recently been shown to activate platelets and cause a fatal, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like condition in mice and rats. We here demonstrate that, upon addition to blood, cationic G7 PAMAM dendrimers induce fibrinogen aggregation, which may contribute to the in vivo DIC-like phenomenon. We demonstrate that amine-terminated dendrimers act directly on fibrinogen in a thrombin-independent manner to generate dense, high-molecular-weight fibrinogen aggregates with minimal fibrin fibril formation. In addition, we hypothesize this clot-like behavior is likely mediated through electrostatic interactions between the densely charged cationic dendrimer surface and negatively charged fibrinogen domains. Interestingly, cationic dendrimers also induced aggregation of albumin, suggesting that many negatively charged blood proteins may be affected by cationic dendrimers. To investigate this further, zebrafish embryos (ZFE) were employed to more specifically determine the speed of this phenomenon and the pathway- and dose-dependency of the resulting vascular occlusion phenotype. These novel findings show that G7 PAMAM dendrimers significantly and adversely impact many blood components to produce rapid coagulation and strongly suggest that these effects are independent of classic coagulation mechanisms. These results also strongly suggest the need to fully characterize amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers in regards to their adverse effects on both coagulation and platelets, which may contribute to blood toxicity. PMID:23062017

  19. C-reactive protein and fibrin clot strength measured by thrombelastography after coronary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P.; Owens, Janelle; Breall, Jeffrey A.; Lu, Deshun; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Bolad, Islam; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is implicated in the progression of coronary artery disease and the molecular processes of inflammation and thrombosis are closely intertwined. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with an elevated risk of adverse ischaemic events after coronary stenting and hypercoagulability. Heightened whole blood clot strength measured by thrombelastography (TEG) has been associated with adverse ischaemic events after stenting. We intended to examine the relationship of CRP to plasma fibrin clot strength in patients after coronary stenting. Plasma fibrin clot strength was measured by TEG in 54 patients 16–24 h after undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Coagulation was induced in citrated plasma by addition of kaolin and CaCl2. Plasma levels of CRP and fibrinogen were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Increasing quartiles of CRP were associated with increasing levels of maximal plasma fibrin clot strength measured by TEG (P < 0.001) and increasing BMI (P =0.04). Patients in the highest quartile of CRP had significantly higher maximal fibrin clot strength (G) than the patients in the lowest quartile (G: 3438 ± 623 vs. 2184 ± 576 dyn/cm2, P < 0.0001). Fibrinogen concentration was not significantly different across quartiles of CRP (P =0.97). Patients with established coronary artery disease undergoing coronary stenting who have elevated CRP after PCI exhibit heightened maximal plasma fibrin clot strength as compared with those with low CRP. Thrombotic risk associated with elevated CRP may be linked to procoagulant changes and high tensile fibrin clot strength independent of fibrinogen concentration. PMID:23429252

  20. Pulsed Focused Ultrasound Induced Displacements in Confined In Vitro Blood Clots

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cameron C.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound has been shown to potentiate the effects of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to improve clot lysis in a range of in vitro and in vivo studies as well as in clinical trials. One possible mechanism of action is acoustic radiation force induced clot displacements. In this study we investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of clot displacements and strain initiated by focused ultrasound pulses. Displacements were produced by a 1.51 MHz f-number 1 transducer over a range of acoustic powers (1–85 W) in clots constrained within an agar vessel phantom channel. Displacements were tracked during and after a 5.45 ms therapy pulse using a 20 MHz high frequency ultrasound imaging probe. Peak thrombus displacements were found to be linear as a function of acoustic power up to 60 W before leveling off near 128 μm for the highest transmit powers. The time to peak displacement and recovery time of blood clots were largely independent of acoustic powers with measured values near 2 ms. A linear relationship between peak axial strain and transmit power was observed, reaching a peak value of 11% at 35 W. The peak strain occurred ~0.75 mm from the focal zone for all powers investigated in both lateral and axial directions. These results indicate that substantial displacements can be induced by focused ultrasound in confined blood clots, and that the spatial and temporal displacement patterns are complex and highly dependant on exposure conditions, which has implications for future work investigating their link to clot lysis and for developing approaches to exploit these effects. PMID:22194235

  1. C-reactive protein and fibrin clot strength measured by thrombelastography after coronary stenting.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Owens, Janelle; Breall, Jeffrey A; Lu, Deshun; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Bolad, Islam; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A

    2013-04-01

    Inflammation is implicated in the progression of coronary artery disease and the molecular processes of inflammation and thrombosis are closely intertwined. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with an elevated risk of adverse ischaemic events after coronary stenting and hypercoagulability. Heightened whole blood clot strength measured by thrombelastography (TEG) has been associated with adverse ischaemic events after stenting. We intended to examine the relationship of CRP to plasma fibrin clot strength in patients after coronary stenting. Plasma fibrin clot strength was measured by TEG in 54 patients 16-24 h after undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Coagulation was induced in citrated plasma by addition of kaolin and CaCl2. Plasma levels of CRP and fibrinogen were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Increasing quartiles of CRP were associated with increasing levels of maximal plasma fibrin clot strength measured by TEG (P < 0.001) and increasing BMI (P = 0.04). Patients in the highest quartile of CRP had significantly higher maximal fibrin clot strength (G) than the patients in the lowest quartile (G: 3438 ± 623 vs. 2184 ± 576 dyn/cm, P < 0.0001). Fibrinogen concentration was not significantly different across quartiles of CRP (P = 0.97). Patients with established coronary artery disease undergoing coronary stenting who have elevated CRP after PCI exhibit heightened maximal plasma fibrin clot strength as compared with those with low CRP. Thrombotic risk associated with elevated CRP may be linked to procoagulant changes and high tensile fibrin clot strength independent of fibrinogen concentration. PMID:23429252

  2. Quantification of intraventricular blood clot in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Maggie; Looi, Thomas; Lasso, Andras; Fichtinger, Gabor; Drake, James

    2015-03-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) affects nearly 15% of preterm infants. It can lead to ventricular dilation and cognitive impairment. To ablate IVH clots, MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is investigated. This procedure requires accurate, fast and consistent quantification of ventricle and clot volumes. We developed a semi-autonomous segmentation (SAS) algorithm for measuring changes in the ventricle and clot volumes. Images are normalized, and then ventricle and clot masks are registered to the images. Voxels of the registered masks and voxels obtained by thresholding the normalized images are used as seed points for competitive region growing, which provides the final segmentation. The user selects the areas of interest for correspondence after thresholding and these selections are the final seeds for region growing. SAS was evaluated on an IVH porcine model. SAS was compared to ground truth manual segmentation (MS) for accuracy, efficiency, and consistency. Accuracy was determined by comparing clot and ventricle volumes produced by SAS and MS, and comparing contours by calculating 95% Hausdorff distances between the two labels. In Two-One-Sided Test, SAS and MS were found to be significantly equivalent (p < 0.01). SAS on average was found to be 15 times faster than MS (p < 0.01). Consistency was determined by repeated segmentation of the same image by both SAS and manual methods, SAS being significantly more consistent than MS (p < 0.05). SAS is a viable method to quantify the IVH clot and the lateral brain ventricles and it is serving in a large-scale porcine study of MRgFUS treatment of IVH clot lysis.

  3. Susceptibility to viral infection is enhanced by stable expression of 3A or 3AB proteins from foot-and-mouth disease virus

    SciTech Connect

    Rosas, Maria F.; Vieira, Yuri A.; Postigo, Raul; Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-10-10

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3A protein is involved in virulence and host range. A distinguishing feature of FMDV 3B among picornaviruses is that three non-identical copies are encoded in the viral RNA and required for optimal replication in cell culture. Here, we have studied the involvement of the 3AB region on viral infection using constitutive and transient expression systems. BHK-21 stably transformed clones expressed low levels of FMDV 3A or 3A(B) proteins in the cell cytoplasm. Transformed cells stably expressing these proteins did not exhibit inner cellular rearrangements detectable by electron microscope analysis. Upon FMDV infection, clones expressing either 3A alone or 3A(B) proteins showed a significant increase in the percentage of infected cells, the number of plaque forming units and the virus yield. The 3A-enhancing effect was specific for FMDV as no increase in viral multiplication was observed in transformed clones infected with another picornavirus, encephalomyocarditis virus, or the negative-strand RNA virus vesicular stomatitis virus. A potential role of 3A protein in viral RNA translation was discarded by the lack of effect on FMDV IRES-dependent translation. Increased viral susceptibility was not caused by a released factor; neither the supernatant of transformed clones nor the addition of purified 3A protein to the infection medium was responsible for this effect. Unlike stable expression, high levels of 3A or 3A(B) protein transient expression led to unspecific inhibition of viral infection. Therefore, the effect observed on viral yield, which inversely correlated with the intracellular levels of 3A protein, suggests a transacting role operating on the FMDV multiplication cycle.

  4. RNA Interference of Soybean Isoflavone Synthase Genes Leads to Silencing in Tissues Distal to the Transformation Site and to Enhanced Susceptibility to Phytophthora sojae1

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Senthil; Graham, Madge Y.; Yu, Oliver; Graham, Terrence L.

    2005-01-01

    Isoflavones are thought to play diverse roles in plant-microbe interactions and are also potentially important to human nutrition and medicine. Isoflavone synthase (IFS) is a key enzyme for the formation of the isoflavones. Here, we examined the consequences of RNAi silencing of genes for this enzyme in soybean (Glycine max). Soybean cotyledon tissues were transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes carrying an RNAi silencing construct designed to silence expression of both copies of IFS genes. Approximately 50% of emerging roots were transformed with the RNAi construct, and most transformed roots exhibited >95% silencing of isoflavone accumulation. Silencing of IFS was also demonstrated throughout the entire cotyledon (in tissues distal to the transformation site) both by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of isoflavones and by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. This distal silencing led to a nearly complete suppression of mRNA accumulation for both the IFS1 and IFS2 genes and of isoflavone accumulations induced by wounding or treatment with the cell wall glucan elicitor from Phytophthora sojae. Preformed isoflavone conjugates were not reduced in distal tissues, suggesting little turnover of these stored isoflavone pools. Distal silencing was established within just 5 d of transformation and was highly efficient for a 3- to 4-d period, after which it was no longer apparent in most experiments. Silencing of IFS was effective in at least two genotypes and led to enhanced susceptibility to P. sojae, disrupting both R gene-mediated resistance in roots and nonrace-specific resistance in cotyledon tissues. The soybean cotyledon system, already a model system for defense signal-response and cell-to-cell signaling, may provide a convenient and effective system for functional analysis of plant genes through gene silencing. PMID:15778457

  5. Expression of the maize ZmGF14-6 gene in rice confers tolerance to drought stress while enhancing susceptibility to pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Campo, Sonia; Peris-Peris, Cristina; Montesinos, Laura; Peñas, Gisela; Messeguer, Joaquima; San Segundo, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are found in all eukaryotes where they act as regulators of diverse signalling pathways associated with a wide range of biological processes. In this study the functional characterization of the ZmGF14-6 gene encoding a maize 14-3-3 protein is reported. Gene expression analyses indicated that ZmGF14-6 is up-regulated by fungal infection and salt treatment in maize plants, whereas its expression is down-regulated by drought stress. It is reported that rice plants constitutively expressing ZmGF14-6 displayed enhanced tolerance to drought stress which was accompanied by a stronger induction of drought-associated rice genes. However, rice plants expressing ZmGF14-6 either in a constitutive or under a pathogen-inducible regime showed a higher susceptibility to infection by the fungal pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Magnaporthe oryzae. Under infection conditions, a lower intensity in the expression of defence-related genes occurred in ZmGF14-6 rice plants. These findings support that ZmGF14-6 positively regulates drought tolerance in transgenic rice while negatively modulating the plant defence response to pathogen infection. Transient expression assays of fluorescently labelled ZmGF14-6 protein in onion epidermal cells revealed a widespread distribution of ZmGF14-6 in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Additionally, colocalization experiments of fluorescently labelled ZmGF14-6 with organelle markers, in combination with cell labelling with the endocytic tracer FM4-64, revealed a subcellular localization of ZmGF14-6 in the early endosomes. Taken together, these results improve our understanding of the role of ZmGF14-6 in stress signalling pathways, while indicating that ZmGF14-6 inversely regulates the plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:22016430

  6. Quantitative assessment of regional cerebral blood flow by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI, without the need for arterial blood signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Yamamoto, Akihide; Iguchi, Satoshi; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Hori, Yuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Shah, Nadim Jon; Yamada, Naoaki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2012-12-01

    In dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI), an arterial input function (AIF) is usually obtained from a time-concentration curve (TCC) of the cerebral artery. This study was aimed at developing an alternative technique for reconstructing AIF from TCCs of multiple brain regions. AIF was formulated by a multi-exponential function using four parameters, and the parameters were determined so that the AIF curves convolved with a model of tissue response reproduced the measured TCCs for 20 regions. Systematic simulations were performed to evaluate the effects of possible error sources. DSC-MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies were performed on 14 patients with major cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) images were calculated from DSC-MRI data, using our novel method alongside conventional AIF estimations, and compared with those from 15O-PET. Simulations showed that the calculated CBF values were sensitive to variations in the assumptions regarding cerebral blood volume. Nevertheless, AIFs were reasonably reconstructed for all patients. The difference in CBF values between DSC-MRI and PET was -2.2 ± 7.4 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.55, p < 0.01) for our method, versus -0.2 ± 8.2 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.47, p = 0.01) for the conventional method. The difference in the ratio of affected to unaffected hemispheres between DSC-MRI and PET was 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for our method, versus 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.83, p < 0.01) for the conventional method. The contrasts in CBF images from our method were the same as those from the conventional method. These findings suggest the feasibility of assessing CBF without arterial blood signals.

  7. Theory of Orbital Susceptibility on Excitonic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyasu; Ogata, Masao

    2016-09-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the orbital susceptibility of an excitonic insulator on the basis of a two-band model. It is shown that a drastic change (an anomalous enhancement) in susceptibility as a function of temperature occurs owing to the occurrence of additional orbital susceptibility due to the excitonic gap. We calculate explicitly the temperature dependence of orbital susceptibility for a model of Ta2NiSe5, and show that the result is consistent with experimental results.

  8. Down-regulation of miR-21 Induces Differentiation of Chemoresistant Colon Cancer Cells and Enhances Susceptibility to Therapeutic Regimens.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingjie; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2013-04-01

    differentiating CR colon cancer cells and supports our contention that differentiation enhances susceptibility of CR cancer cells to conventional and nonconventional therapeutic regimen. PMID:23544170

  9. Effect of thiol derivatives on mixed mucus and blood clots in vitro.

    PubMed

    Risack, L E; Vandevelde, M E; Gobert, J G

    1978-01-01

    The disintegrating effect of three reducing thiol derivatives: [sodium mercaptoethane sulphonate (Mesna), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and dithio-1,4-threitol (DTT)] was investigated in vitro upon blood clots formed in the absence or in the presence of tracheobronchial secretions and compared with the effect of iso-osmotic saline solution. The amounts of haemoglobin released from the clots after 30 min incubation and the initial rates of haemoglobin release were compared for the different products at different concentrations. All three reducing agents showed some ability to disintegrate mixed clots to an extent depending on their concentration. After 30 min incubation, statistical analysis showed a highly significant difference in favour of Mesna at the three concentrations used, i.e. 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mmol/1. The initial rate of haemoglobin release in presence of Mesna was at all concentrations significantly higher than that of NAC or DTT. The effects on normal blood clots were much less pronounced. The effectiveness of Mesna in splitting up mixed blood and mucus clots in the management of patients who had inhaled blood is discussed. PMID:97741

  10. Reflectance changes in clotting native blood: evidence of a red-cell process.

    PubMed

    Greco, Frank A

    2007-01-01

    When broadband light illuminates clotting native blood, the reflectance at each wavelength traces a time course with four discernible regions. Clot formation occurs just before the second phase. Two wavelengths, 471 and 771 nm, were selected for more detailed study of the first two phases. Analysis of each time course in native blood demonstrates that both signals track a single process during the first phase, but distinct processes during the second. Experiments on citrated blood identified which blood components contribute to reflectance changes. Comparison of liquid and clotting blood reveals a single process during the first phase, entailing that rouleaux formation determines the time course at both wavelengths. Control experiments eliminate clot propagation and shape change of red cells or platelets as possible factors in the second phase. Exogenous ADP added to EDTA blood evokes the second-phase response at 471 but not 771 nm, a novel phenomenon that requires the presence of red cells. The descriptive name 'ADP-end-response' is suggested for this red cell process until it is further characterized. We propose that the ADP-end-response determines the 471-nm signal during the second phase of clotting native blood and depends upon platelets in the absence of exogenous ADP. The 771-nm signal reports fibrin cross-linking during the second phase. An earlier pilot study demonstrated that rofecoxib effects the 471-nm signal ex vivo, which indicates that reflectance spectroscopy may be useful in the assessment of drug effects on platelet-erythrocyte interactions. PMID:18332611

  11. The role of lipoprotein(a) in clotting reactions during lipoprotein apheresis-A case report.

    PubMed

    Matney, Kathryn; Berg, Mary; Falko, James M; Draper, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    In individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) who are unable to reach a target low-density lipoprotein level on a drug regimen, lipoprotein apheresis (LA) may be the treatment of choice. Severe reactions involving clotting during LA are not well described in the literature. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman with FH and markedly elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) levels who experienced such a reaction while undergoing LA with a dextran-sulfate cellulose column on the Kaneka MA-01 Liposorber system. Owing to the clotting as well as a blood pressure drop to <100 mm Hg systolic, the procedure was stopped early. Before her second procedure, she was given an increased loading dose of unfractionated heparin. She did not develop clotting during this second procedure. A growing body of literature on the role of Lp(a) in atherothrombotic complications and hemostasis supports a possible mechanism by which clotting in the instrument could occur during apheresis. Our patient's initial pretreatment Lp(a) was 3.5 times greater than the mean Lp(a) levels in patients with FH. This theory is consistent with our case in that the patient's Lp(a) levels progressively declined with each procedure, and she had no subsequent clotting. PMID:27055976

  12. The spider hemolymph clot proteome reveals high concentrations of hemocyanin and von Willebrand factor-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Sanggaard, Kristian W; Dyrlund, Thomas F; Bechsgaard, Jesper S; Scavenius, Carsten; Wang, Tobias; Bilde, Trine; Enghild, Jan J

    2016-02-01

    Arthropods include chelicerates, crustaceans, and insects that all have open circulation systems and thus require different properties of their coagulation system than vertebrates. Although the clotting reaction in the chelicerate horseshoe crab (Family: Limulidae) has been described in details, the overall protein composition of the resulting clot has not been analyzed for any of the chelicerates. The largest class among the chelicerates is the arachnids, which includes spiders, ticks, mites, and scorpions. Here, we use a mass spectrometry-based approach to characterize the spider hemolymph clot proteome from the Brazilian whiteknee tarantula, Acanthoscurria geniculata. We focused on the insoluble part of the clot and demonstrated high concentrations of proteins homologous to the hemostasis-related and multimerization-prone von Willebrand factor. These proteins, which include hemolectins and vitellogenin homologous, were previously identified as essential components of the hemolymph clot in crustaceans and insects. Their presence in the spider hemolymph clot suggests that the origin of these proteins' function in coagulation predates the split between chelicerates and mandibulata. The clot proteome reveals that the major proteinaceous component is the oxygen-transporting and phenoloxidase-displaying abundant hemolymph protein hemocyanin, suggesting that this protein also plays a role in clot biology. Furthermore, quantification of the peptidome after coagulation revealed the simultaneous activation of both the innate immune system and the coagulation system. In general, many of the identified clot-proteins are related to the innate immune system, and our results support the previously suggested crosstalk between immunity and coagulation in arthropods. PMID:26621385

  13. Possible benefits of catheters with lateral holes in coronary thrombus aspiration: a computational study for different clot viscosities and vacuum pressures.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Sajjad; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2014-10-01

    According to a number of clinical studies, coronary aspiration catheters are useful tools to remove a thrombus (blood clot) blocking a coronary artery. However, these thrombectomy devices may fail to remove the blood clot entirely. Few studies have been devoted to a systematic analysis of factors affecting clot aspiration. The geometric characteristics of the aspiration catheter, the physical properties of the thrombus, and the applied vacuum pressure are crucial parameters. In this study, the aspiration of a blood clot blocking a coronary bifurcation is computationally simulated. The clot is modeled as a highly viscous fluid, and a two-phase (blood and clot) problem is solved. The effects of geometric variations in the tip of the coronary catheter, including lateral hole size and location, are investigated considering different aspiration pressures and clot viscosities. A Bird-Carreau model is adopted for blood viscosity, while a power law model is used to describe the clot rheology. Computational results for blood clot aspiration show that the presence of holes in the lateral part of the tip of the catheter can be beneficial depending on clot viscosity, hole features, and applied aspiration pressure. In general, the holes are beneficial when the clot viscosity is low, while aspiration catheters without any extra lateral holes exhibit better performance for higher clot viscosity. However, when higher aspiration pressures are applied, the catheters tend to behave relatively similarly in removing clots with various viscosities, reducing the role of the clot viscosity. PMID:24571089

  14. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera) Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    PubMed Central

    Zolfagharian, Hossein; Mohajeri, Mohammad; Babaie, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bee venom (BV) is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera) on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50), and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT) and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT) tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD) values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs) = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa), respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro. PMID:26998384

  15. EspP, an Extracellular Serine Protease from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Reduces Coagulation Factor Activities, Reduces Clot Strength, and Promotes Clot Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Margaret L.; Mian, Hira S.; Brnjac, Elena; Sandercock, Linda E.; Akula, Indira; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pai, Emil F.; Chesney, Alden E.

    2016-01-01

    Background EspP (E. coli secreted serine protease, large plasmid encoded) is an extracellular serine protease produced by enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7, a causative agent of diarrhea-associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (D+HUS). The mechanism by which EHEC induces D+HUS has not been fully elucidated. Objectives We investigated the effects of EspP on clot formation and lysis in human blood. Methods Human whole blood and plasma were incubated with EspPWT at various concentrations and sampled at various time points. Thrombin time (TT), prothrombin time (PT), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), coagulation factor activities, and thrombelastgraphy (TEG) were measured. Results and Conclusions Human whole blood or plasma incubated with EspPWT was found to have prolonged PT, aPTT, and TT. Furthermore, human whole blood or plasma incubated with EspPWT had reduced activities of coagulation factors V, VII, VIII, and XII, as well as prothrombin. EspP did not alter the activities of coagulation factors IX, X, or XI. When analyzed by whole blood TEG, EspP decreased the maximum amplitude of the clot, and increased the clot lysis. Our results indicate that EspP alters hemostasis in vitro by decreasing the activities of coagulation factors V, VII, VIII, and XII, and of prothrombin, by reducing the clot strength and accelerating fibrinolysis, and provide further evidence of a functional role for this protease in the virulence of EHEC and the development of D+HUS. PMID:26934472

  16. The Occurrence of Thrombosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Reflected in the Clot Lysis Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Lize; Vande Casteele, Niels; Peeters, Miet; Van Assche, Gert; Ferrante, Marc; Van Moerkercke, Wouter; Declerck, Paul; Vermeire, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of thromboembolic events (TE) is an important extraintestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to compare fibrinolysis and clot lysis parameters between (1) patients with IBD and healthy controls and (2) patients with IBD with TE (IBD + TE) and without TE (IBD − TE). Methods: One hundred thirteen healthy controls and 202 patients with IBD, of which 84 patients with IBD + TE and 118 patients with IBD − TE, were included in this case–control study. Three clot lysis parameters (area under the curve, 50% clot lysis time, and amplitude) were determined using a clot lysis assay. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: PAI-1 antigen, active PAI-1, and intact thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor concentrations, as well as 50% clot lysis time and area under the curve, were significantly associated with the presence of IBD (all P < 0.05). The median time between TE and plasma collection was 5.0 (1.8–11.0) years. Comparing IBD + TE versus IBD − TE, active to total PAI-1 ratio (0.36 [0.24–0.61] versus 0.24 [0.13–0.40]), area under the curve (31 [24–49] versus 22 [13-31]), 50% clot lysis time (110 [64–132] versus 95 [70–126] minutes), and amplitude (0.295 [0.222–0.436] versus 0.241 [0.168–0.308]) were significantly higher in IBD + TE (all P <0.05) and remained higher after adjustment for age, gender, C-reactive protein, type of disease, presence of comorbidities, and disease activity. Conclusions: Patients with IBD have an altered clot lysis profile compared with healthy controls. Clot lysis parameters differ significantly between patients with IBD with and without a history of TE and should be included in the risk assessment. PMID:26313696

  17. The prolonged clotting time in two female patients with thromboangiitis obliterans

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yiping; Xia, Yin; Li, Yiqing; Yu, DannyCW

    2013-01-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), also known as Buerger's disease, is segmental non-atherosclerotic inflammatory disease, which affects the small and medium-sized peripheral arteries, veins and nerves of young adult smokers. The paper reports two TAO female patients, 26-year-old and 42-year-old, with prolonged clotting time. We compared 13 male patients and 2 female patients with TAO. The prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) were normal in the male patients, whereas the clotting times were prolonged in the female patients. Coagulation tests including PT, APTT and TT evaluation could be the potential markers to female patients with TAO. PMID:23749821

  18. Acute intracranial hemorrhage secondary to thrombocytopenia: CT appearances unaffected by absence of clot retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, J.N.; Taber, K.H.; Hayman, L.A. )

    1994-02-01

    To describe the in vivo CT appearance of acute intracerebral blood clots formed from anemic platelet-depleted blood. Three patients with intracerebral hemorrhage secondary only to thrombocytopenia were examined with CT within 2 1/2 hours after the onset of clinical symptoms. There were no unusual CT features found in the intracerebral hemorrhages of patients with only thrombocytopenia. Specifically, a hyperdense zone(s) surrounded by areas of decreased density was identified. Clot retraction (which cannot occur in patients with severe thrombocytopenia) is not necessary for the CT appearance of acute intracerebral hemorrhage. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Family history unawareness of blood clot risk: links to misdiagnoses and illness uncertainties in personal and expert realms.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Roxanne; Hong, Soo Jung; Greenberg, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    The difficulty of diagnosing blood clots makes salient the question, "What role does family history awareness have for guiding lay and expert actions?" The authors examine the in-depth life reflection interviews of 20 women who experienced a first venous blood clot between the ages of 18 and 50 years, identifying causal attributions the women made for thrombosis after the event. Twelve participants described an understanding of the cascade of events linked to thrombosis, revealing that there is seldom a single cause. The other eight identified belief in a single determining cause for their thrombosis. The authors reflect on the symptoms the women experienced during the course of the clotting event, patterns of care that they executed to self-manage their blood clot, and their misdiagnoses associated with symptoms and care. The women recalled the patterns of care received through formal health care systems and the reported misdiagnoses linked to these interactions. The recollections reveal that the subtle nature of venous blood clot symptoms contributes to lay and expert misdiagnoses. Use of antibiotics and pain killers in the wake of misdiagnosis masks symptoms, contributing to costly delays in accurate diagnoses. Four women were aware of a family history of clotting when the event occurred, 13 had such a history but lacked awareness until the clotting event, and three had no known history. Among women with awareness of their family history, blood clot diagnosis occurred sooner, promoting survival and efficiencies in health care. Implications for communicating about family history of thrombosis are considered. PMID:24794077

  20. The presence of monocytes enhances the susceptibility of B cells to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus possibly through the increased expression of α2,3 SA receptor.

    PubMed

    Lersritwimanmaen, Patharapan; Na-Ek, Prasit; Thanunchai, Maytawan; Thewsoongnoen, Jutarat; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Wiboon-ut, Suwimon; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Thitithanyanont, Arunee

    2015-08-28

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus causes severe systemic infection in avian and mammalian species, including humans by first targeting immune cells. This subsequently renders the innate and adaptive immune responses less active, thus allowing dissemination of the virus to systemic organs. To gain insight into the pathogenesis of H5N1, this study aims to determine the susceptibility of human PBMCs to the H5N1 virus and explore the factors which influence this susceptibility. We found that PBMCs were a target of H5N1 infection, and that monocytes and B cells were populations which were clearly the most susceptible. Analysis of PBMC subpopulations showed that isolated monocytes and monocytes residing in whole PBMCs had comparable percentages of infection (28.97 ± 5.54% vs 22.23 ± 5.14%). In contrast, isolated B cells were infected to a much lower degree than B cells residing in a mixture of whole PBMCs (0.88 ± 0.34% vs 34.87 ± 4.63%). Different susceptibility levels of B cells for these tested conditions spurred us to explore the B cell-H5N1 interaction mechanisms. Here, we first demonstrated that monocytes play a crucial role in the enhancement of B cell susceptibility to H5N1 infection. Although the actual mechanism by which this enhancement occurs remains in question, α2,3-linked sialic acid (SA), known for influenza virus receptors, could be a responsible factor for the greater susceptibility of B cells, as it was highly expressed on the surface of B cells upon H5N1 infection of B cell/monocyte co-cultures. Our findings reveal some of the factors involved with the permissiveness of human immune cells to H5N1 virus and provide a better understanding of the tropism of H5N1 in immune cells. PMID:26187669

  1. The α-Helix to β-Sheet Transition in Stretched and Compressed Hydrated Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Rustem I.; Faizullin, Dzhigangir A.; Zuev, Yuriy F.; Weisel, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin is a protein polymer that forms the viscoelastic scaffold of blood clots and thrombi. Despite the critical importance of fibrin deformability for outcomes of bleeding and thrombosis, the structural origins of the clot’s elasticity and plasticity remain largely unknown. However, there is substantial evidence that unfolding of fibrin is an important part of the mechanism. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to reveal force-induced changes in the secondary structure of hydrated fibrin clots made of human blood plasma in vitro. When extended or compressed, fibrin showed a shift of absorbance intensity mainly in the amide I band (1600–1700 cm−1) as well as in the amide II and III bands, indicating an increase of the β-sheets and a corresponding reduction of the α-helices. The structural conversions correlated directly with the strain or pressure and were partially reversible at the conditions applied. The additional absorbance observed at 1612–1624 cm−1 was characteristic of the nascent interchain β-sheets, consistent with protein aggregation and fiber bundling during clot deformation observed using scanning electron microscopy. We conclude that under extension and/or compression an α-helix to β-sheet conversion of the coiled-coils occurs in the fibrin clot as a part of forced protein unfolding. PMID:23009851

  2. The configuration of fibrin clots determines capillary morphogenesis and endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nehls, V; Herrmann, R

    1996-05-01

    In the living organism, capillary growth frequently occurs in a fibrin-rich extracellular matrix. The structure and the mechanical properties of fibrin clots are influenced by various macromolecules (i.e., hyaluronic acid and thrombospondin) and also by pH, ionic strength, and thrombin concentrations of the milieu in which they polymerize. The configuration (three-dimensional architecture) and the rigidity of fibrin clots correlate with their opacity measured by spectrophotometric absorbance readings at 350 nm. By using bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells and bovine fibrinogen, we show here that transparent fibrin clots (A(350) < 1.0), polymerized at > or = pH 7.5 or in the presence of increased thrombin or sodium chloride concentrations, strongly stimulated capillary morphogenesis in vitro. In contrast, opaque fibrin gels (A(350) > 1.5), polymerized at pH 7.2 or in the presence of dextran, stimulated only the migration of endothelial cells but not capillary morphogenesis. We demonstrate that the angiomorphogenic effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are strongly dependent on the structure of the fibrin clots. Our findings suggest that bFGF/VEGF primarily stimulate the proliferation of endothelial cells, whereas the three-dimensional architecture of the fibrin matrix is decisive for capillary morphogenesis. PMID:8992233

  3. Cloning and expression of hybrid streptokinase towards clot-specific activity.

    PubMed

    Buniya, Harith K; Murugan, Vadivel; Thangadurai, Chinnathambi

    2014-03-01

    Streptokinase (SK) is a thrombolytic agent that is widely used to treat myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. The lack of fibrin specificity of SK for the clot lysis is one of the limitations of SK. In this study, we have incorporated the finger and Kringle 2 domains from the human tissue type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA) at the 5' end of the SK gene. These domains are responsible for specific binding to fibrin. We have used the pRSETB vector in an attempt to express the hybrid streptokinase possessing specificity for fibrin. On this regard, three hybrid streptokinase were constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3): the finger domain with SK (FSK), the Kringle 2 domain with SK (KSK) and the finger domain+Kringle 2 with SK (FKSK). The activities of the hybrid SKs were assessed by caseinolytic assay and clot lysis assay. All hybrid SKs were found to activate plasminogen in the caseinolytic plate assay. In the clot lysis assay, KSK and FSK were able to dissolute human blood and artificial clots in a fibrin-dependent manner unlike the SK and FKSK proteins. PMID:24440164

  4. Characterization of partially purified milk-clotting enzyme from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Assia I A M; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Hamid, Omer I A

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to extract milk-clotting enzyme from sunflower seeds and to determine its potentiality for manufacturing white soft cheese from cows and goats milk. The seeds were blended and extracted using two types of buffers and milk-clotting and proteolytic activities were evaluated. The enzyme was partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation techniques. Results indicated that sunflower seeds extracted with 5% NaCl in 50 mmol/L acetate buffer, pH 5.0, had the highest milk-clotting activity (MCA) and lowest coagulation time compared to that extracted with only acetate buffer (pH 5.0). Ammonium sulfate at 30-50% saturation purified the enzyme to 4.3 folds with MCA of 241.0 U/mL and final enzyme yield of 10.9%. The partially purified enzyme was characterized by SDS-PAGE that showed two bands with molecular weight of 120 and 62 kDa. When compared with other plant enzymes, the partially purified sunflower enzyme was found to have higher milk-clotting activity and lower proteolytic activity. Also, both milk sources and enzyme types significantly affected the cheese yield and curd formation time. The cheese made from cow milk using sunflower enzyme had higher yield compared to that obtained using commercial rennet, whereas the opposite was observed when using goat milk. PMID:27625777

  5. Plasma fibronectin promotes lung metastasis by contributions to fibrin clots and tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Malik, Gunjan; Knowles, Lynn M; Dhir, Rajiv; Xu, Shuping; Yang, Shuting; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Pilch, Jan

    2010-06-01

    The attachment of circulating tumor cells to the blood vessels of distant organs is an important step in metastasis. We show here that experimental lung metastasis by two cell lines, B16F1 melanoma and 3LL lung carcinoma, is greatly reduced in transgenic mice that lack plasma fibronectin. This multifunctional adhesive glycoprotein becomes cross-linked to fibrin during clotting. Here, we report that eliminating plasma fibronectin from the blood circulation reverses the prometastatic effects of blood clotting and tumor cell integrin alphavbeta3. In vitro studies showed that fibrin-fibronectin complexes, but not purified fibrin, supported tumor cell attachment and invasion. These functions correlate with the ability of fibrin-fibronectin complexes to induce the activation of integrin alphavbeta3. Our findings reveal an important contribution of plasma fibronectin in lung metastasis. Furthermore, they suggest that the previously noted effects of blood clotting on lung metastasis might be mediated in part by a fibronectin-alphavbeta3 integrin axis, in which plasma fibronectin has to be incorporated into the blood clot. PMID:20501851

  6. A novel method of clot extraction using a FilterWire EX in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Aqel, Raed A; Gupta, Ritesh; Zoghbi, Gilbert J

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel approach for the use of a FilterWire EX distal protection device as a snaring device for clot extraction in a patient who sustained acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction due to occlusion of the right coronary artery. PMID:17404414

  7. Blood Clot Simulation Model by Using the Bond-Graph Technique

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, M. Luisa

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that 17 million people die of cardiovascular disease, particularly heart attacks and strokes, every year. Most strokes are caused by a blood clot that occludes an artery in the cerebral circulation and the process concerning the removal of this obstruction involves catheterisation. The fundamental object of the presented study consists in determining and optimizing the necessary simulation model corresponding with the blood clot zone to be implemented jointly with other Mechanical Thrombectomy Device simulation models, which have become more widely used during the last decade. To do so, a multidomain technique is used to better explain the different aspects of the attachment to the artery wall and between the existing platelets, it being possible to obtain the mathematical equations that define the full model. For a better understanding, a consecutive approximation to the definitive model will be presented, analyzing the different problems found during the study. The final presented model considers an elastic characterization of the blood clot composition and the possibility of obtaining a consecutive detachment process from the artery wall. In conclusion, the presented model contains the necessary behaviour laws to be implemented in future blood clot simulation models. PMID:24453867

  8. Purification and identification of a clotting protein from the hemolymph of Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baojie; Peng, Hongni; Liu, Mei; Jiang, Keyong; Zhang, Guofan; Wang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The clotting protein (CP) plays important and diverse roles in crustaceans, such as coagulation and lipid transportation. A clotting protein was purified from the hemolymph of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis (named as Fc-CP) with Q sepharose HP anion-exchange chromatography and phenyl sepharose HP hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Fc-CP was able to form stable clots in vitro in the presence of hemocyte lysate and Ca2+, suggesting that the clotting reaction is catalyzed by a Ca2+-dependent transglutaminase in shrimp hemocytes. The molecular mass of Fc-CP was 380 kDa under non-reducing conditions and 190 kDa under reducing conditions as was determined with SDS-PAGE. CP exists as disulfide-linked homodimers and oligomers. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of Fc-CP was identical to that of shrimps including Penaeus monodon, Farfantepenaeus paulensis and Litopenaeus vannamei; and similar to that of other decapods. The purified Fc-CP was digested with trypsin and verified on an ABI 4700 matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. Our results will aid to better understanding the coagulation mechanism of shrimp hemolymph.

  9. Staphylococcus chromogenes, a Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcus Species That Can Clot Plasma.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Danielle Cabral; Lange, Carla Christine; Avellar-Costa, Pedro; Dos Santos, Katia Regina Netto; Brito, Maria Aparecida Vasconcelos Paiva; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus chromogenes is one of the main coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from mastitis of dairy cows. We describe S. chromogenes isolates that can clot plasma. Since the main pathogen causing mastitis is coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus, the coagulase-positive phenotype of S. chromogenes described here can easily lead to misidentification. PMID:26912749

  10. Fibronectin provides a conduit for fibroblast transmigration from collagenous stroma into fibrin clot provisional matrix.

    PubMed

    Greiling, D; Clark, R A

    1997-04-01

    After injury, the wound space is filled with a fibrin/fibronectin clot containing growth factors released by platelets and monocytes. In response to these factors, fibroblasts migrate into the fibrin clot and contribute to the formation of granulation tissue. The functional mechanisms allowing fibroblasts to leave the collagenous matrix of normal connective tissue and invade the provisional matrix of the fibrin clot have not been fully defined. To investigate these mechanisms we established a new in vitro model which simulates specific aspects of early wound healing, that is, the migration of fibroblasts from a three-dimensional collagen matrix into a fibrin clot. This transmigration could be induced by physiological concentrations of platelet releasate or platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in a concentration-dependent manner. At 24 hours irradiated fibroblasts invaded the fibrin gel almost as well as non-irradiated cells, indicating that transmigration was independent of proliferation. Plasminogen and its activators appear to be necessary for invasion of the fibrin clot since protease inhibitors decreased the amount of migration. These serine proteases, however, were not necessary for exit from the collagen gel as fibroblasts migrated out of the collagen gel onto a surface coated with fibrin fibrils even in the presence of inhibitors. Removal of fibronectin (FN) from either the collagen gel or the fibrin gel markedly decreased the number of migrating cells, suggesting that FN provides a conduit for transmigration. Cell movement in the in vitro model was inhibited by RGD peptide, and by monoclonal antibodies against the subunits of the alpha5 beta1 and alpha v beta3 integrin receptor. Thus, the functional requirements for fibroblast transmigration from collagen-rich to fibrin-rich matrices, such as occurs in early wound healing, have been partially defined using an in vitro paradigm of this important biologic process. PMID:9133673

  11. Hepatitis C virus core protein enhances hepatocellular carcinoma cells to be susceptible to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus through down-regulation of HDAC4.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong; Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Min, Do Sik; Myung, Heejoon; Oh, Sangtaek; Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Kraemer, Olive H; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is known to possess potential oncogenic activity, we explored whether oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) could efficiently induce cytolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells stably expressing HCV core protein (Hep3B-Core). We found that Hep3B-Core cells were more susceptible to VSV as compared to control (Hep3B-Vec) cells owing to core-mediated inactivation of STAT1 and STAT2 proteins. Core expression induced lower phosphorylation levels of type I IFN signaling proteins such as Tyk2 and Jak1, and a reduced response to exogenous IFN-α, which resulted in susceptibility to VSV. Furthermore, as STAT1 acetylation by switching phosphorylation regulated its activity, the role of STAT1 acetylation in susceptibility of Hep3B-Core cells to VSV was investigated. Treatment with trichostatin A, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC), increased STAT1 acetylation but blocked IFN-α-induced phosphorylation of STAT1, leading to increase of susceptibility to VSV. Interestingly, the core protein decreased HDCA4 transcript levels, leading to down-regulation of HDAC4 protein. However, ectopic expression of HDAC4 conversely enforced phosphorylation of STAT1 and hindered VSV replication, indicating that core-mediated reduction of HDAC4 provides a suitable intracellular circumstance for VSV replication. Collectively, we suggest that VSV treatment will be a useful therapeutic strategy for HCV-infected hepatocellular carcinoma cells because HCV core protein suppresses the anti-viral threshold by down-regulation of the STAT1-HDAC4 signaling axis. PMID:27150631

  12. Transgenerational inheritance of enhanced susceptibility to radiation-induced medulloblastoma in newborn Ptch1⁺/⁻ mice after paternal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Paris, Lorena; Giardullo, Paola; Leonardi, Simona; Tanno, Barbara; Meschini, Roberta; Cordelli, Eugenia; Benassi, Barbara; Longobardi, Maria Grazia; Izzotti, Alberto; Pulliero, Alessandra; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    The hypothesis of transgenerational induction of increased cancer susceptibility after paternal radiation exposure has long been controversial because of inconsistent results and the lack of a mechanistic interpretation. Here, exploiting Ptch1 heterozygous knockout mice, susceptible to spontaneous and radiation-induced medulloblastoma, we show that exposure of paternal germ cells to 1 Gy X-rays, at the spermatogonial stage, increased by a considerable 1.4-fold the offspring susceptibility to medulloblastoma induced by neonatal irradiation. This effect gained further biological significance thanks to a number of supporting data on the immunohistochemical characterization of the target tissue and preneoplastic lesions (PNLs). These results altogether pointed to increased proliferation of cerebellar granule cell precursors and PNLs cells, which favoured the development of frank tumours. The LOH analysis of tumor DNA showed Ptch1 biallelic loss in all tumor samples, suggesting that mechanisms other than interstitial deletions, typical of radiation-induced medulloblastoma, did not account for the observed increased cancer risk. This data was supported by comet analysis showing no differences in DNA damage induction and repair in cerebellar cells as a function of paternal irradiation. Finally, we provide biological plausibility to our results offering evidence of a possible epigenetic mechanism of inheritance based on radiation-induced changes of the microRNA profile of paternal sperm. PMID:26452034

  13. Parasitism by the endoparasitoid, Cotesia flavipes induces cellular immunosuppression and enhances susceptibility of the sugar cane borer, Diatraea saccharalis to Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A M A; De Luna-Santillana, E J; Rodríguez-Perez, M A

    2011-01-01

    Cotesia flavipes Cameron (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). The aim of this research was to analyze cellular immunosuppression of D. saccharalis parasitized by C. flavipes in terms of encapsulation, melanization, and hemocyte nodule formation. The encapsulation assay was done 1 and 6 days after parasitoid oviposition. In addition, the susceptibility of parasitized and nonparasitzed larvae to Bacillus thuringiensis HD 73 strain was assessed. 3, 12, and 24 h after bead injection; the percentages of encapsulation were significantly higher in unparasitized larvae compared to larvae parasitized 1 and 6 days after oviposition. Interestingly, there was a significant reduction in numbers of beads encapsulated at 1 day after oviposition compared to 6 days, and unparasitized larvae. The percentage of melanized beads decreased significantly in parasitized larvae compared to control. There was a reduction in the number of nodules in parasitized larvae compared to unparasitized controls. Larvae that were injected with polyndavirus 24 h before beads were injected showed significantly reduced encapsulation responses relative to control larvae. The D. saccharalis parasitized by C. flavipes exhibited higher susceptibility to B. thuringiensis. These results suggest that parasitization induced host immunosuppression, and the immunosuppression factors could impair the defense capacity against microbial pathogens--causing an increase in pathogen susceptibility. PMID:22225507

  14. Kinetics and mechanics of clot contraction are governed by the molecular and cellular composition of the blood.

    PubMed

    Tutwiler, Valerie; Litvinov, Rustem I; Lozhkin, Andrey P; Peshkova, Alina D; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Spiller, Kara L; Cines, Douglas B; Weisel, John W

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-driven blood clot contraction (retraction) is thought to promote wound closure and secure hemostasis while preventing vascular occlusion. Notwithstanding its importance, clot contraction remains a poorly understood process, partially because of the lack of methodology to quantify its dynamics and requirements. We used a novel automated optical analyzer to continuously track in vitro changes in the size of contracting clots in whole blood and in variously reconstituted samples. Kinetics of contraction was complemented with dynamic rheometry to characterize the viscoelasticity of contracting clots. This combined approach enabled investigation of the coordinated mechanistic impact of platelets, including nonmuscle myosin II, red blood cells (RBCs), fibrin(ogen), factor XIIIa (FXIIIa), and thrombin on the kinetics and mechanics of the contraction process. Clot contraction is composed of 3 sequential phases, each characterized by a distinct rate constant. Thrombin, Ca(2+), the integrin αIIbβ3, myosin IIa, FXIIIa cross-linking, and platelet count all promote 1 or more phases of the clot contraction process. In contrast, RBCs impair contraction and reduce elasticity, while increasing the overall contractile stress generated by the platelet-fibrin meshwork. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which blood cells, fibrin(ogen), and platelet-fibrin interactions modulate clot contraction may generate novel approaches to reveal and to manage thrombosis and hemostatic disorders. PMID:26603837

  15. The Plant Membrane-Associated REMORIN1.3 Accumulates in Discrete Perihaustorial Domains and Enhances Susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Richardson, Annis; Dagdas, Yasin F.; Mongrand, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous pathogens such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans infect plants by developing specialized structures termed haustoria inside the host cells. Haustoria are thought to enable the secretion of effector proteins into the plant cells. Haustorium biogenesis, therefore, is critical for pathogen accommodation in the host tissue. Haustoria are enveloped by a specialized host-derived membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which is distinct from the plant plasma membrane. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the EHM are unknown. Remarkably, several plasma membrane-localized proteins are excluded from the EHM, but the remorin REM1.3 accumulates around P. infestans haustoria. Here, we used overexpression, colocalization with reporter proteins, and superresolution microscopy in cells infected by P. infestans to reveal discrete EHM domains labeled by REM1.3 and the P. infestans effector AVRblb2. Moreover, SYNAPTOTAGMIN1, another previously identified perihaustorial protein, localized to subdomains that are mainly not labeled by REM1.3 and AVRblb2. Functional characterization of REM1.3 revealed that it is a susceptibility factor that promotes infection by P. infestans. This activity, and REM1.3 recruitment to the EHM, require the REM1.3 membrane-binding domain. Our results implicate REM1.3 membrane microdomains in plant susceptibility to an oomycete pathogen. PMID:24808104

  16. High levels of fish oil enhance neutrophil development and activation and influence colon mucus barrier function in a genetically susceptible mouse model.

    PubMed

    Duriancik, David M; Comstock, Sarah S; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2015-11-01

    Dietary fatty acids influence immunologic homeostasis, but their effect on initiation of colitis, an immune-mediated disease, is not well established. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that high doses of dietary fish oil (FO) increased colon inflammation and dysplasia in a model of infection-induced colitis. In the current study, we assessed the effects of high-dose dietary FO, 6% by weight, on colon inflammation, neutrophil recruitment and function, and mucus layer integrity in a genetically susceptible, colitis-prone mouse model in the absence of infection. FO-fed SMAD3(-/-) mice had increased colon inflammation evidenced by increased numbers of systemic and local neutrophils and increased neutrophil chemoattractant and inflammatory cytokine gene expression in the colon. Mucus layer thickness in the cecum and goblet cell numbers in the cecum and colon in FO-fed mice were reduced compared to control. FO consumption affected colitis in male and female mice differently. Compared to female control mice, neutrophils from FO-fed female mice had reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon ex vivo stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate while FO-fed male mice produced increased ROS compared to control-fed male mice. In summary, dietary FO impaired mucus layer integrity and was associated with colon inflammation characterized by increased neutrophil numbers and altered neutrophil function. High-dose FO may have detrimental effects in populations genetically susceptible for inflammatory bowel disease and these effects may differ between males and females. PMID:26297475

  17. The microscale evolution of the erosion front of blood clots exposed to ultrasound stimulated microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Christopher N; Leung, Ben Y C; Goertz, David E

    2016-05-01

    Serial two-photon microscopy of blood clots with fluorescently tagged fibrin networks was conducted during microbubble-mediated sonothrombolysis to examine the microscale evolution of the resulting erosion front. The development of a complex zonal erosion pattern was observed, comprised of a cell depleted layer of fibrin network overlying intact clot which then underwent progressive recession. The fibrin zone architecture was dependent on exposure conditions with 0.1 MPa causing no erosion, 0.39 MPa resulting in homogenous structure, and combination 0.39/0.96 MPa pulses forming large-scale tunnels. High speed imaging and Coulter counter data indicated the fibrin zone formation process involves the ejection of intact erythrocytes. PMID:27250198

  18. A very-high-density lipoprotein with clotting ability from hemolymph of sand crayfish, Ibacus ciliatus.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, M; Ando, S

    1998-03-01

    A very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) with a density of 1.27-1.29 g/ml was the most abundant lipoprotein in the hemolymph of the sand crayfish Ibacus ciliatus. The VHDL isolated by a density gradient ultracentrifugation consisted of 94% protein and 6% lipid reflecting its high density, and phospholipid was a predominant lipid component. The VHDL had an apolipoprotein of molecular mass 195 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was identified as follows: LQPGLEYQYRYNGRVAA. This sequence was similar to those of clotting proteins from the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus and the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. Transglutaminase and Ca2+ also induced the VHDL to clot. Considering large amounts of VHDL in the hemolymph of sand crayfish, the VHDL not only functions as lipid carrier but plays an important role in the defense process of crustacea. PMID:9571775

  19. Difficult Ventilation After Successful Intubation in the Emergency Setting due to a Ball Valve Clot.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Justin S; Weigel, Wade; Neal, Joseph M

    2016-05-15

    The inability to ventilate a patient after successful intubation is a rare but emergent situation and may be caused by obstruction of the endotracheal tube, bilateral tension pneumothorax, esophageal intubation, severe bronchospasm, or mainstem bronchus intubation. We describe an increase in mean airway pressure, inability to ventilate, and loss of cardiac output secondary to a blood clot acting as a ball valve at the end of an endotracheal tube. PMID:26934604

  20. Adhesins of Leptospira interrogans Mediate the Interaction to Fibrinogen and Inhibit Fibrin Clot Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rosane; Domingos, Renan F.; Siqueira, Gabriela H.; Fernandes, Luis G.; Souza, Natalie M.; Vieira, Monica L.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Nascimento, Ana L. T. O.

    2013-01-01

    We report in this work that Leptospira strains, virulent L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni, attenuated L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni and saprophytic L. biflexa serovar Patoc are capable of binding fibrinogen (Fg). The interaction of leptospires with Fg inhibits thrombin- induced fibrin clot formation that may affect the haemostatic equilibrium. Additionally, we show that plasminogen (PLG)/plasmin (PLA) generation on the surface of Leptospira causes degradation of human Fg. The data suggest that PLA-coated leptospires were capable to employ their proteolytic activity to decrease one substrate of the coagulation cascade. We also present six leptospiral adhesins and PLG- interacting proteins, rLIC12238, Lsa33, Lsa30, OmpL1, rLIC11360 and rLIC11975, as novel Fg-binding proteins. The recombinant proteins interact with Fg in a dose-dependent and saturable fashion when increasing protein concentration was set to react to a fix human Fg concentration. The calculated dissociation equilibrium constants (KD) of these reactions ranged from 733.3±276.8 to 128±89.9 nM for rLIC12238 and Lsa33, respectively. The interaction of recombinant proteins with human Fg resulted in inhibition of fibrin clot by thrombin-catalyzed reaction, suggesting that these versatile proteins could mediate Fg interaction in Leptospira. Our data reveal for the first time the inhibition of fibrin clot by Leptospira spp. and presents adhesins that could mediate these interactions. Decreasing fibrin clot would cause an imbalance of the coagulation cascade that may facilitate bleeding and help bacteria dissemination PMID:24009788

  1. Investigation of adverse effects of interactions between herbal drugs and natural blood clotting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adhyapak, M S; Kachole, M S

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the world, herbal medicines are consumed by most of the patients without considering their adverse effects. Many herbal medicines/plant extracts have been reported to interact with the natural blood clotting system. In continuation to this effort, thirty medicinal plant extracts were allowed to interact with citrated human blood and the clotting time was measured after re-calcification in vitro using Lee and White method. The aq. leaf ext. of Syzygium cumini and Camellia sinensis significantly prolonged the clotting time. In response to the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests, the ext. of C. sinensis showed normal APTT and marginally prolonged the PT to 16.7 s (control-15.2 s) while S. cumini showed normal PT but significantly prolonged the APTT to 66.9 s (control-20.7 s). This suggests that, C. sinensis acts on the extrinsic pathway while S. cumini on the intrinsic pathway. There are some common herbal formulations that are frequently used by the patients which contain above plant materials, like, Syzygium cumin in anti-diabetic formulations, while the ext. of C. sinensis is consumed frequently as beverage in many part of the world. Hence, patients having known bleeding tendency or haemophilia disease should take into account the interaction potential of these plants with the natural blood clotting system while taking herbal formulations containing above plants; specially, the patients suffering from intrinsic pathway factor deficiency should keep a limit on the consumption of S. cumini while extrinsic pathway factor deficiency patients should limit C. sinensis. Also, the medical practitioners should consider the patient's food consumption history before doing any major surgical procedures. PMID:26340850

  2. Fluorescent in situ hybridization in routinely processed bone marrow aspirate clot and core biopsy sections.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, R. N.; Mark, H. F.; Medeiros, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a technique which complements conventional cytogenetic banding analysis by allowing the evaluation of cells in interphase as well as metaphase. This technique has been used to study air-dried peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate smears. We have applied the FISH technique to study routinely processed sections of bone marrow aspirate clot and decalcified core biopsy specimens, fixed in either formalin or B5 and embedded in paraffin. We evaluated 28 specimens (8 aspirate clot and 20 core biopsy sections) for chromosome 8 copy number, studied previously by conventional cytogenetics, and found the following distribution: 15 with disomy, 11 with trisomy, and 2 with tetrasomy. Using a chromosome 8 alpha-satellite probe, we detected fluorescent hybridization signals in 18 of 28 specimens (64%); 6 of 8 (75%) aspirate clot sections, and 12 of 20 (60%) core biopsy sections. Ten of 13 (77%) B5-fixed and 8 of 15 (53%) formalin-fixed specimens had hybridizing signals. Specimen age was a significant factor; 10 of 11 (91%) specimens processed within the last 6 months showed signals, in contrast with 8 of 17 (47%) specimens older than 6 months. In the positive specimens, 200 cells were analyzed in areas where individual cells could be identified. In the disomic specimens, two signals per cell were seen in 34 to 66% of the cells. Rare cells (0-2%) with three signals were detected. In the trisomic specimens, three signals per cell were seen in 19 to 46% of the cells. In the tetrasomic specimens, four signals per cell were seen in 15 to 25% of the cells. We conclude that the FISH technique may be useful in the detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities such as trisomy and tetrasomy 8 in routinely processed bone marrow aspirate clot and decalcified core biopsy sections. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7992836

  3. Characterization of the Threshold Response of Initiation of Blood Clotting to Stimulus Patch Size

    PubMed Central

    Kastrup, Christian J.; Shen, Feng; Runyon, Matthew K.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2007-01-01

    This article demonstrates that the threshold response of initiation of blood clotting to the size of a patch of stimulus is a robust phenomenon under a wide range of conditions and follows a simple scaling relationship based on the Damköhler number. Human blood and plasma were exposed to surfaces patterned with patches presenting clotting stimuli using microfluidics. Perturbations of the complex network of hemostasis, including temperature, variations in the concentration of stimulus (tissue factor), and the absence or inhibition of individual components of the network (factor IIa, factor V, factor VIII, and thrombomodulin), did not affect the existence of this response. A scaling relationship between the threshold patch size and the timescale of reaction for clotting was supported in numerical simulations, a simple chemical model system, and experiments with human blood plasma. These results may be useful for understanding the spatiotemporal dynamics of other autocatalytic systems and emphasize the relevance of clustering of proteins and lipids in the regulation of signaling processes. PMID:17586576

  4. Bioinformatic Characterization of Genes and Proteins Involved in Blood Clotting in Lampreys.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F

    2015-10-01

    Lampreys and hagfish are the earliest diverging of extant vertebrates and are obvious targets for investigating the origins of complex biochemical systems found in mammals. Currently, the simplest approach for such inquiries is to search for the presence of relevant genes in whole genome sequence (WGS) assemblies. Unhappily, in the past a high-quality complete genome sequence has not been available for either lampreys or hagfish, precluding the possibility of proving gene absence. Recently, improved but still incomplete genome assemblies for two species of lamprey have been posted, and, taken together with an extensive collection of short sequences in the NCBI trace archive, they have made it possible to make reliable counts for specific gene families. Particularly, a multi-source tactic has been used to study the lamprey blood clotting system with regard to the presence and absence of genes known to occur in higher vertebrates. As was suggested in earlier studies, lampreys lack genes for coagulation factors VIII and IX, both of which are critical for the "intrinsic" clotting system and responsible for hemophilia in humans. On the other hand, they have three each of genes for factors VII and X, participants in the "extrinsic" clotting system. The strategy of using raw trace sequence "reads" together with partial WGS assemblies for lampreys can be used in studies on the early evolution of other biochemical systems in vertebrates. PMID:26437661

  5. Continuous production of cheese by immobilized milk-clotting protease from aspergillus niger MC4

    PubMed

    Channe; Shewale

    1998-11-01

    Milk clotting protease from Aspergillus niger MC4 immobilized on glycidyl methacrylate-pentaerythritol triacrylate copolymer GP4 was used for continuous production of cheese using a packed bed reactor. Factors affecting the hydrolysis of kappa-casein and clot formation were studied. Acidified milk (pH 5.8) preincubated at 37 degreesC when passed through the column at a flow rate of 80 mL/min attained the required degree of hydrolysis of kappa-casein for the coagulation in a single pass. Fortification of the hydrolyzed milk with CaCl2 and FeCl3 to a final concentration of 0.01 and 0.02 M, respectively, and incubation of fortified milk at 60 degreesC for 2 h resulted in a hard cake of cheese. The yield of raw cheese was 28 g/100 mL of milk. The immobilized milk-clotting protease was used for 60 days (8 h/day) without any loss in productivity. PMID:9841651

  6. Thrombin and fibrinogen γ' impact clot structure by marked effects on intrafibrillar structure and protofibril packing.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Marco M; Macrae, Fraser L; Duval, Cédric; McPherson, Helen R; Bridge, Katherine I; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Ridger, Victoria C; Connell, Simon D; Philippou, Helen; Ariëns, Robert A S

    2016-01-28

    Previous studies have shown effects of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' on clot structure. However, structural information was obtained using electron microscopy, which requires sample dehydration. Our aim was to investigate the role of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' in modulating fibrin structure under fully hydrated conditions. Fibrin fibers were studied using turbidimetry, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and magnetic tweezers in purified and plasma solutions. Increased thrombin induced a pronounced decrease in average protofibril content per fiber, with a relatively minor decrease in fiber size, leading to the formation of less compact fiber structures. Atomic force microscopy under fully hydrated conditions confirmed that fiber diameter was only marginally decreased. Decreased protofibril content of the fibers produced by high thrombin resulted in weakened clot architecture as analyzed by magnetic tweezers in purified systems and by thromboelastometry in plasma and whole blood. Fibers produced with fibrinogen γ' showed reduced protofibril packing over a range of thrombin concentrations. High-magnification electron microscopy demonstrated reduced protofibril packing in γ' fibers and unraveling of fibers into separate protofibrils. Decreased protofibril packing was confirmed in plasma for high thrombin concentrations and fibrinogen-deficient plasma reconstituted with γ' fibrinogen. These findings demonstrate that, in fully hydrated conditions, thrombin and fibrinogen γ' have dramatic effects on protofibril content and that protein density within fibers correlates with strength of the fibrin network. We conclude that regulation of protofibril content of fibers is an important mechanism by which thrombin and fibrinogen γ' modulate fibrin clot structure and strength. PMID:26608329

  7. Blood Clot Formation Does Not Affect Metastasis Formation or Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rossnagl, Stephanie; von Au, Anja; Vasel, Matthaeus; Cecchini, arco G.; Nakchbandi, Inaam A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is associated with increased fracture risk, due either to metastasis or associated osteoporosis. After a fracture, blood clots form. Because proteins of the coagulation cascade and activated platelets promote cancer development, a fracture in patients with cancer often raises the question whether it is a pathologic fracture or whether the fracture itself might promote the formation of metastatic lesions. We therefore examined whether blood clot formation results in increased metastasis in a murine model of experimental breast cancer metastasis. For this purpose, a clot was surgically induced in the bone marrow of the left tibia of immundeficient mice. Either one minute prior to or five minutes after clot induction, human cancer cells were introduced in the circulation by intracardiac injection. The number of cancer cells that homed to the intervention site was determined by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Metastasis formation and longitudinal growth were evaluated by bioluminescence imaging. The number of cancer cells that homed to the intervention site after 24 hours was similar to the number of cells in the opposite tibia that did not undergo clot induction. This effect was confirmed using two more cancer cell lines. Furthermore, no difference in the number of macroscopic lesions or their growth could be detected. In the control group 72% developed a lesion in the left tibia. In the experimental groups with clot formation 79% and 65% developed lesions in the left tibia (p = ns when comparing each experimental group with the controls). Survival was similar too. In summary, the growth factors accumulating in a clot/hematoma are neither enough to promote cancer cell homing nor support growth in an experimental model of breast cancer bone metastasis. This suggests that blood clot formation, as occurs in traumatic fractures, surgical interventions, and bruises, does not increase the risk of metastasis formation. PMID:24740307

  8. Anti-PF4/heparin antibodies associated with repeated hemofiltration-filter clotting: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lasocki, Sigismond; Piednoir, Pascale; Ajzenberg, Nadine; Geffroy, Arnaud; Benbara, Abdel; Montravers, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is an immune-mediated adverse drug reaction that is associated with a procoagulant state and both arterial and venous thrombosis. After observing two cases of repeated hemofiltration-filter clotting associated with high anti-PF4/heparin antibody concentrations, we systematically measured the anti-PF4/heparin antibody concentration in all cases of unexpected and repeated hemofiltration-filter clotting during continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH). The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with positive anti-PF4/heparin antibody in the case of repeated hemofiltration-filter clotting. Methods We reviewed the charts of all patients who had an anti-PF4/heparin antibody assay performed for repeated hemofiltration-filter clotting between November 2004 and May 2006 in our surgical intensive care unit. We used an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (heparin-platelet factor 4-induced antibody) with an optical density (OD) of greater than 1 IU considered positive. Results During the study period, anti-PF4/heparin antibody assay was performed in 28 out of 87 patients receiving CVVH. Seven patients were positive for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies (OD 2.00 [1.36 to 2.22] IU) and 21 were antibody-negative (OD 0.20 [0.10 to 0.32] IU). Baseline characteristics, platelet counts, and activated partial thromboplastin time ratios were not different between the two groups. CVVH duration was significantly decreased in antibody-positive patients (5.0 [2.5 to 7.5] versus 12.0 [7.5 to 24.0] hours; P = 0.007) as was CVVH efficiency (urea reduction ratio 17% [10% to 37%] versus 44% [30% to 52%]; P = 0.04) on heparin infusion. Anti-PF4/heparin antibody concentration was inversely correlated with CVVH duration. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that a 6-hour cutoff was the best CVVH session duration to predict a positive antibody test (sensitivity 71%, specificity 85%, and area under the curve 0.83). CVVH duration

  9. Blood clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... the tissues in that area. This is called ischemia. If ischemia is not treated promptly, it can lead to ... Heart (angina or a heart attack) Intestines ( mesenteric ischemia ) or mesenteric venous thrombosis Kidneys ( renal vein thrombosis ) ...

  10. Blood clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal vein thrombosis ) Leg or arm arteries Legs ( deep vein thrombosis ) Lungs ( pulmonary embolism ) Neck or brain (stroke) Alternative ... Read More Angina Arterial embolism Atheroembolic renal disease Deep vein thrombosis Hardening of the arteries Heart attack Limb plethysmography ...

  11. Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... and webinars ASH Image Bank Educational Web-based library of hematologic imagery In This Section: Resources for Clinicians Resources for Trainees Resources for Educators Resources for Patients Resources for Industry Professionals View all Guidelines & Quality Care Resources to ...

  12. Apolipoprotein E receptor-2 deficiency enhances macrophage susceptibility to lipid accumulation and cell death to augment atherosclerotic plaque progression and necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Waltmann, Meaghan D.; Basford, Joshua E.; Konaniah, Eddy S.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Hui, David Y.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have linked LRP8 polymorphisms to premature coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in humans. However, the mechanisms by which dysfunctions of apolipoprotein E receptor-2 (apoER2), the protein encoded by LRP8 gene, influence atherosclerosis have not been elucidated completely. The current study focused on the role of apoER2 in macrophages, a cell type that plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Results showed that apoER2-deficient mouse macrophages accumulated more lipids and were more susceptible to oxidized LDL (oxLDL)-induced death compared to control cells. Consistent with these findings, apoER2 deficient macrophages also displayed defective serum-induced Akt activation and higher levels of the pro-apoptotic protein phosphorylated p53. Furthermore, the expression and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) was increased in apoER2-deficient macrophages. Deficiency of apoER2 in hypercholesterolemic LDL receptor-null mice (Lrp8−/−Ldlr−/− mice) also resulted in accelerated atherosclerosis with more complex lesions and extensive lesion necrosis compared to Lrp8+/+Ldlr−/− mice. The atherosclerotic plaques of Lrp8−/−Ldlr−/− mice displayed significantly higher levels of p53-positive macrophages, indicating that the apoER2-deficient macrophages contribute to the accelerated atherosclerotic lesion necrosis observed in these animals. Taken together, this study indicates that apoER2 in macrophages limits PPARγ expression and protects against oxLDL-induced cell death. Thus, abnormal apoER2 functions in macrophages may at least in part contribute to the premature coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in humans with LRP8 polymorphisms. Moreover, the elevated PPARγ expression in apoER2-deficient macrophages suggests that LRP8 polymorphism may be a genetic modifier of cardiovascular risk with PPARγ therapy. PMID:24840660

  13. Impact of experimental haemodilution on platelet function, thrombin generation and clot firmness: effects of different coagulation factor concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Caballo, Carolina; Escolar, Gines; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Lopez-Vílchez, Irene; Lozano, Miguel; Cid, Joan; Pino, Marcos; Beltrán, Joan; Basora, Misericordia; Pereira, Arturo; Galan, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Haemodilution during resuscitation after massive haemorrhage may worsen the coagulopathy and perpetuate bleeding. Materials and methods Blood samples from healthy donors were diluted (30 and-60%) using crystalloids (saline, Ringer’s lactate, PlasmalyteTM) or colloids (6% hydroxyethylstarch [HES130/0.4], 5% human albumin, and gelatin). The effects of haemodilution on platelet adhesion (Impact R), thrombin generation (TG), and thromboelastometry (TEM) parameters were analysed as were the effects of fibrinogen, prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), activated recombinant factor VII (FVIIa), and cryoprecipates on haemodilution. Results Platelet interactions was already significantly reduced at 30% haemodilution. Platelet reactivity was not improved by addition of any of the concentrates tested. A decrease in TG and marked alterations of TEM parameters were noted at 60% haemodilution. HES130/0.4 was the expander with the most deleterious action. TG was significantly enhanced by PCC whereas rFVIIa only caused a mild acceleration of TG initiation. Fibrinogen restored the alterations of TEM parameters caused by haemodilution including those caused by HES 130/0.4. Cryoprecipitates significantly improved the alterations caused by haemodilution on TG and TEM parameters; the effects on TG disappeared after ultracentrifugation of the cryoprecipitates. Discussion The haemostatic alterations caused by haemodilution are multifactorial and affect both blood cells and coagulation. In our in vitro approach, HES 130/0.4 had the most deleterious effect on haemostasis parameters. Coagulation factor concentrates did not improve platelet interactions in the Impact R, but did have favourable effects on coagulation parameters measured by TG and TEM. Fibrinogen notably improved TEM parameters without increasing thrombin generation, suggesting that this concentrate may help to preserve blood clotting abilities during haemodilution without enhancing the prothrombotic risk. PMID

  14. Computational Study of Thrombus Formation and Clotting Factor Effects under Venous Flow Conditions.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Vijay; Rakesh, Vineet; Reifman, Jaques; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y

    2016-04-26

    A comprehensive understanding of thrombus formation as a physicochemical process that has evolved to protect the integrity of the human vasculature is critical to our ability to predict and control pathological states caused by a malfunctioning blood coagulation system. Despite numerous investigations, the spatial and temporal details of thrombus growth as a multicomponent process are not fully understood. Here, we used computational modeling to investigate the temporal changes in the spatial distributions of the key enzymatic (i.e., thrombin) and structural (i.e., platelets and fibrin) components within a growing thrombus. Moreover, we investigated the interplay between clot structure and its mechanical properties, such as hydraulic resistance to flow. Our model relied on the coupling of computational fluid dynamics and biochemical kinetics, and was validated using flow-chamber data from a previous experimental study. The model allowed us to identify the distinct patterns characterizing the spatial distributions of thrombin, platelets, and fibrin accumulating within a thrombus. Our modeling results suggested that under the simulated conditions, thrombin kinetics was determined predominantly by prothrombinase. Furthermore, our simulations showed that thrombus resistance imparted by fibrin was ∼30-fold higher than that imparted by platelets. Yet, thrombus-mediated bloodflow occlusion was driven primarily by the platelet deposition process, because the height of the platelet accumulation domain was approximately twice that of the fibrin accumulation domain. Fibrinogen supplementation in normal blood resulted in a nonlinear increase in thrombus resistance, and for a supplemented fibrinogen level of 48%, the thrombus resistance increased by ∼2.7-fold. Finally, our model predicted that restoring the normal levels of clotting factors II, IX, and X while simultaneously restoring fibrinogen (to 88% of its normal level) in diluted blood can restore fibrin generation to

  15. Temporal variations in plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and clotting factor activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Kamali, F; Edwards, C; Wood, P; Wynne, H A; Kesteven, P

    2001-11-01

    There is no information available on temporal variability in plasma vitamin K concentrations and its relationship to coagulation processes. We investigated the possible existence of temporal changes in plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and activity of clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X and relationships between these variables. Plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and clotting factor activity were measured at four-hour intervals for 28 hours in a group of healthy volunteers. Temporal variations existed in plasma vitamin K concentrations, with a mean maximum at 22:00 hr and a mean minimum (32% of the maximum) at 10:00 hr. Plasma triglycerol concentrations mirrored the changes in vitamin K concentrations. Mean factor VII activity was positively correlated with mean total plasma cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.714; P < 0.0001) and with mean plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.461; P < 0.0001). No distinct correlations were found between plasma vitamin K concentrations and either high density lipoprotein (HDL) or LDL cholesterol concentrations, or between triglycerol, HDL, or LDL cholesterol concentrations and functional activity of factors II, IX, and X. Plasma vitamin K concentrations did not correlate with the functional activity of any of the clotting factors. The presence of a correlation between plasma cholesterol concentrations and factor VII activity for blood samples collected at four-hour intervals suggests that plasma cholesterol concentrations may have a more acute effect on factor VII activity. Temporal variations in plasma vitamin K concentrations indicate that a single time point measurement may be an inappropriate method of establishing vitamin K status in an individual. PMID:11754396

  16. Sensitivity of blood-clotting factors and digestive enzymes to inhibition by organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Quistad, G B; Casida, J E

    2000-01-01

    Organophosphorus pesticide toxicology is normally evaluated in relation to inhibition of cholinesterases (acetyl and butyryl), neuropathy target esterase, and carboxylesterases, with less attention given to other physiologically important hydrolases. This study considers the relative organophosphate sensitivities of the aforementioned serine hydrolases compared with purified blood-clotting factors (thrombin, plasmin, and kallikrein) and digestive enzymes (alpha-chymotrypsin, trypsin, and elastase), assayed under similar conditions. Inhibitors that we examined are organophosphorus insecticides or their activated metabolites (paraoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon, and profenofos) and other toxicants (phenyl saligenin cyclic phosphonate and tribufos) for comparison with values that are found in the literature for the fluorophosphonates (isoflurophate and sarin). Thrombin is the most sensitive blood-clotting factor with IC-50 values of 19 to 160 microM for tribufos, the cyclic phosphonate, isoflurophate, and profenofos; plasmin and kallikrein are less affected (IC-50 >100 microM). Alpha-Chymotrypsin, trypsin, and elastase are most sensitive to the cyclic phosphonate (IC-50 1.3-15 microM) and less so to isoflurophate, sarin, and profenofos (IC-50 values from 3.6 to greater than 100 microM). The cholinesterases, carboxylesterase, and neuropathy target esterase are the most sensitive to inhibition with IC-50 values for the insecticides of less than 0.001 to 0.6, 0.002 to 0.009, and 0.15 to 100 microM, respectively. The generally low potency of these organophosphates for blood-clotting factors and digestive enzymes suggests that associated toxic effects are unlikely at sublethal doses. PMID:10561082

  17. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Blood Flow: Non-Newtonian Rheology and Clotting Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouared, Rafik; Chopard, Bastien

    2005-10-01

    The numerical simulation of thrombosis in stented aneurysms is an important issue to estimate the efficiency of a stent. In this paper, we consider a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) approach to bloodflow modeling and we implement a non-Newtonian correction in order to reproduce more realistic flow profiles. We obtain a good agreement between simulations and Casson's model of blood rheology in a simple geometry. Finally we discuss how, by using a passive scalar suspension model with aggregation on top of the LB dynamics, we can describe the clotting processes in the aneurysm

  18. Changes to the structure of blood clots formed in the presence of fine particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metassan, Sofian; Ariens, Robert A. S.; Scott, D. Julian; Routledge, Michael N.

    2009-02-01

    Both long-term and short-term exposure (one to two hours) to particulate matter are associated with morbidity and mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases. The underlying mechanisms leading to cardiovascular events are unclear, however, changes to blood coagulability upon exposure to ultrafine particulate matter (UFPM, the smallest of which can enter the circulation) is a plausible mechanism. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the direct effects of particulate matter on fibrin polymerization, lateral aggregation and the formation of fibrin network structure. Methods: Standard Urban Particulate Matter (PM) was suspended in Tris buffer centrifuged and filtered with <200nm filter to obtain ultrafine PM or their water-soluble components. Purified normal fibrinogen was made to clot by adding thrombin and calcium chloride in the presence of varying concentrations of PM. Permeation properties (Darcy constant [Ks]) and turbidity of clots were measured to investigate the effects on flow-rate, pore size, and fibrin polymerization. In addition, confocal microscopy was performed to study detailed clot structure. Results: Total PM increased the Ks of clots in a dose dependant manner (Ks = 4.4, 6.9 and 13.2 x 10-9 cm2 for 0, 50 and 100 |ag/ml total PM concentrations, respectively). Filtered PM also produced a significant increase in Ks at PM concentration of 17 |ag/ml. Final turbidity measurements at 20min were obtained for varying concentrations of PM. Maximum optical density (OD) for 1 mg/ml fibrinogen at 0, 50, 100 and 200 |ag/ml total PM concentrations were 0.39, 0.42, 0.45 and 0.46, respectively. The maximum OD for 0, 17, 34 and 68 |ag/ml filtered PM concentrations were 0.39, 0.42 0.47 and 0.51, respectively, suggesting an increase in fibre diameter with increasing particulate concentration. The lag phase was significantly shorter and the rate of polymerisation was significantly faster in the presence of 68 |ag/ml filtered PM. Confocal microscopy results showed

  19. Continuous and semi-continuous cell culture for production of blood clotting factors.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sunil G

    2015-11-10

    Recombinant clotting factors are important biotherapeutics that Pfizer has produced and marketed for over fifteen years. Owing to the complexity of the structure and function of these blood factors, it can be challenging to achieve the required product quality and manufacturing productivity. The article highlights the semi-continuous and continuous cell culture processes employed by Pfizer for the production of BeneFIX and ReFacto AF. The benefits of such processes, the challenges of maintaining an aseptic production culture for extended periods, and batch definition are discussed in this article. PMID:25738489

  20. Cryptogenic left main thrombosis: successful mechanical clot retrieval with a self-expanding trapping device.

    PubMed

    Otto, Sylvia; Mayer, Thomas E; Figulla, Hans R

    2014-03-01

    We present the case of a 52-year-old male with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction due to a spontaneous large left main thrombosis, without any angiographic evidence for coronary artery disease. After multiple unsuccessful attempts of thrombaspiration the large clot was mechanically retrieved by a flow restoration device that was primarily made for intracranial interventions. Intravascular ultrasound revealed marginal lumen narrowing after the intervention, but the final coronary angiogram showed a patent left main and there was no relevant stenosis remaining. PMID:23982983

  1. Methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin enhances the susceptibility of human breast cancer cells to carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil: Involvement of Akt, NF-{kappa}B and Bcl-2

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Ankur Kumar; Singh, Sandeep; Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Vijayakumar, Maleppillil Vavachan; Ajay, Amrendra Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar . E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in

    2006-10-15

    The response rates of extensively used chemotherapeutic drugs, carboplatin (Carb) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) are relatively disappointing because of considerable side effects associated with their high-dose regimen. In the present study, we determined whether treatment with a cholesterol depleting agent, methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MCD), enhances the weak efficacy of low doses of Carb or 5-FU in human breast cancer cells. Data demonstrate that pretreatment with MCD significantly potentiates the cytotoxic activity of Carb and 5-FU in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, we explored the molecular basis of enhanced cytotoxicity, and our data revealed that low-dose treatment with these drugs in MCD pretreated cells exhibited significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation, NF-{kappa}B activity and down-regulation in expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, MCD pretreated cells demonstrated an increased intracellular drug accumulation as compared to cells treated with drugs alone. Taken together, our data provide the basis for potential therapeutic application of MCD in combination with other conventional cytotoxic drugs to facilitate reduction of drug dosage that offers a better chemotherapeutic approach with low toxicity.

  2. Pancreaticoduodenectomy using perioperative zymogen protein C to help prevent blood clotting: a trilogy on increased patient safety.

    PubMed

    Bruley, Duane F; Schulick, Richard D; Streiff, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    The blood clotting mechanism is a very important and complex physiologic process. Blood flow must be continuous through the blood vessels to provide essential oxygen and nutrients to the cells of the body. Dr. Melvin H. Knisely (Honorary First President of ISOTT, 1973) named and pioneered research in blood sludging and clotting which led to his nomination for the Nobel Prize by Dr. August Krogh in 1948. Abnormal clotting is a pathological state that can inhibit and prevent normal blood flow, leading to reduced oxygen transport to tissue from the microcirculation. It can result in the death of cells and tissues, including entire organs as well as the patient. Blood clotting and sludging are common occurrences during and after invasive surgery; thus, it is imperative to find safe procedures to reduce or prevent these deadly phenomena. All anticoagulants used today, for clot prevention and dissolution, can cause excessive bleeding that can lead to enormous medical expense to provide control, otherwise causing patient death. Protein C is a natural protein and is the pivotal anticoagulant in the blood. Due to the mechanism of converting the zymogen protein C (ZPC) to active protein C (APC), only when and where it is needed, and their respective half-lives in the body, the natural anticoagulant, antithrombotic characteristics of APC can be utilized without causing bleeds. PMID:23852508

  3. The clot gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a conserved member of the thioredoxin-like protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Giordano, E; Peluso, I; Rendina, R; Digilio, A; Furia, M

    2003-02-01

    The conversion of pyruvoyl-H(4)-pterin to pyrimidodiazepine (PDA), which is an essential step in the biosynthesis of the red components of Drosophila eye pigments known as drosopterins, requires the products of the genes sepia and clot. While the product of sepia has been shown to correspond to the enzyme PDA-synthase, the role of clot remains unknown, although the clot(1) allele was one of the first eye-color mutants to be isolated in Drosophila melanogaster,and much genetic and biochemical data has become available since. Here we report the cloning of the clot gene, describe its molecular organization and characterize the sequence alterations associated with the alleles cl(1) and cl(2). The coding properties of the gene show that it encodes a protein related to the Glutaredoxin class of the Thioredoxin-like enzyme superfamily, conserved members of which are found in human, mouse and plants. We suggest that the Clot protein is an essential component of a glutathione redox system required for the final step in the biosynthetic pathway for drosopterins. PMID:12589444

  4. Excess selenium increases Ca sup ++ -induced clotting times in chicks and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Herz, W.C.; Combs, G.F. Jr. )

    1991-03-11

    Calcium (Ca{sup ++})-induced clotting times (i.e., prothrombin times, PT times) in young White Leghorn chickens and male weanling Sprague Dawley rats were shown to be elevated in animals fed diets for 20-30 days containing excess Se. Clotting times of chicks were prolonged from those of controls in animals fed either deficient or excess Se, although all dietary treatment groups showed comparable concentrations of total plasma protein. Rats showed significantly prolonged PT times when fed Se at either 5 ppm or 10 ppm. The plasma activities of certain enzymes of hepatic origin (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase) in rats fed excess Se were comparable to those of controls, despite the increase in the PT times. Body weights and liver weights were significantly depressed in those animals only at the 10 ppm Se level. These results demonstrate increased PT times in both chicks and rats. In each species, this effect is independent of feed intake and body weight, and is apparent at levels of Se intake that do not affect other indicators of hepatic damage. Therefore, prolonged PT time may be an early indicator of sub-acute selenosis.

  5. Effects of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 on erythrocytes, platelets and clot viscoelasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bester, Janette; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2016-01-01

    Complex interactions exist between cytokines, and the interleukin family plays a fundamental role in inflammation. Particularly circulating IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 are unregulated in systemic and chronic inflammatory conditions. Hypercoagulability is an important hallmark of inflammation, and these cytokines are critically involved in abnormal clot formation, erythrocyte pathology and platelet hyper-activation, and these three cytokines have known receptors on platelets. Although these cytokines are always unregulated in inflammation, we do not know how the individual cytokines act upon the structure of erythrocytes and platelets, and which of the viscoelastic clot parameters are changed. Here we study the effects of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 at low physiological levels, representative of chronic inflammation, by using scanning electron microscopy and thromboelastography. All three interleukins caused the viscoelastic properties to display an increased hypercoagulability of whole blood and pathology of both erythrocytes and platelets. The most pronounced changes were noted where all three cytokines caused platelet hyper-activation and spreading. Erythrocyte structure was notably affected in the presence of IL-8, where the morphological changes resembled that typically seen in eryptosis (programmed cell death). We suggest that erythrocytes and platelets are particularly sensitive to cytokine presence, and that they are excellent health indicators. PMID:27561337

  6. Leptospira interrogans reduces fibrin clot formation by modulating human thrombin activity via exosite I.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luis G; de Morais, Zenaide M; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2015-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Leptospira are the etiological agents of leptospirosis, a disease that affects humans and animals worldwide. Although there are an increasing number of studies on the biology of Leptospira, the mechanisms of pathogenesis are not yet understood. We report in this work that Leptospira interrogans FIOCRUZ L1-130 virulent, M20 culture attenuated and the saprophyte L. biflexa Patoc 1 strains do not bind prothrombin. Leptospiral binding to thrombin was detected with the virulent, followed by culture-attenuated M20, and practically none was observed with the saprophyte strain. The interaction of Leptospira with thrombin mostly occurs via exosite I, with a minor participation of catalytic site, as determined by employing the thrombin inhibitors hirugen, hirudin and argatroban. Leptospira interrogans binding to thrombin inhibits its catalytic activity reducing fibrin clot formation in thrombin-catalyzed reaction of fibrinogen. This inhibition was more efficient with the virulent FIOCRUZ L1-130 than with the M20 culture attenuated, while none was seen with the saprophyte strain, suggesting that this binding might be important for bacterial virulence. This is the first study reporting the binding of pathogenic Leptospira to thrombin promoting a decrease in fibrin clotting that could lead to hemorrhage, helping bacteria dissemination. PMID:25834144

  7. Clot Lysis and Antimitotic Study of Ficus glomerata Roxb Fruit Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Shivasharanappa, Kirankumar; Londonkar, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the thrombolytic and antimitotic potentiality of various extracts of fruits of Ficus glomerata, a traditional medicinal plant, using an in vitro assay method. Three crude extracts such as petroleum ether (FGPE), chloroform (FGCE), and methanol (FGME) were used for the study, with a standard (streptokinase) and negative control (sterile distilled water) to validate the method. The thrombolytic nature of the plant was found significant with methanol extract and chloroform and petroleum ether extracts have recorded mild activity, when compared with the negative control (sterile distilled water). The extracts have shown mild clot lysis, that is, 2.16%, 23.06%, 27.60%, and 47.74% of sterile distilled water, FGPE, FGCE, and FGME, respectively, while the standard (streptokinase) has shown 74.22% clot lysis. FGME inhibited the root growth in number as well as length effectively, followed by FGPE, while FGCE exhibited moderate antimitotic activity and it was supported by mitotic index. Therefore, the obtained results suggest that among all the extracts of plant the methanolic extract has shown highest thrombolytic and antimitotic activity. PMID:25006495

  8. PsoP1, a milk-clotting aspartic peptidase from the basidiomycete fungus Piptoporus soloniensis.

    PubMed

    El-Baky, Hassan Abd; Linke, Diana; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf Günter

    2011-09-28

    The first enzyme of the basidiomycete Piptoporus soloniensis, a peptidase (PsoP1), was characterized after isolation from submerged cultures, purification by fractional precipitation, and preparative native-polyarylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The native molecular mass of PsoP1 was 38 kDa with an isoelectric point of 3.9. Similar to chymosin from milk calves, PsoP1 showed a maximum milk-clotting activity (MCA) at 35-40 °C and was most stable at pH 6 and below 40 °C. The complete inhibition by pepstatin A identified this enzyme as an aspartic peptidase. Electrospray ionization-tandem MS showed an amino acid partial sequence that was more homologous to mammalian milk clotting peptidases than to the chymosin substitute from a fungal species, such as the Zygomycete Mucor miehei. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE patterns, the peptidase cleaved κ-casein in a way similar to chymosin and hydrolyzed β-casein slowly, as it would be expected from an efficient chymosin substitute. PMID:21888369

  9. 3D GRASE pulsed arterial spin labeling at multiple inflow times in patients with long arterial transit times: comparison with dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Steve Z; Madai, Vince I; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Federico C; Mutke, Matthias A; Bauer, Miriam; Herzig, Cornelius X; Hetzer, Stefan; Günther, Matthias; Sobesky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) at multiple inflow times (multi-TIs) is advantageous for the measurement of brain perfusion in patients with long arterial transit times (ATTs) as in steno-occlusive disease, because bolus-arrival-time can be measured and blood flow measurements can be corrected accordingly. Owing to its increased signal-to-noise ratio, a combination with a three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (GRASE) readout allows acquiring a sufficient number of multi-TIs within a clinically feasible acquisition time of 5 minutes. We compared this technique with the clinical standard dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging–magnetic resonance imaging in patients with unilateral stenosis >70% of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery (MCA) at 3 Tesla. We performed qualitative (assessment by three expert raters) and quantitative (region of interest (ROI)/volume of interest (VOI) based) comparisons. In 43 patients, multi-TI PASL-GRASE showed perfusion alterations with moderate accuracy in the qualitative analysis. Quantitatively, moderate correlation coefficients were found for the MCA territory (ROI based: r=0.52, VOI based: r=0.48). In the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory, a readout related right-sided susceptibility artifact impaired correlation (ROI based: r=0.29, VOI based: r=0.34). Arterial transit delay artifacts were found only in 12% of patients. In conclusion, multi-TI PASL-GRASE can correct for arterial transit delay in patients with long ATTs. These results are promising for the transfer of ASL to the clinical practice. PMID:25407272

  10. A Model Incorporating Some of the Mechanical and Biochemical Factors Underlying Clot Formation and Dissolution in Flowing Blood

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anand, M.; Rajagopal, K.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple interacting mechanisms control the formation and dissolution of clots to maintain blood in a state of delicate balance. In addition to a myriad of biochemical reactions, rheological factors also play a crucial role in modulating the response of blood to external stimuli. To date, a comprehensive model for clot formation and dissolution, that takes into account the biochemical, medical and rheological factors, has not been put into place, the existing models emphasizing either one or the other of the factors. In this paper, after discussing the various biochemical, physiologic and rheological factors at some length, we develop a modelmore » for clot formation and dissolution that incorporates many of the relevant crucial factors that have a bearing on the problem. The model, though just a first step towards understanding a complex phenomenon, goes further than previous models in integrating the biochemical, physiologic and rheological factors that come into play.« less

  11. Recurring Extracorporeal Circuit Clotting During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Resolved after Single-Session Therapeutic Plasma Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Fülöp, Tibor; Cosmin, Adrian; Juncos, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a 17 year old white male with multiple fractures and multi-organ failure who developed oliguric acute renal failure requiring continuous renal replacement therapy. Repeated clotting of the extracorporeal circuit (ECC) prevented delivery of a minimally acceptable dose of renal replacement therapy despite adequate anticoagulation and dialysis catheter exchanges. Evaluation for a primary hypercoagulable state was negative, but his fibrinogen was elevated (1,320 mg/dL, normal range: 150–400 mg/dL), likely induced by his severe inflammatory state. A single session of therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) with albumin and normal saline replacement was performed with subsequent drop in fibrinogen to 615 mg/dL. No further episodes of premature ECC clotting occurred, suggesting plasma factor(s) removed may have contributed to the clinical hypercoagulable state. TPE may play an adjunctive role in select cases of recurrent ECC clotting refractory to current anticoagulation techniques. PMID:21618596

  12. Acute small bowel obstruction due to a large intraluminal blood clot after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Green, Jessica; Ikuine, Tomoko; Hacker, Shoshana; Urrego, Hernan; Tuggle, Karleena

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are a known perioperative complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and common etiologies include internal hernia, port site hernia, jejunojejunostomy stricture, ileus and adhesions. Less commonly, SBO can be caused by superior mesenteric artery syndrome, intussusception and intraluminal blood clot. We present a case of SBO caused by intraluminal blood clot from jejunojejunostomy staple line bleeding in a patient with a normal coagulation profile. Computed tomography was used to elucidate the cause of perioperative SBO, and diagnostic laparoscopy was used to both diagnose and treat the complication. In this case, the intraluminal clot was evacuated laparoscopically by enterotomy, thrombectomy and primary closure without anastomotic revision since there was no evidence of continued bleeding. Administration of enoxaparin and Toradol post-operatively may have exacerbated mild intraluminal bleeding occurring at the stapled jejunojejunal anastomosis. Prompt recognition and treatment of perioperative SBO can prevent catastrophic consequences related to bowel perforation. PMID:27554828

  13. Acute small bowel obstruction due to a large intraluminal blood clot after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jessica; Ikuine, Tomoko; Hacker, Shoshana; Urrego, Hernan; Tuggle, Karleena

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are a known perioperative complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and common etiologies include internal hernia, port site hernia, jejunojejunostomy stricture, ileus and adhesions. Less commonly, SBO can be caused by superior mesenteric artery syndrome, intussusception and intraluminal blood clot. We present a case of SBO caused by intraluminal blood clot from jejunojejunostomy staple line bleeding in a patient with a normal coagulation profile. Computed tomography was used to elucidate the cause of perioperative SBO, and diagnostic laparoscopy was used to both diagnose and treat the complication. In this case, the intraluminal clot was evacuated laparoscopically by enterotomy, thrombectomy and primary closure without anastomotic revision since there was no evidence of continued bleeding. Administration of enoxaparin and Toradol post-operatively may have exacerbated mild intraluminal bleeding occurring at the stapled jejunojejunal anastomosis. Prompt recognition and treatment of perioperative SBO can prevent catastrophic consequences related to bowel perforation. PMID:27554828

  14. In Vitro Infectivity Assessment by Drug Susceptibility Comparison of Recombinant Leishmania major Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein or EGFP-Luciferase Fused Genes with Wild-Type Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Seyed, Negar; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad-Hossein; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rafati, Sima; Taheri, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a worldwide uncontrolled parasitic disease due to the lack of effective drug and vaccine. To speed up effective drug development, we need powerful methods to rapidly assess drug effectiveness against the intracellular form of Leishmania in high throughput assays. Reporter gene technology has proven to be an excellent tool for drug screening in vitro. The effects of reporter proteins on parasite infectivity should be identified both in vitro and in vivo. In this research, we initially compared the infectivity rate of recombinant Leishmania major expressing stably enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) alone or EGFP-luciferase (EGFP-LUC) with the wild-type strain. Next, we evaluated the sensitivity of these parasites to amphotericin B (AmB) as a standard drug in 2 parasitic phases, promastigote and amastigote. This comparison was made by MTT and nitric oxide (NO) assay and by quantifying the specific signals derived from reporter genes like EGFP intensity and luciferase activity. To study the amastigote form, both B10R and THP-1 macrophage cell lines were infected in the stationary phase and were exposed to AmB at different time points. Our results clearly revealed that the 3 parasite lines had similar in vitro infectivity rates with comparable parasite-induced levels of NO following interferon-γ/lipopolysaccharide induction. Based on our results we proposed the more reporter gene, the faster and more sensitive evaluation of the drug efficiency. PMID:26323836

  15. Blocking miRNA Biogenesis in Adult Forebrain Neurons Enhances Seizure Susceptibility, Fear Memory, and Food Intake by Increasing Neuronal Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Fiorenza, Anna; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Rovira, Victor; Scandaglia, Marilyn; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio; Barco, Angel

    2016-04-01

    The RNase Dicer is essential for the maturation of most microRNAs, a molecular system that plays an essential role in fine-tuning gene expression. To gain molecular insight into the role of Dicer and the microRNA system in brain function, we conducted 2 complementary RNA-seq screens in the hippocampus of inducible forebrain-restricted Dicer1 mutants aimed at identifying the microRNAs primarily affected by Dicer loss and their targets, respectively. Functional genomics analyses predicted the main biological processes and phenotypes associated with impaired microRNA maturation, including categories related to microRNA biology, signal transduction, seizures, and synaptic transmission and plasticity. Consistent with these predictions, we found that, soon after recombination, Dicer-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated seizure response, enhanced induction of immediate early genes in response to different stimuli, stronger and more stable fear memory, hyperphagia, and increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the long term, we also observed slow and progressive excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Overall, our results indicate that interfering with microRNA biogenesis causes an increase in neuronal responsiveness and disrupts homeostatic mechanisms that protect the neuron against overactivation, which may explain both the initial and late phenotypes associated with the loss of Dicer in excitatory neurons. PMID:25595182

  16. Enhanced efferocytosis by dendritic cells underlies memory T-cell expansion and susceptibility to autoimmune disease in CD300f-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, L; Choi, S-C; Lee, H-N; Murakami, Y; Qi, C-F; Sengottuvelu, M; Voss, O; Krzewski, K; Coligan, J E

    2016-06-01

    Homeostasis requires the immunologically silent clearance of apoptotic cells before they become pro-inflammatory necrotic cells. CD300f (CLM-1) is a phosphatidylserine receptor known to positively regulate efferocytosis by macrophages, and CD300f gene-deficient mice are predisposed to develop a lupus-like disease. Here we show that, in contrast to CD300f function in macrophages, its expression inhibits efferocytosis by DC, and its deficiency leads to enhanced antigen processing and T-cell priming by these DC. The consequences are the expansion of memory T cells and increased ANA levels in aged CD300f-deficient mice, which predispose CD300f-deficient mice to develop an overt autoimmune disease when exposed to an overload of apoptotic cells, or an exacerbated autoimmunity when combined with FcγRIIB deficiency. Thus, our data demonstrates that CD300f helps to maintain immune homeostasis by promoting macrophage clearance of self-antigens, while conversely inhibiting DC uptake and presentation of self-antigens. PMID:26768664

  17. Shaken and stirred: mechanisms of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Gruber, Matthew J.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    The use of ultrasound and microbubbles as an effective adjuvant to thrombolytics has been demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. However, the specific mechanisms of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis (UET) have yet to be elucidated. We present visual observations illustrating two mechanisms of UET: acoustic cavitation and radiation force. An in vitro flow model was developed to observe human whole blood clots exposed to human fresh-frozen plasma, rt-PA (0, 0.32, 1.58, or 3.15 μg/mL), and the ultrasound contrast agent Definity® (2 μL/mL). Intermittent, continuous-wave, ultrasound (120 kHz, 0.44 MPa peak-to-peak pressure) was used to insonify the perfusate. Ultraharmonic (UH) emissions indicative of stable cavitation were monitored with a passive cavitation detector. The clot was observed with an inverted microscope, and images were recorded with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The images were post processed to determine the time-dependent clot diameter and root-mean-square velocity of the clot position. Clot lysis occurred preferentially surrounding large, resonant-sized bubbles undergoing stable oscillations. UH emissions from stable cavitation were found to correlate with the lytic rate. Clots were observed to translate synchronously with the initiation and cessation of the ultrasound exposure. The root-mean-square velocity of the clot correlated with the lytic rate. These data provide visual documentation of stable cavitation activity and radiation force during sub-megahertz sonothrombolysis. The observations of this study suggest that the process of clot lysis is complex, and both stable cavitation and radiation force are mechanistically responsible for this beneficial bioeffect in this in vitro model. PMID:25438846

  18. Adverse impact of fibrin clot inhibitors on intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for superficial bladder tumors.

    PubMed

    Hudson, M A; Yuan, J J; Catalona, W J; Ratliff, T L

    1990-12-01

    Although intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy has proved to be efficacious in the treatment and prophylaxis against tumor recurrence of superficial bladder tumors, its mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. Previous work has suggested that bacillus Calmette-Guerin organisms attach to the matrix protein, fibronectin, during fibrin clot formation at sites of urothelial disruption and that this attachment was required for the antitumor effect of bacillus Calmette-Guerin to be expressed. Furthermore, drugs inhibiting clot formation were found to abrogate the antitumor effect of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy in a murine bladder tumor model. To examine the effect of inhibitors of fibrin clot formation on the results of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy, a retrospective analysis of 149 evaluable patients receiving intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin for superficial bladder tumors was performed. The over-all response rate free of tumor for 29 patients who concomitantly received inhibitors of fibrin clot formation with bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy was 48%, as compared with 67% for 120 patients who were not receiving these medications (p = 0.0655, chi-square). The most striking difference was noted for patients who failed with recurrent superficial disease. Of the patients who received fibrin clot inhibitors during intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy 35% had recurrent superficial tumors compared to only 8% of those who did not receive these drugs during a mean followup of 29.8 plus or minus 11 months (p = 0.005, chi-square). Our study suggests that inhibitors of fibrin clot formation may have an adverse influence on the results of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for superficial bladder tumors. PMID:2231927

  19. Hemostatic, milk clotting and blood stain removal potential of cysteine proteases from Calotropis gigantea (L.) R. Br. Latex

    PubMed Central

    Bindhu, Omana Sukumaran; Singh, Maheshwari Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Plant latex is a natural source of biologically active compounds and several hydrolytic enzymes responsible for their diverse health benefits. Recent past has witnessed substantial progress in understanding their supplementary industrial and pharmaceutical utility. Calotropis gigantea is one of the important latex producing plants belonging to asclepediaceae family with wide ethnopharmacological applications and is rich in proteolytic enzymes. Present study investigates hemostatic, milk clotting and blood stain removal potential of C. gigantea latex proteases. Materials and Methods: The protease activity of crude enzyme (CE), obtained by centrifugation followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation and dialysis, was assayed using casein as the substrate. Effect of pH, temperature and specific inhibitors on protease activity was determined. Native PAGE and in gel protease activity of CE was performed. Hemostatic (Fibrinogen polymerization, fibrinogen agarose plate and blood clot lysis assays), milk clotting and blood stain removal efficacies of CE were determined. Results: CE exhibited high caseinolytic activity. Enzyme activity was optimum at 37-50ºC and pH 8.0. Fibrinogen polymerization assay showed concentration dependent increase in turbidity indicating thrombin like activity which was further confirmed by fibrinogen agarose plate assays. Clot lysis assay indicated 92.41% thrombolysis by CE in 90 min. CE also revealed significantly high ratio of milk clotting to protease activity (Milk Clotting Index, MCI = 827.59 ± 1.52). Complete destaining of blood stained fabric was observed when incubated with 1% detergent incorporated with 0.1mg/ml CE. The study highlights and validates the compound application potential of latex cysteine proteases from C. gigantea. PMID:24991114

  20. The effect of activated clotting time values for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yi-Yue; Huang, Fang-Yang; Huang, Bao-Tao; Peng, Yong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Shi-Jian; Pu, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Peng-Ju; Chen, Mao

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to illustrate the effect of higher activated clotting time (ACT) values versus lower ACT values on thrombotic or hemorrhagic events in coronary atherosclerotic heart disease (CHD) patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were searched. Observational studies assessing ACT related major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and major bleeding were included. Studies were allocated into three groups. Group 1 included studies with low percentage of participants prescribed with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors ([GPI] ≤30%), Group 2 with high percentage of participants prescribed with GPI (>30%), and Group 3 with routine direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) prescription. The cutoff is designed as 300s (290-310s) for Group 1, and 250s (240-260s) for Group 2. With regard to MACE and major bleeding in Group 1, there was no significant difference between higher ACT values and lower ACT values (risk ratio [RR] for MACE, 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65-2.05, p=0.62, I(2)=94%, RR for major bleeding, 0.96, 95% CI, 0.66-1.40, p=0.83, I(2)=0%). Likewise, no significant difference was found in Group 2 between higher ACT values and lower ACT values (RR for MACE, 1.15, 95% CI, 0.97-1.35, p=0.10, I(2)=0%, RR for major bleeding, 0.85, 95% CI, 0.45-1.60, p=0.61, I(2)=83%). In conclusion, ACT may not have a substantial effect on thrombotic or hemorrhagic complications. Under current clinical practice, target ACT may be higher than what is necessary to prevent thrombotic events. We may achieve a relative low ACT level to preserve efficacy and enhance safety. PMID:27395438

  1. TNF-α triggers rapid membrane insertion of Ca(2+) permeable AMPA receptors into adult motor neurons and enhances their susceptibility to slow excitotoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong Z; Hsu, Cheng-I; Yu, Stephen; Rao, Shyam D; Sorkin, Linda S; Weiss, John H

    2012-12-01

    Excitotoxicity (caused by over-activation of glutamate receptors) and inflammation both contribute to motor neuron (MN) damage in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other diseases of the spinal cord. Microglial and astrocytic activation in these conditions results in release of inflammatory mediators, including the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α has complex effects on neurons, one of which is to trigger rapid membrane insertion of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) type glutamate receptors, and in some cases, specific insertion of GluA2 lacking, Ca(2+) permeable AMPA receptors (Ca-perm AMPAr). In the present study, we use a histochemical stain based upon kainate stimulated uptake of cobalt ions ("Co(2+) labeling") to provide the first direct demonstration of the presence of substantial numbers of Ca-perm AMPAr in ventral horn MNs of adult rats under basal conditions. We further find that TNF-α exposure causes a rapid increase in the numbers of these receptors, via a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase A (PKA) dependent mechanism. Finally, to assess the relevance of TNF-α to slow excitotoxic MN injury, we made use of organotypic spinal cord slice cultures. Co(2+) labeling revealed that MNs in these cultures possess Ca-perm AMPAr. Addition of either a low level of TNF-α, or of the glutamate uptake blocker, trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) to the cultures for 48 h resulted in little MN injury. However, when combined, TNF-α+PDC caused considerable MN degeneration, which was blocked by the AMPA/kainate receptor blocker, 2,3-Dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo (F) quinoxaline (NBQX), or the Ca-perm AMPAr selective blocker, 1-naphthyl acetylspermine (NASPM). Thus, these data support the idea that prolonged TNF-α elevation, as may be induced by glial activation, acts in part by increasing the numbers of Ca-perm AMPAr on MNs to enhance injurious excitotoxic effects of deficient

  2. Fungal Susceptibility of Polyurethanes

    PubMed Central

    Darby, Richard T.; Kaplan, Arthur M.

    1968-01-01

    One hundred laboratory-synthesized polyurethanes were tested by a mixed-culture petri dish method for susceptibility to fungus attack. Polyether polyurethanes were moderately to highly resistant to fungal attack, whereas all polyester polyurethanes tested were highly susceptible. The susceptibility of the polyethers was related to the number of adjacent methylene groups in the polymer chain. At least two such groups were required for appreciable attack to occur. The presence of side chains on the diol moiety of the polyurethane reduced susceptibility. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16349806

  3. Blood Clotting-Inspired Control of Single-Chain Molecules in Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated a clear link between mechanical stimuli and the activation of von Willebrand Factor (vWF), a protein that plays a critical role in the blood clotting cascade. This protein exhibits counter-intuitive conformational and adsorption responses that suggest novel ways of controlling the single-chain dynamics of polymer chains. Specifically, we are using simulation and theoretical approaches to elucidate the fundamental physics that govern globule-stretch transitions in collapsed polymers due to the effect of fluid flows. We begin to extend this general approach to the case of globule adsorption-desorption transitions in the presence of fluid flows, and demonstrate how kinetic considerations must be taken into account to describe the basic features of these transitions. We expect that these results will both allow the development of novel techniques for single-chain targeting and assembly and offer insight into the physiological behavior of vWF.

  4. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  5. Estimates of utility weights in hemophilia: implications for cost-utility analysis of clotting factor prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Scott D; Chaugule, Shraddha S; Hay, Joel W

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of preference-weighted health outcomes or health state utilities are needed to assess improvements in health in terms of quality-adjusted life-years. Gains in quality-adjusted life-years are used to assess the cost–effectiveness of prophylactic use of clotting factor compared with on-demand treatment among people with hemophilia, a congenital bleeding disorder. Published estimates of health utilities for people with hemophilia vary, contributing to uncertainty in the estimates of cost–effectiveness of prophylaxis. Challenges in estimating utility weights for the purpose of evaluating hemophilia treatment include selection bias in observational data, difficulty in adjusting for predictors of health-related quality of life and lack of preference-based data comparing adults with lifetime or primary prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis living within the same country and healthcare system. PMID:25585817

  6. Plasma clot-promoting effect of collagen in relation to collagen-platelet interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, P.A.; Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The hemostatic function of several acid-soluble collagen preparations and a fibrillar-form collagen preparation have been compared. Pepsin-treated acid-soluble collagen isolated from burro and horse aortic tissue and acid-soluble colagen isolated from human umbilical cord readily promoted platelet aggregation, but failed to activate the coagulation mechanism even after prolonged incubation with plasma at 37 C. By contrast, fibrillar-form collagen isolated from burro aorta was both an efficient stimulant for the induction of platelet aggregation and a potent clot-promoting agent. Similar results were found for all the collagen preparations irrespective of whether the studies were conducted with sheep or with burro plasma. Heat denaturation studies showed that the hemostatic functon of the fibrillar-form colagen was dependent on an intact tirple-helical structure.

  7. Hemostatic dressings in civil prehospital practice: 30 uses of QuikClot Combat Gauze.

    PubMed

    Travers, Stéphane; Lefort, Hugues; Ramdani, Eric; Lemoine, Sabine; Jost, Daniel; Bignand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    To report the use and describe the interest of hemostatic dressings in a civilian setting, we provided medical prehospital teams with QuikClot Combat Gauze (QCG) and asked physicians to complete a specific questionnaire after each use. Thirty uses were prospectively reported. The wounds were mostly caused by cold steel (n=15) and were primarily cervicocephalic (n=16), with 19/30 active arterial bleedings. For 26/30 uses, hemostatic dressing was justified by the inefficiency of other hemostasis techniques. Those 30 applications were associated with 22 complete cessations of bleeding, six decreases of bleeding, and ineffectiveness in two cases. The application of QCG permitted the removal of an effective tourniquet that was applied initially for three patients. No side-effects were reported. The provision of hemostatic dressings in civilian resuscitation ambulances was useful by providing an additional tool to limit bleeding while rapidly transporting the injured patient to a surgical facility. PMID:26351975

  8. Spirulan from blue-green algae inhibits fibrin and blood clots: its potent antithrombotic effects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2015-05-01

    We investigated in vitro and in vivo fibrinolytic and antithrombotic activity of spirulan and analyzed its partial biochemical properties. Spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide from the blue-green alga Arthrospira platensis, exhibits antithrombotic potency. Spirulan showed a strong fibrin zymogram lysis band corresponding to its molecular mass. It specifically cleaved Aα and Bβ, the major chains of fibrinogen. Spirulan directly decreased the activity of thrombin and factor X activated (FXa), procoagulant proteins. In vitro assays using human fibrin and mouse blood clots showed fibrinolytic and hemolytic activities of spirulan. Spirulan (2 mg/kg) showed antithrombotic effects in the ferric chloride (FeCl3 )-induced carotid arterial thrombus model and collagen and epinephrine-induced pulmonary thromboembolism mouse model. These results may be attributable to the prevention of thrombus formation and partial lysis of thrombus. Therefore, we suggest that spirulan may be a potential antithrombotic agent for thrombosis-related diseases. PMID:25651404

  9. Fibrin Clot Structure and Mechanics Associated with Specific Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Weigandt, Katie M.; White, Nathan; Chung, Dominic; Ellingson, Erica; Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaoyun; Pozzo, Danilo C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of structural and mechanical characterization, we examine the effect of fibrinogen oxidation on the formation of fibrin clots. We find that treatment with hypochlorous acid preferentially oxidizes specific methionine residues on the α, β, and γ chains of fibrinogen. Oxidation is associated with the formation of a dense network of thin fibers after activation by thrombin. Additionally, both the linear and nonlinear mechanical properties of oxidized fibrin gels are found to be altered with oxidation. Finally, the structural modifications induced by oxidation are associated with delayed fibrin lysis via plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator. Based on these results, we speculate that methionine oxidation of specific residues may be related to hindered lateral aggregation of protofibrils in fibrin gels. PMID:23283239

  10. Clotting Problems with the Teflon-Silastic Arteriovenous Shunt in Patients on Regular Haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitriou, M.; Carroll, R. N. P.; Kulatilake, A. E.

    1969-01-01

    Episodes of clotting that occurred in 22 patients on regular haemodialysis were studied over a six-month period. The venous pressure during dialysis and the radiology of the Teflon-Silastic arteriovenous shunt were found to be satisfactory guides for the management of the shunt. The failure of the shunt during the early stage was mainly due to technical reasons. Histological study of the excised vessels in removed long-term shunts showed that these had failed because of rigidity and thickening of the vessel wall due to calcium and iron deposits or chronic inflammation, or both. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:5776208

  11. TaNAC1 acts as a negative regulator of stripe rust resistance in wheat, enhances susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae, and promotes lateral root development in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengtao; Lin, Ruiming; Feng, Jing; Chen, Wanquan; Qiu, Dewen; Xu, Shichang

    2015-01-01

    Plant-specific NAC transcription factors (TFs) constitute a large family and play important roles in regulating plant developmental processes and responses to environmental stresses, but only some of them have been investigated for effects on disease reaction in cereal crops. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an effective strategy for rapid functional analysis of genes in plant tissues. In this study, TaNAC1, encoding a new member of the NAC1 subgroup, was cloned from bread wheat and characterized. It is a TF localized in the cell nucleus, and contains an activation domain in its C-terminal. TaNAC1 was strongly expressed in wheat roots and was involved in responses to infection by the obligate pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici and defense-related hormone treatments such as salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate, and ethylene. Knockdown of TaNAC1 with barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) enhanced stripe rust resistance. TaNAC1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants gave enhanced susceptibility, attenuated systemic-acquired resistance to Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, and promoted lateral root development. Jasmonic acid-signaling pathway genes PDF1.2 and ORA59 were constitutively expressed in transgenic plants. TaNAC1 overexpression suppressed the expression levels of resistance-related genes PR1 and PR2 involved in SA signaling and AtWRKY70, which functions as a connection node between the JA- and SA-signaling pathways. Collectively, TaNAC1 is a novel NAC member of the NAC1 subgroup, negatively regulates plant disease resistance, and may modulate plant JA- and SA-signaling defense cascades. PMID:25774162

  12. Viscoelastic clot strength predicts coagulation-related mortality within 15 minutes

    PubMed Central

    Pezold, Michael; Moore, Ernest E.; Wohlauer, Max; Sauaia, Angela; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Predicting refractory coagulopathy early in resuscitation of injured patients may decrease a leading cause of preventable death. We hypothesized that clot strength (G) measured by point-of-care rapid thrombelastography (r-TEG) on arrival in the emergency department can predict massive transfusion (MT) and coagulation-related mortality (MT-death). Methods Trauma alerts/activations from May 2008 to September 2010 were reviewed. The variables included the following: age, sex, injury severity score (ISS), systolic blood pressure (SBP), base deficit (BD), traditional coagulation tests (international normalized ratio ([INR], partial thromboplastin time [PTT]), TEG-derived G, and blood products transfused within the first 6 hours. Independent predictors of 2 outcomes (MT [≥10 packed red blood cells units/6 h] and MT-related death) were identified using logistic regression. The individual predictive values of BD, INR, PTT, and G were assessed comparing the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC ROC), while adjusting for age, ISS, and SBP. Results Among the 80 study patients, 48% required MT, and 21% died of MT-related complications. INR, ISS, and G were independent predictors of MT, whereas age, ISS, SBP, and G were independently associated with MT-death. The predictive power for outcome MT did not differ among INR (adjusted AUC ROC = 0.92), PTT (AUC ROC = 0.90, P = .41), or G (AUC ROC = 0.89, P = .39). For outcome MT-death, G had the greatest adjusted AUC ROC (0.93) compared with the AUC ROC for BD (0.87, P = .05), INR (0.88, P = .11), and PTT (0.89; P = .19). Conclusion These data suggest that the point-of-care TEG parameter clot strength (G) provides consistent, independent prediction of MT and MT-death early in the resuscitation of injured patients. PMID:21899867

  13. Pulmonary embolism in congenital bleeding disorders: intriguing discrepancies among different clotting factors deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Cosi, Elisabetta; Tasinato, Valentina; Peroni, Edoardo; Girolami, Bruno; Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a complication of deep vein thrombosis. It occurs in the population with a normal clotting mechanism, but it may also occur in patients with congenital bleeding conditions. Here, we report on all cases of pulmonary embolism in congenital hemorrhagic disorders. All reported cases of pulmonary embolism in congenital coagulation disorders have been gathered by a time-unlimited PubMed search. Cross-checking of the references listed at the end of the single papers was carried out to avoid omissions. Seventy-two patients had an objectively demonstrated pulmonary embolism. The event occurred in patients with fibrinogen, factor V, factor VIII (FVII), FVIII, FIX, and FXI deficiency, and in those with von Willebrand's disease. No embolism was reported in FII, factor X, and FXIII deficiency. Thirty were women and 28 were men, whereas in the remaining 14 cases, sex was not reported. Age varied from 6 to 81 years (mean age 34.3 years). The management varied from only supportive to the administration of unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and anti-vitamin K medications, accompanied by adequate replacement therapy. Evolution was fair or good in the majority of cases, but there were 10 fatalities. Risk factors were present in 61 patients. The most frequent of these were replacement therapy (35 cases), surgery (34), and old age (13). Some patients had more than one risk factor. Eleven patients had no risk factors. There are discrepancies in the prevalence of pulmonary embolism among different clotting disorders. The conditions most frequently affected are FVII deficiency and fibrinogen defects. The significance of the findings is discussed. PMID:26829362

  14. Purification and characterization of a novel milk-clotting metalloproteinase from Paenibacillus spp. BD3526.

    PubMed

    Hang, Feng; Wang, Qinbo; Hong, Qing; Liu, Peiyi; Wu, Zhengjun; Liu, Zhenmin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a milk-clotting enzyme (MCE) isolated from Paenibacillus spp. BD3526 was purified and characterized. The MCE was purified 8.9-fold with a 10.11% recovery using ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography and the specific milk-clotting activity (MCA) reached 6791.73 SU/mg. The enzyme was characterized as a 35kDa metalloproteinase, and the zymogen of which was encoded by a 1671 bp gene named zinc metalloproteinase precursor (zmp) with a predicted molecular weight of 59.6 kDa. The optimal temperature for MCA and proteolytic activity (PA) was 65°C and 60°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable over a pH range of 5.0-9.0 and at temperatures below 50°C. The MCA was completely inactivated when the enzyme was heated at 60°C for 30 min, and the PA was totally inactivated for 20 and 10 min when the enzyme was heated at 55°C and 60°C, respectively. The BD3526 enzyme was preferentially active towards κ-casein (κ-CN) and β-casein (β-CN), as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE), whereas the hydrolysis of αs-casein (αs-CN) was slow and comparable to that caused by chymosin and asparatic acid proteinase from Rhizomucor miehei. The cleavage site of the metalloproteinase in κ-CN was located at the Met106-Ala107 bond, as determined by mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26794311

  15. Iodinated Contrast Does Not Alter Clotting Dynamics in Acute Ischemic Stroke as Measured by Thromboelastography

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Mark M; Archeval-Lao, Joancy M; Cai, Chunyan; Peng, Hui; Sangha, Navdeep; Parker, Stephanie A; Wetzel, Jeremy; Riney, Stephen A; Cherches, Matt F; Guthrie, Greer J; Roper, Tiffany C; Kawano-Castillo, Jorge F; Pandurengan, Renga; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Grotta, James C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Iodinated contrast agents used for computed tomography angiography (CTA) may alter fibrin fiber characteristics and decrease fibrinolysis by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Thromboelastography (TEG™) measures the dynamics of coagulation and correlates with thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. We hypothesized that receiving CTA prior to tPA will not impair thrombolysis as measured by TEG™. Methods AIS patients receiving 0.9 mg/kg tPA within 4.5 hours of symptom onset were prospectively enrolled. For CTA, 350 mg/dL of iohexol or 320 mg/dL of iodixanol at a dose of 2.2 ml/kg was administered. TEG™ was measured prior to tPA and 10-minutes after tPA bolus. CTA timing was left to the discretion of the treating physician. Results Of 136 AIS patients who received tPA, 47 had CTA prior to tPA bolus, and 42 had either CTA following tPA and post-tPA TEG™ draw or no CTA (non-contrast group). The median change in clot lysis (LY30) following tPA was 95.3% in the contrast group vs. 95.0% in the non-contrast group (p = 0.74). Thus, tPA-induced thrombolysis did not differ between contrast and non-contrast groups. Additionally, there was no effect of contrast on any pre-tPA TEG™ value. Conclusions Our data do not support an effect of iodinated contrast agents on clot formation or tPA activity. PMID:24370757

  16. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, C. R.; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young's modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa-27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (<0.13%) and low strain rates (<1/s) employed by the CEMport maintain a linear stress-to-strain relationship which provides a perturbative measurement of the Young's modulus. Measurements of blood plasma CEM versus heparin concentration show that CEMport is sensitive to heparin levels below 0.050 U/ml, which suggests future applications in sensing heparin levels of post-surgical cardiopulmonary bypass patients. The portability, high accuracy, and high precision of this device enable new clinical and animal studies for associating CEM with blood coagulation disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring.

  17. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, C. R.; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young’s modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa–27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (<0.13%) and low strain rates (<1/s) employed by the CEMport maintain a linear stress-to-strain relationship which provides a perturbative measurement of the Young’s modulus. Measurements of blood plasma CEM versus heparin concentration show that CEMport is sensitive to heparin levels below 0.050 U/ml, which suggests future applications in sensing heparin levels of post-surgical cardiopulmonary bypass patients. The portability, high accuracy, and high precision of this device enable new clinical and animal studies for associating CEM with blood coagulation disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26233406

  18. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krebs, C R; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S; Oldenburg, Amy L

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young's modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa-27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (<0.13%) and low strain rates (<1/s) employed by the CEMport maintain a linear stress-to-strain relationship which provides a perturbative measurement of the Young's modulus. Measurements of blood plasma CEM versus heparin concentration show that CEMport is sensitive to heparin levels below 0.050 U/ml, which suggests future applications in sensing heparin levels of post-surgical cardiopulmonary bypass patients. The portability, high accuracy, and high precision of this device enable new clinical and animal studies for associating CEM with blood coagulation disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26233406

  19. Tumour imaging by the detection of fibrin clots in tumour stroma using an anti-fibrin Fab fragment

    PubMed Central

    Obonai, Toshifumi; Fuchigami, Hirobumi; Furuya, Fumiaki; Kozuka, Naoyuki; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of early and aggressive types of cancer is important for providing effective cancer therapy. Cancer-induced fibrin clots exist only within lesions. Previously, we developed a monoclonal antibody (clone 102-10) that recognizes insoluble fibrin but not fibrinogen or soluble fibrin and confirmed that fibrin clots form continuously in various cancers. Here, we describe the development of a Fab fragment probe of clone 102-10 for tumour imaging. The distribution of 102-10 Fab was investigated in genetically engineered mice bearing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and its effect on blood coagulation was examined. Immunohistochemical and ex vivo imaging revealed that 102-10 Fab was distributed selectively in fibrin clots in PDAC tumours 3 h after injection and that it disappeared from the body after 24 h. 102-10 Fab had no influence on blood coagulation or fibrinolysis. Tumour imaging using anti-fibrin Fab may provide a safe and effective method for the diagnosis of invasive cancers by detecting fibrin clots in tumour stroma. PMID:27009516

  20. The evolution of clot-promoting and amidolytic activities in mixtures of Hageman factor (factor XII) and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Ratnoff, O D; Saito, H

    1982-08-01

    Ellagic acid (4,4',5,5',6,6'-hexahydroxydiphenic acid 2,6,2',6'-dilactone) can substitute for negatively charged surfaces as a stimulus to reactions of the intrinsic pathway. Incubation of solutions of 4 X 10(-6)M ellagic acid with purified HF (factor XII) induced clot-promoting and amidolytic activity. Clot-promoting activity tested on a substrate of HF-deficient plasma evolved much more rapidly than amidolytic activity. Clot-promoting activity generated in mixtures of HF and ellagic acid alone, but amidolytic activity was observed only if additional proteins such as albumin were also present. Treatment of purified HF with DFP or filtration of HF through columns of SBTI bound to agarose did not prevent its subsequent activation by ellagic acid. Solutions of SBTI, at high concentration, partly inhibited the generation of amidolytic activity,wheras popcorn inhibitor and a crude IgG fraction of anti-HF inhibited the amidolytic activity that had been generated in a mixture of HF and ellagic acid. Generation of clotting and amidolytic properties was accompanied by scission of HF within an internal disulfide loop and by cleavage of HF into fragments with approximate MWs of 50,000 and 30,000; cleavage was completely blocked by popcorn inhibitor and partially blocked by high concentrations of SBTI. These experiments demonstrate that ellagic acid can activate HF in a manner analogous to negatively charged solids such as glass or kaolin. PMID:7097109

  1. Numerical investigation into blood clotting at the bone-dental implant interface in the presence of an electrical stimulus.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2013-12-01

    The insertion of a dental implant activates a sequence of wound healing events ending with bone formation and implant osseointegration. This sequence starts with the blood coagulation process and the formation of a fibrin network that detains spilt blood. Fibrin formation can be simplified as the kinetic reaction between thrombin and fibrinogen preceding the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin. Based on experimental observations of the electrical properties of these molecules, we present a hypothesis for the mechanism of a static electrical stimulus in controlling the formation of the blood clot. Specifically, the electrical stimulus increases the fibrin network formation in such a way that a preferential region of higher fibrin density is obtained. This hypothesis is validated by means of a numerical model for the blood clot formation at the bone-dental implant interface. Numerical results compare favorably to experimental observations for blood clotting with and without the static electrical stimulus. It is concluded that the density of the fibrin network depends on the strength of the static electrical stimulus, and that the blood clot formation has a preferential direction of formation in the presence of the electrical signal. PMID:24290924

  2. Treatment protocol based on assessment of clot quality during endovascular thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke using the Trevo stent retriever

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kojiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Nishihori, Masahiro; Imai, Tasuku; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The optional endovascular approach for acute ischemic stroke is unclear. The Trevo stent retriever can be used as first-line treatment for fast mechanical recanalization. The authors developed a treatment protocol for acute ischemic stroke based on the assessment of clot quality during clot removal with the Trevo. This prospective single-center study included all patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke between July 2014 and February 2015, who underwent emergency endovascular treatment. According to the protocol, the Trevo was used for first-line treatment. Immediately after the Trevo was deployed, the stent delivery wire was pushed to open the stent by force (ACAPT technique). Clot quality was assessed on the basis of the perfusion status after deployment of the Trevo; continued occlusion or immediate reopening either reoccluded or maintained after the stent retriever had been in place for 5 min. If there was no obvious clot removal after the first pass with the Trevo, according to the quality of the clot, either a second pass was performed or another endovascular device was selected. Twelve consecutive patients with acute major cerebral artery occlusion were analyzed. Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score 2b and 3 was achieved in 11 patients (91.7%) and 9 (75%) had a good clinical outcome after 90 days based on a modified Rankin scale score ≤ 2. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 1 patient (8.3%). The overall mortality rate was 8.3%. Endovascular thrombectomy using the Trevo stent retriever for first-line treatment is feasible and effective. PMID:27578909

  3. Treatment protocol based on assessment of clot quality during endovascular thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke using the Trevo stent retriever.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kojiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Nishihori, Masahiro; Imai, Tasuku; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-08-01

    The optional endovascular approach for acute ischemic stroke is unclear. The Trevo stent retriever can be used as first-line treatment for fast mechanical recanalization. The authors developed a treatment protocol for acute ischemic stroke based on the assessment of clot quality during clot removal with the Trevo. This prospective single-center study included all patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke between July 2014 and February 2015, who underwent emergency endovascular treatment. According to the protocol, the Trevo was used for first-line treatment. Immediately after the Trevo was deployed, the stent delivery wire was pushed to open the stent by force (ACAPT technique). Clot quality was assessed on the basis of the perfusion status after deployment of the Trevo; continued occlusion or immediate reopening either reoccluded or maintained after the stent retriever had been in place for 5 min. If there was no obvious clot removal after the first pass with the Trevo, according to the quality of the clot, either a second pass was performed or another endovascular device was selected. Twelve consecutive patients with acute major cerebral artery occlusion were analyzed. Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score 2b and 3 was achieved in 11 patients (91.7%) and 9 (75%) had a good clinical outcome after 90 days based on a modified Rankin scale score ≤ 2. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 1 patient (8.3%). The overall mortality rate was 8.3%. Endovascular thrombectomy using the Trevo stent retriever for first-line treatment is feasible and effective. PMID:27578909

  4. MR susceptibility imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duyn, Jeff

    2013-04-01

    This work reviews recent developments in the use of magnetic susceptibility contrast for human MRI, with a focus on the study of brain anatomy. The increase in susceptibility contrast with modern high field scanners has led to novel applications and insights into the sources and mechanism contributing to this contrast in brain tissues. Dedicated experiments have demonstrated that in most of healthy brain, iron and myelin dominate tissue susceptibility variations, although their relative contribution varies substantially. Local variations in these compounds can affect both amplitude and frequency of the MRI signal. In white matter, the myelin sheath introduces an anisotropic susceptibility that has distinct effects on the water compartments inside the axons, between the myelin sheath, and the axonal space, and renders their signals dependent on the angle between the axon and the magnetic field. This offers opportunities to derive tissue properties specific to these cellular compartments.

  5. Susceptibility-weighted imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A; Yeom, Kristen W; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging. PMID:25270052

  6. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging. PMID:25270052

  7. Contrasting Roles of the Apoplastic Aspartyl Protease APOPLASTIC, ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1-DEPENDENT1 and LEGUME LECTIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 in Arabidopsis Systemic Acquired Resistance1,2[W

    PubMed Central

    Breitenbach, Heiko H.; Wenig, Marion; Wittek, Finni; Jordá, Lucia; Maldonado-Alconada, Ana M.; Sarioglu, Hakan; Colby, Thomas; Knappe, Claudia; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Pabst, Elisabeth; Mackey, David; Parker, Jane E.; Vlot, A. Corina

    2014-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible immune response that depends on ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) EDS1 is required for both SAR signal generation in primary infected leaves and SAR signal perception in systemic uninfected tissues. In contrast to SAR signal generation, local resistance remains intact in eds1 mutant plants in response to Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. We utilized the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant to identify new SAR regulatory proteins in plants conditionally expressing AvrRpm1. Comparative proteomic analysis of apoplast-enriched extracts from AvrRpm1-expressing wild-type and eds1 mutant plants led to the identification of 12 APOPLASTIC, EDS1-DEPENDENT (AED) proteins. The genes encoding AED1, a predicted aspartyl protease, and another AED, LEGUME LECTIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 (LLP1), were induced locally and systemically during SAR signaling and locally by salicylic acid (SA) or its functional analog, benzo 1,2,3-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester. Because conditional overaccumulation of AED1-hemagglutinin inhibited SA-induced resistance and SAR but not local resistance, the data suggest that AED1 is part of a homeostatic feedback mechanism regulating systemic immunity. In llp1 mutant plants, SAR was compromised, whereas the local resistance that is normally associated with EDS1 and SA as well as responses to exogenous SA appeared largely unaffected. Together, these data indicate that LLP1 promotes systemic rather than local immunity, possibly in parallel with SA. Our analysis reveals new positive and negative components of SAR and reinforces the notion that SAR represents a distinct phase of plant immunity beyond local resistance. PMID:24755512

  8. Plasma fibrin clot phenotype independently affects intracoronary thrombus ultrastructure in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Jaroslaw; Bogaert, Jan; Sadowski, Marcin; Woznicka, Olga; Doulaptsis, Konstantinos; Ntoumpanaki, Maria; Ząbczyk, Michal; Nessler, Jadwiga; Undas, Anetta

    2015-06-01

    Determinants of intracoronary thrombus (ICT) composition in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are largely unknown. We sought to investigate whether plasma fibrin phenotype and platelet reactivity affect ICT ultrastructure. We assessed the content of fibrin, platelets and erythrocytes including polyhedrocytes by scanning electron microscopy on the surface and inside ICT aspirated from 80 STEMI patients within 12 hours since chest pain onset. Plasma fibrin clot permeability (Ks), which indicates the average pore size, lysis time (t50 %), platelet reactivity index (PRI) and ADP-induced platelet aggregation (ADP5, 20µM) were evaluated on admission. All patients received aspirin and 45 (56.3 %) 600 mg of clopidogrel, 80 (60-120) min prior to aspiration. Higher content of fibrin (61.6 vs 34.3 %, P< 0.0001) and platelets (8.2 vs 4.8 %, P=0.018) and lower erythrocyte content (15.8 vs 42.9 %, P< 0.0001) were found on ICT surface compared with its inner part. After adjustment for fibrinogen, in both ICT parts fibrin content was correlated with Ks (r≤-0.55, P< 0.0001) and t50 % (r≥ 0.29, P≤ 0.02) but not with PRI and ADP5,20µM. Polyhedrocytes were observed in 16 (20 %) patients and their large amount expressed as ≥ 50 % fields of view covered by polyhedrocytes was associated with the lower PRI values (40 vs 69 %, P=0.015), but not Ks or t50 %. By multivariate regression, Ks (β=-0.62, P< 0.0001), clopidogrel pretreatment (β=-0.36, P< 0.001), ischemia time (β=0.19, P=0.044) and family history (β=0.18, P=0.049) independently predicted fibrin content in the whole ICT (R²=0.65, P< 0.0001). Formation of denser plasma fibrin clots is independently associated with high fibrin content within the ICT in STEMI. PMID:25739375

  9. Relationship between ADP-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength and anti-platelet responsiveness in ticagrelor treated ACS patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan-Dan; Wang, Xu-Yun; Xi, Shao-Zhi; Liu, Jia; Qin, Liu-An; Jing, Jing; Yin, Tong; Chen, Yun-Dai

    2016-01-01

    Background Ticagrelor provides enhanced antiplatelet efficacy but increased risk of bleeding and dyspnea. This study aimed to display the relationship between ADP-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength (MAADP) and clinical outcomes in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients treated by ticagrelor. Methods Consecutive Chinese-Han patients with ACS who received maintenance dose of ticagrelor on top of aspirin were recruited. After 5-day ticagrelor maintenance treatment, MAADP measured by thrombelastography (TEG) were recorded for the evaluation of ticagrelor anti-platelet reactivity. Pre-specified cutoffs of MAADP > 47 mm for high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) and MAADP < 31 mm for low on-treatment platelet reactivity (LTPR) were applied for evaluation. The occurrences of primary ischemic cardiovascular events (including a composite of cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke), the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) defined bleeding events, and ticagrelor related dyspnea were recorded after a follow-up of three months. Results Overall, 176 ACS patients (Male: 79.55%, Age: 59.91 ± 10.54 years) under ticagrelor maintenance treatment were recruited. The value of MAADP ranged from 4.80% to 72.90% (21.27% ± 12.07% on average), with the distribution higher skewed towards the lower values. Using the pre-specific cutoffs for HTPR and LTPR, seven patients (3.98%) were identified as HTPR and 144 patients (81.82%) as LTPR. After a follow-up of three months in 172 patients, major cardiovascular events occurred in no patient, but TIMI bleeding events in 81 (47.09%) with major bleedings in three patients. All patients with major bleedings were classified as LTPR. Ticagrelor related dyspnea occurred in 31 (18.02%) patients, with 30 (21.28%) classified as LTPR and no one as HTPR (P = 0.02). Conclusions In ticagrelor treated ACS patients, MAADP measured by TEG might be valuable for the prediction of major bleeding and ticagrelor related dyspnea

  10. Ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis with tPA-loaded echogenic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, George J.; Meunier, Jason M.; Huang, Shao-Ling; Lindsell, Christopher J.; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Currently, the only FDA-approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), phospholipid vesicles filled with gas and fluid, can be manufactured to incorporate tPA. Also, transcranial ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis can increase the recanalization rate in stroke patients. However, there is little data on lytic efficacy of combining ultrasound, echogenic liposomes, and tPA treatment. In this study, we measure the effects of pulsed 120-kHz ultrasound on the lytic efficacy of tPA and tPA-incorporating ELIP (t-ELIP) in an in-vitro human clot model. It is hypothesized that t-ELIP exhibits similar lytic efficacy to that of rt-PA. Methods: Blood was drawn from 22 subjects after IRB approval. Clots were made in 20-μL pipettes, and placed in a water tank for microscopic visualization during ultrasound and drug treatment. Clots were exposed to combinations of [tPA] = 3.15 μg/ml, [t-ELIP] = 3.15 μg/ml, and 120-kHz ultrasound for 30 minutes at 37 °C in human plasma. At least 12 clots were used for each treatment. Clot lysis over time was imaged and clot diameter was measured over time, using previously developed imaging analysis algorithms. The fractional clot loss (FCL), which is the decrease in mean clot width at the end of lytic treatment, was used as a measure of lytic efficacy for the various treatment regimens. Results: The fractional clot loss FCL was 31% (95% CI: 26-37%) and 71% (56-86%) for clots exposed to tPA alone or tPA with 120 kHz ultrasound. Similarly, FCL was 48% (31-64%) and 89% (76-100%) for clots exposed to tELIP without or with ultrasound. Conclusions: The lytic efficacy of tPA containing echogenic liposomes is comparable to that of tPA alone. The addition of 120 kHz ultrasound significantly enhanced lytic treatment efficacy for both tPA and t-ELIP. Liposomes loaded with tPA may be a useful adjunct in lytic treatment with tPA. PMID

  11. Enhancement of Platelet Aggregation by Ursolic Acid and Oleanolic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mikyung; Han, Chang-ho; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2014-01-01

    The pentacyclic triterpenoid ursolic acid (UA) and its isomer oleanolic acid (OA) are ubiquitous in food and plant medicine, and thus are easily exposed to the population through natural contact or intentional use. Although they have diverse health benefits, reported cardiovascular protective activity is contentious. In this study, the effect of UA and OA on platelet aggregation was examined on the basis that alteration of platelet activity is a potential process contributing to cardiovascular events. Treatment of UA enhanced platelet aggregation induced by thrombin or ADP, which was concentration-dependent in a range of 5–50 μM. Quite comparable results were obtained with OA, in which OA-treated platelets also exhibited an exaggerated response to either thrombin or ADP. UA treatment potentiated aggregation of whole blood, while OA failed to increase aggregation by thrombin. UA and OA did not affect plasma coagulation assessed by measuring prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. These results indicate that both UA and OA are capable of making platelets susceptible to aggregatory stimuli, and platelets rather than clotting factors are the primary target of them in proaggregatory activity. These compounds need to be used with caution, especially in the population with a predisposition to cardiovascular events. PMID:25009707

  12. JAK2V617F-positive endothelial cells contribute to clotting abnormalities in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Etheridge, S. Leah; Roh, Michelle E.; Cosgrove, Megan E.; Sangkhae, Veena; Fox, Norma E.; Chen, Junmei; López, José A.; Kaushansky, Kenneth; Hitchcock, Ian S.

    2014-01-01

    The Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F mutation is the primary pathogenic mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Although thrombohemorrhagic incidents are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with MPNs, the events causing these clotting abnormalities remain unclear. To identify the cells responsible for the dysfunctional hemostasis, we used transgenic mice expressing JAK2V617F in specific lineages involved in thrombosis and hemostasis. When JAK2V617F was expressed in both hematopoietic and endothelial cells (ECs), the mice developed a significant MPN, characterized by thrombocytosis, neutrophilia, and splenomegaly. However, despite having significantly higher platelet counts than controls, these mice showed severely attenuated thrombosis following injury. Interestingly, platelet activation and aggregation in response to agonists was unaltered by JAK2V617F expression. Subsequent bone marrow transplants revealed the contribution of both endothelial and hematopoietic compartments to the attenuated thrombosis. Furthermore, we identified a potential mechanism for this phenotype through JAK2V617F-regulated inhibition of von Willebrand factor (VWF) function and/or secretion. JAK2V617F+ mice display a condition similar to acquired von Willebrand syndrome, exhibiting significantly less high molecular weight VWF and reduced agglutination to ristocetin. These findings greatly advance our understanding of thrombohemorrhagic events in MPNs and highlight the critical role of ECs in the pathology of hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:24469804

  13. Prolonged clot lysis time increases the risk of a first but not recurrent venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Karasu, Alev; Baglin, Trevor P; Luddington, Roger; Baglin, Caroline A; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2016-03-01

    The role of the fibrinolytic system in the development of venous thrombosis (VT) is unclear. We studied the risk of first and recurrent VT associated with reduced fibrinolysis, as measured by clot lysis time (CLT). We also studied the relationship between CLT and thrombin generation to determine if any relationship between CLT and VT was affected by thrombin generation. Analyses were performed in the Thrombophilia Hypercoagulability Environmental risk for Venous Thromboembolism Study, a two-centre population-based case-control study, including 579 patients and 338 controls, with patients followed from the event to determine incidence of recurrent VT. Hypofibrinolysis was associated with a 1·8-fold increased risk of a first VT [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·2-2·7]. Adjustment for sex, age, study location and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) did not change the result. The risk of VT was 2·9-fold increased when the 90th percentiles of prolonged CLT and high ETP were combined, with the highest risk for unprovoked first events (Odds Ratio = 4·2, 95% CI 1·3-13·5). In the follow-up study the Hazard Ratio for a recurrent VT associated with hypofibrinolysis was 1·5 (95% CI 0·9-2·6). A weak dose response effect was observed in relation to prolongation of CLT and recurrent VT. Although hypofibrinolysis constitutes a risk factor for a first VT, an association with recurrence is, at best, weak. PMID:26773756

  14. Random Forests Are Able to Identify Differences in Clotting Dynamics from Kinetic Models of Thrombin Generation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for distinguishing acute coronary syndromes such as heart attack from stable coronary artery disease, based on the kinetics of thrombin formation, have been limited to evaluating sensitivity of well-established chemical species (e.g., thrombin) using simple quantifiers of their concentration profiles (e.g., maximum level of thrombin concentration, area under the thrombin concentration versus time curve). In order to get an improved classifier, we use a 34-protein factor clotting cascade model and convert the simulation data into a high-dimensional representation (about 19000 features) using a piecewise cubic polynomial fit. Then, we systematically find plausible assays to effectively gauge changes in acute coronary syndrome/coronary artery disease populations by introducing a statistical learning technique called Random Forests. We find that differences associated with acute coronary syndromes emerge in combinations of a handful of features. For instance, concentrations of 3 chemical species, namely, active alpha-thrombin, tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa ternary complex, and intrinsic tenase complex with factor X, at specific time windows, could be used to classify acute coronary syndromes to an accuracy of about 87.2%. Such a combination could be used to efficiently assay the coagulation system. PMID:27171403

  15. Random Forests Are Able to Identify Differences in Clotting Dynamics from Kinetic Models of Thrombin Generation.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Jayavel; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S; Narayanan, Krishna R; Srinivasa, Arun R

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for distinguishing acute coronary syndromes such as heart attack from stable coronary artery disease, based on the kinetics of thrombin formation, have been limited to evaluating sensitivity of well-established chemical species (e.g., thrombin) using simple quantifiers of their concentration profiles (e.g., maximum level of thrombin concentration, area under the thrombin concentration versus time curve). In order to get an improved classifier, we use a 34-protein factor clotting cascade model and convert the simulation data into a high-dimensional representation (about 19000 features) using a piecewise cubic polynomial fit. Then, we systematically find plausible assays to effectively gauge changes in acute coronary syndrome/coronary artery disease populations by introducing a statistical learning technique called Random Forests. We find that differences associated with acute coronary syndromes emerge in combinations of a handful of features. For instance, concentrations of 3 chemical species, namely, active alpha-thrombin, tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa ternary complex, and intrinsic tenase complex with factor X, at specific time windows, could be used to classify acute coronary syndromes to an accuracy of about 87.2%. Such a combination could be used to efficiently assay the coagulation system. PMID:27171403

  16. Simultaneous comparison of thrombogenic reactions to different combinations of anticoagulants, activated clotting times, and materials.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Mirei; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Umezu, Mitsuo; Ozaki, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Thrombogenic reactions under multiple interactions of pharmacological agents, doses, and materials have not been well understood yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability to simultaneously compare thrombogenic reactions to different combinations of anticoagulants, doses, and blood-contacting materials, in a single human blood using an in vitro test method. Four venous blood samples were drawn from each of six healthy volunteers into syringes that contained two different amounts of heparin and argatroban to set the activated clotting time (ACT) to approximately 200 or 500 s, respectively. The four blood samples from each volunteer were immediately poured into two clinical-grade extracorporeal circulation tubes: a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube and a poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate)-coated (PMEA) PVC tube. These tubes with an inner diameter of 12.7 mm were rotated at 183 rpm in a 37°C chamber for 10 min. The results indicated that the in vitro thrombogenicity test method was capable of assessing differences in platelet factor 4 and β-thromboglobulin increases among different combinations of the two materials, two anticoagulants, and two ACTs. Higher amounts of total plasma proteins were absorbed on PVC tubes than on PMEA-coated tubes when using the same anticoagulant and dose. These data elucidate that the in vitro thrombogenicity test method is useful for the simultaneous quantitative evaluation of the influences of various combinations of materials, pharmacological agents, and doses on thrombogenicity in a single human blood. PMID:24652689

  17. Comparison of digoxin concentration in plastic serum tubes with clot activator and heparinized plasma tubes

    PubMed Central

    Dukić, Lora; Šimundić, Ana-Maria; Malogorski, Davorin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Sample type recommended by the manufacturer for the digoxin Abbott assay is either serum collected in glass tubes or plasma (sodium heparin, lithium heparin, citrate, EDTA or oxalate as anticoagulant) collected in plastic tubes. In our hospital samples are collected in plastic tubes. Our hypothesis was that the serum sample collected in plastic serum tube can be used interchangeably with plasma sample for measurement of digoxin concentration. Our aim was verification of plastic serum tubes for determination of digoxin concentration. Materials and methods: Concentration of digoxin was determined simultaneously in 26 venous blood plasma (plastic Vacuette, LH Lithium heparin) and serum (plastic Vacuette, Z Serum Clot activator; both Greiner Bio-One GmbH, Kremsmünster, Austria) samples, on Abbott AxSYM analyzer using the original Abbott Digoxin III assay (Abbott, Wiesbaden, Germany). Tube comparability was assessed using the Passing Bablok regression and Bland-Altman plot. Results: Serum and plasma digoxin concentrations are comparable. Passing Bablok intercept (0.08 [95% CI = −0.10 to 0.20]) and slope (0.99 [95% CI = 0.92 to 1.11]) showed there is no constant or proportional error. Conclusion: Blood samples drawn in plastic serum tubes and plastic plasma tubes can be interchangeably used for determination of digoxin concentration. PMID:24627723

  18. Simulation of intrathrombus fluid and solute transport using in vivo clot structures with single platelet resolution.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Roman S; Stalker, Timothy J; Brass, Lawrence F; Diamond, Scott L

    2013-06-01

    The mouse laser injury thrombosis model provides up to 0.22 μm-resolved voxel information about the pore architecture of the dense inner core and loose outer shell regions of an in vivo arterial thrombus. Computational studies were conducted on this 3D structure to quantify transport within and around the clot: Lattice Boltzmann method defined vessel hemodynamics, while passive Lagrangian Scalar Tracking with Brownian motion contribution simulated diffusive-convective transport of various inert solutes (released from lumen or the injured wall). For an input average lumen blood velocity of 0.478 cm/s (measured by Doppler velocimetry), a 0.2 mm/s mean flow rate was obtained within the thrombus structure, most of which occurred in the 100-fold more permeable outer shell region (calculated permeability of the inner core was 10(-11) cm(2)). Average wall shear stresses were 80-100 dyne/cm(2) (peak values >200 dyne/cm(2)) on the outer rough surface of the thrombus. Within the thrombus, small molecule tracers (0.1 kDa) experienced ~70,000 collisions/s and penetrated/exited it in about 1 s, whereas proteins (~50 kDa) had ~9000 collisions/s and required about 10 s (tortuosity ~2-2.5). These simulations help define physical processes during thrombosis and constraints for drug delivery to the thrombus. PMID:23423707

  19. Four danger response programs determine glomerular and tubulointerstitial kidney pathology: clotting, inflammation, epithelial and mesenchymal healing.

    PubMed

    Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Renal biopsies commonly display tissue remodeling with a combination of many different findings. In contrast to trauma, kidney remodeling largely results from intrinsic responses, but why? Distinct danger response programs were positively selected throughout evolution to survive traumatic injuries and to regenerate tissue defects. These are: (1) clotting to avoid major bleeding, (2) immunity to control infection, (3) epithelial repair and (4) mesenchymal repair. Collateral damages are acceptable for the sake of host survival but causes for kidney injury commonly affect the kidneys in a diffuse manner. This way, coagulation, inflammation, deregulated epithelial healing or fibrosis contribute to kidney remodeling. Here, I focus on how these ancient danger response programs determine renal pathology mainly because they develop in a deregulated manner, either as insufficient or overshooting processes that modulate each other. From a therapeutic point of view, immunopathology can be prevented by suppressing sterile renal inflammation, a useless atavism with devastating consequences. In addition, it appears as an important goal for the future to promote podocyte and tubular epithelial cell repair, potentially by stimulating the differentiation of their newly discovered intrarenal progenitor cells. By contrast, it is still unclear whether selectively targeting renal fibrogenesis can preserve or bring back lost renal parenchyma, which would be required to maintain or improve kidney function. Thus, renal pathology results from ancient danger responses that evolved because of their evolutional benefits upon trauma. Understanding these causalities may help to shape the search for novel treatments for kidney disease patients. PMID:22692229

  20. The conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. XIII. Dissolution of fibrin and inhibition of clotting by various neutral salts.

    PubMed

    SHULMAN, S; KATZ, S; FERRY, J D

    1953-07-01

    1. Fibrin clots prepared in the absence of calcium can be dissolved in solutions of lithium chloride and bromide and sodium bromide and iodide, as well as of guanidine hydrochloride and urea. These salts do not denature fibrinogen under the same conditions of concentration, temperature, and time. Sedimentation experiments on the fibrin solutions show in each case a single sharp peak with a sedimentation constant close to that of fibrinogen. 2. At lower concentrations, these salts inhibit the clotting of fibrinogen by thrombin, but in the case of lithium bromide and sodium iodide, at least, allow an intermediate polymer to accumulate whose sedimentation constant is close to that of the polymer observed in systems inhibited by hexamethylene glycol or urea. PMID:13069679

  1. Identification of an inflammatory bowel disease patient with a deep vein thrombosis and an altered clot lysis profile.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Lize; Wuyts, Joke; Vermeire, Séverine; Gils, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by flares and remission, are prone to develop thrombosis. The mechanism behind this prothrombotic state is not completely understood but is definitely multifactorial and linked with excessive inflammation observed in these patients. So far, no biomarker exists to select among IBD patients those with and increased risk for thrombosis. Corticosteroid therapy, given as rescue IBD treatment, is known to increase the thrombotic risk, whereas for antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha therapy such as infliximab, given to induce and maintain remission in IBD, the results are inconclusive. Here, we describe a 31-year-old IBD patient who developed a deep vein thrombosis. We determined the clot lysis profiles before and after developing thrombosis. We showed that a global functional clot lysis assay can be used as a tool to identify IBD patients who may benefit from thromboprophylactic therapy. PMID:26378816

  2. Abnormal vitamin K metabolism in the presence of normal clotting factor activity in factory workers exposed to 4-hydroxycoumarins.

    PubMed

    Park, B K; Choonara, I A; Haynes, B P; Breckenridge, A M; Malia, R G; Preston, F E

    1986-03-01

    The case histories of two patients exposed to the novel anticoagulants brodifacoum and difenacoum are reported. Abnormal vitamin K1 metabolism, as indicated by elevated vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide plasma concentrations after i.v. administration of vitamin K1, could be detected for more than 18 months after exposure to the anticoagulants. There was a marked prolongation of prothrombin time (greater than 50 s) in both cases, at the time of exposure. However, subsequent haematological investigations (prothrombin time and vitamin K-dependent clotting factor activity) have been shown to be normal in both cases for at least 18 months. These cases confirm the long-acting nature of brodifacoum and difenacoum and present an apparent dissociation between the effect of coumarin anticoagulants on vitamin K1 metabolism and clotting factor activity. PMID:3964529

  3. Abnormal vitamin K metabolism in the presence of normal clotting factor activity in factory workers exposed to 4-hydroxycoumarins.

    PubMed Central

    Park, B K; Choonara, I A; Haynes, B P; Breckenridge, A M; Malia, R G; Preston, F E

    1986-01-01

    The case histories of two patients exposed to the novel anticoagulants brodifacoum and difenacoum are reported. Abnormal vitamin K1 metabolism, as indicated by elevated vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide plasma concentrations after i.v. administration of vitamin K1, could be detected for more than 18 months after exposure to the anticoagulants. There was a marked prolongation of prothrombin time (greater than 50 s) in both cases, at the time of exposure. However, subsequent haematological investigations (prothrombin time and vitamin K-dependent clotting factor activity) have been shown to be normal in both cases for at least 18 months. These cases confirm the long-acting nature of brodifacoum and difenacoum and present an apparent dissociation between the effect of coumarin anticoagulants on vitamin K1 metabolism and clotting factor activity. PMID:3964529

  4. High intensity focused ultrasound sonothrombolysis: the use of perfluorocarbon droplets to achieve clot lysis at reduced acoustic powers

    PubMed Central

    Pajek, Daniel; Burgess, Alison; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate use of intravascular perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets to reduce the sonication powers required to achieve clot lysis using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU with droplets was initially applied to blood clots in an in vitro flow apparatus and inertial cavitation thresholds were determined. An embolic model for ischemic stroke was used to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique in vivo. Recanalization with intravascular droplets was achieved in vivo at 24±5% of the sonication power without droplets. Rabbits receiving 1 ms pulsed sonication during continuous intravascular droplet infusion recanalized in 71% of cases (p=0.041 vs controls). Preliminary experiments showed that damage was contained to the ultrasonic focus, suggesting that safe treatments would be possible with a more tightly focused hemispherical array that allows the whole focus to be placed inside of the main arteries in the human brain. PMID:25023095

  5. The function of the milk-clotting enzymes bovine and camel chymosin studied by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper Langholm; Jacobsen, Jonas; Moss, Marcia L; Rasmussen, Fred; Qvist, Karsten Bruun; Larsen, Sine; van den Brink, Johannes M

    2015-05-01

    Enzymatic coagulation of bovine milk can be divided in 2 steps: an enzymatic step, in which the Phe105-Met106 bond of the milk protein bovine κ-casein is cleaved, and an aggregation step. The aspartic peptidases bovine and camel chymosin (EC 3.4.23.4) are typically used to catalyze the enzymatic step. The most commonly used method to study chymosin activity is the relative milk-clotting activity test that measures the end point of the enzymatic and aggregation step. This method showed that camel chymosin has a 2-fold higher milk-clotting activity toward bovine milk than bovine chymosin. To enable a study of the enzymatic step independent of the aggregation step, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay has been developed using a peptide substrate derived from the 98-108 sequence of bovine κ-casein. This assay and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were employed to determine the enzymatic activity of camel and bovine chymosin under milk clotting-like conditions (pH 6.65, ionic strength 80 mM). The results obtained show that the catalytic efficiency of camel chymosin is 3-fold higher than bovine chymosin. The substrate affinity and catalytic activity of bovine and camel chymosin increase at lower pH (6.00 and 5.50). The glycosylation of bovine and camel chymosin did not affect binding of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrate, but doubly glycosylated camel chymosin seems to have slightly higher catalytic efficiency. In the characterization of the enzymes, the developed assay is easier and faster to use than the traditionally used relative milk-clotting activity test method. PMID:25726113

  6. Activation of mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases leads to generation of a fibrin clot

    PubMed Central

    Gulla, Krishana C; Gupta, Kshitij; Krarup, Anders; Gal, Peter; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Sim, Robert B; O’Connor, C David; Hajela, Krishnan

    2010-01-01

    The lectin pathway of complement is activated upon binding of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins (FCNs) to their targets. Upon recognition of targets, the MBL-and FCN-associated serine proteases (MASPs) are activated, allowing them to generate the C3 convertase C4b2a. Recent findings indicate that the MASPs also activate components of the coagulation system. We have previously shown that MASP-1 has thrombin-like activity whereby it cleaves and activates fibrinogen and factor XIII. MASP-2 has factor Xa-like activity and activates prothrombin through cleavage to form thrombin. We now report that purified L-FCN-MASPs complexes, bound from serum to N-acetylcysteine-Sepharose, or MBL-MASPs complexes, bound to mannan-agarose, generate clots when incubated with calcified plasma or purified fibrinogen and factor XIII. Plasmin digestion of the clot and analysis using anti-D-dimer antibodies revealed that the clot was made up of fibrin and was similar to that generated by thrombin in normal human plasma. Fibrinopeptides A and B (FPA and FPB, respectively) were released after fibrinogen cleavage by L-FCN-MASPs complexes captured on N-acetylcysteine-Sepharose. Studies of inhibition of fibrinopeptide release indicated that the dominant pathway for clotting catalysed by the MASPs is via MASP-2 and prothrombin activation, as hirudin, a thrombin inhibitor that does not inhibit MASP-1 and MASP-2, substantially inhibits fibrinopeptide release. In the light of their potent chemoattractant effects on neutrophil and fibroblast recruitment, the MASP-mediated release of FPA and FPB may play a role in early immune activation. Additionally, MASP-catalysed deposition and polymerization of fibrin on the surface of micro-organisms may be protective by limiting the dissemination of infection. PMID:20002787

  7. Effects of fibrinogen concentrate after shock/resuscitation – A comparison between in vivo microvascular clot formation and thromboelastometry

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Judith; Cabrales, Pedro; Fries, Dietmar; Intaglietta, Marcos; Tsai, Amy G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dilutional coagulopathy after resuscitation with crystalloids/colloids clinically often appears as diffuse microvascular bleeding. Administration of fibrinogen reduces bleeding and increases maximum clot firmness (MCF), measured by thromboelastometry. Study objective was to implement a model where microvascular bleeding can be directly assessed by visualizing clot formation in microvessels, and correlations can be made to thromboelastometry. Design Randomized animal study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Male Syrian Golden hamsters. Interventions Microvessels of Syrian Golden hamsters fitted with a dorsal window chamber were studied using videomicroscopy. After 50% hemorrhage followed by 1 hr of hypovolemia resuscitation with 35% of blood volume using a high molecular weight (MW) HES solution (Hextend®, Hospira, MW 670 kD) occurred. Animals were then treated with 250 mg/kg fibrinogen iv (Laboratoire français du Fractionnement et des Biotechnologies (LFB), Paris, France) or an equal volume of saline before venular vessel wall injuries were made by directed laser irradiation and the ability of microthrombus formation was assessed. Measurements and main results Thromboelastometric measurements of MCF were performed at the beginning and at the end of the experiment. Resuscitation with HES and sham treatment significantly decreased FIBTEM MCF from 32 ± 9 at baseline vs. 13 ± 5 mm after sham treatment (p < 0.001). Infusion of fibrinogen concentrate significantly increased MCF, restoring baseline levels (baseline 32 ± 9 mm; after fibrinogen administration 29 ± 2 mm). In vivo microthrombus formation in laser injured vessels significantly increased in fibrinogen treated animals compared with sham (77% vs. 18%). Conclusions Fibrinogen treatment leads to increased clot firmness in dilutional coagulopathy as measured with thromboelastometry. At the microvascular level this increased clot strength, corresponds to an increased incidence of

  8. Interaction of hirudin with thrombin: Identification of a minimal binding domain of hirudin that inhibits clotting activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S.J.T.; Yates, M.T.; Owen, T.J.; Krstenansky, J.L. )

    1988-10-18

    Hirudin, isolated from the European leech Hirudo medicinalis, is a potent inhibitor of thrombin, forming an almost irreversible thrombin-hirudin complex. Previously, the authors have shown that the carboxyl terminus of hirudin (residues 45-65) inhibits clotting activity and without binding to the catalytic site of thrombin. In the present study, a series of peptides corresponding to this carboxyl-terminal region of hirudin have been synthesized, and their anticoagulant activity and binding properties to thrombin were examined. Binding was assessed by their ability to displace {sup 125}I-hirudin 45-65 from Sepharose-immobilized thrombin and by isolation of peptide-thrombin complexes. They show that the carboxyl-terminal 10 amino acid residues 56-65 (Phe-Glu-Glu-Ile-Pro-Glu-Glu-Tyr-Leu-Gln) are minimally required for binding to thrombin and inhibition of clotting. Phe-56 was critical for maintaining anticoagulant activity as demonstrated by the loss of activity when Phe-56 was substituted with D-Phe, Glu, or Leu. In addition, they found that the binding of the carboxyl-terminal peptide of hirudin with thrombin was associated with a significant conformational change of thrombin as judged by circular dichroism. This conformational change might be responsible for the loss of clotting activity of thrombin.

  9. Fibrinolytic Activity and Dose-Dependent Effect of Incubating Human Blood Clots in Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Elnager, Abuzar; Hassan, Rosline; Idris, Zamzuri; Mustafa, Zulkifli; Wan-Arfah, Nadiah; Sulaiman, S. A.; Gan, Siew Hua; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah

    2015-01-01

    Background. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been reported to possess time-dependent fibrinolytic activity by in vitro assay. This study is aimed at investigating fibrinolytic dose-dependent activity of CAPE using in vitro assays. Methods. Standardized human whole blood (WB) clots were incubated in either blank controls or different concentrations of CAPE (3.75, 7.50, 15.00, 22.50, and 30.00 mM). After 3 hours, D-dimer (DD) levels and WB clot weights were measured for each concentration. Thromboelastography (TEG) parameters were recorded following CAPE incubation, and fibrin morphology was examined under a confocal microscope. Results. Overall, mean DD (μg/mL) levels were significantly different across samples incubated with different CAPE concentrations, and the median pre- and postincubation WB clot weights (grams) were significantly decreased for each CAPE concentration. Fibrin removal was observed microscopically and indicated dose-dependent effects. Based on the TEG test, the Ly30 fibrinolytic parameter was significantly different between samples incubated with two different CAPE concentrations (15.0 and 22.50 mM). The 50% effective dose (ED50) of CAPE (based on DD) was 1.99 mg/mL. Conclusions. This study suggests that CAPE possesses fibrinolytic activity following in vitro incubation and that it has dose-dependent activities. Therefore, further investigation into CAPE as a potential alternative thrombolytic agent should be conducted. PMID:25664321

  10. New and Emerging Agents for the Treatment of Hemophilia: Focus on Extended Half-Life Recombinant Clotting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ragni, Margaret V

    2015-09-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked disorders caused by deficient or defective clotting factor VIII (FVIII) or IX factor (FIX) proteins, and characterized by spontaneous or traumatic bleeding into joints and muscles. Previous use of plasma and plasma-derived clotting factors that lacked appropriate viral inactivation steps in manufacturing led to significant morbidity associated with transfusion-transmitted HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV). The development of recombinant proteins revolutionized their treatment, and, with no new HIV or HCV infection via clotting proteins for nearly 30 years, greatly improved their lifespan, which now approaches that of the general population, and with the same risks for aging complications. Novel long-acting factor proteins are being licensed to extend FVIII and FIX half-life, thereby reducing infusion frequency and potentially bleed frequency and associated morbidity. Further, novel therapeutics which take advantage of new technologies, including siRNA, monoclonal antibody, and small peptide inhibition technologies, have the potential to simplify treatment and improve outcomes for those with inhibitors. PMID:26310188

  11. Anti-thrombogenic properties of a nitric oxide-releasing dextran derivative: evaluation of platelet activation and whole blood clotting kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, Vinod B.; Leszczak, Victoria; Wold, Kathryn A.; Lantvit, Sarah M.; Popat, Ketul C.; Reynolds, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Controlling platelet activation and clotting initiated by cardiovascular interventions remains a major challenge in clinical practice. In this work, the anti-thrombotic properties of a polysaccharide-based nitric oxide (NO)-releasing dextran derivative are presented. Total platelet adhesion, platelet morphology and whole blood clotting kinetics were used as indicators to evaluate the anti-clotting properties of this material. With a total NO delivery of 0.203±0.003 μmol, the NO-releasing dextran derivative (Dex-SNO) mixed with blood plasma demonstrated a significantly lower amount of platelet adhesion and activation onto a surface and reduced whole blood clotting kinetics. Nearly 75% reduction in platelet adhesion and a significant retention of platelet morphology were observed with blood plasma treated with Dex-SNO, suggesting this to be a potential anti-platelet therapeutic agent for preventing thrombosis that does not have an adverse effect on circulating platelets. PMID:24349705

  12. In vitro clot lysis as a potential indicator of thrombus resistance to fibrinolysis--study in healthy subjects and correlation with blood fibrinolytic parameters.

    PubMed

    Colucci, M; Scopece, S; Gelato, A V; Dimonte, D; Semeraro, N

    1997-04-01

    Using an in vitro model of clot lysis, the individual response to a pharmacological concentration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and the influence on this response of the physiological variations of blood parameters known to interfere with the fibrinolytic/thrombolytic process were investigated in 103 healthy donors. 125I-fibrin labelled blood clots were submersed in autologous plasma, supplemented with 500 ng/ml of rt-PA or solvent, and the degree of lysis was determined after 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. Baseline plasma levels of t-PA, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), plasminogen, alpha 2-antiplasmin, fibrinogen, lipoprotein (a), thrombomodulin and von Willebrand factor as well as platelet and leukocyte count and clot retraction were also determined in each donor. rt-PA-induced clot lysis varied over a wide range (28-75%) and was significantly related to endogenous t-PA, PAI-1, plasminogen (p < 0.001) and age (p < 0.01). Multivariate analysis indicated that both PAI-1 antigen and plasminogen independently predicted low response to rt-PA. Surprisingly, however, not only PAI-1 but also plasminogen was negatively correlated with rt-PA-induced clot lysis. The observation that neutralization of PAI-1 by specific antibodies, both in plasma and within the clot, did not potentiate clot lysis indicates that the inhibitor, including the platelet-derived form, is insufficient to attenuate the thrombolytic activity of a pharmacological concentration of rt-PA and that its elevation, similarly to the elevation of plasminogen, is not the cause of clot resistance but rather a coincident finding. It is concluded that the in vitro response of blood clots to rt-PA is poorly influenced by the physiological variations of the examined parameters and that factors other than those evaluated in this study interfere with clot dissolution by rt-PA. In vitro clot lysis test might help to identify patients who may be resistant to thrombolytic therapy

  13. Unfavorably Altered Fibrin Clot Properties in Patients with Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss Syndrome): Association with Thrombin Generation and Eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Mastalerz, Lucyna; Celińska-Lӧwenhoff, Magdalena; Krawiec, Piotr; Batko, Bogdan; Tłustochowicz, Witold; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Given reports on the increased prevalence of thromboembolic incidents in patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA; Churg-Strauss syndrome), we investigated whether fibrin clot properties are unfavorably altered in EGPA. Methods Ex vivo plasma fibrin clot characteristics, including clot permeability, turbidimetry and efficiency of fibrinolysis using two assays, were investigated in 34 consecutive patients with remission in EGPA according to the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score version 3 (23 female, 11 male), aged 48 (range, 21–80) years. The control group comprised 34 age- and sex- matched volunteers. Results Compared with controls, patients with EGPA were characterized by denser fiber clots (estimated pore size, Ks, 7.30±0.93 vs 10.14±1.07 10−9 cm2), faster fibrin polymerization (lag phase in a turbidimetric curve, 41.8±3.6 vs 47.4±2.9 s), thicker fibrin fibers (maximum absorbance, ΔAbs, 0.87±0.09 vs 0.72±0.07), higher maximum levels of D-dimer released from clots (DDmax 4.10±0.46 vs 3.54±0.35 mg/L), and prolonged clot lysis time (t50%; 9.50±1.45 vs 7.56±0.87 min); all p<0.0001. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed denser plasma fibrin networks composed of thinner fibers formed in EGPA. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody status and C-reactive protein did not affect clot variables. Multivariate analysis adjusted for fibrinogen showed that Ks was predicted by eosinophil count, peak thrombin generation, factor VIII, and soluble CD40 ligand, whereas eosinophil count, peak thrombin generation and antiplasmin predicted t50%. Conclusion This study is the first to show that EGPA is associated with prothrombotic plasma fibrin clot phenotype, which may contribute to thromboembolic manifestations reported in this disease. PMID:26540111

  14. Rubella susceptibility predicts measles susceptibility: implications for postpartum immunization.

    PubMed

    Libman, M D; Behr, M A; Martel, N; Ward, B J

    2000-12-01

    Measles and mumps antibody titers were measured in 262 pregnant women who were either positive (n=128) or negative (n=134) for rubella antibodies. Susceptibility to measles and mumps was detected in 4.6% (12/262) and 7.6% (14/184) of the women, respectively. Of the rubella-susceptible group, 8.2% were also measles susceptible, whereas only 0.8% of the rubella-immune women were measles susceptible. Susceptibility to mumps was evenly divided between rubella-susceptible (7.8%) and rubella-immune (7.4%) groups. PMID:11096023

  15. Cow Dung Is a Novel Feedstock for Fibrinolytic Enzyme Production from Newly Isolated Bacillus sp. IND7 and Its Application in In Vitro Clot Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Ponnuswamy; Arun, Arumugaperumal; Vincent, Samuel Gnana Prakash; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial fibrinolytic enzymes find great applications to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases. The novel fibrinolytic enzymes from food grade organisms are useful for thrombolytic therapy. This study reports fibrinolytic enzyme production by Bacillus sp. IND7 in solid-state fermentation (SSF). In this study, cow dung was used as the cheap substrate for the production of fibrinolytic enzyme. Enzyme production was primarily improved by optimizing the nutrient and physical factors by one-variable-at-a-time approach. A statistical method (two-level full factorial design) was applied to investigate the significant variables. Of the different variables, pH, starch, and beef extract significantly influenced on the production of fibrinolytic enzyme (p < 0.05). The optimum levels of these significant factors were further investigated using response surface methodology. The optimum conditions for enhanced fibrinolytic enzyme production were 1.23% (w/w) starch and 0.3% (w/w) beef extract with initial medium pH 9.0. Under the optimized conditions, cow dung substrate yielded 8,345 U/g substrate, and an overall 2.5-fold improvement in fibrinolytic enzyme production was achieved due to its optimization. This is the first report of fibrinolytic enzyme production using cow dung substrate from Bacillus sp. in SSF. The crude enzyme displayed potent activity on zymography and digested goat blood clot completely in in vitro condition. PMID:27065952

  16. Cow Dung Is a Novel Feedstock for Fibrinolytic Enzyme Production from Newly Isolated Bacillus sp. IND7 and Its Application in In Vitro Clot Lysis.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Ponnuswamy; Arun, Arumugaperumal; Vincent, Samuel Gnana Prakash; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial fibrinolytic enzymes find great applications to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases. The novel fibrinolytic enzymes from food grade organisms are useful for thrombolytic therapy. This study reports fibrinolytic enzyme production by Bacillus sp. IND7 in solid-state fermentation (SSF). In this study, cow dung was used as the cheap substrate for the production of fibrinolytic enzyme. Enzyme production was primarily improved by optimizing the nutrient and physical factors by one-variable-at-a-time approach. A statistical method (two-level full factorial design) was applied to investigate the significant variables. Of the different variables, pH, starch, and beef extract significantly influenced on the production of fibrinolytic enzyme (p < 0.05). The optimum levels of these significant factors were further investigated using response surface methodology. The optimum conditions for enhanced fibrinolytic enzyme production were 1.23% (w/w) starch and 0.3% (w/w) beef extract with initial medium pH 9.0. Under the optimized conditions, cow dung substrate yielded 8,345 U/g substrate, and an overall 2.5-fold improvement in fibrinolytic enzyme production was achieved due to its optimization. This is the first report of fibrinolytic enzyme production using cow dung substrate from Bacillus sp. in SSF. The crude enzyme displayed potent activity on zymography and digested goat blood clot completely in in vitro condition. PMID:27065952

  17. Mathematical model and numerical method for studying platelet adhesion and aggregation during blood clotting

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelson, A.L.

    1984-10-01

    The repair of small blood vessels and the pathological growth of internal blood clots involve the formation of platelet aggregates adhering to portions of the vessel wall. Our microscopic model represents blood by a suspension of discrete massless platelets in a viscous incompressible fluid. Platelets are initially noncohesive; however, if stimulated by an above-threshold concentration of the chemical ADP or by contact with the adhesive injured region of the vessel wall, they become cohesive and secrete more ADP into the fluid. Cohesion between platelets and adhesion of a platelet to the injured wall are modeled by creating elastic links. Repulsive forces prevent a platelet from coming too close to another platelet or to the wall. The forces affect the fluid motion in the neighborhood of an aggregate. The platelets and secreted ADP both move by fluid advection and diffusion. The equations of the model are studied numerically in two dimensions. The platelet forces are calculated implicitly by minimizing a nonlinear energy function. Our minimization scheme merges Gill and Murray's (Math. Programming 7 (1974), 311) modified Newton's method with elements of the Yale sparse matix package. The stream-function formulation of the Stokes' equations for the fluid motion under the influence of platelet forces is solved using Bjorstad's biharmonic solver (''Numerical Solution of the Biharmonic Equation,'' Ph.D. Thesis, Stanford University, 1980). The ADP transport equation is solved with an alternating-direction implicit scheme. A linked-list data structure is introduced to keep track of changing platelet states and changing configurations of interplatelet links.

  18. Idiotypes of murine monoclonal antibodies to clotting factor VIII:C

    SciTech Connect

    Pechet, L.; Tiarks, C.Y.; Ghalili, K.; Humphreys, R.E.

    1986-03-05

    The authors goal is to study idiotypic immunoregulation of inhibitors to clotting factor VIII:C. To this end, they used monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against VIII:C: Synbiotics, C7F7, and C5, directed against epitopes on the C terminal fragment of VIII:C; C2, C6, C8 directed against epitopes on the N terminal fragment of VIII:C; C10, directed against a non-functional epitope; IB3, Chemicon and Hybritech, to undetermined epitopes. Anti-idiotypic antibodies against C7F7, C8, Synbiotics and Hybritech were produced in rabbits. Competitive radioimmunoassays (RIA) tested cross-reactivity between each immunogen and the other MoAbs. Synbiotics cross-reacted with Chemicon and IB3, indicating they were directed against the same epitope on the C terminal fragment of VIII:C. They did not cross-react with Hybritech, C7F7, C2, C5, C6, C8, or C10. C7F7 showed no cross-reactivities. C8 cross-reacted with C6 but not with C2, C5, C10, C7F7, Synbiotics, or Hybritech. Hybritech did not did not cross-react with any of the other MoAbs. In conclusion, with four anti-idiotypic antibodies and ten MoAbs to VIII:C, they defined at least five functional epitopes and one non-functional epitope on the factor VIII:C molecule to which inhibitors may develop: C2, C6-C8 (N terminal), C7F7, C5, Synbiotics (C terminal), Hybritech (undetermined epitope) and C10 (non-functional).

  19. A Mathematical Model and Numerical Method for Studying Platelet Adhesion and Aggregation during Blood Clotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelson, Aaron L.

    1984-10-01

    The repair of small blood vessels and the pathological growth of internal blood clots involve the formation of platelet aggregates adhering to portions of the vessel wall. Our microscopic model represents blood by a suspension of discrete massless platelets in a viscous incompressible fluid. Platelets are initially noncohesive; however, if stimulated by an above-threshold concentration of the chemical ADP or by contact with the adhesive injured region of the vessel wall, they become cohesive and secrete more ADP into the fluid. Cohesion between platelets and adhesion of a platelet to the injured wall are modeled by creating elastic links. Repulsive forces prevent a platelet from coming too close to another platelet or to the wall. The forces affect the fluid motion in the neighborhood of an aggregate. The platelets and secreted ADP both move by fluid advection and diffusion. The equations of the model are studied numerically in two dimensions. The platelet forces are calculated implicitly by minimizing a nonlinear energy function. Our minimization scheme merges Gill and Murray's ( Math. Programming7 (1974) , 311) modified Newton's method with elements of the Yale sparse matrix package. The stream-function' formulation' of the Stokes' equations for the fluid motion under the influence of platelet forces is solved using Bjorstad's biharmonic solver ("Numerical Solution of the Biharmonic Equation," Ph. D. Thesis, Stanford University, 1980). The ADP transport equation is solved with an alternating-direction implicit scheme. A linked-list data structure is introduced to keep track of changing platelet states and changing configurations of interplatelet links. Results of calculations with healthy platelets and with diseased platelets are presented.

  20. Dynamics of motion of a clot through an arterial bifurcation: a finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolfazli, Ehsan; Fatouraee, Nasser; Vahidi, Bahman

    2014-10-01

    Although arterial embolism is important as a major cause of brain infarction, little information is available about the hemodynamic factors which govern the path emboli tend to follow. A method which predicts the trajectory of emboli in carotid arteries would be of a great value in understanding ischemic attack mechanisms and eventually devising hemodynamically optimal techniques for prevention of strokes. In this paper, computational models are presented to investigate the motion of a blood clot in a human carotid artery bifurcation. The governing equations for blood flow are the Navier-Stokes formulations. To achieve large structural movements, the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) with an adaptive mesh method was employed for the fluid domain. The problem was solved by simultaneous solution of the fluid and the structure equations. In this paper, the phenomenon was simulated under laminar and Newtonian flow conditions. The measured stress-strain curve obtained from ultrasound elasticity imaging of the thrombus was set to a Sussman-Bathe material model representing embolus material properties. Shear stress magnitudes in the inner wall of the internal carotid artery (ICA) were measured. High magnitudes of wall shear stress (WSS) occurred in the areas in which the embolus and arterial are in contact with each other. Stress distribution in the embolus was also calculated and areas prone to rapture were identified. Effects of embolus size and embolus density on its motion velocity were investigated and it was observed that an increase in either embolus size or density led to a reduction in movement velocity of the embolus. Embolus trajectory and shear stress from a simulation of embolus movement in a three-dimensional model with patient-specific carotid artery bifurcation geometry are also presented.

  1. Magnetic Susceptibility of Wet vs. Dry Sediment and Mass Normalized vs. Volume Normalized Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Hruba, J.; Nabelek, L.

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of magnetic susceptibility in sediments represents a fast and non-destructive technique that can be used to deduce the concentration of magnetic minerals [1, 2]. Magnetic minerals change their magnetic properties with temperature [3]. Heating (during a fire, laboratory, with the purpose of manufacturing a product, etc.) can modify a number of sediment properties [4, 5]. Heat-induced sediment mineralogical changes may cause irreversible changes in the sediment mineral structure and composition, and they occur at a wide range of temperature [6]. We provided measurements of magnetic susceptibility on samples from the Stara Jimka (SJ) paleo lacustrine site in the Bohemian Forest using magnetic susceptibility meter MS-30. Sediment samples of approximately 0.2 cm thickness were weighed and put into plastic containers. First, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were taken on wet samples. Then the containers were put into the oven and sediment was dried at temperature of 110°C. After drying and cooling to room temperature, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were repeated. Dry samples were also weighed. Comparison of magnetic susceptibility of dry versus wet samples showed higher values of magnetic susceptibility of dry samples. This enhancement was probably caused during oven-drying, when constituents of sediment (mainly clays) underwent heat-induced changes. We also compared volume normalized values of magnetic susceptibility with mass normalized values. Mass normalized magnetic susceptibility was burdened by greater noise. References: [1] QUIJANO, L. et al. 2001. Magnetic Susceptibilty in Topsoils and Bulk Cores of Cultivated Calcisols. [2] DEARING, J. A. 1994. Environmental Magnetic Susceptibility. [3] HANESCH, M. and SCHOLGER, R. 2005. The Influence of Soil Type on the Magnetic Susceptibility Measured throughout Soil Profiles. [4] FARWIG, V. J. et al. 2004. The Effects of Heating on Mineral Magnetic Enhancement of Soils. [5] KLETETSCHKA, G

  2. α(1,3)-Fucosyltransferases FUT4 and FUT7 Control Murine Susceptibility to Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huili; Morales-Levy, Maria; Rose, Jason; Mackey, Lantz C.; Bodary, Peter; Eitzman, Daniel; Homeister, Jonathon W.

    2014-01-01

    The α(1,3)-fucosyltransferases, types IV and VII (FUT4 and FUT7, respectively), are required for the synthesis of functional selectin-type leukocyte adhesion molecule ligands. The selectins and their ligands modulate leukocyte trafficking, and P-selectin and its ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, can modulate hemostasis and thrombosis. Regulation of thrombosis by FUT4 and/or FUT7 activity was examined in mouse models of carotid artery thrombosis and collagen/epinephrine-induced thromboembolism. Mice lacking both FUT4 and FUT7 (Fut−/− mice) had a shorter time to occlusive thrombus formation in the injured carotid artery and a higher mortality due to collagen/epinephrine-induced pulmonary thromboemboli. Mice lacking P-selectin or P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 did not have a prothrombotic phenotype. Whole blood platelet aggregation was enhanced, and plasma fibrinogen content, clot weight, and clot strength were increased in Fut−/− mice, and in vitro clot lysis was reduced compared with wild type. Fut4−/−, but not Fut7−/−, mice had increased pulmonary thromboembolism-induced mortality and decreased thromboemboli dissolution in vivo. These data show that FUT4 and FUT7 activity regulates thrombosis in a P-selectin– and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1–independent manner and suggest that FUT4 activity is important for thrombolysis. PMID:23562273

  3. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  4. Comparison of fibrin clot adhesion to dentine conditioned with citric acid, tetracycline, and ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid: An in vitro scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Tanuj; Rahul, Aparna

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the root surface changes subsequent to the application of citric acid, tetracycline, Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the combination of citric acid and tetracycline, and its influence on the adhesion of a fibrin clot with and without mild disruptive forces. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 periodontally diseased root specimens were grouped into Saline (control Group I), 24% EDTA gel (Group-II), Citric acid (Group-III), Tetracycline (Group IV), and Citric acid + tetracycline (Group V) treatment groups containing 20 in each. After root conditioning, fresh human blood was applied to each root specimen and was allowed to clot. Ten specimens in each group were rinsed in phosphate-buffered saline and designated as ′Non-agitated′. The remaining ten specimens from each group were rinsed in phosphate-buffered saline on a rotary shaker and designated as ′Agitated′. The roots were processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to assess and compare the clot adhesion on them. The scores were compared through standard statistical packages. Results: The highest mean blood clot adhesion score was observed in roots treated with a combination of citric acid and tetracycline, whereas, the least score was observed in roots treated with saline. Conclusion: The root specimens treated with the combination of citric acid and tetracycline as well as citric acid alone, best supported the fibrin clot. Tetracycline alone appeared to be less effective in supporting the clot. EDTA gel of 24% was least effective to promote the adhesion of a fibrin clot. PMID:23162325

  5. Differential susceptibility to the environment: an evolutionary--neurodevelopmental theory.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Bruce J; Boyce, W Thomas; Belsky, Jay; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H

    2011-02-01

    Two extant evolutionary models, biological sensitivity to context theory (BSCT) and differential susceptibility theory (DST), converge on the hypothesis that some individuals are more susceptible than others to both negative (risk-promoting) and positive (development-enhancing) environmental conditions. These models contrast with the currently dominant perspective on personal vulnerability and environmental risk: diathesis stress/dual risk. We review challenges to this perspective based on emerging theory and data from the evolutionary, developmental, and health sciences. These challenges signify the need for a paradigm shift in conceptualizing Person x Environment interactions in development. In this context we advance an evolutionary--neurodevelopmental theory, based on DST and BSCT, of the role of neurobiological susceptibility to the environment in regulating environmental effects on adaptation, development, and health. We then outline current thinking about neurogenomic and endophenotypic mechanisms that may underpin neurobiological susceptibility, summarize extant empirical research on differential susceptibility, and evaluate the evolutionary bases and implications of BSCT and DST. Finally, we discuss applied issues including methodological and statistical considerations in conducting differential susceptibility research; issues of ecological, cultural, and racial--ethnic variation in neurobiological susceptibility; and implications of differential susceptibility for designing social programs. We conclude that the differential susceptibility paradigm has far-reaching implications for understanding whether and how much child and adult development responds, for better and for worse, to the gamut of species-typical environmental conditions. PMID:21262036

  6. Combination of recombinant factor VIIa and fibrinogen corrects clot formation in primary immune thrombocytopenia at very low platelet counts.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ole H; Stentoft, Jesper; Radia, Deepti; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Sørensen, Benny

    2013-01-01

    Haemostatic treatment modalities alternative to platelet transfusion are desirable to control serious acute bleeds in primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). This study challenged the hypothesis that recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) combined with fibrinogen concentrate may correct whole blood (WB) clot formation in ITP. Blood from ITP patients (n = 12) was drawn into tubes containing 3·2% citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor 18·3 μg/ml. WB [mean platelet count 22 × 10(9) /l (range 0-42)] was spiked in vitro with buffer, donor platelets (+40 × 10(9) /l), rFVIIa (1 or 4 μg/ml), fibrinogen (1 or 3 mg/ml), or combinations of rFVIIa and fibrinogen. Coagulation profiles were recorded by tissue factor (0·03 pmol/l) activated thromboelastometry. Coagulation in ITP was characterized by a prolonged clotting time (CT, 1490 s (mean)) and a low maximum velocity (MaxVel, 3·4 mm × 100/s) and maximum clot firmness (MCF, 38·2 mm). Fibrinogen showed no haemostatic effect, whereas rFVIIa reduced the CT and increased the MaxVel. The combination of fibrinogen and rFVIIa revealed a significant synergistic effect, improving all parameters (CT 794 s, MaxVel 7·9 mm × 100/s, MCF 50·7 mm) even at very low platelet counts. These data suggest that rFVIIa combined with fibrinogen corrects the coagulopathy of ITP even at very low platelet counts, and may represent an alternative to platelet transfusion. PMID:23151086

  7. Design and Testing of a Minimally Invasive Blood Clot Removal Device ConstructedWith Elements of Superelastic Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puffer, Andrew J.

    Many vascular system problems stem from insufficient blood return flow to the heart. One of the main causes is a blockage within veins or arteries known as a blood clot, or thrombus. This can occur after trauma, surgery, or other phenomenological reasons. Each year in the U.S. more than 175,000 bypass procedures and more than 160,000 amputations resulting from peripheral vessel disease are performed. Clinical data indicates that clot removal devices and procedures can reduce the need for an amputation by 80 percent. Percutaneous thrombectomy refers to the removal of thrombus using catheter based non-surgical methods. The ultimate goal of any modality to treat these conditions of the arterial or venous system is to restore patency, quickly, safely, and cost effectively. Catheter directed thrombectomy and thrombolysis is less traumatic and avoids the morbidity and mortality associated with conventional surgical technique. As a result, there has been a push recently for the use of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) devices. However, all devices have their own set of drawbacks: distal embolization, vessel wall trauma, hemolysis, to name a few. Ongoing efforts have been made to create a prototype thrombectomy device that uses elements of superelastic nitinol (a type of shape memory alloy), that seeks to address some of the drawbacks of current devices. The prototype was designed and tested in a simulated human circulatory system along side a commercially available device (The DiverCE Clot Extraction Catheter). The test evaluated how well the devices minimized distal embolization of a human blood clot created in vitro.. Results of the testing showed that the prototype device created significantly less embolization when compared to the DiverCE particles greater than 102mum (p = 0.0332). Means were statistically not different for particles between 25mum and 102mum (p = 0.2454), and particles between 5mum and 25mum (p = 0.6524). In addition the prototype was shown

  8. Effect of a Tibetan herbal mixture on microvascular endothelial function, heart rate variability and biomarkers of inflammation, clotting and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Daniela; Lambrecht, Julia; Radtke, Thomas; Wilhelm, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2015-08-01

    In this 6-week prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled and double-blind study, we investigated the effects of a natural herbal remedy based on a recipe from Tibet (Padma® 28), on microvascular endothelial function, heart rate variability and biomarkers of inflammation, clotting and coagulation in 80 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients (age 66 ± 8 years) on guideline-based medication for secondary prevention. We found no significant effects of Padma 28 and conclude that the addition of Padma 28 to guideline-based secondary prevention treatment of CAD did not lead to significant effects on important surrogate markers in elderly male CAD patients. PMID:25208904

  9. The relationship between inhibition of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide reductase and reduction of clotting factor activity with warfarin.

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, I A; Malia, R G; Haynes, B P; Hay, C R; Cholerton, S; Breckenridge, A M; Preston, F E; Park, B K

    1988-01-01

    1 The effect of low dose steady state warfarin (0.2 mg and 1 mg daily) on clotting factor activity and vitamin K1 metabolism was studied in seven healthy volunteers. 2 Steady state plasma warfarin concentrations were 41-99 ng ml-1 for the 0.2 mg dose and 157-292 ng ml-1 for the 1 mg dose. 3 There was a significant prolongation of the mean prothrombin time (0.9 s) after 1 mg warfarin daily, but no significant change in prothrombin time after 0.2 mg warfarin daily. There was no significant change in individual clotting factor activity (II, VII, IX or X) with either dose of warfarin. 4 Following the administration of a pharmacological dose of vitamin K1 (10 mg), all seven volunteers had detectable levels of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide with both doses of warfarin (Cpmax 31-409 ng ml-1). 5 Both the Cpmax and the AUC for vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide were significantly greater on 1 mg of warfarin daily than 0.2 mg daily (P less than 0.01). 6 The apparent dissociation between inhibition of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide reductase and reduction of clotting factor activity, produced by warfarin, may reflect the insensitivity of functional clotting factor assays to a small reduction in clotting factor concentration. PMID:3370190

  10. Contributions of Antoine Barthélémy Clot (1793-1868): A historiographical reflection of public health in Ottoman Egypt.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Enein, Basil H; Puddy, William

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews the selected historiographic and contemporary literature that discussed the medical and public health contribution of Antoine Barthélémy Clot (Clot Bey) and how these contributions shaped modern public health in Ottoman Egypt, and the major features that led to the development of the public health infrastructure of early modern Egypt based on the contributions of Clot Bey. The literature discussed the establishment of Egypt's first modern public health and medical schools under the direct administration and guidance of Clot Bey, and his major contribution in the fields of vaccination, quarantine, the development of a culturally congruent curriculum for medical students, and the public health policies and practices enacted during the reign of Muhammad Ali Pasha that addressed major communicable diseases affecting Egypt. With considerable support from the viceroy of Egypt despite popular resistance, Clot Bey significantly modernized Egyptian medicine, medical education and reformed the public health infrastructure. He became one of the preeminent medical figures of nineteenth century Ottoman Egypt. PMID:26025850

  11. Common variation in the C-terminal region of the fibrinogen beta-chain: effects on fibrin structure, fibrinolysis and clot rigidity.

    PubMed

    Ajjan, Ramzi; Lim, Bernard C B; Standeven, Kristina F; Harrand, Robert; Dolling, Sarah; Phoenix, Fladia; Greaves, Richard; Abou-Saleh, Radwa H; Connell, Simon; Smith, D Alastair M; Weisel, John W; Grant, Peter J; Ariëns, Robert A S

    2008-01-15

    Fibrinogen BbetaArg448Lys is a common polymorphism, positioned within the carboxyl terminus of the Bbeta-chain of the molecule. Studies suggest that it is associated with severity of coronary artery disease and development of stroke. The effects of the amino acid substitution on clot structure remains controversial, and the aim of this study was to investigate the effect(s) of this polymorphism on fibrin clot structure using recombinant techniques. Permeation, turbidity, and scanning electron microscopy showed that recombinant Lys448 fibrin had a significantly more compact structure, with thin fibers and small pores, compared with Arg448. Clot stiffness, measured by means of a novel method using magnetic tweezers, was significantly higher for the Lys448 compared with the Arg448 variant. Clots made from recombinant protein variants had similar lysis rates outside the plasma environment, but when added to fibrinogen-depleted plasma, the fibrinolysis rates for Lys448 were significantly slower compared with Arg448. This study demonstrates for the first time that clots made from recombinant BbetaLys448 fibrinogen are characterized by thin fibers and small pores, show increased stiffness, and appear more resistant to fibrinolysis. Fibrinogen BbetaArg448Lys is a primary example of common genetic variation with a significant phenotypic effect at the molecular level. PMID:17925485

  12. Electronic Structures and Magnetic Susceptibility of LANTHANUM(2)COPPER-OXIDE(4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Trei-Wen

    The wavevector dependent magnetic susceptibility, chi(q), has been calculated for body -centered-tetragonal La_2CuO _4. Many body enhancement was incorporated into the calculations with a local exchange-correlation potential correction potential included. The unenhanced susceptibility shows two possible poles of chi (q) along the (110) direction. The enhanced susceptibility chi(q) has been found to exhibit antiferromagnetic instability.

  13. Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) clotting activity in human plasma in health and disease in various animal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Goldsmith, G; Waldmann, R

    1976-12-01

    Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) is an agent in normal human plasma that corrects the impaired in vitro surface-mediated plasma reactions of blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and kinin generation observed in Fitzgerald trait plasma. To assess the possible pathophysiologic role of Fitzgerald factor, its titer was measured by a functional clot-promoting assay. Mean +/- SD in 42 normal adults was 0.99+/-0.25 units/ml, one unit being the activity in 1 ml of normal pooled plasma. No difference in titer was noted between normal men and women, during pregnancy, or after physical exercise. Fitzgerald factor activity was significantly reduced in the plasmas of eight patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis (0.40+/-0.09 units/ml) and of ten patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (0.60+/-0.30 units/ml), but was normal in plasmas of patients with other congenital clotting factor deficiencies, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or sarcoidosis, or under treatment with warfarin. The plasmas of 21 mammalian species tested appeared to contain Fitzgerald factor activity, but those of two avian, two repitilian, and one amphibian species did not correct the coagulant defect in Fitzgerald trait plasmas. PMID:1000085

  14. Evaluation of the catalytic specificity, biochemical properties, and milk clotting abilities of an aspartic peptidase from Rhizomucor miehei.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; Souto, Tatiane Beltramini; de Oliveira, Tássio Brito; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Karcher, Daniel; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; de Oliveira, Arthur H C; Rodrigues, André; Rosa, Jose C; Cabral, Hamilton

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we detail the specificity of an aspartic peptidase from Rhizomucor miehei and evaluate the effects of this peptidase on clotting milk using the peptide sequence of k-casein (Abz-LSFMAIQ-EDDnp) and milk powder. Molecular mass of the peptidase was estimated at 37 kDa, and optimum activity was achieved at pH 5.5 and 55 °C. The peptidase was stable at pH values ranging from 3 to 5 and temperatures of up 45 °C for 60 min. Dramatic reductions in proteolytic activity were observed with exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate, and aluminum and copper (II) chloride. Peptidase was inhibited by pepstatin A, and mass spectrometry analysis identified four peptide fragments (TWSISYGDGSSASGILAK, ASNGGGGEYIFGGYDSTK, GSLTTVPIDNSR, and GWWGITVDRA), similar to rhizopuspepsin. The analysis of catalytic specificity showed that the coagulant activity of the peptidase was higher than the proteolytic activity and that there was a preference for aromatic, basic, and nonpolar amino acids, particularly methionine, with specific cleavage of the peptide bond between phenylalanine and methionine. Thus, this peptidase may function as an important alternative enzyme in milk clotting during the preparation of cheese. PMID:27165660

  15. Magnetically Driven Flows of Suspensions of Rods to Deliver Clot-Busting Drugs to Dead-End Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnecaze, Roger; Clements, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Suspensions of iron particles in the presence of a magnetic field create flows that could significantly increase the delivery of drugs to dissolve clots in stroke victims. An explanation of this flow rests on the foundation of the seminal works by Prof. Acrivos and his students on effective magnetic permittivity of suspensions of rods, hydrodynamic diffusion of particles, and the flow of suspensions. Intravenous administration of the clot dissolving tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the most used therapy for stroke. This therapy is often unsuccessful because the tPA delivery is diffusion-limited and too slow to be effective. Observations show that added iron particles in a rotating magnetic field form rotating rods along the wall of the occluded vessel, creating a convective flow that can carry tPA much faster than diffusion. We present a proposed mechanism for this magnetically driven flow in the form of coupled particle-scale and vessel-scale flow models. At the particle-scale, particles chain up to form rods that rotate, diffuse and translate in the presence of the flow and magnetic fields. Localized vorticity created by the rotating particles drives a macroscopic convective flow in the vessel. Suspension transport equations describe the flow at the vessel-scale. The flow affects the convection and diffusion of the suspension of particles, linking the two scales. The model equations are solved asymptotically and numerically to understand how to create convective flows in dead-end or blocked vessels.

  16. The major clotting protein from guinea pig seminal vesicle contains eight repeats of a 24-amino acid domain.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J T; Hagstrom, J; McCormick, D J; Harvey, S; Madden, B; Holicky, E; Stanford, D R; Wieben, E D

    1987-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major clotting protein from the guinea pig seminal vesicle (SVP-1) has been determined by nucleotide sequencing of cDNA clones corresponding to the 3' terminus of an mRNA that codes for a protein precursor to SVP-1. The first 40 amino acids of the derived protein sequence are identical to those determined by N-terminal sequencing of SVP-1 isolated from the lumen of the seminal vesicle. This finding confirms that SVP-1 is cleaved from the C terminus of a larger precursor protein. The portion of the nucleotide sequence that codes for SVP-1 contains eight highly homologous but imperfect repeats of a 72-nucleotide domain. This repeated structure is also evident at the amino acid level. The consensus 24-amino acid repeat unit contains two lysine and three glutamine residues. Since the clotting of SVP-1 is known to involve the formation of gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine crosslinks, it is likely that the 24-amino acid repeating unit is the unit of function of SVP-1. PMID:3477802

  17. Microfluidic assay of hemophilic blood clotting: Distinct deficits in platelet and fibrin deposition at low factor levels

    PubMed Central

    Colace, T.; Fogarty, Patrick F.; Panckeri, Karen A.; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor deficiencies create a range of bleeding phenotypes. Microfluidic devices offer controlled hemodynamics and defined procoagulant triggers for measurement of clotting under flow. Objectives We tested a flow assay of contact pathway-triggered clotting to quantify platelet and fibrin deposition distal of dysfunctional thrombin production. Microfluidic metrics were then compared with PTT or % factor activity assays. Methods Whole blood (WB) treated with low level corn trypsin inhibitor (4 µg/ml) from 9 healthy donors and 27 patients [deficient in: Factor VIII (19 patients); IX (1); XI (1); VWF (6)] was perfused over fibrillar collagen at wall shear rate=100 s−1. Results Using healthy WB, platelets deposited within 30 sec, while fibrin appeared within 6 min. Compared to healthy controls, WB from patients displayed a 50% reduction in platelet deposition only at <1 % factor activity. In contrast, striking defects in fibrin deposition occurred for patients with <13% factor activity (or PTT >40 sec). Full occlusion of the 60-micron high channel was completely absent over the 15 min test in patients with <1% factor activity, while an intermediate defect was present in patients with >1% factor. Conclusion Spontaneous bleeding in patients with < 1% factor activity may be linked to deficits in both platelet and fibrin deposition, a risk known to be mitigated when factor levels are raised to >1 % activity (PTT of ~40–60 sec), a level that does not necessarily rescue fibrin formation under flow. PMID:24261634

  18. Alate susceptibility in ants.

    PubMed

    Ho, Eddie K H; Frederickson, Megan E

    2014-11-01

    Pathogens are predicted to pose a particular threat to eusocial insects because infections can spread rapidly in colonies with high densities of closely related individuals. In ants, there are two major castes: workers and reproductives. Sterile workers receive no direct benefit from investing in immunity, but can gain indirect fitness benefits if their immunity aids the survival of their fertile siblings. Virgin reproductives (alates), on the other hand, may be able to increase their investment in reproduction, rather than in immunity, because of the protection they receive from workers. Thus, we expect colonies to have highly immune workers, but relatively more susceptible alates. We examined the survival of workers, gynes, and males of nine ant species collected in Peru and Canada when exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. For the seven species in which treatment with B. bassiana increased ant mortality relative to controls, we found workers were significantly less susceptible compared with both alate sexes. Female and male alates did not differ significantly in their immunocompetence. Our results suggest that, as with other nonreproductive tasks in ant colonies like foraging and nest maintenance, workers have primary responsibility for colony immunity, allowing alates to specialize on reproduction. We highlight the importance of colony-level selection on individual immunity in ants and other eusocial organisms. PMID:25540683

  19. Alate susceptibility in ants

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Eddie K H; Frederickson, Megan E

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens are predicted to pose a particular threat to eusocial insects because infections can spread rapidly in colonies with high densities of closely related individuals. In ants, there are two major castes: workers and reproductives. Sterile workers receive no direct benefit from investing in immunity, but can gain indirect fitness benefits if their immunity aids the survival of their fertile siblings. Virgin reproductives (alates), on the other hand, may be able to increase their investment in reproduction, rather than in immunity, because of the protection they receive from workers. Thus, we expect colonies to have highly immune workers, but relatively more susceptible alates. We examined the survival of workers, gynes, and males of nine ant species collected in Peru and Canada when exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. For the seven species in which treatment with B. bassiana increased ant mortality relative to controls, we found workers were significantly less susceptible compared with both alate sexes. Female and male alates did not differ significantly in their immunocompetence. Our results suggest that, as with other nonreproductive tasks in ant colonies like foraging and nest maintenance, workers have primary responsibility for colony immunity, allowing alates to specialize on reproduction. We highlight the importance of colony-level selection on individual immunity in ants and other eusocial organisms. PMID:25540683

  20. The Safety of Using High Frequency, Low Intensity Ultrasound to Enhance Thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, Azita

    2006-05-08

    The EKOS Ultrasound Infusion Systems (EKOS Corporation, Bothell, WA) use high frequency, low intensity ultrasound to accelerate thrombolysis by enhancing clot permeability and lytic drug penetration into thrombus. These systems are designed to provide efficacious catheter-directed treatment for the management of stroke, peripheral arterial occlusion and deep vein thrombosis. The in vitro and in vivo results of investigating the stability of therapeutic and diagnostic compounds used in combination with EKOS devices, the potential for adverse biological effects and the clot fragmentation confirmed the safety of EKOS ultrasound infusion systems in thrombolysis treatment.

  1. The Safety of Using High Frequency, Low Intensity Ultrasound to Enhance Thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Azita

    2006-05-01

    The EKOS Ultrasound Infusion Systems (EKOS Corporation, Bothell, WA) use high frequency, low intensity ultrasound to accelerate thrombolysis by enhancing clot permeability and lytic drug penetration into thrombus. These systems are designed to provide efficacious catheter-directed treatment for the management of stroke, peripheral arterial occlusion and deep vein thrombosis. The in vitro and in vivo results of investigating the stability of therapeutic and diagnostic compounds used in combination with EKOS devices, the potential for adverse biological effects and the clot fragmentation confirmed the safety of EKOS ultrasound infusion systems in thrombolysis treatment.

  2. Enhancement of fibrinolysis in vitro by ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, C W; Onundarson, P T; Carstensen, E L; Blinc, A; Meltzer, R S; Schwarz, K; Marder, V J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound on the rate of fibrinolysis has been investigated using an in vitro system. Plasma or blood clots containing a trace label of 125I fibrin were suspended in plasma containing plasminogen activator and intermittently exposed to continuous wave 1-MHz ultrasound at intensities up to 8 W/cm2. Plasma clot lysis at 1 h with 1 microgram/ml recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) was 12.8 +/- 1.2% without ultrasound and was significantly (P = 0.0001) increased by exposure to ultrasound with greater lysis at 1 W/cm2 (18.0 +/- 1.4%), 2 W/cm2 (19.3 +/- 0.7%), 4 W/cm2 (22.8 +/- 1.8%), and 8 W/cm2 (58.7 +/- 7.1%). Significant increases in lysis were also seen with urokinase at ultrasound intensities of 2 W/cm2 and above. Exposure of clots to ultrasound in the absence of plasminogen activator did not increase lysis. Ultrasound exposure resulted in a marked reduction in the rt-PA concentration required to achieve an equivalent degree of lysis to that seen without ultrasound. For example, 15% lysis occurred in 1 h at 1 microgram/ml rt-PA without ultrasound or with 0.2 microgram/ml with ultrasound, a five-fold reduction in concentration. Ultrasound at 1 W/cm2 and above also potentiated lysis of retracted whole blood clots mediated by rt-PA or urokinase. The maximum temperature increase of plasma clots exposed to 4 W/cm2 ultrasound was only 1.7 degrees C, which could not explain the enhancement of fibrinolysis. Ultrasound exposure did not cause mechanical fragmentation of the clot into sedimentable fragments, nor did it alter the sizes of plasmic derivatives as demonstrated by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We conclude that ultrasound at 1 MHz potentiates enzymatic fibrinolysis by a nonthermal mechanism at energies that can potentially be applied and tolerated in vivo to accelerate therapeutic fibrinolysis. Images PMID:1430229

  3. Toward Modelling Topsoil Magnetic Susceptibility for Demining Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannam, J. A.; Dearing, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Landmine Monitor estimates that landmines cause up to 20,000 fatalities and casualties worldwide every year, in over 100 countries affected by landmine contamination. Although detection technologies have become more sophisticated, the metal detector still remains the most widely employed detection system in landmine affected regions. With increased use of minimum metal mines, the performance and sensitivity of metal detectors are increasingly challenged. In addition to mine constituents, depth of burial and orientation, soil properties significantly affect metal detection capabilities. Soils with high magnetic susceptibility, in particular those dominated by viscous components, interfere with the response signal in both frequency and time domain metal detection systems. Using Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) as a pilot region, we created an expert system to predict topsoil susceptibility from environmental information within a SOTER data base. Initially, the knowledge base is constructed from published relationships of environmental parameters and magnetic susceptibility and knowledge of experts in the field of soil magnetism. The knowledge base is underpinned by environmental conditions that are known to enhance or reduce magnetic susceptibility in topsoils. Where semi-quantitative data exists, transfer-functions are used to provide first approximations of susceptibility classes and offer a basis for a probability score for the susceptibility class. As a first approximation, susceptibility values are categorized into five continuous classes delimited by published magnetic susceptibility ranges in topsoils. The predicted susceptibility maps result in regional contrasts, delineated by the spatial scale of the environmental information. Further development of the model using a Baysean rule-based system with fuzzy boundaries is anticipated. Validation of the model is proposed using archived soil survey samples from BiH. In addition to providing essential data for

  4. Classroom Seating and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackeim, Harold A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether people who differ in behavioral and self-report measures of lateralized seating preferences also differ in hypnotic susceptibility. Only right-handed subjects were used, and the associations between hypnotic susceptibility and seating preference were examined separately for males and females.…

  5. Inactivation thermodynamics and iso-kinetic profiling for evaluating operational suitability of milk clotting enzyme immobilized in composite polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Rajesh Kumari; Bhushan, Bharat; Pal, Ajay; Malhotra, Sarla Popli; Kumar, Satish; Saharan, Vinod

    2016-10-01

    Milk clotting enzyme (MCE) was immobilized in alginate-pectate interwoven gel with the yield of 73%. The encapsulated enzyme retained most of the protein load while soluble enzyme lost major proportion of activity after few hours. The immobilized enzyme showed high operational stability by retaining 40% activity even after 10 uses. The narrow optimal working pH of soluble enzyme changed to a broader range after encapsulation and a shift in optimum temperature from 45 to 50°C was also recorded for encapsulated enzyme. Studies on isokinetic temperature showed that immobilized enzyme is more thermo-stable at higher temperature. Immobilization, therefore, not only improved the catalytic properties and stability but also its suitability in food processes like cheese preparation with reduced cost and time. PMID:27174906

  6. Validation study toward measuring the mechanical properties of blood clots using resonant acoustic spectroscopy with optical vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gongting; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2012-03-01

    Clot elastic modulus (CEM) has recently been shown to correlate with various hemostatic and thrombotic disorders and may be an important diagnostic parameter in cardiovascular diseases. Current methods of CEM measurement lack repeatability and require large sample volume. We present a novel method named resonant acoustic spectroscopy with optical vibrometry (RASOV) that has the potential to assess CEM with higher accuracy and speed, and lower sample volume. To validate RASOV, we measured the acoustic spectrum of agarose gel with varied concentrations in openfaced rectangular wells. Results showed a linear relationship between the natural resonant frequency and agarose content within a concentration range of 4 to 12 mg/mL. Furthermore, we observed that the resonant frequencies decrease with increasing transducer mass. As a highly accurate, resonance-based method, RASOV has great potential for biomechanical properties measurement, especially for human blood.

  7. Data in support of three phase partitioning of zingibain, a milk-clotting enzyme from Zingiber officinale Roscoe rhizomes

    PubMed Central

    Gagaoua, Mohammed; Hafid, Kahina; Hoggas, Naouel

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes data related to a research article titled “Three Phase Partitioning of zingibain, a milk-clotting enzyme from Zingiber officinale Roscoe rhizomes” (Gagaoua et al., 2015) [1]. Zingibain (EC 3.4.22.67), is a coagulant cysteine protease and a meat tenderizer agent that have been reported to produce satisfactory final products in dairy and meat technology, respectively. Zingibains were exclusively purified using chromatographic techniques with very low yield purification. This paper includes data of the effect of temperature, usual salts and organic solvents on the efficiency of the three phase partitioning (TPP) system. Also it includes data of the kinetic activity characterization of the purified zingibain using TPP purification approach. PMID:26909379

  8. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow. PMID:27339024

  9. Venom Concentrations and Clotting Factor Levels in a Prospective Cohort of Russell’s Viper Bites with Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Maduwage, Kalana; Scorgie, Fiona E.; Shahmy, Seyed; Mohamed, Fahim; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harendra; O’Leary, Margaret A.; Gnanathasan, Christeine A.; Lincz, Lisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Russell’s viper envenoming is a major problem in South Asia and causes venom induced consumption coagulopathy. This study aimed to investigate the kinetics and dynamics of venom and clotting function in Russell’s viper envenoming. Methodology/Principal Findings In a prospective cohort of 146 patients with Russell’s viper envenoming, we measured venom concentrations, international normalised ratio [INR], prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), coagulation factors I, II, V, VII, VIII, IX and X, and von Willebrand factor antigen. The median age was 39y (16–82y) and 111 were male. The median peak INR was 6.8 (interquartile range[IQR]:3.7 to >13), associated with low fibrinogen [median,<0.01g/L;IQR:<0.01–0.9g/L), low factor V levels [median,<5%;IQR:<5–4%], low factor VIII levels [median,40%;IQR:12–79%] and low factor X levels [median,48%;IQR:29–67%]. There were smaller reductions in factors II, IX and VII over time. All factors recovered over 48h post-antivenom. The median INR remained >3 at 6h post-antivenom but had reduced to <2, by 24h. The aPTT had also returned to close to normal (<50sec) at 24h. Factor VII, VIII and IX levels were unusually high pre-antivenom, median peak concentrations of 393%, 307% and 468% respectively. Pre-antivenom venom concentrations and the INR (r = 0.20, p = 0.02) and aPTT (r = 0.19, p = 0.03) were correlated (non-parametric Spearman analysis). Conclusions Russell’s viper coagulopathy results in prolonged aPTT, INR, low fibrinogen, factors V, VIII and X which recover over 48h. Severity of clotting abnormalities was associated with venom concentrations. PMID:26296235

  10. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Dissolution of Clots in a Rabbit Model of Embolic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alison; Huang, Yuexi; Waspe, Adam C.; Ganguly, Milan; Goertz, David E.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that only 2–6% of patients receive thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke suggesting that alternative therapies are necessary. In this study, we investigate the potential for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to initiate thrombolysis in an embolic model of stroke. Iron-loaded blood clots were injected into the middle cerebral artery (MCA) of New Zealand White rabbits, through the internal carotid artery and blockages were confirmed by angiography. MRI was used to localize the iron-loaded clot and target the HIFU beam for treatment. HIFU pulses (1.5 MHz, 1 ms bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, 20 s duration) were applied to initiate thrombolysis. Repeat angiograms and histology were used to assess reperfusion and vessel damage. Using 275 W of acoustic power, there was no evidence of reperfusion in post-treatment angiograms of 3 rabbits tested. In a separate group of animals, 415 W of acoustic power was applied and reperfusion was observed in 2 of the 4 (50%) animals treated. In the last group of animals, acoustic power was further increased to 550 W, which led to the reperfusion in 5 of 7 (∼70%) animals tested. Histological analysis confirmed thatthe sonicated vessels remained intact after HIFU treatment. Hemorrhage was detected outside of the sonication site, likely due to the proximity of the target vessel with the base of the rabbit skull. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using HIFU, as a stand-alone method, to cause effective thrombolysis without immediate damage to the targeted vessels. HIFU, combined with imaging modalities used to identify and assess stroke patients, could dramatically reduce the time to achieve flow restoration in patients thereby significantly increasing the number of patients which benefit from thrombolysis treatments. PMID:22870315

  11. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  12. Mechanisms underlying Children's susceptibility to environmental toxicants.

    PubMed Central

    Faustman, E M; Silbernagel, S M; Fenske, R A; Burbacher, T M; Ponce, R A

    2000-01-01

    An important public health challenge has been the need to protect children's health. To accomplish this goal, the scientific community needs scientifically based child-specific risk assessment methods. Critical to their development is the need to understand mechanisms underlying children's sensitivity to environmental toxicants. Risk is defined as the probability of adverse outcome and when applied to environmental risk assessment is usually defined as a function of both toxicity and exposure. To adequately evaluate the potential for enhanced health risks during development, both child-specific factors affecting toxicity and exposure need to be considered. In the first section of this article, example mechanisms of susceptibility relevant for toxicity assessment are identified and discussed. In the second section, examples of exposure factors that help define children's susceptibility are presented. Examples of pesticide research from the newly funded Child Health Center at the University of Washington will be given for illustration. The final section discusses the importance of putting these considerations of children's susceptibility into an overall framework for ascertaining relevancy for human risk assessment. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10698720

  13. Cognitive Factors in Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Robert D.; Field, Peter B.

    1971-01-01

    This research explored the influence of cognitive variables on susceptibility to hypnosis. The three variables of concern in the present study are automatization, attention, and body experience. The results are summarized. (Author)

  14. Growth Conditions and Rifampin Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Arthur L.; Gross, Gayle H.

    1979-01-01

    The susceptibility of Escherichia coli to rifampin was measured during unlimited growth in rich and poor media and during chemostat growth limited by the carbon source. During batch growth at low turbidities, the susceptibility of the bacteria increased as the growth rate decreased, consistent with the longer time available for drug penetration in the poorer media. During chemostat culture, the bacteria remained highly susceptible or became genetically resistant, dependent on the manner in which the bacteria were exposed to the antibiotic. If the concentration of rifampin was abruptly raised, susceptible cells were replaced by genetically resistant cells. However, if the concentration of antibiotic was raised slowly, the genetically susceptible cells continued to grow. This difference in response of chemostat cultures according to mode of drug administration was attributed to an inducible detoxification of the drug by the bacteria, because the susceptible genotype is maintained only when the concentration of rifampin is increased gradually and when a high population of cells is maintained. Direct evidence for the inactivation of the rifampin from the bioassay of culture supernatants is presented. PMID:371543

  15. Amino-Terminal Fusion of Epidermal Growth Factor 4,5,6 Domains of Human Thrombomodulin on Streptokinase Confers Anti-Reocclusion Characteristics along with Plasmin-Mediated Clot Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Neeraj; Arora, Kashika; Vandana; Kwatra, Neha; Sahni, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Streptokinase (SK) is a potent clot dissolver but lacks fibrin clot specificity as it activates human plasminogen (HPG) into human plasmin (HPN) throughout the system leading to increased risk of bleeding. Another major drawback associated with all thrombolytics, including tissue plasminogen activator, is the generation of transient thrombin and release of clot-bound thrombin that promotes reformation of clots. In order to obtain anti-thrombotic as well as clot-specificity properties in SK, cDNAs encoding the EGF 4,5,6 domains of human thrombomodulin were fused with that of streptokinase, either at its N- or C-termini, and expressed these in Pichia pastoris followed by purification and structural-functional characterization, including plasminogen activation, thrombin inhibition, and Protein C activation characteristics. Interestingly, the N-terminal EGF fusion construct (EGF-SK) showed plasmin-mediated plasminogen activation, whereas the C-terminal (SK-EGF) fusion construct exhibited ‘spontaneous’ plasminogen activation which is quite similar to SK i.e. direct activation of systemic HPG in absence of free HPN. Since HPN is normally absent in free circulation due to rapid serpin-based inactivation (such as alpha-2-antiplasmin and alpha-2-Macroglobin), but selectively present in clots, a plasmin-dependent mode of HPG activation is expected to lead to a desirable fibrin clot-specific response by the thrombolytic. Both the N- and C-terminal fusion constructs showed strong thrombin inhibition and Protein C activation properties as well, and significantly prevented re-occlusion in a specially designed assay. The EGF-SK construct exhibited fibrin clot dissolution properties with much-lowered levels of fibrinogenolysis, suggesting unmistakable promise in clot dissolver therapy with reduced hemorrhage and re-occlusion risks. PMID:26974970

  16. CHARACTERIZING AND PROVIDING ADEQUATE PROTECTION FOR SUSCEPTIBLE SUBPOPULATIONS: SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS: SUSCEPTIBILITY ASSOCIATED WITH THE AGED

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUMMARY: An important Agency mandate is to identify subpopulations particularly susceptible to adverse effects associated with exposure to environmental contaminants. For example, a critical public health question is the extent to which exposure to environmental contaminants cont...

  17. Vibrations and spatial patterns in biomimetic surfaces: using the shark-skin effect to control blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Maani, Nazanin; Rayz, Vitaliy L; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of small-amplitude fast vibrations and small-amplitude spatial patterns on various systems involving wetting and liquid flow, such as superhydrophobic surfaces, membranes and flow pipes. First, we introduce a mathematical method of averaging the effect of small spatial and temporal patterns and substituting them with an effective force. Such an effective force can change the equilibrium state of a system as well as a phase state, leading to surface texture-induced and vibration-induced phase control. Vibration and patterns can effectively jam holes in vessels with liquid, separate multi-phase flow, change membrane properties, result in propulsion and locomotion and lead to many other multi-scale, nonlinear effects including the shark-skin effect. We discuss the application of such effects to blood flow for novel biomedical 'haemophobic' applications which can prevent blood clotting and thrombosis by controlling the surface pattern at a wall of a vessel (e.g. a catheter or stent).This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354733

  18. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yoshiyuki; Tomer, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine) is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4) and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg). Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. PMID:15712599

  19. Enzymatic milk clotting activity in artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaves and alpine thistle (Carduus defloratus) flowers. Immobilization of alpine thistle aspartic protease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marilena; Di Pierro, Prospero; Dejonghe, Winnie; Mariniello, Loredana; Porta, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    Two different milk clotting enzymes, belonging to the aspartic protease family, were extracted from both artichoke leaves and alpine thistle flowers, and the latter was covalently immobilized by using a polyacrylic support containing polar epoxy groups. Our findings showed that the alpine thistle aspartic protease was successfully immobilized at pH 7.0 on Immobeads IB-150P beads and that, under these experimental conditions, an immobilization yield of about 68% and a recovery of about 54% were obtained. Since the enzyme showed an optimal pH of 5.0, a value very similar to the one generally used for milk clotting during cheese making, and exhibited a satisfactory stability over time, the use of such immobilized vegetable rennet for the production of novel dairy products is suggested. PMID:26988483

  20. [Vitamin K 1 concentration and vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in newborn infants after intramuscular and oral administration of vitamin K 1].

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, B; Kisrákói, C; Téglás, E; Verbényi, M; Kovács, I

    1990-06-17

    Serum concentration of vitamin K1 and activity of vitamin-K-dependent factors II, VII, IX and X were determined before and after vitamin K1 administration in infants. The babies received vitamin K1 intramuscularly or orally. 12 hours after vitamin K1 treatment the mean concentration was increased in the groups receiving vitamin K1 intramusculary or orally, respectively. Serum level of vitamin K1 fell exponentially, the mean half life was about 30 hours in both groups. Activity of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors did not change significantly after intramuscular or oral vitamin K1 administration during the first four-five days of life. It was no direct correlation between the concentration of vitamin K1 and the activity of vitamin-K-dependent clotting factors. This study suggest that oral administration of vitamin K1 is as effective as the intramuscular route. PMID:2195426

  1. Early clinical experience of the safety and efficacy of EndoClot in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Al-Bakir, Ibrahim; Bhuva, Meha; Patel, Jay; Fullard, Mark; Leahy, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: EndoClot is a novel topical hemostatic powder approved for use in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study examines its impact as rescue therapy in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding for which standard endoscopic therapy failed to achieve hemostasis. Methods: This observational study covered a 24-month period. Data were collated from patients treated with EndoClot for comparison with a cohort of patients managed with standard endoscopic therapy. End points of this study included immediate hemostasis, 30-day rebleed rate, 30-day mortality rate, and adverse events. Results: Between April 1, 2012, and March 31, 2014, gastroscopic procedures were performed in 1009 patients, of whom 173 required endoscopic therapy. EndoClot was used in 21 patients, with immediate hemostasis achieved in all cases, a 30-day rebleed rate of 4.8 % (95 % confidence interval [95 %CI] – 4.34 % to 3.94 %), and a 30-day mortality rate of 19.0 % (95 %CI 2.29 % – 35.91 %). Despite higher risk bleeds in this cohort of patients, Fisher's exact test demonstrated no significant difference between their 30-day mortality rate (P = 0.51) and rebleed rate (P = 0.31) and those of the patients treated with standard endoscopic hemostatic techniques. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that EndoClot can be used both safely and effectively in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26716120

  2. A comparative evaluation of the blood clot, platelet-rich plasma, and platelet-rich fibrin in regeneration of necrotic immature permanent teeth: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Isha; Mittal, Neelam; Mishra, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was designed as a clinical trial to evaluate and compare the regenerative potential of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and blood clot in immature necrotic permanent teeth with or without associated apical periodontitis. Methods: Access preparation was done under rubber dam isolation. Copious irrigation was done with 2.5% NaOCl and triple antibiotic paste was placed as an intracanal medicament. After 4 weeks, the cases were divided into four groups with five patients in each group. The study design had three test arms and one control arm. Group I in which mineral trioxide aggregate apexification was carried out and it was kept as control group to evaluate the regenerative potential of blood clot and platelet concentrates, Group II in which blood clot was used as scaffold in the canal, Group III in PRF was used as scaffold, and Group IV in which PRP carried on collagen was used as a scaffold. Results: The clinical and radiographic evaluation after 6 and 18 months was done by two independent observers who were blinded from the groups. The scoring was done as: None score was denoted by, Fair by 1, Good by 2, and Excellent by 3. The data were then analyzed statistically by Fisher's exact test using Statistics and Data 11.1(PRP Using harvest Smart PReP2) which showed statistically significant values in Group III as compared to other Groups. Conclusion: PRF has huge potential to accelerate the growth characteristics in immature necrotic permanent teeth as compared to PRP and blood clot. PMID:25684914

  3. Transamidase Reactions Involved in the Enzymic Coagulation of Semen: Isolation of γ-Glutamyl-ε-Lysine Dipeptide from Clotted Secretion Protein of Guinea Pig Seminal Vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Ashman, H. G.; Notides, A. C.; Pabalan, S. S.; Lorand, L.

    1972-01-01

    New supportive evidence is advanced in favor of the hypothesis that the enzymic coagulation of guinea pig semen involves transamidase reactions that result in the formation of γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine intermolecular cross linkages between molecules of a basic protein in seminal vesicle secretion. The dipeptide γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine was isolated in large quantities from proteolytic digests of the coagulated basic vesicular secretion protein that comprises the seminal clot. Images PMID:4506101

  4. Transamidase reactions involved in the enzymic coagulation of semen: isolation of -glutamyl- -lysine dipeptide from clotted secretion protein of guinea pig seminal vesicle.

    PubMed

    Williams-Ashman, H G; Notides, A C; Pabalan, S S; Lorand, L

    1972-08-01

    New supportive evidence is advanced in favor of the hypothesis that the enzymic coagulation of guinea pig semen involves transamidase reactions that result in the formation of gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine intermolecular cross linkages between molecules of a basic protein in seminal vesicle secretion. The dipeptide gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine was isolated in large quantities from proteolytic digests of the coagulated basic vesicular secretion protein that comprises the seminal clot. PMID:4506101

  5. Molecular mechanisms of antithrombin-heparin regulation of blood clotting proteinases. a paradigm for understanding proteinase regulation by serpin family protein proteinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Steven T.; Richard, Benjamin; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Gettins, Peter G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Serpin family protein proteinase inhibitors regulate the activity of serine and cysteine proteinases by a novel conformational trapping mechanism that may itself be regulated by cofactors to provide a finely-tuned time and location-dependent control of proteinase activity. The serpin, antithrombin, together with its cofactors, heparin and heparan sulfate, perform a critical anticoagulant function by preventing the activation of blood clotting proteinases except when needed at the site of a vascular injury. Here, we review the detailed molecular understanding of this regulatory mechanism that has emerged from numerous X-ray crystal structures of antithrombin and its complexes with heparin and target proteinases together with mutagenesis and functional studies of heparin-antithrombin-proteinase interactions in solution. Like other serpins, antithrombin achieves specificity for its target blood clotting proteinases by presenting recognition determinants in an exposed reactive center loop as well as in exosites outside the loop. Antithrombin reactivity is repressed in the absence of its activator because of unfavorable interactions that diminish the favorable RCL and exosite interactions with proteinases. Binding of a specific heparin or heparan sulfate pentasaccharide to antithrombin induces allosteric activating changes that mitigate the unfavorable interactions and promote template bridging of the serpin and proteinase. Antithrombin has thus evolved a sophisticated means of regulating the activity of blood clotting proteinases in a time and location-dependent manner that exploits the multiple conformational states of the serpin and their differential stabilization by glycosaminoglycan cofactors. PMID:20685328

  6. Transcatheter embolization by autologous blood clot is useful management for small side branch perforation due to percutaneous coronary intervention guide wire.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinichiro; Nishigaki, Kazuhiko; Ojio, Shinsuke; Yasuda, Shinji; Okubo, Munenori; Yamaki, Takahiko; Kubota, Tomoki; Takasugi, Nobuhiro; Ishihara, Yoshiyuki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2008-12-01

    A 75-year-old man underwent PCI for a bifurcation lesion with 90% stenosis in segment 6 and 75% proximal stenosis in segment 9 of the left coronary artery. We implanted a Duraflex coronary stent into segment 6 and kissing balloon inflation for segments 6 and 9. Although these 2 lesions were adequately dilated, we noticed coronary perforation caused by the guide wire in a small branch of segment 9. We tried to repair the perforation using a small balloon and long inflation, but unfortunately the perforation was not improved. We attempted to occlude the small branch including the perforation site with an autologous blood clot via a wire microcatheter inserted into the small branch. The autologous blood clot was suspended in contrast media and saline. Using this procedure, the small branch of segment 9 was occluded completely and the perforated site was repaired. After the procedure, no significant CPK elevation was detected, and 6 months later, we confirmed that small branch embolization was improved and coronary flow was good. Autologous blood clot is useful to occlude and repair perforations in small side branches of the coronary artery without myocardial damage. PMID:19027608

  7. Serum susceptibility of bovine pasteurellas.

    PubMed Central

    Blau, K A; Ward, A C; Prieur, D J; Corbeil, L B

    1987-01-01

    In this study, the serum sensitivity of 23 P. haemolytica isolates and 18 P. multocida isolates was determined by incubating dilutions of bacteria with equal volumes of fresh or heat-inactivated bovine serum for one, two, or three hours. Clinical isolates of both Pasteurella species were resistant to serum, whereas isolates from asymptomatic cattle varied in serum susceptibility. The classical pathway of complement appeared to be the principal means of complement mediated killing as detected by incubation in the presence or absence of EGTA-MgCl2. Lyzozyme and iron saturation of serum did not greatly affect serum susceptibility with either of the Pasteurella species. PMID:3300919

  8. Multifocal Signal Loss at Bridging Veins on Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging in Abusive Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, U; Körner, H; Meyer, S; Reith, W

    2015-06-01

    Identifying abusive head trauma (AHT) in infants is difficult because often there are no externally visible injuries and symptoms are nonspecific. The radiological finding that usually raises suspicion of AHT--especially when found with retinal hemorrhage and inappropriate history--is subdural hematoma (SDH). In addition to that, bridging vein thrombosis, assessed by imaging or autopsy, has been reported as a sign of the traumatic cause of SDH. Here we present two cases of AHT-associated SDH in infants, in which multifocal signal loss at bridging veins was present on susceptibility-weighted imaging without signs of venous infarction. As susceptibility-weighted imaging has been reported to be more sensitive for blood products than gradient-echo T2-weighted imaging, we propose that it might help to identify clot formation on injured bridging veins and therefore increase the sensitivity of imaging studies for a traumatic cause of SDH, helping to identify AHT that is considered to be caused by violent shaking. PMID:24499867

  9. Charge and Paramagnetic Spin Susceptibilities of Doped Gapped Graphene-Like Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, H.; Naseri, Y.

    2016-06-01

    We address spin polarization dependence of dynamical charge and spin susceptibilities of doped gapped graphene-like structures in the context of tight binding model Hamiltonian. The frequency behavior of both longitudinal and transverse spin susceptibilities has been calculated via calculating correlation function of spin density operators. Our results show the increase of electronic concentration corresponding to chemical potential leads to enhance the intensity of charge spectral function. We also show that longitudinal spin susceptibility reduces at fixed frequency with gap parameter associated with on-site energy difference between two types of sublattice atoms. Furthermore, the resonance peak in longitudinal spin susceptibility goes to higher frequencies with gap parameter. The effect of magnetization on the longitudinal spin susceptibility indicates two different behaviors depending on frequency region. Finally, the effects of magnetization and gap parameter on the frequency behavior of transverse spin susceptibility have been studied in details.

  10. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents. PMID:286720

  11. Genetics and gastric cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Lu, Fang; Zeng, Sha; Sun, Suqing; Lu, Li; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has high morbidity and mortality in China. It is ranked first in malignant tumors of the digestive system. Its etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear, but they may be associated with a variety of factors. Genetic susceptibility genes have become a research hotspot in China. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of gastric cancer can facilitate achieving individualized prevention and developing more effective methods to reduce clinical adverse consequences, which has important clinical significance. Genetic susceptibility results from the influence of genetic factors or specific genetic defects that endow an individual’s offspring with certain physiological and metabolic features that are prone to certain diseases. Currently, studies on the genetic susceptibility genes of gastric cancer have become a hotspot. The purpose is to screen for the etiology of gastric cancer, search for gene therapy methods, and ultimately provide a scientific basis for the prevention and control of gastric cancer. This article reviews the current progress of studies on genetic susceptibility genes for gastric cancer. PMID:26309491

  12. Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2007-09-01

    Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

  13. Evaluation of the Q analyzer, a new cap-piercing fully automated coagulometer with clotting, chromogenic, and immunoturbidometric capability.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Steve; Woolley, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The Q analyzer is a recently launched fully automated photo-optical analyzer equipped with primary tube cap-piercing and capable of clotting, chromogenic, and immunoturbidometric tests. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of the Q analyzer with reagents from the instrument manufacturer. We assessed precision and throughput when performing coagulation screening tests, prothrombin time (PT)/international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and fibrinogen assay by Clauss assay. We compared results with established reagent instrument combinations in widespread use. Precision of PT/INR and APTT was acceptable as indicated by total precision of around 3%. The time to first result was 3  min for an INR and 5  min for PT/APTT. The system produced 115 completed samples per hour when processing only INRs and 60 samples (120 results) per hour for PT/APTT combined. The sensitivity of the DG-APTT Synth/Q method to mild deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII), IX, and XI was excellent (as indicated by APTTs being prolonged above the upper limit of the reference range). The Q analyzer was associated with high precision, acceptable throughput, and good reliability. When used in combination with DG-PT reagent and manufacturer's instrument-specific international sensitivity index, the INRs obtained were accurate. The Q analyzer with DG-APTT Synth reagent demonstrated good sensitivity to isolated mild deficiency of FVIII, IX, and XI and had the advantage of relative insensitivity to mild FXII deficiency. Taken together, our data indicate that the Q hemostasis analyzer was suitable for routine use in combination with the reagents evaluated. PMID:23249565

  14. Chondrogenic Regeneration Using Bone Marrow Clots and a Porous Polycaprolactone-Hydroxyapatite Scaffold by Three-Dimensional Printing

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingqiang; Wei, Bo; Liu, Nancy; Li, Chenshuang; Guo, Yang; Shamie, Arya Nick; Chen, James; Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in directing three-dimensional (3D) cartilage regeneration. Our recent study reported the potential advantages of bone marrow clots (MC) in promoting extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold chondrogenic regeneration. The aim of this study is to build a new scaffold for MC, with improved characteristics in mechanics, shaping, and biodegradability, compared to our previous study. To address this issue, this study prepared a 3D porous polycaprolactone (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold combined with MC (Group A), while the control group (Group B) utilized a bone marrow stem cell seeded PCL-HA scaffold. The results of in vitro cultures and in vivo implantation demonstrated that although an initial obstruction of nutrient exchange caused by large amounts of fibrin and erythrocytes led to a decrease in the ratio of live cells in Group A, these scaffolds also showed significant improvements in cell adhesion, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation with porous recanalization in the later culture, compared to Group B. After 4 weeks of in vivo implantation, Group A scaffolds have a superior performance in DNA content, Sox9 and RunX2 expression, cartilage lacuna-like cell and ECM accumulation, when compared to Group B. Furthermore, Group A scaffold size and mechanics were stable during in vitro and in vivo experiments, unlike the scaffolds in our previous study. Our results suggest that the combination with MC proved to be a highly efficient, reliable, and simple new method that improves the biological performance of 3D PCL-HA scaffold. The MC-PCL-HA scaffold is a candidate for future cartilage regeneration studies. PMID:25530453

  15. Chondrogenic regeneration using bone marrow clots and a porous polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffold by three-dimensional printing.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqiang; Wei, Bo; Liu, Nancy; Li, Chenshuang; Guo, Yang; Shamie, Arya Nick; Chen, James; Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Xu, Yan; Bian, Xiuwu; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Liming

    2015-04-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in directing three-dimensional (3D) cartilage regeneration. Our recent study reported the potential advantages of bone marrow clots (MC) in promoting extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold chondrogenic regeneration. The aim of this study is to build a new scaffold for MC, with improved characteristics in mechanics, shaping, and biodegradability, compared to our previous study. To address this issue, this study prepared a 3D porous polycaprolactone (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold combined with MC (Group A), while the control group (Group B) utilized a bone marrow stem cell seeded PCL-HA scaffold. The results of in vitro cultures and in vivo implantation demonstrated that although an initial obstruction of nutrient exchange caused by large amounts of fibrin and erythrocytes led to a decrease in the ratio of live cells in Group A, these scaffolds also showed significant improvements in cell adhesion, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation with porous recanalization in the later culture, compared to Group B. After 4 weeks of in vivo implantation, Group A scaffolds have a superior performance in DNA content, Sox9 and RunX2 expression, cartilage lacuna-like cell and ECM accumulation, when compared to Group B. Furthermore, Group A scaffold size and mechanics were stable during in vitro and in vivo experiments, unlike the scaffolds in our previous study. Our results suggest that the combination with MC proved to be a highly efficient, reliable, and simple new method that improves the biological performance of 3D PCL-HA scaffold. The MC-PCL-HA scaffold is a candidate for future cartilage regeneration studies. PMID:25530453

  16. Magnetic susceptibility of petroleum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, O. P.; Potter, D. K.

    2003-04-01

    Technological progress in petroleum exploration, production and processing requires a profound knowledge of the magnetic properties of the petroleum fluids. However, as far as we know there are not widely available constants of magnetic susceptibility for the majority of petroleum fluids. We have therefore measured the mass magnetic susceptibility (χ_m) of several petroleum fluids (such as crude oils, refined oil fractions, and formation waters) from local and worldwide sites. The magnetic features of natural reservoir petroleum fluids, together with fluids connected with the petroleum industry (such as drilling fluids etc.), fall into the following categories: diamagnetic solutions, paramagnetic suspensions and ferromagnetic "ferrofluid" suspensions. In the current investigations we have concentrated on the natural reservoir fluids, which are generally diamagnetic. There were distinct differences between the χ_m of the crude oils and the formation waters, with the oils having generally a more negative value of χ_m. The magnetic susceptibility of the oils appears to be related to their main physical and chemical properties, such as density, composition of group hydrocarbons, sulphur content and concentration of organometallic compounds. Low acidity and low sulphur oils have more negative values of χ_m. Light fractions of crude oil consisting mainly of paraffinic and naphtenic hydrocarbons are the most diamagnetic. The content of the less diamagnetic aromatics increases in the kerosene and gas oil fractions, and results in an increase in the magnetic susceptibility. Also, the magnetic susceptibility of the heavy oil fraction has a significantly higher χ_m than the light fractions, which appears to be connected with a higher concentration of paramagnetic components in the heavy fraction. The χ_m of the oil from various oil provinces were compared and found to be different. It seems that values of χ_m reflect specific features of the geological conditions for

  17. The effects of polydispersity on the initial susceptibilities of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Philip J.; Elfimova, Ekaterina A.; Ivanov, Alexey O.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of particle-size polydispersity on the initial susceptibilities of concentrated ferrofluids are analyzed using a combination of theory and computer simulation. The study is focused on a model ferrofluid with a prescribed magnetic-core diameter distribution, a fixed non-magnetic surface layer (corresponding to a demagnetized layer and adsorbed surfactant) and a combination of dipolar and hard-core interactions. The non-trivial effects of polydispersity are identified by comparing the initial susceptibilities of monodisperse and polydisperse ferrofluids with the same Langevin susceptibility. The theory is based on a correction to the second-order modified mean-field theory arising from a formal Mayer-type cluster expansion; this correction is dependent on a parameter similar to the normal dipolar coupling constant, except that it contains a complicated double average over the particle-size distribution, which means that the initial susceptibility should depend significantly on polydispersity. Specifically, the theory predicts that the initial susceptibility is enhanced significantly by polydispersity. This prediction is tested rigorously against results from Monte Carlo simulations and is found to be robust. The qualitative agreement between theory and simulation is already satisfactory, but the quantitative agreement could be improved by a systematic extension of the cluster expansion. The overall conclusion is that polydispersity should be accounted for carefully in magnetogranulometric analyses of real ferrofluids.

  18. The effects of polydispersity on the initial susceptibilities of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Camp, Philip J; Elfimova, Ekaterina A; Ivanov, Alexey O

    2014-11-12

    The effects of particle-size polydispersity on the initial susceptibilities of concentrated ferrofluids are analyzed using a combination of theory and computer simulation. The study is focused on a model ferrofluid with a prescribed magnetic-core diameter distribution, a fixed non-magnetic surface layer (corresponding to a demagnetized layer and adsorbed surfactant) and a combination of dipolar and hard-core interactions. The non-trivial effects of polydispersity are identified by comparing the initial susceptibilities of monodisperse and polydisperse ferrofluids with the same Langevin susceptibility. The theory is based on a correction to the second-order modified mean-field theory arising from a formal Mayer-type cluster expansion; this correction is dependent on a parameter similar to the normal dipolar coupling constant, except that it contains a complicated double average over the particle-size distribution, which means that the initial susceptibility should depend significantly on polydispersity. Specifically, the theory predicts that the initial susceptibility is enhanced significantly by polydispersity. This prediction is tested rigorously against results from Monte Carlo simulations and is found to be robust. The qualitative agreement between theory and simulation is already satisfactory, but the quantitative agreement could be improved by a systematic extension of the cluster expansion. The overall conclusion is that polydispersity should be accounted for carefully in magnetogranulometric analyses of real ferrofluids. PMID:25327692

  19. Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections.

    PubMed

    Smeekens, Sanne P; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Netea, Mihai G

    2013-06-01

    Candida spp. are medically important fungi causing severe mucosal and life-threatening invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, not all individuals at risk develop Candida infections, and it is believed that genetic variation plays an important role in host susceptibility. On the one hand, severe fungal infections are associated with monogenic primary immunodeficiencies such as defects in STAT1, STAT3 or CARD9, recently discovered as novel clinical entities. On the other hand, more common polymorphisms in genes of the immune system have also been associated with fungal infections such as recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and candidemia. The discovery of the genetic susceptibility to Candida infections can lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as to the design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies. This review is part of the review series on host-pathogen interactions. See more reviews from this series. PMID:23629947

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Wu, C C; Shryock, T R; Lin, T L; Faderan, M; Veenhuizen, M F

    2000-09-15

    A broth microdilution technique was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 15 field isolates of Mycoplasma hyorhinis to 10 antimicrobial agents, representative of different classes, and contrasting newer agents to existing ones. For the macrolides, the MIC(90) for tylosin and tilmicosin was 1 and 4 microg/ml, respectively, but was > or = 16 microg/ml for erythromycin. Tetracycline, lincomycin and enrofloxacin each had an MIC(90) of 2 microg/ml. The mycoplasma had similar levels of susceptibility to the aminoglycoside and aminocyclictol classes exhibiting an MIC(90) of 4 microg/ml for gentamicin and 2 microg/ml for spectinomycin. The isolates exhibited high MICs to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole with an MIC(90) > or = 16/304 microg/ml. In summary, M. hyorhinis isolates from the US had low MICs against a variety of antimicrobials tested, with the exception of erythromycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. PMID:10925038

  1. Magnetic Susceptibility as a Biosignature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryshyn, V.; Corsetti, F. A.; Lund, S.; Berelson, W.

    2011-12-01

    Stromatolites, laminated sedimentary structures generally thought to have been produced by the activity of microorganisms, have long been studied in the geobiologic community. However, abiotic processes such as mineral growth can mimic stromatolite morphology and diagenesis commonly obscures other potentially diagnostic features (microstructure, isotopes, etc.). Here, we report a new biosignature based on the detrital magnetic mineral component present in nearly all sedimentary rocks. Magnetic grains in an abiotic structure should obey the laws of gravity/angle of repose and be swept off peaks/concentrated in lows, whereas magnetic grains should adhere to a biofilm and be more evenly distributed around the structure, even at steep angles, versus the abiotic scenario. Laboratory experiments were preformed in which small (2 μm) particles of magnetite were introduced into a tank that contained glass slides on which carbonate had abiotically precipitated. The slides were inclined at a variety of angles, ranging from 0 (horizontal) to 90 degrees (vertical). Samples were taken from the slides, dried, and their magnetic susceptibility was measured. In these experiments, no magnetic signature was found on the slides inclined at angles higher than 45 degrees, even though carbonate had precipitated onto the slides. A parallel biotic laboratory experiment was performed using cyanobacterial mats inclined at a variety of angles. In this experiment, all mats had over an order of magnitude more magnetic susceptibility than their abiotic counterparts, and even mats inclined at 90 degrees (vertical) held significant amounts of magnetic particles. Lastly, using the results of the laboratory experiments as a framework, several stromatolites of both known and strongly suspected biogenicity (biotic and abiotic) were tested by microdrilling and measuring the magnetic susceptibility at different depositional angles along individual lamina. The results of these experiments suggest that

  2. Temporal percolation of a susceptible adaptive network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, L. D.; Macri, P. A.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2013-09-01

    In the past decades, many authors have used the susceptible-infected-recovered model to study the impact of the disease spreading on the evolution of the infected individuals. However, few authors focused on the temporal unfolding of the susceptible individuals. In this paper, we study the dynamic of the susceptible-infected-recovered model in an adaptive network that mimics the transitory deactivation of permanent social contacts, such as friendship and work-ship ties. Using an edge-based compartmental model and percolation theory, we obtain the evolution equations for the fraction susceptible individuals in the susceptible biggest component. In particular, we focus on how the individual’s behavior impacts on the dilution of the susceptible network. We show that, as a consequence, the spreading of the disease slows down, protecting the biggest susceptible cluster by increasing the critical time at which the giant susceptible component is destroyed. Our theoretical results are fully supported by extensive simulations.

  3. National Blood Clot Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... that support women’s health causes compete for cash prize donations from Revlon. The top five charities that… ... 22182 more info Follow us Twitter Facebook Google Plus Email YouTube Pinterest Instagram DISCLAIMER NBCA provides the ...

  4. How Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interactions Pill Identifier Commonly searched drugs Aspirin Metformin Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News FDA: ... really thin the blood. Commonly used anticoagulants are warfarin , given by mouth, and heparin , given by injection. ...

  5. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Resources for Industry Professionals View all Guidelines & Quality Care Resources to help practitioners improve patient care Professional Development Resources for continuing medical education (CME) ...

  6. Conserved Amblyomma americanum tick Serpin19, an inhibitor of blood clotting factors Xa and XIa, trypsin and plasmin, has anti-haemostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Tirloni, Lucas; Radulovic, Zeljko; Lewis, Lauren; Bakshi, Mariam; Hill, Creston; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Termignoni, Carlos; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-08-01

    Tick saliva serine protease inhibitors (serpins) facilitate tick blood meal feeding through inhibition of protease mediators of host defense pathways. We previously identified a highly conserved Amblyomma americanum serpin 19 that is characterised by its reactive center loop being 100% conserved in ixodid ticks. In this study, biochemical characterisation reveals that the ubiquitously transcribed A. americanum serpin 19 is an anti-coagulant protein, inhibiting the activity of five of the eight serine protease blood clotting factors. Pichia pastoris-expressed recombinant (r) A. americanum serpin 19 inhibits the enzyme activity of trypsin, plasmin and blood clotting factors (f) Xa and XIa, with stoichiometry of inhibition estimated at 5.1, 9.4, 23.8 and 28, respectively. Similar to typical inhibitory serpins, recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 forms irreversible complexes with trypsin, fXa and fXIa. At a higher molar excess of recombinant A. americanum serpin 19, fXIIa is inhibited by 82.5%, and thrombin (fIIa), fIXa, chymotrypsin and tryptase are inhibited moderately by 14-29%. In anti-hemostatic functional assays, recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 inhibits thrombin but not ADP and cathepsin G activated platelet aggregation, delays clotting in recalcification and thrombin time assays by up to 250s, and up to 40s in the activated partial thromboplastin time assay. Given A. americanum serpin 19 high cross-tick species conservation, and specific reactivity of recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 with antibodies to A. americanum tick saliva proteins, we conclude that recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 is a potential candidate for development of a universal tick vaccine. PMID:25957161

  7. Effect of warfarin on plasma and liver vitamin K levels and vitamin K epoxide reductase activity in relation to plasma clotting factor levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Y; Yamano, M; Yasunaga, K; Shike, T; Uchida, K

    1990-01-15

    Changes in plasma and liver vitamin K1 and vitamin K1 epoxide levels, liver microsomal vitamin K epoxide reductase activity, and plasma clotting factor II and VII levels were determined in rats after a single injection of warfarin (2.5 mg/kg, s.c.). The plasma and liver vitamin K1 levels gradually decreased after warfarin injection, attaining the lowest values at 2-3 hrs and remaining low for 48 hrs. They then returned to the control levels at 72 hrs. The changes in vitamin K1 epoxide levels were opposite, with an increase being seen soon after the warfarin injection, the highest values at 3 hrs and a gradual decrease to the initial levels occurring subsequently. The combined levels of vitamin K1 plus vitamin K1 epoxide, however, remained almost constant in both plasma and liver after the warfarin injection. The liver vitamin K epoxide reductase activity decreased to its lowest level soon after the injection and then gradually increased after 12 hrs, but the activity at 72 hrs was only about 30% of the initial activity. The plasma clotting factor levels gradually decreased after the injection, bottomed at 24 hrs and then began to increase, recovering almost to the initial levels at 72 hrs. A positive correlation was found between plasma and liver levels for both vitamin K1 and vitamin K1 epoxide, and the slope of the vitamin K1 epoxide curve was steeper than that for vitamin K1 in the warfarin-treated rats. A similar positive correlation was found for both vitamin K1 and vitamin K1 epoxide after vitamin K1 injection in normal untreated rats, but the slope of the vitamin K1 epoxide curve was much shallower. These results suggest that warfarin inhibits vitamin K epoxide reductase and decreases blood clotting factor synthesis, thus increasing plasma and liver vitamin K1 epoxide levels. A vitamin K epoxide reductase activity one third of that in normal rats is sufficient to maintain normal reduction of vitamin K1 epoxide and synthesis of blood clotting factors. PMID

  8. Enhanced susceptibility to infections in a diabetic wound healing model

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Tobias; Spielmann, Malte; Zuhaili, Baraa; Koehler, Till; Fossum, Magdalena; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Yao, Feng; Steinstraesser, Lars; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Eriksson, Elof

    2008-01-01

    Background Wound infection is a common complication in diabetic patients. The progressive spread of infections and development of drug-resistant strains underline the need for further insights into bacterial behavior in the host in order to develop new therapeutic strategies. The aim of our study was to develop a large animal model suitable for monitoring the development and effect of bacterial infections in diabetic wounds. Methods Fourteen excisional wounds were created on the dorsum of diabetic and non-diabetic Yorkshire pigs and sealed with polyurethane chambers. Wounds were either inoculated with 2 × 108 Colony-Forming Units (CFU) of Staphylococcus aureus or injected with 0.9% sterile saline. Blood glucose was monitored daily, and wound fluid was collected for bacterial quantification and measurement of glucose concentration. Tissue biopsies for microbiological and histological analysis were performed at days 4, 8, and 12. Wounds were assessed for reepithelialization and wound contraction. Results Diabetic wounds showed a sustained significant infection (>105 CFU/g tissue) compared to non-diabetic wounds (p < 0.05) over the whole time course of the experiment. S. aureus-inoculated diabetic wounds showed tissue infection with up to 8 × 107 CFU/g wound tissue. Non-diabetic wounds showed high bacterial counts at day 4 followed by a decrease and no apparent infection at day 12. Epidermal healing in S. aureus-inoculated diabetic wounds showed a significant delay compared with non-inoculated diabetic wounds (59% versus 84%; p < 0.05) and were highly significant compared with healing in non-diabetic wounds (97%; p < 0.001). Conclusion Diabetic wounds developed significantly more sustained infection than non-diabetic wounds. S. aureus inoculation leads to invasive infection and significant wound healing delay and promotes invasive co-infection with endogenous bacteria. This novel wound healing model provides the opportunity to closely assess infections during diabetic wound healing and to monitor the effect of therapeutical agents in vivo. PMID:18312623

  9. Parasitism enhances susceptibility to bacterial infection in tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gyrodactylus is a small elongate monogenetic parasite that mainly lives on the skin and gills of freshwater fish. Gyrodactylus causes mechanical injuries on fish epithelium that can lead to fish mortality under crowded conditions. Streptococcus iniae is a severe bacterial pathogen and the economic l...

  10. Parasitism by Ich enhanced susceptibility of tilapia to Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In aquaculture systems, fish are commonly infected by two or more pathogens. Bacterium Flavobacterium columnare and parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) are two common pathogens of cultured fish and result in heavy economic losses for aquaculture. There is no published information available ...

  11. Laser based enhancement of susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznick, Yana; Banin, Ehud; Lipovsky, Anat; Lubart, Rachel; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2012-03-01

    Our objective is to test the effect of pulsed (Q-switched) and continuous wave (CW) laser light at wavelength of 532nm on the viability of free-living stationary phase bacteria with and without gentamicin (an antibiotic) treatment. Free living stationary phase gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1) was immersed in Luria Broth (LB) solution and exposed to Q-switched and CW lasers with and without the addition of the antibiotic gentamicin. Cell viability was determined at different time points. Laser treatment alone did not reduce cell viability compared to untreated control and the gentamicin treatment alone only resulted in a 0.5 log reduction in the viable count for P. aeruginosa. The combined laser and gentamicin treatment, however, resulted in a synergistic effect and viability was reduced by 8 log's for P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  12. Mthfr gene ablation enhances susceptibility to arsenic prenatal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J. Zhu, Huiping; Finnell, Richard H.

    2014-02-15

    Background: In utero exposure to arsenic is known to adversely affect reproductive outcomes. Evidence of arsenic teratogenicity varies widely and depends on individual genotypic differences in sensitivity to As. In this study, we investigated the potential interaction between 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) genotype and arsenic embryotoxicity using the Mthfr knockout mouse model. Methods: Pregnant dams were treated with sodium arsenate, and reproductive outcomes including: implantation, resorption, congenital malformation and fetal birth weight were recorded at E18.5. Results: When the dams in Mthfr{sup +/−} × Mthfr{sup +/−} matings were treated with 7.2 mg/kg As, the resorption rate increased to 43.4%, from a background frequency of 7.2%. The As treatment also induced external malformations (40.9%) and significantly lowered the average fetal birth weight among fetuses, without any obvious toxic effect on the dam. When comparing the pregnancy outcomes resulting from different mating scenarios (Mthfr{sup +/+} × Mthfr{sup +/−}, Mthfr{sup +/−} × Mthfr{sup +/−} and Mthfr{sup −/−} × {sup Mthfr+/−}) and arsenic exposure; the resorption rate showed a linear relationship with the number of null alleles (0, 1 or 2) in the Mthfr dams. Fetuses from nullizygous dams had the highest rate of external malformations (43%) and lowest average birth weight. When comparing the outcomes of reciprocal matings (nullizygote × wild-type versus wild-type × nullizygote) after As treatment, the null dams showed significantly higher rates of resorptions and malformations, along with lower fetal birth weights. Conclusions: Maternal genotype contributes to the sensitivity of As embryotoxicity in the Mthfr mouse model. The fetal genotype, however, does not appear to affect the reproductive outcome after in utero As exposure. - Highlights: • An interaction between Mthfr genotype and arsenic embryotoxicity is presented. • Maternal Mthfr genotype contributes to the