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Sample records for enhancing genetic gains

  1. Advances in Maize Genomics and Their Value for Enhancing Genetic Gains from Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunbi; Skinner, Debra J.; Wu, Huixia; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Araus, Jose Luis; Yan, Jianbing; Gao, Shibin; Warburton, Marilyn L.; Crouch, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    Maize is an important crop for food, feed, forage, and fuel across tropical and temperate areas of the world. Diversity studies at genetic, molecular, and functional levels have revealed that, tropical maize germplasm, landraces, and wild relatives harbor a significantly wider range of genetic variation. Among all types of markers, SNP markers are increasingly the marker-of-choice for all genomics applications in maize breeding. Genetic mapping has been developed through conventional linkage mapping and more recently through linkage disequilibrium-based association analyses. Maize genome sequencing, initially focused on gene-rich regions, now aims for the availability of complete genome sequence. Conventional insertion mutation-based cloning has been complemented recently by EST- and map-based cloning. Transgenics and nutritional genomics are rapidly advancing fields targeting important agronomic traits including pest resistance and grain quality. Substantial advances have been made in methodologies for genomics-assisted breeding, enhancing progress in yield as well as abiotic and biotic stress resistances. Various genomic databases and informatics tools have been developed, among which MaizeGDB is the most developed and widely used by the maize research community. In the future, more emphasis should be given to the development of tools and strategic germplasm resources for more effective molecular breeding of tropical maize products. PMID:19688107

  2. Estimating soybean genetic gain for yield in the northern United States – Influence of cropping history

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mean on-farm USA soybean yield increased at a rate of 21.3 kg per ha per year between 1924 and 2010, due to adoption of yield-enhancing genetic and agronomic technologies. To estimate annual rates of genetic yield gain in three northern USA soybean maturity groups (MG) and determine if these estimat...

  3. Genetic contributions to yield gains in US wheat, 1980 - 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increases in wheat grain yield (kg harvested per hectare) over time derive from improved agronomic practices, and from enhanced genetic potential of wheat cultivars. Estimation of the rate of genetic improvement over time is important as it allows prediction of whether future grain supplies will me...

  4. Gain enhancement in a XeCl-pumped Raman amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Rifkin, J.; Bernt, M.L.; MacPherson, D.C.; Carlsten, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    A comparison of the theoretical predictions of a multimode broadband model with the experimentally measured gain enhancement in a Raman amplifier is presented. The results show that the multimode theory with fixed and totally random phases is in agreement with the data obtained from an excimer-laser-pumped Raman amplifier. Additionally, this theory indicates that the correlated gain can be larger than the gain for a monochromatic laser, as might be expected for a model with amplitude modulation.

  5. Simultaneous gain and phase-shift enhancements in periodic gain structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, R.H.; Chuang, Z.M.; Corzine, S.W.; Coldren, L.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The recently proposed concept of periodic gain, i.e., dividing the active region into segments placed at optical electric-field standing wave maxima, has been shown to greatly reduce the threshold gain requirement of the active media by up to a factor of 2 in high-finesse vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers. The lasing wavelength is determined by the period of the standing wave; however, previous analyses of these structures have failed to show that a similar enhancement effect occurs for the index shift resulting from the active segments as well. In this communication, we show that effects on both gain and index can be rigorously derived from conventional transmission scattering theory.

  6. The Role of Leptin in Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain: Genetic and Non-Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Panariello, Fabio; Polsinelli, Gina; Borlido, Carol; Monda, Marcellino; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and disabling mental illness affecting millions of people worldwide. A greater proportion of people with schizophrenia tends to be overweight. Antipsychotic medications have been considered the primary risk factor for obesity in schizophrenia, although the mechanisms by which they increase weight and produce metabolic disturbances are unclear. Several lines of research indicate that leptin could be a good candidate involved in pathways linking antipsychotic treatment and weight gain. Leptin is a circulating hormone released by adipocytes in response to increased fat deposition to regulate body weight, acting through receptors in the hypothalamus. In this work, we reviewed preclinical, clinical, and genetic data in order to infer the potential role played by leptin in antipsychotic-induced weight gain considering two main hypotheses: (1) leptin is an epiphenomenon of weight gain; (2) leptin is a consequence of antipsychotic-induced “leptin-resistance status,” causing weight gain. PMID:22523667

  7. Expected genetic contributions and their impact on gene flow and genetic gain.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, J A; Bijma, P; Villanueva, B

    1999-10-01

    Long-term genetic contributions (r(i)) measure lasting gene flow from an individual i. By accounting for linkage disequilibrium generated by selection both within and between breeding groups (categories), assuming the infinitesimal model, a general formula was derived for the expected contribution of ancestor i in category q (mu(i)(q)), given its selective advantages (s(i)(q)). Results were applied to overlapping generations and to a variety of modes of inheritance and selection indices. Genetic gain was related to the covariance between r(i) and the Mendelian sampling deviation (a(i)), thereby linking gain to pedigree development. When s(i)(q) includes a(i), gain was related to E[mu(i)(q))a(i)], decomposing it into components attributable to within and between families, within each category, for each element of s(i)(q). The formula for mu(i)(q) was consistent with previous index theory for predicting gain in discrete generations. For overlapping generations, accurate predictions of gene flow were obtained among and within categories in contrast to previous theory that gave qualitative errors among categories and no predictions within. The generation interval was defined as the period for which mu(i)(q), summed over all ancestors born in that period, equaled 1. Predictive accuracy was supported by simulation results for gain and contributions with sib-indices, BLUP selection, and selection with imprinted variation. PMID:10511574

  8. Commissural Gain Control Enhances the Midbrain Representation of Sound Location

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Llwyd David; Papasavvas, Christoforos A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate localization of sound sources is essential for survival behavior in many species. The inferior colliculi (ICs) are the first point in the auditory pathway where cues used to locate sounds, ie, interaural time differences (ITDs), interaural level differences (ILDs), and pinna spectral cues, are all represented in the same location. These cues are first extracted separately on each side of the midline in brainstem nuclei that project to the ICs. Because of this segregation, each IC predominantly represents stimuli in the contralateral hemifield. We tested the hypothesis that commissural connections between the ICs mediate gain control that enhances sound localization acuity. We recorded IC neurons sensitive to either ITDs or ILDs in anesthetized guinea pig, before, during, and following recovery from deactivation of the contralateral IC by cryoloop cooling or microdialysis of procaine. During deactivation, responses were rescaled by divisive gain change and additive shifts, which reduced the dynamic range of ITD and ILD response functions and the ability of neurons to signal changes in sound location. These data suggest that each IC exerts multiplicative gain control and subtractive shifts over the other IC that enhances the neural representation of sound location. Furthermore, this gain control operates in a similar manner on both ITD- and ILD-sensitive neurons, suggesting a shared mechanism operates across localization cues. Our findings reveal a novel dependence of sound localization on commissural processing. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sound localization, a fundamental process in hearing, is dependent on bilateral computations in the brainstem. How this information is transmitted from the brainstem to the auditory cortex, through several stages of processing, without loss of signal fidelity, is not clear. We show that the ability of neurons in the auditory midbrain to encode azimuthal sound location is dependent on gain control mediated by the commissure of

  9. Efficient use of hybrid Genetic Algorithms in the gain optimization of distributed Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Neto, B; Teixeira, A L J; Wada, N; André, P S

    2007-12-24

    In this paper, we propose an efficient and accurate method that combines the Genetic Algorithm (GA) with the Nelder-Mead method in order to obtain the gain optimization of distributed Raman amplifiers. By using these two methods together, the advantages of both are combined: the convergence of the GA and the high accuracy of the Nelder-Mead. To enhance the convergence of the GA, several features were examined and correlated with fitting errors. It is also shown that when the right moment to switch between methods is chosen, the computation time can be reduced by a factor of two. PMID:19551045

  10. Gain-enhanced hyperbolic metamaterials at telecommunication frequencies (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Joseph S. T.; Vallini, Felipe; Kante, Boubacar; Shahin, Shiva; Riley, Conor; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-09-01

    Using effective medium theory (EMT), Bloch's theorem (BT), and the transfer matrix method (TMM), we analyze the possibility of gain-enhanced transmission in metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion at telecommunication frequencies. We compare different combinations of dissipative metals and active dielectrics, including noble metals, transparent conducting oxides (TCO), III-V compounds, and solid-state dopants. We find that both indium gallium arsenide phosphide (InGaAsP) and erbium-doped silica (Er:SiO2), when combined with silver, show promise as a platform for demonstration of pump-dependent transmission. On the other hand, when these active dielectrics are combined with aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO), a low-loss TCO, gain-enhanced transmission is negligible. Results based on EMT are compared to the more accurate BT and TMM. When losses are ignored, quantitative agreement between these analytical techniques is observed near the center of the first Brillouin zone of a one-dimensional periodic structure. Including realistic levels of loss and gain, however, EMT predictions become overly optimistic compared to BT and TMM. We also discuss the limitations to assumptions inherent to EMT, BT, and TMM, and suggest avenues for future analysis.

  11. Gain-enhanced optical cooling in cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; Faez, Sanli; Marquardt, Florian; Tureci, Hakan

    2013-03-01

    We study the optical cooling of the mechanical motion of the resonator mirror in a cavity-optomechanical system that contains an optical gain medium. We find that the optical damping caused by radiation pressure force is vanishingly small if the active medium is pumped incoherently above its lasing threshold. In addition, we find that the spontaneous emission of the active medium always tends to increase the final effective temperature of the mechanical motion. In the presence of an additional seeding signal, i.e. a coherent drive of fixed frequency within the width of the gain curve however, we find that the cooling rate can be enhanced significantly with respect to that of a passive cavity. We attribute this effect to a reduced effective optical damping in the presence of incoherent pumping.

  12. "Genetic Engineering" Gains Momentum (Science/Society Case Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John W.; Moore, Elizabeth A., Eds.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the benefits and hazards of genetic engineering, or "recombinant-DNA" research. Recent federal safety rules issued by NIH which ease the strict prohibitions on recombinant-DNA research are explained. (CS)

  13. Who Gains? Genetic and Neurophysiological Correlates of BMI Gain Upon College Entry in Women

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Lance O.

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation examined P3 event-related electroencephalographic potentials and a short and selected list of addiction-related candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 84 female students, aged 18–20 yrs. The students were assigned to groups defined by the presence versus absence of a positive body mass index (BMI) change from the pre-college physical exam to the current day. Analyses revealed significantly greater P3 latencies and reduced P3 amplitudes during a response inhibition task among students who exhibited a BMI gain. BMI gain was also significantly associated with a ANKK1 SNP previously implicated in substance dependence risk. In logistic regression analyses, P3 latencies at the frontal electrode and this ANKK1 genotype correctly classified 71.1% of the students into the BMI groups. The present findings suggest that heritable indicators of impaired response inhibition can differentiate students who may be on a path toward an overweight or obese body mass. PMID:25049133

  14. Knowledge Gaining by Human Genetic Studies on Tuberculosis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui-Qi; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious health issue in the developing world. Lack of knowledge on the etiological mechanisms of TB hinders the development of effective strategies for the treatment or prevention of TB disease. Human genetic study is an indispensable approach to understand the molecular basis of common diseases. Numerous efforts were made to screen the human genome for TB susceptibility by linkage mapping. A large number of candidate-based association studies of TB were performed to examine the association of predicted functional DNA variations in candidate genes. Recently, the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) on TB was reported. The GWAS is a proof-of-principle evidence which justifies the genetic approach to understand TB. Further hypothesis-free efforts on TB research may renovate the traditional idea of TB genetic susceptibility as none of the candidate genes with important roles in containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection was identified of association with active TB, while the TB-associated loci in the GWAS harbors no gene with function in MTB infection. PMID:21179108

  15. The inevitability of genetic enhancement technologies.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Francoise; Robert, Jason Scott

    2004-01-01

    We outline a number of ethical objections to genetic technologies aimed at enhancing human capacities and traits. We then argue that, despite the persuasiveness of some of these objections, they are insufficient to stop the development and use of genetic enhancement technologies. We contend that the inevitability of the technologies results from a particular guiding worldview of humans as masters of the human evolutionary future, and conclude that recognising this worldview points to new directions for ethical thinking about genetic enhancement technologies. PMID:15168695

  16. High-gain nonlinear observer for simple genetic regulation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, L. A.; Ibarra-Junquera, V.; Escalante-Minakata, P.; Rosu, H. C.

    2007-07-01

    High-gain nonlinear observers occur in the nonlinear automatic control theory and are in standard usage in chemical engineering processes. We apply such a type of analysis in the context of a very simple one-gene regulation circuit. In general, an observer combines an analytical differential-equation-based model with partial measurement of the system in order to estimate the non-measured state variables. We use one of the simplest observers, that of Gauthier et al., which is a copy of the original system plus a correction term which is easy to calculate. For the illustration of this procedure, we employ a biological model, recently adapted from Goodwin's old book by De Jong, in which one plays with the dynamics of the concentrations of the messenger RNA coding for a given protein, the protein itself, and a single metabolite. Using the observer instead of the metabolite, it is possible to rebuild the non-measured concentrations of the mRNA and the protein.

  17. Enhancing optical gains in Si nanocrystals via hydrogenation and cerium ion doping

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong-Chen; Li, Yan-Li; Song, Sheng-Chi; Guo, Wen-Ping; Lu, Ming; Chen, Jia-Rong

    2014-07-28

    We report optical gain enhancements in Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) via hydrogenation and Ce{sup 3+} ion doping. Variable stripe length technique was used to obtain gains. At 0.3 W/cm{sup 2} pumping power density of pulsed laser, net gains were observed together with gain enhancements after hydrogenation and/or Ce{sup 3+} ion doping; gains after loss corrections were between 89.52 and 341.95 cm{sup −1}; and the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime was found to decrease with the increasing gain enhancement. At 0.04 W/cm{sup 2} power density, however, no net gain was found and the PL lifetime increased with the increasing PL enhancement. The results were discussed according to stimulated and spontaneous excitation and de-excitation mechanisms of Si-NCs.

  18. Feature-based attention enhances performance by increasing response gain.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Katrin; Heeger, David J; Carrasco, Marisa

    2012-12-01

    Covert spatial attention can increase contrast sensitivity either by changes in contrast gain or by changes in response gain, depending on the size of the attention field and the size of the stimulus (Herrmann et al., 2010), as predicted by the normalization model of attention (Reynolds & Heeger, 2009). For feature-based attention, unlike spatial attention, the model predicts only changes in response gain, regardless of whether the featural extent of the attention field is small or large. To test this prediction, we measured the contrast dependence of feature-based attention. Observers performed an orientation-discrimination task on a spatial array of grating patches. The spatial locations of the gratings were varied randomly so that observers could not attend to specific locations. Feature-based attention was manipulated with a 75% valid and 25% invalid pre-cue, and the featural extent of the attention field was manipulated by introducing uncertainty about the upcoming grating orientation. Performance accuracy was better for valid than for invalid pre-cues, consistent with a change in response gain, when the featural extent of the attention field was small (low uncertainty) or when it was large (high uncertainty) relative to the featural extent of the stimulus. These results for feature-based attention clearly differ from results of analogous experiments with spatial attention, yet both support key predictions of the normalization model of attention. PMID:22580017

  19. Gain enhancement methods for printed circuit antennas through multiple superstrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. Y.; Alexopoulos, Nicolaos G.

    1987-07-01

    Reciprocity and a transmission line model are used to determine the radiation properties of printed circuit antennas (PCA's) in a multilayered material configuration. It is demonstrated that extremely high directive gain may result at any scan angle, with practical materials, if the thickness of the substrate and multiple superstrate layers is chosen properly. This model is also used to analyze the radiation characteristics of printed circuit antennas in inhomogeneous substrates.

  20. Improving temporal coherence to enhance gain and improve detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Ronald A.; Rice, Heath E.

    2008-04-01

    Temporal coherence is an important property of many acoustic signals. This paper discusses two fluctuation-based signal processors that improve the temporal coherence of phase and amplitude. Then they exploit the improved coherences to achieve substantial gains, such as, elimination of all noise to achieve exceptionally large "noise-free" automatic detections of temporally coherent signals. Both processors are discussed. One exploits phase fluctuations and the other one exploits amplitude fluctuations. The exploited parameters and signal processors are defined. Results are presented for automatic signal detection of a heavy treaded / tracked vehicle, a helicopter, a fast-boat in shallow coastal water, and a submerged source in the ocean.

  1. Distinct developmental genetic mechanisms underlie convergently evolved tooth gain in sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Nicholas A.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Donde, Nikunj N.; Cleves, Phillip A.; Agoglia, Rachel M.; Miller, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    Teeth are a classic model system of organogenesis, as repeated and reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions pattern placode formation and outgrowth. Less is known about the developmental and genetic bases of tooth formation and replacement in polyphyodonts, which are vertebrates with continual tooth replacement. Here, we leverage natural variation in the threespine stickleback fish Gasterosteus aculeatus to investigate the genetic basis of tooth development and replacement. We find that two derived freshwater stickleback populations have both convergently evolved more ventral pharyngeal teeth through heritable genetic changes. In both populations, evolved tooth gain manifests late in development. Using pulse-chase vital dye labeling to mark newly forming teeth in adult fish, we find that both high-toothed freshwater populations have accelerated tooth replacement rates relative to low-toothed ancestral marine fish. Despite the similar evolved phenotype of more teeth and an accelerated adult replacement rate, the timing of tooth number divergence and the spatial patterns of newly formed adult teeth are different in the two populations, suggesting distinct developmental mechanisms. Using genome-wide linkage mapping in marine-freshwater F2 genetic crosses, we find that the genetic basis of evolved tooth gain in the two freshwater populations is largely distinct. Together, our results support a model whereby increased tooth number and an accelerated tooth replacement rate have evolved convergently in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations using largely distinct developmental and genetic mechanisms. PMID:26062935

  2. Genetic diversity and selection gain in the physic nut (Jatropha curcas).

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, B P; Silva, S A; Souza, D R; Santos, P A; Oliveira, R S; Lyra, D H

    2013-01-01

    The use of efficient breeding methods depends on knowledge of genetic control of traits to be improved. We estimated genetic parameters, selection gain, and genetic diversity in physic nut half-sib families, in order to provide information for breeding programs of this important biofuel species. The progeny test included 20 half-sib families in 4 blocks and 10 plants per plot. The mean progeny heritability values were: 50% for number of bunches, 47% for number of fruits, 35% for number of seeds, 6% for stem diameter, 26% for number of primary branches, 14% for number of secondary branches, 66% for plant height, and 25% for survival of the plants, demonstrating good potential for early selection in plant height, number of branches, and number of fruits per plant. In the analysis of genetic diversity, genotypes were divided into 4 groups. Genotypes 18, 19, 20, and 8 clustered together and presented the highest means for the vegetative and production. Lower means were observed in the 17, 12, 13, and 9 genotypes from the same group. We detected genetic variability in this population, with high heritability estimates and accuracy, demonstrating the possibility of obtaining genetic gains for vegetative characters and production at 24 months after planting. PMID:23315871

  3. Distinct developmental genetic mechanisms underlie convergently evolved tooth gain in sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Nicholas A; Glazer, Andrew M; Donde, Nikunj N; Cleves, Phillip A; Agoglia, Rachel M; Miller, Craig T

    2015-07-15

    Teeth are a classic model system of organogenesis, as repeated and reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions pattern placode formation and outgrowth. Less is known about the developmental and genetic bases of tooth formation and replacement in polyphyodonts, which are vertebrates with continual tooth replacement. Here, we leverage natural variation in the threespine stickleback fish Gasterosteus aculeatus to investigate the genetic basis of tooth development and replacement. We find that two derived freshwater stickleback populations have both convergently evolved more ventral pharyngeal teeth through heritable genetic changes. In both populations, evolved tooth gain manifests late in development. Using pulse-chase vital dye labeling to mark newly forming teeth in adult fish, we find that both high-toothed freshwater populations have accelerated tooth replacement rates relative to low-toothed ancestral marine fish. Despite the similar evolved phenotype of more teeth and an accelerated adult replacement rate, the timing of tooth number divergence and the spatial patterns of newly formed adult teeth are different in the two populations, suggesting distinct developmental mechanisms. Using genome-wide linkage mapping in marine-freshwater F2 genetic crosses, we find that the genetic basis of evolved tooth gain in the two freshwater populations is largely distinct. Together, our results support a model whereby increased tooth number and an accelerated tooth replacement rate have evolved convergently in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations using largely distinct developmental and genetic mechanisms. PMID:26062935

  4. Bioethics, sport and the genetically enhanced athlete.

    PubMed

    Miah, Andy

    2002-01-01

    This paper begins by acknowledging the interest taken by various international organisations in genetic enhancement and sport, including the US President's Council on Bioethics (July, 2002) and the World Anti-Doping Agency (March, 2002). It is noticed how sporting organisations have been particularly concerned to emphasize the 'threat' of genetics to sport, whereas other institutions have recognised the broader bioethical issues arising from this prospect, which do not readily reject the use of genetic technology in sport. Sports are identified as necessarily 'human' and 'moral' practices, the exploration of which can reveal greater insight into the intuitive fears about genetic modification. It is argued that anti-doping testing measures and sanctions unacceptably persecute the athlete. While there are substantial reasons to be concerned about the use of genetic modification in sport, the desire for policy ought not diminish the need for ethical research; nor ought such research embody the similar guise of traditional 'anti' doping strategies. Rather, the approach to genetics in sport must be informed more by broader social policies in bioethics and recognition of the greater goods arising from genetic technology. PMID:16285154

  5. Realized gain and prediction of yield with genetically improved Pinus radiata in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, S.D.; Hayes, J.D. ); Garcia, O. . Centro de Investigacions Forestais de Lourizan)

    1999-05-01

    Pinus radiata D. Don seedlots of varying genetic quality were compared in block-plot genetic-gain trials at 10 locations representing most of the site types in New Zealand. Permanent sample plots were measured annually for growth from age 6--8 yr from planting to ages 15--17 (midrotation). Seedlots from first-generation open-pollinated seed orchards and a mix of crosses that all involved the top-performing parent were, respectively, on average 4.5 % and 5.3% taller and had 6% and 11% larger mean diameter, 12% and 30% more basal area, and 15% and 34% more stem volume than seedlots originating from mild mass selection in harvested stands (climbing select). The observed growth increases were quantified as changes in the rate of growth from that predicted by pre-existing growth models in order to account for tree size and stocking differences. Seedlots from first-generation seed orchards and crosses of the top clone, respectively, grew 5.1% and 4.5% faster in height, and functions for basal area and stocking changed 13% and 26.4% faster, respectively, than the baseline growth models, which were based on climbing select. This implies that increased basal area growth must be taken into account in order to obtain accurate prediction of gain in stem volume. The incorporation of these observed increases in growth rates into stand growth models as genetic-gain multipliers in order to extrapolate predictions of growth of genetically improved seedlots beyond the sites, silvicultures, and seedlots represented in the genetic gain trials is discussed.

  6. Quantitative Genetics of Transgenic Mice: Components of Phenotypic Variation in Body Weights and Weight Gains

    PubMed Central

    Clutter, A. C.; Pomp, D.; Murray, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic mice possessing an ovine growth hormone gene were used to study the effects of elevated growth hormone on quantitative genetic variation. Males hemizygous for the transgene were mated to wild-type females to produce half- and full-sib families in which approximately half the progeny were transgenic and half were wild type. Analyses of body weights at 3-10 weeks, and weight gains from 3 to 6, and 6 to 10 weeks produced estimates of the proportion of total variance due to additive genetic effects (h(2)) and common litter effects (c(2)), and the genetic correlation between transgenic and wild-type expression of each trait. At 10 weeks, body weight of transgenics exceeded that of wild types by 26 and 49% in males and females, respectively. Estimated genetic variances in the transgenic group were significantly greater than zero for body weights at most ages and for both measurements of gain. Common litter effects accounted for a similar proportion of variation in the wild-type and transgenic groups. Additive genetic correlations between wild-type and transgenic expression of body weights tended to decline with age, indicating that a partially different array of genes may have begun to affect body weight in the transgenic group. PMID:8844161

  7. How Swedish breeders can substantially increase the genetic gain for the English Setter's hunting traits.

    PubMed

    Arvelius, P; Klemetsdal, G

    2013-04-01

    In both Sweden (Swe) and Norway (Nor), the English Setter is used for hunting. Similar field trials are arranged to give breeders information on the dogs' hunting abilities. Our main objective was to study if a joint Swe-Nor genetic evaluation can improve accuracy compared with estimation of breeding values on a national level only. Genetic parameters for six hunting traits were estimated in univariate (within country) and bivariate (across country, of equivalent traits between countries and joint pedigree) analyses utilizing 3620 Swe records from 685 dogs and 94,414 Nor records from 7175 dogs. A mixed linear animal model was used, including fixed effects of sex, type of trial, year, month and interaction between age and class of trial, and random effects of animal, permanent environment, judge and residual. Heritabilities ranged from 0.07 to 0.13 for Swe and from 0.08 to 0.18 for Nor. The accuracies were higher in the bivariate analyses, especially for dogs with Swe trial results with an average increase of 19%. If comparing selection based on a joint genetic evaluation over phenotypic results alone (which is today's method), the potential genetic gain in Swe was almost doubled. Our results suggest that a joint genetic evaluation is especially advantageous for a population with limited information, such as the English Setter population in Swe. However, it should also be beneficial for Norwegian breeders because it makes it easier for them to select Swedish dogs, potentially resulting in faster genetic gain and lowered inbreeding rate. PMID:23496015

  8. Low-index-metamaterial for gain enhancement of planar terahertz antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qing-Le; Si, Li-Ming Lv, Xin; Huang, Yongjun; Zhu, Weiren

    2014-03-15

    We theoretically present a high gain planar antenna at terahertz (THz) frequencies by combing a conventional log-periodic antenna (LPA) with a low-index-metamaterial (LIM, |n| < 1). The LIM is realized by properly designing a fishnet metamaterial using full-wave finite-element simulation. Owing to the impedance matching, the LIM can be placed seamlessly on the substrate of the LPA without noticeable reflection. The effectiveness of using LIM for antenna gain enhancement is confirmed by comparing the antenna performance with and without LIM, where significantly improved half-power beam-width (3-dB beam-width) and more than 4 dB gain enhancement are seen within a certain frequency range. The presented LIM-enhanced planar THz antenna is compact, flat, low profile, and high gain, which has extensive applications in THz systems, including communications, radar, and spectroscopy.

  9. A Confucian reflection on genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruiping

    2010-04-01

    This essay explores a proper Confucian vision on genetic enhancement. It argues that while Confucians can accept a formal starting point that Michael Sandel proposes in his ethics of giftedness, namely, that children should be taken as gifts, Confucians cannot adopt his generalist strategy. The essay provides a Confucian full ethics of giftedness by addressing a series of relevant questions, such as what kind of gifts children are, where the gifts are from, in which way they are given, and for what purpose they are given. It indicates that Confucians should sort out different types of enhancement and bring them to the test of the Confucian values in terms of both Confucian virtue principles and specific ritual rules. It concludes that Confucians can accept some types of enhancement but must reject others. PMID:20379929

  10. Genetic variation and gains in resistance of strawberry to Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Osorio, L F; Pattison, J A; Peres, N A; Whitaker, V M

    2014-01-01

    Anthracnose crown rot is an important disease of strawberry primarily caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in Florida and North Carolina. Information on the magnitude of additive and nonadditive genetic variation is required to define breeding strategies and to estimate potential genetic gains. However, little is known about the genetic control of resistance and its utility in breeding. Our objectives were to obtain estimates of heritabilities and of components of genetic variances, genotype-environment interactions, and gains for resistance, and to examine the effects of locations and transplant types on the estimates. An incomplete diallel mating design generated 42 full-sib families, which were propagated in plugs from seed (seedling tests) and as bare-root runner plants (clonal tests) of different genotypes of the same families. Both seedlings and clones were inoculated with C. gloeosporioides under field conditions in North Carolina and Florida during the 2010-11 season. Narrow-sense heritability (h(2)) and broad-sense heritability (H(2)) for both clones and seedlings were higher at the North Carolina location (h(2) = 0.34 to 0.62 and H(2) = 0.46 to 0.85) than at the Florida location (h(2) = 0.16 to 0.22 and H(2) = 0.37 to 0.46). Likewise, the seedling tests showed higher genetic control than the clonal tests at both locations. Estimates of dominance variance were approximately one-third of the additive variance at North Carolina and were even larger at Florida. Epistasis was negative at both locations and assumed zero for heritability (H(2)) calculations. Genotype-environment interactions were different by transplant type, suggesting rank changes across locations. 'Pelican' was the most resistant parent at both locations, followed by 'NCH09-68' at the NC location and 'Winter Dawn' at the Florida location. Selection and deployment of the most resistant clone within each of the five best families is estimated to produce average genetic gains of 53.0 and 73

  11. Enhanced optical precursors by Doppler effect via active Raman gain process.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yandong; Niu, Yueping; Zhang, Lida; Yang, Aihong; Jiang, Lin; Gong, Shangqing

    2012-08-15

    A scheme for enhancing precursor pulse by Doppler effect is proposed in a room-temperature active-Raman-gain medium. Due to abnormal dispersion between two gain peaks, main fields are advanced and constructively interfere with optical precursors, which leads to enhancement of the transient pulse at the rise edge of the input. Moreover, after Doppler averaging, the abnormal dispersion intensifies and the constructive interference between precursors and main fields is much strengthened, which boosts the transient spike. Simulation results demonstrate that the peak intensity of precursors could be enhanced nearly 20 times larger than that of the input. PMID:23381248

  12. Genetic benefits enhance the reproductive success of polyandrous females.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, S D; Zeh, J A; Zeh, D W

    1999-08-31

    Although it is generally accepted that females can gain material benefits by mating with more than one male, the proposal that polyandry provides genetic benefits remains controversial, largely because direct experimental support is lacking. Here, we report the results of a study testing for genetic benefits to polyandry in the pseudoscorpion Cordylochernes scorpioides. In an experiment that controlled for male mating experience and the number of spermatophores accepted by a female, twice-mated females received either one sperm-packet from each of two different males (the "DM" treatment) or two sperm-packets from a single male (the same male or "SM" treatment). Over their lifetime, DM females gave birth to 32% more offspring than did SM females, primarily because of a significantly reduced rate of spontaneous abortion. This result could not be attributed to male infertility nor to lack of sexual receptivity in males paired with previous mates. Spermatophore and sperm numbers did not differ between males presented with a previous mate and males paired with a new female. Because SM and DM females received the same quantity of ejaculate, it was possible to eliminate material benefits as a contributor to the enhanced reproductive success of DM females. The reduction in embryo failure rate achieved by DM females is most consistent with the genetic incompatibility avoidance hypothesis, i.e., that polyandry enables females to exploit postcopulatory mechanisms for reducing the risk and/or cost of fertilization by genetically incompatible sperm. This study, which rigorously controlled for material benefits and excluded inbreeding effects, demonstrates that polyandry provides genetic benefits that significantly enhance female lifetime reproductive success. PMID:10468592

  13. Genetic benefits enhance the reproductive success of polyandrous females

    PubMed Central

    Newcomer, Scott D.; Zeh, Jeanne A.; Zeh, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that females can gain material benefits by mating with more than one male, the proposal that polyandry provides genetic benefits remains controversial, largely because direct experimental support is lacking. Here, we report the results of a study testing for genetic benefits to polyandry in the pseudoscorpion Cordylochernes scorpioides. In an experiment that controlled for male mating experience and the number of spermatophores accepted by a female, twice-mated females received either one sperm-packet from each of two different males (the “DM” treatment) or two sperm-packets from a single male (the same male or “SM” treatment). Over their lifetime, DM females gave birth to 32% more offspring than did SM females, primarily because of a significantly reduced rate of spontaneous abortion. This result could not be attributed to male infertility nor to lack of sexual receptivity in males paired with previous mates. Spermatophore and sperm numbers did not differ between males presented with a previous mate and males paired with a new female. Because SM and DM females received the same quantity of ejaculate, it was possible to eliminate material benefits as a contributor to the enhanced reproductive success of DM females. The reduction in embryo failure rate achieved by DM females is most consistent with the genetic incompatibility avoidance hypothesis, i.e., that polyandry enables females to exploit postcopulatory mechanisms for reducing the risk and/or cost of fertilization by genetically incompatible sperm. This study, which rigorously controlled for material benefits and excluded inbreeding effects, demonstrates that polyandry provides genetic benefits that significantly enhance female lifetime reproductive success. PMID:10468592

  14. Estimate of genetic gain in popcorn after cycles of phenotypic recurrent selection.

    PubMed

    Ematné, H J; Nunes, J A R; Dias, K O G; Prado, P E R; Souza, J C

    2016-01-01

    Popcorn is widely consumed in Brazil, yet there are few breeding programs for this crop. Recurrent selection (RS) is a viable breeding alternative for popcorn; however, the gains achieved must be frequently checked. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of selection for grain type (round and pointed) after four cycles of phenotypic RS on the main agronomic traits of popcorn, to estimate the genetic gain achieved for the trait of expansion volume (EV), and to obtain estimates of phenotypic correlations for the main traits of the crop in the UFLA E and UFLA R populations. The zero, one, two, and three cycles of the UFLA E and UFLA R populations, the fourth cycle, and the controls IAC-112 and IAC-125 were used. The experiments were conducted at the experimental farm of Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA; Environment 1) and at the experimental area of the Genetics and Plant Breeding Sector of the Department of Biology at UFLA (Environment 2) in the 2010/11 crop season. Nine agronomic traits were evaluated, including EV and grain yield (GY). The UFLA R and UFLA E populations showed similar behavior for all evaluated traits. The type of grain did not affect the genetic gain for EV, which was 5 and 3.7% in each cycle carried out in the UFLA E and UFLA R population, respectively. Phenotypic selection carried out during recombination for EV is an effective method for increasing expression of the trait. EV and GY did not show a linear association. PMID:27323058

  15. Undergraduates Achieve Learning Gains in Plant Genetics through Peer Teaching of Secondary Students

    PubMed Central

    Chrispeels, H. E.; Klosterman, M. L.; Martin, J. B.; Lundy, S. R.; Watkins, J. M.; Gibson, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that undergraduates who peer teach genetics will have greater understanding of genetic and molecular biology concepts as a result of their teaching experiences. Undergraduates enrolled in a non–majors biology course participated in a service-learning program in which they led middle school (MS) or high school (HS) students through a case study curriculum to discover the cause of a green tomato variant. The curriculum explored plant reproduction and genetic principles, highlighting variation in heirloom tomato fruits to reinforce the concept of the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. HS students were taught additional activities related to mole­cular biology techniques not included in the MS curriculum. We measured undergraduates’ learning outcomes using pre/postteaching content assessments and the course final exam. Undergraduates showed significant gains in understanding of topics related to the curriculum they taught, compared with other course content, on both types of assessments. Undergraduates who taught HS students scored higher on questions specific to the HS curriculum compared with undergraduates who taught MS students, despite identical lecture content, on both types of assessments. These results indicate the positive effect of service-learning peer-teaching experiences on undergraduates’ content knowledge, even for non–science major students. PMID:25452487

  16. Comparison of genetic gains per year for carcass traits among breeding programs in the Japanese Brown and the Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Miyake, T; Gaillard, C; Oguni, T; Matsumoto, M; Ito, M; Kurahara, T; Sasae, Y; Fujinaka, K; Ohtagaki, S; Dougo, T

    2006-02-01

    The breeding program for beef cattle in Japan has changed dramatically over 4 decades. Visual judging was done initially, but progeny testing in test stations began in 1968. In the 1980s, the genetic evaluation program using field records, so-called on-farm progeny testing, was first adopted in Oita, Hyogo, and Kumamoto prefectures. In this study, genetic trends for carcass traits in these 3 Wagyu populations were estimated, and genetic gains per year were compared among the 3 different beef cattle breeding programs. The field carcass records used were collected between 1988 and 2003. The traits analyzed were carcass weight, LM area, rib thickness, s.c. fat thickness, and beef marbling standard number. The average breeding values of reproducing dams born the same year were used to estimate the genetic trends for the carcass traits. For comparison of the 3 breeding programs, birth years of the dams were divided into 3 periods reflecting each program. Positive genetic trends for beef marbling standard number were clearly shown in all populations. The genetic gains per year for all carcass traits were significantly enhanced by adopting the on-farm progeny testing program. These results indicate that the on-farm progeny testing program with BLUP is a very powerful approach for genetic improvement of carcass traits in Japanese Wagyu beef cattle. PMID:16424259

  17. Genetic enhancement in sport: just another form of doping?

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Maxwell J

    2012-12-01

    Patented genetic technologies such as the ACTN3 genetic test are adding a new dimension to the types of performance enhancement available to elite athletes. Organized sports organizations and governments are seeking to prevent athletes' use of biomedical enhancements. This paper discusses how these interdiction efforts will affect the use and availability of genetic technologies that can enhance athletic performance. The paper provides a working definition of enhancement, and in light of that definition and the concerns of the sports community, reviews genetic enhancement as a result of varied technologies, including, genetic testing to identify innate athletic ability, performance-enhancing drugs developed with genetic science and technology, pharmacogenetics, enhancement through reproductive technologies, somatic gene transfer, and germ line gene transfer. PMID:22830451

  18. Antenna Gain Enhancement and Beamshaping using a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbitt, Christopher

    Dielectric and metamaterial lenses have been designed for gain enhancement and beam shaping. The motivation for this work came from a commercially available slotted waveguide antenna with a dielectric lens that shapes the beam and enhances the gain only in the azimuth plane. When two of these antennas, each with a dielectric lens, are stacked as an array to form the sum and difference patterns the elevation plane gain is low and the beam width too wide to be acceptable for radar applications. The objective of the present work is to design a diffractive optical element (DOE) lens for gain enhancement gain and beam shaping. As compared to other available lenses it is much thinner, lighter and easily machined. The DOE lens is made from rexolite which has a dielectric constant of 2.53. The DOE lens is composed of a series of zones which focus the light at a certain focal length. The phase is the same everywhere on each zone at the focal point. The phase difference between neighboring zones is 2pi, resulting in a constructive interference at the focus. These zones are able to focus the radiation from an antenna in order to enhance the gain and shape the beam. The design parameters include the lens diameter, number of zones, the center zone thickness for a particular frequency and refractive index of the dielectric material. A comprehensive study has been performed in CST Microwave Studio to illustrate the properties of the DOE lens. The focusing property for image formation is verified by a plane wave excitation. Lenses have been designed and tested at different frequencies and with varying design parameters. Gain enhancement and beam shaping are illustrated by modeling the DOE lens in CST and placing it in front of different antennas. This work presents lenses for 10GHz and 40GHz horn antennas, a 3GHz slotted waveguide antenna array, and a 10GHz microstrip patch arrays. Beam shaping and focusing is clearly illustrated for each type of antenna. It is seen that the size

  19. Optimisation of contribution of candidate parents to maximise genetic gain and restricting inbreeding using semidefinite programming (Open Access publication)

    PubMed Central

    Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Woolliams, John A

    2007-01-01

    An approach for optimising genetic contributions of candidates to control inbreeding in the offspring generation using semidefinite programming (SDP) was proposed. Formulations were done for maximising genetic gain while restricting inbreeding to a preset value and for minimising inbreeding without regard of gain. Adaptations to account for candidates with fixed contributions were also shown. Using small but traceable numerical examples, the SDP method was compared with an alternative based upon Lagrangian multipliers (RSRO). The SDP method always found the optimum solution that maximises genetic gain at any level of restriction imposed on inbreeding, unlike RSRO which failed to do so in several situations. For these situations, the expected gains from the solution obtained with RSRO were between 1.5–9% lower than those expected from the optimum solution found with SDP with assigned contributions varying widely. In conclusion SDP is a reliable and flexible method for solving contribution problems. PMID:17212945

  20. Modeling of genetic gain for single traits from marker-assisted seedling selection in clonally propagated crops

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Sushan; Hardner, Craig; Carter, Patrick A; Evans, Kate; Main, Dorrie; Peace, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Seedling selection identifies superior seedlings as candidate cultivars based on predicted genetic potential for traits of interest. Traditionally, genetic potential is determined by phenotypic evaluation. With the availability of DNA tests for some agronomically important traits, breeders have the opportunity to include DNA information in their seedling selection operations—known as marker-assisted seedling selection. A major challenge in deploying marker-assisted seedling selection in clonally propagated crops is a lack of knowledge in genetic gain achievable from alternative strategies. Existing models based on additive effects considering seed-propagated crops are not directly relevant for seedling selection of clonally propagated crops, as clonal propagation captures all genetic effects, not just additive. This study modeled genetic gain from traditional and various marker-based seedling selection strategies on a single trait basis through analytical derivation and stochastic simulation, based on a generalized seedling selection scheme of clonally propagated crops. Various trait-test scenarios with a range of broad-sense heritability and proportion of genotypic variance explained by DNA markers were simulated for two populations with different segregation patterns. Both derived and simulated results indicated that marker-based strategies tended to achieve higher genetic gain than phenotypic seedling selection for a trait where the proportion of genotypic variance explained by marker information was greater than the broad-sense heritability. Results from this study provides guidance in optimizing genetic gain from seedling selection for single traits where DNA tests providing marker information are available. PMID:27148453

  1. Estimates of genetic parameters for visual scores and daily weight gain in Brangus animals.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, S A; Oliveira, J A; Costa, G Z; Fries, L A

    2011-05-01

    (Co)variance components were estimated for visual scores of conformation (CY), early finishing (PY) and muscling (MY) at 550 days of age (yearling), average daily gain from weaning to yearling (GWY), conformation (CW), early finishing (PW) and muscling (MW) scores at weaning, and average daily gain from birth to weaning (GBW) in animals forming the Brazilian Brangus breed born between 1986 and 2002 from the livestock files of GenSys Consultants Associados S/C Ltda. The data set contained 53 683; 45 136; 52 937; 56 471; 24 531; 21 166; 24 006 and 25 419 records for CW, PW, MW, GBW, CY, PY, MY and GWY, respectively. Data were analyzed by the restricted maximum likelihood method using single- and two-trait animal models. Direct heritability estimates obtained by single-trait analysis were 0.12, 0.14, 0.13 and 0.14 for CY, PY and MY scores and GWY, respectively. A positive association was observed between the same visual scores at weaning and yearling, with correlations ranging from 0.64 to 0.94. Estimated correlations between GBW and weaning and yearling scores ranged from 0.60 to 0.77. The genetic correlation between GBW and GWY was low (0.10), whereas correlations of 0.55, 0.37 and 0.47 were observed between GWY and CY, PY and MY, respectively. Moreover, GWY showed a weak correlation with CW (0.10), PW (-0.08) and MW (-0.03) scores. These results indicate that selection of the traits that was studied would result in a small response. In addition, selection based on average daily gain may have an indirect effect on visual scores as the correlations between GWY and visual scores were generally strong. PMID:22440022

  2. Genetic gains in the UENF-14 popcorn population with recurrent selection.

    PubMed

    Freitas, I L J; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Freitas, S P; Cabral, P D S; Ribeiro, R M; Gonçalves, L S A

    2014-01-01

    The popcorn breeding program of Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro aims to provide farmers a cultivar with desirable agronomic traits, particularly with respect to grain yield (GY) and popping expansion (PE). We evaluated full-sib families from the seventh cycle of recurrent selection and estimated the genetic progress with respect to GY and PE. Eight traits were evaluated in 200 full-sib families that were randomized into blocks with two replicates per set in two contrasting environments, Campos dos Goytacazes and Itaocara, located in north and northwest Rio de Janeiro State, respectively. There were significant differences between sets in families with respect to all traits evaluated, which indicates genetic variability that may be explored in future cycles. Using random economic weights in the selection of superior progenies, the Mulamba and Mock index showed gains for PE and GY of 5.11 and 7.78%, respectively. Significant PE and GY increases were found when comparing the evolution of mean values of these two parameters that were assessed at cycles C₀-C₆ and predicted for C₇. Thus, an advanced-cycle popcorn cultivar with genotypic superiority for the main traits of economic interest can be made available to farmers in Rio de Janeiro State. PMID:24535880

  3. Fast Ignition Thermonuclear Fusion: Enhancement of the Pellet Gain by the Colossal-Magnetic-Field Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The fast ignition fusion pellet gain can be enhanced by a laser generated B-field shell. The B-field shell, (similar to Earth's B-field, but with the alternating B-poles), follows the pellet compression in a frozen-in B-field regime. A properly designed laser-pellet coupling can lead to the generation of a B-field shell, (up to 100 MG), which inhibits electron thermal transport and confines the alpha-particles. In principle, a pellet gain of few-100s can be achieved in this manner. Supported in part by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University, 1010 Pearl, La Jolla, CA 92038-1007.

  4. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sofus C.; Ängquist, Lars; Laurin, Charles; Morgen, Camilla S.; Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Smith, George Davey; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Nohr, Ellen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG), and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup. Objective To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity. Design A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) sampling the most obese women (n = 990) and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128). Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n = 4,841). We included 32 body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS). Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined. Results In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g) of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01). For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01) per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings. Conclusion We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs. PMID:26930408

  5. Genomic selection strategies in a small dairy cattle population evaluated for genetic gain and profit.

    PubMed

    Thomasen, J R; Egger-Danner, C; Willam, A; Guldbrandtsen, B; Lund, M S; Sørensen, A C

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a genomic breeding scheme in a small dairy cattle population that was intermediate in terms of using both young bulls (YB) and progeny-tested bulls (PB). This scheme was compared with a conventional progeny testing program without use of genomic information and, as the extreme case, a juvenile scheme with genomic information, where all bulls were used before progeny information was available. The population structure, cost, and breeding plan parameters were chosen to reflect the Danish Jersey cattle population, being representative for a small dairy cattle population. The population consisted of 68,000 registered cows. Annually, 1,500 bull dams were screened to produce the 500 genotyped bull calves from which 60 YB were selected to be progeny tested. Two unfavorably correlated traits were included in the breeding goal, a production trait (h(2)=0.30) and a functional trait (h(2)=0.04). An increase in reliability of 5 percentage points for each trait was used in the default genomic scenario. A deterministic approach was used to model the different breeding programs, where the primary evaluation criterion was annual monetary genetic gain (AMGG). Discounted profit was used as an indicator of the economic outcome. We investigated the effect of varying the following parameters: (1) increase in reliability due to genomic information, (2) number of genotyped bull calves, (3) proportion of bull dam sires that are young bulls, and (4) proportion of cow sires that are young bulls. The genomic breeding scheme was both genetically and economically superior to the conventional breeding scheme, even in a small dairy cattle population where genomic information causes a relatively low increase in reliability of breeding values. Assuming low reliabilities of genomic predictions, the optimal breeding scheme according to AMGG was characterized by mixed use of YB and PB as bull sires. Exclusive use of YB for production cows increased AMGG up

  6. Germ-line genetic enhancement and Rawlsian primary goods.

    PubMed

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2005-03-01

    Genetic interventions raise a host of moral issues and, of its various species, germ-line genetic enhancement is the most morally contentious. This paper surveys various arguments against germ-line enhancement and attempts to demonstrate their inadequacies. A positive argument is advanced in favor of certain forms of germ-line enhancements, which holds that they are morally permissible if and only if they augment Rawlsian primary goods, either directly or by facilitating their acquisition. PMID:15881795

  7. Litter, permanent environmental, ram-flock, and genetic effects on early weight gain of lambs.

    PubMed

    Hagger, C

    1998-02-01

    Twelve models were fitted to early growth data of two Swiss sheep breeds to investigate their suitability for evaluation of breeding values. Models were identical for fixed parity, litter size, sex and lambing season effects, random flock-year, and direct genetic effects but differed for combinations of random litter, permanent environmental, ram-flock, and maternal genetic effects. Records of average daily gain to 30 d of 25,564 lambs of the Black-Brown Mountain Sheep (SBS) and of 26,391 lambs of the White Alpine Sheep (WAS) born 1989 to 1995 and their pedigrees were available. A single-trait animal model was fitted by the restricted maximum likelihood method. The information criterion of a particular model (i.e., the maximum of the likelihood function adjusted for the number of independently estimated parameters) was used to evaluate the models for their fitting power. The litter effect accounted for between 26 and 31% of the phenotypic variance, with little variation within breed. Models containing the ram-flock effect provided a better fit of the data than otherwise identical models. This effect contributed 6 and 4% to the phenotypic variance in the two breeds and strongly influenced estimates of other components. The proportion of phenotypic variance due to the flock-year effect was 23 and 25% without and 19 and 23% including the ram-flock effect in the model in the two breeds. Including permanent environmental effect of the ewe in addition to litter effect led to a better fit of the data. Depending on the model, it then contributed between 3 and 6% to the phenotypic variance. Fitting the ram-flock effect reduced heritability considerably and increased the breed difference of the estimates of this parameter. Estimates ranging from .16 to .10 and from .08 to .14 were obtained for the SBS and WAS breeds, respectively. For models without the ram-flock effect, negative estimates of the direct-maternal correlation of between -.38 and -.45 were observed. Including

  8. The wisdom of caution: genetic enhancement and future children.

    PubMed

    Borenstein, Jason

    2009-12-01

    Many scholars predict that the technology to modify unborn children genetically is on the horizon. According to supporters of genetic enhancement, allowing parents to select a child's traits will enable him/her to experience a better life. Following their logic, the technology will not only increase our knowledge base and generate cures for genetic illness, but it may enable us to increase the intelligence, strength, and longevity of future generations as well. Yet it must be examined whether supporters of genetic enhancement, especially libertarians, adequately appreciate the ethical hazards emerging from the technology, including whether its use might violate the harm principle. PMID:19915956

  9. Meander-line-based inhomogeneous anisotropic artificial material for gain enhancement of UWB Vivaldi antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Singh, Hari Shankar; Meshram, Manoj Kumar

    2016-02-01

    An inhomogeneous anisotropic (IA) artificial material (AM) is proposed having epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) characteristics and effective refractive index >1, simultaneously, in the same direction. Further, the proposed IA-AM is utilized for the gain enhancement of Vivaldi antenna for ultra-wideband (UWB) applications. The IA-AM consists of two types of compact meandered line-based anisotropic artificial material with ENZ characteristics in two adjacent narrow bands of 5.5-8.5 and 8-11.5 GHz. However, the non-resonant behavior of the artificial material in other direction appears with high refractive index property in broadband region. The combination of both the unit cells with broadband ENZ and high refractive index property is used to improve the gain of the Vivaldi antenna in broadband. The proposed IA-AM-loaded Vivaldi antenna exhibits a gain enhancement of up to 2 dBi compared to the original antenna in the operating frequency band of 3.1-12 GHz with | S 11| < -10 dB. The proposed antenna shows nearly stable unidirectional radiation patterns with high directivity and nearly flat group delay.

  10. Printed Wide-Slot Antenna Design with Bandwidth and Gain Enhancement on Low-Cost Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Samsuzzaman, M.; Islam, M. T.; Mandeep, J. S.; Misran, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a printed wide-slot antenna design and prototyping on available low-cost polymer resin composite material fed by a microstrip line with a rotated square slot for bandwidth enhancement and defected ground structure for gain enhancement. An I-shaped microstrip line is used to excite the square slot. The rotated square slot is embedded in the middle of the ground plane, and its diagonal points are implanted in the middle of the strip line and ground plane. To increase the gain, four L-shaped slots are etched in the ground plane. The measured results show that the proposed structure retains a wide impedance bandwidth of 88.07%, which is 20% better than the reference antenna. The average gain is also increased, which is about 4.17 dBi with a stable radiation pattern in the entire operating band. Moreover, radiation efficiency, input impedance, current distribution, axial ratio, and parametric studies of S11 for different design parameters are also investigated using the finite element method-based simulation software HFSS. PMID:24696661

  11. Printed wide-slot antenna design with bandwidth and gain enhancement on low-cost substrate.

    PubMed

    Samsuzzaman, M; Islam, M T; Mandeep, J S; Misran, N

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a printed wide-slot antenna design and prototyping on available low-cost polymer resin composite material fed by a microstrip line with a rotated square slot for bandwidth enhancement and defected ground structure for gain enhancement. An I-shaped microstrip line is used to excite the square slot. The rotated square slot is embedded in the middle of the ground plane, and its diagonal points are implanted in the middle of the strip line and ground plane. To increase the gain, four L-shaped slots are etched in the ground plane. The measured results show that the proposed structure retains a wide impedance bandwidth of 88.07%, which is 20% better than the reference antenna. The average gain is also increased, which is about 4.17 dBi with a stable radiation pattern in the entire operating band. Moreover, radiation efficiency, input impedance, current distribution, axial ratio, and parametric studies of S11 for different design parameters are also investigated using the finite element method-based simulation software HFSS. PMID:24696661

  12. A new metasurface reflective structure for simultaneous enhancement of antenna bandwidth and gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. Habib; Islam, M. T.

    2014-08-01

    A new bi-layered metasurface reflective structure (MRS) on a high-permittivity, low-loss, ceramic-filled, bio-plastic, sandwich-structured, dielectric substrate is proposed for the simultaneous enhancement of the bandwidth and gain of a dual band patch antenna. By incorporating the MRS with a 4 mm air gap between the MRS and the antenna, the bandwidth and gain of the dual band patch antenna are significantly enhanced. The reflection coefficient (S11 < -10 dB) bandwidth of the proposed MRS-loaded antenna increased by 240% (178%), and the average peak gain improved by 595% (128%) compared to the antenna alone in the lower (upper) band. Incremental improvements of the magnitude and directional patterns have been observed from the measured radiation patterns at the three resonant frequencies of 0.9 GHz, 3.7 GHz and 4.5 GHz. The effects of different configurations of the radiating patch and the ground plane on the reflection coefficient have been analyzed. In addition, the voltage standing wave ratio and input impedance have also been validated using a Smith chart.

  13. Bias in the prediction of genetic gain due to mass and half-sib selection in random mating populations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The prediction of gains from selection allows the comparison of breeding methods and selection strategies, although these estimates may be biased. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of such bias in predicting genetic gain. For this, we simulated 10 cycles of a hypothetical breeding program that involved seven traits, three population classes, three experimental conditions and two breeding methods (mass and half-sib selection). Each combination of trait, population, heritability, method and cycle was repeated 10 times. The predicted gains were biased, even when the genetic parameters were estimated without error. Gain from selection in both genders is twice the gain from selection in a single gender only in the absence of dominance. The use of genotypic variance or broad sense heritability in the predictions represented an additional source of bias. Predictions based on additive variance and narrow sense heritability were equivalent, as were predictions based on genotypic variance and broad sense heritability. The predictions based on mass and family selection were suitable for comparing selection strategies, whereas those based on selection within progenies showed the largest bias and lower association with the realized gain. PMID:21637512

  14. Quantum noise effects with Kerr-nonlinearity enhancement in coupled gain-loss waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bing; Yan, Shu-Bin; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Min

    2015-05-01

    It is generally difficult to study the dynamical properties of a quantum system with both inherent quantum noises and nonperturbative nonlinearity. Due to the possibly drastic intensity increase of an input coherent light in gain-loss waveguide couplers with parity-time (PT ) symmetry, the Kerr effect from a nonlinearity added into the system can be greatly enhanced and is expected to create macroscopic entangled states of the output light fields with huge photon numbers. Meanwhile, quantum noises also coexist with the amplification and dissipation of the light fields. Under the interplay between the quantum noises and nonlinearity, the quantum dynamical behaviors of the systems become rather complicated. However, the important quantum noise effects have been mostly neglected in previous studies about nonlinear PT -symmetric systems. Here we present a solution to this nonperturbative quantum nonlinear problem, showing the real-time evolution of the system observables. The enhanced Kerr nonlinearity is found to give rise to a previously unknown decoherence effect that is irrelevant to the quantum noises and imposes a limit on the emergence of macroscopic nonclassicality. In contrast to what happens in linear systems, the quantum noises exert significant impact on the system dynamics and can create nonclassical light field states in conjunction with the enhanced Kerr nonlinearity. This study on the noise involved in quantum nonlinear dynamics of coupled gain-loss waveguides can help to better understand the quantum noise effects in many nonlinear systems.

  15. GABAergic neural activity involved in salicylate-induced auditory cortex gain enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Lobarinas, E; Deng, A; Goodey, R; Stolzberg, D; Salvi, R J; Sun, W

    2011-08-25

    Although high doses of sodium salicylate impair cochlear function, it paradoxically enhances sound-evoked activity in the auditory cortex (AC) and augments acoustic startle reflex responses, neural and behavioral metrics associated with hyperexcitability and hyperacusis. To explore the neural mechanisms underlying salicylate (SS)-induced hyperexcitability and "increased central gain," we examined the effects of GABA receptor agonists and antagonists on SS-induced hyperexcitability in the AC and startle reflex responses. Consistent with our previous findings, local or systemic application of SS significantly increased the amplitude of sound-evoked AC neural activity, but generally reduced spontaneous activity in the AC. Systemic injection of SS also significantly increased the acoustic startle reflex. S-baclofen or R-baclofen, GABA-B agonists, which suppressed sound-evoked AC neural firing rate and local field potentials, also suppressed the SS-induced enhancement of the AC field potential and the acoustic startle reflex. Local application of vigabatrin, which enhances GABA concentration in the brain, suppressed the SS-induced enhancement of AC firing rate. Systemic injection of vigabatrin also reduced the SS-induced enhancement of acoustic startle reflex. Collectively, these results suggest that the sound-evoked behavioral and neural hyperactivity induced by SS may arise from a SS-induced suppression of GABAergic inhibition in the AC. PMID:21664433

  16. A Cognitive Tutor for Genetics Problem Solving: Learning Gains and Student Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Albert; Kauffman, Linda; Maclaren, Ben; Wagner, Angela; Jones, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Genetics is a unifying theme of biology that poses a major challenge for students across a wide range of post-secondary institutions, because it entails complex problem solving. This article reports a new intelligent learning environment called the Genetics Cognitive Tutor, which supports genetics problem solving. The tutor presents complex,…

  17. Enhancing speed of pinning synchronizability: low-degree nodes with high feedback gains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Zhuo, Zhao; Liao, Hao; Fu, Zhong-Qian; Cai, Shi-Min

    2015-12-01

    Controlling complex networks is of paramount importance in science and engineering. Despite recent efforts to improve controllability and synchronous strength, little attention has been paid to the speed of pinning synchronizability (rate of convergence in pinning control) and the corresponding pinning node selection. To address this issue, we propose a hypothesis to restrict the control cost, then build a linear matrix inequality related to the speed of pinning controllability. By solving the inequality, we obtain both the speed of pinning controllability and optimal control strength (feedback gains in pinning control) for all nodes. Interestingly, some low-degree nodes are able to achieve large feedback gains, which suggests that they have high influence on controlling system. In addition, when choosing nodes with high feedback gains as pinning nodes, the controlling speed of real systems is remarkably enhanced compared to that of traditional large-degree and large-betweenness selections. Thus, the proposed approach provides a novel way to investigate the speed of pinning controllability and can evoke other effective heuristic pinning node selections for large-scale systems.

  18. Enhancing speed of pinning synchronizability: low-degree nodes with high feedback gains

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Zhuo, Zhao; Liao, Hao; Fu, Zhong-Qian; Cai, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Controlling complex networks is of paramount importance in science and engineering. Despite recent efforts to improve controllability and synchronous strength, little attention has been paid to the speed of pinning synchronizability (rate of convergence in pinning control) and the corresponding pinning node selection. To address this issue, we propose a hypothesis to restrict the control cost, then build a linear matrix inequality related to the speed of pinning controllability. By solving the inequality, we obtain both the speed of pinning controllability and optimal control strength (feedback gains in pinning control) for all nodes. Interestingly, some low-degree nodes are able to achieve large feedback gains, which suggests that they have high influence on controlling system. In addition, when choosing nodes with high feedback gains as pinning nodes, the controlling speed of real systems is remarkably enhanced compared to that of traditional large-degree and large-betweenness selections. Thus, the proposed approach provides a novel way to investigate the speed of pinning controllability and can evoke other effective heuristic pinning node selections for large-scale systems. PMID:26626045

  19. Enhancing speed of pinning synchronizability: low-degree nodes with high feedback gains.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Zhuo, Zhao; Liao, Hao; Fu, Zhong-Qian; Cai, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Controlling complex networks is of paramount importance in science and engineering. Despite recent efforts to improve controllability and synchronous strength, little attention has been paid to the speed of pinning synchronizability (rate of convergence in pinning control) and the corresponding pinning node selection. To address this issue, we propose a hypothesis to restrict the control cost, then build a linear matrix inequality related to the speed of pinning controllability. By solving the inequality, we obtain both the speed of pinning controllability and optimal control strength (feedback gains in pinning control) for all nodes. Interestingly, some low-degree nodes are able to achieve large feedback gains, which suggests that they have high influence on controlling system. In addition, when choosing nodes with high feedback gains as pinning nodes, the controlling speed of real systems is remarkably enhanced compared to that of traditional large-degree and large-betweenness selections. Thus, the proposed approach provides a novel way to investigate the speed of pinning controllability and can evoke other effective heuristic pinning node selections for large-scale systems. PMID:26626045

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF GENETICALLY ENHANCED BACULOVIRUS PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The assessment of potential environmental impacts of genetically improved viral pesticides will include an evaluation of the properties of the foreign gene product(s) as well as the biological properties of altered virus itself. It is anticipated that in the near future several t...

  1. GENETIC ENGINEERING OF ENHANCED MICROBIAL NITRIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to introduce genetic information in the form of antibiotic or mercuric ion resistance genes into Nitrobacter hamburgensis strain X14. The resistance genes were either stable components of broad host range plasmids or transposable genes on methods for p...

  2. Genetic Engineering Strategies for Enhanced Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Krishnamoorthy; Chandra, Niharika; Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Veeranki, Venkata Dasu

    2015-07-01

    The focus on biodiesel research has shown a tremendous growth over the last few years. Several microbial and plant sources are being explored for the sustainable biodiesel production to replace the petroleum diesel. Conventional methods of biodiesel production have several limitations related to yield and quality, which led to development of new engineering strategies to improve the biodiesel production in plants, and microorganisms. Substantial progress in utilizing algae, yeast, and Escherichia coli for the renewable production of biodiesel feedstock via genetic engineering of fatty acid metabolic pathways has been reported in the past few years. However, in most of the cases, the successful commercialization of such engineering strategies for sustainable biodiesel production is yet to be seen. This paper systematically presents the drawbacks in the conventional methods for biodiesel production and an exhaustive review on the present status of research in genetic engineering strategies for production of biodiesel in plants, and microorganisms. Further, we summarize the technical challenges need to be tackled to make genetic engineering technology economically sustainable. Finally, the need and prospects of genetic engineering technology for the sustainable biodiesel production and the recommendations for the future research are discussed. PMID:25902752

  3. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind

    PubMed Central

    Quartier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  4. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Bertrand; Quartier, Pierre; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-02-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  5. Undergraduates Achieve Learning Gains in Plant Genetics through Peer Teaching of Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrispeels, H. E.; Klosterman, M. L.; Martin, J. B.; Lundy, S. R.; Watkins, J. M.; Gibson, C. L.; Muday, G. K.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that undergraduates who peer teach genetics will have greater understanding of genetic and molecular biology concepts as a result of their teaching experiences. Undergraduates enrolled in a non-majors biology course participated in a service-learning program in which they led middle school (MS) or high school (HS)…

  6. Enhanced gain and narrow linewidth of an optical cavity by the Doppler effect in a four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Li, Peng; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Luyin

    2013-07-01

    A scheme for high gain and narrow linewidth of an optical cavity with a four-level atomic system is proposed by the Doppler effect via active Raman gain (ARG) process. Atomic motion leads to Doppler frequency shift which induces constructive interference for the linear susceptibility. The enhanced normal dispersion greatly narrows the cavity linewidth, and the amplified gain gives rise to a high cavity transmission. Simulation results show that the cavity linewidth based on ARG is about one order of magnitude narrower than that based on electromagnetically-induced transparency under the same conditions, and the cavity transmission intensity could be enhanced by nearly 30 times.

  7. Systematic methods to enhance diversity knowledge gained: a proposed path to professional richness.

    PubMed

    Scisney-Matlock, M

    2000-01-01

    Faculty members in nursing schools have the responsibility to provide learning experiences for students that have the potential to solidly link indicators of professional richness, knowledge gained about diversity, enhanced critical thinking skills, ethical reasoning and decision-making. The challenge then is for faculty members to implement systematic methods to ensure that students are exposed to in- and out-of classroom experiences that result in measurable outcomes indicating a strong association between what a student is expected to learn and the diversity knowledge gained. The purpose of this study is to describe the effect of a target intervention derived from synthesizing multiple theories (social, cognitive, moral and ethical) and learning experiences on students' perception of global diversity. Two independent cohorts of senior nursing students, (control group, N = 65 and experimental group, N = 55) were taught a required undergraduate course: Societal Health Issues (SHI) with the same objectives over two consecutive years. Drastic and remarkable differences were demonstrated using separate multiple regression analyses of the experimental group (adjusted R2 change of 47% (F = 11.123, (df1 = 4; df2 = 47), p = .000) and control group (adjusted R2 change of 1% (F = 1.36, (df1 = 4; df2 = 52), p = .259). This study suggests preliminary empirical support for exploring how conceptual frameworks may guide faculty to consider pushing beyond traditional teaching methods to develop and organize systematic methods for infusing diversity content in courses. PMID:11249260

  8. The silencing of Kierkegaard in Habermas' critique of genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Karin

    2009-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an important part of Habermas' critique of genetic enhancement, which has been largely ignored in the discussion; namely his use of Kierkegaard's reflections on the existential conditions for becoming one-self from Either/or and the Sickness unto Death. It will be argued that, although Habermas presents some valuable and highly significant perspectives on the effect of genetic enhancement on the individual's self-understanding and ability to experience him- or herself as a free and equal individual, he does not succeed in working out a consistent argument. The claim is that he fails to explain how the existential analysis is related to his reflections on the sociological and psychological impacts of genetic enhancement in the realm of communicative action. It is this lack of theoretical clarity, which seems to render Habermas vulnerable to some of the critique which has been raised against his theory from a number of different scientific disciplines and areas of research. Hence, the first part of the paper provides some examples of the nature and variety of this critique, the second part presents Habermas' own critique of genetic enhancement in the context of a dispute between so-called 'liberal' and 'conservative' arguments, and finally, the third part discusses the limits and possibilities of his position in a future debate about genetic enhancement. PMID:19234761

  9. Association Mapping for Enhancing Maize Genetic Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping through linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis is a powerful tool for the dissection of complex agronomic traits and for the identification of alleles that can contribute to the enhancement of a target trait. With the developments of high throughput genotyping techniques and advanc...

  10. Genetic Diversity of Tick-Borne Rickettsial Pathogens; Insights Gained from Distant Strains.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Rosshandler, Ivan Imaz; Kerudin, Ammielle Akim; Sambono, Jacqueline; Lew-Tabor, Ala; Rolls, Peter; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Brayton, Kelly A

    2014-01-14

    The ability to capture genetic variation with unprecedented resolution improves our understanding of bacterial populations and their ability to cause disease. The goal of the pathogenomics era is to define genetic diversity that results in disease. Despite the economic losses caused by vector-borne bacteria in the Order Rickettsiales, little is known about the genetic variants responsible for observed phenotypes. The tick-transmitted rickettsial pathogen Anaplasma marginale infects cattle in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, including Australia. Genomic analysis of North American A. marginale strains reveals a closed core genome defined by high levels of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). Here we report the first genome sequences and comparative analysis for Australian strains that differ in virulence and transmissibility. A list of genetic differences that segregate with phenotype was evaluated for the ability to distinguish the attenuated strain from virulent field strains. Phylogenetic analyses of the Australian strains revealed a marked evolutionary distance from all previously sequenced strains. SNP analysis showed a strikingly reduced genetic diversity between these strains, with the smallest number of SNPs detected between any two A. marginale strains. The low diversity between these phenotypically distinct bacteria presents a unique opportunity to identify the genetic determinants of virulence and transmission. PMID:25364572

  11. Crop genetic improvement for enhanced human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Toenniessen, Gary H

    2002-09-01

    In the past decade, micronutrient malnutrition has been identified as a major underlying cause of numerous human health problems in developing countries. The international agricultural research system has been highly successful in producing crop varieties with traits desired by farmers, such as higher yield and greater tolerance of poor growing conditions. These improved varieties have spread widely throughout developing countries and now provide the staple foods eaten daily by billions of people, including the poor in many difficult to reach rural areas. Modern plant breeding and biotechnology offer new opportunities to use this same international system to increase the micronutrient content and enhance the nutritional value of these staple foods. Over time, this could be an important complement to the progress that is being made in providing micronutrient supplements and fortified foods and in encouraging people to eat more diversified diets. Nutritionists and agriculturists will need to work together to define the deficiencies, target the right populations and deliver the right products. PMID:12221274

  12. Selection for feed efficiency traits and correlated genetic responses in feed intake and weight gain of Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Grion, A L; Mercadante, M E Z; Cyrillo, J N S G; Bonilha, S F M; Magnani, E; Branco, R H

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate genetic parameters for indicator traits of feed efficiency and to recommend traits that would result in better responses to selection for increased weaning weight (weaning weight adjusted to 210 d of age [W210]), ADG, and metabolic BW (BW(0.75)) and lower DMI. Records of W210 from 8,004 Nellore animals born between 1978 and 2011 and postweaning performance test records from 678 males and females born between 2004 and 2011 were used. The following feed efficiency traits were evaluated: G:F, partial efficiency of growth (PEG), relative growth rate (RGR), Kleiber's ratio (KR), residual feed intake (RFI), residual weight gain (RWG), and residual intake and gain (RIG). Covariance and variance components were estimated by the restricted maximum likelihood method using multitrait analysis under an animal model. Estimates of genetic gain and correlated responses were obtained considering single-stage and 2-stage selection. Heritability estimates were 0.22 ± 0.03 (W210), 0.60 ± 0.08 (DMI), 0.42 ± 0.08 (ADG), 0.56 ± 0.06 (BW(0.75)), 0.19 ± 0.07 (G:F), 0.25 ± 0.09 (PEG), 0.19 ± 0.07 (RGR), 0.22 ± 0.07 (KR), 0.33 ± 0.10 (RFI), 0.13 ± 0.07 (RWG), and 0.19 ± 0.08 (RIG). The genetic correlations of DMI with W210 (0.64 ± 0.10), ADG (0.87 ± 0.06), and BW(0.75) (0.84 ± 0.05) were high. The only efficiency traits showing favorable responses to selection for lower DMI were G:F, PEG, RFI, and RIG. However, the use of G:F, PEG, or RFI as a selection criterion results in unfavorable correlated responses in some growth traits. The linear combination of RFI and RWG through RIG is the best selection criterion to obtain favorable responses in postweaning growth and feed intake of Nellore cattle in single-stage selection. Genetic gains in feed efficiency are expected even after preselection for W210 and subsequent feed efficiency testing of the preselected animals. PMID:24492579

  13. Integrated genomic approaches to enhance genetic resistance in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chicken has led the way amongst agricultural animal species in infectious disease control and, in particular, selection for genetic resistance. The generation of the chicken genome sequence and the availability of other empowering tools and resources greatly enhance the ability to select for enh...

  14. Exploiting genetic diversity in Citrullus spp. to enhance watermelon cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to many years of cultivation and selection for desirable fruit quality, a narrow genetic base exists among watermelon cultivars. There is a continuous need to enhance watermelon cultivars for disease and pest resistance. U.S. Plant Introductions (PIs) representing the different groups of waterm...

  15. A gain and bandwidth enhanced transimpedance preamplifier for Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzu-Yung; Green, Roger J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-12-15

    The nature of the ion signal from a 12-T Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the electronic noise were studied to further understand the electronic detection limit. At minimal cost, a new transimpedance preamplifier was designed, computer simulated, built, and tested. The preamplifier design pushes the electronic signal-to-noise performance at room temperature to the limit, because of its enhanced tolerance of the capacitance of the detection device, lower intrinsic noise, and larger flat mid-band gain (input current noise spectral density of around 1 pA/{radical}(Hz) when the transimpedance is about 85 dB{Omega}). The designed preamplifier has a bandwidth of {approx}3 kHz to 10 MHz, which corresponds to the mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of approximately 18 to 61 k at 12 T. The transimpedance and the bandwidth can be easily adjusted by changing the value of passive components. The feedback limitation of the circuit is discussed. With the maximum possible transimpedance of 5.3 M{Omega} when using an 0402 surface mount resistor, the preamplifier was estimated to be able to detect {approx}110 charges in a single scan.

  16. A gain and bandwidth enhanced transimpedance preamplifier for Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Yung; Green, Roger J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the ion signal from a 12-T Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the electronic noise were studied to further understand the electronic detection limit. At minimal cost, a new transimpedance preamplifier was designed, computer simulated, built, and tested. The preamplifier design pushes the electronic signal-to-noise performance at room temperature to the limit, because of its enhanced tolerance of the capacitance of the detection device, lower intrinsic noise, and larger flat mid-band gain (input current noise spectral density of around 1 pA/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\sqrt{\\mbox{Hz}}$\\end{document}Hz when the transimpedance is about 85 dBΩ). The designed preamplifier has a bandwidth of ∼3 kHz to 10 MHz, which corresponds to the mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of approximately 18 to 61 k at 12 T. The transimpedance and the bandwidth can be easily adjusted by changing the value of passive components. The feedback limitation of the circuit is discussed. With the maximum possible transimpedance of 5.3 MΩ when using an 0402 surface mount resistor, the preamplifier was estimated to be able to detect ∼110 charges in a single scan. PMID:22225232

  17. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime. PMID:26461447

  18. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C.; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F.; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime.

  19. Gain enhancement plasma-loaded FEL in the presence of beat waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shamamian, A.H.; Gevorgian, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    An expression for the dielectric permittivity of underdense plasma interacting with laser beat waves is derived. It is shown that the presence of beat waves in plasma results in an effective growth of the plasma frequency. The FEL Gain is investigated in the case when the frequency of soft photons weakly depending on the electron beam energy and the synchronism condition is maintained. It is shown that the plasma beat waves lead to the essential increase in FEL gain.

  20. Enhanced near-infrared photodetection with avalanche gain in silicon microdisk resonators integrated with p-n diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haike; Zhou, Linjie; Yang, Rui; Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jianping

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the photocurrent generation by two-photon absorption effect in silicon microdisk resonators integrated with p-n diodes. The photocurrent is quite dependent on the p-n junction position with respect to the whispering gallery mode. Avalanche gain increases significantly when the bias exceeds -19  V, leading to considerable enhancement of photocurrent. At -22  V bias with on-chip optical power of 44.7 μW, the responsivity exceeds 1 A/W with an avalanche gain of 188 while the dark current is more than 50 times lower than the photocurrent. PMID:25078219

  1. Experiences gained from implementing mandatory buffer strips in Denmark: how can we enhance their ecosystem services?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronvang, Brian; Hoffmann, Carl Christian; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Hille, Sandra; Rubæk, Gitte; Heckrath, Goswin; Gertz, Flemming; Jensen, Henning; Feuerback, Peter; Strand, John; Stutter, Marc

    2015-04-01

    along watercourses from ca. 50,000 ha to ca. 25,000 ha and at the same time they reduced the width of the mandatory BSs from 10 m to 9 m. The aim of this presentation is to share the experience gained in Denmark on establishing mandatory BSs. Furthermore, we will show some preliminary results from two newly initiated research projects (BUFFERTECH and BALTICSEA2020) that studies how to enhance the ecosystem services provided by buffer strips. We will show how intelligently to guide managers when establishing BSs along watercourses at catchment scale utilizing a combined P-index model for soil erosion and a statistical model for P retention in BSs as well as results obtained from new 'Engineered' or 'Constructed' BSs that delays tile drainage flow from field to streams thereby increasing nutrient retention. Acknowledgement The work is supported by the Strategic Research Foundation/Innovation Fund Denmark project 'BUFFERTECH - Optimization of Ecosystem Services Provided by Buffer Strips Using Novel Technological Methods' (Grant No. 1305-00017B) and the BalticSea2020 project 'Integrerade skyddszoner (IBZ)'.

  2. Double-maximum enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio gain via stochastic resonance and vibrational resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-08-01

    This paper studies the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of a parallel array of nonlinear elements that transmits a common input composed of a periodic signal and external noise. Aiming to further enhance the SNR gain, each element is injected with internal noise components or high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations. We report that the SNR gain exhibits two maxima at different values of the internal noise level or of the sinusoidal vibration amplitude. For the addition of internal noise to an array of threshold-based elements, the condition for occurrence of stochastic resonance is analytically investigated in the limit of weak signals. Interestingly, when the internal noise components are replaced by high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations, the SNR gain displays the vibrational multiresonance phenomenon. In both considered cases, there are certain regions of the internal noise intensity or the sinusoidal vibration amplitude wherein the achieved maximal SNR gain can be considerably beyond unity for a weak signal buried in non-Gaussian external noise. Due to the easy implementation of sinusoidal vibration modulation, this approach is potentially useful for improving the output SNR in an array of nonlinear devices. PMID:25215715

  3. Electron injection for enhanced energy gain by a radially polarized laser pulse in vacuum in the presence of magnetic wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotra, Harjit Singh; Kant, Niti

    2016-01-01

    We present a scheme of electron injection for enhanced electron energy gain by using a radially polarized (RP) laser pulse in vacuum under the influence of magnetic wiggler. The inherent symmetry of an RP laser pulse enforces the trapping and acceleration of electrons in the direction of propagation of laser pulse during laser electron interaction. A magnetic wiggler encircles the trajectory of accelerated electron and improves the strength of v →×B → force which supports the retaining of betatron resonance for longer duration and leads to enhance electron acceleration. Four times higher electron energy is observed with a RP laser pulse of peak intensity 8.5 ×1020W/cm 2 in the presence of magnetic wiggler of 10.69 kG than that in the absence of magnetic wiggler. We have also analyzed the electron injection for enhanced energy gain and observe that the electron energy gain is relatively higher with a sideway injection than that of axial injection of electron. Injection angle δ is optimized and found that at δ=10 ° to the direction of propagation of laser pulse, maximum energy is obtained.

  4. Bandwidth and gain enhancement of optically transparent 60-GHz CPW-fed antenna by using BSIS-UC-EBG structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Tian, Huiping; Guo, Zheng; Yang, Daquan; Zhou, Jian; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-06-01

    A method in terms of bandwidth and gain enhancement is presented for optically transparent coplanar waveguide fed (CPW-Fed) antenna, which supports unlicensed 60 GHz band (57-66 GHz) applications. The original antenna and mesh antenna in [8] were designed on a transparent material that is made of a 0.2-mm-thick fused silica 7980 Corning substrate (ɛr: 3.8 and tan δ: 0.0001). However, the peak gains of -5.3 and -5.4 dBi at 60 GHz of those antennas can be further improved. Thus, in this paper, a novel bidirectional symmetric I-shaped slot uniplanar compact electromagnetic band-gap (BSIS-UC-EBG) structure with a reflection phase band of 58.0-62.1 GHz is proposed to improve antenna performance. Based on this BSIS-UC-EBG structure, both transparent BSIS-UC-EBG antenna and transparent mesh BSIS-UC-EBG antenna with enhanced properties are presented and discussed. The analysis results show that the impedance bandwidth (the peak gain) of transparent BSIS-UC-EBG antenna and transparent mesh BSIS-UC-EBG antenna are enhanced to 36.6% (4.7 dBi) and 44.7% (5.8 dBi), respectively. In addition, we also discuss the comparison of radiation patterns at 60 GHz, and the results illustrate that the radiation patterns are basically identical.

  5. Gain enhanced L-band optical fiber amplifiers and tunable fiber lasers with erbium-doped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Leblanc, M.; Schinn, G. W.

    2003-02-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of gain enhanced L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA) by either recycling residual ASE or using a second C-band wavelength pump laser and on the experimental demonstration of L-band tunable erbium-doped fiber ring lasers. We observed that by reflecting ASE from pumped erbium-doped fiber (EDF) the L-band EDFA gain can be enhanced of 2-15 dB depending on amplifier designs. We also studied wavelength and power dependence of second pump laser on the gain enhanced L-band EDFA and found that an optimum wavelength for second pump laser was between 1550 and 1560 nm. Finally, a L-band tunable erbium-doped fiber laser was also constructed in which lazing oscillation was observed closed to 1624 nm by recycling residual ASE. This L-band tunable laser has a line-width of about 300 MHz, an output power of 1 mW, and a signal to source spontaneous emission ratio of 60 dB.

  6. Intensity fluctuations in bimodal micropillar lasers enhanced by quantum-dot gain competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leymann, H. A. M.; Hopfmann, C.; Albert, F.; Foerster, A.; Khanbekyan, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Forchel, A.; Kamp, M.; Wiersig, J.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate correlations between orthogonally polarized cavity modes of a bimodal micropillar laser with a single layer of self-assembled quantum dots in the active region. While one emission mode of the microlaser demonstrates a characteristic S-shaped input-output curve, the output intensity of the second mode saturates and even decreases with increasing injection current above threshold. Measuring the photon autocorrelation function g(2)(τ) of the light emission confirms the onset of lasing in the first mode with g(2)(0) approaching unity above threshold. In contrast, strong photon bunching associated with superthermal values of g(2)(0) is detected for the other mode for currents above threshold. This behavior is attributed to gain competition of the two modes induced by the common gain material, which is confirmed by photon cross-correlation measurements revealing a clear anticorrelation between emission events of the two modes. The experimental studies are in qualitative agreement with theoretical studies based on a microscopic semiconductor theory, which we extend to the case of two modes interacting with the common gain medium. Moreover, we treat the problem by a phenomenological birth-death model extended to two interacting modes, which reveals that the photon probability distribution of each mode has a double-peak structure, indicating switching behavior of the modes for pump rates around threshold.

  7. Genetic and phenotypic relationships of serum leptin concentration with performance, efficiency of gain, and carcass merit of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Nkrumah, J D; Keisler, D H; Crews, D H; Basarab, J A; Wang, Z; Li, C; Price, M A; Okine, E K; Moore, S S

    2007-09-01

    Leptin is the hormone product of the obese gene that is synthesized and predominantly expressed by adipocytes. This study estimated the genetic variation in serum leptin concentration and evaluated the genetic and phenotypic relationships of serum leptin concentration with performance, efficiency of gain, and carcass merit. There were 464 steers with records for serum leptin concentration, performance, and efficiency of gain and 381 steers with records for carcass traits. The analyses included a total of 813 steers, including those without phenotypic records. Phenotypic and genetic parameter estimates were obtained using SAS and ASREML, respectively. Serum leptin concentration was moderately heritable (h2 = 0.34 +/- 0.13) and averaged 13.91 (SD = 5.74) ng/mL. Sire breed differences in serum leptin concentration correlated well with breed differences in body composition. Specifically, the serum leptin concentration was 20% greater in Angus-sired steers compared with Charolais-sired steers (P < 0.001). Consequently, ultrasound backfat (27%), carcass 12th-rib fat (31%), ultrasound marbling (14%), and carcass marbling (15%) were less in Charolais- than Angus-sired steers (P < 0.001). Conversely, carcass LM area (P = 0.05) and carcass lean meat yield (P < 0.001) were greater in Charolais- compared with Angus-sired steers. Steers with greater serum leptin concentration also had greater DMI (P < 0.001), greater residual feed intake (P = 0.04), and partial efficiency of growth (P = 0.01), but did not differ in feed conversion ratio (P > 0.10). Serum leptin concentration was correlated phenotypically with ultrasound backfat (r = 0.41; P < 0.001), carcass 12th-rib fat (r = 0.42; P < 0.001), ultrasound marbling (r = 0.25; P < 0.01), carcass marbling (r = 0.28; P < 0.01), ultrasound LM area (r = -0.19; P < 0.01), carcass LM area (r = -0.17; P < 0.05), lean meat yield (r = -0.38; P < 0.001), and yield grade (r = 0.32; P < 0.001). The corresponding genetic correlations were

  8. Resource Allocation for Maximizing Prediction Accuracy and Genetic Gain of Genomic Selection in Plant Breeding: A Simulation Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Allocating resources between population size and replication affects both genetic gain through phenotypic selection and quantitative trait loci detection power and effect estimation accuracy for marker-assisted selection (MAS). It is well known that because alleles are replicated across individuals in quantitative trait loci mapping and MAS, more resources should be allocated to increasing population size compared with phenotypic selection. Genomic selection is a form of MAS using all marker information simultaneously to predict individual genetic values for complex traits and has widely been found superior to MAS. No studies have explicitly investigated how resource allocation decisions affect success of genomic selection. My objective was to study the effect of resource allocation on response to MAS and genomic selection in a single biparental population of doubled haploid lines by using computer simulation. Simulation results were compared with previously derived formulas for the calculation of prediction accuracy under different levels of heritability and population size. Response of prediction accuracy to resource allocation strategies differed between genomic selection models (ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction [RR-BLUP], BayesCπ) and multiple linear regression using ordinary least-squares estimation (OLS), leading to different optimal resource allocation choices between OLS and RR-BLUP. For OLS, it was always advantageous to maximize population size at the expense of replication, but a high degree of flexibility was observed for RR-BLUP. Prediction accuracy of doubled haploid lines included in the training set was much greater than of those excluded from the training set, so there was little benefit to phenotyping only a subset of the lines genotyped. Finally, observed prediction accuracies in the simulation compared well to calculated prediction accuracies, indicating these theoretical formulas are useful for making resource allocation

  9. Resource allocation for maximizing prediction accuracy and genetic gain of genomic selection in plant breeding: a simulation experiment.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Aaron J

    2013-03-01

    Allocating resources between population size and replication affects both genetic gain through phenotypic selection and quantitative trait loci detection power and effect estimation accuracy for marker-assisted selection (MAS). It is well known that because alleles are replicated across individuals in quantitative trait loci mapping and MAS, more resources should be allocated to increasing population size compared with phenotypic selection. Genomic selection is a form of MAS using all marker information simultaneously to predict individual genetic values for complex traits and has widely been found superior to MAS. No studies have explicitly investigated how resource allocation decisions affect success of genomic selection. My objective was to study the effect of resource allocation on response to MAS and genomic selection in a single biparental population of doubled haploid lines by using computer simulation. Simulation results were compared with previously derived formulas for the calculation of prediction accuracy under different levels of heritability and population size. Response of prediction accuracy to resource allocation strategies differed between genomic selection models (ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction [RR-BLUP], BayesCπ) and multiple linear regression using ordinary least-squares estimation (OLS), leading to different optimal resource allocation choices between OLS and RR-BLUP. For OLS, it was always advantageous to maximize population size at the expense of replication, but a high degree of flexibility was observed for RR-BLUP. Prediction accuracy of doubled haploid lines included in the training set was much greater than of those excluded from the training set, so there was little benefit to phenotyping only a subset of the lines genotyped. Finally, observed prediction accuracies in the simulation compared well to calculated prediction accuracies, indicating these theoretical formulas are useful for making resource allocation

  10. Enhanced entrainability of genetic oscillators by period mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Biological oscillators coordinate individual cellular components so that they function coherently and collectively. They are typically composed of multiple feedback loops, and period mismatch is unavoidable in biological implementations. We investigated the advantageous effect of this period mismatch in terms of a synchronization response to external stimuli. Specifically, we considered two fundamental models of genetic circuits: smooth and relaxation oscillators. Using phase reduction and Floquet multipliers, we numerically analysed their entrainability under different coupling strengths and period ratios. We found that a period mismatch induces better entrainment in both types of oscillator; the enhancement occurs in the vicinity of the bifurcation on their limit cycles. In the smooth oscillator, the optimal period ratio for the enhancement coincides with the experimentally observed ratio, which suggests biological exploitation of the period mismatch. Although the origin of multiple feedback loops is often explained as a passive mechanism to ensure robustness against perturbation, we study the active benefits of the period mismatch, which include increasing the efficiency of the genetic oscillators. Our findings show a qualitatively different perspective for both the inherent advantages of multiple loops and their essentiality. PMID:23389900

  11. Ejector Enhanced Pulsejet Based Pressure Gain Combustors: An Old Idea With a New Twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Dougherty, Kevin T.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of pressure-gain combustion for gas turbine application is described. The test article consists of an off-the-shelf valved pulsejet, and an optimized ejector, both housed within a shroud. The combination forms an effective can combustor across which there is a modest total pressure rise rather than the usual loss found in conventional combustors. Although the concept of using a pulsejet to affect semi-constant volume (i.e., pressure-gain) combustion is not new, that of combining it with a well designed ejector to efficiently mix the bypass flow is. The result is a device which to date has demonstrated an overall pressure rise of approximately 3.5 percent at an overall temperature ratio commensurate with modern gas turbines. This pressure ratio is substantially higher than what has been previously reported in pulsejet-based combustion experiments. Flow non-uniformities in the downstream portion of the device are also shown to be substantially reduced compared to those within the pulsejet itself. The standard deviation of total pressure fluctuations, measured just downstream of the ejector was only 5.0 percent of the mean. This smoothing aspect of the device is critical to turbomachinery applications since turbine performance is, in general, negatively affected by flow non-uniformities and unsteadiness. The experimental rig will be described and details of the performance measurements will be presented. Analyses showing the thermodynamic benefits from this level of pressure-gain performance in a gas turbine will also be assessed for several engine types. Issues regarding practical development of such a device are discussed, as are potential emissions reductions resulting from the rich burning nature of the pulsejet and the rapid mixing (quenching) associated with unsteady ejectors.

  12. Enhanced Decoding for the Galileo Low-Gain Antenna Mission: Viterbi Redecoding With Four Decoding Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, S.; Belongie, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo low-gain antenna mission will be supported by a coding system that uses a (14,1/4) inner convolutional code concatenated with Reed-Solomon codes of four different redundancies. Decoding for this code is designed to proceed in four distinct stages of Viterbi decoding followed by Reed-Solomon decoding. In each successive stage, the Reed-Solomon decoder only tries to decode the highest redundancy codewords not yet decoded in previous stages, and the Viterbi decoder redecodes its data utilizing the known symbols from previously decoded Reed-Solomon codewords.

  13. Reduction of body-weight gain enhances in vitro embryo production in overfed superovulated dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Freret, S; Grimard, B; Ponter, A A; Joly, C; Ponsart, C; Humblot, P

    2006-04-01

    The aim of our study was to test whether a reduction in dietary intake could improve in vitro embryo production in superovulated overfed dairy heifers. Cumulus-oocyte complexes of 16 Prim' Holstein heifers (14 +/- 1 months old) were collected by ovum pick-up (OPU), every 2 weeks following superovulation treatment with 250 microg FSH, before being matured and fertilized in vitro. Embryos were cultured in Synthetic Oviduct Fluid medium for 7 days. Heifers were fed with hay, soybean meal, barley, minerals and vitamins. From OPU 1 to 4 (period 1), all heifers received individually for 8 weeks a diet formulated for a 1000 g/day live-weight gain. From OPU 5 to 8 (period 2), the heifers were allocated to one of two diets (1000 or 600 g/day) for 8 weeks. Heifers' growth rates were monitored and plasma concentrations of metabolites, metabolic and reproductive hormones were measured each week. Mean live-weight gain observed during period 1 was 950 +/- 80 g/day (n = 16). In period 2 it was 730 +/- 70 (n = 8) and 1300 +/- 70 g/day (n = 8) for restricted and overfed groups respectively. When comparing period 1 and period 2 within groups, significant differences were found. In the restricted group, a higher blastocyst rate, greater proportions of grade 1-3 and grade 1 embryos, associated with higher estradiol at OPU and lower glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate, were observed in period 2 compared with period 1. Moreover, after 6 weeks of dietary restriction (OPU 7), numbers of day 7 total embryos, blastocysts and grade 1-3 embryos had significantly increased. On the contrary, in the overfed group, we observed more <8 mm follicles 2 days before superovulation treatment, higher insulin and IGF-I and lower nonesterified fatty acids in period 2 compared with period 1 (no significant difference between periods for embryo production). After 6 weeks of 1300 g/day live-weight gain (OPU 7), embryo production began to decrease. Whatever the group, oocyte collection did not differ between

  14. Enhancing Integrative Experiences: Evidence of Student Perceptions of Learning Gains from Cross-Course Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingert, Jason R.; Wasileski, Sally A.; Peterson, Karin; Mathews, Leah Greden; Lanou, Amy Joy; Clarke, David

    2011-01-01

    This article offers food for thought on a strategy used by seven faculty to enhance students' integrative learning by offering cross-course, cross-disciplinary projects and shared activities focused on food. The faculty teach a cluster of ten courses in natural sciences, health sciences, social sciences and humanities that address food themes.…

  15. What Do the Participants Gain? Group Counselling to Enhance Agency at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhalakka-Ruoho, Marjatta; Ruponen, Ritva

    2013-01-01

    Group counselling was carried out in an IT enterprise. The task was to study structured group counselling as a space for enhancing participants' agency at work. The first research question concerned changes the participants reported regarding the group and their collaborative and individual work. The second research question asked what kinds…

  16. Bandwidth enhancement of waveguide-coupled photodetectors with inductive gain peaking.

    PubMed

    Gould, Michael; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Ding, Ran; Hochberg, Michael

    2012-03-26

    Silicon has recently attracted a great deal of interest as an economical platform for integrated photonics systems. Integrated photodetectors are a key component of such systems, and CMOS-compatible processes involving epitaxially grown germanium for photodetection have been demonstrated. Detector parasitic capacitance is a key limitation, which will likely worsen if techniques such as bump bonding are employed. Here we propose leveraging the complexity available in silicon photonics processes to compensate for this using a technique known as gain peaking. We predict that by simply including an inductor and capacitor in the photodetector circuit with the properly chosen values, detector bandwidths can be as much as doubled, with no undesired effects. PMID:22453392

  17. Enhanced decoding for the Galileo low-gain antenna mission: Viterbi redecoding with four decoding stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S.; Belongie, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo low-gain antenna mission will be supported by a coding system that uses a (14,1/4) inner convolutional code concatenated with Reed-Solomon codes of four different redundancies. Decoding for this code is designed to proceed in four distinct stages of Viterbi decoding followed by Reed-Solomon decoding. In each successive stage, the Reed-Solomon decoder only tries to decode the highest redundancy codewords not yet decoded in previous stages, and the Viterbi decoder redecodes its data utilizing the known symbols from previously decoded Reed-Solomon codewords. A previous article analyzed a two-stage decoding option that was not selected by Galileo. The present article analyzes the four-stage decoding scheme and derives the near-optimum set of redundancies selected for use by Galileo. The performance improvements relative to one- and two-stage decoding systems are evaluated.

  18. Enhanced decoding for the Galileo low-gain antenna mission: Viterbi redecoding with four decoding stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, S.; Belongie, M.

    1995-05-01

    The Galileo low-gain antenna mission will be supported by a coding system that uses a (14,1/4) inner convolutional code concatenated with Reed-Solomon codes of four different redundancies. Decoding for this code is designed to proceed in four distinct stages of Viterbi decoding followed by Reed-Solomon decoding. In each successive stage, the Reed-Solomon decoder only tries to decode the highest redundancy codewords not yet decoded in previous stages, and the Viterbi decoder redecodes its data utilizing the known symbols from previously decoded Reed-Solomon codewords. A previous article analyzed a two-stage decoding option that was not selected by Galileo. The present article analyzes the four-stage decoding scheme and derives the near-optimum set of redundancies selected for use by Galileo. The performance improvements relative to one- and two-stage decoding systems are evaluated.

  19. Tandem shock waves to enhance genetic transformation of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Loske, Achim M; Fernández, Francisco; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Ortíz-Vázquez, Elizabeth; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2014-08-01

    Filamentous fungi are used in several industries and in academia to produce antibiotics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceutical compounds. The development of valuable strains usually requires the insertion of recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid; however, the protocols to transfer DNA to fungal cells are highly inefficient. Recently, underwater shock waves were successfully used to genetically transform filamentous fungi. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that the efficiency of transformation can be improved significantly by enhancing acoustic cavitation using tandem (dual-pulse) shock waves. Results revealed that tandem pressure pulses, generated at a delay of 300 μs, increased the transformation efficiency of Aspergillus niger up to 84% in comparison with conventional (single-pulse) shock waves. This methodology may also be useful to obtain new strains required in basic research and biotechnology. PMID:24680880

  20. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    PubMed

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different. PMID:26923584

  1. Genetic parameters related to environmental variability of weight traits in a selection experiment for weight gain in mice; signs of correlated canalised response

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Escriche, Noelia; Moreno, Almudena; Nieto, Blanca; Piqueras, Pepa; Salgado, Concepción; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Data from an experimental mice population selected from 18 generations to increase weight gain were used to estimate the genetic parameters associated with environmental variability. The analysis involved three traits: weight at 21 days, weight at 42 days and weight gain between 21 and 42 days. A dataset of 5273 records for males was studied. Data were analysed using Bayesian procedures by comparing the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) value of two different models: one assuming homogeneous environmental variances and another assuming them as heterogeneous. The model assuming heterogeneity was better in all cases and also showed higher additive genetic variances and lower common environmental variances. The heterogeneity of residual variance was associated with systematic and additive genetic effects thus making reduction by selection possible. Genetic correlations between the additive genetic effects on mean and environmental variance of the traits analysed were always negative, ranging from -0.19 to -0.38. An increase in the heritability of the traits was found when considering the genetic determination of the environmental variability. A suggested correlated canalised response was found in terms of coefficient of variation but it could be insufficient to compensate for the scale effect associated with an increase of the mean. PMID:18400150

  2. Gain enhancement of a multiband resonator using defected ground surface on epoxy woven glass material.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Shahidul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Arshad, Haslina

    2014-01-01

    A multiband microstrip resonator is proposed in this study which is realized through a rectangular radiator with embedded symmetrical rectangular slots in it and a defected ground surface. The study is presented with detailed parametric analyses to understand the effect of various design parameters. The design and analyses are performed using the FIT based full-wave electromagnetic simulator CST microwave studio suite. With selected parameter values, the resonator showed a peak gain of 5.85 dBi at 5.2 GHz, 6.2 dBi at 8.3 GHz, 3.9 dBi at 9.5 GHz, 5.9 dBi at 12.2 GHz, and 4.7 dBi at 14.6 GHz. Meanwhile, the main lobe magnitude and the 3 dB angular beam width are 6.2 dBi and 86°, 5.9 dBi and 53.7°, 8.5 dBi and 43.9°, 8.6 dBi and 42.1°, and 4.7 dBi and 30.1°, respectively, at the resonant frequencies. The overall resonator has a compact dimension of 0.52λ  × 0.52λ  × 0.027λ at the lower resonant frequency. For practical validation, a lab prototype was built on a 1.6 mm thick epoxide woven glass fabric dielectric material which is measured using a vector network analyzer and within an anechoic chamber. The comparison between the simulated and measured results showed a very good understanding, which implies the practical suitability of the proposed multiband resonator design. PMID:24883354

  3. Gain Enhancement of a Multiband Resonator Using Defected Ground Surface on Epoxy Woven Glass Material

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Arshad, Haslina

    2014-01-01

    A multiband microstrip resonator is proposed in this study which is realized through a rectangular radiator with embedded symmetrical rectangular slots in it and a defected ground surface. The study is presented with detailed parametric analyses to understand the effect of various design parameters. The design and analyses are performed using the FIT based full-wave electromagnetic simulator CST microwave studio suite. With selected parameter values, the resonator showed a peak gain of 5.85 dBi at 5.2 GHz, 6.2 dBi at 8.3 GHz, 3.9 dBi at 9.5 GHz, 5.9 dBi at 12.2 GHz, and 4.7 dBi at 14.6 GHz. Meanwhile, the main lobe magnitude and the 3 dB angular beam width are 6.2 dBi and 86°, 5.9 dBi and 53.7°, 8.5 dBi and 43.9°, 8.6 dBi and 42.1°, and 4.7 dBi and 30.1°, respectively, at the resonant frequencies. The overall resonator has a compact dimension of 0.52λ  × 0.52λ  × 0.027λ at the lower resonant frequency. For practical validation, a lab prototype was built on a 1.6 mm thick epoxide woven glass fabric dielectric material which is measured using a vector network analyzer and within an anechoic chamber. The comparison between the simulated and measured results showed a very good understanding, which implies the practical suitability of the proposed multiband resonator design. PMID:24883354

  4. Genetic Factors for Enhancement of Nicotine Levels in Cultivated Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingwu; Lewis, Ramsey S.; Shi, Junli; Song, Zhongbang; Gao, Yulong; Li, Wenzheng; Chen, Hongxia; Qu, Rongda

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine has practical applications relating to smoking cessation devices and alternative nicotine products. Genetic manipulation for increasing nicotine content in cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) may be of value for industrial purposes, including the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of nicotine extraction. Biotechnological approaches have been evaluated in connection with this objective, but field-based results are few. Here, we report characterization of two genes encoding basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs), NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b from tobacco. Overexpression of NtMYC2a increased leaf nicotine levels in T1 transgenic lines approximately 2.3-fold in greenhouse-grown plants of tobacco cultivar ‘NC 95′. Subsequent field testing of T2 and T3 generations of transgenic NtMYC2a overexpression lines showed nicotine concentrations were 76% and 58% higher than control lines, respectively. These results demonstrated that the increased nicotine trait was stably inherited to the T2 and T3 generations, indicating the important role that NtMYC2a plays in regulating nicotine accumulation in N. tabacum and the great potential of NtMYC2a overexpression in tobacco plants for industrial nicotine production. Collected data in this study also indicated a negative feedback inhibition of nicotine biosynthesis. Further enhancement of nicotine accumulation in tobacco leaf may require modification of the processes of nicotine transport and deposition. PMID:26626731

  5. Thalidomide treatment reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha production and enhances weight gain in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Tramontana, J. M.; Utaipat, U.; Molloy, A.; Akarasewi, P.; Burroughs, M.; Makonkawkeyoon, S.; Johnson, B.; Klausner, J. D.; Rom, W.; Kaplan, G.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The monocyte-derived cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), is essential for host immunity, but overproduction of this cytokine may have serious pathologic consequences. Excess TNF alpha produced in pulmonary tuberculosis may cause fevers, weakness, night sweats, necrosis, and progressive weight loss. Thalidomide (alpha-N-phthalimidoglutarimide) has recently been shown to suppress TNF alpha production by human monocytes in vitro and to reduce serum TNF alpha in leprosy patients. We have therefore conducted a two-part placebo-controlled pilot study of thalidomide in patients with active tuberculosis to determine its effects on clinical response, immune reactivity, TNF alpha levels, and weight. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 30 male patients with active tuberculosis, either human immunodeficiency virus type 1 positive (HIV-1+) or HIV-1-, received thalidomide or placebo for single or multiple 14 day cycles. Toxicity of the study drug, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), cytokine production, and weight gain were evaluated. RESULTS: Thalidomide treatment was well tolerated, without serious adverse events. The drug did not adversely affect the DTH response to purified protein derivative (PPD), total leukocyte, or differential cell counts. TNF alpha production was significantly reduced during thalidomide treatment while interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) production was enhanced. Daily administration of thalidomide resulted in a significant enhancement of weight gain. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that thalidomide is well tolerated by patients receiving anti-tuberculosis therapy. Thalidomide treatment reduces TNF alpha production both in vivo and in vitro and is associated with an accelerated weight gain during the study period. PMID:8521296

  6. Stochasticity enhances the gaining of bet-hedging strategies in contact-process-like dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Pigolotti, Simone; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-03-01

    In biology and ecology, individuals or communities of individuals living in unpredictable environments often alternate between different evolutionary strategies to spread and reduce risks. Such behavior is commonly referred to as "bet-hedging." Long-term survival probabilities and population sizes can be much enhanced by exploiting such hybrid strategies. Here, we study the simplest possible birth-death stochastic model in which individuals can choose among a poor but safe strategy, a better but risky alternative, or a combination of both. We show analytically and computationally that the benefits derived from bet-hedging strategies are much stronger for higher environmental variabilities (large external noise) and/or for small spatial dimensions (large intrinsic noise). These circumstances are typically encountered by living systems, thus providing us with a possible justification for the ubiquitousness of bet-hedging in nature. PMID:25871061

  7. Evaporation of uniform antireflection coatings on hemispherical lenses to enhance infrared antenna gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovick, Brian A.; Krenz, Peter M.; Zummo, Guy; Boreman, Glenn D.

    2010-03-01

    Infrared dipole-coupled bolometers receive radiation more efficiently when illuminated through a high permittivity, antireflection (AR) coated, hemispherical immersion lens. To maintain the enhanced responsivity for all illumination angles, the AR coating must be uniform over the hemispherical surface. An evaporation method for depositing a uniform AR coating on the hemispherical surface is presented. The lens is tilted relative to the source, which can be either electron-beam or thermal, and rotated throughout the deposition. Evaporation at an angle of 70° yields a uniform film with less than 10% thickness variation over a 120° full angle of the hemispherical surface. A theoretical model is developed and compared to profilometer measurements. In all cases, there is general agreement between theory and measurement. A single dipole is fabricated onto the flat surface of an AR-coated germanium immersion lens and the responsivity is measured for both substrate-side and air-side illumination. With a zinc sulfide (ZnS) single-layer AR coating, substrate-side illumination yields a broadside antenna response 49 ± 2.7 times greater than air-side illumination.

  8. Enhanced attentional gain as a mechanism for generalized perceptual learning in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Learning to better discriminate a specific visual feature (i.e., a specific orientation in a specific region of space) has been associated with plasticity in early visual areas (sensory modulation) and with improvements in the transmission of sensory information from early visual areas to downstream sensorimotor and decision regions (enhanced readout). However, in many real-world scenarios that require perceptual expertise, observers need to efficiently process numerous exemplars from a broad stimulus class as opposed to just a single stimulus feature. Some previous data suggest that perceptual learning leads to highly specific neural modulations that support the discrimination of specific trained features. However, the extent to which perceptual learning acts to improve the discriminability of a broad class of stimuli via the modulation of sensory responses in human visual cortex remains largely unknown. Here, we used functional MRI and a multivariate analysis method to reconstruct orientation-selective response profiles based on activation patterns in the early visual cortex before and after subjects learned to discriminate small offsets in a set of grating stimuli that were rendered in one of nine possible orientations. Behavioral performance improved across 10 training sessions, and there was a training-related increase in the amplitude of orientation-selective response profiles in V1, V2, and V3 when orientation was task relevant compared with when it was task irrelevant. These results suggest that generalized perceptual learning can lead to modified responses in the early visual cortex in a manner that is suitable for supporting improved discriminability of stimuli drawn from a large set of exemplars. PMID:24920023

  9. Genospirituality: genetic engineering for spiritual and religious enhancement.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2008-12-01

    The most frequently discussed role for genetic engineering is in relation to medicine, and a second area which provokes discussion is the use of genetic engineering as an enhancement technology. But one neglected area is the potential use of genetic engineering to increase human spiritual and religious experience - or genospirituality. If technologies are devised which can conveniently and safely engineer genes causal of spiritual and religious behaviours, then people may become able to choose their degree of religiosity or spiritual sensitivity. For instance, it may become possible to increase the likelihood of direct religious experience - i.e. 'revelation': the subjective experience of communication from the deity. Or, people may be able to engineer 'animistic' thinking, a mode of cognition in which the significant features of the world - such as large animals, trees, distinctive landscape features - are regarded as sentient and intentional beings; so that the individual experiences a personal relationship with the world. Another potentially popular spiritual ability would probably be shamanism; in which states of altered consciousness (e.g. trances, delirium or dreams) are induced and the shaman may undergo the experience of transformations, 'soul journeys' and contact with a spirit realm. Ideally, shamanistic consciousness could be modulated such that trances were self-induced only when wanted and when it was safe and convenient; and then switched-off again completely when full alertness and concentration are necessary. It seems likely that there will be trade-offs for increased spirituality; such as people becoming less 'driven' to seek status and monetary rewards - as a result of being more spiritually fulfilled people might work less hard and take more leisure. On the other hand, it is also possible that highly moral, altruistic, peaceable and principled behaviours might become more prevalent; and the energy and joyousness of the best churches might spread

  10. High gain 1.3-μm GaInNAs SOA with fast gain dynamics and enhanced temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitsios, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Iliadis, N.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Viheriälä, J.; Laakso, A.; Dris, S.; Spyropoulou, M.; Avramopoulos, H.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.; Guina, M.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are a well-established solution of optical access networks. They could prove an enabling technology for DataCom by offering extended range of active optical functionalities. However, in such costand energy-critical applications, high-integration densities increase the operational temperatures and require powerhungry external cooling. Taking a step further towards improving the cost and energy effectiveness of active optical components, we report on the development of a GaInNAs/GaAs (dilute nitride) SOA operating at 1.3μm that exhibits a gain value of 28 dB and combined with excellent temperature stability owing to the large conduction band offset between GaInNAs quantum well and GaAs barrier. Moreover, the characterization results reveal almost no gain variation around the 1320 nm region for a temperature range from 20° to 50° C. The gain recovery time attained values as short as 100 ps, allowing implementation of various signal processing functionalities at 10 Gb/s. The combined parameters are very attractive for application in photonic integrated circuits requiring uncooled operation and thus minimizing power consumption. Moreover, as a result of the insensitivity to heating issues, a higher number of active elements can be integrated on chip-scale circuitry, allowing for higher integration densities and more complex optical on-chip functions. Such component could prove essential for next generation DataCom networks.

  11. Genetic response to selection for weaning weight or yearling weight or yearling weight and muscle score in Hereford cattle: efficiency of gain, growth, and carcass characteristics.

    PubMed

    Koch, R M; Cundiff, L V; Gregory, K E; Van Vleck, L D

    2004-03-01

    An experiment involving crosses among selection and control lines was conducted to partition direct and maternal additive genetic response to 20 yr of selection for 1) weaning weight, 2) yearling weight, and 3) index of yearling weight and muscle score. Selection response was evaluated for efficiency of gain, growth from birth through market weight, and carcass characteristics. Heritability and genetic correlations among traits were estimated using animal model analyses. Over a time-constant interval, selected lines were heavier, gained more weight, consumed more ME, and had more gain/ME than the control. Over a weight-constant interval, selected lines required fewer days, consumed less ME, had more efficient gains, and required less energy for maintenance than control. Direct and maternal responses were estimated from reciprocal crosses among unselected sires and dams of control and selection lines. Most of the genetic response to selection in all three lines was associated with direct genetic effects, and the highest proportion was from postweaning gain. Indirect responses of carcass characteristics to selection over the 20 yr were increased weight of carcasses that had more lean meat, produced with less feed per unit of gain. At a constant carcass weight, selected lines had 1.32 to 1.85% more retail product and 1.62 to 2.24% less fat trim and 10/100 to 25/100 degrees less marbling than control. At a constant age, heritability of direct and maternal effects and correlations between them were as follows: market weight, 0.36, 0.14, and 0.10; carcass weight, 0.26, 0.15, and 0.03; longissimus muscle area, 0.33, 0.00, and 0.00; marbling, 0.36, 0.07, and -0.35; fat thickness, 0.41, 0.05, and -0.18; percentage of kidney, pelvic, and heart fat, 0.12, 0.08, and -0.76; percentage of retail product, 0.46, 0.05, and -0.29; retail product weight, 0.44, 0.08, -0.14; and muscle score, 0.37, 0.14, and -0.54. Selection criteria in all lines improved efficiency of postweaning gain

  12. Effect of photonic crystal and frequency selective surface implementation on gain enhancement in the microstrip patch antenna at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Ameneh; Sadeghzadeh, Ramezan Ali; Geran, Fatemeh

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, microstrip patch antenna with frequency selective surface (FSS) and photonic band gap (PBG) structures in the frequency range of 0.5-0.7 THz is presented for wireless communications. Proposed patch antenna is designed on a substrate with uniform and non-uniform PBG structures. Here, the effects of substrate thickness, various radii and arrangement of holes on antenna resonance in both PBG forms are studied. Near zero characteristic on uniform and non-uniform PBG substrate is compared and the results show that along with increase in hole radius, antenna operating frequency and bandwidth are increased. Also, the FSS structure is designed as a perfect absorber. Finally, by using FSS and PBG structures simultaneously, gain enhancement, increase in directivity and pattern shaping are studied at THz field. The antenna gain in final structure is increased by 2 dBi (32%) in comparison to simple form and Half-Power beam width is reduced from 100°×80° in simple form to 72°×48° by using FSS and PBG. All simulations and designs are done by Ansoft HFSS and CST Microwave Studio simulation tools with different full wave methods.

  13. Lotus tenuis x L. corniculatus interspecific hybridization as a means to breed bloat-safe pastures and gain insight into the genetic control of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in legumes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are secondary metabolites that strongly affect plant quality traits. The concentration and the structure of these metabolites influence the palatability and nutritional value of forage legumes. Hence, modulating PAs in the leaves of forage legumes is of paramount relevance for forage breeders worldwide. The lack of genetic variation in the leaf PA trait within the most important forage species and the difficulties in engineering this pathway via the ectopic expression of regulatory genes, prompted us to pursue alternative strategies to enhance this trait in forage legumes of agronomic interest. The Lotus genus includes forage species which accumulate PAs in edible organs and can thus be used as potential donor parents in breeding programs. Results We recovered a wild, diploid and PA-rich population of L. corniculatus and crossed with L. tenuis. The former grows in an alkaline-salty area in Spain while the latter is a diploid species, grown extensively in South American pastures, which does not accumulate PAs in the herbage. The resulting interspecific hybrids displayed several traits of outstanding agronomic relevance such as rhizome production, PA levels in edible tissues sufficient to prevent ruminal bloating (around 5 mg of PAs/g DW), biomass production similar to the cultivated parent and potential for adaptability to marginal lands. We show that PA levels correlate with expression levels of the R2R3MYB transcription factor TT2 and, in turn, with those of the key structural genes of the epicatechin and catechin biosynthetic pathways leading to PA biosynthesis. Conclusions The L. tenuis x L. corniculatus hybrids, reported herein, represent the first example of the introgression of the PA trait in forage legumes to levels known to provide nutritional and health benefits to ruminants. Apart from PAs, the hybrids have additional traits which may prove useful to breed forage legumes with increased persistence and adaptability to

  14. Enhanced synthesis and release of dopamine in transgenic mice with gain-of-function α6* nAChRs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiang; Lee, Jang-Won; Oh, Gyeon; Grady, Sharon R.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Brunzell, Darlene H.; Cannon, Jason R.; Drenan, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    α6β2* nAChRs in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to nucleus accumbens (NAc) pathway are implicated in the response to nicotine, and recent work suggests these receptors play a role in the rewarding action of ethanol. Here, we studied mice expressing gain-of-function α6β2* nAChRs (α6L9’S mice) that are hypersensitive to nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine (ACh). Evoked extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were enhanced in α6L9’S NAc slices compared to control, non-transgenic (nonTg) slices. Extracellular DA levels in both nonTg and α6L9’S slices were further enhanced in the presence of GBR12909, suggesting intact DA transporter function in both mouse strains. Ongoing α6β2* nAChR activation by ACh plays a role in enhancing DA levels, as α-conotoxin MII completely abolished evoked DA release in α6L9’S slices and decreased spontaneous DA release from striatal synaptosomes. In HPLC experiments, α6L9’S NAc tissue contained significantly more DA, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) compared to nonTg NAc tissue. Serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and norepinephrine (NE) were unchanged in α6L9’S compared to nonTg tissue. Western blot analysis revealed increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression in α6L9’S NAc. Overall, these results show that enhanced α6β2* nAChR activity in NAc can stimulate DA production and lead to increased extracellular DA levels. PMID:24266758

  15. Enhanced synthesis and release of dopamine in transgenic mice with gain-of-function α6* nAChRs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Lee, Jang-Won; Oh, Gyeon; Grady, Sharon R; McIntosh, J Michael; Brunzell, Darlene H; Cannon, Jason R; Drenan, Ryan M

    2014-04-01

    α6β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs)s in the ventral tegmental area to nucleus accumbens (NAc) pathway are implicated in the response to nicotine, and recent work suggests these receptors play a role in the rewarding action of ethanol. Here, we studied mice expressing gain-of-function α6β2* nAChRs (α6L9'S mice) that are hypersensitive to nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine. Evoked extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were enhanced in α6L9'S NAc slices compared to control, non-transgenic (non-Tg) slices. Extracellular DA levels in both non-Tg and α6L9'S slices were further enhanced in the presence of GBR12909, suggesting intact DA transporter function in both mouse strains. Ongoing α6β2* nAChR activation by acetylcholine plays a role in enhancing DA levels, as α-conotoxin MII completely abolished evoked DA release in α6L9'S slices and decreased spontaneous DA release from striatal synaptosomes. In HPLC experiments, α6L9'S NAc tissue contained significantly more DA, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid compared to non-Tg NAc tissue. Serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and norepinephrine (NE) were unchanged in α6L9'S compared to non-Tg tissue. Western blot analysis revealed increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression in α6L9'S NAc. Overall, these results show that enhanced α6β2* nAChR activity in NAc can stimulate DA production and lead to increased extracellular DA levels. PMID:24266758

  16. Enhanced growth of Juniperus thurifera under a warmer climate is explained by a positive carbon gain under cold and drought.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Teresa E; Camarero, J Julio; Granda, Elena; Pías, Beatriz; Valladares, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Juniperus thurifera L. is an endemic conifer of the western Mediterranean Basin where it is subjected to a severe climatic stress characterized by low winter temperatures and summer drought. Given the trend of increased warming-induced drought stress in this area and the climatic sensitivity of this species, we expect a negative impact of climate change on growth and ecophysiological performance of J. thurifera in the harsh environments where it dominates. To evaluate this, we measured long- and short-term radial growth using dendrochronology, photosynthesis and water-use efficiency in males, females and juveniles in three sites in Central Spain. Climate was monitored and completed with historical records. Mean annual temperature has increased +0.2 °C per decade in the study area, and the main warming trends corresponded to spring (+0.2 °C per decade) and summer (+0.3 °C per decade). Radial growth and maximum photosynthesis peaked in spring and autumn. Positive photosynthetic rates were maintained all year long, albeit at reduced rates in winter and summer. Radial growth was enhanced by wet conditions in the previous autumn and by warm springs and high precipitation in summer of the year of tree-ring formation. Cloud cover during the summer increased growth, while cloudy winters led to impaired carbon gain and reduced growth in the long term. We argue that maintenance of carbon gain under harsh conditions (low winter temperatures and dry summer months) and plastic xylogenesis underlie J. thurifera's ability to profit from changing climatic conditions such as earlier spring onset and erratic summer rainfall. Our results highlight that not only the magnitude but also the sign of the impact of climate change on growth and persistence of Mediterranean trees is species specific. PMID:22427371

  17. Multiple Query Evaluation Based on an Enhanced Genetic Algorithm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamine, Lynda; Chrisment, Claude; Boughanem, Mohand

    2003-01-01

    Explains the use of genetic algorithms to combine results from multiple query evaluations to improve relevance in information retrieval. Discusses niching techniques, relevance feedback techniques, and evolution heuristics, and compares retrieval results obtained by both genetic multiple query evaluation and classical single query evaluation…

  18. Prediction of Genetic Values for Feed Intake from Individual Body Weight Gain and Total Feed Intake of the Pen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Records of individual feed intake (FI) and gain (G) were obtained from the Germ Plasm Evaluation (GPE) program at US Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC). Animals were randomly assigned to pens. Only pens with 6 to 9 steers were used for this study (Data Set 1,289 steers). Variance components and g...

  19. Gains in reliability from combining subsets of 500, 5,000, 50,000 or 500,000 genetic markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More genetic markers can increase both reliability and cost of genomic selection. Fewer markers can be used to trace chromosome segments within a population once identified by high-density haplotyping. Combinations of marker densities can improve reliability at lower cost. As of January 2010, 33,414...

  20. Discovery of Genetic Variation that Enhances Improvement of Dairy Production and Health in Cattle and Buffalos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis underlying this project is that genome-wide information on genetic variation will increase accuracy of predictions of genetic merit; will enhance heritability and reliability of these predictions through improved pedigree information; and will improve detection of most quantitative tr...

  1. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human

    PubMed Central

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Hartley, Catherine A.; Johnson, David C.; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C.; Ra, Stephen; Gray, Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Glatt, Charles E.; Hill, Matthew N.; Casey, B. J.; Lee, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry, and behavior. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest a gain-of-function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human. PMID:25731744

  2. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T; Hartley, Catherine A; Johnson, David C; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C; Ra, Stephen; Gray, J Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Glatt, Charles E; Hill, Matthew N; Casey, B J; Lee, Francis S

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry and behaviour. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviours. These results suggest a gain of function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human. PMID:25731744

  3. Thickness-dependent carrier transport and optically enhanced transconductance gain in III-VI multilayer InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Multilayer InSe with a thickness above ∼20 nm, is a direct semiconductor with a peak absorption wavelength approaching λ = 1000 nm, which is a promising candidate for solar-energy conversion and 2D optoelectronics devices. We present herein the experimental observations of thickness-dependent conductivity and photoconductive-responsivity spectrum in multilayer InSe as well as optically enhanced transconductance gain in the multilayer InSe metal-semiconductor-field-effect transistor (MESFET) illuminated by a halogen lamp. The voltage-current (V-I) measurement result shows multilayer InSe belongs to a p-type semiconductor, which can form a p-channel FET device. Thickness (t) dependent conductivity (σ) of multilayer InSe reveals about six-order variation from 5076 (Ω-cm)‑1 (t = 5 nm) to 2.56 × 10‑3 (Ω-cm)‑1 (t = 184 μm, bulk) following a relationship of σ ∝ t ‑1.38. The highest conductivity in a thin InSe (e.g. t = 5 nm) is due to the increase of carrier density when the thickness is decreased. The photoresponsivity spectrum of a Ag-InSe-Ag multilayer photoconductor demonstrates a prominent peak absorption at 1.1 ∼ 1.3 eV, matches well with the direct-free-exciton energy of the InSe. A multilayer p-InSe MESFET was tested by V-I measurement. The transconductance was measured and determined to be {g}m={≤ft|\\tfrac{\\partial {{{I}}}{{D}}}{\\partial {{{V}}}{{G}}}\\right|}{{{V}}{{SD}}={{2V}}} = ({1.25 +/- 0.008})× {10}-4≤ft(\\tfrac{{{A}}}{{{V}}}\\right). The gm value will enhance about three times when the MESFET was placed under the illumination of a tungsten halogen lamp of a lower power density ∼0.5 mW · cm‑2. All the experimental results demonstrate multilayer InSe a promising 2D material available for microelectronics and optoelectronics applications.

  4. Learning about Genetic Inheritance through Technology-Enhanced Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Michelle; Merritt, Joi; Opperman, Amanda; Porter, Jakob; Erlenbeck, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Genetics is an increasingly important topic in today's society, and one that permeates people's lives on many levels. Students, teachers, and the general public alike are constantly exposed to this topic through popular television shows such as "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," political issues like voting on stem-cell research, and the…

  5. Genetic Engineering of Algae for Enhanced Biofuel Production ▿

    PubMed Central

    Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Darzins, Al; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    There are currently intensive global research efforts aimed at increasing and modifying the accumulation of lipids, alcohols, hydrocarbons, polysaccharides, and other energy storage compounds in photosynthetic organisms, yeast, and bacteria through genetic engineering. Many improvements have been realized, including increased lipid and carbohydrate production, improved H2 yields, and the diversion of central metabolic intermediates into fungible biofuels. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attracting considerable interest within these efforts due to their relatively high photosynthetic conversion efficiencies, diverse metabolic capabilities, superior growth rates, and ability to store or secrete energy-rich hydrocarbons. Relative to cyanobacteria, eukaryotic microalgae possess several unique metabolic attributes of relevance to biofuel production, including the accumulation of significant quantities of triacylglycerol; the synthesis of storage starch (amylopectin and amylose), which is similar to that found in higher plants; and the ability to efficiently couple photosynthetic electron transport to H2 production. Although the application of genetic engineering to improve energy production phenotypes in eukaryotic microalgae is in its infancy, significant advances in the development of genetic manipulation tools have recently been achieved with microalgal model systems and are being used to manipulate central carbon metabolism in these organisms. It is likely that many of these advances can be extended to industrially relevant organisms. This review is focused on potential avenues of genetic engineering that may be undertaken in order to improve microalgae as a biofuel platform for the production of biohydrogen, starch-derived alcohols, diesel fuel surrogates, and/or alkanes. PMID:20139239

  6. Harnessing Automatic Data Collection to Enhance Genetic Improvement Programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automatic data collection can improve data accuracy, reduce cost of obtaining data, and enable addition of other traits. In the United States, genetic improvement programs for dairy cattle have benefited from a long history of innovation related to data collection and processing: computerization in ...

  7. Genetically enhanced cellulase production in Pseudomonas cellulosa using recombinant DNA technology

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1999-01-01

    An enhanced strain of Pseudomonas celllulosa was obtained by introducing a recombinant genetic construct comprising a heterologous cellulase gene operably connected to a promoter into ATCC 55702, mutagenizing the transformants by treatment with MNNG, and selecting a high cellulase producing transformant. The transformant, designated Pseudomonas cellulosa ATCC XXXX, exhibits enhanced levels of cellulase production relative to the untransformed Pseudomonas cellulosa strain #142 ATCC 55702.

  8. An Ethical Study on the Uses of Enhancement Genetic Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakita, Koji

    A variety of biomedical technologies are being developed that can be used for purposes other than treating diseases. Such “enhancement technologies” can be used to improve our own and future generation's life-chances. While these technologies can help people in many ways, their use raises important ethical issues. Some arguments for anti-enhancement as well as pro-enhancement seem to rest, however, on shaky foundation. Both company engineers and the general public had better learn more from technological, economical and philosophical histories. For such subjects may provide engineers with less opportunities of technological misuses and more powers of self-esteem in addition to self-control.

  9. Tapered InAs/InGaAs quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier design for enhanced gain and beam quality.

    PubMed

    Mesaritakis, Charis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Simos, Hercules; Simos, Christos; Krakowski, Michel; Krestnikov, Igor; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2013-07-15

    In this Letter, a design for a tapered InAs/InGaAs quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier is proposed and experimentally evaluated. The amplifier's geometry was optimized in order to reduce gain saturation effects and improve gain efficiency and beam quality. The experimental measurements confirm that the proposed amplifier allows for an elevated optical gain in the saturation regime, whereas a five-fold increase in the coupling efficiency to a standard single mode optical fiber is observed, due to the improvement in the beam quality factor M² of the emitted beam. PMID:23939062

  10. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources. PMID:26606925

  11. Genetic assignment methods for gaining insight into the management of infectious disease by understanding pathogen, vector, and host movement.

    PubMed

    Remais, Justin V; Xiao, Ning; Akullian, Adam; Qiu, Dongchuan; Blair, David

    2011-04-01

    For many pathogens with environmental stages, or those carried by vectors or intermediate hosts, disease transmission is strongly influenced by pathogen, host, and vector movements across complex landscapes, and thus quantitative measures of movement rate and direction can reveal new opportunities for disease management and intervention. Genetic assignment methods are a set of powerful statistical approaches useful for establishing population membership of individuals. Recent theoretical improvements allow these techniques to be used to cost-effectively estimate the magnitude and direction of key movements in infectious disease systems, revealing important ecological and environmental features that facilitate or limit transmission. Here, we review the theory, statistical framework, and molecular markers that underlie assignment methods, and we critically examine recent applications of assignment tests in infectious disease epidemiology. Research directions that capitalize on use of the techniques are discussed, focusing on key parameters needing study for improved understanding of patterns of disease. PMID:21552326

  12. Enhanced photo-assisted electrical gating in vanadium dioxide based on saturation-induced gain modulation of erbium-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Wook; Kim, Bong-Jun; Choi, Sungyoul; Lee, Yong Wan; Kim, Hyun-Tak

    2009-10-26

    By incorporating saturation-induced gain modulation of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), we have demonstrated a high-speed photo-assisted electrical gating with considerably enhanced switching characteristics in a two-terminal device fabricated by using vanadium dioxide thin film. The gating operation was performed by illuminating the output light of the EDFA, whose transient gain was modulated by adjusting the chopping frequency of the input light down to 1 kHz, onto the device. In the proposed gating scheme, gated signals with a temporal duration of approximately 40 micros were successively generated at a repetition rate of 1 kHz. PMID:19997180

  13. Genetic determinants for enhanced glycerol growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Ho, Ping-Wei; Klein, Mathias; Nevoigt, Elke

    2016-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae generally shows a low natural capability to utilize glycerol as the sole source of carbon, particularly when synthetic medium is used and complex supplements are omitted. Nevertheless, wild type isolates have been identified that show a moderate growth under these conditions. In the current study we made use of intraspecies diversity to identify targets suitable for reverse metabolic engineering of the non-growing laboratory strain CEN.PK113-1A. A genome-wide genetic mapping experiment using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis was conducted, and one major and several minor genetic loci were identified responsible for the superior glycerol growth phenotype of the previously selected S. cerevisiae strain CBS 6412-13A. Downscaling of the major locus by fine-mapping and reciprocal hemizygosity analysis allowed the parallel identification of two superior alleles (UBR2CBS 6412-13A and SSK1CBS 6412-13A). These alleles together with the previously identified GUT1CBS 6412-13A allele were used to replace the corresponding alleles in the strain CEN.PK113-1A. In this way, glycerol growth could be established reaching a maximum specific growth rate of 0.08h(-1). Further improvement to a maximum specific growth rate of 0.11h(-1) could be achieved by heterologous expression of the glycerol facilitator FPS1 from Cyberlindnera jadinii. PMID:26971668

  14. Recent Enhancements to the Genetic Risk Prediction Model BRCAPRO

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Emanuele; Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Biswas, Swati

    2015-01-01

    BRCAPRO is a widely used model for genetic risk prediction of breast cancer. It is a function within the R package BayesMendel and is used to calculate the probabilities of being a carrier of a deleterious mutation in one or both of the BRCA genes, as well as the probability of being affected with breast and ovarian cancer within a defined time window. Both predictions are based on information contained in the counselee’s family history of cancer. During the last decade, BRCAPRO has undergone several rounds of successive refinements: the current version is part of release 2.1 of BayesMendel. In this review, we showcase some of the most notable features of the software resulting from these recent changes. We provide examples highlighting each feature, using artificial pedigrees motivated by complex clinical examples. We illustrate how BRCAPRO is a comprehensive software for genetic risk prediction with many useful features that allow users the flexibility to incorporate varying amounts of available information. PMID:25983549

  15. Evaluation of implant strategies in Angus-sired steers with high or low genetic potential for marbling and gain.

    PubMed

    Black, D N; Neville, B W; Crosswhite, M R; Dahlen, C R

    2015-11-01

    Sixty-nine Angus-sired steer calves (332.3 kg initial BW) were used to determine the effects of single or double implant strategies on steers of high or low genetic potential (GP) determined by the GeneMax (Zoetis, Florham Park, NJ) genetic profiling test. Steers were assigned to treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial design with factors of 1) composite GP score (high, mean GP score of 86.5 [HI]; low, mean GP score of 25.3[LO]) and 2) implant strategy (single, steers implanted on d 70 [1X], or double, steers implanted d 0 and 70 [2X]). All steers were given the same implant (Revalor-S; Merck Animal Health, Summit, NJ), with the 2X group implanted on d 0 and 70 and the 1X group implanted only on d 70. A diet containing 1.38 Mcal NEg/kg DM was fed ad libitum, once daily. Ultrasound was used to measure body composition characteristics on d 0 and 70. Steers were harvested after 140 d on feed. At both the d-0 and d-70 ultrasound, HI steers had greater ( < 0.001) percent intramuscular fat (IMF) than LO steers, but no differences ( ≥ 0.24) were observed in LM area (LMA), rib fat thickness (RF), or rump fat thickness (RMFT). Steers in the 2X group had larger ( = 0.02) LMA and less ( = 0.03) IMF on d 70 than 1X steers and no differences ( ≥ 0.50) in RF or RMFT were observed. From d 0 to 70, HI steers had ADG, DMI, and G:F ( ≥ 0.60) similar to LO steers; however, 2X steers had greater ( < 0.001) ADG and were more ( < 0.001) feed efficient compared with 1X steers during the same interval. Over the entire 140-d feeding period, there were no differences ( ≥ 0.6) in BW, ADG, DMI, or G:F between GP groups; however, 2X steers had greater ( = 0.03) ADG compared with 1X steers and still had similar ( ≥ 0.12) DMI and G:F. Upon slaughter, marbling score tended to be impacted by a GP × implant interaction (499.9 ± 18.5, 545.6 ± 18.5, 487.1 ± 18.5, and 469.8 ± 18.5 for HI and 2X, HI and 1X, LO and 2X, and LO and 1X, respectively; = 0.06). No differences ( ≥ 0.7) were observed

  16. Influence of a Small Fraction of Individuals with Enhanced Mutations on a Population Genetic Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    It has been observed that a higher mutation load could be introduced into the genomes of children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (fertilization in-vitro). This generates two effects — slightly higher mutational pressure on the whole genetic pool of population and inhomogeneity of mutation distributions in the genetic pool. Computer simulations of the Penna ageing model suggest that already a small fraction of births with enhanced number of new mutations can negatively influence the whole population.

  17. Assessing the impact of natural service bulls and genotype by environment interactions on genetic gain and inbreeding in organic dairy cattle genomic breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Yin, T; Wensch-Dorendorf, M; Simianer, H; Swalve, H H; König, S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare genetic gain and inbreeding coefficients of dairy cattle in organic breeding program designs by applying stochastic simulations. Evaluated breeding strategies were: (i) selecting bulls from conventional breeding programs, and taking into account genotype by environment (G×E) interactions, (ii) selecting genotyped bulls within the organic environment for artificial insemination (AI) programs and (iii) selecting genotyped natural service bulls within organic herds. The simulated conventional population comprised 148 800 cows from 2976 herds with an average herd size of 50 cows per herd, and 1200 cows were assigned to 60 organic herds. In a young bull program, selection criteria of young bulls in both production systems (conventional and organic) were either 'conventional' estimated breeding values (EBV) or genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) for two traits with low (h 2=0.05) and moderate heritability (h 2=0.30). GEBV were calculated for different accuracies (r mg), and G×E interactions were considered by modifying originally simulated true breeding values in the range from r g=0.5 to 1.0. For both traits (h 2=0.05 and 0.30) and r mg⩾0.8, genomic selection of bulls directly in the organic population and using selected bulls via AI revealed higher genetic gain than selecting young bulls in the larger conventional population based on EBV; also without the existence of G×E interactions. Only for pronounced G×E interactions (r g=0.5), and for highly accurate GEBV for natural service bulls (r mg>0.9), results suggests the use of genotyped organic natural service bulls instead of implementing an AI program. Inbreeding coefficients of selected bulls and their offspring were generally lower when basing selection decisions for young bulls on GEBV compared with selection strategies based on pedigree indices. PMID:24703184

  18. Development of genetically enhanced baculovirus pesticides (Chapter 5). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    The report describes the assessment of the potential environmental impacts of genetically improved viral pesticides, including an evaluation of the properties of the foreign gene product(s) and the biological properties of the altered virus itself. The current field release studies are collecting much of the information which will be needed to assess the environmental safety of these new pesticides. Of primary concern will be the cost-to-benefit ratios as determined by production costs, stability, application, technology, and field efficacy. Despite the improvements afforded through biotechnology, it is clear that viral and other microbial pesticides will only reduce, not eliminate, the agricultural requirements for synthetic pesticides. Even so, biological pesticides are among the best solutions to reducing crop losses in the absence of ecological disturbances and potential health hazards.

  19. Enhancements and justice: problems in determining the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Ronald A

    2005-03-01

    There is a concern that genetic engineering will exacerbate existing social divisions and inequalities, especially if only the wealthy can afford genetic enhancements. Accordingly, many argue that justice requires the imposition of constraints on genetic engineering. However, it would be unwise to decide at this time what limits should be imposed in the future. Decision makers currently lack both the theoretical tools and the factual foundation for making sound judgments about the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society. Moreover, focusing on the uncertain inequities of the future may result in failure to give priority to more pressing inequities of the present. Especially in a country that recently has enacted tax legislation that will widen existing wealth disparities, concern about the distant threat of a genetic aristocracy appears misplaced. PMID:15881599

  20. Control of Growth Efficiency in Young Plantation Loblolly Pine and Sweetgum through Irrigation and Fertigation Enhancement of Leaf Carbon Gain

    SciTech Connect

    L. Samuelson

    1999-07-07

    The overall objective of this study was to determine if growth efficiency of young plantation loblolly pine and sweetgum can be maintained by intensive forest management and whether increased carbon gain is the mechanism controlling growth efficiency response to resource augmentation. Key leaf physiological processes were examined over two growing seasons in response to irrigation, fertigation (irrigation with a fertilizer solution), and fertigation plus pest control (pine only). Although irrigation improved leaf net photosynthesis in pine and decreased stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit in sweetgum, no consistent physiological responses to fertigation were detected in either species. After 4 years of treatment, a 3-fold increase in woody net primary productivity was observed in both species in response to fertigation. Trees supplemented with fertigation and fertigation plus pest control exhibited the largest increases in growth and biomass. Furthermore, growth efficiency was maintained by fertigation and fertigation plus pest control, despite large increases in crown development and self-shading. Greater growth in response to intensive culture was facilitated by significant gains in leaf mass and whole tree carbon gain rather than detectable increases in leaf level processes. Growth efficiency was not maintained by significant increases in leaf level carbon gain but was possibly influenced by changes in carbon allocation to root versus shoot processes.

  1. GenMin: An enhanced genetic algorithm for global optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Lagaris, I. E.

    2008-06-01

    A new method that employs grammatical evolution and a stopping rule for finding the global minimum of a continuous multidimensional, multimodal function is considered. The genetic algorithm used is a hybrid genetic algorithm in conjunction with a local search procedure. We list results from numerical experiments with a series of test functions and we compare with other established global optimization methods. The accompanying software accepts objective functions coded either in Fortran 77 or in C++. Program summaryProgram title: GenMin Catalogue identifier: AEAR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 35 810 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 436 613 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: GNU-C++, GNU-C, GNU Fortran 77 Computer: The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Operating system: The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler RAM: 200 KB Word size: 32 bits Classification: 4.9 Nature of problem: A multitude of problems in science and engineering are often reduced to minimizing a function of many variables. There are instances that a local optimum does not correspond to the desired physical solution and hence the search for a better solution is required. Local optimization techniques are frequently trapped in local minima. Global optimization is hence the appropriate tool. For example, solving a nonlinear system of equations via optimization, employing a least squares type of objective, one may encounter many local minima that do not correspond to solutions (i.e. they are far from zero). Solution method: Grammatical evolution and a stopping rule. Running time: Depending on the

  2. Pre-breeding for diversification of primary gene pool and genetic enhancement of grain legumes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shivali; Upadhyaya, H. D.; Varshney, R. K.; Gowda, C. L. L.

    2013-01-01

    The narrow genetic base of cultivars coupled with low utilization of genetic resources are the major factors limiting grain legume production and productivity globally. Exploitation of new and diverse sources of variation is needed for the genetic enhancement of grain legumes. Wild relatives with enhanced levels of resistance/tolerance to multiple stresses provide important sources of genetic diversity for crop improvement. However, their exploitation for cultivar improvement is limited by cross-incompatibility barriers and linkage drags. Pre-breeding provides a unique opportunity, through the introgression of desirable genes from wild germplasm into genetic backgrounds readily used by the breeders with minimum linkage drag, to overcome this. Pre-breeding activities using promising landraces, wild relatives, and popular cultivars have been initiated at International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) to develop new gene pools in chickpea, pigeonpea, and groundnut with a high frequency of useful genes, wider adaptability, and a broad genetic base. The availability of molecular markers will greatly assist in reducing linkage drags and increasing the efficiency of introgression in pre-breeding programs. PMID:23970889

  3. Genome-wide association and systems genetic analyses of residual feed intake, daily feed consumption, backfat and weight gain in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Feed efficiency is one of the major components determining costs of animal production. Residual feed intake (RFI) is defined as the difference between the observed and the expected feed intake given a certain production. Residual feed intake 1 (RFI1) was calculated based on regression of individual daily feed intake (DFI) on initial test weight and average daily gain. Residual feed intake 2 (RFI2) was as RFI1 except it was also regressed with respect to backfat (BF). It has been shown to be a sensitive and accurate measure for feed efficiency in livestock but knowledge of the genomic regions and mechanisms affecting RFI in pigs is lacking. The study aimed to identify genetic markers and candidate genes for RFI and its component traits as well as pathways associated with RFI in Danish Duroc boars by genome-wide associations and systems genetic analyses. Results Phenotypic and genotypic records (using the Illumina Porcine SNP60 BeadChip) were available on 1,272 boars. Fifteen and 12 loci were significantly associated (p < 1.52 × 10-6) with RFI1 and RFI2, respectively. Among them, 10 SNPs were significantly associated with both RFI1 and RFI2 implying the existence of common mechanisms controlling the two RFI measures. Significant QTL regions for component traits of RFI (DFI and BF) were detected on pig chromosome (SSC) 1 (for DFI) and 2 for (BF). The SNPs within MAP3K5 and PEX7 on SSC 1, ENSSSCG00000022338 on SSC 9, and DSCAM on SSC 13 might be interesting markers for both RFI measures. Functional annotation of genes in 0.5 Mb size flanking significant SNPs indicated regulation of protein and lipid metabolic process, gap junction, inositol phosphate metabolism and insulin signaling pathway are significant biological processes and pathways for RFI, respectively. Conclusions The study detected novel genetic variants and QTLs on SSC 1, 8, 9, 13 and 18 for RFI and indicated significant biological processes and metabolic pathways involved in RFI. The

  4. Enhancing the Internationalisation of Distance Education in the Biological Sciences: The DUNE Project and Genetic Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, C. K.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Distance Educational Network of Europe (DUNE) project that aims at enhancing the development of distance education in an international context. Highlights issues relating to the delivery of distance-learning courses in a transnational forum. Describes the genetic engineering course that aims at explaining the core techniques of…

  5. Genetic dissection of the α-globin super-enhancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hay, Deborah; Hughes, Jim R; Babbs, Christian; Davies, James O J; Graham, Bryony J; Hanssen, Lars L P; Kassouf, Mira T; Oudelaar, A Marieke; Sharpe, Jacqueline A; Suciu, Maria C; Telenius, Jelena; Williams, Ruth; Rode, Christina; Li, Pik-Shan; Pennacchio, Len A; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; Ayyub, Helena; Butler, Sue; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Gibbons, Richard J; Smith, Andrew J H; Wood, William G; Higgs, Douglas R

    2016-08-01

    Many genes determining cell identity are regulated by clusters of Mediator-bound enhancer elements collectively referred to as super-enhancers. These super-enhancers have been proposed to manifest higher-order properties important in development and disease. Here we report a comprehensive functional dissection of one of the strongest putative super-enhancers in erythroid cells. By generating a series of mouse models, deleting each of the five regulatory elements of the α-globin super-enhancer individually and in informative combinations, we demonstrate that each constituent enhancer seems to act independently and in an additive fashion with respect to hematological phenotype, gene expression, chromatin structure and chromosome conformation, without clear evidence of synergistic or higher-order effects. Our study highlights the importance of functional genetic analyses for the identification of new concepts in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27376235

  6. Genetically Induced Cholinergic Hyper-Innervation Enhances Taste Learning

    PubMed Central

    Neseliler, Selin; Narayanan, Darshana; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Katz, Donald B.; Birren, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Acute inhibition of acetylcholine (ACh) has been shown to impair many forms of simple learning, and notably conditioned taste aversion (CTA). The most adhered-to theory that has emerged as a result of this work – that ACh increases a taste’s perceived novelty, and thereby its associability – would be further strengthened by evidence showing that enhanced cholinergic function improves learning above normal levels. Experimental testing of this corollary hypothesis has been limited, however, by side-effects of pharmacological ACh agonism and by the absence of a model that achieves long-term increases in cholinergic signaling. Here, we present this further test of the ACh hypothesis, making use of mice lacking the p75 pan-neurotrophin receptor gene, which show a resultant over-abundance of cholinergic neurons in sub-regions of the basal forebrain (BF). We first demonstrate that the p75−/− abnormality directly affects portions of the CTA circuit, locating mouse gustatory cortex (GC) using a functional assay and then using immunohistochemisty to demonstrate cholinergic hyper-innervation of GC in the mutant mice – hyper-innervation that is unaccompanied by changes in cell numbers or compensatory changes in muscarinic receptor densities. We then demonstrate that both p75−/− and wild-type (WT) mice learn robust CTAs, which extinguish more slowly in the mutants. Further testing to distinguish effects on learning from alterations in memory retention demonstrate that p75−/− mice do in fact learn stronger CTAs than WT mice. These data provide novel evidence for the hypothesis linking ACh and taste learning. PMID:22144949

  7. Genetic modification of cassava for enhanced starch production.

    PubMed

    Ihemere, Uzoma; Arias-Garzon, Diana; Lawrence, Susan; Sayre, Richard

    2006-07-01

    To date, transgenic approaches to biofortify subsistence crops have been rather limited. This is particularly true for the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). Cassava has one of the highest rates of CO(2) fixation and sucrose synthesis for any C3 plant, but rarely reaches its yield potentials in the field. It was our hypothesis that starch production in cassava tuberous roots could be increased substantially by increasing the sink strength for carbohydrate. To test this hypothesis, we generated transgenic plants with enhanced tuberous root ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) activity. This was achieved by expressing a modified form of the bacterial glgC gene under the control of a Class I patatin promoter. AGPase catalyses the rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis, and therefore the expression of a more active bacterial form of the enzyme was expected to lead to increased starch production. To facilitate maximal AGPase activity, we modified the Escherichia coli glgC gene (encoding AGPase) by site-directed mutagenesis (G336D) to reduce allosteric feedback regulation by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Transgenic plants (three) expressing the glgC gene had up to 70% higher AGPase activity than control plants when assayed under conditions optimal for plant and not bacterial AGPase activity. Plants having the highest AGPase activities had up to a 2.6-fold increase in total tuberous root biomass when grown under glasshouse conditions. In addition, plants with the highest tuberous root AGPase activity had significant increases in above-ground biomass, consistent with a possible reduction in feedback inhibition on photosynthetic carbon fixation. These results demonstrate that targeted modification of enzymes regulating source-sink relationships in crop plants having high carbohydrate source strengths is an effective strategy for increasing carbohydrate yields in sink tissues. PMID:17177810

  8. Gain and noise figure enhancement of Er+3/Yb+3 co-doped fiber/Raman hybrid amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahran, O.

    2016-02-01

    An Er/Yb co-doped fiber/Raman hybrid amplifier (HA) is proposed and studied theoretically and analytically to improve the gain and noise figure of optical amplifiers. The calculations are performed under a uniform dopant and steady-state conditions. The initial energy transfer efficiency for Er/Yb co-doped fiber amplifier (EYDFA) is introduced, while the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is neglected. The glass fiber used for both Er/Yb and Raman amplifiers is phosphate. Different pump powers are used for both EYDFA and RA with 1 μW input signal power, 1 m length of Er/Yb amplifier and 25 km length of Raman amplifier (RA). The proposed model is validated for Er/Yb co-doped amplifier and Raman amplifier separately by comparing the calculating results with the experimental data. A high gain and low noise figure at 200 mW Raman pump power and 500 mW Er/Yb pump power are obtained for the proposed HA as compared with the experimental results of EYDFA, Raman amplifier and the EDFA/Raman hybrid amplifier.

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of genetically modified flax fibres enhanced with poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan; Dymińska, Lucyna; Mączka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy

    2009-02-01

    Genetically modified flax fibres, derived from transgenic flax with expression of three bacterial genes necessary for synthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB), have been analysed. These transgenic flaxes, enhanced with different amount of the PHB, have been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. The integral intensities of the IR bands have been used for estimation of the chemical content of the normal and transgenic flaxes as well as the differences between the natural and genetically modified flax fibres. The spectroscopic data were compared to those obtained from chemical analysis of flax fibres.

  10. In sport and social justice, is genetic enhancement a game changer?

    PubMed

    Parker, Lisa S

    2012-12-01

    The possibility of genetic enhancement to increase the likelihood of success in sport and life's prospects raises questions for accounts of sport and theories of justice. These questions obviously include the fairness of such enhancement and its relationship to the goals of sport and demands of justice. Of equal interest, however, is the effect on our understanding of individual effort, merit, and desert of either discovering genetic contributions to components of such effort or recognizing the influence of social factors on the development and exercise of individual effort. This paper analyzes arguments about genetic enhancement with the goal of raising questions about how sport and justice regard unchosen, undeserved inequalities and what is assumed to be their opposite-namely, the exercise and results of individual effort. It is suggested that contemplating enhancement of natural assets previously outside human control may reinforce recognition of responsibility to intervene with regard to social advantages so as to support individual effort and improve individuals' life prospects. PMID:22983765

  11. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  12. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  13. Appetite Enhancement and Weight Gain by Peripheral Administration of TrkB Agonists in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lin, John C.; Tsao, David; Barras, Paul; Bastarrachea, Raul A.; Boyd, Bob; Chou, Joyce; Rosete, Rodnie; Long, Hua; Forgie, Alison; Abdiche, Yasmina; Dilley, Jeanette; Stratton, Jennifer; Garcia, Carlos; Sloane, David L.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Rosenthal, Arnon

    2008-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB pathway resulted in hyperphagia and morbid obesity in human and rodents. Conversely, peripheral or central stimulation of TrkB by its natural ligands BDNF or NT4 reduced body weight and food intake in mice, supporting the idea that TrkB is a key anorexigenic signal downstream of the melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r) system. Here we show that in non-human primates TrkB agonists were anorexigenic when applied centrally, but surprisingly orexigenic, leading to gain in appetite, body weight, fat deposits and serum leptin levels, when given peripherally. The orexigenic and pro-obesity effects of peripherally administered TrkB agonists appear to be dose dependent, not associated with fluid retention nor with evidence of receptor down regulation. Our findings revealed that TrkB signaling exerts dual control on energy homeostasis in the primates that could be targeted for the treatment of either wasting disorders or obesity. PMID:18382675

  14. Analyzing and Quantifying the Gain-of-Function Enhancement of IP3 Receptor Gating by Familial Alzheimer’s Disease-Causing Mutants in Presenilins

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Don-On Daniel; Cheung, King-Ho; Toglia, Patrick; Foskett, J. Kevin; Ullah, Ghanim

    2015-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD)-causing mutant presenilins (PS) interact with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) Ca2+ release channels resulting in enhanced IP3R channel gating in an amyloid beta (Aβ) production-independent manner. This gain-of-function enhancement of IP3R activity is considered to be the main reason behind the upregulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in the presence of optimal and suboptimal stimuli and spontaneous Ca2+ signals observed in cells expressing mutant PS. In this paper, we employed computational modeling of single IP3R channel activity records obtained under optimal Ca2+ and multiple IP3 concentrations to gain deeper insights into the enhancement of IP3R function. We found that in addition to the high occupancy of the high-activity (H) mode and the low occupancy of the low-activity (L) mode, IP3R in FAD-causing mutant PS-expressing cells exhibits significantly longer mean life-time for the H mode and shorter life-time for the L mode, leading to shorter mean close-time and hence high open probability of the channel in comparison to IP3R in cells expressing wild-type PS. The model is then used to extrapolate the behavior of the channel to a wide range of IP3 and Ca2+ concentrations and quantify the sensitivity of IP3R to its two ligands. We show that the gain-of-function enhancement is sensitive to both IP3 and Ca2+ and that very small amount of IP3 is required to stimulate IP3R channels in the presence of FAD-causing mutant PS to the same level of activity as channels in control cells stimulated by significantly higher IP3 concentrations. We further demonstrate with simulations that the relatively longer time spent by IP3R in the H mode leads to the observed higher frequency of local Ca2+ signals, which can account for the more frequent global Ca2+ signals observed, while the enhanced activity of the channel at extremely low ligand concentrations will lead to spontaneous Ca2+ signals in cells expressing FAD

  15. Genetic diversity enhanced by ancient introgression and secondary contact in East Pacific black mangroves.

    PubMed

    Nettel, Alejandro; Dodd, Richard S; Afzal-Rafii, Zara; Tovilla-Hernández, Cristian

    2008-06-01

    Regional distribution of genetic diversity in widespread species may be influenced by hybridization with locally restricted, closely related species. Previous studies have shown that Central American East Pacific populations of the wide-ranged Avicennia germinans, the black mangrove, harbour higher genetic diversity than the rest of its range. Genetic diversity in this region might be enhanced by introgression with the locally restricted Avicennia bicolor. We tested the hypotheses of ancient hybridization using phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and intergenic chloroplast DNA; we also tested for current hybridization by population level analysis of nuclear microsatellites. Our results unveiled ancient ITS introgression between a northern Pacific Central American A. germinans lineage and A. bicolor. However, microsatellite data revealed contemporary isolation between the two species. Polymorphic ITS sequences from Costa Rica and Panama are consistent with a zone of admixture between the introgressant ITS A. germinans lineage and a southern Central American lineage of A. germinans. Interspecific introgression influenced lineage diversity and divergence at the nuclear ribosomal DNA; intraspecific population differentiation and secondary contact are more likely to have enhanced regional genetic diversity in Pacific Central American populations of the widespread A. germinans. PMID:18466233

  16. A fast-evolving human NPAS3 enhancer gained reporter expression in the developing forebrain of transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, Gretel B.; López-Leal, Rodrigo; Lorenzo, Juan R.; Franchini, Lucía F.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental brain gene NPAS3 stands out as a hot spot in human evolution because it contains the largest number of human-specific, fast-evolving, conserved, non-coding elements. In this paper we studied 2xHAR142, one of these elements that is located in the fifth intron of NPAS3. Using transgenic mice, we show that the mouse and chimp 2xHAR142 orthologues behave as transcriptional enhancers driving expression of the reporter gene lacZ to a similar NPAS3 expression subdomain in the mouse central nervous system. Interestingly, the human 2xHAR142 orthologue drives lacZ expression to an extended expression pattern in the nervous system. Thus, molecular evolution of 2xHAR142 provides the first documented example of human-specific heterotopy in the forebrain promoted by a transcriptional enhancer and suggests that it may have contributed to assemble the unique properties of the human brain. PMID:24218632

  17. Enhanced biofilm formation and multi-host transmission evolve from divergent genetic backgrounds in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Murray, Susan; Yahara, Koji; Mageiros, Leonardos; Bowen, Ryan; Jones, Nathan H; Jeeves, Rose E; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2015-11-01

    Multicellular biofilms are an ancient bacterial adaptation that offers a protective environment for survival in hostile habitats. In microaerophilic organisms such as Campylobacter, biofilms play a key role in transmission to humans as the bacteria are exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations when leaving the reservoir host gut. Genetic determinants of biofilm formation differ between species, but little is known about how strains of the same species achieve the biofilm phenotype with different genetic backgrounds. Our approach combines genome-wide association studies with traditional microbiology techniques to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation in 102 Campylobacter jejuni isolates. We quantified biofilm formation among the isolates and identified hotspots of genetic variation in homologous sequences that correspond to variation in biofilm phenotypes. Thirteen genes demonstrated a statistically robust association including those involved in adhesion, motility, glycosylation, capsule production and oxidative stress. The genes associated with biofilm formation were different in the host generalist ST-21 and ST-45 clonal complexes, which are frequently isolated from multiple host species and clinical samples. This suggests the evolution of enhanced biofilm from different genetic backgrounds and a possible role in colonization of multiple hosts and transmission to humans. PMID:26373338

  18. Enhanced stability of maize endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is gained through mutants that alter subunit interactions.

    PubMed

    Greene, T W; Hannah, L C

    1998-10-27

    Temperature lability of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP; glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase; ADP: alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.27), a key starch biosynthetic enzyme, may play a significant role in the heat-induced loss in maize seed weight and yield. Here we report the isolation and characterization of heat-stable variants of maize endosperm AGP. Escherichia coli cells expressing wild type (WT) Shrunken2 (Sh2), and Brittle2 (Bt2) exhibit a reduced capacity to produce glycogen when grown at 42 degreesC. Mutagenesis of Sh2 and coexpression with WT Bt2 led to the isolation of multiple mutants capable of synthesizing copious amounts of glycogen at this temperature. An increase in AGP stability was found in each of four mutants examined. Initial characterization revealed that the BT2 protein was elevated in two of these mutants. Yeast two-hybrid studies were conducted to determine whether the mutant SH2 proteins more efficiently recruit the BT2 subunit into tetramer assembly. These experiments showed that replacement of WT SH2 with the heat-stable SH2HS33 enhanced interaction between the SH2 and BT2 subunits. In agreement, density gradient centrifugation of heated and nonheated extracts from WT and one of the mutants, Sh2hs33, identified a greater propensity for heterotetramer dissociation in WT AGP. Sequencing of Sh2hs33 and several other mutants identified a His-to-Tyr mutation at amino acid position 333. Hence, a single point mutation in Sh2 can increase the stability of maize endosperm AGP through enhanced subunit interactions. PMID:9789090

  19. Enhancement of myocardial regeneration through genetic engineering of cardiac progenitor cells expressing Pim-1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Cottage, Chistopher T.; Wu, Weitao; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie A.; Avitable, Daniele; Quijada, Pearl; Collins, Brett L.; Fransioli, Jenna; Sussman, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite numerous studies demonstrating efficacy of cellular adoptive transfer for therapeutic myocardial regeneration, problems remain for donated cells with regard to survival, persistence, engraftment, and long-term benefits. This study redresses these concerns by enhancing the regenerative potential of adoptively transferred cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) via genetic engineering to overexpress Pim-1, a cardioprotective kinase that enhances cell survival and proliferation. Methods and Results Intramyocardial injections of CPCs overexpressing Pim-1 were given to infarcted female mice. Animals were monitored over 4, 12, and 32-weeks to assess cardiac function and engraftment of Pim-1 CPCs using echocardiography, in vivo hemodynamics, and confocal imagery. CPCs overexpressing Pim-1 show increased proliferation and expression of markers consistent with cardiogenic lineage commitment following dexamethasone exposure in vitro. Animals that received CPCs overexpressing Pim-1 also produce greater levels of cellular engraftment, persistence, and functional improvement relative to control CPCs up to 32-weeks post-delivery. Salutary effects include reduction of infarct size, greater number of c-kit+ cells, and increased vasculature in the damaged region. Conclusions Myocardial repair is significantly enhanced by genetic engineering of CPCs using Pim-1 kinase. Ex vivo gene delivery to enhance cellular survival, proliferation, and regeneration may overcome current limitations of stem cell-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:19901187

  20. The genetics of Tamarix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic studies have helped us gain basic knowledge of the Tamarix invasion. We now have a better understanding of the species identities involved in the invasion, their evolutionary relationships, and the contribution of hybridization to the invasion. This information can be used to enhance the eff...

  1. A Novel Conditional Genetic System Reveals That Increasing Neuronal cAMP Enhances Memory and Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Isiegas, Carolina; McDonough, Conor; Huang, Ted; Havekes, Robbert; Fabian, Sara; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Hui; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Kim, Jae-Ick; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Hye-Ryeon; Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Lee, Nuribalhae; Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Jeong-Sik; Son, Hyeon; Zhuo, Min; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Abel, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Consistent evidence from pharmacological and genetic studies shows that cAMP is a critical modulator of synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, the potential of the cAMP signaling pathway as a target for memory enhancement remains unclear because of contradictory findings from pharmacological and genetic approaches. To address these issues, we have developed a novel conditional genetic system in mice based on the heterologous expression of an Aplysia octopamine receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor whose activation by its natural ligand octopamine leads to rapid and transient increases in cAMP. We find that activation of this receptor transgenically expressed in mouse forebrain neurons induces a rapid elevation of hippocampal cAMP levels, facilitates hippocampus synaptic plasticity, and enhances the consolidation and retrieval of fear memory. Our findings clearly demonstrate that acute increases in cAMP levels selectively in neurons facilitate synaptic plasticity and memory, and illustrate the potential of this heterologous system to study cAMP-mediated processes in mammalian systems. PMID:18550764

  2. Wild Help for Enhancing Genetic Resistance in Lentil Against Fungal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Wong, Melissa M L; Bett, Kirstin E; Banniza, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris) is one of the cool season grain legume crops and an important source of dietary proteins and fibre. Fungal diseases are main constraints to lentil production and account for significant yield and quality losses. Lentil has a narrow genetic base presumably due to a bottleneck during domestication and as a result, any resistance to fungal diseases in the cultivated genepool is gradually eroded and overcome by pathogens. New sources of resistance have been identified in wild lentil (Lens ervoides). This article provides an overview of harnessing resistance potential of wild germplasm to enhance genetic resistance in lentil cultivars using next-generation sequencing-based genotyping, comparative genomics and marker-assisted selection breeding. PMID:26363611

  3. Exopolysaccharide production by a genetically engineered Enterobacter cloacae strain for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Luo, Yijing; Zhong, Weizhang; Xiao, Meng; Yi, Wenjing; Yu, Li; Fu, Pengcheng

    2011-05-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a petroleum biotechnology for manipulating function and/or structure of microbial environments existing in oil reservoirs for prolonged exploitation of the largest source of energy. In this study, an Enterobacter cloacae which is capable of producing water-insoluble biopolymers at 37°C and a thermophilic Geobacillus strain were used to construct an engineered strain for exopolysaccharide production at higher temperature. The resultant transformants, GW3-3.0, could produce exopolysaccharide up to 8.83 g l(-1) in molasses medium at 54°C. This elevated temperature was within the same temperature range as that for many oil reservoirs. The transformants had stable genetic phenotype which was genetically fingerprinted by RAPD analysis. Core flooding experiments were carried out to ensure effective controlled profile for the simulation of oil recovery. The results have demonstrated that this approach has a promising application potential in MEOR. PMID:21444201

  4. Owning genetic information and gene enhancement techniques: why privacy and property rights may undermine social control of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Moore, A D

    2000-04-01

    In this article I argue that the proper subjects of intangible property claims include medical records, genetic profiles, and gene enhancement techniques. Coupled with a right to privacy these intangible property rights allow individuals a zone of control that will, in most cases, justifiably exclude governmental or societal invasions into private domains. I argue that the threshold for overriding privacy rights and intangible property rights is higher, in relation to genetic enhancement techniques and sensitive personal information, than is commonly suggested. Once the bar is raised, so-to-speak, the burden of overriding it is formidable. Thus many policy decisions that have been recently proposed or enacted--citywide audio and video surveillance, law enforcement DNA sweeps, genetic profiling, national bans on genetic testing and enhancement of humans, to name a few--will have to be backed by very strong arguments. PMID:11765764

  5. Noonan Syndrome/Leukemia-associated Gain-of-function Mutations in SHP-2 Phosphatase (PTPN11) Enhance Cell Migration and Angiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siying; Yu, Wen-Mei; Zhang, Wanming; McCrae, Keith R.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in SHP-2 phosphatase (PTPN11) that cause hyperactivation of its catalytic activity have been identified in Noonan syndrome and various childhood leukemias. Recent studies suggest that the gain-of-function (GOF) mutations of SHP-2 play a causal role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GOF mutations of SHP-2 induce these phenotypes are not fully understood. Here, we show that GOF mutations in SHP-2, such as E76K and D61G, drastically increase spreading and migration of various cell types, including hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. More importantly, in vivo angiogenesis in SHP-2 D61G knock-in mice is also enhanced. Mechanistic studies suggest that the increased cell migration is attributed to the enhanced β1 integrin outside-in signaling. In response to β1 integrin cross-linking or fibronectin stimulation, activation of ERK and Akt kinases is greatly increased by SHP-2 GOF mutations. Also, integrin-induced activation of RhoA and Rac1 GTPases is elevated. Interestingly, mutant cells with the SHP-2 GOF mutation (D61G) are more sensitive than wild-type cells to the suppression of cell motility by inhibition of these pathways. Collectively, these studies reaffirm the positive role of SHP-2 phosphatase in cell motility and suggest a new mechanism by which SHP-2 GOF mutations contribute to diseases. PMID:19008228

  6. Giant enhancement of optical high-order sideband generation and their control in a dimer of two cavities with gain and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahui; Li, Jiahua; Xiao, Qian; Wu, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Parity-time (PT ) symmetric systems, which rely on the balanced gain-loss condition and render the Hamiltonian non-Hermitian, have provided a new platform to engineer effective light-matter interactions in recent years. Here we explore the high-order sideband features of the output fields obtained from a PT -symmetric optical system consisting of a passive nonlinear cavity coupled to an active linear cavity. By employing a perturbation technique, we derive analytic formulas used to determine the nonlinear transmission coefficient of optical second-order sideband in this structure. Using experimentally achievable parameters, it is clearly shown that the efficiency of the second-order sideband generation can be greatly enhanced in the PT -symmetric dimer, extremely in the vicinity of the transition point from unbroken- to broken-PT regimes. Moreover, we further analyzed the influences of the system parameters, including the photon-tunneling rate between two cavities, Kerr nonlinearity strength, and optical detuning, on the second-order sideband generation. Subsequently we investigate the higher-order sideband output spectrum by numerical simulations, where the sideband amplitude also is largely enhanced in the PT -symmetric arrangement, compared with the passive-passive double-cavity system. Our obtained results provide a new avenue for acquiring optical high-order sidebands and operating light, which may inspire further applications in chip-scale optical communications and optical frequency combs.

  7. A genetic dissection of breed composition and performance enhancement in the Alaskan sled dog

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Alaskan sled dog offers a rare opportunity to investigate the development of a dog breed based solely on performance, rather than appearance, thus setting the breed apart from most others. Several established breeds, many of which are recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC), have been introduced into the sled dog population to enhance racing performance. We have used molecular methods to ascertain the constitutive breeds used to develop successful sled dog lines, and in doing so, determined the breed origins of specific performance-related behaviors. One hundred and ninety-nine Alaskan sled dogs were genotyped using 96 microsatellite markers that span the canine genome. These data were compared to that from 141 similarly genotyped purebred dog breeds. Sled dogs were evaluated for breed composition based on a variety of performance phenotypes including speed, endurance and work ethic, and the data stratified based on population structure. Results We observe that the Alaskan sled dog has a unique molecular signature and that the genetic profile is sufficient for identifying dogs bred for sprint versus distance. When evaluating contributions of existing breeds we find that the Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky contributions are associated with enhanced endurance; Pointer and Saluki are associated with enhanced speed and the Anatolian Shepherd demonstrates a positive influence on work ethic. Conclusion We have established a genetic breed profile for the Alaskan sled dog, identified profile variance between sprint and distance dogs, and established breeds associated with enhanced performance attributes. These data set the stage for mapping studies aimed at finding genes that are associated with athletic attributes integral to the high performing Alaskan sled dog. PMID:20649949

  8. Genetic modification of plant cell walls to enhance biomass yield and biofuel production in bioenergy crops.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanting; Fan, Chunfen; Hu, Huizhen; Li, Ying; Sun, Dan; Wang, Youmei; Peng, Liangcai

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls represent an enormous biomass resource for the generation of biofuels and chemicals. As lignocellulose property principally determines biomass recalcitrance, the genetic modification of plant cell walls has been posed as a powerful solution. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the effects of distinct cell wall polymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, pectin, wall proteins) on the enzymatic digestibility of biomass under various physical and chemical pretreatments in herbaceous grasses, major agronomic crops and fast-growing trees. We also compare the main factors of wall polymer features, including cellulose crystallinity (CrI), hemicellulosic Xyl/Ara ratio, monolignol proportion and uronic acid level. Furthermore, the review presents the main gene candidates, such as CesA, GH9, GH10, GT61, GT43 etc., for potential genetic cell wall modification towards enhancing both biomass yield and enzymatic saccharification in genetic mutants and transgenic plants. Regarding cell wall modification, it proposes a novel groove-like cell wall model that highlights to increase amorphous regions (density and depth) of the native cellulose microfibrils, providing a general strategy for bioenergy crop breeding and biofuel processing technology. PMID:27269671

  9. Selective enhancement of autotrophic acetate production with genetically modified Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Straub, Melanie; Demler, Martin; Weuster-Botz, Dirk; Dürre, Peter

    2014-05-20

    Great interest has emerged in the recent past towards the potential of autotrophic acetogenic bacteria for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. This group of microorganisms possesses an ancient pathway for the fixation of carbon dioxide in the presence of hydrogen, making them highly attractive for the utilization of gas mixtures as a cheap and abundant carbon and energy source. As more and more genome sequence data of acetogens becomes available, the genetic tools are being developed concomitantly. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the genetic modification of the well-characterized acetogen Acetobacterium woodii. This microorganism selectively produces acetate under autotrophic conditions, but seems to be limited at high acetate concentrations. To increase the carbon flow through the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and therefore increase the efficiency of CO2 fixation, genes of enzyme groups of this pathway were selectively overexpressed (the four THF-dependent enzymes for the processing of formate as well as phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase to enhance an ATP-generation step). Acetate production with genetically modified strains was increased in a batch process under pH-controlled reaction conditions in a stirred-tank reactor with continuous sparging of H2 and CO2. Final acetate concentrations of more than 50gL(-1) acetate were thus measured with the recombinant strains at low cell concentrations of 1.5-2gL(-1) dry cell mass in less than four days under autotrophic conditions. PMID:24637370

  10. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of noradrenaline synthesis enhances the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Weinshenker, David; Ferrucci, Michela; Busceti, Carla L.; Biagioni, Francesca; Lazzeri, Gloria; Liles, L. Cameron; Lenzi, Paola; Murri, Luigi; Paparelli, Antonio; Fornai, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) lesions of the locus coeruleus (LC), the major brain noradrenergic nucleus, exacerbate the damage to nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) terminals caused by the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH). However, because noradrenergic terminals contain other neuromodulators and the noradrenaline (NA) transporter, which may act as a neuroprotective buffer, it was unclear whether this enhancement of METH neurotoxicity was caused by the loss of noradrenergic innervation or the loss of NA itself. We addressed the specific role of NA by comparing the effects of METH in mice with noradrenergic lesions (DSP-4) and those with intact noradrenergic terminals but specifically lacking NA (genetic or acute pharmacological blockade of the NA biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase; DBH). We found that genetic deletion of DBH (DBH −/− mice) and acute treatment of wild-type mice with a DBH inhibitor (fusaric acid) recapitulated the effects of DSP-4 lesions on METH responses. All three methods of NA depletion enhanced striatal DA release, extracellular oxidative stress (as measured by in vivo microdialysis of DA and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), and behavioural stereotypies following repeated METH administration. These effects accompanied a worsening of the striatal DA neuron terminal damage and ultrastructural changes to medium spiny neurons. We conclude that NA itself is neuroprotective and plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of striatal DA terminals to the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of METH. PMID:18042179

  11. Genetic enhancement, post-persons and moral status: a reply to Buchanan.

    PubMed

    DeGrazia, David

    2012-03-01

    Responding to several leading ideas from a paper by Allen Buchanan, the present essay explores the implications of genetic enhancement for moral status. Contrary to doubts expressed by Buchanan, I argue that genetic enhancement could lead to the existence of beings so superior to contemporary human beings that we might aptly describe them as post-persons. If such post-persons emerged, how should we understand their moral status in relation to ours? The answer depends in part on which of two general models of moral status--one based on respect and one based on interests--is more adequate. Buchanan tentatively argues that a respect-based model is preferable. I challenge Buchanan's view, along these lines: If we embrace a respect-based model of moral status featuring a threshold that divides persons, who are thought to have full and equal moral status, from sentient nonpersons, thought to have less moral status, then we should acknowledge a second threshold and a level of moral status higher than ours. A better option, I tentatively suggest, is to drop the idea of levels of moral status, accept that all sentient beings have moral status, and allow that some differences in interests and capacities justify some significant differences in how we should treat beings of different kinds. PMID:22074771

  12. Ethical Reflections on Genetic Enhancement with the Aim of Enlarging Altruism.

    PubMed

    DeGrazia, David

    2016-09-01

    When it comes to caring about and helping those in need, our imaginations tend to be weak and our motivation tends to be parochial. This is a major moral problem in view of how much unmet need there is in the world and how much material capacity there is to address that need. With this problem in mind, the present paper will focus on genetic means to the enhancement of a moral capacity-a disposition to altruism-and of a cognitive capacity that facilitates use of the moral capacity: the ability to grasp vividly the needs of individuals who are unknown and not present. I will address two questions, with more extensive attention to the first question. First, assuming we had excellent reason to believe that the enhancements were safe, effective, and available to all who desired them, would seeking these enhancements be inherently morally acceptable-that is, free of inherent wrongness? Second, would it be wise for a society to pursue these enhancements? I will defend an affirmative answer to the first question while leaving the second question open. PMID:26246070

  13. I'll be a monkey's uncle: a moral challenge to human genetic enhancement research.

    PubMed

    Rosoff, Philip M

    2011-10-01

    The potential for genetic engineering of enhancements to complex human traits has been the subject of vigorous debate for a number of years. Most of the discussion has centered on the possible moral consequences of pursuing enhancements, especially those that might affect complex behaviours and components of personality. Little has been written on the actual process of implementing this technology. This paper presents a 'thought experiment' about the likely form of final preclinical testing for a technology to enhance intelligence as a prototypical multiplex trait. The significance and the potential dangers of implementing enhancements in humans, especially to highly valued traits such as intelligence, would mandate a thorough programme of testing in animals, including non-human primates such as chimpanzees. The implications this would have for researchers, society and, most importantly, the animals themselves are discussed, and the paper concludes with a suggestion for a morally justifiable approach to resolve the tragic question of what to do with research animals who have a cognitive capacity that is close to that of humans. PMID:21515875

  14. A Method to Exploit the Structure of Genetic Ancestry Space to Enhance Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Bodea, Corneliu A; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Daly, Mark J; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2016-05-01

    One goal of human genetics is to understand the genetic basis of disease, a challenge for diseases of complex inheritance because risk alleles are few relative to the vast set of benign variants. Risk variants are often sought by association studies in which allele frequencies in case subjects are contrasted with those from population-based samples used as control subjects. In an ideal world we would know population-level allele frequencies, releasing researchers to focus on case subjects. We argue this ideal is possible, at least theoretically, and we outline a path to achieving it in reality. If such a resource were to exist, it would yield ample savings and would facilitate the effective use of data repositories by removing administrative and technical barriers. We call this concept the Universal Control Repository Network (UNICORN), a means to perform association analyses without necessitating direct access to individual-level control data. Our approach to UNICORN uses existing genetic resources and various statistical tools to analyze these data, including hierarchical clustering with spectral analysis of ancestry; and empirical Bayesian analysis along with Gaussian spatial processes to estimate ancestry-specific allele frequencies. We demonstrate our approach using tens of thousands of control subjects from studies of Crohn disease, showing how it controls false positives, provides power similar to that achieved when all control data are directly accessible, and enhances power when control data are limiting or even imperfectly matched ancestrally. These results highlight how UNICORN can enable reliable, powerful, and convenient genetic association analyses without access to the individual-level data. PMID:27087321

  15. Enhanced genetic analysis of single human bioparticles recovered by simplified micromanipulation from forensic 'touch DNA' evidence.

    PubMed

    Farash, Katherine; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-01-01

    DNA profiles can be obtained from 'touch DNA' evidence, which comprises microscopic traces of human biological material. Current methods for the recovery of trace DNA employ cotton swabs or adhesive tape to sample an area of interest. However, such a 'blind-swabbing' approach will co-sample cellular material from the different individuals, even if the individuals' cells are located in geographically distinct locations on the item. Thus, some of the DNA mixtures encountered in touch DNA samples are artificially created by the swabbing itself. In some instances, a victim's DNA may be found in significant excess thus masking any potential perpetrator's DNA. In order to circumvent the challenges with standard recovery and analysis methods, we have developed a lower cost, 'smart analysis' method that results in enhanced genetic analysis of touch DNA evidence. We describe an optimized and efficient micromanipulation recovery strategy for the collection of bio-particles present in touch DNA samples, as well as an enhanced amplification strategy involving a one-step 5 µl microvolume lysis/STR amplification to permit the recovery of STR profiles from the bio-particle donor(s). The use of individual or few (i.e., "clumps") bioparticles results in the ability to obtain single source profiles. These procedures represent alternative enhanced techniques for the isolation and analysis of single bioparticles from forensic touch DNA evidence. While not necessary in every forensic investigation, the method could be highly beneficial for the recovery of a single source perpetrator DNA profile in cases involving physical assault (e.g., strangulation) that may not be possible using standard analysis techniques. Additionally, the strategies developed here offer an opportunity to obtain genetic information at the single cell level from a variety of other non-forensic trace biological material. PMID:25867046

  16. Genetic analysis of pathway regulation for enhancing branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Saksa, Kristen; Zhao, Feiyi; Qiu, Joyce; Xiong, Liming

    2010-08-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) valine, leucine and isoleucine are essential amino acids that play critical roles in animal growth and development. Animals cannot synthesize these amino acids and must obtain them from their diet. Plants are the ultimate source of these essential nutrients, and they synthesize BCAAs through a conserved pathway that is inhibited by its end products. This feedback inhibition has prevented scientists from engineering plants that accumulate high levels of BCAAs by simply over-expressing the respective biosynthetic genes. To identify components critical for this feedback regulation, we performed a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants that exhibit enhanced resistance to BCAAs. Multiple dominant allelic mutations in the VALINE-TOLERANT 1 (VAT1) gene were identified that conferred plant resistance to valine inhibition. Map-based cloning revealed that VAT1 encodes a regulatory subunit of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS), the first committed enzyme in the BCAA biosynthesis pathway. The VAT1 gene is highly expressed in young, rapidly growing tissues. When reconstituted with the catalytic subunit in vitro, the vat1 mutant-containing AHAS holoenzyme exhibits increased resistance to valine. Importantly, transgenic plants expressing the mutated vat1 gene exhibit valine tolerance and accumulate higher levels of BCAAs. Our studies not only uncovered regulatory characteristics of plant AHAS, but also identified a method to enhance BCAA accumulation in crop plants that will significantly enhance the nutritional value of food and feed. PMID:20497381

  17. Dilute nitride resonant cavity enhanced photodetector with internal gain for the λ ∼ 1.3 μm optical communications window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkan, N.; Erol, A.; Sarcan, F.; Al-Ghuraibawi, L. F. F.; Nordin, M. S.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a novel dilute nitride-based resonant cavity enhanced photodetector (RCEPD) operating at 1.286 μm. The RCEPD was fabricated using 21 pairs top and 24 pairs bottom GaAs/AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflectors for mirrors and 7 nm thick nine GaAs/Ga0.65In0.35N0.02 As0.98 quantum wells as the absorption region. For a 15 μm diameter window, the photocurrent at 1.286 μm is 27 μA and 42 μA, at V = 0 and -1 V, respectively, whereas the dark current is as low as 1.7 nA at -1 V. At the operating wavelength, an excellent wavelength selectivity with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 nm, and a high quantum efficiency of 43% are demonstrated. The device exhibits significant internal gain at very small reverse bias voltages of V ⩾ -2 V with an overall quantum efficiency of 67%. These are the best ever recorded values for a dilute nitride RCEPD.

  18. A Classical Genetic Solution to Enhance the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Phytochemicals in Andrographis paniculata Nees

    PubMed Central

    Talei, Daryush; Abdul Kadir, Mihdzar; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Andrographolides, the diterpene lactones, are major bioactive phytochemicals which could be found in different parts of the medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. A number of such compounds namely andrographolide (AG), neoandrographolide (NAG), and 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (DDAG) have already attracted a great deal of attention due to their potential therapeutic effects in hard-to-treat diseases such as cancers and HIV. Recently, they have also been considered as substrates for the discovery of novel pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, there is still a huge gap in knowledge on the genetic pattern of the biosynthesis of these bioactive compounds. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the genetic mechanisms controlling the biosynthesis of these phytochemicals using a diallel analysis. The high performance liquid chromatography analysis of the three andrographolides in 210 F1 progenies confirmed that the biosynthesis of these andrographolides was considerably increased via intraspecific hybridization. The results revealed high, moderate and low heterosis for DDAG, AG and NAG, respectively. Furthermore, the preponderance of non-additive gene actions was affirmed in the enhancement of the three andrographolides contents. The consequence of this type of gene action was the occurrence of high broad-sense and low narrow-sense heritabilities for the above mentioned andrographolides. The prevalence of non-additive gene action suggests the suitability of heterosis breeding and hybrid seed production as a preferred option to produce new plant varieties with higher andrographolide contents using the wild accessions of A. paniculata. Moreover, from an evolutionary point of view, the occurrence of population bottlenecks in the Malaysian accessions of A. paniculata was unveiled by observing a low level of additive genetic variance (VA) for all the andrographolides. PMID:24586262

  19. Genetic screens for floral mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: enhancers and suppressors.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Thanh Theresa; Luscher, Elizabeth; Li, Shaofang; Liu, Xigang; Won, So Youn; Chen, Xuemei

    2014-01-01

    The flower is a hallmark feature that has contributed to the evolutionary success of land plants. Diverse mutagenic agents have been employed as a tool to genetically perturb flower development and identify genes involved in floral patterning and morphogenesis. Since the initial studies to identify genes governing processes such as floral organ specification, mutagenesis in sensitized backgrounds has been used to isolate enhancers and suppressors to further probe the molecular basis of floral development. Here, we first describe two commonly employed methods for mutagenesis (using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) or T-DNAs as mutagens), and then describe three methods for identifying a mutation that leads to phenotypic alterations--traditional map-based cloning, TAIL-PCR, and deep sequencing in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24395255

  20. Genetic Screens for Floral Mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: Enhancers and Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Thanh Theresa; Luscher, Elizabeth; Li, Shaofang; Liu, Xigang; Won, So Youn; Chen, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    The flower is a hallmark feature that has contributed to the evolutionary success of land plants. Diverse mutagenic agents have been employed as a tool to genetically perturb flower development and identify genes involved in floral patterning and morphogenesis. Since the initial studies to identify genes governing processes such as floral organ specification, mutagenesis in sensitized backgrounds has been used to isolate enhancers and suppressors to further probe the molecular basis of floral development. Here, we first describe two commonly employed methods for mutagenesis (using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) or T-DNAs as mutagens), and then describe three methods for identifying a mutation that leads to phenotypic alterations—traditional map-based cloning, TAIL-PCR, and deep sequencing in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24395255

  1. Global Wild Annual Lens Collection: A Potential Resource for Lentil Genetic Base Broadening and Yield Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mohar; Bisht, Ishwari Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Dutta, Manoranjan; Bansal, Kailash Chander; Karale, Moreshwar; Sarker, Ashutosh; Amri, Ahmad; Kumar, Shiv; Datta, Swapan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWRs) are invaluable gene sources for various traits of interest, yet these potential resources are themselves increasingly threatened by the impact of climate change as well as other anthropogenic and socio-economic factors. The prime goal of our research was to cover all aspects of wild Lens genetic resource management like species characterization, agro-morphological evaluation, diversity assessment, and development of representative sets for its enhanced utilization in lentil base broadening and yield improvement initiatives. We characterized and evaluated extensively, the global wild annual Lens taxa, originating from twenty seven counties under two agro-climatic conditions of India consecutively for three cropping seasons. Results on various qualitative and quantitative characters including two foliar diseases showed wide variations for almost all yield attributing traits including multiple disease resistance in the wild species, L. nigricans and L. ervoides accessions. The core set developed from the entire Lens taxa had maximum representation from Turkey and Syria, indicating rich diversity in accessions originating from these regions. Diversity analysis also indicated wide geographical variations across genepool as was reflected in the core set. Potential use of core set, as an initial starting material, for genetic base broadening of cultivated lentil was also suggested. PMID:25254552

  2. Global wild annual Lens collection: a potential resource for lentil genetic base broadening and yield enhancement.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohar; Bisht, Ishwari Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Dutta, Manoranjan; Bansal, Kailash Chander; Karale, Moreshwar; Sarker, Ashutosh; Amri, Ahmad; Kumar, Shiv; Datta, Swapan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWRs) are invaluable gene sources for various traits of interest, yet these potential resources are themselves increasingly threatened by the impact of climate change as well as other anthropogenic and socio-economic factors. The prime goal of our research was to cover all aspects of wild Lens genetic resource management like species characterization, agro-morphological evaluation, diversity assessment, and development of representative sets for its enhanced utilization in lentil base broadening and yield improvement initiatives. We characterized and evaluated extensively, the global wild annual Lens taxa, originating from twenty seven counties under two agro-climatic conditions of India consecutively for three cropping seasons. Results on various qualitative and quantitative characters including two foliar diseases showed wide variations for almost all yield attributing traits including multiple disease resistance in the wild species, L. nigricans and L. ervoides accessions. The core set developed from the entire Lens taxa had maximum representation from Turkey and Syria, indicating rich diversity in accessions originating from these regions. Diversity analysis also indicated wide geographical variations across genepool as was reflected in the core set. Potential use of core set, as an initial starting material, for genetic base broadening of cultivated lentil was also suggested. PMID:25254552

  3. Dehydroepiandrosterone-enhanced dual specificity protein phosphatase (DDSP) prevents diet-induced and genetic obesity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tetsuhiro; Ashida, Kenji; Goto, Kiminobu; Nawata, Hajime; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yanase, Toshihiko; Nomura, Masatoshi

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) exerts a wide variety of therapeutic effects against medical disorders, such as diabetes and obesity. However, the molecular basis of DHEA action remains to be clarified. Previously, we reported that DHEA-enhanced dual specificity protein phosphatase, designated DDSP, is one of the target molecules of DHEA. To examine the role of DDSP in DHEA signaling, we generated mice that carry a DDSP transgene in which expression is driven by the CAG promoter (DDSP-Tg). DDSP-Tg mice weighed significantly less than wild-type (WT) control mice when a high fat diet was supplied (p < 0.01). No difference in food-intake or locomotor activity was found between DDSP-Tg and WT mice. Oxygen consumption of DDSP-Tg mice was higher than that of WT mice (p < 0.01), which suggested an increase in basal metabolism in DDSP-Tg mice. To further investigate the role of DDSP in genetic obese mice, DDSP-Tg mice with a db/db background were generated (DDSP-Tg db/db). We observed cancellation of obesity by the db/db mutation and development of a cachexic phenotype in DDSP-Tg db/db mice. In conclusion, our study shows that expression of DDSP leads to prevention of diet-induced and genetic (db/db) obesity. Anti-obese effects of DHEA might be mediated through DDSP, which might be a therapeutic target for intervention of obesity. PMID:26523513

  4. The effects of genetic markers on BTA6 significant for steer feed intake and gain traits on carcass and meat traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic selection for animals that require less feed while still achieving acceptable levels of production could result in substantial cost savings for cattle producers. We have identified DNA markers on bovine chromosome 6 located between 38.16 - 38.38 Mb that were significant for both feed intake ...

  5. Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Dietary Guidelines Communicator’s Guide Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator You are here Home / Online Tools Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator Print Share Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator Pregnancy Weight Gain Intro ...

  6. Pharmacologic And Genetic Strategies To Enhance Cell Therapy For Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez; Hare, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is emerging as an exciting potential therapeutic approach for cardiac regeneration following myocardial infarction (MI). As heart failure (HF) prevalence increases over time, development of new interventions designed to aid cardiac recovery from injury are crucial and should be considered more broadly. In this regard, substantial efforts to enhance the efficacy and safety of cell therapy are continuously growing along several fronts, including modifications to improve the reprogramming efficiency of inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS), genetic engineering of adult stem cells, and administration of growth factors or small molecules to activate regenerative pathways in the injured heart. These interventions are emerging as potential therapeutic alternatives and/or adjuncts based on their potential to promote stem cell homing, proliferation, differentiation, and/or survival. Given the promise of therapeutic interventions to enhance the regenerative capacity of multipotent stem cells as well as specifically guide endogenous or exogenous stem cells into a cardiac lineage, their application in cardiac regenerative medicine should be the focus of future clinical research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Key Signaling Molecules Special Issue’. PMID:21645519

  7. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  8. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  9. Extensive genetic diversity and low linkage disequilibrium within the COMT locus in Germplasm Enhancement of Maize populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Caffeic acid 3-O-methytransferase (COMT) gene is a prime candidate for cell wall digestibility improvement based on the characterization of brown midrib-3 mutants. We compared the genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium at COMT locus between populations sampled within the Germplasm Enhance...

  10. Genetic disruption of KSHV major latent nuclear antigen LANA enhances viral lytic transcriptional program

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qiuhua; Zhou Fuchun; Ye Fengchun; Gao Shoujiang

    2008-09-30

    Following primary infection, KSHV establishes a lifelong persistent latent infection in the host. The mechanism of KSHV latency is not fully understood. The latent nuclear antigen (LANA or LNA) encoded by ORF73 is one of a few viral genes expressed during KSHV latency, and is consistently detected in all KSHV-related malignancies. LANA is essential for KSHV episome persistence, and regulates the expression of viral lytic genes through epigenetic silencing, and inhibition of the expression and transactivation function of the key KSHV lytic replication initiator RTA (ORF50). In this study, we used a genetic approach to examine the role of LANA in regulating KSHV lytic replication program. Deletion of LANA did not affect the expression of its adjacent genes vCyclin (ORF72) and vFLIP (ORF71). In contrast, the expression levels of viral lytic genes including immediate-early gene RTA, early genes MTA (ORF57), vIL-6 (ORF-K2) and ORF59, and late gene ORF-K8.1 were increased before and after viral lytic induction with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and sodium butyrate. This enhanced expression of viral lytic genes was also observed following overexpression of RTA with or without simultaneous chemical induction. Consistent with these results, the LANA mutant cells produced more infectious virions than the wild-type virus cells did. Furthermore, genetic repair of the mutant virus reverted the phenotypes to those of wild-type virus. Together, these results have demonstrated that, in the context of viral genome, LANA contributes to KSHV latency by regulating the expression of RTA and its downstream genes.

  11. Light-extraction enhancement for light-emitting diodes: a firefly-inspired structure refined by the genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay, Annick; Mayer, Alexandre

    2014-09-01

    The efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LED) has increased significantly over the past few years, but the overall efficiency is still limited by total internal reflections due to the high dielectric-constant contrast between the incident and emergent media. The bioluminescent organ of fireflies gave incentive for light-extraction enhance-ment studies. A specific factory-roof shaped structure was shown, by means of light-propagation simulations and measurements, to enhance light extraction significantly. In order to achieve a similar effect for light-emitting diodes, the structure needs to be adapted to the specific set-up of LEDs. In this context simulations were carried out to determine the best geometrical parameters. In the present work, the search for a geometry that maximizes the extraction of light has been conducted by using a genetic algorithm. The idealized structure considered previously was generalized to a broader variety of shapes. The genetic algorithm makes it possible to search simultaneously over a wider range of parameters. It is also significantly less time-consuming than the previous approach that was based on a systematic scan on parameters. The results of the genetic algorithm show that (1) the calculations can be performed in a smaller amount of time and (2) the light extraction can be enhanced even more significantly by using optimal parameters determined by the genetic algorithm for the generalized structure. The combination of the genetic algorithm with the Rigorous Coupled Waves Analysis method constitutes a strong simulation tool, which provides us with adapted designs for enhancing light extraction from light-emitting diodes.

  12. Yield gains in leafy vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yield of all crops have increased during the past century through improved cultural practices and plant breeding. We reviewed gains in yield of lettuce and spinach in the U.S., principally California and Arizona. We proposed several genetic models for yield of lettuce based on the market type: whole...

  13. Genetic deletion of MT₁/MT₂ melatonin receptors enhances murine cognitive and motor performance.

    PubMed

    O'Neal-Moffitt, G; Pilli, J; Kumar, S S; Olcese, J

    2014-09-26

    Melatonin, an indoleamine hormone secreted into circulation at night primarily by the brain's pineal gland, has been shown to have a wide variety of actions on the development and physiology of neurons in the CNS. Acting via two G-protein-coupled membrane receptors (MT1 and MT2), melatonin modulates neurogenesis, synaptic functions, neuronal cytoskeleton and gene expression. In the present studies, we sought to characterize the behavior and neuronal biology of transgenic mice lacking both of these melatonin receptors as a way to understand the hormone's receptor versus non-receptor-mediated actions in CNS-dependent activities, such as learning and memory, anxiety, general motor performance and circadian rhythmicity. Assessment of these behaviors was complemented by molecular analyses of gene expression in the brain. Our results demonstrate mild behavioral hyperactivity and a lengthened circadian period of free-running motor activity in melatonin receptor-deficient mice as compared to receptor-intact control mice beginning at an early age. Significant improvement in cognitive performance was found using the Barnes Maze and the Y-Maze. No behavioral changes in anxiety levels were found. Electrophysiological measures in hippocampal slices revealed a clear enhancement of long-term potentiation in mice lacking melatonin receptors with no significant differences in paired-pulse facilitation. Quantitative analysis of brain protein expression levels of phosphoCREB and phosphoERK1/2 and key markers of synaptic activity (synapsin, glutamate receptor 1, spinophilin, and glutamic acid decarboxylase 1) revealed significant differences between the double-knockout and wild-type animals, consistent with the behavioral findings. Thus, genetic deletion of melatonin receptors produces mice with enhanced cognitive and motor performance, supporting the view that these receptors play an important role in neurobehavioral development. PMID:25046530

  14. Genetic engineering approaches for enhanced production of biodiesel fuel from microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G.

    1993-12-31

    Efforts are currently underway in several laboratories to develop renewable fuels from biological sources. This group has been involved in research concerning the production of lipid-derived {open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes} fuel from microscopic algae. Lipid accumulation in algae typically occurs during periods of environmental stress, including growth under nutrient-deficient conditions. Biochemical studies have suggested that acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-containing enzyme that catalyzes an early step in fatty acid biosynthesis, may be involved in the control of this lipid accumulation process. Therefore, it may be possible to enhance lipid production rates by increasing the activity of this enzyme via genetic engineering. As a first step toward this objective, the authors have cloned the gene that encodes ACC from the eukaryotic alga Cyclotella cryptica, representing the first time that this gene has been isolated from a photosynthetic organism. The amino acid sequence of ACC deducted from this gene exhibits a high degree of similarity to the sequences of animal and yeast ACCs in the biotin carboxylase and carboxyltransferase domains, but less similarity exists in the bioin carboxyl carrier protein domain. Comparison of the genomic nucleotide sequence to the sequences of cDNA clones has revealed the presence of two introns in the gene. The authors are currently constructing expression vectors containing this gene and developing algal transformation protocols to enable over expression of ACC in C. cryptica and all other algal species.

  15. Tuning to the significant: neural and genetic processes underlying affective enhancement of visual perception and memory.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Jelena; Anderson, Adam K; Todd, Rebecca M

    2014-02-01

    Emotionally arousing events reach awareness more easily and evoke greater visual cortex activation than more mundane events. Recent studies have shown that they are also perceived more vividly and that emotionally enhanced perceptual vividness predicts memory vividness. We propose that affect-biased attention (ABA) - selective attention to emotionally salient events - is an endogenous attentional system tuned by an individual's history of reward and punishment. We present the Biased Attention via Norepinephrine (BANE) model, which unifies genetic, neuromodulatory, neural and behavioural evidence to account for ABA. We review evidence supporting BANE's proposal that a key mechanism of ABA is locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) activity, which interacts with activity in hubs of affective salience networks to modulate visual cortex activation and heighten the subjective vividness of emotionally salient stimuli. We further review literature on biased competition and look at initial evidence for its potential as a neural mechanism behind ABA. We also review evidence supporting the role of the LC-NE system as a driving force of ABA. Finally, we review individual differences in ABA and memory including differences in sensitivity to stimulus category and valence. We focus on differences arising from a variant of the ADRA2b gene, which codes for the alpha2b adrenoreceptor as a way of investigating influences of NE availability on ABA in humans. PMID:24269973

  16. Characterization and noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer with serum surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoxin; Li, Linfang; Zeng, Qiuyao; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Jin, Mei; Su, Chengkang; Lin, Lin; Xu, Junfa; Liu, Songhao

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to characterize and classify serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra between bladder cancer patients and normal volunteers by genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with linear discriminate analysis (LDA). Two group serum SERS spectra excited with nanoparticles are collected from healthy volunteers (n = 36) and bladder cancer patients (n = 55). Six diagnostic Raman bands in the regions of 481-486, 682-687, 1018-1034, 1313-1323, 1450-1459 and 1582-1587 cm-1 related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids are picked out with the GAs and LDA. By the diagnostic models built with the identified six Raman bands, the improved diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% were acquired for classifying bladder cancer patients from normal serum SERS spectra. The results are superior to the sensitivity of 74.6% and specificity of 97.2% obtained with principal component analysis by the same serum SERS spectra dataset. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed the efficiency of diagnostic algorithm based on GA-LDA technique. This exploratory work demonstrates that the serum SERS associated with GA-LDA technique has enormous potential to characterize and non-invasively detect bladder cancer through peripheral blood.

  17. Toward responsible stock enhancement: broadcast spawning dynamics and adaptive genetic management in white seabass aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Gruenthal, Kristen M; Drawbridge, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary effects captive-bred individuals that can have on wild conspecifics are necessary considerations for stock enhancement programs, but breeding protocols are often developed without the knowledge of realized reproductive behavior. To help fill that gap, parentage was assigned to offspring produced by a freely mating group of 50 white seabass (Atractoscion nobilis), a representative broadcast spawning marine finfish cultured for conservation. Similar to the well-known and closely related red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), A. nobilis exhibited large variation in reproductive success. More males contributed and contributed more equally than females within and among spawns in a mating system best described as lottery polygyny. Two females produced 27% of the seasonal offspring pool and female breeding effective size averaged 1.85 per spawn and 12.38 seasonally, whereas male breeding effective size was higher (6.42 and 20.87, respectively), with every male contributing 1–7% of offspring. Further, females batch spawned every 1–5 weeks, while males displayed continuous reproductive readiness. Sex-specific mating strategies resulted in multiple successful mate pairings and a breeding effective to census size ratio of ≥0.62. Understanding a depleted species’ mating system allowed management to more effectively utilize parental genetic variability for culture, but the fitness consequences of long-term stocking can be difficult to address. PMID:25568060

  18. Human genetic enhancement: is it really a matter of perfection? A dialog with Hanson, Keenan, and Shuman.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Paulina

    1999-08-01

    The author reviews the arguments made by Mark Hanson, James Keenan, S.J., and Joel Shuman in this issue. In the first section, she argues that they offer a significant contribution toward an understanding of the inner logic of a new trend in contemporary medicine, genetic engineering. However, she criticizes the authors for relying excessively on procedural guidelines and for failing to bring the practical realities of medicine and technology to bear on theory. She argues that more concrete guidelines, which are ultimately grounded in a Christian conception of the person and on the commandment to love, are necessary. Writing from the Roman Catholic perspective, the author argues that the distinction between genetic enhancement and gene therapy is essential, despite the criticisms which have been offered of this distinction. Understanding this distinction will be critical for identifying as licit only those forms of genetic manipulation which respect the dignity of the human person. PMID:11658192

  19. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Louis, Ard A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps—a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure—to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  20. Genetically Determined Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Mice Causally Involves Accelerated and Enhanced Recruitment of Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christine; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Lang, Roland; Brandau, Sven; Hermann, Corinna; Ehlers, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classical twin studies and recent linkage analyses of African populations have revealed a potential involvement of host genetic factors in susceptibility or resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to identify the candidate genes involved and test their causal implication, we capitalized on the mouse model of tuberculosis, since inbred mouse strains also differ substantially in their susceptibility to infection. Two susceptible and two resistant mouse strains were aerogenically infected with 1,000 CFU of M. tuberculosis, and the regulation of gene expression was examined by Affymetrix GeneChip U74A array with total lung RNA 2 and 4 weeks postinfection. Four weeks after infection, 96 genes, many of which are involved in inflammatory cell recruitment and activation, were regulated in common. One hundred seven genes were differentially regulated in susceptible mouse strains, whereas 43 genes were differentially expressed only in resistant mice. Data mining revealed a bias towards the expression of genes involved in granulocyte pathophysiology in susceptible mice, such as an upregulation of those for the neutrophil chemoattractant LIX (CXCL5), interleukin 17 receptor, phosphoinositide kinase 3 delta, or gamma interferon-inducible protein 10. Following M. tuberculosis challenge in both airways or peritoneum, granulocytes were recruited significantly faster and at higher numbers in susceptible than in resistant mice. When granulocytes were efficiently depleted by either of two regimens at the onset of infection, only susceptible mice survived aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis significantly longer than control mice. We conclude that initially enhanced recruitment of granulocytes contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:16790804

  1. Genetically engineered immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus strains producing antioxidant enzymes exhibit enhanced anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; LeBlanc, Jean Guy

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  2. Genetically Engineered Immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Producing Antioxidant Enzymes Exhibit Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  3. Genetic Enhancement of Limb Defects in a Mouse Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; CALOF, ANNE L.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by a wide variety of structural and functional abnormalities in almost every organ system of the body. CdLS is now known to be caused by mutations that disrupt the function of the cohesin complex or its regulators, and studies of animal models and cell lines tell us that the effect of these mutations is to produce subtle yet pervasive dysregulation of gene expression. With many hundreds of mostly small gene expression changes occurring in every cell type and tissue, identifying the etiology of any particular birth defect is very challenging. Here we focus on limb abnormalities, which are commonly seen in CdLS. In the limb buds of the Nipbl-haploinsufficient mouse (Nipbl+/− mouse), a model for the most common form of CdLS, modest gene expression changes are observed in several candidate pathways whose disruption is known to cause limb abnormalities, yet the limbs of Nipbl+/− mice develop relatively normally. We hypothesized that further impairment of candidate pathways might produce limb defects similar to those seen in CdLS, and performed genetic experiments to test this. Focusing on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp), and Hox gene pathways, we show that decreasing Bmp or Hox function (but not Shh function) enhances polydactyly in Nipbl+/− mice, and in some cases produces novel skeletal phenotypes. However, frank limb reductions, as are seen in a subset of individuals with CdLS, do not occur, suggesting that additional signaling and/or gene regulatory pathways are involved in producing such dramatic changes. PMID:27120109

  4. Genetic enhancement of limb defects in a mouse model of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Burks, Martha E; Santos, Rosaysela; Kawauchi, Shimako; Calof, Anne L; Lander, Arthur D

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by a wide variety of structural and functional abnormalities in almost every organ system of the body. CdLS is now known to be caused by mutations that disrupt the function of the cohesin complex or its regulators, and studies of animal models and cell lines tell us that the effect of these mutations is to produce subtle yet pervasive dysregulation of gene expression. With many hundreds of mostly small gene expression changes occurring in every cell type and tissue, identifying the etiology of any particular birth defect is very challenging. Here we focus on limb abnormalities, which are commonly seen in CdLS. In the limb buds of the Nipbl-haploinsufficient mouse (Nipbl(+/-) mouse), a model for the most common form of CdLS, modest gene expression changes are observed in several candidate pathways whose disruption is known to cause limb abnormalities, yet the limbs of Nipbl(+/-) mice develop relatively normally. We hypothesized that further impairment of candidate pathways might produce limb defects similar to those seen in CdLS, and performed genetic experiments to test this. Focusing on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp), and Hox gene pathways, we show that decreasing Bmp or Hox function (but not Shh function) enhances polydactyly in Nipbl(+/-) mice, and in some cases produces novel skeletal phenotypes. However, frank limb reductions, as are seen in a subset of individuals with CdLS, do not occur, suggesting that additional signaling and/or gene regulatory pathways are involved in producing such dramatic changes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27120109

  5. Enhanced biofilm formation and multi‐host transmission evolve from divergent genetic backgrounds in C ampylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Murray, Susan; Yahara, Koji; Mageiros, Leonardos; Bowen, Ryan; Jones, Nathan H.; Jeeves, Rose E.; Lappin‐Scott, Hilary M.; Asakura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multicellular biofilms are an ancient bacterial adaptation that offers a protective environment for survival in hostile habitats. In microaerophilic organisms such as C ampylobacter, biofilms play a key role in transmission to humans as the bacteria are exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations when leaving the reservoir host gut. Genetic determinants of biofilm formation differ between species, but little is known about how strains of the same species achieve the biofilm phenotype with different genetic backgrounds. Our approach combines genome‐wide association studies with traditional microbiology techniques to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation in 102 C ampylobacter jejuni isolates. We quantified biofilm formation among the isolates and identified hotspots of genetic variation in homologous sequences that correspond to variation in biofilm phenotypes. Thirteen genes demonstrated a statistically robust association including those involved in adhesion, motility, glycosylation, capsule production and oxidative stress. The genes associated with biofilm formation were different in the host generalist ST‐21 and ST‐45 clonal complexes, which are frequently isolated from multiple host species and clinical samples. This suggests the evolution of enhanced biofilm from different genetic backgrounds and a possible role in colonization of multiple hosts and transmission to humans. PMID:26373338

  6. Genetic Transformation of Artemisia carvifolia Buch with rol Genes Enhances Artemisinin Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Dilshad, Erum; Cusido, Rosa Maria; Estrada, Karla Ramirez; Bonfill, Mercedes; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    The potent antimalarial drug artemisinin has a high cost, since its only viable source to date is Artemisia annua (0.01–0.8% DW). There is therefore an urgent need to design new strategies to increase its production or to find alternative sources. In the current study, Artemisia carvifolia Buch was selected with the aim of detecting artemisinin and then enhancing the production of the target compound and its derivatives. These metabolites were determined by LC-MS in the shoots of A. carvifolia wild type plants at the following concentrations: artemisinin (8μg/g), artesunate (2.24μg/g), dihydroartemisinin (13.6μg/g) and artemether (12.8μg/g). Genetic transformation of A. carvifolia was carried out with Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 harboring the rol B and rol C genes. Artemisinin content increased 3-7-fold in transgenics bearing the rol B gene, and 2.3-6-fold in those with the rol C gene. A similar pattern was observed for artemisinin analogues. The dynamics of artemisinin content in transgenics and wild type A.carvifolia was also correlated with the expression of genes involved in its biosynthesis. Real time qPCR analysis revealed the differential expression of genes involved in artemisinin biosynthesis, i.e. those encoding amorpha-4, 11 diene synthase (ADS), cytochrome P450 (CYP71AV1), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), with a relatively higher transcript level found in transgenics than in the wild type plant. Also, the gene related to trichome development and sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis (TFAR1) showed an altered expression in the transgenics compared to wild type A.carvifolia, which was in accordance with the trichome density of the respective plants. The trichome index was significantly higher in the rol B and rol C gene-expressing transgenics with an increased production of artemisinin, thereby demonstrating that the rol genes are effective inducers of plant secondary metabolism. PMID:26444558

  7. Genetic Transformation of Artemisia carvifolia Buch with rol Genes Enhances Artemisinin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Dilshad, Erum; Cusido, Rosa Maria; Ramirez Estrada, Karla; Bonfill, Mercedes; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    The potent antimalarial drug artemisinin has a high cost, since its only viable source to date is Artemisia annua (0.01-0.8% DW). There is therefore an urgent need to design new strategies to increase its production or to find alternative sources. In the current study, Artemisia carvifolia Buch was selected with the aim of detecting artemisinin and then enhancing the production of the target compound and its derivatives. These metabolites were determined by LC-MS in the shoots of A. carvifolia wild type plants at the following concentrations: artemisinin (8μg/g), artesunate (2.24μg/g), dihydroartemisinin (13.6μg/g) and artemether (12.8μg/g). Genetic transformation of A. carvifolia was carried out with Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 harboring the rol B and rol C genes. Artemisinin content increased 3-7-fold in transgenics bearing the rol B gene, and 2.3-6-fold in those with the rol C gene. A similar pattern was observed for artemisinin analogues. The dynamics of artemisinin content in transgenics and wild type A.carvifolia was also correlated with the expression of genes involved in its biosynthesis. Real time qPCR analysis revealed the differential expression of genes involved in artemisinin biosynthesis, i.e. those encoding amorpha-4, 11 diene synthase (ADS), cytochrome P450 (CYP71AV1), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), with a relatively higher transcript level found in transgenics than in the wild type plant. Also, the gene related to trichome development and sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis (TFAR1) showed an altered expression in the transgenics compared to wild type A.carvifolia, which was in accordance with the trichome density of the respective plants. The trichome index was significantly higher in the rol B and rol C gene-expressing transgenics with an increased production of artemisinin, thereby demonstrating that the rol genes are effective inducers of plant secondary metabolism. PMID:26444558

  8. Incorporation of genetic technologies associated with applied reproductive technologies to enhance world food production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal breeding and reproductive physiology have been closely related throughout the history of animal production science. Artificial insemination provides the best method of increasing the influence of sires with superior genetics to improve production traits. Multiple ovulation embryo transfer (MO...

  9. Genetic analysis of stress responses in soil bacteria for enhanced bioremediation of mixed contaminants. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.K.

    1998-06-01

    'To realize the full potential of bioremediation, the individual bacterial responses to the stresses (lack of nutrients or oxygen; mixed pollutants) encountered at contaminated sites must be understood. This information can then be extrapolated to field applications using indigenous bacteria or genetically engineered micro-organisms. Studying bacterial response to stresses presents an opportunity for improving bioremediation strategies, both with indigenous populations and genetically engineered microbes, and should contribute to environmental management and restoration goals. Enhancing in-situ removal of hazardous wastes by stimulating the growth of indigenous bacteria with nutrients has been demonstrated. But how much and how often to apply these supplements has been difficult to determine, and controlled and reproducible degradation of pollutants in the environment has not yet been achieved. As of May 31st 1998, this report summarizes work after 17 months of a 36 month project.'

  10. Impact of demographic, genetic, and bioimpedance factors on gestational weight gain and birth weight in a Romanian population: A cross-sectional study in mothers and their newborns: the Monebo study (STROBE-compliant article).

    PubMed

    Mărginean, Claudiu; Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Bănescu, Claudia; Meliţ, Lorena; Tripon, Florin; Iancu, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    The present study had 2 objectives, first, to investigate possible relationships between increased gestational weight gain and demographic, clinical, paraclinical, genetic, and bioimpedance (BIA) characteristics of Romanian mothers, and second, to identify the influence of predictors (maternal and newborns characteristics) on our outcome birth weight (BW).We performed a cross-sectional study on 309 mothers and 309 newborns from Romania, divided into 2 groups: Group I-141 mothers with high gestational weight gain (GWG) and Group II-168 mothers with normal GWG, that is, control group.The groups were evaluated regarding demographic, anthropometric (body mass index [BMI], middle upper arm circumference, tricipital skinfold thickness, weight, height [H]), clinical, paraclinical, genetic (interleukin 6 [IL-6]: IL-6 -174G>C and IL-6 -572C>G gene polymorphisms), and BIA parameters.We noticed that fat mass (FM), muscle mass (MM), bone mass (BM), total body water (TBW), basal metabolism rate (BMR) and metabolic age (P < 0.001), anthropometric parameters (middle upper arm circumference, tricipital skinfold thickness; P < 0.001/P = 0.001) and hypertension (odds ratio = 4.65, 95% confidence interval: 1.27-17.03) were higher in mothers with high GWG. BW was positively correlated with mothers' FM (P < 0.001), TBW (P = 0.001), BMR (P = 0.02), while smoking was negatively correlated with BW (P = 0.04). Variant genotype (GG+GC) of the IL-6 -572C>G polymorphism was higher in the control group (P = 0.042).We observed that high GWG may be an important predictor factor for the afterward BW, being positively correlated with FM, TBW, BMR, metabolic age of the mothers, and negatively with the mother's smoking status. Variant genotype (GG+GC) of the IL-6 -572C>G gene polymorphism is a protector factor against obesity in mothers. All the variables considered explained 14.50% of the outcome variance. PMID:27399105

  11. Characterization of Greater Middle Eastern genetic variation for enhanced disease gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Scott, Eric M; Halees, Anason; Itan, Yuval; Spencer, Emily G; He, Yupeng; Azab, Mostafa Abdellateef; Gabriel, Stacey B; Belkadi, Aziz; Boisson, Bertrand; Abel, Laurent; Clark, Andrew G; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    The Greater Middle East (GME) has been a central hub of human migration and population admixture. The tradition of consanguinity, variably practiced in the Persian Gulf region, North Africa, and Central Asia, has resulted in an elevated burden of recessive disease. Here we generated a whole-exome GME variome from 1,111 unrelated subjects. We detected substantial diversity and admixture in continental and subregional populations, corresponding to several ancient founder populations with little evidence of bottlenecks. Measured consanguinity rates were an order of magnitude above those in other sampled populations, and the GME population exhibited an increased burden of runs of homozygosity (ROHs) but showed no evidence for reduced burden of deleterious variation due to classically theorized 'genetic purging'. Applying this database to unsolved recessive conditions in the GME population reduced the number of potential disease-causing variants by four- to sevenfold. These results show variegated genetic architecture in GME populations and support future human genetic discoveries in Mendelian and population genetics. PMID:27428751

  12. Genetic diversity and selection of genotypes to enhance Zn and Fe content in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important source of dietary protein and minerals worldwide. Genes conditioning variability for mineral contents are not clearly understood. Our ultimate goal is to identify genes conditioning genetic variation for Zn and Fe content. To establish mapping popu...

  13. Application of marker selection to enhance estimation of genetic effects and gene interaction in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection on important genetic markers can improve estimates of additive and dominance association effects. A composite population of beef cattle was selected for intermediate frequencies of myostatin (GDF8) F94L and µ-calpain (CAPN1) polymorphisms. Important additive associations of the GDF8 locu...

  14. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF STRESS RESPONSES IN SOIL BACTERIA FOR ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION OF MIXED CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation is, in some cases, a cost-effective approach to site clean-up. However, to realize the full potential of this biological process, fundamental information is needed about genetic responses of bacteria to environmental factors in the contaminated subsurface. Identifi...

  15. Advancing Educational Theory by Enhancing Practice in a Technology-Supported Genetics Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Daniel T.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.; Horwitz, Paul; Christie, Mary Ann

    1999-01-01

    Highlights key points from national reports addressing contemporary perspectives on learning theory, K-12 educational technology, educational theory development, and educational research policy, using illustrations from GenScope, an open-ended exploratory software tool that lets students investigate various phenomena in genetics. Illustrations…

  16. Genetic Enhancement of Polyploid Crops Using Tools of Classical Cytogenetics and Modern Biotechnology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional plant breeding has been mainly instrumental in the genetic improvement of crop plants. Sustained improvement of crop species has been achieved through hybridization with landraces and allied species resulting in high-yielding, superior cultivars of staple food crops. Although plant bre...

  17. Welfare Gains from Financial Liberalization

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Robert M.; Ueda, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    Financial liberalization has been a controversial issue, as empirical evidence for growth enhancing effects is mixed. Here, we find sizable welfare gains from liberalization (cost to repression), though the gain in economic growth is ambiguous. We take the view that financial liberalization is a government policy that alters the path of financial deepening, while financial deepening is endogenously chosen by agents given a policy and occurs in transition towards a distant steady state. This history-dependent view necessitates the use of simulation analysis based on a growth model. Our application is a specific episode: Thailand from 1976 to 1996. PMID:20806055

  18. Expression of recombinant human α-lactalbumin in milk of transgenic cloned pigs is sufficient to enhance intestinal growth and weight gain of suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Li, Qiuyan; Li, Yan; Wen, Xiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zaihu; Zhang, Jiuming; Yu, Zhengquan; Li, Ning

    2016-06-10

    Human α-lactalbumin (HLA) has very high nutritional value and important physiological functions during the neonatal period. The peptides derived from HLA provide diverse health benefits including antimicrobial, antiviral, immune-modulating, and antihypertensive effects. Thus, it is worth investigating the effects on offspring development of increasing HLA in milk. In this study, we found that recombinant human α-lactalbumin (rHLA) exhibits efficient inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion system. Using a BAC clone containing the complete HLA gene as a candidate vector, we generated two lines of transgenic cloned sows via somatic cell nuclear transfer that over-expressed rHLA. The average concentrations of rHLA in milk from the two lines of transgenic cloned sows were 2.24 ± 0.71 mg/ml and 2.67 ± 1.29 mg/ml. The feeding experiments revealed that rHLA represses dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in vivo. Furthermore, the piglets reared by rHLA transgenic cloned sows exhibit better performance in gain of body weight and intestine growth than the control piglets reared by non-transgenic sows. Therefore, these findings indicate that rHLA could serve as a natural precursor for a DPP-IV inhibitor, and the transgenic technology that produced the over-expression of rHLA could be a useful method for pig breeders to improve lactation performance. PMID:26899869

  19. High-gain 1.3  μm GaInNAs semiconductor optical amplifier with enhanced temperature stability for all-optical signal processing at 10  Gb/s.

    PubMed

    Fitsios, D; Giannoulis, G; Korpijärvi, V-M; Viheriälä, J; Laakso, A; Iliadis, N; Dris, S; Spyropoulou, M; Avramopoulos, H; Kanellos, G T; Pleros, N; Guina, M

    2015-01-01

    We report on the complete experimental evaluation of a GaInNAs/GaAs (dilute nitride) semiconductor optical amplifier that operates at 1.3 μm and exhibits 28 dB gain and a gain recovery time of 100 ps. Successful wavelength conversion operation is demonstrated using pseudorandom bit sequence 27-1 non-return-to-zero bit streams at 5 and 10  Gb/s, yielding error-free performance and showing feasibility for implementation in various signal processing functionalities. The operational credentials of the device are analyzed in various operational regimes, while its nonlinear performance is examined in terms of four-wave mixing. Moreover, characterization results reveal enhanced temperature stability with almost no gain variation around the 1320 nm region for a temperature range from 20°C to 50°C. The operational characteristics of the device, along with the cost and energy benefits of dilute nitride technology, make it very attractive for application in optical access networks and dense photonic integrated circuits. PMID:25967005

  20. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  1. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  2. Expression of rabbit IL-4 by recombinant myxoma viruses enhances virulence and overcomes genetic resistance to myxomatosis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, P J; Perkins, H D; Inglis, B; Stagg, R; McLaughlin, E; Collins, S V; Van Leeuwen, B H

    2004-06-20

    Rabbit IL-4 was expressed in the virulent standard laboratory strain (SLS) and the attenuated Uriarra (Ur) strain of myxoma virus with the aim of creating a Th2 cytokine environment and inhibiting the development of an antiviral cell-mediated response to myxomatosis in infected rabbits. This allowed testing of a model for genetic resistance to myxomatosis in wild rabbits that have undergone 50 years of natural selection for resistance to myxomatosis. Expression of IL-4 significantly enhanced virulence of both virulent and attenuated virus strains in susceptible (laboratory) and resistant (wild) rabbits. SLS-IL-4 completely overcame genetic resistance in wild rabbits. The pathogenesis of SLS-IL-4 was compared in susceptible and resistant rabbits. The results support a model for resistance to myxomatosis of an enhanced innate immune response controlling virus replication and allowing an effective antiviral cell-mediated immune response to develop in resistant rabbits. Expression of IL-4 did not overcome immunity to myxomatosis induced by immunization. PMID:15183059

  3. Improved adherence with PTH(1–84) in an extension trial for 24 months results in enhanced BMD gains in the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Bilezikian, J. P.; Greenspan, S. L.; Wüster, C.; Muñoz-Torres, M.; Bone, H. G.; Rosen, C. J.; Andersen, H. S.; Hanley, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of PTH(1–84) treatment over 24 months followed by 12 months discontinuation on BMD, bone turnover markers, fractures and the impact of adherence on efficacy. Introduction There is limited information about the effect of PTH(1-84) after 18 months and limited data about the impact of compliance on response to anabolic therapy. Methods Seven hundred and eighty-one subjects who received active PTH(1–84) in the Treatment of Osteoporosis with Parathyroid hormone trial for approximately 18 months were entered into a 6-month open-label extension. Thereafter, they were followed for 12 additional months after discontinuation of treatment. Endpoints examined included changes in BMD and biochemical markers. Results PTH(1–84) treatment over 24 months increased BMD at the lumbar spine by 6.8 % above baseline (p < 0.05). The total corresponding BMD increases at the hip and femoral neck were 1.1 and 2.2% above baseline. Larger increases in spine BMD were observed in participants with ≥80 % adherence to daily injections of PTH(1–84) (8.3% in adherent vs 4.9 % in poorly adherent patients). Total hip BMD gains were 1.7 % in adherent vs 0.6 % in poorly adherent participants. Markers of bone turnover (BSAP and NTx) peaked 6 months after starting PTH(1–84) treatment and declined slowly but remained above baseline at 24 months. After discontinuation of PTH(1–84) treatment (at 24 months), bone turnover markers returned to near baseline levels by 30 months. The adherent group sustained significantly fewer fractures than the poorly adherent group. Conclusions PTH(1–84) treatment over 24 months results in continued increases in lumbar spine BMD. Adherence to treatment with PTH(1–84) for up to 24 months is also associated with greater efficacy. PMID:22930240

  4. Central Gain Control in Tinnitus and Hyperacusis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Benjamin D.; Rodrigues, Paulo V.; Salvi, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss induced by noise or ototoxic drug exposure reduces the neural activity transmitted from the cochlea to the central auditory system. Despite a reduced cochlear output, neural activity from more central auditory structures is paradoxically enhanced at suprathreshold intensities. This compensatory increase in the central auditory activity in response to the loss of sensory input is referred to as central gain enhancement. Enhanced central gain is hypothesized to be a potential mechanism that gives rise to hyperacusis and tinnitus, two debilitating auditory perceptual disorders that afflict millions of individuals. This review will examine the evidence for gain enhancement in the central auditory system in response to cochlear damage. Further, it will address the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this enhancement and discuss the contribution of central gain enhancement to tinnitus and hyperacusis. Current evidence suggests that multiple mechanisms with distinct temporal and spectral profiles are likely to contribute to central gain enhancement. Dissecting the contributions of these different mechanisms at different levels of the central auditory system is essential for elucidating the role of central gain enhancement in tinnitus and hyperacusis and, most importantly, the development of novel treatments for these disorders. PMID:25386157

  5. Genetic manipulation of iron biomineralization enhances MR relaxivity in a ferritin-M6A chimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Radoul, Marina; Lewin, Limor; Cohen, Batya; Oren, Roni; Popov, Stanislav; Davidov, Geula; Vandsburger, Moriel H.; Harmelin, Alon; Bitton, Ronit; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Neeman, Michal; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin has gained significant attention as a potential reporter gene for in vivo imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, due to the ferritin ferrihydrite core, the relaxivity and sensitivity for detection of native ferritin is relatively low. We report here on a novel chimeric magneto-ferritin reporter gene – ferritin-M6A – in which the magnetite binding peptide from the magnetotactic bacteria magnetosome-associated Mms6 protein was fused to the C-terminal of murine h-ferritin. Biophysical experiments showed that purified ferritin-M6A assembled into a stable protein cage with the M6A protruding into the cage core, enabling magnetite biomineralisation. Ferritin-M6A-expressing C6-glioma cells showed enhanced (per iron) r2 relaxivity. MRI in vivo studies of ferritin-M6A-expressing tumour xenografts showed enhanced R2 relaxation rate in the central hypoxic region of the tumours. Such enhanced relaxivity would increase the sensitivity of ferritin as a reporter gene for non-invasive in vivo MRI-monitoring of cell delivery and differentiation in cellular or gene-based therapies. PMID:27211820

  6. Genetic manipulation of iron biomineralization enhances MR relaxivity in a ferritin-M6A chimeric complex.

    PubMed

    Radoul, Marina; Lewin, Limor; Cohen, Batya; Oren, Roni; Popov, Stanislav; Davidov, Geula; Vandsburger, Moriel H; Harmelin, Alon; Bitton, Ronit; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Neeman, Michal; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin has gained significant attention as a potential reporter gene for in vivo imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, due to the ferritin ferrihydrite core, the relaxivity and sensitivity for detection of native ferritin is relatively low. We report here on a novel chimeric magneto-ferritin reporter gene - ferritin-M6A - in which the magnetite binding peptide from the magnetotactic bacteria magnetosome-associated Mms6 protein was fused to the C-terminal of murine h-ferritin. Biophysical experiments showed that purified ferritin-M6A assembled into a stable protein cage with the M6A protruding into the cage core, enabling magnetite biomineralisation. Ferritin-M6A-expressing C6-glioma cells showed enhanced (per iron) r2 relaxivity. MRI in vivo studies of ferritin-M6A-expressing tumour xenografts showed enhanced R2 relaxation rate in the central hypoxic region of the tumours. Such enhanced relaxivity would increase the sensitivity of ferritin as a reporter gene for non-invasive in vivo MRI-monitoring of cell delivery and differentiation in cellular or gene-based therapies. PMID:27211820

  7. Enhanced Genetic Analysis of Single Human Bioparticles Recovered by Simplified Micromanipulation from Forensic ‘Touch DNA’ Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Farash, Katherine; Hanson, Erin K.; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-01-01

    DNA profiles can be obtained from ‘touch DNA’ evidence, which comprises microscopic traces of human biological material. Current methods for the recovery of trace DNA employ cotton swabs or adhesive tape to sample an area of interest. However, such a ‘blind-swabbing’ approach will co-sample cellular material from the different individuals, even if the individuals’ cells are located in geographically distinct locations on the item. Thus, some of the DNA mixtures encountered in touch DNA samples are artificially created by the swabbing itself. In some instances, a victim’s DNA may be found in significant excess thus masking any potential perpetrator’s DNA. In order to circumvent the challenges with standard recovery and analysis methods, we have developed a lower cost, ‘smart analysis’ method that results in enhanced genetic analysis of touch DNA evidence. We describe an optimized and efficient micromanipulation recovery strategy for the collection of bio-particles present in touch DNA samples, as well as an enhanced amplification strategy involving a one-step 5 µl microvolume lysis/STR amplification to permit the recovery of STR profiles from the bio-particle donor(s). The use of individual or few (i.e., “clumps”) bioparticles results in the ability to obtain single source profiles. These procedures represent alternative enhanced techniques for the isolation and analysis of single bioparticles from forensic touch DNA evidence. While not necessary in every forensic investigation, the method could be highly beneficial for the recovery of a single source perpetrator DNA profile in cases involving physical assault (e.g., strangulation) that may not be possible using standard analysis techniques. Additionally, the strategies developed here offer an opportunity to obtain genetic information at the single cell level from a variety of other non-forensic trace biological material. PMID:25867046

  8. Genetic Optimization of Metalloenzymes: Enhancing Enzymes for Non-Natural Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hyster, Todd K; Ward, Thomas R

    2016-06-20

    Artificial metalloenzymes have received increasing attention over the last decade as a possible solution to unaddressed challenges in synthetic organic chemistry. Whereas traditional transition-metal catalysts typically only take advantage of the first coordination sphere to control reactivity and selectivity, artificial metalloenzymes can modulate both the first and second coordination spheres. This difference can manifest itself in reactivity profiles that can be truly unique to artificial metalloenzymes. This Review summarizes attempts to modulate the second coordination sphere of artificial metalloenzymes by using genetic modifications of the protein sequence. In doing so, successful attempts and creative solutions to address the challenges encountered are highlighted. PMID:26971363

  9. Optobionic vision—a new genetically enhanced light on retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, Patrick; Grossman, Nir; Memon, Muhammad Ali; Burrone, Juan; Dawson, Martin; Drakakis, Emmanuel; Neil, Mark; Nikolic, Konstantin

    2009-06-01

    The recent discovery that neurons can be photostimulated via genetic incorporation of artificial opsins is creating a revolution in the field of neural stimulation. In this paper we show its potential in the field of retinal prosthesis. We show that we need typically 100 mW cm-2 in instantaneous light intensity on the neuron in order to stimulate action potentials. We also show how this can be reduced down to safe levels in order to negate thermal and photochromic damage to the eye. We also describe a gallium nitride LED light source which is also able to generate patterns of the required intensity in order to transfer reliable images.

  10. CRISPR/Cas9 system as an innovative genetic engineering tool: Enhancements in sequence specificity and delivery methods.

    PubMed

    Jo, Young-Il; Suresh, Bharathi; Kim, Hyongbum; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    While human gene therapy has gained significant attention for its therapeutic promise, CRISPR/Cas9 technology has made a breakthrough as an efficient genome editing tool by emulating prokaryotic immune defense mechanisms. Although many studies have found that CRISPR/Cas9 technology is more efficient, specific and manipulable than previous generations of gene editing tools, it can be further improved by elevating its overall efficiency in a higher frequency of genome modifications and reducing its off-target effects. Here, we review the development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology, focusing on enhancement of its sequence specificity, reduction of off-target effects and delivery systems. Moreover, we describe recent successful applications of CRISPR/Cas9 technology in laboratory and clinical studies. PMID:26434948

  11. From The Cover: Poly- amino ester-containing microparticles enhance the activity of nonviral genetic vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Steven R.; Lynn, David M.; Ge, Qing; Anderson, Daniel G.; Puram, Sidharth V.; Chen, Jianzhu; Eisen, Herman N.; Langer, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Current nonviral genetic vaccine systems are less effective than viral vaccines, particularly in cancer systems where epitopes can be weakly immunogenic and antigen-presenting cell processing and presentation to T cells is down-regulated. A promising nonviral delivery method for genetic vaccines involves microencapsulation of antigen-encoding DNA, because such particles protect plasmid payloads and target them to phagocytic antigen-presenting cells. However, conventional microparticle formulations composed of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid take too long to release encapsulated payload and fail to induce high levels of target gene expression. Here, we describe a microparticle-based DNA delivery system composed of a degradable, pH-sensitive poly- amino ester and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid. These formulations generate an increase of 3-5 orders of magnitude in transfection efficiency and are potent activators of dendritic cells in vitro. When used as vaccines in vivo, these microparticle formulations, unlike conventional formulations, induce antigen-specific rejection of transplanted syngenic tumor cells.

  12. An Enhanced Genetic Approach to Composing Cooperative Learning Groups for Multiple Grouping Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Yin, Peng-Yeng; Hwang, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2008-01-01

    Cooperative learning is known to be an effective educational strategy in enhancing the learning performance of students. The goal of a cooperative learning group is to maximize all members' learning efficacy. This is accomplished via promoting each other's success, through assisting, sharing, mentoring, explaining, and encouragement. To achieve…

  13. Intensive cognitive training in schizophrenia enhances working memory and associated prefrontal cortical efficiency in a manner that drives long-term functional gains

    PubMed Central

    Luks, Tracy L.; Garrett, Coleman; Chung, Cleo; Fisher, Melissa; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether intensive computerized cognitive training in schizophrenia could improve working memory performance and increase signal efficiency of associated middle frontal gyri (MFG) circuits in a functionally meaningful manner. Thirty schizophrenia participants and 13 healthy comparison participants underwent fMRI scanning during a letter N-back working memory task. Schizophrenia participants were then randomly assigned to either 80 hours (16 weeks) of cognitive training or a computer games control condition. After this intervention, participants completed a second fMRI N-back scanning session. At baseline, during 2-back working memory trials, healthy participants showed the largest and most significant activation in bilateral MFG, which correlated with task performance. Schizophrenia participants showed impaired working memory, hypoactivation in left MFG, and no correlation between bilateral MFG signal and task performance. After training, schizophrenia participants improved their 2-back working memory performance and showed increased activation in left MFG. They also demonstrated a significant association between enhanced task performance and right MFG signal, similar to healthy participants. Both task performance and brain activity in right MFG after training predicted better generalized working memory at 6-month follow-up. Furthermore, task performance and brain activity within bilateral MFG predicted better occupational functioning at 6-month follow-up. No such findings were observed in the computer games control participants. Working memory impairments in schizophrenia and its underlying neural correlates in MFG can be improved by intensive computerized cognitive training; these improvements generalize beyond the trained task and are associated with enduring effects on cognition and functioning 6 months after the intervention. PMID:24867353

  14. Gain weighted eigenspace assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the development of the gain weighted eigenspace assignment methodology. This provides a designer with a systematic methodology for trading off eigenvector placement versus gain magnitudes, while still maintaining desired closed-loop eigenvalue locations. This is accomplished by forming a cost function composed of a scalar measure of error between desired and achievable eigenvectors and a scalar measure of gain magnitude, determining analytical expressions for the gradients, and solving for the optimal solution by numerical iteration. For this development the scalar measure of gain magnitude is chosen to be a weighted sum of the squares of all the individual elements of the feedback gain matrix. An example is presented to demonstrate the method. In this example, solutions yielding achievable eigenvectors close to the desired eigenvectors are obtained with significant reductions in gain magnitude compared to a solution obtained using a previously developed eigenspace (eigenstructure) assignment method.

  15. Genetic Analysis of Stress Responses in Soil Bacteria for Enhanced Bioremediation of Mixed Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide fundamental knowledge on environment stress response of subsurface bacteria and a radiation-resistant bacterium (Deinococcus radiodurans). This information will be particularly useful in the development of successful bioremediation strategies. These organisms represent two phylogenetically distinct groups of soil bacteria, each of which has specific features of interest for bioremediation. The subsurface bacteria, Sphingomonas spp (Savannah River Site), have unique degradative capabilities of organic waste. The study of subsurface bacteria will serve as a model for bioremediation using indigenous bacteria. D. radiodurans exhibits high resistance to external stress such as ionizing radiation and organic solvent. The study of D. radiodurans will serve as a model for the use of genetically engineered bacteria for bioremediation.

  16. Estimates of epistatic and pleiotropic effects of () and () genetic markers on beef heifer performance traits enhanced by selection.

    PubMed

    Tait, R G; Cushman, R A; McNeel, A K; Casas, E; Smith, T P L; Freetly, H C; Bennett, G L

    2016-03-01

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC II) was subjected to marker assisted selection for 2 yr to equalize and genetic marker frequencies to evaluate the epistatic and pleiotropic effects of these markers on BW, reproduction, and first calf performance traits in replacement beef females ( = 171) managed under 2 postweaning development protocols. Traits evaluated on the heifers were birth BW, weaning BW, 11-mo BW, 12-mo BW, 13-mo BW, first breeding season pregnancy evaluation BW, first calving season BW, 11-mo puberty, 12-mo puberty, 13-mo puberty, first breeding season pregnancy, and first calf weaning rate. Additionally, heifer's first calf performance traits of ordinal calving date, first calf birth BW, and first calf weaning BW (with and without age adjustment) were analyzed. Selection to increase minor allele frequencies and balanced sampling across genotype classes enhanced the ability to detect all genetic effects except dominance × dominance epistasis. The × genotype effect was significant ( < 0.05) for 11-mo BW and 12-mo BW and tended to be significant ( = 0.08) for 13-mo BW. Consistently, for all 3 traits, the most significant effect among epistatic × genotype effects was the additive effect, with the G allele decreasing BW. There were no associations between × genotype and fertility related traits ( ≥ 0.46) in this study. Additionally, there were no × genotype associations with first progeny performance traits ( ≥ 0.14). The large effect of the additive × additive interaction on first calf weaning BW was imprecisely estimated, which may warrant further investigation. PMID:27065254

  17. Enhancer Analysis Unveils Genetic Interactions between TLX and SOX2 in Neural Stem Cells and In Vivo Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammed M.; Smith, Derek K.; Niu, Wenze; Fang, Sanhua; Iqbal, Nida; Sun, Guoqiang; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Summary The orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a master regulator of postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and neurogenesis; however, it remains unclear how TLX expression is precisely regulated in these tissue-specific stem cells. Here, we show that a highly conserved cis-element within the Tlx locus functions to drive gene expression in NSCs. We demonstrate that the transcription factors SOX2 and MYT1 specifically interact with this genomic element to directly regulate Tlx enhancer activity in vivo. Knockdown experiments further reveal that SOX2 dominantly controls endogenous expression of TLX, whereas MYT1 only plays a modulatory role. Importantly, TLX is essential for SOX2-mediated in vivo reprogramming of astrocytes and itself is also sufficient to induce neurogenesis in the adult striatum. Together, these findings unveil functional genetic interactions among transcription factors that are critical to NSCs and in vivo cell reprogramming. PMID:26607952

  18. CD226 as a genetic adjuvant to enhance immune efficacy induced by Ag85A DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Fangli; Zhu, Junfeng; Sang, Lixuan; Han, Xue; Wang, Danan; Shan, Fengping; Li, Shengjun; Sun, Xun; Lu, Changlong

    2015-03-01

    Antigen-85A (Ag85A) is one of the major proteins secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Many studies on animal models have shown that vaccination with the recombinant Ag85A-DNA or Ag85A protein induces powerful immune response. However, these vaccines cannot generate sufficient protective immunity in the systemic compartment. CD226, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is expressed in the majority of NK cells, T cells, monocytes, and platelets, and can be served as a co-stimulator that contributes to multiple innate and adaptive responses. However, there has been no study where either CD226 protein or DNA has been used as an adjuvant for vaccine development. The aim of this study was to develop a novel Ag85A DNA vaccine with CD226 as the genetic adjuvant to increase the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A. Oral vaccination with pcDNA3.1-Ag85A-CD226 DNA induced potent immune responses in mice. CD226 was an effective genetic adjuvant that improved the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A and enhanced the activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells in mice. Th1 dominant cytokines (i.e. IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α), cellular immunity (i.e. CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells in splenocytes) and MLNs were also significantly elevated by pcDNA3.1-Ag85A-CD226 DNA vaccination. Our results suggest that CD226 is an effective adjuvant to enhance the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A. Our findings provide a new strategy for the development of a DNA vaccine co-expressing Ag85A and CD226. PMID:25582686

  19. Cell Type Specificity and Host Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Dambach, Kaitlyn M.; Donofrio, Gina C.; Tassaneetrithep, Boonrat; Marovich, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is implicated in severe, usually secondary, dengue virus (DV) infections. Preexisting heterotypic antibodies, via their Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR) interactions, may increase disease severity through enhanced target cell infection. Greater numbers of infected target cells may contribute to higher viremia and excess cytokine levels often observed in severe disease. Monocytes, macrophages, and immature and mature dendritic cells (DC) are considered major cellular targets of DV. Apheresis of multiple donors allowed isolation of autologous primary myeloid target cell types for head-to-head comparison of infection rates, viral output, and cytokine production under direct infection (without antibody) or ADE conditions (with antibody). All studied cell types except immature DC supported ADE. All cells undergoing ADE secreted proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) at enhancement titers, but distinct cell-type-specific patterns were observed for other relevant proteins (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-α/β] and IL-10). Macrophages produced type I interferons (IFN-α/β) that were modulated by ADE. Mature DC mainly secreted IFN-β. Interestingly, only monocytes secreted IL-10, and only upon antibody-enhanced infection. While ADE infection rates were remarkably consistent in monocytes (10 to 15%) across donors, IL-10 protein levels varied according to previously described regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL-10 promoter region. The homozygous GCC haplotype was associated with high-level IL-10 secretion, while the ACC and ATA haplotypes produced intermediate and low levels of IL-10, respectively. Our data suggest that ADE effects are cell type specific, are influenced by host genetics, and, depending on relative infection rates, may further contribute to the complexity of DV pathogenesis. PMID:21123382

  20. Argument-predicate distance as a filter for enhancing precision in extracting predications on the genetic etiology of disease

    PubMed Central

    Masseroli, Marco; Kilicoglu, Halil; Lang, François-Michel; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2006-01-01

    Background Genomic functional information is valuable for biomedical research. However, such information frequently needs to be extracted from the scientific literature and structured in order to be exploited by automatic systems. Natural language processing is increasingly used for this purpose although it inherently involves errors. A postprocessing strategy that selects relations most likely to be correct is proposed and evaluated on the output of SemGen, a system that extracts semantic predications on the etiology of genetic diseases. Based on the number of intervening phrases between an argument and its predicate, we defined a heuristic strategy to filter the extracted semantic relations according to their likelihood of being correct. We also applied this strategy to relations identified with co-occurrence processing. Finally, we exploited postprocessed SemGen predications to investigate the genetic basis of Parkinson's disease. Results The filtering procedure for increased precision is based on the intuition that arguments which occur close to their predicate are easier to identify than those at a distance. For example, if gene-gene relations are filtered for arguments at a distance of 1 phrase from the predicate, precision increases from 41.95% (baseline) to 70.75%. Since this proximity filtering is based on syntactic structure, applying it to the results of co-occurrence processing is useful, but not as effective as when applied to the output of natural language processing. In an effort to exploit SemGen predications on the etiology of disease after increasing precision with postprocessing, a gene list was derived from extracted information enhanced with postprocessing filtering and was automatically annotated with GFINDer, a Web application that dynamically retrieves functional and phenotypic information from structured biomolecular resources. Two of the genes in this list are likely relevant to Parkinson's disease but are not associated with this disease

  1. Digital automatic gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Performance analysis, used to evaluated fitness of several circuits to digital automatic gain control (AGC), indicates that digital integrator employing coherent amplitude detector (CAD) is best device suited for application. Circuit reduces gain error to half that of conventional analog AGC while making it possible to automatically modify response of receiver to match incoming signal conditions.

  2. Weight gain - unintentional

    MedlinePlus

    ... trying to do so can have many causes. Metabolism slows down as you age . This can cause weight gain if you eat too much, eat the wrong foods, or do not get enough exercise. Drugs that can cause weight gain include: Birth control ...

  3. Health gain versus equity.

    PubMed

    Scott-Samuel, A

    1992-05-01

    A new organisation, the Association for Public Health, has just been formed 'to help deliver real health gain for the population'. Alex Scott-Samuel suggests that the concept of 'health gain' is counter to health equality and needs wider debate. PMID:1624317

  4. Invention and Gain Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Robert J.; Dixon, Stacey

    1989-01-01

    Gain analysis is applied to the invention of the sewing needle as well as different sewing implements and modes of sewing. The analysis includes a two-subject experiment. To validate the generality of gain heuristics and underlying switching processes, the invention of the assembly line is also analyzed. (TJH)

  5. Genetic Algorithm Used for Load Shedding Based on Sensitivity to Enhance Voltage Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titare, L. S.; Singh, P.; Arya, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to calculate optimum load shedding with voltage stability consideration based on sensitivity of proximity indicator using genetic algorithm (GA). Schur's inequality based proximity indicator of load flow Jacobian has been selected, which indicates system state. Load flow Jacobian of the system is obtained using Continuation power flow method. If reactive power and active rescheduling are exhausted, load shedding is the last line of defense to maintain the operational security of the system. Load buses for load shedding have been selected on the basis of sensitivity of proximity indicator. The load bus having large sensitivity is selected for load shedding. Proposed algorithm predicts load bus rank and optimum load to be shed on load buses. The algorithm accounts inequality constraints not only in present operating conditions, but also for predicted next interval load (with load shedding). Developed algorithm has been implemented on IEEE 6-bus system. Results have been compared with those obtained using Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization (TLBO), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and its variant.

  6. Genetic design of enhanced valley splitting towards a spin qubit in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijun; Luo, Jun-Wei; Saraiva, Andre; Koiller, Belita; Zunger, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The long spin coherence time and microelectronics compatibility of Si makes it an attractive material for realizing solid-state qubits. Unfortunately, the orbital (valley) degeneracy of the conduction band of bulk Si makes it difficult to isolate individual two-level spin-1/2 states, limiting their development. This degeneracy is lifted within Si quantum wells clad between Ge-Si alloy barrier layers, but the magnitude of the valley splittings achieved so far is small—of the order of 1 meV or less—degrading the fidelity of information stored within such a qubit. Here we combine an atomistic pseudopotential theory with a genetic search algorithm to optimize the structure of layered-Ge/Si-clad Si quantum wells to improve this splitting. We identify an optimal sequence of multiple Ge/Si barrier layers that more effectively isolates the electron ground state of a Si quantum well and increases the valley splitting by an order of magnitude, to ∼9 meV. PMID:24013452

  7. Enhancement in Motor Learning through Genetic Manipulation of the Lynx1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Julie M.; Walz, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The cholinergic system is a neuromodulatory neurotransmitter system involved in a variety of brain processes, including learning and memory, attention, and motor processes, among others. The influence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the cholinergic system are moderated by lynx proteins, which are GPI-anchored membrane proteins forming tight associations with nicotinic receptors. Previous studies indicate lynx1 inhibits nicotinic receptor function and limits neuronal plasticity. We sought to investigate the mechanism of action of lynx1 on nicotinic receptor function, through the generation of lynx mouse models, expressing a soluble version of lynx and comparing results to the full length overexpression. Using rotarod as a test for motor learning, we found that expressing a secreted variant of lynx leads to motor learning enhancements whereas overexpression of full-length lynx had no effect. Further, adult lynx1KO mice demonstrated comparable motor learning enhancements as the soluble transgenic lines, whereas previously, aged lynx1KO mice showed performance augmentation only with nicotine treatment. From this we conclude the motor learning is more sensitive to loss of lynx function, and that the GPI anchor plays a role in the normal function of the lynx protein. In addition, our data suggests that the lynx gene plays a modulatory role in the brain during aging, and that a soluble version of lynx has potential as a tool for adjusting cholinergic-dependent plasticity and learning mechanisms in the brain. PMID:23139735

  8. Dominant Enhancers of Egfr in Drosophila Melanogaster: Genetic Links between the Notch and Egfr Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Price, J. V.; Savenye, E. D.; Lum, D.; Breitkreutz, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key component of a complex signaling pathway that participates in multiple developmental processes. We have performed an F(1) screen for mutations that cause dominant enhancement of wing vein phenotypes associated with mutations in Egfr. With this screen, we have recovered mutations in Hairless (H), vein, groucho (gro), and three apparently novel loci. All of the E(Egfr)s we have identified show dominant interactions in transheterozygous combinations with each other and with alleles of N or Su(H), suggesting that they are involved in cross-talk between the N and EGFR signaling pathways. Further examination of the phenotypic interactions between Egfr, H, and gro revealed that reductions in Egfr activity enhanced both the bristle loss associated with H mutations, and the bristle hyperplasia and ocellar hypertrophy associated with gro mutations. Double mutant combinations of Egfr and gro hypomorphic alleles led to the formation of ectopic compound eyes in a dosage sensitive manner. Our findings suggest that these E(Egfr)s represent links between the Egfr and Notch signaling pathways, and that Egfr activity can either promote or suppress Notch signaling, depending on its developmental context. PMID:9383058

  9. Enhancement of phosphate absorption by garden plants by genetic engineering: a new tool for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Keisuke; Togami, Junichi; Mason, John G; Chandler, Stephen F; Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Although phosphorus is an essential factor for proper plant growth in natural environments, an excess of phosphate in water sources causes serious pollution. In this paper we describe transgenic plants which hyperaccumulate inorganic phosphate (Pi) and which may be used to reduce environmental water pollution by phytoremediation. AtPHR1, a transcription factor for a key regulator of the Pi starvation response in Arabidopsis thaliana, was overexpressed in the ornamental garden plants Torenia, Petunia, and Verbena. The transgenic plants showed hyperaccumulation of Pi in leaves and accelerated Pi absorption rates from hydroponic solutions. Large-scale hydroponic experiments indicated that the enhanced ability to absorb Pi in transgenic torenia (AtPHR1) was comparable to water hyacinth a plant that though is used for phytoremediation causes overgrowth problems. PMID:23984322

  10. Enhancement of Phosphate Absorption by Garden Plants by Genetic Engineering: A New Tool for Phytoremediation

    PubMed Central

    Togami, Junichi; Mason, John G.; Chandler, Stephen F.; Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Although phosphorus is an essential factor for proper plant growth in natural environments, an excess of phosphate in water sources causes serious pollution. In this paper we describe transgenic plants which hyperaccumulate inorganic phosphate (Pi) and which may be used to reduce environmental water pollution by phytoremediation. AtPHR1, a transcription factor for a key regulator of the Pi starvation response in Arabidopsis thaliana, was overexpressed in the ornamental garden plants Torenia, Petunia, and Verbena. The transgenic plants showed hyperaccumulation of Pi in leaves and accelerated Pi absorption rates from hydroponic solutions. Large-scale hydroponic experiments indicated that the enhanced ability to absorb Pi in transgenic torenia (AtPHR1) was comparable to water hyacinth a plant that though is used for phytoremediation causes overgrowth problems. PMID:23984322

  11. Enhanced flight performance by genetic manipulation of wing shape in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ray, Robert P; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Henningsson, Per; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Insect wing shapes are remarkably diverse and the combination of shape and kinematics determines both aerial capabilities and power requirements. However, the contribution of any specific morphological feature to performance is not known. Using targeted RNA interference to modify wing shape far beyond the natural variation found within the population of a single species, we show a direct effect on flight performance that can be explained by physical modelling of the novel wing geometry. Our data show that altering the expression of a single gene can significantly enhance aerial agility and that the Drosophila wing shape is not, therefore, optimized for certain flight performance characteristics that are known to be important. Our technique points in a new direction for experiments on the evolution of performance specialities in animals. PMID:26926954

  12. Enhanced flight performance by genetic manipulation of wing shape in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Robert P.; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Henningsson, Per; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Insect wing shapes are remarkably diverse and the combination of shape and kinematics determines both aerial capabilities and power requirements. However, the contribution of any specific morphological feature to performance is not known. Using targeted RNA interference to modify wing shape far beyond the natural variation found within the population of a single species, we show a direct effect on flight performance that can be explained by physical modelling of the novel wing geometry. Our data show that altering the expression of a single gene can significantly enhance aerial agility and that the Drosophila wing shape is not, therefore, optimized for certain flight performance characteristics that are known to be important. Our technique points in a new direction for experiments on the evolution of performance specialities in animals. PMID:26926954

  13. Subtle genetic changes enhance virulence of methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Highlander, Sarah K; Hultén, Kristina G; Qin, Xiang; Jiang, Huaiyang; Yerrapragada, Shailaja; Mason, Edward O; Shang, Yue; Williams, Tiffany M; Fortunov, Régine M; Liu, Yamei; Igboeli, Okezie; Petrosino, Joseph; Tirumalai, Madhan; Uzman, Akif; Fox, George E; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Muzny, Donna M; Hemphill, Lisa; Ding, Yan; Dugan, Shannon; Blyth, Peter R; Buhay, Christian J; Dinh, Huyen H; Hawes, Alicia C; Holder, Michael; Kovar, Christie L; Lee, Sandra L; Liu, Wen; Nazareth, Lynne V; Wang, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Jianling; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Weinstock, George M

    2007-01-01

    Background Community acquired (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) increasingly causes disease worldwide. USA300 has emerged as the predominant clone causing superficial and invasive infections in children and adults in the USA. Epidemiological studies suggest that USA300 is more virulent than other CA-MRSA. The genetic determinants that render virulence and dominance to USA300 remain unclear. Results We sequenced the genomes of two pediatric USA300 isolates: one CA-MRSA and one CA-methicillin susceptible (MSSA), isolated at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston. DNA sequencing was performed by Sanger dideoxy whole genome shotgun (WGS) and 454 Life Sciences pyrosequencing strategies. The sequence of the USA300 MRSA strain was rigorously annotated. In USA300-MRSA 2658 chromosomal open reading frames were predicted and 3.1 and 27 kilobase (kb) plasmids were identified. USA300-MSSA contained a 20 kb plasmid with some homology to the 27 kb plasmid found in USA300-MRSA. Two regions found in US300-MRSA were absent in USA300-MSSA. One of these carried the arginine deiminase operon that appears to have been acquired from S. epidermidis. The USA300 sequence was aligned with other sequenced S. aureus genomes and regions unique to USA300 MRSA were identified. Conclusion USA300-MRSA is highly similar to other MRSA strains based on whole genome alignments and gene content, indicating that the differences in pathogenesis are due to subtle changes rather than to large-scale acquisition of virulence factor genes. The USA300 Houston isolate differs from another sequenced USA300 strain isolate, derived from a patient in San Francisco, in plasmid content and a number of sequence polymorphisms. Such differences will provide new insights into the evolution of pathogens. PMID:17986343

  14. Genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma mediated by a LMO1 super-enhancer polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Oldridge, Derek A.; Wood, Andrew C.; Weichert-Leahey, Nina; Crimmins, Ian; Sussman, Robyn; Winter, Cynthia; McDaniel, Lee D.; Diamond, Maura; Hart, Lori S.; Zhu, Shizhen; Durbin, Adam D.; Abraham, Brian J.; Anders, Lars; Tian, Lifeng; Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S.; Khan, Javed; Bramlett, Kelli; Rahman, Nazneen; Capasso, Mario; Iolascon, Achille; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Young, Richard A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Diskin, Sharon J.; Look, A. Thomas; Maris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neuroblastoma is a pediatric malignancy that typically arises in early childhood and is derived from the developing sympathetic nervous system. Clinical phenotypes range from localized tumors with excellent outcomes to widely metastatic disease where long-term survival is approximately 40% despite intensive therapy1. A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified common polymorphisms at the LMO1 gene locus that are highly associated with neuroblastoma susceptibility and oncogenic addiction to LMO1 in the tumor cells2. Here we sought to discover the causal DNA variant at this locus and the mechanism by which it leads to neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We first imputed all possible genotypes across the LMO1 locus and then mapped highly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) to areas of chromatin accessibility, evolutionary conservation, and transcription factor binding sites. SNP rs2168101 G>T was the most highly associated variant (combined P=7.47×10-29, Odds Ratio 0.65, 95% CI: 0.60-0.70) and resided in a super-enhancer defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 within the first intron of LMO1. The ancestral G-allele that is associated with tumor formation resides in a conserved GATA transcription factor binding motif. We show that the newly evolved protective TATA allele is associated with decreased total LMO1 expression (P=0.028) in neuroblastoma primary tumors and ablates GATA3 binding (P<0.0001). We demonstrate allelic imbalance favoring the G-containing strand in tumors heterozygous for this SNP as demonstrated both by RNA sequencing (P<0.0001) and reporter assays (P=0.002). These findings show that a recently evolved polymorphism within a super-enhancer element in the first intron of LMO1 influences neuroblastoma susceptibility through differential GATA transcription factor binding and direct modulation of LMO1 expression in cis, and this leads to an oncogenic dependency in tumor cells. PMID:26560027

  15. Genetic Signatures for Enhanced Olfaction in the African Mole-Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos, Sofia; Bishop, Jacqueline M.; O’Ryan, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    The Olfactory Receptor (OR) superfamily, the largest in the vertebrate genome, is responsible for vertebrate olfaction and is traditionally subdivided into 17 OR families. Recent studies characterising whole-OR subgenomes revealed a ‘birth and death’ model of evolution for a range of species, however little is known about fine-scale evolutionary dynamics within single-OR families. This study reports the first assessment of fine-scale OR evolution and variation in African mole-rats (Bathyergidae), a family of subterranean rodents endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Because of the selective pressures of life underground, enhanced olfaction is proposed to be fundamental to the evolutionary success of the Bathyergidae, resulting in a highly diversified OR gene-repertoire. Using a PCR-sequencing approach, we analysed variation in the OR7 family across 14 extant bathyergid species, which revealed enhanced levels of functional polymorphisms concentrated across the receptors’ ligand-binding region. We propose that mole-rats are able to recognise a broad range of odorants and that this diversity is reflected throughout their OR7 gene repertoire. Using both classic tests and tree-based methods to test for signals of selection, we investigate evolutionary forces across the mole-rat OR7 gene tree. Four well-supported clades emerged in the OR phylogeny, with varying signals of selection; from neutrality to positive and purifying selection. Bathyergid life-history traits and environmental niche-specialisation are explored as possible drivers of adaptive OR evolution, emerging as non-exclusive contributors to the positive selection observed at OR7 genes. Our results reveal unexpected complexity of evolutionary mechanisms acting within a single OR family, providing insightful perspectives into OR evolutionary dynamics. PMID:24699281

  16. Genetic deletion or TWEAK blocking antibody administration reduce atherosclerosis and enhance plaque stability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Cristina; Fernández-Laso, Valvanera; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Muñoz-García, Begoña; Moreno, Juan A; Pastor-Vargas, Carlos; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Burkly, Linda C; Egido, Jesús; Martín-Ventura, Jose L; Blanco-Colio, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical complications associated with atherosclerotic plaques arise from luminal obstruction due to plaque growth or destabilization leading to rupture. Tumour necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 12 (TNFSF12) also known as TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a proinflammatory cytokine that participates in atherosclerotic plaque development, but its role in plaque stability remains unclear. Using two different approaches, genetic deletion of TNFSF12 and treatment with a TWEAK blocking mAb in atherosclerosis-prone mice, we have analysed the effect of TWEAK inhibition on atherosclerotic plaques progression and stability. Mice lacking both TNFSF12 and Apolipoprotein E (TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/−) exhibited a diminished atherosclerotic burden and lesion size in their aorta. Advanced atherosclerotic plaques of TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/− or anti-TWEAK treated mice exhibited an increase collagen/lipid and vascular smooth muscle cell/macrophage ratios compared with TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− control mice, reflecting a more stable plaque phenotype. These changes are related with two different mechanisms, reduction of the inflammatory response (chemokines expression and secretion and nuclear factor kappa B activation) and decrease of metalloproteinase activity in atherosclerotic plaques of TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/−. A similar phenotype was observed with anti-TWEAK mAb treatment in TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− mice. Brachiocephalic arteries were also examined since they exhibit additional features akin to human atherosclerotic plaques associated with instability and rupture. Features of greater plaque stability including augmented collagen/lipid ratio, reduced macrophage content, and less presence of lateral xanthomas, buried caps, medial erosion, intraplaque haemorrhage and calcium content were present in TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/− or anti-TWEAK treatment in TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− mice. Overall, our data indicate that anti-TWEAK treatment has the capacity to diminish

  17. Control of the olive fruit fly using genetics-enhanced sterile insect technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major arthropod pest of commercial olive production, causing extensive damage to olive crops worldwide. Current control techniques rely on spraying of chemical insecticides. The sterile insect technique (SIT) presents an alternative, environmentally friendly and species-specific method of population control. Although SIT has been very successful against other tephritid pests, previous SIT trials on olive fly have produced disappointing results. Key problems included altered diurnal mating rhythms of the laboratory-reared insects, resulting in asynchronous mating activity between the wild and released sterile populations, and low competitiveness of the radiation-sterilised mass-reared flies. Consequently, the production of competitive, male-only release cohorts is considered an essential prerequisite for successful olive fly SIT. Results We developed a set of conditional female-lethal strains of olive fly (named Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal; RIDL®), providing highly penetrant female-specific lethality, dominant fluorescent marking, and genetic sterility. We found that males of the lead strain, OX3097D-Bol, 1) are strongly sexually competitive with wild olive flies, 2) display synchronous mating activity with wild females, and 3) induce appropriate refractoriness to wild female re-mating. Furthermore, we showed, through a large proof-of-principle experiment, that weekly releases of OX3097D-Bol males into stable populations of caged wild-type olive fly could cause rapid population collapse and eventual eradication. Conclusions The observed mating characteristics strongly suggest that an approach based on the release of OX3097D-Bol males will overcome the key difficulties encountered in previous olive fly SIT attempts. Although field confirmation is required, the proof-of-principle suppression and elimination of caged wild-type olive fly populations through OX3097D-Bol male releases provides

  18. Genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma mediated by a LMO1 super-enhancer polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Oldridge, Derek A; Wood, Andrew C; Weichert-Leahey, Nina; Crimmins, Ian; Sussman, Robyn; Winter, Cynthia; McDaniel, Lee D; Diamond, Maura; Hart, Lori S; Zhu, Shizhen; Durbin, Adam D; Abraham, Brian J; Anders, Lars; Tian, Lifeng; Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S; Khan, Javed; Bramlett, Kelli; Rahman, Nazneen; Capasso, Mario; Iolascon, Achille; Gerhard, Daniela S; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M; Young, Richard A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Diskin, Sharon J; Look, A Thomas; Maris, John M

    2015-12-17

    Neuroblastoma is a paediatric malignancy that typically arises in early childhood, and is derived from the developing sympathetic nervous system. Clinical phenotypes range from localized tumours with excellent outcomes to widely metastatic disease in which long-term survival is approximately 40% despite intensive therapy. A previous genome-wide association study identified common polymorphisms at the LMO1 gene locus that are highly associated with neuroblastoma susceptibility and oncogenic addiction to LMO1 in the tumour cells. Here we investigate the causal DNA variant at this locus and the mechanism by which it leads to neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We first imputed all possible genotypes across the LMO1 locus and then mapped highly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) to areas of chromatin accessibility, evolutionary conservation and transcription factor binding sites. We show that SNP rs2168101 G>T is the most highly associated variant (combined P = 7.47 × 10(-29), odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.70), and resides in a super-enhancer defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 within the first intron of LMO1. The ancestral G allele that is associated with tumour formation resides in a conserved GATA transcription factor binding motif. We show that the newly evolved protective TATA allele is associated with decreased total LMO1 expression (P = 0.028) in neuroblastoma primary tumours, and ablates GATA3 binding (P < 0.0001). We demonstrate allelic imbalance favouring the G-containing strand in tumours heterozygous for this SNP, as demonstrated both by RNA sequencing (P < 0.0001) and reporter assays (P = 0.002). These findings indicate that a recently evolved polymorphism within a super-enhancer element in the first intron of LMO1 influences neuroblastoma susceptibility through differential GATA transcription factor binding and direct modulation of LMO1 expression in cis, and this leads to an oncogenic

  19. Enhanced production of arginine and urea by genetically engineered Escherichia coli K-12 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, M; Rajagopal, B S; McCann, M T; Malamy, M H

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains capable of enhanced synthesis of arginine and urea were produced by derepression of the arginine regulon and simultaneous overexpression of the E. coli carAB and argI genes and the Bacillus subtilis rocF gene. Plasmids expressing carAB driven by their natural promoters were unstable. Therefore, E. coli carAB and argI genes with and without the B. subtilis rocF gene were constructed as a single operon under the regulation of the inducible promoter ptrc. Arginine operator sequences (Arg boxes) from argI were also cloned into the same plasmids for titration of the arginine repressor. Upon overexpression of these genes in E. coli strains, very high carbamyl phosphate synthetase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and arginase catalytic activities were achieved. The biosynthetic capacity of these engineered bacteria when overexpressing the arginine biosynthetic enzymes was 6- to 16-fold higher than that of controls but only if exogenous ornithine was present (ornithine was rate limiting). Overexpression of arginase in bacteria with a derepressed arginine biosynthetic pathway resulted in a 13- to 20-fold increase in urea production over that of controls with the parent vector alone; in this situation, the availability of carbamyl phosphate was rate limiting. PMID:8979336

  20. Massive Sorghum Collection Genotyped with SSR Markers to Enhance Use of Global Genetic Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Sophie; Chantereau, Jacques; Deu, Monique; Gardes, Laetitia; Noyer, Jean-Louis; Rami, Jean-François; Rivallan, Ronan; Li, Yu; Lu, Ping; Wang, Tianyu; Folkertsma, Rolf T.; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Glaszmann, Jean-Christophe; Hash, C. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Large ex situ collections require approaches for sampling manageable amounts of germplasm for in-depth characterization and use. We present here a large diversity survey in sorghum with 3367 accessions and 41 reference nuclear SSR markers. Of 19 alleles on average per locus, the largest numbers of alleles were concentrated in central and eastern Africa. Cultivated sorghum appeared structured according to geographic regions and race within region. A total of 13 groups of variable size were distinguished. The peripheral groups in western Africa, southern Africa and eastern Asia were the most homogeneous and clearly differentiated. Except for Kafir, there was little correspondence between races and marker-based groups. Bicolor, Caudatum, Durra and Guinea types were each dispersed in three groups or more. Races should therefore better be referred to as morphotypes. Wild and weedy accessions were very diverse and scattered among cultivated samples, reinforcing the idea that large gene-flow exists between the different compartments. Our study provides an entry to global sorghum germplasm collections. Our reference marker kit can serve to aggregate additional studies and enhance international collaboration. We propose a core reference set in order to facilitate integrated phenotyping experiments towards refined functional understanding of sorghum diversity. PMID:23565161

  1. Genetic Predisposition to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Is Mediated by a BMF Super-Enhancer Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, Radhika; Sava, Georgina P; Speedy, Helen E; Beà, Sílvia; Martín-Subero, José I; Studd, James B; Migliorini, Gabriele; Law, Philip J; Puente, Xose S; Martín-García, David; Salaverria, Itziar; Gutiérrez-Abril, Jesús; López-Otín, Carlos; Catovsky, Daniel; Allan, James M; Campo, Elías; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-08-23

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is an adult B cell malignancy. Genome-wide association studies show that variation at 15q15.1 influences CLL risk. We deciphered the causal variant at 15q15.1 and the mechanism by which it influences tumorigenesis. We imputed all possible genotypes across the locus and then mapped highly associated SNPs to areas of chromatin accessibility, evolutionary conservation, and transcription factor binding. SNP rs539846 C>A, the most highly associated variant (p = 1.42 × 10(-13), odds ratio = 1.35), localizes to a super-enhancer defined by extensive histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation in intron 3 of B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-modifying factor (BMF). The rs539846-A risk allele alters a conserved RELA-binding motif, disrupts RELA binding, and is associated with decreased BMF expression in CLL. These findings are consistent with rs539846 influencing CLL susceptibility through differential RELA binding, with direct modulation of BMF expression impacting on anti-apoptotic BCL2, a hallmark of oncogenic dependency in CLL. PMID:27524613

  2. Preventing Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    ... If this is the case, preventing further weight gain is a worthy goal. As people age, their body composition gradually shifts — the proportion of muscle decreases and the proportion of fat increases. This ...

  3. Genetics- and genomics-based interventions for nutritional enhancement of grain legume crops: status and outlook.

    PubMed

    Bohra, Abhishek; Sahrawat, Kanwar L; Kumar, Shiv; Joshi, Rohit; Parihar, Ashok K; Singh, Ummed; Singh, Deepak; Singh, Narendra P

    2015-05-01

    Meeting the food demands and ensuring nutritional security of the ever increasing global population in the face of degrading natural resource base and impending climate change is the biggest challenge of the twenty first century. The consequences of mineral/micronutrient deficiencies or the hidden hunger in the developing world are indeed alarming and need urgent attention. In addressing the problems associated with mineral/micronutrient deficiency, grain legumes as an integral component of the farming systems in the developing world have to play a crucial role. For resource-poor populations, a strategy based on selecting and/or developing grain legume cultivars with grains denser in micronutrients, by biofortification, seems the most appropriate and attractive approach to address the problem. This is evident from the on-going global research efforts on biofortification to provide nutrient-dense grains for use by the poorest of the poor in the developing countries. Towards this end, rapidly growing genomics technologies hold promise to hasten the progress of breeding nutritious legume crops. In conjunction with the myriad of expansions in genomics, advances in other 'omics' technologies particularly plant ionomics or ionome profiling open up novel opportunities to comprehensively examine the elemental composition and mineral networks of an organism in a rapid and cost-effective manner. These emerging technologies would effectively guide the scientific community to enrich the edible parts of grain legumes with bio-available minerals and enhancers/promoters. We believe that the application of these new-generation tools in turn would provide crop-based solutions to hidden hunger worldwide for achieving global nutritional security. PMID:25592547

  4. Phenotypic and Marker-Assisted Genetic Enhancement of Parental Lines of Rajalaxmi, an Elite Rice Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Dash, Amit K; Rao, Ravi N; Rao, G J N; Verma, Ram L; Katara, Jawahar L; Mukherjee, Arup K; Singh, Onkar N; Bagchi, Torit B

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic male sterile line system comprising CRMS 32A and its maintainer line CRMS 32B is a popular choice for the development of new hybrids in India as CRMS 32A, having Kalinga 1 cytoplasm (other than WA), is a viable alternative to WA cytoplasm. However, both lines are susceptible to bacterial blight (BB), a major disease on rice. As enhancement of host plant resistance is the most effective and economical strategy to control this disease, four resistance genes (Xa4, xa5, xa13, and Xa21) were transferred from a BB pyramid line of IR64, into the A and B lines using a marker-assisted backcrossing (MAB) breeding strategy. During the transfer of genes into CRMS 32B, foreground selection was applied using markers associated with the genes, and plants having resistance alleles of the donor, are selected. Selection for morphological and quality traits was practiced to select plants similar to the recurrent parent. The four gene and three gene pyramid lines exhibited high levels of resistance against the BB pathogen when challenged with eight virulent isolates. Using genome wide based SSR markers for background selection, pyramids having >95% of the recurrent parent genome were identified. With CRMS 32B gene pyramid as donor, the four resistance genes were transferred into the A line through repeated backcrosses and the A line pyramids also exhibited high level of resistance against BB. Through a combination of selection at phenotypic and molecular levels, four BB resistance genes were successfully introduced into two parental lines (CRMS 32 B and A) of Rajalaxmi, an elite popular hybrid. The pyramided B lines did exhibit high levels of resistance against BB. Selection for morphological and quality traits and background selection hastened the recovery of the recurrent parent genome in the recombinants. Through repeated backcrosses, all the four resistance genes were transferred to CRMS 32A and test crosses suggest that the maintenance ability of the improved CRMS

  5. Enhanced production of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase in Pichia pastoris via genetic and fermentation strategies.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhonggang; Xu, Li; Pan, Dujie; Jiao, Liangcheng; Liu, Ziming; Yan, Yunjun

    2014-10-01

    This study attempted to enhance the expression level of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL) in Pichia pastoris using a series of strategies. The tll gene was first inserted into the expression vector pPIC9 K and transformed into P. pastoris strain GS115. The maximum hydrolytic activity of TLL reached 4,350 U/mL under the optimal culture conditions of a 500 mL shaking flask containing 20 mL culture medium with the addition of 1.2 % (w/v) methanol, cultivation for 144 h at pH 7.0 and 27 °C. To further increase the TLL expression and copy number, strains containing two plasmids were obtained by sequential electroporation into GS115/9k-TLL #3 with a second vector, either pGAPZαA-TLL, pFZα-TLL, or pPICZαA-TLL. The maximum activity of the resultant strains GS115/9KTLL-ZαATLL #40, GS115/9KTLL-FZαATLL #46 and GS115/9KTLL-GAPTLL #45 was 6,600 U/mL, 6,000 U/mL and 4,800 U/mL, respectively. The tll copy number in these strains, as assessed by real-time quantitative PCR, was demonstrated to be seven, five, and three, respectively, versus two copies in GS115/9k-TLL #3. When a co-feeding strategy of sorbitol/methanol was adopted in a 3-L fermenter, the maximum TLL activity of GS115/9k-TLL #3 increased to 27,000 U/mL after 130 h of fed-batch fermentation, whereas, the maximum TLL activity was 19,500 U/mL after 145 h incubation when methanol was used as the sole carbon source. PMID:25074457

  6. Phenotypic and Marker-Assisted Genetic Enhancement of Parental Lines of Rajalaxmi, an Elite Rice Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Amit K.; Rao, Ravi N.; Rao, G. J. N.; Verma, Ram L.; Katara, Jawahar L.; Mukherjee, Arup K.; Singh, Onkar N.; Bagchi, Torit B.

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic male sterile line system comprising CRMS 32A and its maintainer line CRMS 32B is a popular choice for the development of new hybrids in India as CRMS 32A, having Kalinga 1 cytoplasm (other than WA), is a viable alternative to WA cytoplasm. However, both lines are susceptible to bacterial blight (BB), a major disease on rice. As enhancement of host plant resistance is the most effective and economical strategy to control this disease, four resistance genes (Xa4, xa5, xa13, and Xa21) were transferred from a BB pyramid line of IR64, into the A and B lines using a marker-assisted backcrossing (MAB) breeding strategy. During the transfer of genes into CRMS 32B, foreground selection was applied using markers associated with the genes, and plants having resistance alleles of the donor, are selected. Selection for morphological and quality traits was practiced to select plants similar to the recurrent parent. The four gene and three gene pyramid lines exhibited high levels of resistance against the BB pathogen when challenged with eight virulent isolates. Using genome wide based SSR markers for background selection, pyramids having >95% of the recurrent parent genome were identified. With CRMS 32B gene pyramid as donor, the four resistance genes were transferred into the A line through repeated backcrosses and the A line pyramids also exhibited high level of resistance against BB. Through a combination of selection at phenotypic and molecular levels, four BB resistance genes were successfully introduced into two parental lines (CRMS 32 B and A) of Rajalaxmi, an elite popular hybrid. The pyramided B lines did exhibit high levels of resistance against BB. Selection for morphological and quality traits and background selection hastened the recovery of the recurrent parent genome in the recombinants. Through repeated backcrosses, all the four resistance genes were transferred to CRMS 32A and test crosses suggest that the maintenance ability of the improved CRMS

  7. Genetic blockade of the dopamine D3 receptor enhances hippocampal expression of PACAP and receptors and alters their cortical distribution.

    PubMed

    Marzagalli, R; Leggio, G M; Bucolo, C; Pricoco, E; Keay, K A; Cardile, V; Castorina, S; Salomone, S; Drago, F; Castorina, A

    2016-03-01

    Dopamine D3 receptors (D3Rs) are implicated in several aspects of cognition, but their role in aversive conditioning has only been marginally uncovered. Investigations have reported that blockade of D3Rs enhances the acquisition of fear memories, a phenomenon tightly linked to the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). However, the impact of D3R ablation on the PACAPergic system in regions critical for the formation of new memories remains unexplored. To address this issue, levels of PACAP and its receptors were compared in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex (CX) of mice devoid of functional D3Rs (D3R(-/-)) and wild-types (WTs) using a series of comparative immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses. Morphometric and stereological data revealed increased hippocampal area and volume in D3R(-/-) mice, and augmented neuronal density in CA1 and CA2/3 subfields. PACAP levels were increased in the hippocampus of D3R(-/-) mice. Expression of PACAP receptors was also heightened in mutant mice. In the CX, PACAP immunoreactivity (IR), was restricted to cortical layer V in WTs, but was distributed throughout layers IV-VI in D3R(-/-) mice, along with increased mRNAs, protein concentration and staining scores. Consistently, PAC1, VPAC1 and VPAC2 IRs were variably redistributed in CX, with a general upregulation in cortical layers II-IV in knockout animals. Our interpretation of these findings is that disturbed dopamine neurotransmission due to genetic D3R blockade may enhance the PACAP/PAC1-VPAC axis, a key endogenous system for the processing of fear memories. This could explain, at least in part, the facilitated acquisition and consolidation of aversive memories in D3R(-/-) mice. PMID:26718601

  8. Development of Genetically Modified Chinese Hamster Ovary Host Cells for the Enhancement of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rahimpour, Azam; Ahani, Roshanak; Najaei, Azita; Adeli, Ahmad; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used host system for the expression of high quality recombinant proteins. However, the development of stable, high-yielding CHO cell lines is a major bottleneck in the industrial manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Therefore, different strategies such as the generation of more efficient expression vectors and establishment of genetically engineered host cells have been employed to increase the efficiency of cell line development. In order to examine the possibility of generating improved CHO host cells, cell line engineering approaches were developed based on ceramide transfer protein (CERT), and X-box binding protein 1s (XBP1s). Methods CHO cells were transfected with CERT S132A, a mutant variant of CERT which is resistant to phosphorylation, or XBP1s expression plasmids, and then stable cell pools were generated. Transient expression of t-PA was examined in engineered cell pools in comparison to un-modified CHO host cells. Results Overexpression of CERT S132A led to the enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) expression in transient expression by 50%. On the other hand, it was observed that the ectopic expression of the XBP1s, did not improve the t-PA expression level. Conclusion The results obtained in this study indicate successful development of the improved CHO host cells through CERT S132A overexpression. PMID:27547109

  9. AAV8-Mediated In Vivo Overexpression of miR-155 Enhances the Protective Capacity of Genetically Attenuated Malarial Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hentzschel, Franziska; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Börner, Kathleen; Heiss, Kirsten; Knapp, Bettina; Sattler, Julia M; Kaderali, Lars; Castoldi, Mirco; Bindman, Julia G; Malato, Yann; Willenbring, Holger; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Grimm, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Malaria, caused by protozoan Plasmodium parasites, remains a prevalent infectious human disease due to the lack of an efficient and safe vaccine. This is directly related to the persisting gaps in our understanding of the parasite's interactions with the infected host, especially during the clinically silent yet essential liver stage of Plasmodium development. Previously, we and others showed that genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) that arrest in the liver induce sterile immunity, but only upon multiple administrations. Here, we comprehensively studied hepatic gene and miRNA expression in GAP-injected mice, and found both a broad activation of IFNγ-associated pathways and a significant increase of murine microRNA-155 (miR-155), that was especially pronounced in non-parenchymal cells including liver-resident macrophages (Kupffer cells). Remarkably, ectopic upregulation of this miRNA in the liver of mice using robust hepatotropic adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) vectors enhanced GAP's protective capacity substantially. In turn, this AAV8-mediated miR-155 expression permitted a reduction of GAP injections needed to achieve complete protection against infectious parasite challenge from previously three to only one. Our study highlights a crucial role of mammalian miRNAs in Plasmodium liver infection in vivo and concurrently implies their great potential as future immune-augmenting agents in improved vaccination regimes against malaria and other diseases. PMID:25189739

  10. Biochemical, genetic, and metabolic engineering strategies to enhance coproduction of 1-propanol and ethanol in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srirangan, Kajan; Liu, Xuejia; Westbrook, Adam; Akawi, Lamees; Pyne, Michael E; Moo-Young, Murray; Chou, C Perry

    2014-11-01

    We recently reported the heterologous production of 1-propanol in Escherichia coli via extended dissimilation of succinate under anaerobic conditions through expression of the endogenous sleeping beauty mutase (Sbm) operon. In the present work, we demonstrate high-level coproduction of 1-propanol and ethanol by developing novel engineered E. coli strains with effective cultivation strategies. Various biochemical, genetic, metabolic, and physiological factors affecting relative levels of acidogenesis and solventogenesis during anaerobic fermentation were investigated. In particular, CPC-PrOH3, a plasmid-free propanogenic E. coli strain derived by activating the Sbm operon on the genome, showed high levels of solventogenesis accounting for up to 85 % of dissimilated carbon. Anaerobic fed-batch cultivation of CPC-PrOH3 with glycerol as the major carbon source produced high titers of nearly 7 g/L 1-propanol and 31 g/L ethanol, implying its potential industrial applicability. The activated Sbm pathway served as an ancillary channel for consuming reducing equivalents upon anaerobic dissimilation of glycerol, resulting in an enhanced glycerol dissimilation and a major metabolic shift from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. PMID:25301579

  11. A rapid method for detection of genetically modified organisms based on magnetic separation and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Guven, Burcu; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Tamer, Ugur; Çalık, Pınar

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a new method combining magnetic separation (MS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was developed to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs). An oligonucleotide probe which is specific for 35 S DNA target was immobilized onto gold coated magnetic nanospheres to form oligonucleotide-coated nanoparticles. A self assembled monolayer was formed on gold nanorods using 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and the second probe of the 35 S DNA target was immobilized on the activated nanorod surfaces. Probes on the nanoparticles were hybridized with the target oligonucleotide. Optimization parameters for hybridization were investigated by high performance liquid chromatography. Optimum hybridization parameters were determined as: 4 μM probe concentration, 20 min immobilization time, 30 min hybridization time, 55 °C hybridization temperature, 750 mM buffer salt concentration and pH: 7.4. Quantification of the target concentration was performed via SERS spectra of DTNB on the nanorods. The correlation between the target concentration and the SERS signal was found to be linear within the range of 25-100 nM. The analyses were performed with only one hybridization step in 40 min. Real sample analysis was conducted using Bt-176 maize sample. The results showed that the developed MS-SERS assay is capable of detecting GMOs in a rapid and selective manner. PMID:22049365

  12. Expression of Rice Chitinase Gene in Genetically Engineered Tomato Confers Enhanced Resistance to Fusarium Wilt and Early Blight

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Nyla; Chaudhary, Zubeda; Gulfraz, Muhammad; Rashid, Hamid; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study reporting the evaluation of transgenic lines of tomato harboring rice chitinase (RCG3) gene for resistance to two important fungal pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) causing fusarium wilt and Alternaria solani causing early blight (EB). In this study, three transgenic lines TL1, TL2 and TL3 of tomato Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Riogrande genetically engineered with rice chitinase (RCG 3) gene and their R1 progeny was tested for resistance to Fol by root dip method and A. solani by detached leaf assay. All the R0 transgenic lines were highly resistant to these fungal pathogens compared to non-transgenic control plants. The pattern of segregation of three independent transformant for Fol and A. solani was also studied. Mendelian segregation was observed in transgenic lines 2 and 3 while it was not observed in transgenic line 1. It was concluded that introduction of chitinase gene in susceptible cultivar of tomato not only enhanced the resistance but was stably inherited in transgenic lines 2 and 3. PMID:26361473

  13. Genetic engineering to enhance the Ehrlich pathway and alter carbon flux for increased isobutanol production from glucose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takashi; Tezuka, Hironori; Ishii, Jun; Matsuda, Fumio; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-05-31

    The production of higher alcohols by engineered bacteria has received significant attention. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has considerable potential as a producer of higher alcohols because of its capacity to naturally fabricate fusel alcohols, in addition to its robustness and tolerance to low pH. However, because its natural productivity is not significant, we considered a strategy of genetic engineering to increase production of the branched-chain higher alcohol isobutanol, which is involved in valine biosynthesis. Initially, we overexpressed 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in S. cerevisiae to enhance the endogenous activity of the Ehrlich pathway. We then overexpressed Ilv2, which catalyzes the first step in the valine synthetic pathway, and deleted the PDC1 gene encoding a major pyruvate decarboxylase with the intent of altering the abundant ethanol flux via pyruvate. Through these engineering steps, along with modification of culture conditions, the isobutanol titer of S. cerevisiae was elevated 13-fold, from 11 mg/l to 143 mg/l, and the yield was 6.6 mg/g glucose, which is higher than any previously reported value for S. cerevisiae. PMID:22342368

  14. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  15. Achieving yield gains in wheat.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew; Foulkes, John; Furbank, Robert; Griffiths, Simon; King, Julie; Murchie, Erik; Parry, Martin; Slafer, Gustavo

    2012-10-01

    Wheat provides 20% of calories and protein consumed by humans. Recent genetic gains are <1% per annum (p.a.), insufficient to meet future demand. The Wheat Yield Consortium brings expertise in photosynthesis, crop adaptation and genetics to a common breeding platform. Theory suggest radiation use efficiency (RUE) of wheat could be increased ~50%; strategies include modifying specificity, catalytic rate and regulation of Rubisco, up-regulating Calvin cycle enzymes, introducing chloroplast CO(2) concentrating mechanisms, optimizing light and N distribution of canopies while minimizing photoinhibition, and increasing spike photosynthesis. Maximum yield expression will also require dynamic optimization of source: sink so that dry matter partitioning to reproductive structures is not at the cost of the roots, stems and leaves needed to maintain physiological and structural integrity. Crop development should favour spike fertility to maximize harvest index so phenology must be tailored to different photoperiods, and sensitivity to unpredictable weather must be modulated to reduce conservative responses that reduce harvest index. Strategic crossing of complementary physiological traits will be augmented with wide crossing, while genome-wide selection and high throughput phenotyping and genotyping will increase efficiency of progeny screening. To ensure investment in breeding achieves agronomic impact, sustainable crop management must also be promoted through crop improvement networks. PMID:22860982

  16. Genetic Modification of the Soybean to Enhance the β-Carotene Content through Seed-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Pak, Jung Hun; Lee, Jai-Heon; Kim, Doh-Hoon; Choi, Hong Kyu; Jung, Ho Won; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Chung, Young-Soo; Ha, Sun-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway was genetically manipulated using the recombinant PAC (Phytoene synthase-2A-Carotene desaturase) gene in Korean soybean (Glycine max L. cv. Kwangan). The PAC gene was linked to either the β-conglycinin (β) or CaMV-35S (35S) promoter to generate β-PAC and 35S-PAC constructs, respectively. A total of 37 transgenic lines (19 for β-PAC and 18 for 35S-PAC) were obtained through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using the modified half-seed method. The multi-copy insertion of the transgene was determined by genomic Southern blot analysis. Four lines for β-PAC were selected by visual inspection to confirm an orange endosperm, which was not found in the seeds of the 35S-PAC lines. The strong expression of PAC gene was detected in the seeds of the β-PAC lines and in the leaves of the 35S-PAC lines by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analyses, suggesting that these two different promoters function distinctively. HPLC analysis of the seeds and leaves of the T2 generation plants revealed that the best line among the β-PAC transgenic seeds accumulated 146 µg/g of total carotenoids (approximately 62-fold higher than non-transgenic seeds), of which 112 µg/g (77%) was β-carotene. In contrast, the level and composition of the leaf carotenoids showed little difference between transgenic and non-transgenic soybean plants. We have therefore demonstrated the production of a high β-carotene soybean through the seed-specific overexpression of two carotenoid biosynthetic genes, Capsicum phytoene synthase and Pantoea carotene desaturase. This nutritional enhancement of soybean seeds through the elevation of the provitamin A content to produce biofortified food may have practical health benefits in the future in both humans and livestock. PMID:23118971

  17. Two Genetically and Molecularly Distinct Functions Involved in Early Neurogenesis Reside within the Enhancer of Split Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Delidakis, C.; Preiss, A.; Hartley, D. A.; Artavanis-Tsakonas, S.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular correlation of the genetic aspects of the function of the neurogenic gene Enhancer of split [E(spl)] has previously been hampered by the densely transcribed nature of the chromosomal region within which it resides. We present data indicating that two distinct molecular species contribute to E(spl) function. Analysis of new E(spl) alleles has allowed us to define two complementing functions within the locus. Subsequent phenotypic analysis of different E(spl) deficiencies combined with P element-transformed constructs has demonstrated that these two functions correspond to: (1) a family of helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein-encoding genes and (2) the single copy gene E(spl) m9/10, whose product shares homology with G-protein β subunits. The zygotically active E(spl) HLH genes can, at least partially, substitute for one another's functions and their total copy number determines the activity of the locus. E(spl) m9/10 acts synergistically with the E(spl) HLH genes and other neurogenic genes in the process of neurogenesis. The maternal component of E(spl) m9/10 has the most pronounced effect in neurogenesis, while its zygotic component is predominantly required during postembryonic development. The lethality of trans-heterozygotes of null E(spl) deficiency alleles with a strong Delta point mutation is a result of the concomitant reduction in activity of both E(spl) HLH and m9/10 functions. Immunocytochemical localization of the E(spl) m9/10 protein has revealed that it is a ubiquitously distributed nuclear component in embryonic, larval and imaginal tissues. PMID:1752423

  18. Stock enhancement or sea ranching? Insights from monitoring the genetic diversity, relatedness and effective population size in a seeded great scallop population (Pecten maximus).

    PubMed

    Morvezen, R; Boudry, P; Laroche, J; Charrier, G

    2016-09-01

    The mass release of hatchery-propagated stocks raises numerous questions concerning its efficiency in terms of local recruitment and effect on the genetic diversity of wild populations. A seeding program, consisting of mass release of hatchery-produced juveniles in the local naturally occurring population of great scallops (Pecten maximus L.), was initiated in the early 1980s in the Bay of Brest (France). The present study aims at evaluating whether this seeding program leads to actual population enhancement, with detectable effects on genetic diversity and effective population size, or consists of sea ranching with limited genetic consequences on the wild stock. To address this question, microsatellite-based genetic monitoring of three hatchery-born and naturally recruited populations was conducted over a 5-year period. Results showed a limited reduction in allelic richness but a strong alteration of allelic frequencies in hatchery populations, while genetic diversity appeared very stable over time in the wild populations. A temporal increase in relatedness was observed in both cultured stock and wild populations. Effective population size (Ne) estimates were low and variable in the wild population. Moreover, the application of the Ryman-Laikre model suggested a high contribution of hatchery-born scallops to the reproductive output of the wild population. Overall, the data suggest that the main objective of the seeding program, which is stock enhancement, is fulfilled. Moreover, gene flow from surrounding populations and/or the reproductive input of undetected sub-populations within the bay may buffer the Ryman-Laikre effect and ensure the retention of the local genetic variability. PMID:27353046

  19. Amoco technique gains support

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Amoco Corp.`s low-cost horizontal drilling technique and equipment are gaining acceptance in the oilpatch after five years of design and fine-tuning work. The system is purely mechanical, and it`s designed to operate with a workover rig instead of a drilling rig. It`s engineered to drill short-radius horizontal wells with lateral sup to 1,000 feet, so far.

  20. The gain-of-function enhancement of IP3-receptor channel gating by familial Alzheimer's disease-linked presenilin mutants increases the open probability of mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Toglia, Patrick; Ullah, Ghanim

    2016-07-01

    Mutants in presenilins (PS1 or PS2) are the major cause of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). They affect intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis by increasing the open probability (Po) of inositol 1,4,5-trisposphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) Ca(2+) release channel located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leading to exaggerated Ca(2+) release into a cytoplasmic microdomain formed by neighboring cluster of a few IP3R channels and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). Ca(2+) concentration in the microdomain ( [Formula: see text] ) depends on the distance between the cluster and MCU (r); the number of IP3R in the cluster releasing Ca(2+) to the cytoplasm ( [Formula: see text] ), and Po of IP3R. Using experimental whole-cell IP3R-mediated cytosolic Ca(2+) data, in conjunction with a computational model of cell bioenergetics, a data-driven Markov chain model for IP3R gating, and a model for the dynamics of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), we explore differences in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in cells expressing wild type (PS1-WT) and FAD-causing mutant (PS1-M146L) PS. We find that increased mitochondrial [Formula: see text] due to the gain-of-function enhancement of IP3R channels in the cells expressing PS1-M146L leads to the opening of PTP in high conductance state (PTPh), where the latency of opening is inversely correlated with r and proportional to [Formula: see text] . Furthermore, we observe diminished inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), [NADH], [Formula: see text] , and [ATP] when PTP opens. Additionally, we explore how parameters such as the pH gradient, inorganic phosphate concentration, and the rate of the Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger affect the latency of PTP to open in PTPh. PMID:27184076

  1. Collapsible high gain antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribb, H. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A lightweight small high gain antenna which is capable of being packaged in a collapsed form and automatically expanded when in use is described. The antenna includes a cylindrical housing having a rod with a piston adjacent to one end extending through it. Attached to the outer end of the rod in a normally collapsed state is a helical wire coil. When the gas producing means is activated the piston and rod are shifted outwardly to expand the wire coil. A latch is provided for holding the helical coil in the expanded position.

  2. Helicopter high gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, T. B.; Nunn, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    High gain control is explored through a design study of the CH-47B helicopter. The plans are designed to obtain the maximum bandwidth possible given the hardware constraints. Controls are designed with modal control theory to specific bandwidths and closed loop mode shapes. Comparisons are made to an earlier complementary filter approach. Bandwidth improvement by removal of limitations is explored in order to establish hardware and mechanization options. Improvements in the pitch axis control system and in the rate gyro sensor noise characteristics in all axes are discussed. The use of rotor state feedback is assessed.

  3. Gaining a Professional Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonen, Ruth; Griffith, Phyllis

    1998-01-01

    The American School Food Service Association has two recognition programs: the recently revised School Foodservice and Nutrition Certification Program and the new School Foodservice and Nutrition Specialist Credentialing Program. The credentialing program was created to enhance school food-service professionals' image and improve their management…

  4. FEL gain optimisation and spontaneous radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, L.M.; Srivastava, A.; Pandya, T.P.

    1995-12-31

    Colson have evaluated FEL gains for small deviations from perfect electron beam injection, with radiation of the same polarisation as that of the wiggler fields. We find that for optimum gain the polarisation of the optical field should be the same as that of the spontaneous emission under these conditions. With a helical wiggler the axial oscillations resulting from small departures from perfect electron beam injection lead to injection dependent unequal amplitudes and phases of the spontaneous radiation in the two transverse directions. Viewed along the axis therefore the spontaneous emission is elliptically polarised. The azimuth of the ellipse varies with the difference of phase of the two transverse components of spontaneous emission but the eccentricity remains the same. With planar wigglers the spontaneous emission viewed in the axial direction is linearly polarised, again with an injection dependent azimuth. For optimum coherent gain of a radiation field its polarisation characteristics must be the same as those of the spontaneous radiation with both types of wiggler. Thus, with a helical wiggler and the data reported earlier, an increase of 10% in the FEL gain at the fundamental frequency and of 11% at the fifth harmonic has been calculated in the small gain per pass limit. Larger enhancements in gain may result from more favourable values of input parameters.

  5. Cochlear gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Marcel

    2005-03-01

    The nonlinear auditory phenomena of compression, suppression, and distortion are known to have a cochlear-mechanical origin. An instantaneous nonlinear transfer function is often assumed to underlie these phenomena, but there are experimental indications that auditory nonlinearity is sluggish rather than instantaneous. This study analyzes the consequences of such sluggishness, using automatic gain control (AGC) as a model noninstantaneous nonlinearity. The distinctive characteristic of AGC, its delayed action, is shown to produce a number of observable and measurable effects that distinguish AGC from instantaneous nonlinearities. A major class of such AGC-specific effects concerns the phase of aural distortion products. For example, the phase of the cancellation tone in the classical psychoacoustic cancellation paradigm is linearly related to the frequency spacing of the primary tones in an AGC, as opposed to the square-law relationship produced by an instantaneous nonlinearity. These and other predictions are confronted with experimental data from the literature. The impact of putative AGC-related delays on the interpretation of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) is discussed. Detailed suggestions are made for experiments specifically aimed at determining whether cochlear nonlinearity is instantaneous or delayed. .

  6. Managing price, gaining profit.

    PubMed

    Marn, M V; Rosiello, R L

    1992-01-01

    The fastest and most effective way for a company to realize maximum profit is to get its pricing right. The right price can boost profit faster than increasing volume will; the wrong price can shrink it just as quickly. Yet many otherwise tough-minded managers miss out on significant profits because they shy away from pricing decisions for fear that they will alienate their customers. Worse, if management isn't controlling its pricing policies, there's a good chance that the company's clients are manipulating them to their own advantage. McKinsey & Company's Michael Marn and Robert Rosiello show managers how to gain control of the pricing puzzle and capture untapped profit potential by using two basic concepts: the pocket price waterfall and the pocket price band. The pocket price waterfall reveals how price erodes between a company's invoice figure and the actual amount paid by the customer--the transaction price. It tracks the volume purchase discounts, early payment bonuses, and frequent customer incentives that squeeze a company's profits. The pocket price band plots the range of pocket prices over which any given unit volume of a single product sells. Wide price bands are commonplace: some manufacturers' transaction prices for a given product range 60%; one fastener supplier's price band ranged up to 500%. Managers who study their pocket price waterfalls and bands can identify unnecessary discounting at the transaction level, low-performance accounts, and misplaced marketing efforts. The problems, once identified, are typically easy and inexpensive to remedy. PMID:10121318

  7. Acting to gain information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenchein, Stanley J.; Burns, J. Brian; Chapman, David; Kaelbling, Leslie P.; Kahn, Philip; Nishihara, H. Keith; Turk, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    This report is concerned with agents that act to gain information. In previous work, we developed agent models combining qualitative modeling with real-time control. That work, however, focused primarily on actions that affect physical states of the environment. The current study extends that work by explicitly considering problems of active information-gathering and by exploring specialized aspects of information-gathering in computational perception, learning, and language. In our theoretical investigations, we analyzed agents into their perceptual and action components and identified these with elements of a state-machine model of control. The mathematical properties of each was developed in isolation and interactions were then studied. We considered the complexity dimension and the uncertainty dimension and related these to intelligent-agent design issues. We also explored active information gathering in visual processing. Working within the active vision paradigm, we developed a concept of 'minimal meaningful measurements' suitable for demand-driven vision. We then developed and tested an architecture for ongoing recognition and interpretation of visual information. In the area of information gathering through learning, we explored techniques for coping with combinatorial complexity. We also explored information gathering through explicit linguistic action by considering the nature of conversational rules, coordination, and situated communication behavior.

  8. A Model Inquiry-Based Genetics Experiment for Introductory Biology Students: Screening for Enhancers & Suppressors of Ptpmeg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setty, Sumana; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.

    2015-01-01

    It has been noted that undergraduate project-based laboratories lead to increased interest in scientific research and student understanding of biological concepts. We created a novel, inquiry-based, multiweek genetics research project studying Ptpmeg, for the Introductory Biology Laboratory course at Brandeis University. Ptpmeg is a protein…

  9. On Comparing Transition Rate Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuterberg, Sven-Eric

    This report is about the problem of making transition or enrollment rate gains comparable. It is shown that measures based on the proportions themselves, i.e. the difference between proportions, the proportion ratio and the residual gain ratio do not make the gains comparable. Instead a non-linear transformation has to be done. Two such…

  10. Airflow models gaining clout

    SciTech Connect

    Post, N.M.

    1994-10-10

    Move over, mock-ups. So long, smoke bombs. Take a walk, wind tunnels. Computational fluid dynamics, a spaceage simulation technique, is gaining velocity in the building community. And the design of inner spaces may never be the same. CFD is an equation-intensive computer modeling method that can simulate transient and steady-state airflow patterns and temperature gradients, indoors or out. CFD is used to downsize heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, locate air outlets, and in general, create spaces that offer creature comfort, provide quality air and use less energy. The method is good for new construction, retrofits and forensic work, for example to investigate a building fire or a contaminant. In a room, CFD helps engineers consider, over a period of time, the combined impacts of ventilation, size, shape, contents, weather, even fenestration. For its first decade or two, CFD stayed the near-exclusive domain of aerospace, defense and electronics. With few exceptions, the building community could not afford the supercomputers that were needed to run the tens of thousands of equations involved. However, in the past few years, thanks to the increasing power and decreasing cost of computers, CFD simulation became practical. Curtain wall designers are even using it, though not without some controversy. Indoor air quality specialists, smoke and fire-spread researchers, laboratory designers, energy engineers, code writers, architects, and plant and building engineers are uncharacteristically upbeat about the tool. {open_quotes}CFD modeling is so many light years ahead of design tools that exist,{close_quotes} says Mariano Rodriguez, director of research and development for architect The Hillier Group, Princeton, N.J. {open_quotes}It`s the next step up from a wind tunnel test, and you don`t need a $300,000 wind tunnel.{close_quotes}

  11. Post-Zygotic and Inter-Individual Structural Genetic Variation in a Presumptive Enhancer Element of the Locus between the IL10Rβ and IFNAR1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Kancherla Reddy; Przerada, Szymon; Paprocka, Hanna; Zywicka, Anna; Westerman, Maxwell P.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Srutek, Ewa; Jankowski, Michal; Zegarski, Wojciech; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Although historically considered as junk-DNA, tandemly repeated sequence motifs can affect human phenotype. For example, variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) with embedded enhancers have been shown to regulate gene transcription. The post-zygotic variation is the presence of genetically distinct populations of cells in an individual derived from a single zygote, and this is an understudied aspect of genome biology. We report somatically variable VNTR with sequence properties of an enhancer, located upstream of IFNAR1. Initially, SNP genotyping of 63 monozygotic twin pairs and multiple tissues from 21 breast cancer patients suggested a frequent post-zygotic mosaicism. The VNTR displayed a repeated 32 bp core motif in the center of the repeat, which was flanked by similar variable motifs. A total of 14 alleles were characterized based on combinations of segments, which showed post-zygotic and inter-individual variation, with up to 6 alleles in a single subject. Somatic variation occurred in ∼24% of cases. In this hypervariable region, we found a clustering of transcription factor binding sites with strongest sequence similarity to mouse Foxg1 transcription factor binding motif. This study describes a VNTR with sequence properties of an enhancer that displays post-zygotic and inter-individual genetic variation. This element is within a locus containing four related cytokine receptors: IFNAR2, IL10Rβ, IFNAR1 and IFNGR2, and we hypothesize that it might function in transcriptional regulation of several genes in this cluster. Our findings add another level of complexity to the variation among VNTR-based enhancers. Further work may unveil the normal function of this VNTR in transcriptional control and its possible involvement in diseases connected with these receptors, such as autoimmune conditions and cancer. PMID:24023707

  12. Recent and Projected Increases in Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Can Enhance Gene Flow between Wild and Genetically Altered Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Ziska, Lewis H.; Gealy, David R.; Tomecek, Martha B.; Jackson, Aaron K.; Black, Howard L.

    2012-01-01

    Although recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide can alter plant phenological development, these changes have not been quantified in terms of floral outcrossing rates or gene transfer. Could differential phenological development in response to rising CO2 between genetically modified crops and wild, weedy relatives increase the spread of novel genes, potentially altering evolutionary fitness? Here we show that increasing CO2 from an early 20th century concentration (300 µmol mol−1) to current (400 µmol mol−1) and projected, mid-21st century (600 µmol mol−1) values, enhanced the flow of genes from wild, weedy rice to the genetically altered, herbicide resistant, cultivated population, with outcrossing increasing from 0.22% to 0.71% from 300 to 600 µmol mol−1. The increase in outcrossing and gene transfer was associated with differential increases in plant height, as well as greater tiller and panicle production in the wild, relative to the cultivated population. In addition, increasing CO2 also resulted in a greater synchronicity in flowering times between the two populations. The observed changes reported here resulted in a subsequent increase in rice dedomestication and a greater number of weedy, herbicide-resistant hybrid progeny. Overall, these data suggest that differential phenological responses to rising atmospheric CO2 could result in enhanced flow of novel genes and greater success of feral plant species in agroecosystems. PMID:22649533

  13. Genetic Resistance to Malaria Is Associated With Greater Enhancement of Immunoglobulin (Ig)M Than IgG Responses to a Broad Array of Plasmodium falciparum Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Arama, Charles; Skinner, Jeff; Doumtabe, Didier; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M.; Jain, Aarti; Traore, Boubacar; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Davies, David Huw; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Dolo, Amagana; Felgner, Philip L.; Crompton, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. People of the Fulani ethnic group are more resistant to malaria compared with genetically distinct ethnic groups, such as the Dogon people, in West Africa, and studies suggest that this resistance is mediated by enhanced antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum antigens. However, prior studies measured antibody responses to <0.1% of P falciparum proteins, so whether the Fulani mount an enhanced and broadly reactive immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG response to P falciparum remains unknown. In general, little is known about the extent to which host genetics influence the overall antigen specificity of IgM and IgG responses to natural infections. Methods. In a cross-sectional study in Mali, we collected plasma from asymptomatic, age-matched Fulani (n = 24) and Dogon (n = 22) adults with or without concurrent P falciparum infection. We probed plasma against a protein microarray containing 1087 P falciparum antigens and compared IgM and IgG profiles by ethnicity. Results. We found that the breadth and magnitude of P falciparum-specific IgM and IgG responses were significantly higher in the malaria-resistant Fulani versus the malaria-susceptible Dogon, and, unexpectedly, P falciparum-specific IgM responses more strongly distinguished the 2 ethnic groups. Conclusions. These findings point to an underappreciated role for IgM in protection from malaria, and they suggest that host genetics may influence the antigen specificity of IgM and IgG responses to infection. PMID:26361633

  14. emGain: Determination of EM gain of CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Olivier; Carignan, Claude; Blais-Ouellette, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    The determination of the EM gain of the CCD is best done by fitting the histogram of many low-light frames. Typically, the dark+CIC noise of a 30ms frame itself is a sufficient amount of signal to determine accurately the EM gain with about 200 512x512 frames. The IDL code emGain takes as an input a cube of frames and fit the histogram of all the pixels with the EM stage output probability function. The function returns the EM gain of the frames as well as the read-out noise and the mean signal level of the frames.

  15. Gain-assisted transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hao, Jiaming; Tang, Xiaohong; Zouhdi, Said

    2011-04-25

    Loss severely degrades the cloaking effect of the device designed by traditional transformation. In this letter, we propose gain-assisted transformation optics to overcome the loss problem by introducing gain media into a spherical cloak. The gain media, which can amplify the electromagnetic fields, is controlled precisely to compensate the inherent loss in experimental realization of cloaks. We discuss the significance of controlling embedded gain materials in the context of the inverse design mechanism, which allows us to wisely select realizable materials with constant gain and loss along the radius. For practical realizations, isotropic spherical gain-assisted cloak is designed. Full-wave simulations validate the proposed design concept, which can be utilized to alleviate the inevitable loss problem in transformational optical devices. PMID:21643112

  16. Embryos of Robertsonian Translocation Carriers Exhibit a Mitotic Interchromosomal Effect That Enhances Genetic Instability during Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Alfarawati, Samer; Fragouli, Elpida; Colls, Pere; Wells, Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Balanced chromosomal rearrangements represent one of the most common forms of genetic abnormality affecting approximately 1 in every 500 (0.2%) individuals. Difficulties processing the abnormal chromosomes during meiosis lead to an elevated risk of chromosomally abnormal gametes, resulting in high rates of miscarriage and/or children with congenital abnormalities. It has also been suggested that the presence of chromosome rearrangements may also cause an increase in aneuploidy affecting structurally normal chromosomes, due to disruption of chromosome alignment on the spindle or disturbance of other factors related to meiotic chromosome segregation. The existence of such a phenomenon (an inter-chromosomal effect—ICE) remains controversial, with different studies presenting contradictory data. The current investigation aimed to demonstrate conclusively whether an ICE truly exists. For this purpose a comprehensive chromosome screening technique, optimized for analysis of minute amounts of tissue, was applied to a unique collection of samples consisting of 283 oocytes and early embryos derived from 44 patients carrying chromosome rearrangements. A further 5,078 oocytes and embryos, derived from chromosomally normal individuals of identical age, provided a robust control group for comparative analysis. A highly significant (P = 0.0002) increase in the rate of malsegregation affecting structurally normal chromosomes was observed in association with Robertsonian translocations. Surprisingly, the ICE was clearly detected in early embryos from female carriers, but not in oocytes, indicating the possibility of mitotic rather than the previously suggested meiotic origin. These findings have implications for our understanding of genetic stability during preimplantation development and are of clinical relevance for patients carrying a Robertsonian translocation. The results are also pertinent to other situations when cellular mechanisms for maintaining genetic fidelity

  17. The potential for enhancing the power of genetic association studies in African Americans through the reuse of existing genotype data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gary K; Millikan, Robert C; John, Esther M; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J; Chanock, Stephen J; Ziegler, Regina G; Bandera, Elisa V; Henderson, Brian E; Haiman, Christopher A; Stram, Daniel O

    2010-09-01

    We consider the feasibility of reusing existing control data obtained in genetic association studies in order to reduce costs for new studies. We discuss controlling for the population differences between cases and controls that are implicit in studies utilizing external control data. We give theoretical calculations of the statistical power of a test due to Bourgain et al (Am J Human Genet 2003), applied to the problem of dealing with case-control differences in genetic ancestry related to population isolation or population admixture. Theoretical results show that there may exist bounds for the non-centrality parameter for a test of association that places limits on study power even if sample sizes can grow arbitrarily large. We apply this method to data from a multi-center, geographically-diverse, genome-wide association study of breast cancer in African-American women. Our analysis of these data shows that admixture proportions differ by center with the average fraction of European admixture ranging from approximately 20% for participants from study sites in the Eastern United States to 25% for participants from West Coast sites. However, these differences in average admixture fraction between sites are largely counterbalanced by considerable diversity in individual admixture proportion within each study site. Our results suggest that statistical correction for admixture differences is feasible for future studies of African-Americans, utilizing the existing controls from the African-American Breast Cancer study, even if case ascertainment for the future studies is not balanced over the same centers or regions that supplied the controls for the current study. PMID:20824062

  18. Genetic Deletion of the Transcriptional Repressor NFIL3 Enhances Axon Growth In Vitro but Not Axonal Repair In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    van der Kallen, Loek R.; Eggers, Ruben; Ehlert, Erich M.; Verhaagen, Joost; Smit, August B.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal regeneration after injury requires the coordinated expression of genes in injured neurons. We previously showed that either reducing expression or blocking function of the transcriptional repressor NFIL3 activates transcription of regeneration-associated genes Arg1 and Gap43 and strongly promotes axon outgrowth in vitro. Here we tested whether genetic deletion or dominant-negative inhibition of NFIL3 could promote axon regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve lesion in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, we observed no changes in the expression of regeneration-associated genes and a significant delay in functional recovery following genetic deletion of Nfil3. When NFIL3 function was inhibited specifically in dorsal root ganglia prior to sciatic nerve injury, we observed a decrease in regenerative axon growth into the distal nerve segment rather than an increase. Finally, we show that deletion of Nfil3 changes sciatic nerve lesion-induced expression in dorsal root ganglia of genes that are not typically involved in regeneration, including several olfactory receptors and developmental transcription factors. Together our findings show that removal of NFIL3 in vivo does not recapitulate the regeneration-promoting effects that were previously observed in vitro, indicating that in vivo transcriptional control of regeneration is probably more complex and more robust against perturbation than in vitro data may suggest. PMID:25993115

  19. A Web-based database of genetic association studies in cutaneous melanoma enhanced with network-driven data exploration tools.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I; Antonopoulou, Kyriaki; Chatzinasiou, Foteini; Lill, Christina M; Bourdakou, Marilena M; Sakellariou, Argiris; Kypreou, Katerina; Stefanaki, Irene; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P A; Bertram, Lars; Stratigos, Alexander J; Spyrou, George M

    2014-01-01

    The publicly available online database MelGene provides a comprehensive, regularly updated, collection of data from genetic association studies in cutaneous melanoma (CM), including random-effects meta-analysis results of all eligible polymorphisms. The updated database version includes data from 192 publications with information on 1114 significantly associated polymorphisms across 280 genes, along with new front-end and back-end capabilities. Various types of relationships between data are calculated and visualized as networks. We constructed 13 different networks containing the polymorphisms and the genes included in MelGene. We explored the derived network representations under the following questions: (i) are there nodes that deserve consideration regarding their network connectivity characteristics? (ii) What is the relation of either the genome-wide or nominally significant CM polymorphisms/genes with the ones highlighted by the network representation? We show that our network approach using the MelGene data reveals connections between statistically significant genes/ polymorphisms and other genes/polymorphisms acting as 'hubs' in the reconstructed networks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first database containing data from a comprehensive field synopsis and systematic meta-analyses of genetic polymorphisms in CM that provides user-friendly tools for in-depth molecular network visualization and exploration. The proposed network connections highlight potentially new loci requiring further investigation of their relation to melanoma risk. Database URL: http://www.melgene.org. PMID:25380778

  20. A Web-based database of genetic association studies in cutaneous melanoma enhanced with network-driven data exploration tools

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I.; Antonopoulou, Kyriaki; Chatzinasiou, Foteini; Lill, Christina M.; Bourdakou, Marilena M.; Sakellariou, Argiris; Kypreou, Katerina; Stefanaki, Irene; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Bertram, Lars; Stratigos, Alexander J.; Spyrou, George M.

    2014-01-01

    The publicly available online database MelGene provides a comprehensive, regularly updated, collection of data from genetic association studies in cutaneous melanoma (CM), including random-effects meta-analysis results of all eligible polymorphisms. The updated database version includes data from 192 publications with information on 1114 significantly associated polymorphisms across 280 genes, along with new front-end and back-end capabilities. Various types of relationships between data are calculated and visualized as networks. We constructed 13 different networks containing the polymorphisms and the genes included in MelGene. We explored the derived network representations under the following questions: (i) are there nodes that deserve consideration regarding their network connectivity characteristics? (ii) What is the relation of either the genome-wide or nominally significant CM polymorphisms/genes with the ones highlighted by the network representation? We show that our network approach using the MelGene data reveals connections between statistically significant genes/ polymorphisms and other genes/polymorphisms acting as ‘hubs’ in the reconstructed networks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first database containing data from a comprehensive field synopsis and systematic meta-analyses of genetic polymorphisms in CM that provides user-friendly tools for in-depth molecular network visualization and exploration. The proposed network connections highlight potentially new loci requiring further investigation of their relation to melanoma risk. Database URL: http://www.melgene.org. PMID:25380778

  1. Genetic analysis of stress responses in soil bacteria for enhanced bioremediation of mixed contaminants. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.K.

    1997-06-01

    'To provide increased knowledge of stress responses of indigenous microbes at contaminated sites as well as using microbes as molecular probes for monitoring the performance and effectiveness of bioremediation, the authors propose to identify the stress-inducible genes and promoters from two soil bacteria, Deinococcus radiodurans and Sphingomonas F199. These organisms represent two phylogenetically distinct groups of soil bacteria, each of which has specific features of interest for bioremediation. D. radiodurans exhibits high resistance to external stress; F199 is a deep subsurface (Savannah River Site) organism with unique degradative capabilities. Research Statement To realize the full potential of bioremediation, an understanding of microbial community and individual bacterial responses to the stresses encountered at contaminated sites is needed. Knowledge about genetic responses of soil and subsurface bacteria to environmental stresses, which include low nutrients, low oxygen, and mixed pollutants, will allow extrapolation of basic principles to field applications either using indigenous bacteria or genetically engineered microorganisms. Defining bacterial responses to those stresses presents an opportunity for improving bioremediation strategies, and should contribute to environmental management and restoration actions that would reduce the cost and time required to achieve DOE''s cleanup goals.'

  2. Genetically engineered charge modifications to enhance protein separation in aqueous two-phase systems: Charge directed partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, J.R.; Glatz, C.E.

    1995-04-05

    This report continues the authors` examination of the effect of genetically engineered charge modifications on the partitioning behavior of proteins in aqueous two-phase extraction. The genetic modifications consisted of the fusion of charged peptide tails to {beta}-galactosidase and charge-change point mutations to T4 lysozyme. In this study, they examined charge directed partitioning behavior in PEG/dextran systems containing small amounts of the charged polymers diethylaminoethyl-dextran (DEAE-dextran) or dextran sulfate. The best results were obtained when attractive forces between the protein and polymer were present. Nearly 100% of the {beta}-galactosidase, which carries a net negative charge, partitioned to the DEAE-dextran-rich phase regardless of whether the phase was dextran or PEG. In these cases, cloudiness of the protein-rich phases suggest that strong charge interactions resulted in protein/polymer aggregation, which may have contribution to the extreme partitioning. Unlike the potential-driven partitioning reported previously, consistent partitioning trends were observed as a result of the fusion tails, with observed shifts in partition coefficient (K{sub p}) of up to 37-fold. However, these changes could not be solely attributed to charge-based interactions.

  3. Nature's loss, Immunologists gain?

    PubMed

    Aluvihare

    2000-01-01

    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology Nature Publishing Group (2000). ISSN 1471-0072. Monthly First there was Annual Reviews, then came the monthly Elsevier Trends Journals, both of which try to identify hot topics in their chosen fields. The Current Opinion journals followed several years later, and Current Opinion in Cell Biology is presently one of the highest 'impact factor' review journals, with a distinguished board of editors and advisors and a systematic approach to regular coverage of the major fields of cell biology. Important topics are visited once a year, whether or not something specially exciting happened in the last 12 months. Add to this list Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology, the FASEB journal and the countless minireviews in 'real' journals, and you begin to wonder how anyone finds any time for doing experiments, or indeed reading the primary literature. So, into this already crowded field arrive three important newcomers: Nature Reviews in Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Neurosciences, of which the first two will probably interest readers of Journal of Cell Science the most. Backed by the name and money of Nature and edited by experienced Nature staff, it is hard to see how these publications can possibly do other than succeed with writers and readers alike. What's inside the first issue? The cover of Nature Reviews in Molecular Cell Biology presents a 3-colour montage of a blue cell nucleus surrounded by splotches of green GPI-anchored GFP overlaid by orange actin stress fibres that seem to come from somewhere else. This image trails a comprehensive review from Kai Simons and Derek Toomre about Lipid Rafts. There are another five major review articles: calcium puffs and sparks, rings around DNA, HIV inhibitors, kinesin and the circadian clock provide a rich and varied mix of topics from authors who know what they're talking about. Surrounding this core is an entertaining mixture of 'highlights' at the front: news and views about

  4. Genetic Enhancement as Care or as Domination? The Ethics of Asymmetrical Relationships in the Upbringing of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junker-Kenny, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    Should a society oriented towards justice provide parents with the possibility of enhancing their children's genes? The opposing arguments of authors in the Rawls School and of the theorist of communicative action, Jurgen Habermas, are analysed in terms of their key concepts. Their positions are then assessed from the point of view of the…

  5. Electrophoresis-Enhanced Detection of Deoxyribonucleic Acids on a Membrane-Based Lateral Flow Strip Using Avian Influenza H5 Genetic Sequence as the Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Chuang; Chen, Chih-Hung; Fu, Ja-Wei; Yang, Huan-Ching

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a simple strategy to detect a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on a membrane-based lateral flow (MBLF) strip without tedious gel preparation, gel electrophoresis, and EtBr-staining processes. The method also enhances the detection signal of the genetic sample. A direct electric field was applied over two ends of the MBLF strips to induce an electrophoresis of DNAs through the strips. The signal enhancement was demonstrated by the detection of the H5 subtype of avian influenza virus (H5 AIV). This approach showed an excellent selectivity of H5 AIV from other two control species, Arabidopsis thaliana and human PSMA5. It also showed an effective signal repeatability and sensitivity over a series of analyte concentrations. Its detection limit could be enhanced, from 40 ng to 0.1 ng by applying 12 V. The nano-gold particles for the color development were labeled on the capture antibody, and UV-VIS and TEM were used to check if the labeling was successful. This detection strategy could be further developed to apply on the detection of drug-allergic genes at clinics or detection of infectious substances at incident sites by a simple manipulation with an aid of a mini-PCR machine and auxiliary kits. PMID:24603637

  6. Drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-01-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16341287

  7. Drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-08-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16234878

  8. Computer algorithm for coding gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    Development of a computer algorithm for coding gain for use in an automated communications link design system. Using an empirical formula which defines coding gain as used in space communications engineering, an algorithm is constructed on the basis of available performance data for nonsystematic convolutional encoding with soft-decision (eight-level) Viterbi decoding.

  9. CTLA-4 recombinant protein genetically fused to canine Fcepsilon receptor Ialpha enhances allergen specific lymphocyte responses in experimentally sensitized dogs.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Sho; Tsukui, Toshihiro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2004-06-01

    Vaccination with a recombinant antigen fused to a targeting molecule is a potential strategy for inducing efficient immune responses. For the therapeutic purpose of allergic diseases in dogs, a DNA construct which expresses recombinant fusion protein with two functional domains, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA-4) and Fcepsilon receptor Ialpha, was developed to bridge antigen-presenting cells and IgE-allergen complex. The recombinant fusion protein expressed by the DNA construct was demonstrated to retain the ability to bind monocytes in PBMC and dog IgE, respectively. Additionally, the recombinant protein induced enhancement of allergen-induced lymphoproliferation in experimentally sensitized dogs under conditions of suboptimal allergen stimulation. These results indicated that the DNA construct could enhance allergen-induced immune responses in vivo, implying its usefulness for perspective application in immunotherapy in dogs. PMID:15240934

  10. Enhanced (hydrodynamic) transport induced by population growth in reaction–diffusion systems with application to population genetics

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, Marcel Ovidiu; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Ross, John

    2004-01-01

    We consider a system made up of different physical, chemical, or biological species undergoing replication, transformation, and disappearance processes, as well as slow diffusive motion. We show that for systems with net growth the balance between kinetics and the diffusion process may lead to fast, enhanced hydrodynamic transport. Solitary waves in the system, if they exist, stabilize the enhanced transport, leading to constant transport speeds. We apply our theory to the problem of determining the original mutation position from the current geographic distribution of a given mutation. We show that our theory is in good agreement with a simulation study of the mutation problem presented in the literature. It is possible to evaluate migratory trajectories from measured data related to the current distribution of mutations in human populations. PMID:15231998

  11. Genetic Enhancement of Visual Learning by Activation of Protein Kinase C Pathways in Small Groups of Rat Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Wang, Xiaodan; Kong, Lingxin; Lu, Xiu-gui; Lee, Brian; Liu, Meng; Sun, Mei; Franklin, Corinna; Cook, Robert G.; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Although learning and memory theories hypothesize that memories are encoded by specific circuits, it has proven difficult to localize learning within a cortical area. Neural network theories predict that activation of a small fraction of the neurons in a circuit can activate that circuit. Consequently, altering the physiology of a small group of neurons might potentiate a specific circuit and enhance learning, thereby localizing learning to that circuit. In this study, we activated protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in small groups of neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex. We microinjected helper virus-free herpes simplex virus vectors that expressed a constitutively active PKC into POR cortex. This PKC was expressed predominantly in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in POR cortex. This intervention increased phosphorylation of five PKC substrates that play critical roles in neurotransmitter release (GAP-43 and dynamin) or glutamatergic neurotransmission (specific subunits of AMPA or NMDA receptors and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate). Additionally, activation of PKC pathways in cultured cortical neurons supported activation-dependent increases in release of glutamate and GABA. This intervention enhanced the learning rate and accuracy of visual object discriminations. In individual rats, the numbers of transfected neurons positively correlated with this learning. During learning, neuronal activity was increased in neurons proximal to the transfected neurons. These results demonstrate that potentiating small groups of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in POR cortex enhances visual object learning. More generally, these results suggest that learning can be mediated by specific cortical circuits. PMID:16162929

  12. Introductory molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Moulds, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with an overview of the current principles of genetics and molecular genetics. Over this foundation, it adds detailed and specialized information: a description of the translation, transcription, expression and regulation of DNA and RNA; a description of the manipulation of genetic material via promoters, enhancers, and gene splicing; and a description of cloning techniques, especially those for blood group genes. The last chapter looks to the impact of molecular genetics on transfusion medicine.

  13. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer and enhanced green fluorescent protein visualization in the mycorrhizal ascomycete Tuber borchii: a first step towards truffle genetics.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Benedetto; de Raaf, Michiel A; Filetici, Patrizia; Ottonello, Simone; Ballario, Paola

    2005-07-01

    Mycorrhizal ascomycetes are ecologically and commercially important fungi that have proved impervious to genetic transformation so far. We report here on the successful transient transformation of Tuber borchii, an ectomycorrhizal ascomycete that colonizes a variety of trees and produces highly prized hypogeous fruitbodies known as "truffles". A hypervirulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain bearing the binary plasmid pBGgHg was used for transformation. The genes for hygromycin resistance and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), both under the control of vector-borne promoters, were employed as selection markers. Patches of dark and fluorescent hyphae were observed upon fluorescence microscopic examination of hygromycin-resistant mycelia. The presence of EGFP was confirmed by both confocal microscopy and PCR analysis. The lack in the transformed mycelia of the DNA coding for kanamicin resistance (a trait encoded by a vector-borne gene located outside of the T-DNA region) indicates that Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer correctly occurred in T. borchii. PMID:15868150

  14. Enhanced cell surface expression, immunogenicity and genetic stability resulting from a spontaneous truncation of HIV Env expressed by a recombinant MVA

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, Linda S. Belyakov, Igor M.; Earl, Patricia L.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Moss, Bernard

    2008-03-15

    During propagation of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) encoding HIV 89.6 Env, a few viral foci stained very prominently. Virus cloned from such foci replicated to higher titers than the parent and displayed enhanced genetic stability on passage. Sequence analysis showed a single nucleotide deletion in the 89.6 env gene of the mutant that caused a frame shift and truncation of 115 amino acids from the cytoplasmic domain. The truncated Env was more highly expressed on the cell surface, induced higher antibody responses than the full-length Env, reacted with HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and mediated CD4/co-receptor-dependent fusion. Intramuscular (IM), intradermal (ID) needleless, and intrarectal (IR) catheter inoculations gave comparable serum IgG responses. However, intraoral (IO) needleless injector route gave the highest IgA in lung washings and IR gave the highest IgA and IgG responses in fecal extracts. Induction of CTL responses in the spleens of individual mice as assayed by intracellular cytokine staining was similar with both the full-length and truncated Env constructs. Induction of acute and memory CTL in the spleens of mice immunized with the truncated Env construct by ID, IO, and IR routes was comparable and higher than by the IM route, but only the IR route induced CTL in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Thus, truncation of Env enhanced genetic stability as well as serum and mucosal antibody responses, suggesting the desirability of a similar modification in MVA-based candidate HIV vaccines.

  15. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN after a spinal cord injury enhances regenerative growth of CST axons and motor function recovery in mice

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Camelia A.; Steward, Oswald

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that conditional genetic deletion of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in neonatal mice enhances the ability of axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury (SCI) in adults. Here, we assessed whether deleting PTEN in adult neurons post-SCI is also effective, and whether enhanced regenerative growth is accompanied by enhanced recovery of voluntary motor function. PTENloxP/loxP mice received moderate contusion injuries at cervical level 5 (C5). One group received unilateral injections of adeno-associated virus expressing CRE (AAV-CRE) into the sensorimotor cortex; controls received a vector expressing green fluorescent protein (AAV-GFP) or injuries only (no vector injections). Forelimb function was tested for 14 weeks post-SCI using a grip strength meter (GSM) and a hanging task. The corticospinal tract (CST) was traced by injecting mini-ruby BDA into the sensorimotor cortex. Forelimb gripping ability was severely impaired immediately post-SCI but recovered slowly over time. The extent of recovery was significantly greater in PTEN-deleted mice in comparison to either the AAV-GFP group or the injury only group. BDA tract tracing revealed significantly higher numbers of BDA-labeled axons in caudal segments in the PTEN-deleted group compared to control groups. In addition, in the PTEN-deleted group, there were exuberant collaterals extending from the main tract rostral to the lesion, into and around the scar tissue at the injury site. These results indicate that PTEN deletion in adult mice shortly post-SCI can enhance regenerative growth of CST axons and forelimb motor function recovery. PMID:25704959

  16. Reliability of Raw Gain, Residual Gain, and Estimated True Gain Scores: A Simulation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachor, Robert E.; Cizek, Gregory J.

    The gain, or difference, score is defined as the difference between the posttest score and the pretest score for an individual. Gain scores appear to be a natural measure of growth for education and the social sciences, but they contain two sources of measurement error, error in either the pretest or posttest scores, and cannot be considered…

  17. Carbohydrate Modified Diet & Insulin Sensitizers Reduce Body Weight & Modulate Metabolic Syndrome Measures in EMPOWIR (Enhance the Metabolic Profile of Women with Insulin Resistance): A Randomized Trial of Normoglycemic Women with Midlife Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Mogul, Harriette R.; Freeman, Ruth; Nguyen, Khoa; Frey, Michael; Klein, Lee-Ann; Jozak, Sheila; Tanenbaum, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Progressive midlife weight gain is associated with multiple adverse health outcomes and may represent an early manifestation of insulin resistance in a distinct subset of women. Emerging data implicate hyperinsulinema as a proximate cause of weight gain and support strategies that attenuate insulin secretion. Objective To assess a previously reported novel hypocaloric carbohydrate modified diet alone (D), and in combination with metformin (M) and metformin plus low-dose rosiglitazone (MR), in diverse women with midlife weight gain (defined as >20lbs since the twenties), normal glucose tolerance, and hyperinsulinemia. Participants 46 women, mean age 46.6±1.0, BMI 30.5±0.04 kg/m2, 54.5% white, 22.7% black, 15.9% Hispanic, at 2 university medical centers. Methods A dietary intervention designed to reduce insulin excursions was implemented in 4 weekly nutritional group workshops prior to randomization. Main Outcome Measure Change in 6-month fasting insulin. Pre-specified secondary outcomes were changes in body weight, HOMA-IR, metabolic syndrome (MS) measures, leptin, and adiponectin. Results Six-month fasting insulin declined significantly in the M group: 12.5 to 8.0 µU/ml, p = .026. Mean 6-month weight decreased significantly and comparably in D, M, and MR groups: 4.7, 5.4, and 5.5% (p’s.049, .002, and.032). HOMA–IR decreased in M and MR groups (2.5 to 1.6 and 1.9 to 1.3, p’s = .054, .013). Additional improvement in MS measures included reduced waist circumference in D and MR groups and increased HDL in the D and M groups. Notably, mean fasting leptin did not decline in a subset of subjects with weight loss (26.15±2.01 ng/ml to 25.99±2.61 ng/ml, p = .907. Adiponectin increased significantly in the MR group (11.1±1.0 to 18.5±7.4, p<.001) Study medications were well tolerated. Conclusions These findings suggest that EMPOWIR’s easily implemented dietary interventions, alone and in combination with pharmacotherapies that target

  18. Effect of Enhanced Information, Values Clarification, and Removal of Financial Barriers on Use of Prenatal Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kuppermann, Miriam; Pena, Sherri; Bishop, Judith T.; Nakagawa, Sanae; Gregorich, Steven E.; Sit, Anita; Vargas, Juan; Caughey, Aaron B.; Sykes, Susan; Pierce, Lasha; Norton, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Prenatal genetic testing guidelines recommend providing patients with detailed information to allow informed, preference-based screening and diagnostic testing decisions. The effect of implementing these guidelines is not well understood. Objective Toanalyze the effect of a decision support guide and elimination of financial barriers to testing on use of prenatal genetic testing and decision-making among women of varying literacy and numeracy levels. Design Randomized trial conducted from 2010-2013. Setting Prenatal clinics at three county hospitals, a community clinic, an academic center, and three medical centers of an integrated health care delivery system in the San Francisco Bay area. Participants English- or Spanish-speaking women who had not yet undergone screening and/or diagnostic testing and remained pregnant at 11 weeks gestation (n=710). Interventions A computerized, interactive decision support guide and access to prenatal testing with no out-of-pocket expense (n=357) or usual care as per current guidelines (n=353). Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was invasive diagnostic test use, obtained via medical record review. Secondary outcomes included testing strategy undergone, and knowledge, risk comprehension, decisional conflict and decision regret at 24-36 weeks' gestation. Results Women randomized to the intervention group, compared to those randomized to the control group, were less likely to have invasive testing [5.9% vs. 12.3%, odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% CI 0.25-0.80] and more likely to forego testing altogether [25.6% vs. 20.4%, OR 3.30 (reference group screening followed by invasive testing), CI 1.43-7.64]. They also had higher knowledge scores (9.4 vs. 8.6 on a 15-point scale, mean group difference 0.82, CI 0.34-1.31), and were more likely to correctly estimate the amniocentesis-related miscarriage risk (73.8% vs. 59.0%, OR 1.95, CI 1.39-2.75) and their age-adjusted chance of carrying a fetus with trisomy 21 (58.7% vs. 46

  19. Sabbatical leave: who gains and how much?

    PubMed

    Davidson, Oranit B; Eden, Dov; Westman, Mina; Cohen-Charash, Yochi; Hammer, Leslie B; Kluger, Avraham N; Krausz, Moshe; Maslach, Christina; O'Driscoll, Michael; Perrewé, Pamela L; Quick, James Campbell; Rosenblatt, Zehava; Spector, Paul E

    2010-09-01

    A rigorous quasi-experiment tested the ameliorative effects of a sabbatical leave, a special case of respite from routine work. We hypothesized that (a) respite increases resource level and well-being and (b) individual differences and respite features moderate respite effects. A sample of 129 faculty members on sabbatical and 129 matched controls completed measures of resource gain, resource loss, and well-being before, during, and after the sabbatical. Among the sabbatees, resource loss declined and resource gain and well-being rose during the sabbatical. The comparison group showed no change. Moderation analysis revealed that those who reported higher respite self-efficacy and greater control, were more detached, had a more positive sabbatical experience, and spent their sabbatical outside their home country enjoyed more enhanced well-being than others. PMID:20718526

  20. Enhanced antibiotic production by Streptomyces sindenensis using artificial neural networks coupled with genetic algorithm and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, C K M; Khan, Mahvish; Praveen, Vandana; Khan, Saif; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotic production with Streptomyces sindenensis MTCC 8122 was optimized under submerged fermentation conditions by artificial neural network (ANN) coupled with genetic algorithm (GA) and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex (NMDS). Feed forward back-propagation ANN was trained to establish the mathematical relationship among the medium components and length of incubation period for achieving maximum antibiotic yield. The optimization strategy involved growing the culture with varying concentrations of various medium components for different incubation periods. Under non-optimized condition, antibiotic production was found to be 95 microgram/ml, which nearly doubled (176 microgram/ml) with the ANN-GA optimization. ANN-NMDS optimization was found to be more efficacious, and maximum antibiotic production (197 microgram/ml) was obtained by cultivating the cells with (g/l) fructose 2.7602, MgSO4 1.2369, (NH4)2PO4 0.2742, DL-threonine 3.069%, and soyabean meal 1.952%, for 9.8531 days of incubation, which was roughly 12% higher than the yield obtained by ANN coupled with GA under the same conditions. PMID:22580313

  1. The enhanced locating performance of an integrated cross-correlation and genetic algorithm for radio monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Tang; Wu, Chi-Lin; Cheng, Hsu-Chih

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of wireless broadband communication technology has affected the location accuracy of worldwide radio monitoring stations that employ time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) location technology. In this study, TDOA-based location technology was implemented in Taiwan for the first time according to International Telecommunications Union Radiocommunication (ITU-R) recommendations regarding monitoring and location applications. To improve location accuracy, various scenarios, such as a three-dimensional environment (considering an unequal locating antenna configuration), were investigated. Subsequently, the proposed integrated cross-correlation and genetic algorithm was evaluated in the metropolitan area of Tainan. The results indicated that the location accuracy at a circular error probability of 50% was less than 60 m when a multipath effect was present in the area. Moreover, compared with hyperbolic algorithms that have been applied in conventional TDOA-based location systems, the proposed algorithm yielded 17-fold and 19-fold improvements in the mean difference when the location position of the interference station was favorable and unfavorable, respectively. Hence, the various forms of radio interference, such as low transmission power, burst and weak signals, and metropolitan interference, was proved to be easily identified, located, and removed. PMID:24763254

  2. Genetic predisposition to low bone mass is paralleled by an enhanced sensitivity to signals anabolic to the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judex, Stefan; Donahue, Leah-Rae; Rubin, Clinton

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the adult skeleton is determined, in large part, by its genome. Whether genetic variations may influence the effectiveness of interventions to combat skeletal diseases remains unknown. The differential response of trabecular bone to an anabolic (low-level mechanical vibration) and a catabolic (disuse) mechanical stimulus were evaluated in three strains of adult mice. In low bone-mineral-density C57BL/6J mice, the low-level mechanical signal caused significantly larger bone formation rates (BFR) in the proximal tibia, but the removal of functional weight bearing did not significantly alter BFR. In mid-density BALB/cByJ mice, mechanical stimulation also increased BFR, whereas disuse significantly decreased BFR. In contrast, neither anabolic nor catabolic mechanical signals influenced any index of bone formation in high-density C3H/HeJ mice. Together, data from this study indicate that the sensitivity of trabecular tissue to both anabolic and catabolic stimuli is influenced by the genome. Extrapolated to humans, these results may explain in part why prophylaxes for low bone mass are not universally effective, yet also indicate that there may be a genotypic indication of people who are at reduced risk of suffering from bone loss.

  3. The Enhanced Locating Performance of an Integrated Cross-Correlation and Genetic Algorithm for Radio Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yao-Tang; Wu, Chi-Lin; Cheng, Hsu-Chih

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of wireless broadband communication technology has affected the location accuracy of worldwide radio monitoring stations that employ time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) location technology. In this study, TDOA-based location technology was implemented in Taiwan for the first time according to International Telecommunications Union Radiocommunication (ITU-R) recommendations regarding monitoring and location applications. To improve location accuracy, various scenarios, such as a three-dimensional environment (considering an unequal locating antenna configuration), were investigated. Subsequently, the proposed integrated cross-correlation and genetic algorithm was evaluated in the metropolitan area of Tainan. The results indicated that the location accuracy at a circular error probability of 50% was less than 60 m when a multipath effect was present in the area. Moreover, compared with hyperbolic algorithms that have been applied in conventional TDOA-based location systems, the proposed algorithm yielded 17-fold and 19-fold improvements in the mean difference when the location position of the interference station was favorable and unfavorable, respectively. Hence, the various forms of radio interference, such as low transmission power, burst and weak signals, and metropolitan interference, was proved to be easily identified, located, and removed. PMID:24763254

  4. Genetic variants and disease-associated factors contribute to enhanced IRF-5 expression in blood cells of systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Di; Stone, Rivka C.; Program, MD/PhD; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Sangster-Guity, Niquiche; Nordmark, Gunnel; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Wang, Chuan; Alm, Gunnar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars; Barnes, Betsy J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Genetic variants of the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) gene are associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility. The contribution of these variants to IRF-5 expression in primary blood cells of SLE patients has not been addressed, nor has the role of type I IFN. The aim of this study was to determine the association between increased IRF-5 expression and the IRF5 risk haplotype in SLE patients. Methods IRF-5 transcript and protein levels in 44 Swedish patients with SLE and 16 healthy controls were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, minigene assay, and flow cytometry. The rs2004640, rs10954213, rs10488631 and the CGGGG indel were genotyped in these patients. Genotypes of these polymorphisms defined a common risk and protective haplotype. Results IRF-5 expression and alternative splicing were significantly upregulated in SLE patients versus healthy donors. Enhanced transcript and protein levels were associated with the risk haplotype of IRF5; rs10488631 gave the only significant independent association that correlated with increased transcription from non-coding exon 1C. Minigene experiments demonstrated an important role for rs2004640 and the CGGGG indel, along with type I IFNs in regulating IRF-5 expression. Conclusions This study provides the first formal proof that IRF-5 expression and alternative splicing are significantly upregulated in primary blood cells of SLE patients. The risk haplotype is associated with enhanced IRF-5 transcript and protein expression in SLE patients. PMID:20112383

  5. Gaining approval for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Vanessa; Srinivasan, Neil; Lambiase, Pier

    2016-07-01

    Set-up and delivery of a clinical research project can be complicated and difficult. This article introduces the regulatory processes involved in gaining approval for clinical research and discusses the obstacles that may be encountered. PMID:27388381

  6. Information Gain Based Dimensionality Selection for Classifying Text Documents

    SciTech Connect

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Milos Manic; Miles McQueen

    2013-06-01

    Selecting the optimal dimensions for various knowledge extraction applications is an essential component of data mining. Dimensionality selection techniques are utilized in classification applications to increase the classification accuracy and reduce the computational complexity. In text classification, where the dimensionality of the dataset is extremely high, dimensionality selection is even more important. This paper presents a novel, genetic algorithm based methodology, for dimensionality selection in text mining applications that utilizes information gain. The presented methodology uses information gain of each dimension to change the mutation probability of chromosomes dynamically. Since the information gain is calculated a priori, the computational complexity is not affected. The presented method was tested on a specific text classification problem and compared with conventional genetic algorithm based dimensionality selection. The results show an improvement of 3% in the true positives and 1.6% in the true negatives over conventional dimensionality selection methods.

  7. Modal Analysis and Gain Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Interactive program yields eigenvectors, eigenvalues, and gains for feedback-control systems. Interactive Modal Analysis and Gain Estimation System (IMAGES) provides eigensystem synthesis capability to control-system engineer. IMAGES modular and flexible. Capable of both modal and spectral synthesis of multi-input control systems. IMAGES user-oriented, interactive program that frees engineer to concentrate on eigensystem synthesis. Engineer provided with scratch-pad capability that speeds control-system design.

  8. Cryopreservation enhances embryogenic capacity of Gentiana cruciata (L.) suspension culture and maintains (epi)genetic uniformity of regenerants.

    PubMed

    Mikuła, Anna; Tomiczak, Karolina; Rybczyński, Jan J

    2011-04-01

    The embryogenic cell suspension culture of Gentiana cruciata, cryopreserved by the encapsulation/dehydration method, survived both short- (48 h) and long-term (1.5 years) cryostorage with more than 80% viability. To assess the influence of cryotreatments on the embryogenic potential, a proembryogenic mass was encapsulated and exposed to the following treatments: (1) osmotic dehydration (OD), (2) OD + air desiccation (AD) and (3) OD + AD + cryostorage (LN). The somatic embryogenesis efficiency increased ten times after osmotic dehydration. The AD and LN cryotreatments did not cause any significant alterations in somatic embryo production. We monitored the (epi)genetic stability of 288 regenerants derived from: non-cryotreated, short-term, and long-term cryostored tissue using metAFLP markers and ten primer combinations. Changes in the sequence and DNA methylation levels were studied by subjecting the DNA to digestion with two pairs of isoschisomer restriction enzymes (KpnI/MseI and Acc65I/MseI). Two new AFLP unique DNA fragments at the DNA sequence level, with no differences at the methylation level, were found between regenerants derived from cryopreserved tissue, compared with the non-cryotreated controls. The Acc65I/MseI methylation levels for the three groups of regenerants were not significantly different. Cluster analysis was capable of identifying a number of sub-clusters. Only one of the sub-clusters comprises almost all regenerants derived from non-cryotreated and short-term cryostored tissue. Plantlets derived from long-term cryostored tissue were grouped into separate clusters. The observed AFLP alterations did not appear to be associated with the use of cryopreservation, but were probably related to the process of in vitro culture. PMID:21161232

  9. Thalamocortical neurons display suppressed burst-firing due to an enhanced Ih current in a genetic model of absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cain, Stuart M; Tyson, John R; Jones, Karen L; Snutch, Terrance P

    2015-06-01

    Burst-firing in distinct subsets of thalamic relay (TR) neurons is thought to be a key requirement for the propagation of absence seizures. However, in the well-regarded Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) model as yet there has been no link described between burst-firing in TR neurons and spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs). GAERS ventrobasal (VB) neurons are a specific subset of TR neurons that do not normally display burst-firing during absence seizures in the GAERS model, and here, we assessed the underlying relationship of VB burst-firing with Ih and T-type calcium currents between GAERS and non-epileptic control (NEC) animals. In response to 200-ms hyperpolarizing current injections, adult epileptic but not pre-epileptic GAERS VB neurons displayed suppressed burst-firing compared to NEC. In response to longer duration 1,000-ms hyperpolarizing current injections, both pre-epileptic and epileptic GAERS VB neurons required significantly more hyperpolarizing current injection to burst-fire than those of NEC animals. The current density of the Hyperpolarization and Cyclic Nucleotide-activated (HCN) current (Ih) was found to be increased in GAERS VB neurons, and the blockade of Ih relieved the suppressed burst-firing in both pre-epileptic P15-P20 and adult animals. In support, levels of HCN-1 and HCN-3 isoform channel proteins were increased in GAERS VB thalamic tissue. T-type calcium channel whole-cell currents were found to be decreased in P7-P9 GAERS VB neurons, and also noted was a decrease in CaV3.1 mRNA and protein levels in adults. Z944, a potent T-type calcium channel blocker with anti-epileptic properties, completely abolished hyperpolarization-induced VB burst-firing in both NEC and GAERS VB neurons. PMID:24953239

  10. Genetic expression programming-based DBA for enhancing peer-assisted music-on-demand service in EPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, Andrew Tanny; Hwang, I.-Shyan; Nikoukar, AliAkbar; Lee, Jhong-Yue

    2015-03-01

    Today, the popularity of peer-assisted music-on-demand (MoD) has increased significantly worldwide. This service allows users to access large music library tracks, listen to music, and share their playlist with other users. Unlike the conventional voice traffic, such an application maintains music quality that ranges from 160 kbps to 320 kbps, which most likely consumes more bandwidth than other traffics. In the access network, Ethernet passive optical network (EPON) is one of the best candidates for delivering such a service because of being cost-effective and with high bandwidth. To maintain music quality, a stutter needs to be prevented because of either network effects or when the due user was not receiving enough resources to play in a timely manner. Therefore, in this paper, we propose two genetic expression programming (GEP)-based dynamic bandwidth allocations (DBAs). The first DBA is a generic DBA that aims to find an optimum formula for voice, video, and data services. The second DBA aims to find optimum formulas so that Optical Line Terminal (OLT) can satisfy not only the voice and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) MoD traffics but also reduce the stutter. Optical Network Unit (ONU) traits such as REPORT and GATE messages, cycle time, and mean packet delay are set to be predictor variables. Simulation results show that our proposed DBAs can satisfy the voice and P2P MoD services packet delay and monitor other overall system performances such as expedited forwarding (EF) jitter, packet loss, bandwidth waste, and system throughputs.

  11. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory predict gains in mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaoran; Geary, David C

    2013-01-01

    Visuospatial competencies are related to performance in mathematical domains in adulthood, but are not consistently related to mathematics achievement in children. We confirmed the latter for first graders and demonstrated that children who show above average first-to-fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory have an advantage over other children in mathematics. The study involved the assessment of the mathematics and reading achievement of 177 children in kindergarten to fifth grade, inclusive, and their working memory capacity and processing speed in first and fifth grade. Intelligence was assessed in first grade and their second to fourth grade teachers reported on their in-class attentive behavior. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory span (d = 2.4) were larger than gains in the capacity of the central executive (d = 1.6) that in turn were larger than gains in phonological memory span (d = 1.1). First to fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory and in speed of numeral processing predicted end of fifth grade mathematics achievement, as did first grade central executive scores, intelligence, and in-class attentive behavior. The results suggest there are important individual differences in the rate of growth of visuospatial memory during childhood and that these differences become increasingly important for mathematics learning. PMID:23936154

  12. Triticale development in Algeria: genetic gains through decades.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Benbelkacem; Fatiha, Sadli

    2014-01-01

    Algeria started working on triticale since the late seventies, it was first as a scientific curiosity (1974-1980), the production of this crop began in the early eighties and expanded well for a decade (10.000ha) then decreased for another decade due to lack of subsidies and serious interest from decision makers putting all their effort in wheat production which is the predominant crop in the country. Since the 1990s up to date, it is developing again mainly based on feed market requirements (20.500ha in 2001) and a better consideration by stakeholders. Triticale is now developed by the informal seed system. Triticale is grown in Algeria under a wide range of soil and climatic conditions, including dryland and marginal soils. Under high input and rainfall environments, the best triticale cultivars have comparable grain yield with wheat but slightly lower to barley. This advantage is larger under dry conditions. Our study was dealing with an evaluation of the progress made in time since their introduction and selection of triticale varieties. The study was conducted on twenty five varieties and advanced lines, selected in the different phases of triticale development, during the three last seasons (2009 - 2012) in two contrasting regions (semi arid and high input environment) showed very interesting results and a linear improvement in grain yield and its components, and also in the feeding quality traits. The improvement was apparent in both sites; although result data was higher in number in the high input environment, the increase rate was larger in the semi arid area of study. In the favorable area, grain yield increased from 2.94t/ha for the varieties developed in the early phase (late 1970s), to 3.98t/ha for the varieties released in the second phase (1990s) up to 5.45t/ha for the latest varieties developed in the 2000s. Grain yield increased in the dry area from 2.42t/ha to 4.92t/ha. The trend is almost the same for all yield components and even for forage quality traits. PMID:26072575

  13. Lithium and genetic inhibition of GSK3beta enhance the effect of methamphetamine on circadian rhythms in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Miranda-Anaya, Manuel; Tataroglu, Ozgur; Menaker, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Lithium, a drug commonly used to treat mood disorders, and the psychostimulant methamphetamine are both capable of altering circadian rhythmicity. Although the actions of lithium on the circadian system are thought to occur through inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta), the mechanism by which methamphetamine alters circadian rhythms is unknown. We tested the effects of concurrent methamphetamine and lithium treatment on the circadian wheel-running behavior of mice. Methamphetamine alone lengthened both the active duration and the free-running period of locomotor activity in animals housed in constant conditions. Administering lithium enhanced the period-lengthening effects of methamphetamine in animals housed in constant darkness. This effect was even more pronounced when animals were housed in constant light. Lithium increased both methamphetamine intake and serum levels of methamphetamine, possibly contributing to the effects on circadian behavior. We also tested the effect of methamphetamine in mutant mice possessing only one allele for Gsk3beta. These animals, when treated with methamphetamine, responded like wild-type mice treated with a combination of methamphetamine and lithium, displaying long, free-running rhythms. These data, together with many others in the literature, point to a complicated interaction between the circadian system and the development and possible treatment of psychopathologies such as bipolar disorder and drug addiction. PMID:19339873

  14. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  15. The hitchhiker's guide to Xenopus genetics.

    PubMed

    Abu-Daya, Anita; Khokha, Mustafa K; Zimmerman, Lyle B

    2012-03-01

    A decade after the human genome sequence, most vertebrate gene functions remain poorly understood, limiting benefits to human health from rapidly advancing genomic technologies. Systematic in vivo functional analysis is ideally suited to the experimentally accessible Xenopus embryo, which combines embryological accessibility with a broad range of transgenic, biochemical, and gain-of-function assays. The diploid X. tropicalis adds loss-of-function genetics and enhanced genomics to this repertoire. In the last decade, diverse phenotypes have been recovered from genetic screens, mutations have been cloned, and reverse genetics in the form of TILLING and targeted gene editing have been established. Simple haploid genetics and gynogenesis and the very large number of embryos produced streamline screening and mapping. Improved genomic resources and the revolution in high-throughput sequencing are transforming mutation cloning and reverse genetic approaches. The combination of loss-of-function mutant backgrounds with the diverse array of conventional Xenopus assays offers a uniquely flexible platform for analysis of gene function in vertebrate development. PMID:22344745

  16. Loss/gain-induced ultrathin antireflection coatings

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Li, Sucheng; Hou, Bo; Lai, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Tradional antireflection coatings composed of dielectric layers usually require the thickness to be larger than quarter wavelength. Here, we demonstrate that materials with permittivity or permeability dominated by imaginary parts, i.e. lossy or gain media, can realize non-resonant antireflection coatings in deep sub-wavelength scale. Interestingly, while the reflected waves are eliminated as in traditional dielectric antireflection coatings, the transmitted waves can be enhanced or reduced, depending on whether gain or lossy media are applied, respectively. We provide a unified theory for the design of such ultrathin antireflection coatings, showing that under different polarizations and incident angles, different types of ultrathin coatings should be applied. Especially, under transverse magnetic polarization, the requirement shows a switch between gain and lossy media at Brewster angle. As a proof of principle, by using conductive films as a special type of lossy antireflection coatings, we experimentally demonstrate the suppression of Fabry-Pérot resonances in a broad frequency range for microwaves. This valuable functionality can be applied to remove undesired resonant effects, such as the frequency-dependent side lobes induced by resonances in dielectric coverings of antennas. Our work provides a guide for the design of ultrathin antireflection coatings as well as their applications in broadband reflectionless devices. PMID:27349750

  17. Loss/gain-induced ultrathin antireflection coatings.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Li, Sucheng; Hou, Bo; Lai, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Tradional antireflection coatings composed of dielectric layers usually require the thickness to be larger than quarter wavelength. Here, we demonstrate that materials with permittivity or permeability dominated by imaginary parts, i.e. lossy or gain media, can realize non-resonant antireflection coatings in deep sub-wavelength scale. Interestingly, while the reflected waves are eliminated as in traditional dielectric antireflection coatings, the transmitted waves can be enhanced or reduced, depending on whether gain or lossy media are applied, respectively. We provide a unified theory for the design of such ultrathin antireflection coatings, showing that under different polarizations and incident angles, different types of ultrathin coatings should be applied. Especially, under transverse magnetic polarization, the requirement shows a switch between gain and lossy media at Brewster angle. As a proof of principle, by using conductive films as a special type of lossy antireflection coatings, we experimentally demonstrate the suppression of Fabry-Pérot resonances in a broad frequency range for microwaves. This valuable functionality can be applied to remove undesired resonant effects, such as the frequency-dependent side lobes induced by resonances in dielectric coverings of antennas. Our work provides a guide for the design of ultrathin antireflection coatings as well as their applications in broadband reflectionless devices. PMID:27349750

  18. NPY1-36 and PYY1-36 activate cardiac fibroblasts: an effect enhanced by genetic hypertension and inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao; Gillespie, Delbert G; Jackson, Edwin K

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nerves release neuropeptide Y (NPY)1-36, and peptide YY (PYY)1-36 is a circulating peptide; therefore, these PP-fold peptides could affect cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). We examined the effects of NPY1-36 and PYY1-36 on the proliferation of and collagen production ([(3)H]proline incorporation) by CFs isolated from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) normotensive rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Experiments were performed with and without sitagliptin, an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP4; an ectoenzyme that metabolizes NPY1-36 and PYY1-36 (Y1 receptor agonists) to NPY3-36 and PYY3-36 (inactive at Y1 receptors), respectively]. NPY1-36 and PYY1-36, but not NPY3-36 or PYY3-36, stimulated proliferation of CFs, and these effects were more potent than ANG II, enhanced by sitagliptin, blocked by BIBP3226 (Y1 receptor antagonist), and greater in SHR CFs. SHR CF membranes expressed more receptor for activated C kinase (RACK)1 [which scaffolds the Gi/phospholipase C (PLC)/PKC pathway] compared with WKY CF membranes. RACK1 knockdown (short hairpin RNA) and inhibition of Gi (pertussis toxin), PLC (U73122), and PKC (GF109203X) blocked the proliferative effects of NPY1-36. NPY1-36 and PYY1-36 stimulated collagen production more potently than did ANG II, and this was enhanced by sitagliptin and greater in SHR CFs. In conclusion, 1) NPY1-36 and PYY1-36, via the Y1 receptor/Gi/PLC/PKC pathway, activate CFs, and this pathway is enhanced in SHR CFs due to increased localization of RACK1 in membranes; and 2) DPP4 inhibition enhances the effects of NPY1-36 and PYY1-36 on CFs, likely by inhibiting the metabolism of NPY1-36 and PYY1-36. The implications are that endogenous NPY1-36 and PYY1-36 could adversely affect cardiac structure/function by activating CFs, and this may be exacerbated in genetic hypertension and by DPP4 inhibitors. PMID:26371160

  19. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control system (AGC) was designed and constructed for the prototype Loran C receiver. The AGC is designed to improve the signal-to-signal ratio of the received Loran signals. The AGC design does not require any analog to digital conversion and it utilizes commonly available components. The AGC consists of: (1) a circuit which samples the peak of the envelope of the Loran signal to obtain an AGC voltage for each of three Loran stations, (2) a dc gain circuit to control the overall gain of the AGC system, and (3) an AGC amplification of the input RF signal. The performance of the AGC system was observed in bench and flight tests; it has improved the overall accuracy of the receiver. Improvements in the accuracy of the time difference calculations to within approx. + or - 1.5 microseconds of the observed time differnces for a given position are reported.

  20. High current gain transistor laser.

    PubMed

    Liang, Song; Qiao, Lijun; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A transistor laser (TL), having the structure of a transistor with multi-quantum wells near its base region, bridges the functionality gap between lasers and transistors. However, light emission is produced at the expense of current gain for all the TLs reported up to now, leading to a very low current gain. We propose a novel design of TLs, which have an n-doped InP layer inserted in the emitter ridge. Numerical studies show that a current flow aperture for only holes can be formed in the center of the emitter ridge. As a result, the common emitter current gain can be as large as 143.3, which is over 15 times larger than that of a TL without the aperture. Besides, the effects of nonradiative recombination defects can be reduced greatly because the flow of holes is confined in the center region of the emitter ridge. PMID:27282466

  1. High current gain transistor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Song; Qiao, Lijun; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A transistor laser (TL), having the structure of a transistor with multi-quantum wells near its base region, bridges the functionality gap between lasers and transistors. However, light emission is produced at the expense of current gain for all the TLs reported up to now, leading to a very low current gain. We propose a novel design of TLs, which have an n-doped InP layer inserted in the emitter ridge. Numerical studies show that a current flow aperture for only holes can be formed in the center of the emitter ridge. As a result, the common emitter current gain can be as large as 143.3, which is over 15 times larger than that of a TL without the aperture. Besides, the effects of nonradiative recombination defects can be reduced greatly because the flow of holes is confined in the center region of the emitter ridge.

  2. High current gain transistor laser

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Song; Qiao, Lijun; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A transistor laser (TL), having the structure of a transistor with multi-quantum wells near its base region, bridges the functionality gap between lasers and transistors. However, light emission is produced at the expense of current gain for all the TLs reported up to now, leading to a very low current gain. We propose a novel design of TLs, which have an n-doped InP layer inserted in the emitter ridge. Numerical studies show that a current flow aperture for only holes can be formed in the center of the emitter ridge. As a result, the common emitter current gain can be as large as 143.3, which is over 15 times larger than that of a TL without the aperture. Besides, the effects of nonradiative recombination defects can be reduced greatly because the flow of holes is confined in the center region of the emitter ridge. PMID:27282466

  3. Gain lever characterization in monolithically integrated diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocha, Michael; Bond, Tiziana; Welty, Rebecca; Vernon, Stephen; Kallman, Jeffrey; Behymer, Elaine

    2005-04-01

    Gain Lever, an effect for enhancing amplitude modulation (AM) efficiency in multisection laser diodes1, has been characterized in InGaAs DQW edge emitting lasers that are integrated with passive waveguides. Specifically designed structures which give a range of split ratios from 1:1 to 9:1 have been fabricated and measured to fully characterize the parameter space for operation in the gain lever mode. Additionally the experimental results are compared to a hybrid 3-D simulation involving effective index method (EIM) reduction to 2-D. Gains greater than 6 dB in the AM efficiency can be achieved within the appropriate operating range, but this gain drops rapidly as the parameter range is exceeded. High speed RF modulation with significant gain is, in principle, possible if proper biasing and modulation conditions are used. This phenomenon can also be useful for high-speed digital information transmission.

  4. Approximate reversibility in the context of entropy gain, information gain, and complete positivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscemi, Francesco; Das, Siddhartha; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-06-01

    There are several inequalities in physics which limit how well we can process physical systems to achieve some intended goal, including the second law of thermodynamics, entropy bounds in quantum information theory, and the uncertainty principle of quantum mechanics. Recent results provide physically meaningful enhancements of these limiting statements, determining how well one can attempt to reverse an irreversible process. In this paper, we apply and extend these results to give strong enhancements to several entropy inequalities, having to do with entropy gain, information gain, entropic disturbance, and complete positivity of open quantum systems dynamics. Our first result is a remainder term for the entropy gain of a quantum channel. This result implies that a small increase in entropy under the action of a subunital channel is a witness to the fact that the channel's adjoint can be used as a recovery map to undo the action of the original channel. We apply this result to pure-loss, quantum-limited amplifier, and phase-insensitive quantum Gaussian channels, showing how a quantum-limited amplifier can serve as a recovery from a pure-loss channel and vice versa. Our second result regards the information gain of a quantum measurement, both without and with quantum side information. We find here that a small information gain implies that it is possible to undo the action of the original measurement if it is efficient. The result also has operational ramifications for the information-theoretic tasks known as measurement compression without and with quantum side information. Our third result shows that the loss of Holevo information caused by the action of a noisy channel on an input ensemble of quantum states is small if and only if the noise can be approximately corrected on average. We finally establish that the reduced dynamics of a system-environment interaction are approximately completely positive and trace preserving if and only if the data processing

  5. A lovastatin-elicited genetic program inhibits M2 macrophage polarization and enhances T cell infiltration into spontaneous mouse mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Emilia; Carmona-Rodríguez, Lorena; Tardáguila, Manuel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; González-Martín, Alicia; Almonacid, Luis; Casas, Josefina; Fabriás, Gemma; Mañes, Santos

    2013-01-01

    Beyond their ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis, the statins have pleiotropic effects that include anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Statins could have clinical utility, alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutics, in the treatment of cancer. The mechanisms that underlie the anti-tumor activity of the statins are nonetheless poorly defined. No studies have analyzed how they alter the tumor-associated leukocyte infiltrate, a central factor that influences tumor stroma and cancer evolution. Here we used HER2/neu transgenic (Tg-neu) mice to analyze the effect of lovastatin (Lov) on the inflammatory reaction of spontaneous mammary tumors. Lov treatment of tumor-bearing Tg-neu mice did not alter growth of established tumors, but significantly reduced the number of new oncogenic lesions in these mice. Moreover, Lov inhibited the growth of newly implanted Tg-neu tumors in immunocompetent but not in immunodeficient mice. We found that Lov enhanced tumor infiltration by effector T cells, and reduced the number of immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic M2-like tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Concomitantly, the drug improved the structure and function of the tumor vasculature, measured as enhanced tumor oxygenation and penetration of cytotoxic drugs. Microarray analysis identified a Lov-elicited genetic program in Tg-neu tumors that might explain these effects; we observed Lov-induced downregulation of placental growth factor, which triggers aberrant angiogenesis and M2-like TAM polarization. Our results identify a role for lovastatin in the shaping and re-education of the inflammatory infiltrate in tumors, with functional consequences in angiogenesis and antitumor immunity. PMID:24317954

  6. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains That Persist in Feedlot Cattle Are Genetically Related and Demonstrate an Enhanced Ability To Adhere to Intestinal Epithelial Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Brandon A.; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Mason, Gary L.; Ruby, John R.; Choat, W. Travis; Loneragan, Guy H.; Smith, Gary C.; Sofos, John N.; Belk, Keith E.

    2009-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to investigate the nature of Escherichia coli O157:H7 colonization of feedlot cattle over the final 100 to 110 days of finishing. Rectal fecal grab samples were collected from an initial sample population of 788 steers every 20 to 22 days and microbiologically analyzed to detect E. coli O157:H7. The identities of presumptive colonies were confirmed using a multiplex PCR assay that screened for gene fragments unique to E. coli O157:H7 (rfbE and fliCh7) and other key virulence genes (eae, stx1, and stx2). Animals were classified as having persistent shedding (PS), transient shedding (TS), or nonshedding (NS) status if they consecutively shed the same E. coli O157:H7 genotype (based on the multiplex PCR profile), exhibited variable E. coli O157 shedding, or never shed morphologically typical E. coli O157, respectively. Overall, 1.0% and 1.4% of steers were classified as PS and NS animals, respectively. Characterization of 132 E. coli O157:H7 isolates from PS and TS animals by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing yielded 32 unique PFGE types. One predominant PFGE type accounted for 53% of all isolates characterized and persisted in cattle throughout the study. Isolates belonging to this predominant and persistent PFGE type demonstrated an enhanced (P < 0.0001) ability to adhere to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells compared to isolates belonging to less common PFGE types but exhibited equal virulence expression. Interestingly, the attachment efficacy decreased as the genetic divergence from the predominant and persistent subtype increased. Our data support the hypothesis that certain E. coli O157:H7 strains persist in feedlot cattle, which may be partially explained by an enhanced ability to colonize the intestinal epithelium. PMID:19617387

  7. Enhanced genetic algorithm optimization model for a single reservoir operation based on hydropower generation: case study of Mosul reservoir, northern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Aqeeli, Yousif H; Lee, T S; Abd Aziz, S

    2016-01-01

    Achievement of the optimal hydropower generation from operation of water reservoirs, is a complex problems. The purpose of this study was to formulate and improve an approach of a genetic algorithm optimization model (GAOM) in order to increase the maximization of annual hydropower generation for a single reservoir. For this purpose, two simulation algorithms were drafted and applied independently in that GAOM during 20 scenarios (years) for operation of Mosul reservoir, northern Iraq. The first algorithm was based on the traditional simulation of reservoir operation, whilst the second algorithm (Salg) enhanced the GAOM by changing the population values of GA through a new simulation process of reservoir operation. The performances of these two algorithms were evaluated through the comparison of their optimal values of annual hydropower generation during the 20 scenarios of operating. The GAOM achieved an increase in hydropower generation in 17 scenarios using these two algorithms, with the Salg being superior in all scenarios. All of these were done prior adding the evaporation (Ev) and precipitation (Pr) to the water balance equation. Next, the GAOM using the Salg was applied by taking into consideration the volumes of these two parameters. In this case, the optimal values obtained from the GAOM were compared, firstly with their counterpart that found using the same algorithm without taking into consideration of Ev and Pr, secondly with the observed values. The first comparison showed that the optimal values obtained in this case decreased in all scenarios, whilst maintaining the good results compared with the observed in the second comparison. The results proved the effectiveness of the Salg in increasing the hydropower generation through the enhanced approach of the GAOM. In addition, the results indicated to the importance of taking into account the Ev and Pr in the modelling of reservoirs operation. PMID:27390638

  8. High-level hemicellulosic arabinose predominately affects lignocellulose crystallinity for genetically enhancing both plant lodging resistance and biomass enzymatic digestibility in rice mutants.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengcheng; Zhang, Mingliang; Guo, Kai; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Ran; Feng, Yongqing; Yi, Xiaoyan; Zou, Weihua; Wang, Lingqiang; Wu, Changyin; Tian, Jinshan; Lu, Tiegang; Xie, Guosheng; Peng, Liangcai

    2015-05-01

    Rice is a major food crop with enormous biomass residue for biofuels. As plant cell wall recalcitrance basically decides a costly biomass process, genetic modification of plant cell walls has been regarded as a promising solution. However, due to structural complexity and functional diversity of plant cell walls, it becomes essential to identify the key factors of cell wall modifications that could not much alter plant growth, but cause an enhancement in biomass enzymatic digestibility. To address this issue, we performed systems biology analyses of a total of 36 distinct cell wall mutants of rice. As a result, cellulose crystallinity (CrI) was examined to be the key factor that negatively determines either the biomass enzymatic saccharification upon various chemical pretreatments or the plant lodging resistance, an integrated agronomic trait in plant growth and grain production. Notably, hemicellulosic arabinose (Ara) was detected to be the major factor that negatively affects cellulose CrI probably through its interlinking with β-1,4-glucans. In addition, lignin and G monomer also exhibited the positive impact on biomass digestion and lodging resistance. Further characterization of two elite mutants, Osfc17 and Osfc30, showing normal plant growth and high biomass enzymatic digestion in situ and in vitro, revealed the multiple GH9B candidate genes for reducing cellulose CrI and XAT genes for increasing hemicellulosic Ara level. Hence, the results have suggested the potential cell wall modifications for enhancing both biomass enzymatic digestibility and plant lodging resistance by synchronically overexpressing GH9B and XAT genes in rice. PMID:25418842

  9. Mutual Gains Means Everyone Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Bernard L.

    1997-01-01

    Mutual gains negotiation is an innovative system that emphasizes interests instead of positions and problem solving instead of preconceived solutions. The process can reverse social disintegration, reverse worker alienation, and address a shifting educational environment. It can resolve difficult labor-management problems such as contracting out,…

  10. The Gains from Vertical Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Domingue, Ben

    2013-01-01

    It is often assumed that a vertical scale is necessary when value-added models depend upon the gain scores of students across two or more points in time. This article examines the conditions under which the scale transformations associated with the vertical scaling process would be expected to have a significant impact on normative interpretations…

  11. Gaining Perspective on Parenting Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue offers a collection of articles focusing on support groups for parents of infants and toddlers, including the following: (1) "Gaining Perspective on Parenting Groups" (Nick Carter and Cathie Harvey) which reviews the purposes, history, and essential ingredients of such groups; (2) "The MELD Experience with Parent Groups" (Joyce…

  12. Genetic engineering of the complete carotenoid pathway towards enhanced astaxanthin formation in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous starting from a high-yield mutant.

    PubMed

    Gassel, Sören; Breitenbach, Jürgen; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is one of the rare organisms which can synthesize the commercially interesting carotenoid astaxanthin. However, astaxanthin yield in wild-type and also in classical mutants is still too low for an attractive bioprocess. Therefore, we combined classical mutagenesis with genetic engineering of the complete pathway covering improved precursor supply for carotenogenesis, enhanced metabolite flow into the pathway, and efficient conversion of intermediates into the desired end product astaxanthin. We also constructed new transformation plasmids for the stepwise expression of the genes of 3-hydroxymethyl-3-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, phytoene synthase/lycopene cyclase, and astaxanthin synthase. Starting from two mutants with a 15-fold higher astaxanthin, we obtained transformants with an additional 6-fold increase in the final step of pathway engineering. Thus, a maximum astaxanthin content of almost 9 mg per g dry weight was reached in shaking cultures. Under optimized fermenter conditions, astaxanthin production with these engineered transformants should be comparable to Haematococcus pluvialis, the leading commercial producer of natural astaxanthin. PMID:24241897

  13. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist. PMID:27067213

  14. Accurately control and flatten gain spectrum of L-band erbium doped fiber amplifier based on suitable gain-clamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiuru; Meng, Xiangyu; Liu, Chunyu

    2016-04-01

    The increasing traffic with dynamic nature requires the applications of gain-clamped L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). However, the weak or over clamping may lead the unexpected gain-compression and flatness-worsening. In this article, to enhance practicality, we modify the partly gain-clamping configuration and utilize a pair of C-band fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to non-uniformly compress the gain spectrum of L-band. Through a comprehensive test and comparison, the suitable gain-clamping region for the amplified signals is found, and the gain in L-band is accurately controlled and flattened under the matched central wavelength of FBGs. The experimental results show that, our designed L-band EDFA achieves a trade-off among the output gain, flatness and stability. The ±0.44 dB flatness and 20.2 dB average gain are together obtained in the range of 1570-1610 nm, with the ±0.1 dB stability of signals in over 30 dBm dynamic range.

  15. Photomultiplier tube gain regulating system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Wayne F.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved system for regulating the gain of a photomultiplier tube, and was designed for use with the photomultiplier tubes of a GeMSAEC fast analyzers. It has the following advantages over the prior system: noise is virtually eliminated; sample analysis can begin after 3 to 4 revolutions of the rotor; fluorescent and light scattering solutions can be used as a reference; and the reference solution can be in any cuvette on the rotor.

  16. Gain functionalization of silica microresonators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lan; Vahala, K J

    2003-04-15

    Erbium-doped solgel films are applied to the surface of silica microspheres to create low-threshold microactivity lasers. This gain functionalization can be applied by use of a number of different dopants, thereby extending the wavelength range of this class of device. Also, by varying the doping concentration and thickness of the applied solgel layer, one can vary the laser dynamics so that both continuous-wave and pulsating modes of operation are possible. PMID:12703910

  17. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  18. Genetic removal of the A2A adenosine receptor enhances pulmonary inflammation, mucin production, and angiogenesis in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Amir; Mi, Tiejuan; Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Blackburn, Michael R

    2007-09-01

    Adenosine is generated at sites of tissue injury where it serves to regulate inflammation and damage. Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and damage in diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; however, the contribution of specific adenosine receptors to key immunoregulatory processes in these diseases is still unclear. Mice deficient in the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) develop pulmonary inflammation and mucous metaplasia in association with adenosine elevations making them a useful model for assessing the contribution of specific adenosine receptors to adenosine-mediated pulmonary disease. Studies suggest that the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)R) functions to limit inflammation and promote tissue protection; however, the contribution of A(2A)R signaling has not been examined in the ADA-deficient model of adenosine-mediated lung inflammation. The purpose of the current study was to examine the contribution of A(2A)R signaling to the pulmonary phenotype seen in ADA-deficient mice. This was accomplished by generating ADA/A(2A)R double knockout mice. Genetic removal of the A(2A)R from ADA-deficient mice resulted in enhanced inflammation comprised largely of macrophages and neutrophils, mucin production in the bronchial airways, and angiogenesis, relative to that seen in the lungs of ADA-deficient mice with the A(2A)R. In addition, levels of the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and CXCL1 were elevated, whereas levels of cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-6 were not. There were no compensatory changes in the other adenosine receptors in the lungs of ADA/A(2A)R double knockout mice. These findings suggest that the A(2A)R plays a protective role in the ADA-deficient model of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:17601796

  19. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for the prototype Loran-C receiver is discussed. The current version of the prototype receiver, the Mini L-80, was tested initially in 1980. The receiver uses a super jolt microcomputer to control a memory aided phase loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The AGC control adjusts the level of each station signal, such that the early portion of each envelope rise is about at the same amplitude in the receiver envelope detector.

  20. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for a prototype Loran C receiver. The receiver uses a microcomputer to control a memory aided phase-locked loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The circuit designed for the AGC is described, and bench and flight test results are presented. The AGC circuit described actually samples starting at a point 40 microseconds after a zero crossing determined by the software lock pulse ultimately generated by a 30 microsecond delay and add network in the receiver front end envelope detector.

  1. [Fast food promotes weight gain].

    PubMed

    Stender, Steen; Dyerberg, Jørn; Astrup, Arne V

    2007-05-01

    The total amounts of fat in a fast food menu consisting of French fries and fried Chicken Nuggets from McDonald's and KFC, respectively, bought in 35 different countries vary from 41 to 71 gram. In most countries the menu contained unacceptably high amounts of industrially-produced trans fat which contributes to an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, weight gain, abdominal fat accumulation and type 2 diabetes. The quality of the ingredients in fast food ought to be better and the size of the portions smaller and less energy-dense so that frequent fast food meals do not increase the risk of obesity and diseases among customers. PMID:17537359

  2. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  3. Estimates of epistatic and pleiotropic effects of casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) and thyroglobulin (TG) genetic markers on beef heifer performance traits enhanced by selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC II) was subjected to marker assisted selection for two years to equalize CSN1S1 and TG genetic marker frequencies to evaluate the epista...

  4. Genomic-Based Optimum Contribution in Conservation and Genetic Improvement Programs with Antagonistic Fitness and Productivity Traits

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Molano, Enrique; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Banos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Animal selection for genetic improvement of productivity may lead to an increase in inbreeding through the use of techniques that enhance the reproductive capability of selected animals. Therefore, breeding strategies aim to balance maintaining genetic variability and acceptable fitness levels with increasing productivity. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of genomic-based optimum contribution strategies at addressing this objective when fitness and productivity are genetically antagonistic traits. Strategies are evaluated in directional selection (increasing productivity) or conservation (maintaining fitness) scenarios. In the former case, substantial rates of genetic gain can be achieved while greatly constraining the rate of increase in inbreeding. Under a conservation approach, inbreeding depression can be effectively halted while also achieving a modest rate of genetic gain for productivity. Furthermore, the use of optimum contribution strategies when combined with a simple non-random mating scheme (minimum kinship method) showed an additional delay in the increase of inbreeding in the short term. In conclusion, genomic-based optimum contribution methods can be effectively used to control inbreeding and inbreeding depression, and still allow genetic gain for productivity traits even when fitness and productivity are antagonistically correlated. PMID:26941779

  5. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. PMID:18230893

  6. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  7. Cognitive Enhancement and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement--augmenting normal cognitive capacities--is not new. Literacy, numeracy, computers, and the practices of science are all cognitive enhancements. Science is now making new cognitive enhancements possible. Biomedical cognitive enhancements (BCEs) include the administration of drugs, implants of genetically engineered or…

  8. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  9. Information gains from cosmological probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandis, S.; Seehars, S.; Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Nicola, A.

    2016-05-01

    In light of the growing number of cosmological observations, it is important to develop versatile tools to quantify the constraining power and consistency of cosmological probes. Originally motivated from information theory, we use the relative entropy to compute the information gained by Bayesian updates in units of bits. This measure quantifies both the improvement in precision and the `surprise', i.e. the tension arising from shifts in central values. Our starting point is a WMAP9 prior which we update with observations of the distance ladder, supernovae (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and weak lensing as well as the 2015 Planck release. We consider the parameters of the flat ΛCDM concordance model and some of its extensions which include curvature and Dark Energy equation of state parameter w. We find that, relative to WMAP9 and within these model spaces, the probes that have provided the greatest gains are Planck (10 bits), followed by BAO surveys (5.1 bits) and SNe experiments (3.1 bits). The other cosmological probes, including weak lensing (1.7 bits) and {H0} measures (1.7 bits), have contributed information but at a lower level. Furthermore, we do not find any significant surprise when updating the constraints of WMAP9 with any of the other experiments, meaning that they are consistent with WMAP9. However, when we choose Planck15 as the prior, we find that, accounting for the full multi-dimensionality of the parameter space, the weak lensing measurements of CFHTLenS produce a large surprise of 4.4 bits which is statistically significant at the 8 σ level. We discuss how the relative entropy provides a versatile and robust framework to compare cosmological probes in the context of current and future surveys.

  10. ANCILLARY SCIENTISTS SYMPOSIUM: GENETIC TECHNOLOGY APPLIED TO POULTRY PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although classical genetics has significantly contributed to animal agriculture such as the gain in animal productivity, breeding efficiency, and selection of desirable biological traits, the advances in molecular genetics, including DNA cloning, sequencing, genotyping, and DNA microarray technology...

  11. A gain-of-function mutation in the ROC1 gene alters plant architecture in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiqing; Song, Li; Yang, Yaxuan; Liu, Dong

    2013-02-01

    Plant architecture is an important agronomic trait and is useful for identification of plant species. The molecular basis of plant architecture, however, is largely unknown. Forward genetics was used to identify an Arabidopsis mutant with altered plant architecture. Using genetic and molecular approaches, we analyzed the roles of a mutated cyclophilin in the control of plant architecture. The Arabidopsis mutant roc1 has reduced stem elongation and increased shoot branching, and the mutant phenotypes are strongly affected by temperature and photoperiod. Map-based cloning and transgenic experiments demonstrated that the roc1 mutant phenotypes are caused by a gain-of-function mutation in a cyclophilin gene, ROC1. Besides, application of the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) further suppresses stem elongation in the mutant. GA treatment enhances the accumulation of mutated but not of wildtype (WT) ROC1 proteins. The roc1 mutation does not seem to interfere with GA biosynthesis or signaling. GA signaling, however, antagonizes the effect of the roc1 mutation on stem elongation. The altered plant architecture may result from the activation of an R gene by the roc1 protein. We also present a working model for the interaction between the roc1 mutation and GA signaling in regulating stem elongation. PMID:23206262

  12. Nano-engineered ultra-high-gain microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, D. R.; Gorelikov, D.; de Rouffignac, P.; Saadatmand, K.; Stenton, K.; Sullivan, N.; Tremsin, A. S.

    2009-08-01

    Highly localized and very fast electron amplification of microchannel plates (MCPs) enables a large number of high-resolution and high-sensitivity detection technologies, which provide spatial and/or temporal information for each detected photon/electron/ion/neutron. Although there has been significant progress in photocathode and readout technologies the MCPs themselves have not evolved much from the technology developed several decades ago. Substantial increases in the gain of existing MCP technology have been accomplished by utilizing state-of-the-art processes developed for nano-engineered structures. The gain of treated MCPs with aspect ratio of 40:1 is reproducibly measured to reach unprecedented values of 2×10 5. This gain enhancement is shown to be stable during MCP operation. In addition, the initial experiments indicate improved stability of gain as a function of extracted charge and MCP storage conditions. We also present results from a fully independent thin-film process for manufacturing non-lead glass MCPs using engineered thin films for both the resistive and emissive layers. These substrate-independent MCPs show high gain, less gain degradation with extracted charge, and greater pore-to-pore and plate-to-plate uniformity than has been possible with conventional lead glass structures.

  13. Non-semantic contributions to "semantic" redundancy gain.

    PubMed

    Shepherdson, Peter; Miller, Jeff

    2016-08-01

    Recently, two groups of researchers have reported redundancy gains (enhanced performance with multiple, redundant targets) in tasks requiring semantic categorization. Here we report two experiments aimed at determining whether the gains found by one of these groups resulted from some form of semantic coactivation. We asked undergraduate psychology students to complete choice RT tasks requiring the semantic categorization of visually presented words, and compared performance with redundant targets from the same semantic category to performance with redundant targets from different semantic categories. If the redundancy gains resulted from the combination of information at a semantic level, they should have been greater in the former than the latter situation. However, our results showed no significant differences in redundancy gain (for latency and accuracy) between same-category and different-category conditions, despite gains appearing in both conditions. Thus, we suggest that redundancy gain in the semantic categorization task may result entirely from statistical facilitation or combination of information at non-semantic levels. PMID:26339718

  14. Are videogame training gains specific or general?

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Many recent studies using healthy adults document enhancements in perception and cognition from playing commercial action videogames (AVGs). Playing action games (e.g., Call of Duty, Medal of Honor) is associated with improved bottom-up lower-level information processing skills like visual-perceptual and attentional processes. One proposal states a general improvement in the ability to interpret and gather statistical information to predict future actions which then leads to better performance across different perceptual/attentional tasks. Another proposal claims all the tasks are separately trained in the AVGs because the AVGs and laboratory tasks contain similar demands. We review studies of action and non-AVGs to show support for the latter proposal. To explain transfer in AVGs, we argue that the perceptual and attention tasks share common demands with the trained videogames (e.g., multiple object tracking (MOT), rapid attentional switches, and peripheral vision). In non-AVGs, several studies also demonstrate specific, limited transfer. One instance of specific transfer is the specific enhancement to mental rotation after training in games with a spatial emphasis (e.g., Tetris). In contrast, the evidence for transfer is equivocal where the game and task do not share common demands (e.g., executive functioning). Thus, the “common demands” hypothesis of transfer not only characterizes transfer effects in AVGs, but also non-action games. Furthermore, such a theory provides specific predictions, which can help in the selection of games to train human cognition as well as in the design of videogames purposed for human cognitive and perceptual enhancement. Finally this hypothesis is consistent with the cognitive training literature where most post-training gains are for tasks similar to the training rather than general, non-specific improvements. PMID:24782722

  15. New Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... human genome, behavioral genetics, pharmacogenetics, drug resistance, biofilms, computer modeling. » more Chapter 5: 21st-Century Genetics Covers systems biology, GFP, genetic testing, privacy concerns, DNA forensics, ...

  16. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles Genetic Counseling Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetic Counseling Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... informed decisions about testing and treatment. Reasons for Genetic Counseling There are many reasons that people go ...

  17. CCD Side 2 Gain Ratio Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Linda

    2002-07-01

    Observe a bright spectrophotometric standard star at the center of the detector with a wide slit {52x2} with the 3 low dispersion gratings at gain 1 and gain 4, so that the ratio of gain 4 to gain 1 can be measured. {This will be used to calibrate gain 4 relative to gain 1, which is already well measured.} Read out some additional exposures through non-default amplifier B, which is used for some calibration programs, so that the gains of amp B relative to amp D can be measured. Place the target at row 900, close to the D amplifier and far from the B amplifier, then take long and short exposures with G230LB with both amplifiers, so that CTE can be measured over a broad range of counts. With gain 4/1, amp B/D, and CTE known from these measurements, find the sensitivity at row 900 relative to the central row.

  18. Dietary restraint and gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Sunni L.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Herring, Amy; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a history of preconceptional dieting and restrained eating was related to higher weight gains in pregnancy. Design Dieting practices were assessed among a prospective cohort of pregnant women using the Revised Restraint Scale. Women were classified on three separate subscales as restrained eaters, dieters, and weight cyclers. Subjects Participants included 1,223 women in the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition Study. Main outcome measures Total gestational weight gain and adequacy of weight gain (ratio of observed/expected weight gain based on Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations). Statistical analyses performed Multiple linear regression was used to model the two weight gain outcomes, while controlling for potential confounders including physical activity and weight gain attitudes. Results There was a positive association between each subscale and total weight gain, as well as adequacy of weight gain. Women classified as cyclers gained an average of 2 kg more than non-cyclers, and showed higher observed/expected ratios by 0.2 units. Among restrained eaters and dieters, there was a differential effect by BMI. With the exception of underweight women, all other weight status women with a history of dieting or restrained eating gained more weight during pregnancy and had higher adequacy of weight gain ratios. In contrast, underweight women with a history of restrained eating behaviors gained less weight compared to underweight women without those behaviors. Conclusions Restrained eating behaviors were associated with weight gains above the IOM recommendations for normal, overweight, and obese women, and weight gains below the recommendations for underweight women. Excessive gestational weight gain is of concern given its association with postpartum weight retention. The dietary restraint tool is useful for identifying women who would benefit from nutritional counseling prior to or during pregnancy in regards to achieving targeted

  19. Electrical and Optical Gain Lever Effects in InGaAs Double Quantum Well Diode Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M D; Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Nikolic, R J; Vernon, S P; Kallman, J S; Behymer, E M

    2007-01-03

    In multisection laser diodes, the amplitude or frequency modulation (AM or FM) efficiency can be improved using the gain lever effect. To study gain lever, InGaAs double quantum well (DQW) edge emitting lasers have been fabricated with integrated passive waveguides and dual sections providing a range of split ratios from 1:1 to 9:1. Both the electrical and the optical gain lever have been examined. An electrical gain lever with greater than 7 dB enhancement of AM efficiency was achieved within the range of appropriate DC biasing currents, but this gain dropped rapidly outside this range. We observed a 4 dB gain in the optical AM efficiency under non-ideal biasing conditions. This value agreed with the measured gain for the electrical AM efficiency under similar conditions. We also examined the gain lever effect under large signal modulation for digital logic switching applications. To get a useful gain lever for optical gain quenched logic, a long control section is needed to preserve the gain lever strength and a long interaction length between the input optical signal and the lasing field of the diode must be provided. The gain lever parameter space has been fully characterized and validated against numerical simulations of a semi-3D hybrid beam propagation method (BPM) model for the coupled electron-photon rate equation. We find that the optical gain lever can be treated using the electrical injection model, once the absorption in the sample is known.

  20. Characteristics of Eye-Position Gain Field Populations Determine Geometry of Visual Space

    PubMed Central

    Lehky, Sidney R.; Sereno, Margaret E.; Sereno, Anne B.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated differences in eye-position spatial maps for anterior inferotemporal cortex (AIT) in the ventral stream and lateral intraparietal cortex (LIP) in the dorsal stream, based on population decoding of gaze angle modulations of neural visual responses (i.e., eye-position gain fields). Here we explore the basis of such spatial encoding differences through modeling of gain field characteristics. We created a population of model neurons, each having a different eye-position gain field. This population was used to reconstruct eye-position visual space using multidimensional scaling. As gain field shapes have never been well-established experimentally, we examined different functions, including planar, sigmoidal, elliptical, hyperbolic, and mixtures of those functions. All functions successfully recovered positions, indicating weak constraints on allowable gain field shapes. We then used a genetic algorithm to modify the characteristics of model gain field populations until the recovered spatial maps closely matched those derived from monkey neurophysiological data in AIT and LIP. The primary differences found between model AIT and LIP gain fields were that AIT gain fields were more foveally dominated. That is, gain fields in AIT operated on smaller spatial scales and smaller dispersions than in LIP. Thus, we show that the geometry of eye-position visual space depends on the population characteristics of gain fields, and that differences in gain field characteristics for different cortical areas may underlie differences in the representation of space. PMID:26834587

  1. Terahertz-wave parametric gain of stimulated polariton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takida, Yuma; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Nawata, Kouji; Tokizane, Yu; Han, Zhengli; Koyama, Mio; Notake, Takashi; Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    We have experimentally determined the terahertz- (THz-) wave parametric gain of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) by phonon-polaritons in LiNb O3 . Our approach is based on ultrabright THz-wave generation from SRS under stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression with subnanosecond pump pulses. To obtain the frequency dependence of the parametric gain, we measured the crystal-length dependence of the THz-wave output directly using a surface-coupling configuration. We found that the product of the parametric gain and the threshold crystal length is constant throughout the tuning range. Our result provides a physical basis for the design and performance enhancement of SRS-based ultrabright tabletop THz-wave sources for various applications.

  2. Ethereal and material gain: unanticipated opportunity with illness or disability.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Seamus; Shanahan, Fergus

    2014-02-01

    When caregivers address the positive aspects of illness or disability, there is a risk of patronising the sufferer. It is equally problematic when secondary gain is judged in a negative light and impedes an effective doctor-patient relationship. Changing attitudes, and particularly the negative perception of a patient's gain from illness, are reflected in biographies of artists, philosophers and other creative individuals. In contrast, some memoirs about illness feature a retrospective discussion of the positive features of the experience - from one who is now free from the ordeal. The experience of continual sufferers may be more instructive. We examine contemporary examples of unanticipated advantage or gain arising from ongoing disability or illness. The contribution of disability/illness to remarkable achievement promotes enhanced self-appreciation for patients and may foster in others a better understanding of what it means to suffer and live with disability. PMID:24532744

  3. Gestational weight gain among Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Lam, Kim; Raine, Susan P

    2014-01-01

    To describe gestational weight gain among Hispanic women and to examine psychological, social, and cultural contexts affecting weight gain. A total of 282 Hispanic women were surveyed post-partum before leaving the hospital. Women were queried about their prepregnancy weight and weight gained during pregnancy. Adequacy of gestational weight gain was based on guidelines set by the Institute of Medicine in 2009. Independent risk factors for excessive or insufficient weight gain were examined by logistic regression. Most women were unmarried (59 %), with a mean age of 28.4 ± 6.6 years and an average weight gain of 27.9 ± 13.3 lbs. Approximately 45 % of women had gained too much, 32 % too little, and only 24 % had an adequate amount of weight gain. The mean birth weight was 7.3, 7.9, and 6.8 lbs among the adequate, excessive, and insufficient weight gain groups. Among women who exercised before pregnancy, two-thirds continued to do so during pregnancy; the mean gestational weight gain of those who continued was lower than those who stopped (26.8 vs. 31.4 lbs, p = 0.04). Independent risk factors for excessive weight gain were being unmarried, U.S. born, higher prepregnancy body mass index, and having indifferent or negative views about weight gain. Independent risk factors for insufficient weight gain were low levels of support and late initiation of prenatal care. Depression, stress, and a woman's or her partner's happiness regarding pregnancy were unrelated to weight gain. The results of this study can be used by prenatal programs to identify Hispanic women at risk for excessive or insufficient gestational weight gain. PMID:23456347

  4. Optimum wavelet based masking for the contrast enhancement of medical images using enhanced cuckoo search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Ebenezer; Anitha, J

    2016-04-01

    Unsharp masking techniques are a prominent approach in contrast enhancement. Generalized masking formulation has static scale value selection, which limits the gain of contrast. In this paper, we propose an Optimum Wavelet Based Masking (OWBM) using Enhanced Cuckoo Search Algorithm (ECSA) for the contrast improvement of medical images. The ECSA can automatically adjust the ratio of nest rebuilding, using genetic operators such as adaptive crossover and mutation. First, the proposed contrast enhancement approach is validated quantitatively using Brain Web and MIAS database images. Later, the conventional nest rebuilding of cuckoo search optimization is modified using Adaptive Rebuilding of Worst Nests (ARWN). Experimental results are analyzed using various performance matrices, and our OWBM shows improved results as compared with other reported literature. PMID:26945462

  5. Enhanced Classification of Brugada Syndrome–Associated and Long-QT Syndrome–Associated Genetic Variants in the SCN5A-Encoded Nav1.5 Cardiac Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Giudicessi, John R.; Ye, Dan; Tester, David J.; Callis, Thomas E.; Valdivia, Carmen R.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Wilde, Arthur A.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A 2% to 5% background rate of rare SCN5A nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) among healthy individuals confounds clinical genetic testing. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to enhance interpretation of SCN5A nsSNVs for clinical genetic testing using estimated predictive values derived from protein-topology and 7 in silico tools. Methods and Results Seven in silico tools were used to assign pathogenic/benign status to nsSNVs from 2888 long-QT syndrome cases, 2111 Brugada syndrome cases, and 8975 controls. Estimated predictive values were determined for each tool across the entire SCN5A-encoded Nav1.5 channel as well as for specific topographical regions. In addition, the in silico tools were assessed for their ability to correlate with cellular electrophysiology studies. In long-QT syndrome, transmembrane segments S3−S5+S6 and the DIII/DIV linker region were associated with high probability of pathogenicity. For Brugada syndrome, only the transmembrane spanning domains had a high probability of pathogenicity. Although individual tools distinguished case- and control-derived SCN5A nsSNVs, the composite use of multiple tools resulted in the greatest enhancement of interpretation. The use of the composite score allowed for enhanced interpretation for nsSNVs outside of the topological regions that intrinsically had a high probability of pathogenicity, as well as within the transmembrane spanning domains for Brugada syndrome nsSNVs. Conclusions We have used a large case/control study to identify regions of Nav1.5 associated with a high probability of pathogenicity. Although topology alone would leave the variants outside these identified regions in genetic purgatory, the synergistic use of multiple in silico tools may help promote or demote a variant's pathogenic status. PMID:25904541

  6. Quantitative analysis of serum neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from subtypes A, B, C, D, E, F, and I: lack of direct correlation between neutralization serotypes and genetic subtypes and evidence for prevalent serum-dependent infectivity enhancement.

    PubMed Central

    Kostrikis, L G; Cao, Y; Ngai, H; Moore, J P; Ho, D D

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) M group strains have been assigned to date to nine distinct genetic subtypes, designated A through I, according to phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences of their env or gag genes. Whether there is any relationship between phylogenetic subtypes and the neutralization serotypes is not clear, yet defining the nature of any such relationship by mathematical means would be of major importance for the development of globally effective HIV-1 vaccines. We have therefore developed a quantitative method to analyze serum neutralization of HIV-1 isolates and to identify HIV-1 neutralization serotypes. This method involves calculations of the neutralization index, N(i), a newly defined parameter derived from plots generated from in vitro neutralization assays, calculations of pairwise serum-virus vector distances, and cluster analyses. We have applied this approach to analyze three independent neutralization matrices involving primary HIV-1 strains and sera from genetic subtypes A, B, C, D, E, F, and I. Detailed serum and HIV-1 isolate cluster analyses have shown that in general, the identified neutralization serotypes do not directly correlate with HIV-1 genetic subtypes. These results suggest that neutralization serotypes do not during natural HIV-1 infection are not governed by antibodies directed against simple epitopes within gp120 monomers. A significant proportion (28%) of 1,213 combinations of sera and HIV-1 isolates caused serum-dependent infectivity enhancement [negative N(i) values] rather than neutralization. We also noted that negative N(i) values tended to correlate better with certain HIV-1 isolates rather than with HIV-1-positive sera. Syncytium-inducing variants of HIV-1 were slightly more likely than non-syncytium-inducing variants to undergo serum-dependent infectivity enhancement, although the latter variants could clearly be susceptible to enhancement. PMID:8523557

  7. Genetic Modification of Stem Cells for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M. Ian; Tang, Yao Liang

    2009-01-01

    Gene modification of cells for prior to their transplantation, especially stem cells, enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the Trojan horse, the gene modified cell has to gain entrance inside the host’s walls and survive and deliver its transgene products Using cellular, molecular and gene manipulation techniques the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves constructing modules of functional gene sequences. They can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell specific promoters and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and non viral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases,( including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and spinal cord injury repair), bone defects, hemophilia, and cancer. PMID:18031863

  8. Characterization of Newly Gained Introns in Daphnia Populations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenli; Kuzoff, Robert; Wong, Chen Khuan; Tucker, Abraham; Lynch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As one of the few known species in an active phase of intron proliferation, the microcrustacean Daphnia pulex is an especially attractive system for interrogating the gain and loss of introns in natural populations. In this study, we used a comparative population-genomic approach to identify and characterize 90 recently gained introns in this species. Molecular clock analyses indicate that these introns arose between 3.9 × 105 and 1.45 × 104 years ago, with a spike in intron proliferation approximately 5.2 × 104 to 1.22 × 105 years ago. Parallel gains at homologous positions contribute to 47.8% (43/90) of discovered new introns. A disproportionally large number of new introns were found in historically isolated populations in Oregon. Nonetheless, derived, intron-bearing alleles were also identified in a wide range of geographic locations, suggesting intron gain and, to a lesser degree, intron loss are important sources of genetic variation in natural populations of Daphnia. A majority (55/90 or 61.1%) of the identified neointrons have associated internal direct repeats with lengths and compositions that are unlikely to occur by chance, suggesting repeated bouts of staggered double-strand breaks (DSBs) during their evolution. Accordingly, internal, staggered DSBs may contribute to a passive trend toward increased length and sequence diversity in nascent introns. PMID:25123113

  9. Nitrogen incorporation effects on gain properties of GaInNAs lasers : experiment and theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Thranhardt, A.; Mawst, L. J.; Hader, J.; Schlichenmaier, C.; Tansu, N.; Yeh, J. -Y.; Belenky, G.; Chow, Weng Wah; Shterengas, L.; Moloney, Jerome V.; Koch, S. W.; Kuznetsova, I.

    2005-05-01

    Gain properties of GaInNAs lasers with different nitrogen concentrations in the quantum wells are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Whereas nitrogen incorporation induces appreciable modifications in the spectral extension and the carrier density dependence of the gain, it is found that the linewidth enhancement factor is reduced by inclusion of nitrogen, but basically unaffected by different nitrogen content due to the balancing between gain and index changes.

  10. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal's wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  11. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal’s wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  12. GENETICS OF STEM RUST RESISTANCE IN THE SPRING WHEAT CULTIVAR THATCHER AND THE ENHANCEMENT OF STEM RUST RESISTANCE BY LR34

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three recombinant inbred line populations from the crosses RL6071/Thatcher, RL6071/RL6058 (Thatcher Lr34), and Thatcher/RL6058, were used to study the genetics of stem rust resistance in Thatcher. Segregation of stem rust resistance in each population was used to determine the number of genes confer...

  13. A Reverse Genetic System Provides a Powerful Tool in the Design of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses with Enhanced Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fact that the foot-and-mouth disease viral (FMDV) RNA can be made infectious in the absence of other components of the virion allows the recovery of genetically engineered new viruses from in vitro-generated RNA molecules. We utilize infectious cDNA technology to produce recombinant FMDV, retain...

  14. Genetic test reporting enhances understanding of risk information and acceptance of prevention recommendations compared to family history-based counseling alone.

    PubMed

    Taber, Jennifer M; Aspinwall, Lisa G; Stump, Tammy K; Kohlmann, Wendy; Champine, Marjan; Leachman, Sancy A

    2015-10-01

    It is unknown whether or why genetic test reporting confers benefits in the understanding and management of cancer risk beyond what patients learn from counseling based on family history. A prospective nonexperimental control group study compared participants from melanoma-prone families who underwent CDKN2A/p16 (p16) genetic testing (27 carriers, 38 noncarriers) to participants from equivalently melanoma-prone families known not to carry a deleterious p16 mutation (31 no-test controls). All participants received equivalent counseling concerning elevated lifetime melanoma risk and corresponding recommendations for prevention and screening. Both immediately and 1 month after counseling, participants receiving a genetic test result reported greater understanding of their risk, decreased derogation of the risk information, and greater personal applicability of prevention recommendations than no-test controls. Decreased derogation of risk information after test reporting predicted further increases in understanding of melanoma risk and applicability of prevention recommendations 1 month later. Results suggest unique benefits of genetic test reporting in promoting understanding and acceptance of information about hereditary cancer risk and its management. PMID:26178773

  15. Broadband optical gain via interference in the free electron laser: principles and proposed realizations.

    PubMed

    Rostovtsev, Y V; Kurizki, G; Scully, M O

    2001-08-01

    We propose experimentally simplified schemes of an optically dispersive interface region between two coupled free electron lasers (FELs), aimed at achieving a much broader gain bandwidth than in a conventional FEL or a conventional optical klystron composed of two separated FELs. The proposed schemes can universally enhance the gain of FELs, regardless of their design, when operated in the short pulsed regime. PMID:11497719

  16. PRECONCEPTION PREDICTORS OF WEIGHT GAIN DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Carol S.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Downs, Danielle Symons; Chuang, Cynthia H.; Dyer, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We examined preconception (prepregnancy) predictors of pregnancy weight gain and weight gain that exceeds the 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations based on pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), in a prospective study. Methods Data are from a population-based cohort study of 1,420 women who were interviewed at baseline and 2 years later. The analytic sample includes 103 women who were not pregnant at baseline and gave birth to full-term singletons during the follow-up period. Preconception maternal weight category as well as health behaviors, psychosocial stress, parity, and age were examined as predictors of pregnancy weight gain and of weight gain in excess of the IOM recommendations using multiple linear and logistic regression analysis. Results Pregnancy weight gain averaged 33.01 pounds, with 51% of women gaining weight in excess of the 2009 IOM recommendations for their preconception weight category. Preconception overweight (BMI = 25–29.9) increased the odds of excessive pregnancy weight gain nearly threefold, whereas preconception physical activity levels meeting activity guidelines reduced the odds of excessive weight gain but was marginally statistically significant. Conclusion Although future research examining the role of physical activity in relation to pregnancy weight gain is needed, preconception overweight and physical activity levels are prime targets for interventions to avoid excessive pregnancy weight gain. PMID:20133152

  17. Using molecular classification to predict gains in maximal aerobic capacity following endurance exercise training in humans

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Steen; Rankinen, Tuomo; Koch, Lauren G.; Sarzynski, Mark; Jensen, Thomas; Keller, Pernille; Scheele, Camilla; Vollaard, Niels B. J.; Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; MacDougald, Ormond A.; Jansson, Eva; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Pedersen, Bente K.; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Wahlestedt, Claes; Britton, Steven L.; Bouchard, Claude

    2010-01-01

    A low maximal oxygen consumption (V̇o2max) is a strong risk factor for premature mortality. Supervised endurance exercise training increases V̇o2max with a very wide range of effectiveness in humans. Discovering the DNA variants that contribute to this heterogeneity typically requires substantial sample sizes. In the present study, we first use RNA expression profiling to produce a molecular classifier that predicts V̇o2max training response. We then hypothesized that the classifier genes would harbor DNA variants that contributed to the heterogeneous V̇o2max response. Two independent preintervention RNA expression data sets were generated (n = 41 gene chips) from subjects that underwent supervised endurance training: one identified and the second blindly validated an RNA expression signature that predicted change in V̇o2max (“predictor” genes). The HERITAGE Family Study (n = 473) was used for genotyping. We discovered a 29-RNA signature that predicted V̇o2max training response on a continuous scale; these genes contained ∼6 new single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with gains in V̇o2max in the HERITAGE Family Study. Three of four novel candidate genes from the HERITAGE Family Study were confirmed as RNA predictor genes (i.e., “reciprocal” RNA validation of a quantitative trait locus genotype), enhancing the performance of the 29-RNA-based predictor. Notably, RNA abundance for the predictor genes was unchanged by exercise training, supporting the idea that expression was preset by genetic variation. Regression analysis yielded a model where 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms explained 23% of the variance in gains in V̇o2max, corresponding to ∼50% of the estimated genetic variance for V̇o2max. In conclusion, combining RNA profiling with single-gene DNA marker association analysis yields a strongly validated molecular predictor with meaningful explanatory power. V̇o2max responses to endurance training can be predicted by measuring a ∼30

  18. Exploring the genetic basis of stroke. Spanish stroke genetics consortium.

    PubMed

    Giralt-Steinhauer, E; Jiménez-Conde, J; Soriano Tárraga, C; Mola, M; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Ois, A; Fernández-Cádenas, I; Carrera, C; Montaner, J; Díaz Navarro, R M; Vives-Bauzá, C; Roquer, J

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of stroke genetics studies ranging from the candidate gene approach to more recent studies by the genome wide association. It highlights the complexity of stroke owing to its different aetiopathogenic mechanisms, the difficulties in studying its genetic component, and the solutions provided to date. The study emphasises the importance of cooperation between the different centres, whether this takes places occasionally or through the creation of lasting consortiums. This strategy is currently essential to the completion of high-quality scientific studies that allow researchers to gain a better knowledge of the genetic component of stroke as it relates to aetiology, treatment, and prevention. PMID:23831412

  19. Microchannel plate modal gain variations with temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the modal gain of two high-gain curved-channel microchannel plates (MCPs) at various operating temperatures are presented. Both MCPs were fabricated from the Long Life glass with 12-micron diam channels on 15-micron centers. The modal gain was found to decrease with increasing temperature at a rate of -0.1 percent C. This reduction of gain with temperature is attributed primarily to an axial temperature gradient along each MCP channel creating a nonuniform electric field within the channel that lowers the effective output gain. A lowering of the secondary electron yield resulting from increased phonon scattering of secondary electrons released within the walls of the MCP channels was assessed, but was found to have a negligible contribution to the drop in gain with temperature.

  20. Random lasing with spatially nonuniform gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ting; Lü, Jiantao

    2016-07-01

    Spatial and spectral properties of random lasing with spatially nonuniform gain were investigated in two-dimensional (2D) disordered medium. The pumping light was described by an individual electric field and coupled into the rate equations by using the polarization equation. The spatially nonuniform gain comes from the multiple scattering of this pumping light. Numerical simulation of the random system with uniform and nonuniform gain were performed both in weak and strong scattering regime. In weak scattering sample, all the lasing modes correspond to those of the passive system whether the nonuniform gain is considered. However, in strong scattering regime, new lasing modes appear with nonuniform gain as the localization area changes. Our results show that it is more accurate to describe the random lasing behavior with introducing the nonuniform gain origins from the multiple light scattering.

  1. Phenotypic H-Antigen Typing by Mass Spectrometry Combined with Genetic Typing of H Antigens, O Antigens, and Toxins by Whole-Genome Sequencing Enhances Identification of Escherichia coli Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Huixia; Domish, Larissa; Sloan, Angela; Hernandez, Drexler; McCorrister, Stuart; Robinson, Alyssia; Walker, Matthew; Peterson, Lorea A. M.; Majcher, Miles; Ratnam, Sam; Haldane, David J. M.; Bekal, Sadjia; Wylie, John; Chui, Linda; Tyler, Shaun; Xu, Bianli; Reimer, Aleisha; Nadon, Celine; Knox, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phenotypic H-antigen typing (MS-H) combined with whole-genome-sequencing-based genetic identification of H antigens, O antigens, and toxins (WGS-HOT) was used to type 60 clinical Escherichia coli isolates, 43 of which were previously identified as nonmotile, H type undetermined, or O rough by serotyping or having shown discordant MS-H and serotyping results. Whole-genome sequencing confirmed that MS-H was able to provide more accurate data regarding H antigen expression than serotyping. Further, enhanced and more confident O antigen identification resulted from gene cluster based typing in combination with conventional typing based on the gene pair comprising wzx and wzy and that comprising wzm and wzt. The O antigen was identified in 94.6% of the isolates when the two genetic O typing approaches (gene pair and gene cluster) were used in conjunction, in comparison to 78.6% when the gene pair database was used alone. In addition, 98.2% of the isolates showed the existence of genes for various toxins and/or virulence factors, among which verotoxins (Shiga toxin 1 and/or Shiga toxin 2) were 100% concordant with conventional PCR based testing results. With more applications of mass spectrometry and whole-genome sequencing in clinical microbiology laboratories, this combined phenotypic and genetic typing platform (MS-H plus WGS-HOT) should be ideal for pathogenic E. coli typing. PMID:27307455

  2. Phenotypic H-Antigen Typing by Mass Spectrometry Combined with Genetic Typing of H Antigens, O Antigens, and Toxins by Whole-Genome Sequencing Enhances Identification of Escherichia coli Isolates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Keding; Chui, Huixia; Domish, Larissa; Sloan, Angela; Hernandez, Drexler; McCorrister, Stuart; Robinson, Alyssia; Walker, Matthew; Peterson, Lorea A M; Majcher, Miles; Ratnam, Sam; Haldane, David J M; Bekal, Sadjia; Wylie, John; Chui, Linda; Tyler, Shaun; Xu, Bianli; Reimer, Aleisha; Nadon, Celine; Knox, J David; Wang, Gehua

    2016-08-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phenotypic H-antigen typing (MS-H) combined with whole-genome-sequencing-based genetic identification of H antigens, O antigens, and toxins (WGS-HOT) was used to type 60 clinical Escherichia coli isolates, 43 of which were previously identified as nonmotile, H type undetermined, or O rough by serotyping or having shown discordant MS-H and serotyping results. Whole-genome sequencing confirmed that MS-H was able to provide more accurate data regarding H antigen expression than serotyping. Further, enhanced and more confident O antigen identification resulted from gene cluster based typing in combination with conventional typing based on the gene pair comprising wzx and wzy and that comprising wzm and wzt The O antigen was identified in 94.6% of the isolates when the two genetic O typing approaches (gene pair and gene cluster) were used in conjunction, in comparison to 78.6% when the gene pair database was used alone. In addition, 98.2% of the isolates showed the existence of genes for various toxins and/or virulence factors, among which verotoxins (Shiga toxin 1 and/or Shiga toxin 2) were 100% concordant with conventional PCR based testing results. With more applications of mass spectrometry and whole-genome sequencing in clinical microbiology laboratories, this combined phenotypic and genetic typing platform (MS-H plus WGS-HOT) should be ideal for pathogenic E. coli typing. PMID:27307455

  3. Gestational weight gain trajectories in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini-Vallis, Helena; Lee-Baggley, Dayna; Stewart, Moira; Ryan, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify gestational weight gain trajectories, stratified by prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), of women with singleton pregnancies who received prenatal care in a primary care setting, and to compare these trajectories with the 2009 Institute of Medicine gestational weight gain recommendations. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Halifax, NS. Participants Women who received prenatal care at the Dalhousie Family Medicine clinics in Halifax from 2009 to 2013. Main outcome measures For each prenatal visit, gestational age and weight measurements were obtained. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the gestational weight gain trajectories. The upper limit of the guideline-recommended weekly gestational weight gain was compared with the 95% CI of the observed mean weekly gestational weight gain for each prepregnancy BMI category. Results A total of 280 women were included in the analyses. There was a significant interaction between prepregnancy BMI category and gestational weight gain over time (P < .001), with gestational weight gain being significantly lower among women with prepregnancy BMI of 30.0 kg/m2 or greater compared with those with BMI of 18.5 to less than 25.0 kg/m2 and 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2. When comparing women’s weight gain with the recommendations, women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 had the most guideline discordance, deviating from the weight gain recommendations at 20 weeks’ gestation. Conclusion These results are relevant and of benefit to women and clinicians wishing to address excess gestational weight gain, and to researchers and policy makers developing interventions aimed at curbing gestational weight gain in primary care. Although our results showed women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 gained the most excess, guideline-discordant weight, interventions should target all women planning or experiencing a pregnancy.

  4. Pharmacodynamics of drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, S. K.; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2001-08-01

    Body weight gain during treatment with drugs for any kind of disease may represent improvement of the disease itself. However, sometimes these drug-induced alterations of the body's appetite-regulating mechanisms result in excessive weight gain, thus jeopardizing compliance with prescribed medication. A number of drugs are capable of changing body weight as an adverse consequence of their therapeutic effect. Included in this category are the psychotropic drugs such as antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers. Antipsychotics are well-known culprits of weight gain. The low-potency (e.g., chlorpromazine and thioridazine) and atypical agents (e.g., clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone) are most often associated with weight gain. Antidepressants such as tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors are most often associated with significant weight gain. The tertiary tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline is thought to induce the most weight gain. Mood stabilizers such as lithium carbonate, valproic acid and carbamazepine also induce weight gain in a considerable number of patients. Treatment with corticosteroids is associated with dose-dependent body weight gain in many patients and corticosteroid-induced obesity aggravates other corticosteroid-associated health risks. Insulin therapy in diabetic patients usually increases body weight. Finally, sulfonylurea derivatives, antineoplastic agents used for the treatment of breast cancer and several drugs used in migraine prophylaxis may cause body weight gain as well. (c) 2001 Prous Science. All rights reserved. PMID:12743638

  5. Very high gain Nd:YLF amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Knights, M.G.; Thomas, M.D.; Chicklis, E.P.; Rines, G.A.; Seka, W.

    1988-05-01

    The authors report on high gain Nd:YLF rod amplifiers in which single-pass, small signal gains of over 1700 have been obtained along with stored energy densitiesgreater than or equal to0.4J/cm/sup 3/. The ability of Nd:YLF amplifiers to support such gains is a result of high parasitic oscillation thresholds, due primarily to the low refractive index of the material. These results suggest that Nd:YLF is an excellent candidate for amplifiers where high specific stored energies and/or very high gains are required.

  6. WFC3 SMOV Proposal 11419: UVIS Gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Borders, T.

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the gain results obtained from the SMOV UVIS Detector Functional program, proposal #11419. Based on internal calibration flatfields, the gain at the nominal 1.5 setting was measured at 1.61, 1.61, 1.63, and 1.62 e-/DN, with errors <0.01 e- /DN, for quadrants A, B, C, and D, respectively. These values are ~3% higher than those measured in ground test images and to date have been stable on-orbit: a preliminary mea- surement of the recent Cycle 17 gain data (proposal 11906, PI Pavlovsky) yielded gains within 1% or better of the SMOV values. The off-nominal gain settings are restricted parameters and unavailable for general use, however, the SMOV proposal obtained data to check these settings on-orbit relative to the nominal 1.5 setting. The values for the off-nominal gains were measured at 1.04, 1.02, 1.04, 1.04 e-/DN and at 2.17, 2.12, 2.17, 2.16 e-/DN for the gain 1.0 and gain 2.0 settings. The exposure times for the gain 4.0 images were erroneously set too low to allow a determination of that setting; the observations were not repeated.

  7. Measurement of Antenna Bore-Sight Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortinberry, Jarrod; Shumpert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The absolute or free-field gain of a simple antenna can be approximated using standard antenna theory formulae or for a more accurate prediction, numerical methods may be employed to solve for antenna parameters including gain. Both of these methods will result in relatively reasonable estimates but in practice antenna gain is usually verified and documented via measurements and calibration. In this paper, a relatively simple and low-cost, yet effective means of determining the bore-sight free-field gain of a VHF/UHF antenna is proposed by using the Brewster angle relationship.

  8. Why Research on the Pharmacogenetics of Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Is Warranted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleister, Heidi M.; Valdovinos, Maria Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Weight gain is an often-observed side effect of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) and is particularly significant in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). The majority of individuals treated with AAPs will gain at least 10% of their initial body weight over the course of therapy (Umbricht & Kane, 1996). One's genetic constitution is an…

  9. Clinical Genetic Testing in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New technologies for mutation detection in the human genome have greatly increased our understanding of epilepsy genetics. Application of genomic technologies in the clinical setting allows for more efficient genetic diagnosis in some patients; therefore, it is important to understand the types of tests available and the types of mutations that can be detected. Making a genetic diagnosis improves overall patient care by enhancing prognosis and recurrence risk counseling and informing treatment decisions. PMID:26316867

  10. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing statistically-based genetics problems. This issue is at the emerging edge of modern college-level genetics instruction, and this study attempts to identify key theoretical components for creating a specialized biological statistics curriculum. The goal of this curriculum will be to prepare biology students with the skills for assimilating quantitatively-based genetic processes, increasingly at the forefront of modern genetics. To fulfill this, two college level classes at two universities were surveyed. One university was located in the northeastern US and the other in the West Indies. There was a sample size of 42 students and a supplementary interview was administered to a select 9 students. Interviews were also administered to professors in the field in order to gain insight into the teaching of statistics in genetics. Key findings indicated that students had very little to no background in statistics (55%). Although students did perform well on exams with 60% of the population receiving an A or B grade, 77% of them did not offer good explanations on a probability question associated with the normal distribution provided in the survey. The scope and presentation of the applicable statistics/mathematics in some of the most used textbooks in genetics teaching, as well as genetics syllabi used by instructors do not help the issue. It was found that the text books, often times, either did not give effective explanations for students, or completely left out certain topics. The omission of certain statistical/mathematical oriented topics was seen to be also true with the genetics syllabi reviewed for this study. Nonetheless

  11. The relationship between parental genetic or phenotypic divergence and progeny variation in the maize nested association mapping population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The choice of populations for quantitative genetics experiments impacts inferences about genetic architecture and prospective selection gains. Plant breeding and quantitative genetics studies are often conducted in one or a few among many possible biparental families. Trait genotypic variation withi...

  12. New Results in Astrodynamics Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverstone-Carroll, V.; Hartmann, J. W.; Williams, S. N.; Mason, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Generic algorithms have gained popularity as an effective procedure for obtaining solutions to traditionally difficult space mission optimization problems. In this paper, a brief survey of the use of genetic algorithms to solve astrodynamics problems is presented and is followed by new results obtained from applying a Pareto genetic algorithm to the optimization of low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft missions.

  13. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources ... prevalent. Using various laboratory techniques, the scientists isolate DNA from these samples and examine it for unique ...

  14. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000510.htm Genetic counseling To use the sharing features on this ... cystic fibrosis or Down syndrome. Who May Want Genetic Counseling? It is up to you whether or ...

  15. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    Genetics is the study of heredity, the process of a parent passing certain genes on to their ... certain diseases are also often determined by genes. Genetic counseling is the process where parents can learn ...

  16. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  17. Assessing the Permeability of Landscape Features to Animal Movement: Using Genetic Structure to Infer Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sara J.; Kierepka, Elizabeth M.; Swihart, Robert K.; Latch, Emily K.; Rhodes, Olin E.

    2015-01-01

    Human-altered environments often challenge native species with a complex spatial distribution of resources. Hostile landscape features can inhibit animal movement (i.e., genetic exchange), while other landscape attributes facilitate gene flow. The genetic attributes of organisms inhabiting such complex environments can reveal the legacy of their movements through the landscape. Thus, by evaluating landscape attributes within the context of genetic connectivity of organisms within the landscape, we can elucidate how a species has coped with the enhanced complexity of human altered environments. In this research, we utilized genetic data from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) in conjunction with spatially explicit habitat attribute data to evaluate the realized permeability of various landscape elements in a fragmented agricultural ecosystem. To accomplish this we 1) used logistic regression to evaluate whether land cover attributes were most often associated with the matrix between or habitat within genetically identified populations across the landscape, and 2) utilized spatially explicit habitat attribute data to predict genetically-derived Bayesian probabilities of population membership of individual chipmunks in an agricultural ecosystem. Consistency between the results of the two approaches with regard to facilitators and inhibitors of gene flow in the landscape indicate that this is a promising new way to utilize both landscape and genetic data to gain a deeper understanding of human-altered ecosystems. PMID:25719366

  18. Assessing the permeability of landscape features to animal movement: using genetic structure to infer functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sara J; Kierepka, Elizabeth M; Swihart, Robert K; Latch, Emily K; Rhodes, Olin E

    2015-01-01

    Human-altered environments often challenge native species with a complex spatial distribution of resources. Hostile landscape features can inhibit animal movement (i.e., genetic exchange), while other landscape attributes facilitate gene flow. The genetic attributes of organisms inhabiting such complex environments can reveal the legacy of their movements through the landscape. Thus, by evaluating landscape attributes within the context of genetic connectivity of organisms within the landscape, we can elucidate how a species has coped with the enhanced complexity of human altered environments. In this research, we utilized genetic data from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) in conjunction with spatially explicit habitat attribute data to evaluate the realized permeability of various landscape elements in a fragmented agricultural ecosystem. To accomplish this we 1) used logistic regression to evaluate whether land cover attributes were most often associated with the matrix between or habitat within genetically identified populations across the landscape, and 2) utilized spatially explicit habitat attribute data to predict genetically-derived Bayesian probabilities of population membership of individual chipmunks in an agricultural ecosystem. Consistency between the results of the two approaches with regard to facilitators and inhibitors of gene flow in the landscape indicate that this is a promising new way to utilize both landscape and genetic data to gain a deeper understanding of human-altered ecosystems. PMID:25719366

  19. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  20. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  1. 75 FR 63763 - Program Integrity: Gainful Employment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Proposed Rulemaking on Program Integrity: Gainful Employment, published in the Federal Register on July 26, 2010 (75 FR 43616). DATES: The public meeting sessions will be held on the dates and at the locations... CFR Part 668 RIN 1840-AD04 Program Integrity: Gainful Employment AGENCY: Office of...

  2. Correcting the Normalized Gain for Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John; Stewart, Gay

    2010-01-01

    The normalized gain, "g", has been an important tool for the characterization of conceptual improvement in physics courses since its use in Hake's extensive study on conceptual learning in introductory physics. The normalized gain is calculated from the score on a pre-test administered before instruction and a post-test administered after…

  3. Decision-directed automatic gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, W. J., III

    1979-01-01

    Logic circuitry determines whether gain fluctuation are result of signal-strength changes or of atypical strings of like data symbols. Automatic Gain Control (AGC) system provides tight control that is independent of short-term, average, received signal energy and has negligible degrading effect on probability of error for signal.

  4. Complying with physician gain-sharing restrictions.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, P K

    1998-05-01

    Many IDSs are considering implementing gain-sharing programs as a way to motivate their physicians to provide high-quality, cost-effective services. Before embarking on such programs, however, IDSs need to understand the legal requirements associated with such programs to ensure that the gain-sharing arrangement is in compliance with Federal law. PMID:10179436

  5. Preferred hearing aid gain in everyday environments.

    PubMed

    Cox, R M; Alexander, G C

    1991-04-01

    Thirty-three hearing-impaired individuals were each fitted with three hearing aids. The instruments conformed to three frequency-gain prescriptions, differing by a total of 8 dB/octave, with the middle prescription derived using the MSU version 3.0 procedure. The subjects were divided into three matched groups of eleven. Each group used the fitted hearing aids in one of three everyday listening environments representing quiet, reverberant, and noisy situations, respectively. In each listening environment, preferred hearing aid gain for conversationally produced speech was measured in each hearing aid condition for each subject. Preferred gain in daily listening situations was compared to prescribed gain. Results indicated that: (1) preferred gain averaged across all three environments was about equal to prescribed gain, (2) mean preferred gain in each separate environment was substantially different from the prescribed level, (3) volume control adjustments of about +/- 8 dB relative to the prescribed level would be necessary to accommodate the preferred gain settings of the typical hearing aid wearer in daily life. Guidelines are presented for establishing recommended volume control settings for hearing aid users who may be unable to set the volume control independently. PMID:2065837

  6. Coherent control in quantum dot gain media using shaped pulses: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Akhilesh Kumar; Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi

    2015-11-16

    We present a numerical study of coherent control in a room temperature InAs/InP quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) using shaped ultra-short pulses. Both the gain and absorption regimes were analyzed for pulses with central wavelengths lying on either side of the inhomogeneously broadened gain spectrum. The numerical experiments predict that in the gain regime the coherent interactions between a QD SOA and a pulse can be controlled by incorporating a quadratic spectral phase (QSP) in the pulse profile. The sequential interaction with the gain medium of different spectral components of the pulse results in either suppression or enhancement of the coherent signatures on the pulse profile depending upon their proximity to the gain spectrum peak. In the absorption regime, positive QSP induces a negative chirp that adds up to that of a two photon absorption induced Kerr-like effect resulting in pulse compression while negative QSP enhances dispersive broadening of the pulse. PMID:26698476

  7. Sudden Gains During Therapy of Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Schulz, Stefan M.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Moscovitch, David A.; Suvak, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the phenomenon of sudden gains in 107 participants with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who received either cognitive–behavioral group therapy or exposure group therapy without explicit cognitive interventions, which primarily used public speaking situations as exposure tasks. Twenty-two out of 967 session-to-session intervals met criteria for sudden gains, which most frequently occurred in Session 5. Individuals with sudden gains showed similar improvements in the 2 treatment groups. Although cognitive–behavioral therapy was associated with more cognitive changes than exposure therapy, cognitive changes did not precede sudden gains. In general, the results of this study question the clinical significance of sudden gains in social phobia treatment. PMID:16881776

  8. Neural mechanisms of gain-loss asymmetry in temporal discounting.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Saori C; Yamada, Katsunori; Yoneda, Hiroyasu; Ohtake, Fumio

    2014-04-16

    Humans typically discount future gains more than losses. This phenomenon is referred to as the "sign effect" in experimental and behavioral economics. Although recent studies have reported associations between the sign effect and important social problems, such as obesity and incurring multiple debts, the biological basis for this phenomenon remains poorly understood. Here, we hypothesized that enhanced loss-related neural processing in magnitude and/or delay representation are causes of the sign effect. We examined participants performing intertemporal choice tasks involving future gains or losses and compared the brain activity of those who exhibited the sign effect and those who did not. When predicting future losses, significant differences were apparent between the two participant groups in terms of striatal activity representing delay length and in insular activity representing sensitivity to magnitude. Furthermore, participants with the sign effect exhibited a greater insular response to the magnitude of loss than to that of gain, and also a greater striatal response to the delay of loss than to that of gain. These findings may provide a new biological perspective for the development of novel treatments and preventive measures for social problems associated with the sign effect. PMID:24741049

  9. Flavor-calorie relationships: effect on weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Z S; Schiffman, S S

    1991-09-01

    The effects of flavor variety, caloric density variety, and inconsistency of flavor-caloric density relationships on caloric intake and weight gain were studied in 36 young male rats. Lab chow was diluted with cellulose to produce three foods that differed in caloric density while having identical nutritional composition. High-density (HD) food contained 3.33 kcal/g; mid-density (MD) food contained 2.64 kcal/g; low-density (LD) food contained 2.06 kcal/g. These foods were flavored with nonnutritive powders and were used in four different feeding regimens. For 15 days, group FLAV ate MD with one of 3 flavors added daily in a 3-day rotation. Groups DENS and NOVEL rotated daily among LD, HD, and MD. One of three flavors was added to each food. For group DENS, LD always contained one flavor, MD always contained another flavor, and HD always contained the third flavor. For group NOVEL, flavor-density pairings were not consistent. A control group, CONT, ate only MD with a single flavor. Weight gain was greatest in group NOVEL. Neither density variety nor flavor variety alone enhanced weight gain relative to control. In a subsequent experiment, group NOVEL did not display a preference for a glucose-paired flavor. These results suggest that reduced orosensory control of energy balance induced by uncoupling of flavor-calorie relationships contributes to weight gain. PMID:1800996

  10. Genetically modified human placenta‑derived mesenchymal stem cells with FGF‑2 and PDGF‑BB enhance neovascularization in a model of hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Su, Chao; Chen, Xiancheng; Zhang, Dongmei; Wan, Yang; Ye, Tinghong; Shen, Guobo; Wang, Yongsheng; Shi, Huashan; Yang, Li; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-10-01

    Ischemic diseases represent a challenging worldwide health burden. The current study investigated the therapeutic potential of genetically modified human placenta‑derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPDMSCs) with basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and platelet‑derived growth factor‑BB (PDGF‑BB) genes in hindlimb ischemia. Mesenchymal stem cells obtained from human term placenta were transfected ex vivo with adenoviral bicistronic vectors carrying the FGF2 and PDGF‑BB genes (Ad‑F‑P). Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was surgically induced by excision of the right femoral artery in New Zealand White rabbits. Ad‑F‑P genetically modified hPDMSCs, Ad‑null (control vector)‑modified hPDMSCs, unmodified hPDMSCs or media were intramuscularly implanted into the ischemic limbs 7 days subsequent to the induction of ischemia. Four weeks after cell therapy, angiographic analysis revealed significantly increased collateral vessel formation in the Ad‑F‑P‑hPDMSC group compared with the control group. Histological examination revealed markedly increased capillary and arteriole density in the Ad‑F‑P‑hPDMSC group. The xenografted hPDMSCs survived in the ischemic tissue for at least 4 weeks subsequent to cell therapy. The current study demonstrated that the combination of hPDMSC therapy with FGF2 and PDGF‑BB gene therapy effectively induced collateral vessel formation and angiogenesis, suggesting a novel strategy for therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:26239842

  11. Genetically modified human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells with FGF-2 and PDGF-BB enhance neovascularization in a model of hindlimb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    YIN, TAO; HE, SISI; SU, CHAO; CHEN, XIANCHENG; ZHANG, DONGMEI; WAN, YANG; YE, TINGHONG; SHEN, GUOBO; WANG, YONGSHENG; SHI, HUASHAN; YANG, LI; WEI, YUQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic diseases represent a challenging worldwide health burden. The current study investigated the therapeutic potential of genetically modified human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPDMSCs) with basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) genes in hindlimb ischemia. Mesenchymal stem cells obtained from human term placenta were transfected ex vivo with adenoviral bicistronic vectors carrying the FGF2 and PDGF-BB genes (Ad-F-P). Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was surgically induced by excision of the right femoral artery in New Zealand White rabbits. Ad-F-P genetically modified hPDMSCs, Ad-null (control vector)-modified hPDMSCs, unmodified hPDMSCs or media were intramuscularly implanted into the ischemic limbs 7 days subsequent to the induction of ischemia. Four weeks after cell therapy, angiographic analysis revealed significantly increased collateral vessel formation in the Ad-F-P-hPDMSC group compared with the control group. Histological examination revealed markedly increased capillary and arteriole density in the Ad-F-P-hPDMSC group. The xenografted hPDMSCs survived in the ischemic tissue for at least 4 weeks subsequent to cell therapy. The current study demonstrated that the combination of hPDMSC therapy with FGF2 and PDGF-BB gene therapy effectively induced collateral vessel formation and angiogenesis, suggesting a novel strategy for therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:26239842

  12. High levels of fish oil enhance neutrophil development and activation and influence colon mucus barrier function in a genetically susceptible mouse model.

    PubMed

    Duriancik, David M; Comstock, Sarah S; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2015-11-01

    Dietary fatty acids influence immunologic homeostasis, but their effect on initiation of colitis, an immune-mediated disease, is not well established. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that high doses of dietary fish oil (FO) increased colon inflammation and dysplasia in a model of infection-induced colitis. In the current study, we assessed the effects of high-dose dietary FO, 6% by weight, on colon inflammation, neutrophil recruitment and function, and mucus layer integrity in a genetically susceptible, colitis-prone mouse model in the absence of infection. FO-fed SMAD3(-/-) mice had increased colon inflammation evidenced by increased numbers of systemic and local neutrophils and increased neutrophil chemoattractant and inflammatory cytokine gene expression in the colon. Mucus layer thickness in the cecum and goblet cell numbers in the cecum and colon in FO-fed mice were reduced compared to control. FO consumption affected colitis in male and female mice differently. Compared to female control mice, neutrophils from FO-fed female mice had reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon ex vivo stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate while FO-fed male mice produced increased ROS compared to control-fed male mice. In summary, dietary FO impaired mucus layer integrity and was associated with colon inflammation characterized by increased neutrophil numbers and altered neutrophil function. High-dose FO may have detrimental effects in populations genetically susceptible for inflammatory bowel disease and these effects may differ between males and females. PMID:26297475

  13. Genetic and field management strategies to enhance the nutritional value of rice grains and limit accumulation of undesirable elements such as arsenic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancing the nutritional value of rice grains is of particular interest because rice is a primary dietary component for more than half of the world’s population, and is a primary source of nutrients in many underdeveloped countries. Because rice can be grown under both flooded and unflooded field ...

  14. Controlling gain one photon at a time

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Gregory W; Rieke, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is a salient property of sensory processing. All adaptational or gain control mechanisms face the challenge of obtaining a reliable estimate of the property of the input to be adapted to and obtaining this estimate sufficiently rapidly to be useful. Here, we explore how the primate retina balances the need to change gain rapidly and reliably when photons arrive rarely at individual rod photoreceptors. We find that the weakest backgrounds that decrease the gain of the retinal output signals are similar to those that increase human behavioral threshold, and identify a novel site of gain control in the retinal circuitry. Thus, surprisingly, the gain of retinal signals begins to decrease essentially as soon as background lights are detectable; under these conditions, gain control does not rely on a highly averaged estimate of the photon count, but instead signals from individual photon absorptions trigger changes in gain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00467.001 PMID:23682314

  15. High gain holmium-doped fibre amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Nikita; Li, Zhihong; Jung, Yongmin; Daniel, Jae M O; Barua, Pranabesh; Shardlow, Peter C; Liang, Sijing; Sahu, Jayanta K; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Richardson, David J

    2016-06-27

    We investigate the operation of holmium-doped fibre amplifiers (HDFAs) in the 2.1 µm spectral region. For the first time we demonstrate a diode-pumped HDFA. This amplifier provides a peak gain of 25 dB at 2040 nm with a 15 dB gain window spanning the wavelength range 2030 - 2100 nm with an external noise figure (NF) of 4-6 dB. We also compare the operation of HDFAs when pumped at 1950 nm and 2008 nm. The 1950 nm pumped HDFA provides 41 dB peak gain at 2060 nm with 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2120 nm and an external NF of 7-10 dB. By pumping at the longer wavelength of 2008 nm the gain bandwidth of the amplifier is shifted to longer wavelengths and using this architecture a HDFA was demonstrated with a peak gain of 39 dB at 2090 nm and 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2150 nm. The external NF over this wavelength range was 8-14 dB. PMID:27410557

  16. Active rc filter permits easy trade-off of amplifier gain and sensitivity to gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerwin, W. J.; Shaffer, C. V.

    1968-01-01

    Passive RC network was designed with zeros of transmission in the right half of the complex frequency plane in the feedback loop of a simple negative-gain amplifier. The proper positioning provides any desired trade-off between amplifier gain and sensitivity to amplifier gain.

  17. Nonunity gain minimal-disturbance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sabuncu, Metin; Andersen, Ulrik L.; Mista, Ladislav Jr.; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Filip, Radim; Leuchs, Gerd

    2007-09-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optimal nonunity gain Gaussian scheme for partial measurement of an unknown coherent state that causes minimal disturbance of the state. The information gain and the state disturbance are quantified by the noise added to the measurement outcomes and to the output state, respectively. We derive the optimal trade-off relation between the two noises and we show that the tradeoff is saturated by nonunity gain teleportation. Optimal partial measurement is demonstrated experimentally using a linear optics scheme with feedforward.

  18. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  19. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  20. GAIN OF FUNCTION STAT1 MUTATION-RELATED PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCY IS ASSOCIATED WITH DISSEMINATED MUCORMYCOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nilay; Hanks, Mary E.; Chandrasekaran, Prabha; Davis, Brian C.; Hsu, Amy P.; Van Wagoner, Nicholas J.; Merlin, Jessica S.; Spalding, Christine; La Hoz, Ricardo M.; Holland, Steven M.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We identified a novel gain of function mutation in STAT1 in a patient with disseminated Apophysomyces trapeziformis infection who had never had mucocutaneous candidiasis or autoimmunity. To our knowledge this is the first report of a genetic predisposition associated with mucormycosis. PMID:24709374

  1. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  2. Soft x-ray laser gain measurements in a recombining plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Milchberg, H.; Keane, C.; Voorhees, D.

    1985-03-01

    An enhancement of approx. 100 of stimulated emission over spontaneous emission of the CVI 182 A line (one-pass gain approx. = 6.5) was measured in a recombining, magnetically confined plasma column by two independent techniques using intensity calibrated XUV monochromators. Additional confirmation that the enhancement was due to stimulated emission has been obtained with a soft x-ray mirror.

  3. Enhanced production of 2,3-butanediol by a genetically engineered Bacillus sp. BRC1 using a hydrolysate of empty palm fruit bunches.

    PubMed

    Kang, In Yeong; Park, Jang Min; Hong, Won-Kyung; Kim, Yun Seok; Jung, You Ree; Kim, Seung-Bum; Heo, Sun-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Mok; Kang, Ji Young; Oh, Baek-Rock; Kim, Dae-Hyuk; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Chul Ho

    2015-02-01

    A Bacillus species that produces 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), termed BRC1, was newly isolated, and a 2,3-BD dehydrogenase (Bdh) from this species was identified and characterized at the molecular and biochemical level. Sequence analysis revealed that Bdh is homologous to D-2,3-BD dehydrogenases. An analysis of the enzymatic properties of Bdh overexpressed in Escherichia coli confirmed the molecular results, showing preferred activity toward D-2,3-BD. Optimum pH, temperature, and kinetics determined for reductive and oxidative reactions support the preferential production of 2,3-BD during cell growth. Overexpression of bdh under the control of a xylose-inducible promoter resulted in increased enzyme activity and enhanced 2,3-BD production in Bacillus sp. BRC1. Additionally, a hydrolysate of cellulosic material, (empty palm fruit bunches), was successfully used for the enhanced production of 2,3-BD in the recombinant Bacillus strain. PMID:25135315

  4. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; de Girolamo, Laura; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPARγ and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPARγ/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPARγ target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal a role for HDACs in orchestrating osteo-differentiation of hASCs at transcriptional level, and might provide new insights into the modulation of hASCs-based regenerative therapy. PMID:23085045

  5. Npc1 deficiency in the C57BL/6J genetic background enhances Niemann-Pick disease type C spleen pathology.

    PubMed

    Parra, Julio; Klein, Andrés D; Castro, Juan; Morales, María Gabriela; Mosqueira, Matías; Valencia, Ilse; Cortés, Victor; Rigotti, Attilio; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2011-09-30

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive neurovisceral lipid storage disorder. The affected genes are NPC1 and NPC2. Mutations in either gene lead to intracellular cholesterol accumulation. There are three forms of the disease, which are categorized based on the onset and severity of the disease: the infantile form, in which the liver and spleen are severely affected, the juvenile form, in which the liver and brain are affected, and the adult form, which affects the brain. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in the Npc1 gene originated in the BALB/c inbred strain mimics the juvenile form of the disease. To study the influence of genetic background on the expression of NPC disease in mice, we transferred the Npc1 mutation from the BALB/c to C57BL/6J inbred background. We found that C57BL/6J-Npc1(-/-) mice present with a much more aggressive form of the disease, including a shorter lifespan than BALB/c-Npc1(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the amount of cholesterol in the brains of Npc1(-/-) mice of either mouse strain. However, Npc1(-/-) mice with the C57BL/6J genetic background showed striking spleen damage with a marked buildup of cholesterol and phospholipids at an early age, which correlated with large foamy cell clusters. In addition, C57BL/6J Npc1(-/-) mice presented red cell abnormalities and abundant ghost erythrocytes that correlated with a lower hemoglobin concentration. We also found abnormalities in white cells, such as cytoplasmic granulation and neutrophil hypersegmentation that included lymphopenia and atypias. In conclusion, Npc1 deficiency in the C57BL6/J background is associated with spleen, erythrocyte, and immune system abnormalities that lead to a reduced lifespan. PMID:21910975

  6. From genetic improvement to commercial-scale mass culture of a Chilean strain of the green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis with enhanced productivity of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Patricia I.; Inostroza, Ingrid; Pizarro, Mario; Pérez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a red ketocarotenoid, widely used as a natural red colourant in marine fish aquaculture and poultry and, recently, as an antioxidant supplement for humans and animals. The green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the richest natural sources of this pigment. However, its slow growth rate and complex life cycle make mass culture difficult for commercial purposes. The aims of this research were (i) to standardize and apply a genetic improvement programme to a Chilean strain of H. pluvialis in order to improve its carotenogenic capacity and (ii) to evaluate the performance of a selected mutant strain in commercial-sized (125 000 L) open ponds in the north of Chile. Haematococcus pluvialis strain 114 was mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate. The level of mutagen dose (exposure time and concentration) was one that induced at least 90 % mortality. Surviving colonies were screened for resistance to the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor diphenylamine (25 µM). Resistant mutants were grown in a 30-mL volume for 30 days, after which the total carotenoid content was determined by spectrophotometry. Tens of mutants with improved carotenogenic capacity compared with the wild-type strain were isolated by the application of these standardized protocols. Some mutants exhibited curious morphological features such as spontaneous release of astaxanthin and loss of flagella. One of the mutants was grown outdoors in commercial-sized open ponds of 125 000 L in the north of Chile. Grown under similar conditions, the mutant strain accumulated 30 % more astaxanthin than the wild-type strain on a per dry weight basis and 72 % more on a per culture volume basis. We show that random mutagenesis/selection is an effective strategy for genetically improving strains of H. pluvialis and that improved carotenogenic capacity is maintained when the volume of the cultures is scaled up to a commercial size. PMID:23789055

  7. Genetic variance and covariance components for feed intake, average daily gain, and postweaning gain in growing beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feed is the single most expensive cost related to a beef cattle production enterprise. Data collection to determine feed efficient animals is also costly. Currently a 70 d performance test is recommended for accurate calculation of efficiency. Previous research has suggested intake tests can be l...

  8. Microwave gain medium with negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dexin; Chang, Kihun; Ran, Lixin; Xin, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Artificial effective media are attractive because of the fantastic applications they may enable, such as super lensing and electromagnetic invisibility. However, the inevitable loss due to their strongly dispersive nature is one of the fundamental challenges preventing such applications from becoming a reality. In this study, we demonstrate an effective gain medium based on negative resistance, to overcompensate the loss of a conventional passive metamaterial, meanwhile keeping its original negative-index property. Energy conservation-based theory, full-wave simulation and experimental measurement show that a fabricated sample consisting of conventional sub-wavelength building blocks with embedded microwave tunnel diodes exhibits a band-limited Lorentzian dispersion simultaneously with a negative refractive index and a net gain. Our work provides experimental evidence to the assertion that a stable net gain in negative-index gain medium is achievable, proposing a potential solution for the critical challenge current metamateiral technology faces in practical applications.

  9. Nonreciprocal gain control for ring laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dueker, G.; Lee, P.

    1967-01-01

    Nonreciprocal gain control is used in a ring laser where the two contracirculating beams may have differing intensities because of the residual Faraday rotation and other secondary nonreciprocal effects.

  10. Experience Matters: Information Acquisition Optimizes Probability Gain

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan D.; McKenzie, Craig R.M.; Cottrell, Garrison W.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    Deciding which piece of information to acquire or attend to is fundamental to perception, categorization, medical diagnosis, and scientific inference. Four statistical theories of the value of information—information gain, Kullback-Liebler distance, probability gain (error minimization), and impact—are equally consistent with extant data on human information acquisition. Three experiments, designed via computer optimization to be maximally informative, tested which of these theories best describes human information search. Experiment 1, which used natural sampling and experience-based learning to convey environmental probabilities, found that probability gain explained subjects’ information search better than the other statistical theories or the probability-of-certainty heuristic. Experiments 1 and 2 found that subjects behaved differently when the standard method of verbally presented summary statistics (rather than experience-based learning) was used to convey environmental probabilities. Experiment 3 found that subjects’ preference for probability gain is robust, suggesting that the other models contribute little to subjects’ search behavior. PMID:20525915

  11. Experience matters: information acquisition optimizes probability gain.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonathan D; McKenzie, Craig R M; Cottrell, Garrison W; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2010-07-01

    Deciding which piece of information to acquire or attend to is fundamental to perception, categorization, medical diagnosis, and scientific inference. Four statistical theories of the value of information-information gain, Kullback-Liebler distance, probability gain (error minimization), and impact-are equally consistent with extant data on human information acquisition. Three experiments, designed via computer optimization to be maximally informative, tested which of these theories best describes human information search. Experiment 1, which used natural sampling and experience-based learning to convey environmental probabilities, found that probability gain explained subjects' information search better than the other statistical theories or the probability-of-certainty heuristic. Experiments 1 and 2 found that subjects behaved differently when the standard method of verbally presented summary statistics (rather than experience-based learning) was used to convey environmental probabilities. Experiment 3 found that subjects' preference for probability gain is robust, suggesting that the other models contribute little to subjects' search behavior. PMID:20525915

  12. Organic Causes of Weight Gain and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Organic Causes of Weight Gain and Obesity Page Content ... as children, before they became heavy. Still other organic factors partly determine which kids can eat anything ...

  13. Improvement of FK506 production in Streptomyces tsukubaensis by genetic enhancement of the supply of unusual polyketide extender units via utilization of two distinct site-specific recombination systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Qinglin; Cen, Peilin; Xu, Zhinan; Liu, Wen

    2012-08-01

    FK506 is a potent immunosuppressant that has a wide range of clinical applications. Its 23-member macrocyclic scaffold, mainly with a polyketide origin, features two methoxy groups at C-13 and C-15 and one allyl side chain at C-21, due to the region-specific incorporation of two unusual extender units derived from methoxymalonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) and allylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA), respectively. Whether their intracellular formations can be a bottleneck for FK506 production remains elusive. In this study, we report the improvement of FK506 yield in the producing strain Streptomyces tsukubaensis by the duplication of two sets of pathway-specific genes individually encoding the biosyntheses of these two extender units, thereby providing a promising approach to generate high-FK506-producing strains via genetic manipulation. Taking advantage of the fact that S. tsukubaensis is amenable to two actinophage (ΦC31 and VWB) integrase-mediated recombination systems, we genetically enhanced the biosyntheses of methoxymalonyl-ACP and allylmalonyl-CoA, as indicated by transcriptional analysis. Together with the optimization of glucose supplementation, the maximal FK506 titer eventually increased by approximately 150% in comparison with that of the original strain. The strategy of engineering the biosynthesis of unusual extender units described here may be applicable to improving the production of other polyketide or nonribosomal peptide natural products that contain pathway-specific building blocks. PMID:22582065

  14. Coupling coefficient of gain-guided lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Kapon, E.; Lindsey, C.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the coupling coefficient for two gain-guided coupled waveguides, e.g., semiconductor laser arrays. A common parabolic gain distribution is assumed for the lasers, and the effective dielectric constant distribution is approximated in terms of the bulk refraction index, wavelength, power filling factor, and the antiguiding factor. The fundamental mode is then formulated and used in an integral for the coupling coefficient. The dependence of the coefficient of various waveguide parameters is described.

  15. The Galileo high gain antenna deployment anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    On April 11, 1991, the Galileo spacecraft executed a sequence that would open the spacecraft's High Gain Antenna. The Antenna's launch restraint had been released just after deployment sequence, the antenna, which opens like an umbrella, never reached the fully deployed position. The analyses and tests that followed allowed a conclusive determination of the likely failure mechanisms and pointed to some strategies to use for recovery of the high gain antenna.

  16. Effect of body weight gain on insulin sensitivity after retirement from exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, Constantine B.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Mondon, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the body-weight gain after retirement from an exercise-training program on the retained increase in insulin sensitivity elicited by the training was investigated in exercise-trained (ET) rats. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance and insulin suppression tests immediately after training and during retirement. Results show that, compared with sedentary controls, exercise training enhanced insulin-induced glucose uptake, but the enhanced sensitivity was gradually lost with the end of running activity until after seven days of retirement, when it became equal to that of controls. This loss of enhanced sensitivity to insulin was associated with an accelerated gain in body weight beginning one day after the start of retirement. However, those animals that gained weight only at rates similar to those of control rats, retained their enhanced sensitivity to insulin.

  17. Context-specific adaptation of saccade gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark; Clendaniel, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies established that vestibular reflexes can have two adapted states (e.g., gain) simultaneously, and that a context cue (e.g., vertical eye position) can switch between the two states. The present study examined this phenomenon of context-specific adaptationfor horizontal saccades, using a variety of contexts. Our overall goal was to assess the efficacy of different context cues in switching between adapted states. A standard double-step paradigm was used to adapt saccade gain. In each experiment, we asked for a simultaneous gain decrease in one context and gain increase in another context, and then determined if a change in the context would invoke switching between the adapted states. Horizontal eye position worked well as a context cue: saccades with the eyes deviated to the right could be made to have higher gains while saccades with the eyes deviated to the left could be made to have lower gains. Vertical eye position was less effective. This suggests that the more closely related a context cue is to the response being adapted, the more effective it is. Roll tilt of the head, and upright versus supine orientations, were somewhat effective in context switching; these paradigms contain orientation of gravity with respect to the head as part of the context.

  18. Can LENR Energy Gains Exceed 1000?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Energy gain is defined as the energy realized from reactions divided by the energy required to produce those reactions. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) have already been measured to significantly exceed the energy gain of 10 projected from ITER,possibly 15 years from now. Electrochemical experiments using the Pd-D system have shown energy gains exceeding 10. Gas phase experiments with the Ni-H system were reported to yield energy gains of over 100. Neither of these reports has been adequately verified or reproduced. However, the question in the title still deserves consideration. If, as thought by many, it is possible to trigger nuclear reactions that yield MeV energies with chemical energies of the order of eV, then the most optimistic expectation is that LENR gains could approach one million. Hence, the very tentative answer to the question above is yes. However, if LENR could be initiated with some energy cost, and then continue to ``burn,'' very high energy gains might be realized. Consider a match and a pile of dry logs. The phenomenon termed ``heat after death'' will be examined to see if it might be the initial evidence for nuclear ``burning.''

  19. Genetic barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  20. An assessment of wheat breeding gains in hot environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdji, S. M.; Mathews, K.; Reynolds, M.; Crossa, J.; Lobell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Wheat, a critical crop for ensuring global food security, has the lowest optimum temperatures among the major cereals, and is already grown in many heat stress areas, thereby increasing risks to production from a warming climate. Historical spring wheat trial data from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) was used to investigate the relationship between environmental conditions and yield in major wheat-growing areas, assess the response to future warming, and identify different rates of genetic gains due to variety improvement across environments and breeding nurseries. Results were compared for two nurseries: 1) the Elite Spring Wheat Yield Trial (ESWYT), which aims to improve yield potential under optimal environmental conditions, and 2) the Semi-Arid Wheat Yield Trial (SAWYT), where improvements are targeted in semi-arid, rainfed environments, frequently subject to heat and water stress. Yields from 25 years of trial data were paired with reconstructed daily weather data in an empirical model with environmental variables averaged by growth stage. Temperature, radiation, day length and interaction terms between temperature and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) were all determined to be significant terms in the model. Results show a detrimental response to warming across all temperatures in the grain-filling, or final growth stage, particularly under low VPD/ humid conditions. A negative response to warming was also observed in the reproductive stage after ~14C, although high VPD conferred no additional benefit, perhaps due to a higher sensitivity and/or exposure to water stress during this period. A projected 2C season average warming was seen to have differential effects between ESWYT and SAWYT, with SAWYT germplasm less sensitive to warming up until ~21C, but an equally negative response to further warming for both nurseries. The regions where wheat is already grown under hot, and sometimes humid, conditions, particularly in south and south

  1. Genetically engineered plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Forestiere, Carlo; Pasquale, Alyssa J; Capretti, Antonio; Miano, Giovanni; Tamburrino, Antonello; Lee, Sylvanus Y; Reinhard, Björn M; Dal Negro, Luca

    2012-04-11

    In the present Letter, we demonstrate how the design of metallic nanoparticle arrays with large electric field enhancement can be performed using the basic paradigm of engineering, namely the optimization of a well-defined objective function. Such optimization is carried out by coupling a genetic algorithm with the analytical multiparticle Mie theory. General design criteria for best enhancement of electric fields are obtained, unveiling the fundamental interplay between the near-field plasmonic and radiative photonic coupling. Our optimization approach is experimentally validated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements, which demonstrate how genetically optimized arrays, fabricated using electron beam lithography, lead to order of ten improvement of Raman enhancement over nanoparticle dimer antennas, and order of one hundred improvement over optimal nanoparticle gratings. A rigorous design of nanoparticle arrays with optimal field enhancement is essential to the engineering of numerous nanoscale optical devices such as plasmon-enhanced biosensors, photodetectors, light sources and more efficient nonlinear optical elements for on chip integration. PMID:22381056

  2. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; Girolamo, Laura de; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal

  3. Genetic diversity within honeybee colonies increases signal production by waggle-dancing foragers

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Heather R; Burke, Kelly M; Seeley, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated considerable benefits of intracolonial genetic diversity for the productivity of honeybee colonies: single-patriline colonies have depressed foraging rates, smaller food stores and slower weight gain relative to multiple-patriline colonies. We explored whether differences in the use of foraging-related communication behaviour (waggle dances and shaking signals) underlie differences in foraging effort of genetically diverse and genetically uniform colonies. We created three pairs of colonies; each pair had one colony headed by a multiply mated queen (inseminated by 15 drones) and one colony headed by a singly mated queen. For each pair, we monitored the production of foraging-related signals over the course of 3 days. Foragers in genetically diverse colonies had substantially more information available to them about food resources than foragers in uniform colonies. On average, in genetically diverse colonies compared with genetically uniform colonies, 36% more waggle dances were identified daily, dancers performed 62% more waggle runs per dance, foragers reported food discoveries that were farther from the nest and 91% more shaking signals were exchanged among workers each morning prior to foraging. Extreme polyandry by honeybee queens enhances the production of worker–worker communication signals that facilitate the swift discovery and exploitation of food resources. PMID:18198143

  4. Genetic diversity within honeybee colonies increases signal production by waggle-dancing foragers.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Heather R; Burke, Kelly M; Seeley, Thomas D

    2008-04-01

    Recent work has demonstrated considerable benefits of intracolonial genetic diversity for the productivity of honeybee colonies: single-patriline colonies have depressed foraging rates, smaller food stores and slower weight gain relative to multiple-patriline colonies. We explored whether differences in the use of foraging-related communication behaviour (waggle dances and shaking signals) underlie differences in foraging effort of genetically diverse and genetically uniform colonies. We created three pairs of colonies; each pair had one colony headed by a multiply mated queen (inseminated by 15 drones) and one colony headed by a singly mated queen. For each pair, we monitored the production of foraging-related signals over the course of 3 days. Foragers in genetically diverse colonies had substantially more information available to them about food resources than foragers in uniform colonies. On average, in genetically diverse colonies compared with genetically uniform colonies, 36% more waggle dances were identified daily, dancers performed 62% more waggle runs per dance, foragers reported food discoveries that were farther from the nest and 91% more shaking signals were exchanged among workers each morning prior to foraging. Extreme polyandry by honeybee queens enhances the production of worker-worker communication signals that facilitate the swift discovery and exploitation of food resources. PMID:18198143

  5. An assessment of wheat yield sensitivity and breeding gains in hot environments

    PubMed Central

    Gourdji, Sharon M.; Mathews, Ky L.; Reynolds, Matthew; Crossa, José; Lobell, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic improvements in heat tolerance of wheat provide a potential adaptation response to long-term warming trends, and may also boost yields in wheat-growing areas already subject to heat stress. Yet there have been few assessments of recent progress in breeding wheat for hot environments. Here, data from 25 years of wheat trials in 76 countries from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) are used to empirically model the response of wheat to environmental variation and assess the genetic gains over time in different environments and for different breeding strategies. Wheat yields exhibited the most sensitivity to warming during the grain-filling stage, typically the hottest part of the season. Sites with high vapour pressure deficit (VPD) exhibited a less negative response to temperatures during this period, probably associated with increased transpirational cooling. Genetic improvements were assessed by using the empirical model to correct observed yield growth for changes in environmental conditions and management over time. These ‘climate-corrected’ yield trends showed that most of the genetic gains in the high-yield-potential Elite Spring Wheat Yield Trial (ESWYT) were made at cooler temperatures, close to the physiological optimum, with no evidence for genetic gains at the hottest temperatures. In contrast, the Semi-Arid Wheat Yield Trial (SAWYT), a lower-yielding nursery targeted at maintaining yields under stressed conditions, showed the strongest genetic gains at the hottest temperatures. These results imply that targeted breeding efforts help us to ensure progress in building heat tolerance, and that intensified (and possibly new) approaches are needed to improve the yield potential of wheat in hot environments in order to maintain global food security in a warmer climate. PMID:23222442

  6. Invasive blue mussels threaten regional scale genetic diversity in mainland and remote offshore locations: the need for baseline data and enhanced protection in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jonathan P A; Zbawicka, Małgorzata; Westfall, Kristen M; Wenne, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Human-mediated biological transfers of species have substantially modified many ecosystems with profound environmental and economic consequences. However, in many cases, invasion events are very hard to identify because of the absence of an appropriate baseline of information for receiving sites/regions. In this study, use of high-resolution genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms - SNPs) highlights the threat of introduced Northern Hemisphere blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) at a regional scale to Southern Hemisphere lineages of blue mussels via hybridization and introgression. Analysis of a multispecies SNP dataset reveals hotspots of invasive Northern Hemisphere blue mussels in some mainland New Zealand locations, as well as the existence of unique native lineages of blue mussels on remote oceanic islands in the Southern Ocean that are now threatened by invasive mussels. Samples collected from an oil rig that has moved between South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand were identified as invasive Northern Hemisphere mussels, revealing the relative ease with which such non-native species may be moved from region to region. In combination, our results highlight the existence of unique lineages of mussels (and by extension, presumably of other taxa) on remote offshore islands in the Southern Ocean, the need for more baseline data to help identify bioinvasion events, the ongoing threat of hybridization and introgression posed by invasive species, and the need for greater protection of some of the world's last great remote areas. PMID:27124277

  7. Enhancement of tendon-to-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells genetically modified with bFGF/BMP2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Biao; Li, Bin; Qi, Yong-Jian; Ni, Qu-Bo; Pan, Zheng-Qi; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Many strategies, including various growth factors and gene transfer, have been used to augment healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The biological environment regulated by the growth factors during the stage of tendon-bone healing was considered important in controlling the integrating process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) genetically modified with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on healing after ACL reconstruction. BMSCs were infected with an adenoviral vector encoding BMP2 (AdBMP2) or bFGF (AdbFGF). Then, the infected BMSCs were surgically implanted into the tendon-bone interface. At 12 weeks postoperatively, the formation of abundant cartilage-like cells, smaller tibial bone tunnel and significantly higher ultimate load and stiffness levels, through histological analysis, micro-computed tomography and biomechanical testing, were observed. In addition, the AdBMP2-plus-AdbFGF group had the smallest bone tunnel and the best mechanical properties among all the groups. The addition of BMP2 or bFGF by gene transfer resulted in better cellularity, new bone formation and higher mechanical property, which contributed to the healing process after ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, the co-application of these two genes was more powerful and efficient than either single gene therapy. PMID:27173013

  8. A systematic analysis of TCA Escherichia coli mutants reveals suitable genetic backgrounds for enhanced hydrogen and ethanol production using glycerol as main carbon source.

    PubMed

    Valle, Antonio; Cabrera, Gema; Muhamadali, Howbeer; Trivedi, Drupad K; Ratray, Nicholas J W; Goodacre, Royston; Cantero, Domingo; Bolivar, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Biodiesel has emerged as an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels; however, the low price of glycerol feed-stocks generated from the biodiesel industry has become a burden to this industry. A feasible alternative is the microbial biotransformation of waste glycerol to hydrogen and ethanol. Escherichia coli, a microorganism commonly used for metabolic engineering, is able to biotransform glycerol into these products. Nevertheless, the wild type strain yields can be improved by rewiring the carbon flux to the desired products by genetic engineering. Due to the importance of the central carbon metabolism in hydrogen and ethanol synthesis, E. coli single null mutant strains for enzymes of the TCA cycle and other related reactions were studied in this work. These strains were grown anaerobically in a glycerol-based medium and the concentrations of ethanol, glycerol, succinate and hydrogen were analysed by HPLC and GC. It was found that the reductive branch is the more relevant pathway for the aim of this work, with malate playing a central role. It was also found that the putative C4-transporter dcuD mutant improved the target product yields. These results will contribute to reveal novel metabolic engineering strategies for improving hydrogen and ethanol production by E. coli. PMID:26058953

  9. Enhancement of tendon-to-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells genetically modified with bFGF/BMP2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Li, Bin; Qi, Yong-Jian; Ni, Qu-Bo; Pan, Zheng-Qi; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Many strategies, including various growth factors and gene transfer, have been used to augment healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The biological environment regulated by the growth factors during the stage of tendon-bone healing was considered important in controlling the integrating process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) genetically modified with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on healing after ACL reconstruction. BMSCs were infected with an adenoviral vector encoding BMP2 (AdBMP2) or bFGF (AdbFGF). Then, the infected BMSCs were surgically implanted into the tendon-bone interface. At 12 weeks postoperatively, the formation of abundant cartilage-like cells, smaller tibial bone tunnel and significantly higher ultimate load and stiffness levels, through histological analysis, micro-computed tomography and biomechanical testing, were observed. In addition, the AdBMP2-plus-AdbFGF group had the smallest bone tunnel and the best mechanical properties among all the groups. The addition of BMP2 or bFGF by gene transfer resulted in better cellularity, new bone formation and higher mechanical property, which contributed to the healing process after ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, the co-application of these two genes was more powerful and efficient than either single gene therapy. PMID:27173013

  10. Genetics of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Radha, Venkatesan; Kanthimathi, Sekar; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has now become a major public health problem because of its prevalence and its associated complications during pregnancy. Earlier studies have suggested that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and GDM might have similar pathophysiology, such as increased insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion resulting in hyperglycaemia. Evidence for a genetic basis of GDM has been poorly understood. To some extent, the current advancement in genomic techniques has thrown better light on the genetics of GDM. Based on the candidate gene approach and genome wide association studies, genetic loci in several genes that are responsible for insulin secretion, insulin resistance, lipid and glucose metabolism and other pathways have shown association with the GDM susceptibility. Understanding the possible underlying genetic factors of GDM would help us in gaining knowledge on the pathophysiologic mechanism of the disease. PMID:27582142

  11. Genetic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  12. Pharmacogenetics of leptin in antipsychotic-associated weight gain and obesity-related complications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amy K; Bishop, Jefrey R

    2013-01-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics can greatly improve symptoms of psychosis-spectrum disorders. Unfortunately, these drugs are associated with weight gain, which increases a patient’s risk for developing chronic diseases including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases or other obesity-related complications. There are interindividual differences in weight gain resulting from antipsychotic drug use that may be explained by pharmacodynamic characteristics of these agents as well as clinical factors. In addition, genetic variations in pathways associated with satiety are increasingly recognized as potential contributors to antipsychotic-associated weight gain. Polymorphisms in the leptin gene, as well as the leptin receptor gene, are potential pharmacogenetic markers associated with these outcomes. This article summarizes evidence for the associations of the leptin gene and the leptin receptor gene polymorphisms with antipsychotic-induced weight gain, potential mechanisms underlying these relationships, and discusses areas for future pharmacogenetic investigation. PMID:21787190

  13. Many human accelerated regions are developmental enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Capra, John A.; Erwin, Genevieve D.; McKinsey, Gabriel; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic changes underlying the dramatic differences in form and function between humans and other primates are largely unknown, although it is clear that gene regulatory changes play an important role. To identify regulatory sequences with potentially human-specific functions, we and others used comparative genomics to find non-coding regions conserved across mammals that have acquired many sequence changes in humans since divergence from chimpanzees. These regions are good candidates for performing human-specific regulatory functions. Here, we analysed the DNA sequence, evolutionary history, histone modifications, chromatin state and transcription factor (TF) binding sites of a combined set of 2649 non-coding human accelerated regions (ncHARs) and predicted that at least 30% of them function as developmental enhancers. We prioritized the predicted ncHAR enhancers using analysis of TF binding site gain and loss, along with the functional annotations and expression patterns of nearby genes. We then tested both the human and chimpanzee sequence for 29 ncHARs in transgenic mice, and found 24 novel developmental enhancers active in both species, 17 of which had very consistent patterns of activity in specific embryonic tissues. Of these ncHAR enhancers, five drove expression patterns suggestive of different activity for the human and chimpanzee sequence at embryonic day 11.5. The changes to human non-coding DNA in these ncHAR enhancers may modify the complex patterns of gene expression necessary for proper development in a human-specific manner and are thus promising candidates for understanding the genetic basis of human-specific biology. PMID:24218637

  14. Edemagenic gain and interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Quick, C M; Stewart, R H; Drake, R E; Cox, C S; Laine, G A

    2008-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, interstitial fluid volume is tightly regulated by balancing microvascular filtration and lymphatic return to the central venous circulation. Even though microvascular filtration and lymphatic return are governed by conservation of mass, their interaction can result in exceedingly complex behavior. Without making simplifying assumptions, investigators must solve the fluid balance equations numerically, which limits the generality of the results. We thus made critical simplifying assumptions to develop a simple solution to the standard fluid balance equations that is expressed as an algebraic formula. Using a classical approach to describe systems with negative feedback, we formulated our solution as a "gain" relating the change in interstitial fluid volume to a change in effective microvascular driving pressure. The resulting "edemagenic gain" is a function of microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)), effective lymphatic resistance (R(L)), and interstitial compliance (C). This formulation suggests two types of gain: "multivariate" dependent on C, R(L), and K(f), and "compliance-dominated" approximately equal to C. The latter forms a basis of a novel method to estimate C without measuring interstitial fluid pressure. Data from ovine experiments illustrate how edemagenic gain is altered with pulmonary edema induced by venous hypertension, histamine, and endotoxin. Reformulation of the classical equations governing fluid balance in terms of edemagenic gain thus yields new insight into the factors affecting an organ's susceptibility to edema. PMID:18056984

  15. New night vision goggle gain definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, Vyacheslav B.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Larason, Thomas C.

    2015-05-01

    A new definition is proposed for the calibration of Night Vision Goggle (NVG) gains. This definition is based on the measurement of radiometric input and output quantities of the NVG. While the old definition used the "equivalent fL" which is a non SI traceable luminance unit, the new definition utilizes the radiance quantities that are traceable to the SI units through NIST standards. The new NVG gain matches the previous one as a result of the application of a correction coefficient originating from the conversion of the radiance to luminance units. The new definition was tested at the NIST Night Vision Calibration Facility and the measurement results were compared to the data obtained with a Hoffman Test Set Model ANV-126. Comparing the radiometric quantities of the Hoffman Test Set and those measured by the NIST transfer standard radiometer, indicates that the observed differences up to 15% were due to the calibration and experimental errors of the ANV-126 Test Set. In view of different spectral characteristics of luminophores that can be utilized in the NVG design, the simulation of the NVG output for gain measurement was performed. The NVG output was simulated with a sphere-based source using different LEDs and the measured gain was compared to that obtained with the ANV-126 internal luminance meter. The NVG gain uncertainty analysis was performed for the Type A, B, and C goggles.

  16. Gain and energy storage in holmium YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.; Deyst, John P.

    1991-01-01

    It is demonstrated that Q-switched holmium lasers are capable of high-gain and high-energy operation at 300 K. Small-signal gain coefficients of 0.50 and 0.12/cm have been measured in YLF and YAG, respectively. Small-signal gains of 0.50/cm are comparable to those achievable in Nd:YAG and are not typical of low-gain materials. This large gain in the Ho:YLF material is made possible by operating the amplifier in the ground state depletion mode. The amplifier performance data and associated analysis presented demonstrate that efficient energy storage is possible with very high excited state ion densities of the Ho 5I7 upper laser level. This is an important result since upconversion can limit the 5I7 population. Although upconversion was still present in this experiment, it was possible to achieve efficient energy storage, demonstrating that the problem is manageable even at high excitation densities in YLF.

  17. Genetic, physiological and nutritional studies on Clostridium strains isolated and screened for characteristics useful in enhanced oil recovery, with special reference to high salt tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Grula, M.M.; Russell, H.H.

    1990-03-01

    This work is concerned with a group of microorganisms generally thought to have the highest potential for usefulness in microbial enhancement of oil recovery (MEOR), namely, fermentative species of the genus Clostridium. The report consists of two parts: (1) a study of the effects of various environmental factors (mainly chemical) on growth, gas production, sporulation, and spore germination of several strains of Clostridium in laboratory media; and (2) a study of the effects of core minerals and pore volume on solvent, acid, and gas production and refeedability (in cores) of similar freshly isolated Clostridium strains. In addition, the bacterial strains were characterized, and their basic nutritional requirements were determined. 15 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  18. Enhancement of Lipid Productivity in Oleaginous Colletotrichum Fungus through Genetic Transformation Using the Yeast CtDGAT2b Gene under Model-Optimized Growth Condition

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Prabuddha; Mall, Nikunj; Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Chakraborty, Monami; Maiti, Mrinal K.

    2014-01-01

    Oleaginous fungi are of special interest among microorganisms for the production of lipid feedstocks as they can be cultured on a variety of substrates, particularly waste lingocellulosic materials, and few fungal strains are reported to accumulate inherently higher neutral lipid than bacteria or microalgae. Previously, we have characterized an endophytic filamentous fungus Colletotrichum sp. DM06 that can produce total lipid ranging from 34% to 49% of its dry cell weight (DCW) upon growing with various carbon sources and nutrient-stress conditions. In the present study, we report on the genetic transformation of this fungal strain with the CtDGAT2b gene, which encodes for a catalytically efficient isozyme of type-2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) from oleaginous yeast Candida troplicalis SY005. Besides the increase in size of lipid bodies, total lipid titer by the transformed Colletotrichum (lipid content ∼73% DCW) was found to be ∼1.7-fold more than the wild type (lipid content ∼38% DCW) due to functional activity of the CtDGAT2b transgene when grown under standard condition of growth without imposition of any nutrient-stress. Analysis of lipid fractionation revealed that the neutral lipid titer in transformants increased up to 1.8-, 1.6- and 1.5-fold compared to the wild type when grown under standard, nitrogen stress and phosphorus stress conditions, respectively. Lipid titer of transformed cells was further increased to 1.7-fold following model-based optimization of culture conditions. Taken together, ∼2.9-fold higher lipid titer was achieved in Colletotrichum fungus due to overexpression of a rate-limiting crucial enzyme of lipid biosynthesis coupled with prediction-based bioprocess optimization. PMID:25375973

  19. 1,25(OH)2D3-enhanced hypercalciuria in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats fed a low-calcium diet

    PubMed Central

    Asplin, John R.; Krieger, Nancy S.; Culbertson, Christopher D.; Asplin, Daniel M.; Bushinsky, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The inbred genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rats exhibit many features of human idiopathic hypercalciuria and have elevated levels of vitamin D receptors (VDR) in calcium (Ca)-transporting organs. On a normal-Ca diet, 1,25(OH)2D3 (1,25D) increases urine (U) Ca to a greater extent in GHS than in controls [Sprague-Dawley (SD)]. The additional UCa may result from an increase in intestinal Ca absorption and/or bone resorption. To determine the source, we asked whether 1,25D would increase UCa in GHS fed a low-Ca (0.02%) diet (LCD). With 1,25D, UCa in SD increased from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 9.3 ± 0.9 mg/day and increased more in GHS from 4.7 ± 0.3 to 21.5 ± 0.9 mg/day (P < 0.001). In GHS rats on LCD with or without 1,25D, UCa far exceeded daily Ca intake (2.6 mg/day). While the greater excess in UCa in GHS rats must be derived from bone mineral, there may also be a 1,25D-mediated decrease in renal tubular Ca reabsorption. RNA expression of the components of renal Ca transport indicated that 1,25D administration results in a suppression of klotho, an activator of the renal Ca reabsorption channel TRPV5, in both SD and GHS rats. This fall in klotho would decrease tubular reabsorption of the 1,25D-induced bone Ca release. Thus, the greater increase in UCa with 1,25D in GHS fed LCD strongly suggests that the additional UCa results from an increase in bone resorption, likely due to the increased number of VDR in the GHS rat bone cells, with a possible component of decreased renal tubular calcium reabsorption. PMID:23926184

  20. Gain-assisted plasmon induced transparency in T-shaped metamaterials for slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jinna; Wang, Junqiao; Ding, Pei; Fan, Chunzhen; Liang, Erjun

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the gain-assisted plasmonic analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a novel planar metamaterial, whose unit cell consists of two perpendicularly connected metallic bars, forming a ‘T’ configuration. An EIT-like resonance can be achieved by introducing symmetry breaking into its shape. The results show that the group index is greatly enhanced at the optimum value of the gain due to a dramatic amplification of the EIT-like resonance. Furthermore, a trade-off between the group index and the transmittance at the EIT-like resonance, which always exists in passive systems with no gains, can be removed at an approximate gain level. E-field enhancements are used to understand the underlying physics.

  1. Genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Fraser, F C

    1974-09-01

    A workshop was sponsored by the National Genetics Foundation to evaluate and make recommendations about the status of genetic counseling, its goals, nature, achievements, and needs. The process of genetic workup and counseling is divided into 5 stages: validation of the diagnosis; obtaining family history; estimation of the risk of recurrence; helping the family make a decision and take appropriate action; and extending counseling to other members of the family. Counseling can be directed at individuals or at special groups with the potential of carrying such diseases as sickle cell amenia or Tay-Sachs. No consensus exists on an optimal counseling approach. Genetic counseling is regarded as a team effort, requiring, in addition to the counselor, laboratory facilities and a variety of specialists. The source of payment for genetic counseling services is regarded as a problem of increasing concern. Generally, the fee paid rarely covers the cost of the many procedures and it is suggested that the cost, like that of other public health services, should be subsidized by the state. Considerable argument exists over whether a genetic counselor must have a M.D. degree or whether a Ph. D. in medical genetics is suitable enough. The quality of much genetic counseling, which is often done in the office of doctors unskilled in the field, would be increased if better training in genetics were offered to medical students and if physicians were informed of the existence of counseling centers. Further, there is a growing feeling that some sort of accreditation of genetic counselors is desirable. PMID:4609197

  2. High gain Raman amplifier with inherent gain flattening and dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakkar, Charu; Thyagarajan, K.

    2005-06-01

    We report here an inherently gain-flattened, high-gain discrete Raman fiber amplifier design with 21 dB net gain (±1.4 dB gain ripple) over 25 nm bandwidth. The amplifier design is based on a W-shape highly nonlinear fiber, in which, optimized spectral variation of leakage loss has been used to achieve inherent gain flattening of Raman gain. The proposed fiber has an additional advantage of having a high negative dispersion coefficient (∼-84 ps/km nm) over the operating range of wavelength and thus the designed discrete amplifier module, based on this fiber, is also capable of compensating dispersion accumulated in one span (70 km) of transmission through G.652 fiber. Hence, the designed module is proposed as a composite amplifier and dispersion-compensating unit for 25 nm bandwidth, which is capable of handling both attenuation and dispersion of one span of G. 652 transmission.

  3. Polyandry promotes enhanced offspring survival in decorated crickets.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Tracie M; Sakaluk, Scott K

    2005-01-01

    Although female multiple mating is ubiquitous in insects, its adaptive significance remains poorly understood. Benefits to multiple mating can accrue via direct material benefits, indirect genetic benefits, or both. We investigated the effects of multiple mating in the decorated cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, by simultaneously varying the number of times that females mated and the number of different males with which they mated, measuring aspects of female fecundity and elements of offspring performance and viability. Multiple matings resulted in enhanced female fitness relative to single matings when females mated with different partners, but not when females mated repeatedly with the same male. Specifically, polyandrous females produced significantly more offspring surviving to reproductive maturity than did monogamous females mating once or mating repeatedly with the same male. These results suggest that the benefit females gain from multiple mating is influenced primarily by genetic and not material benefits. PMID:15792235

  4. A Genetic-Pathophysiological Framework for Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures of the skull, provides a paradigm for investigating the interplay of genetic and environmental factors leading to malformation. Over the past 20 years molecular genetic techniques have provided a new approach to dissect the underlying causes; success has mostly come from investigation of clinical samples, and recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing have dramatically enhanced the study of the human as the preferred “model organism.” In parallel, however, we need a pathogenetic classification to describe the pathways and processes that lead to cranial suture fusion. Given the prenatal onset of most craniosynostosis, investigation of mechanisms requires more conventional model organisms; principally the mouse, because of similarities in cranial suture development. We present a framework for classifying genetic causes of craniosynostosis based on current understanding of cranial suture biology and molecular and developmental pathogenesis. Of note, few pathologies result from complete loss of gene function. Instead, biochemical mechanisms involving haploinsufficiency, dominant gain-of-function and recessive hypomorphic mutations, and an unusual X-linked cellular interference process have all been implicated. Although few of the genes involved could have been predicted based on expression patterns alone (because the genes play much wider roles in embryonic development or cellular homeostasis), we argue that they fit into a limited number of functional modules active at different stages of cranial suture development. This provides a useful approach both when defining the potential role of new candidate genes in craniosynostosis and, potentially, for devising pharmacological approaches to therapy. PMID:26340332

  5. Image formation using stimulated raman scattering gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, V. G.; Makarov, E. A.; Stasel'ko, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical analysis of the spatial, noise, and energy characteristics of an amplifier has been performed in the mode of spectral and time selection using subnanosecond stimulated Raman Scattering gain of weak echo signals in crystalline active media that are known for high (up to 10-1 cm/MW) gain coefficients. The possibility to reach high gain values has been demonstrated for weak signals from objects at acceptable angular sizes of the field of vision of an amplifier. To provide a signal-to-noise ratio that exceeds unity over the entire field of vision, the number of photons at the input to an amplifier that is required has to exceed the number of its resolution elements. Accurate determination of the possibilities of recording of weak echo signals and quality of images of targets that are obtained using amplifiers under stimulated Raman Scattering requires additional special experiments.

  6. Aromatic Gain in a Supramolecular Polymer.

    PubMed

    Saez Talens, Victorio; Englebienne, Pablo; Trinh, Thuat T; Noteborn, Willem E M; Voets, Ilja K; Kieltyka, Roxanne E

    2015-09-01

    The synergy of aromatic gain and hydrogen bonding in a supramolecular polymer is explored. Partially aromatic bis(squaramide) bolaamphiphiles were designed to self-assemble through a combination of hydrophobic, hydrogen-bonding, and aromatic effects into stiff, high-aspect-ratio fibers. UV and IR spectroscopy show electron delocalization and geometric changes within the squaramide ring indicative of strong hydrogen bonding and aromatic gain of the monomer units. The aromatic contribution to the interaction energy was further supported computationally by nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA) indices, demonstrating greater aromatic character upon polymerization: at least 30% in a pentamer. The aromatic gain-hydrogen bonding synergy results in a significant increase in thermodynamic stability and a striking difference in aggregate morphology of the bis(squaramide) bolamphiphile compared to isosteres that cannot engage in this effect. PMID:26179942

  7. Adaptive gain control during human perceptual choice

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, Samuel; Wyart, Valentin; Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Myers, Nicholas; de Gardelle, Vincent; Castañón, Santiago Herce; Summerfield, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Neural systems adapt to background levels of stimulation. Adaptive gain control has been extensively studied in sensory systems, but overlooked in decision-theoretic models. Here, we describe evidence for adaptive gain control during the serial integration of decision-relevant information. Human observers judged the average information provided by a rapid stream of visual events (samples). The impact that each sample wielded over choices depended on its consistency with the previous sample, with more consistent or expected samples wielding the greatest influence over choice. This bias was also visible in the encoding of decision information in pupillometric signals, and in cortical responses measured with functional neuroimaging. These data can be accounted for with a new serial sampling model in which the gain of information processing adapts rapidly to reflect the average of the available evidence. PMID:24656259

  8. Analytic gain in probabilistic decompression sickness models.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E

    2013-11-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease known to be related to inert gas bubble formation originating from gases dissolved in body tissues. Probabilistic DCS models, which employ survival and hazard functions, are optimized by fitting model parameters to experimental dive data. In the work reported here, I develop methods to find the survival function gain parameter analytically, thus removing it from the fitting process. I show that the number of iterations required for model optimization is significantly reduced. The analytic gain method substantially improves the condition number of the Hessian matrix which reduces the model confidence intervals by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:24209920

  9. Varactor-diode modulator yields conversion gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, K.

    1980-05-01

    It is shown that varactor diodes used as modulator elements can make a balanced diode mixer yield conversion gain when employed in an upconverter. Replacing the normal mixer diodes with varactor diodes and inserting the IF and LO voltages at a level that drives the diodes into their nonlinear voltage-capacitance region produces a parametric amplifying effect. This modification results in conversion gain rather than loss, and brings the desired output power up to the 0.1-1.0 W level. The use of this technique in a lower-sideband UHF TV upconverter is considered.

  10. Reducing gain shifts in photomultiplier tubes

    DOEpatents

    Cohn, Charles E.

    1976-01-01

    A means is provided for reducing gain shifts in multiplier tubes due to varying event count rates. It includes means for limiting the number of cascaded, active dynodes of the multiplier tube to a predetermined number with the last of predetermined number of dynodes being the output terminal of the tube. This output is applied to an amplifier to make up for the gain sacrificed by not totally utilizing all available active stages of the tube. Further reduction is obtained by illuminating the predetermined number of dynodes with a light source of such intensity that noise appearing at the output dynode associated with the illumination is negligible.

  11. Alcohol gains access to appetitive learning through adolescent heavy drinking.

    PubMed

    DiLeo, Alyssa; Wright, Kristina M; Mangone, Elizabeth; McDannald, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent heavy alcohol drinking increases the risk for alcohol use disorders in adulthood, yet mechanisms conferring increased risk are not well understood. We propose that adolescent alcohol drinking shapes alcohol's aversive or appetitive properties in adulthood. Alcohol normally drives aversive learning and alcohol-predictive cues are avoided. We hypothesize that through adolescent heavy drinking alcohol gains access to appetitive learning. A primary consequence is that alcohol-predictive cues become valued and sought out. To test this hypothesis, we gave genetically heterogeneous, male Long Evans rats voluntary, chronic intermittent access to water or alcohol throughout adolescence and then identified moderate and heavy alcohol drinkers. After a short abstinence period, we assessed the aversive or appetitive properties of alcohol using flavor learning procedures. We compared alcohol to the known appetitive properties of sugar. Flavor learning in adult rats who were alcohol-naïve or adolescent moderate alcohol drinkers revealed alcohol to be aversive and sugar to be appetitive. The same flavor learning procedures revealed both alcohol and sugar to be appetitive in adult rats who were adolescent heavy drinkers. The results demonstrate that alcohol gains access to neurobehavioral circuits for appetitive learning through adolescent heavy alcohol drinking. PMID:26052793

  12. Alcohol gains access to appetitive learning through adolescent heavy drinking

    PubMed Central

    DiLeo, Alyssa; Wright, Kristina M.; Mangone, Elizabeth; McDannald, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent heavy alcohol drinking increases the risk for alcohol use disorders in adulthood, yet mechanisms conferring increased risk are not well understood. We propose that adolescent alcohol drinking shapes alcohol’s aversive or appetitive properties in adulthood. Alcohol normally drives aversive learning and alcohol-predictive cues are avoided. We hypothesize that through adolescent heavy drinking alcohol gains access to appetitive learning. A primary consequence is that alcohol-predictive cues become valued and sought out. To test this hypothesis, we gave genetically heterogeneous, male Long Evans rats voluntary, chronic intermittent access to water or alcohol throughout adolescence and then identified moderate and heavy alcohol drinkers. After a short abstinence period, we assessed the aversive or appetitive properties of alcohol using flavor learning procedures. We compared alcohol to the known appetitive properties of sugar. Flavor learning in adult rats who were alcohol-naïve or adolescent moderate alcohol drinkers revealed alcohol to be aversive and sugar to be appetitive. The same flavor learning procedures revealed both alcohol and sugar to be appetitive in adult rats who were adolescent heavy drinkers. The results demonstrate that alcohol gains access to neurobehavioral circuits for appetitive learning through adolescent heavy alcohol drinking. PMID:26052793

  13. Ribose Accelerates Gut Motility and Suppresses Mouse Body Weight Gaining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Tong-Ruei R; Xu, Cong; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is closely related to excessive energy consumption. Clinical intervention of energy intake is an attractive strategy to fight obesity. However, the current FDA-approved weight-loss drugs all have significant side effects. Here we show that ribose upregulates gut motility and suppresses mice body weight gain. Ribokinase, which is encoded by Rbks gene, is the first enzyme for ribose metabolism in vivo. Rbks mutation resulted in ribose accumulation in the small intestine, which accelerated gut movement. Ribose oral treatment in wild type mice also enhanced bowel motility and rendered mice resistance to high fat diets. The suppressed weight gain was resulted from enhanced ingested food excretion. In addition, the effective dose of ribose didn't cause any known side effects (i.e. diarrhea and hypoglycemia). Overall, our results show that ribose can regulate gut motility and energy homeostasis in mice, and suggest that administration of ribose and its analogs could regulate gastrointestinal motility, providing a novel therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal dysfunction and weight control. PMID:27194947

  14. Gain Modulation by Nicotine in Macaque V1

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Anita A.; Aoki, Chiye; Hawken, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acetylcholine is a ubiquitous cortical neuromodulator implicated in cognition. In order to understand the potential for acetylcholine to play a role in visual attention, we studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) localization and function in area V1 of the macaque. We found nAChRs presynaptically at thalamic synapses onto excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurons in the primary thalamorecipient layer 4c. Furthermore, consistent with the release enhancement suggested by this localization, we discovered that nicotine increases responsiveness and lowers contrast threshold in layer 4c neurons. We also found that nAChRs are expressed by GABAergic interneurons in V1 but rarely by pyramidal neurons, and that nicotine suppresses visual responses outside layer 4c. All sensory systems incorporate gain control mechanisms, or processes which dynamically alter input/output relationships. We demonstrate that at the site of thalamic input to visual cortex, the effect of this nAChR-mediated gain is an enhancement of the detection of visual stimuli. PMID:18031686

  15. Reward Region Responsivity Predicts Future Weight Gain and Moderating Effects of the TaqIA Allele

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Kyle S.; Yokum, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Because no large prospective study has investigated neural vulnerability factors that predict future weight gain, we tested whether neural response to receipt and anticipated receipt of palatable food and monetary reward predicted body fat gain over a 3-year follow-up in healthy-weight adolescent humans and whether the TaqIA polymorphism moderates these relations. A total of 153 adolescents completed fMRI paradigms assessing response to these events; body fat was assessed annually over follow-up. Elevated orbitofrontal cortex response to cues signaling impending milkshake receipt predicted future body fat gain (r = 0.32), which is a novel finding that provides support for the incentive sensitization theory of obesity. Neural response to receipt and anticipated receipt of monetary reward did not predict body fat gain, which has not been tested previously. Replicating an earlier finding (Stice et al., 2008a), elevated caudate response to milkshake receipt predicted body fat gain for adolescents with a genetic propensity for greater dopamine signaling by virtue of possessing the TaqIA A2/A2 allele, but lower caudate response predicted body fat gain for adolescents with a genetic propensity for less dopamine signaling by virtue of possessing a TaqIA A1 allele, though this interaction was only marginal [p-value <0.05 corrected using voxel-level familywise error rate (pFWE) = 0.06]. Parental obesity, which correlated with TaqIA allele status (odds ratio = 2.7), similarly moderated the relation of caudate response to milkshake receipt to future body fat gain, which is another novel finding. The former interaction implies that too much or too little dopamine signaling and reward region responsivity increases risk for overeating, suggesting qualitatively distinct reward surfeit and reward deficit pathways to obesity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Because no large prospective study has investigated neural vulnerability factors that predict future weight gain we tested whether

  16. Improved survival of very high light and oxidative stress is conferred by spontaneous gain-of-function mutations in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Förster, Britta; Osmond, C Barry; Pogson, Barry J

    2005-08-15

    Investigations into high light and oxidative stress in photosynthetic organisms have focussed primarily on genetic impairment of different photoprotective functions. There are few reports of "gain-of-function" mutations that provide enhanced resistance to high light and/or oxidative stress without reduced productivity. We have isolated at least four such very high light resistant (VHL(R)) mutations in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, that permit near maximal growth rates at light intensities lethal to wild type. This resistance is not due to an alteration in electron transport rate or quantity and functionality of the two photosystems that could have enhanced photochemical quenching. Nor is it due to reduced excitation pressure by downregulation of the light harvesting antennae or increased nonphotochemical quenching. In fact, photosynthetic activity is unaffected in more than 30 VHL(R) isolates. Instead, the basis of the VHL(R) phenotype is a combination of traits, which appears to be dominated by enhanced capacity to tolerate reactive oxygen species generated by excess light, methylviologen, rose bengal or hydrogen peroxide. This is further evidenced in lower levels of ROS after exposure to very high light in the VHL(R)-S9 mutant. Additionally, the VHL(R) phenotype is associated with increased zeaxanthin accumulation, maintenance of fast synthesis and degradation rates of the D1 protein, and sustained balanced electron flow into and out of PSI under very high light. We conclude that the VHL(R) mutations arose from a selection pressure that favors changes to the regulatory system(s) that coordinates several photoprotective processes amongst which repair of PSII and enhanced detoxification of reactive oxygen species play seminal roles. PMID:16002040

  17. Gaining Insights into Children's Geometric Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Nancy K.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how research on children's geometric thinking was used in conjunction with the picture book "The Greedy Triangle" to gain valuable insights into children's prior geometric knowledge of polygons. Exercises focused on the names, visual appearance, and properties of polygons, as well as real-world connections for each, are…

  18. Texas Gains on NAEP: Points of Light?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    Places the 1992-1996 gain in mathematics scores from Texas on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) from fourth to eighth grades, asserting that the so-called miracle in Texas looks much like the median elsewhere. Texas ranks 17th among the 35 states and 2 districts with NAEP scores for the period, but Texas is no worse than most…

  19. Electromagnetically induced gain in molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Nandini; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2009-12-01

    We report electromagnetically induced gain in a highly degenerate two-level rotational vibrational molecular system. Using two photon (Raman-type) interaction with right and left circularly polarized pump and probe waves, the Zeeman coherence is established within the manifold of degenerate sublevels belonging to a rotational vibrational eigenstate. We analytically and numerically calculate the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility for a Doppler-broadened molecular transition for an arbitrary high rotational angular momentum (J≥20) . It is shown that for a Q -type open transition, a weak probe will experience an electromagnetically induced gain in presence of a strong copropagating pump wave. The inversionless gain originates due to cancellation of absorption from the interference of the coupled Λ - and V-type excitation channels in an N -type configuration. A detailed analysis of the optical susceptibility as a function of Doppler detuning explains how the gain bands are generated in a narrow transparency window from the overlapping contributions of different velocity groups. It is shown that the orientation dependent coherent interaction in presence of a strong pump induces narrow resonances for the probe susceptibility. The locations, intensity, and sign (positive or negative susceptibility) of these resonances are decided by the frequency detuning of the Doppler group and the strength of the coupling field. The availability of high power tunable quantum cascade lasers covering a spectral region from about 4 to 12μm opens up the possibility of investigating the molecular vibrational rotational transitions for a variety of coherent effects.

  20. Information gains from cosmic microwave background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehars, Sebastian; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre; Paranjape, Aseem; Akeret, Joël

    2014-07-01

    To shed light on the fundamental problems posed by dark energy and dark matter, a large number of experiments have been performed and combined to constrain cosmological models. We propose a novel way of quantifying the information gained by updates on the parameter constraints from a series of experiments which can either complement earlier measurements or replace them. For this purpose, we use the Kullback-Leibler divergence or relative entropy from information theory to measure differences in the posterior distributions in model parameter space from a pair of experiments. We apply this formalism to a historical series of cosmic microwave background experiments ranging from Boomerang to WMAP, SPT, and Planck. Considering different combinations of these experiments, we thus estimate the information gain in units of bits and distinguish contributions from the reduction of statistical errors and the "surprise" corresponding to a significant shift of the parameters' central values. For this experiment series, we find individual relative entropy gains ranging from about 1 to 30 bits. In some cases, e.g. when comparing WMAP and Planck results, we find that the gains are dominated by the surprise rather than by improvements in statistical precision. We discuss how this technique provides a useful tool for both quantifying the constraining power of data from cosmological probes and detecting the tensions between experiments.