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Sample records for entire oropharyngeal packing

  1. Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  2. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  3. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit

    2014-11-01

    Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a complex and often relentless malignancy prone to local invasion and dissemination. Despite advances in understanding of the disease and improved therapeutic interventions, it continues to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival rate remains poor. The financial cost of treating OPC may be the highest of all cancers in the United States and survivors often experience major detriments to quality of life. Major risk factors for OPC are tobacco, alcohol, areca nut, and human papillomavirus infection. This article updates medical practitioners on the causes, presentation, diagnosis, and management of OPC. PMID:25443678

  4. Mouse Model of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Norma V.; Filler, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with defects in cell-mediated immunity or saliva production. Animal models of this infection are important for studying disease pathogenesis and evaluating vaccines and antifungal therapies. Here we describe a simple murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Mice are rendered susceptible to oral infection by injection with cortisone acetate and then inoculated by placing a swab saturated with Candida albicans sublingually. This process results in a reproducible level of infection, the histopathology of which mimics that of pseudomembranous oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients. Using this model, data are obtained after 5–9 days of work. PMID:22402633

  5. Influence of Smoking History on Imaging Characteristics among HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients: A Blinded Matched-Pair Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Sarah C.; Reid, Holly H.; Li, Guojun; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancers represent a distinct clinical entity with more favorable prognosis than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. However, among patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas, those with a significant smoking history have a much worse prognosis. Recently, imaging characteristics of oropharyngeal cancers were identified as markers of poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether nodal imaging characteristics differ between smokers and never/light smokers with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Materials and Methods Review of 130 pretreatment CT examinations of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers in smokers (>10 pack-years) and never/light smokers (≤10 pack-years) matched for T stage and tumor subsite was performed with the reviewing radiologist blinded to HPV status, smoking history, and clinical stage. An additional 24 pretreatment CT examinations of patients with HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers were also reviewed in a blinded fashion. Imaging characteristics of metastatic nodal disease were compared using chi-square testing (Fisher exact testing where appropriate) and McNemar chi-square testing for the matched-pair analysis. Results As expected, those with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer were more likely to be younger, male, non-Hispanic white, never/former smokers, and never drinkers than those with HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer. Furthermore, the HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers were more likely to be in the tonsil, smaller T-category, higher N-category, poorly differentiated, tonsil primaries, smaller T-category, higher N-category, and poorly differentiated than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. However, among the HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers, we could identify no obvious difference in the pretreatment imaging characteristics of paired smokers and never/light smokers. Conclusions Among patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer, no

  6. General Information about Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  8. Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shivani; Goldenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer represents a growing proportion of head and neck malignancies. This has been associated with the increase in infection of the oropharynx by oncogenic strains of human papillomavirus (HPV). Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has opened the door for minimally invasive surgery for HPV-related and non-HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Compared to traditional open surgical approaches, TORS has been shown to improve functional outcomes in speech and swallowing, while maintaining good oncologic outcomes. PMID:24808952

  9. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Cancer starts when cells in ... the parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  10. Worldwide trends show oropharyngeal cancer rates increasing

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer significantly increased during the period 1983-2002 among people in countries that are economically developed. Oropharyngeal cancer occurs primarily in the middle part of the throat behind t

  11. Dexamethasone in Reducing Oral Pain and Dry Mouth After Surgery in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-08

    Dysphagia; Pain; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Teledynamic Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; McCullough, Gary; He, Xuming; McWeeny, Elizabeth; Perlman, Adrienne L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present investigation was to test the feasibility and clinical utility of a real-time Internet-based protocol for remote, telefluoroscopic evaluation of oropharyngeal swallowing. Method: In this prospective cohort study, the authors evaluated 32 patients with a primary diagnosis of stroke or head/neck cancer. All…

  13. Radiation Therapy and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-08

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  14. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  16. Aging effects on oropharyngeal swallow and the role of dental care in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Logemann, J A; Curro, F A; Pauloski, B; Gensler, G

    2013-11-01

    Difficulty with oropharyngeal swallow requires careful diagnosis and treatment from a team of professionals including the patients' physicians and the speech-language pathologist specializing in dysphagia. The dentist can be a critical team member in prevention, early identification, and management of oropharyngeal dysphagia. This manuscript reviews the physiology of normal oropharyngeal swallow and the effects of normal aging on this physiology. Typical etiologies for oropharyngeal dysphagia are defined as is the most commonly used physiologic diagnostic procedure, the modified barium swallow (MBS). The critical role of the dentist in identifying risk of oropharyngeal dysphagia, making appropriate referrals, and improving oral hygiene to prevent aspiration pneumonia in the elderly is discussed. PMID:23574512

  17. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  18. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  19. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  20. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... called “oropharyngeal cancers.” How does HPV cause cancer? HPV can cause normal cells in infected skin ... unclear if having HPV alone is sufficient to cause oropharyngeal cancers, or if other factors (such as smoking or ...

  1. Reduced-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  2. Early diagnosis of asymptomatic oral and oropharyngeal squamous cancers.

    PubMed

    Mashberg, A; Samit, A

    1995-01-01

    An examination of the oral cavity and oropharynx in asymptomatic patients at high risk requires an orderly visual inspection of the entire oral and oropharyngeal mucosa with particular attention to the tongue, floor of mouth, soft palate, uvula, tonsillar pillars, and the lingual aspects of the retromolar trigones. Completion and clear documentation of the entire examination should be recorded. Detected lesions that do not resolve in a reasonable length of time--two to three weeks--require intense and assiduous investigation. The following specifics should be considered. 1. Alcohol drinkers and cigarette smokers, especially those 40 years of age and older, are at very high risk for the development of upper aerodigestive tract and lung squamous carcinomas. 2. The floor of the mouth, the ventrolateral tongue, and the soft palate complex are the high-risk sites within the oral cavity and oropharynx. 3. Persistent mucosal erythroplasia rather than leukoplakia is the earliest visual sign of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. These lesions should not be regarded merely as precancerous changes. The evidence indicates that these lesions in high-risk sites should be considered to be invasive carcinoma or carcinoma in situ unless proven otherwise by biopsy. 4. Toluidine blue staining is a useful diagnostic adjunct, particularly as a method of ruling out false-negative clinical impressions. It may also be used as a rinse in high-risk patients to encompass the entire oral mucosa after a negative clinical examination and as a guide to improve biopsy yields. 5. If oral or oropharyngeal cancer is identified, evaluations of the larynx, hypopharynx, esophagus, and lungs should be performed to rule out multiple primary cancers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7583906

  3. Oropharyngeal cancer: an emergent disease?

    PubMed

    Granados-García, Martín

    2016-04-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer incidence has recently increased, thereby attracting public attention. Akin to other malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract, it has been attributed to the carcinogenic effects of tobacco and alcohol use. However, recent evidence shows that a substantial increase in the disease is attributable to the effects of human papillomavirus (HPV). Marked progress has been made in relation to the knowledge of molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of these cancers. This has led to the development of new and promising therapies of a more specific and less toxic nature that have prolonged life and improved its quality. However, these therapies have failed to significantly increase the proportion of patients who are cured. To decrease the mortality associated with these neoplasms, it is necessary to adopt public health measures aimed at prevention and early diagnosis. PMID:27557387

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  5. Does the Oropharyngeal Fat Tissue Influence the Oropharyngeal Airway in Snorers? Dynamic CT Study

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Huseyin; Celebi, Mehmet; Sakan, Banu Baglan

    2004-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if snorers have a narrower oropharyngeal airway area because of fat infiltration, and an elevated body mass index. Materials and Methods Ten control subjects and 19 patients that snored were evaluated. We obtained 2-mm-thick axial CT scan images every 0.6 seconds during expiration and inspiration at the same level of the oropharynx. We selected the largest and the smallest oropharyngeal airway areas and found the differences. From the slice that had the smallest oropharyngeal airway area, the thickness of the parapharyngeal and subcutaneous fat was measured. The measurements from the left and right side were added together and single values for parapharyngeal and subcutaneous fat tissue thickness were then found. Results The conventional measure of body mass index was significantly higher in the snorers (p < 0.05). The difference in the smallest oropharyngeal airway area between snorers and the controls was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The average difference between the largest and the smallest oropharyngeal area in the control group and the snorer group was statistically significant (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the largest oropharyngeal airway area, the total subcutaneous fat width and the total parapharyngeal fat width between snorers and control subjects (p > 0.05). Conclusion We concluded that the oropharyngeal fat deposition in snorers is not an important factor, and it does not predispose a person to the upper airway narrowing. PMID:15235234

  6. Battery pack

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, R.J.; Brittingham, D.C.; Basta, J.C.

    1993-07-06

    A battery pack is described, having a center of mass, for use with a medical instrument including a latch, an ejector, and an electrical connector, the battery pack comprising: energy storage means for storing electrical energy; latch engagement means, physically coupled to the energy storage means, for engaging the latch; ejector engagement means, physically coupled to the energy storage means, for engaging the ejector; and connector engagement means, physically coupled to the energy storage means, for engaging the connector, the latch engagement means, ejector engagement means, and connector engagement means being substantially aligned in a plane offset from the center of mass of the battery pack.

  7. Epidemiology of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pytynia, Kristen B.; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is increasing in incidence in epidemic proportion. This site specific increase in incidence is due to an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma, while the incidence of tobacco related squamous cell carcinoma is decreasing. In particular, the incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increased among middle aged white men, and sexual behavior is a risk factor. HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma represents a growing etiologically distinct subset of head and neck cancers with unique epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics that differ from those of HPV-unassociated cancers. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of HPV-related OPSCC, the prevalence of oral/oropharyngeal HPV infection, and efforts aimed at reducing the incidence of HPV-related OPSCC. PMID:24461628

  8. Radon exposure and oropharyngeal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Espinosa, Tania; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a multifactorial disease. Alcohol and tobacco are the main risk factors. Radon is a human carcinogen linked to lung cancer risk, but its influence in other cancers is not well known. We aim to assess the effect of radon exposure on the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer through a systematic review of the scientific literature. This review performs a qualitative analysis of the available studies. 13 cohort studies were included, most of them mortality studies, which analysed the relationship between occupational or residential radon exposure with oropharyngeal cancer mortality or incidence. Most of the included studies found no association between radon exposure and oral and pharyngeal cancer. This lack of effect was observed in miners studies and in general population studies. Further research is necessary to quantify if this association really exists and its magnitude, specially performing studies in general population, preferably living in areas with high radon levels. PMID:26335172

  9. Management of dysphagia in advanced oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Penner, Jamie L; McClement, Susan E; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2007-05-01

    Individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer often experience dysphagia as a result of their illness and its treatment. Research consistently demonstrates that dysphagia and difficulty with oral intake have many implications, including a negative impact on quality of life. Nurses are in a key position to provide support and initiate appropriate interventions for individuals with dysphagia. Using the Human Response to Illness model (Mitchell et al, 1991) as an organising framework, this paper presents a critical review of the empirical literature regarding dysphagia in individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer that will: i) provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of dysphagia; ii) identify current gaps in our knowledge; and iii) establish the foundation for appropriate evidence-based interventions to optimise functioning and quality of life in this patient population. PMID:17577172

  10. Active Tobacco Smoking and Distant Metastasis in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Sean M.; Ali, Nawal N.; Margalit, Danielle N.; Chan, Annie W.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Distant metastasis is the site of first relapse in approximately one-third of patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma, irrespective of human papillomavirus status. Yet the risk factors associated with distant metastasis are not well characterized. We sought to characterize the relationship between smoking status and distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the association between tobacco smoking status and distant metastasis in a retrospective cohort study of 132 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy and chemotherapy for Stage III-IVA/B oropharyngeal cancer. Information on tobacco smoking was prospectively collected by patient questionnaires and physician notes at the time of diagnosis. Thirty-three percent of the patients were nonsmokers, 51% were former smokers, 16% were active smokers. The cumulative lifetime tobacco smoking in pack-years was 20 (range, 0-150). Results: With a median follow-up time of 52 months, the overall rate of distant metastasis at 4 years was 8%. Distant metastasis was the most common first site of relapse, occurring in 56% of the patients with recurrences. Active smokers had higher rates of distant metastasis than non-active smokers (including never- and former smokers; 31% vs. 4%, p < 0.001) and former smokers (31% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of distant metastasis for patients with lifetime cumulative pack-years >20 and {<=}20 (10% vs. 4%, p = 0.19). In univariate analysis, active smoking (p = 0.0004) and N category (p = 0.009) were predictive of increased risk of distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, active smoking was the most significant predictive factor for increased risk of distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 12.7, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study identified a strong association between active smoking and distant metastasis in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  11. Valve stem and packing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents overtightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing.

  12. Valve stem and packing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, J.J.

    1991-09-03

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents over tightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing. 2 figures.

  13. The epidemiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wahi, P. N.

    1968-01-01

    Records of the Sarojini Naidu Medical College Hospital, Agra, India, suggested that there was a much higher endemicity of oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Mainpuri district, a rural area about 75 miles (120 km) from Agra City, than there was in Agra district itself. It was decided in 1963 to set up a complete cancer registry in Mainpuri district, based on the Sarojini Naidu Medical College and in association with the WHO International Reference Centre for the Histopathological Nomenclature and Classification of Oropharyngeal Tumours, which would, among other duties, undertake a study of the epidemiology by means of an intensive field-programme in the area. The epidemiological survey was carried out between March 1964 and September 1966. All factors considered to have any relevance to the disease were surveyed and particularly strong correlations were discovered between the prevalence of oral cancer and the use of local tobaccos (adulterated to a greater or lesser extent with various other materials), especially for chewing but also for smoking. There was also some correlation between prevalence of oral cancer and the use of certain alcoholic drinks. A number of other factors, most probably influencing or modifying the use of tobacco and alcohol, were found to be significant also. PMID:5302449

  14. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  15. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis following Oropharyngeal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Asli; Turhan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT) is a rare condition which may lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Prolonged central venous catheterization, intravenous (IV) drug use, trauma, and radiotherapy are the most frequent causes of the IJVT. IJVT that develops after the oropharyngeal infection is a quite rare situation today. In this paper, a 37-year-old woman was presented; swelling occurred on her neck after acute tonsillitis and she was diagnosed with IJVT through Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed without complications. Early diagnosis and conservative treatment with broad-spectrum IV antibiotics and anticoagulant agents have a critical importance for the prevention of fatal complications. PMID:26457221

  16. Oropharyngeal decontamination in intensive care patients: less is not more.

    PubMed

    Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M

    2009-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common cause of morbidity, antibiotic use, increased length of stay and, possibly, increased mortality in ICU patients. Colonization of the oropharyngeal cavity with potentially pathogenic micro-organisms is instrumental in the pathogenesis of VAP, and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) with antibiotics (AB-SOD) or antiseptics, such as chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX-SOD), has been associated with reduced incidences of VAP. In a recent issue of Critical Care Scannapieco and colleagues investigated differences in oropharyngeal colonization between mechanically ventilated patients receiving oropharyngeal decontamination with 0.12% CHX-SOD either once or twice daily compared to placebo. CHX-SOD was associated with a reduction in Staphylococcus aureus colonization, but the study was underpowered to demonstrate a reduction in VAP incidence. We urgently need well-designed and adequately powered studies to evaluate the potential benefits of CHX-SOD on patient outcome in ICUs. PMID:19735585

  17. HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ethnicity, and Sex, United States, 2008–2012 The graph above shows age-adjusted incidence rates for HPV- ... were diagnosed with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. This graph was adapted from Viens LJ, Henley SJ, Watson ...

  18. Human Papilloma Virus and Oropharyngeal Carcinoma - Lessons from History.

    PubMed

    Vlantis, Alexander Chris

    2016-03-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a common virus that infects epithelium in 10% of the world's population. While most sexually active people become infected, the majority with a healthy natural immunity control their infection. When the infection becomes persistent in cervical mucosa for instance, it is associated with nearly all cervical cancers. Fortunately cervical cancer screening is both sensitive and specific and when accessed has led to significant reductions of this disease. Despite this, cervical cancer still remains one of the leading causes of death from cancer. Oropharyngeal mucosa is becoming persistently infected with HPV in an increasing number of people leading to a potential epidemic of oropharyngeal carcinoma. While only 10% of new oropharyngeal infections persist, those in elderly men who smoke are more likely to do so. Some centres report more than 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are associated with HPV infection, which is different to cancers caused by alcohol and tobacco. Other centres report only a 20% association. Education against high-risk sexual behaviour has been met with limited success. Screening for oropharyngeal HPV infection has been disappointing with a pickup rate of only 40%. Some hope lies in detecting viral DNA in both the saliva and plasma. A HPV vaccine has been available since 2006 but is not yet routinely given to both sexes in many countries. Its effect on the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas is currently unknown. Vigilance by dental and medical colleagues in the meantime is essential. PMID:26981602

  19. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Andrew P.; Saha, Sandeep; Kraninger, Jennifer L.; Swick, Adam D.; Yu, Menggang; Lambertg, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The global incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been increasing, and it has been proposed that a rising rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers is driving the observed changes in OPSCC incidence. We carried out this systematic review to further examine the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC over time worldwide. Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify all articles through January 31, 2014 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC. Articles that met inclusion criteria were divided into four time frames (pre-1995, 1995—1999, 2000—2004, and 2005—present) based on the median year of the study's sample collection period. Employing a weighted analysis of variance (ANOVA) model, we examined the trends of HPV-positivity over time worldwide, in North America, and in Europe. Results Our literature search identified 699 unique articles. 175 underwent review of the entire study and 105 met inclusion criteria. These 105 articles reported on the HPV prevalence in 9541 OPSCC specimens across 23 nations. We demonstrated significant increases in the percentage change of HPV-positive OPSCCs from pre-1995 to present: 20.6% worldwide (p-value for trend: p<0.001), 21.6% in North America (p=0.013) and 21.5% in Europe (p=0.033). Discussion Interestingly, while in Europe there was a steady increase in HPV prevalence across all time frames, reaching nearly 50% most recently, in North America HPV prevalence appears to have plateaued over the past decade at about 65%. These findings may have important implications regarding predictions for the future incidence of OPSCC. PMID:26049691

  20. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease. PMID:10225629

  1. What Are the Key Statistics about Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are the key statistics about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? The American ... increase the risk for these second cancers. For statistics related to survival, see the section “ Survival rates ...

  2. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the United States Across Time

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in approximately 5% of all human cancer. Although initially recognized for causing nearly all cases of cervical carcinoma, much data has now emerged implicating HPVs as a causal factor in other anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), most commonly oropharyngeal cancers. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have improved survival compared to patients with HPV– cancers. Furthermore, epidemiological evidence shows the incidence of OPSCC has been steadily rising over time in the United States. It has been proposed that an increase in HPV-related OPSCCs is the driving force behind the increasing rate of OPSCC. Although some studies have revealed an increase in HPV+ head and neck malignancies over time in specific regions of the United States, there has not been a comprehensive study validating this trend across the entire country. Therefore, we undertook this meta-analysis to assess all literature through August 2013 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC for patient populations within the United States. The results show an increase in the prevalence of HPV+ OPSCC from 20.9% in the pre-1990 time period to 51.4% in 1990–1999 and finally to 65.4% for 2000–present. In this manner, our study provides further evidence to support the hypothesis that HPV-associated OPSCCs are driving the increasing incidence of OPSCC over time in the United States. PMID:24641254

  3. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in the United States across time.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew P; Saha, Sandeep; Yu, Menggang; Kimple, Randall J; Lambert, Paul F

    2014-04-21

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in approximately 5% of all human cancer. Although initially recognized for causing nearly all cases of cervical carcinoma, much data has now emerged implicating HPVs as a causal factor in other anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), most commonly oropharyngeal cancers. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have improved survival compared to patients with HPV- cancers. Furthermore, epidemiological evidence shows the incidence of OPSCC has been steadily rising over time in the United States. It has been proposed that an increase in HPV-related OPSCCs is the driving force behind the increasing rate of OPSCC. Although some studies have revealed an increase in HPV+ head and neck malignancies over time in specific regions of the United States, there has not been a comprehensive study validating this trend across the entire country. Therefore, we undertook this meta-analysis to assess all literature through August 2013 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC for patient populations within the United States. The results show an increase in the prevalence of HPV+ OPSCC from 20.9% in the pre-1990 time period to 51.4% in 1990-1999 and finally to 65.4% for 2000-present. In this manner, our study provides further evidence to support the hypothesis that HPV-associated OPSCCs are driving the increasing incidence of OPSCC over time in the United States. PMID:24641254

  4. HPV and oropharyngeal cancer: etiology and prognostic importance.

    PubMed

    Yom, Sue S

    2015-12-01

    HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease, but the overwhelming majority of individuals clear the infection. A small percentage of individuals develop persistence of oncogenic HPV types, especially HPV-16; and as a result, squamous cell carcinoma can develop in the tonsils and base of the tongue. Over 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are now thought to be associated with oncogenic HPV infection. Immunohistochemistry for p16 protein is often used as a surrogate marker for oncogenic HPV in the oropharyngeal tissues, although alternative HPV DNA testing methods are under intensive study. The clinical profile of patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) differs quite notably from that of traditional head and neck cancer patients, and the prognosis for HPV-associated OPC is significantly better. As a result, experimental clinical trials are focused on de-intensification of therapies with the hope of preserving an improved long-term quality of life for these patients. PMID:26650695

  5. Semilobar Holoprosencephaly with Congenital Oropharyngeal Stenosis in a Term Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Nagata, Chie; Higuchi, Masataka; Ito, Yushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is often accompanied by a deficit in midline facial development; however, congenital oropharyngeal stenosis in neonates with HPE has not been reported before. We describe a case of a neonate with prenatally diagnosed semilobar HPE accompanied by congenital oropharyngeal stenosis. Case Report The patient was born at 39 weeks of gestation and developed dyspnea shortly after. Laryngoscopic test revealed oropharyngeal stenosis. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure, high-flow nasal cannula, and nasopharyngeal airway did not resolve her dyspnea; tracheostomy was required. Conclusion Neonates with HPE might be at higher risk of pharyngeal stenosis because of the functional and/or anatomical abnormalities. In the case of dyspnea in neonates with HPE, laryngoscopic evaluation should be considered. PMID:26495165

  6. Advances in radiation oncology for the management of oropharyngeal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gunn, G Brandon; Frank, Steven J

    2013-08-01

    The major benefits of modern radiation therapy (eg, intensity-modulated [x-ray] radiation therapy [IMRT]) for oropharyngeal cancer are reduced xerostomia and better quality of life. Intensity-modulated proton therapy may provide additional advantages over IMRT by reducing radiation beam-path toxicities. Several acute and late treatment-related toxicities and symptom constellations must be kept in mind when designing and comparing future treatment strategies, particularly because currently most patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma present with human papillomavirus-positive disease and are expected to have a high probability of long-term survival after treatment. PMID:23910474

  7. Association between Chronic Periodontitis and Oral/Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Renata Costa de; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case control study was to assess the association between the extent and severity of chronic periodontitis and oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The case group comprised 35 patients (mean age 56.1±8.4), diagnosed for oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The control group comprised 40 individuals (mean age 55.4±9.4) without diagnostic of cancer. All individuals were subjected to a periodontal examination, including bleeding on probing, plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and decayed, extracted and filled teeth index (DMFT). The case group had significantly more sites with plaque. GI and BOP had similar values in both groups. The median PPD and CAL values were significantly higher for the case group. Chronic generalized periodontitis was predominant in 80% of patients with oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. Eighty nine percent of the patients in the case group presented severe chronic periodontitis. There was no significant difference between groups for median values of DMFT. The extent and severity of chronic periodontitis remained as risk indicators for oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer even after the adjustments for traditional confound factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:27224557

  8. Flat Pack Toy Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutcheson, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces the concept of flat pack toys. Flat pack toys are designed using a template on a single sheet of letter-sized card stock paper. Before being cut out and built into a three-dimensional toy, they are scanned into the computer and uploaded to a website. With the template accessible from the website, anyone with…

  9. TLC Pack Unpacked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberhofer, Margret; Colpaert, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    TLC Pack stands for Teaching Languages to Caregivers and is a course designed to support migrants working or hoping to work in the caregiving sector. The TLC Pack resources range from A2 to B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), and will be made available online in the six project languages: Dutch, English,…

  10. Bidispersed Sphere Packing on Spherical Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy; Mascioli, Andrew; Burke, Christopher

    Packing problems on spherical surfaces have a long history, originating in the classic Thompson problem of finding the ground state configuration of charges on a sphere. Such packings contain a minimal number of defects needed to accommodate the curvature; this is predictable using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from knowledge of the topology of the surface and the local symmetry of the ordering. Famously, the packing of spherical particles on a sphere contains a 'scar' transition, where additional defects over those required by topology appear above a certain critical number of particles and self-organize into chains or scars. In this work, we study the packing of bidispersed packings on a sphere, and hence determine the interaction of bidispersity and curvature. The resultant configurations are nearly crystalline for low values of bidispersity and retain scar-like structures; these rapidly become disordered for intermediate values and approach a so-called Appollonian limit at the point where smaller particles can be entirely accommodated within the voids left by the larger particles. We connect our results with studies of bidispersed packings in the bulk and on flat surfaces from the literature on glassy systems and jamming. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  11. Radiosensitization of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E6*I

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ervinna; Delic, Naomi C.; Hong, Angela; Zhang Mei; Rose, Barbara R.; Lyons, J. Guy

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) whose disease is associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have a significantly better outcome than those with HPV-negative disease, but the reasons for the better outcome are not known. We postulated that they might relate to an ability of HPV proteins to confer a better response to radiotherapy, a commonly used treatment for OSCC. Methods and Materials: We stably expressed the specific splicing-derived isoforms, E6*I and E6*II, or the entire E6 open reading frame (E6total), which gives rise to both full length and E6*I isoforms, in OSCC cell lines. Radiation resistance was measured in clonogenicity assays, p53 activity was measured using transfected reporter genes, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. Results: E6*I and E6total sensitized the OSCC cells to irradiation, E6*I giving the greatest degree of radiosensitization (approximately eightfold lower surviving cell fraction at 10 Gy), whereas E6*II had no effect. In contrast to radiosensitivity, E6*I was a weaker inhibitor than E6total of tumor suppressor p53 transactivator activity in the same cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that irradiated E6*I expressing cells had a much higher G2M:G1 ratio than control cells, indicating that, after G2, cells were diverted from the cell cycle to programmed cell death. Conclusion: This study supports a role for E6*I in the enhanced responsiveness of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas to p53-independent radiation-induced death.

  12. Review of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Deepu George; Rooban, T; Janani, V; Joshua, E; Rao, UK; Ranganathan, K

    2010-01-01

    Malignancies are usually preceded by the presence of various paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS), which could be the indirect and/or remote effects of the metabolites produced by neoplastic cells. PNS manifested by oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, which is the most common head and neck malignancy, are highlighted in this review. Knowledge of the clinical spectrum of these syndromes will equip the oral physician for early diagnosis and management of these hidden malignancies, especially of the pharyngeal region. PMID:21731261

  13. Evaluation of Microbial Load in Oropharyngeal Mucosa from Tannery Workers

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Arévalo, Diana C.; Castellanos-Arévalo, Andrea P.; Camarena-Pozos, David A.; Colli-Mull, Juan G.; Maldonado-Vega, María

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal skin provides an ideal medium for the propagation of microorganisms and it is used like raw material in the tannery and footware industry. The aim of this study was to evaluate and identify the microbial load in oropharyngeal mucosa of tannery employees. Methods The health risk was estimated based on the identification of microorganisms found in the oropharyngeal mucosa samples. The study was conducted in a tanners group and a control group. Samples were taken from oropharyngeal mucosa and inoculated on plates with selective medium. In the samples, bacteria were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and the yeasts through a presumptive method. In addition, the sensitivity of these microorganisms to antibiotics/antifungals was evaluated. Results The identified bacteria belonged to the families Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Neisseriaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Moraxellaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae, of which some species are considered as pathogenic or opportunistic microorganisms; these bacteria were not present in the control group. Forty-two percent of bacteria identified in the tanners group are correlated with respiratory diseases. Yeasts were also identified, including the following species: Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, and Candida krusei. Regarding the sensitivity test of bacteria identified in the tanners group, 90% showed sensitivity to piperacillin/tazobactam, 87% showed sensitivity to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, 74% showed sensitivity to ampicillin/sulbactam, and 58% showed sensitivity to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Conclusion Several of the bacteria and yeast identified in the oropharyngeal mucosa of tanners have been correlated with infections in humans and have already been reported as airborne microorganisms in this working environment, representing a health risk for workers. PMID:25830072

  14. Screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke: insufficient evidence for guidelines.

    PubMed

    Martino, R; Pron, G; Diamant, N

    2000-01-01

    There is no evaluation of the evidence for the screening of oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke. We reviewed the literature on clinical screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia in adults with stroke to determine (a) the accuracy of different screening tests used to detect dysphagia defined by abnormal oropharyngeal physiology on videofluoroscopy and (b) the health outcomes reported and whether screening alters those outcomes. Peer-reviewed English-language and human studies were sought through Medline (from 1966 to July 1997) by using the key words cerebrovascular disorders and deglutition disorders, relevant Internet addresses, and extensive hand searching of bibliographies of identified articles. Of the 154 sources identified, 89 articles were original, peer-reviewed, and focused on oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke patients. To evaluate the evidence, the next selection identified 10 articles on the comparison of screening and videofluoroscopic findings and three articles on screening and health outcomes. Evidence was rated according to the level of study design by using the values of the Canadian Task Force on Periodic Health Examination. From the identified screening tests, most of the screenings were related to laryngeal signs (63%) and most of the outcomes were related to physiology (74%). Evidence for screening accuracy was limited because of poor study design and the predominant use of aspiration as the diagnostic reference. Only two screening tests were identified as accurate: failure on the 50-ml water test (likelihood ratio = 5.7, 95% confidence interval = 2.5-12.9) and impaired pharyngeal sensation (likelihood ratio = 2.5, 95% confidence interval = 1.7-3.7). Limited evidence for screening benefit suggested a reduction in pneumonia, length of hospital stay, personnel costs, and patient charges. In conclusion, screening accuracy needs to be assessed by using both abnormal physiology and aspiration as diagnostic markers for dysphagia. Large well-designed trials

  15. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  16. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  17. Graphitic packing removal tool

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  18. Quality of life in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossio, P; Torres-Carranza, E; Cayuela, A; Gutierrez-Perez, J L; Gili-Miner, M

    2009-03-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important aspect in the clinical assessment and management of patients with cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QoL at the time of diagnosis in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer and to establish the influence of variables such as gender, age, tumor location and tumor staging. The authors studied 149 patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer for 2 years. QoL was measured using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and its specific modules for head and neck cancer QLQ-H&N 35. Variable deterioration of QoL was observed before therapy. The emotional domain showed the greatest alterations, while pain was the most remarkable symptom variable. QoL seems to be associated with gender (female patients obtained worse scores in most of the functional scales), age (patients < 65 years scored better), tumor location (orpharyngeal tumors showed worse prognosis) and tumor staging (early stages obtained better scores than advances ones). Many patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer show poor QoL before initiating treatment. The present study of a homogeneous group of patients is the first carried out in Spain following the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire and its results may serve for future reference. These results are similar to those obtained in populations from the north and centre of Europe. PMID:19135864

  19. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  20. Tiber winding pack design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.

    1985-08-19

    A preliminary winding pack design was performed with the goal of showing feasibility of producing 10-T maximum field with a pack current density of 40 A.mm/sup -2/ while accepting 2.7 kW per coil nuclear heating. A cable-in-conduit conductor design (CIC), reported at the 6th Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy, was based on several key issues.

  1. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia after Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen K.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Review. Objective Postoperative oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the most common complications following anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). We review and summarize recent literature in order to provide a general overview of clinical signs and symptoms, assessment, incidence and natural history, pathophysiology, risk factors, treatment, prevention, and topics for future research. Methods A search of English literature regarding dysphagia following anterior cervical spine surgery was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. The search was focused on articles published since the last review on this topic was published in 2005. Results Patients who develop dysphagia after ACSS show significant alterations in swallowing biomechanics. Patient history, physical examination, X-ray, direct or indirect laryngoscopy, and videoradiographic swallow evaluation are considered the primary modalities for evaluating oropharyngeal dysphagia. There is no universally accepted objective instrument for assessing dysphagia after ACSS, but the most widely used instrument is the Bazaz Dysphagia Score. Because dysphagia is a subjective sensation, patient-reported instruments appear to be more clinically relevant and more effective in identifying dysfunction. The causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS are multifactorial, involving neuronal, muscular, and mucosal structures. The condition is usually transient, most often beginning in the immediate postoperative period but sometimes beginning more than 1 month after surgery. The incidence of dysphagia within one week after ACSS varies from 1 to 79% in the literature. This wide variance can be attributed to variations in surgical techniques, extent of surgery, and size of the implant used, as well as variations in definitions and measurements of dysphagia, time intervals of postoperative evaluations, and relatively small sample sizes used in published studies. The factors most commonly associated with an

  2. Pessimal shapes for packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav

    2014-03-01

    The question of which convex shapes leave the most empty space in their densest packing is the subject of Reinhardt's conjecture in two dimensions and Ulam's conjecture in three dimensions. Such conjectures about pessimal packing shapes have proven notoriously difficult to make progress on. I show that the regular heptagon is a local pessimum among all convex shapes, and that the 3D ball is a local pessimum among origin-symmetric shapes. Any shape sufficiently close in the space of shapes to these local pessima can be packed at a greater efficiency than they. In two dimensions and in dimensions above three, the ball is not a local pessimum, so the situation in 3D is unusual and intriguing. I will discuss what conditions conspire to make the 3D ball a local pessimum and whether we can prove that it is also a global pessimum.

  3. The packing of particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cumberland, D.J.; Crawford, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The wide range of information currently available on the packing of particles is brought together in this monograph. The authors' interest in the subject was initially aroused by the question of whether there is an optimum particle size distribution which would maximise the packing density of particles - a question which has attracted the interest of scientists and engineers for centuries. The densification of a powder mass is of relevance in a great many industries, among them the pharmaceutical, ceramic, powder metallurgy and civil engineering industries. In addition, the packing of regular - or irregular - shaped particles is also of relevance to a surprisingly large number of other industries and subject areas, i.e. the foundry industry, nuclear engineering, chemical engineering, crystallography, geology, biology, telecommunications, and so on. Accordingly, this book is written for a wide audience.

  4. Bilateral Blindness Following Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, K. Liang; Kuruvilla, Sara; Sanatani, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a life-threatening neurologic complication of thiamine deficiency. Though the presentation of symptoms can vary widely, the classical triad is founded on ophthalmoplegia, alteration of mental status, and gait disturbance. We describe a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in an oncology patient shortly after concurrent 5-fluorouracil, carboplatin, and radiotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, presenting as complete bilateral blindness, ataxia, nystagmus, and confusion. Thiamine was given based on clinical suspicion and rapid improvement of clinical findings occurred. An MRI performed later supported the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy. A multifactorial etiology of thiamine deficiency from nutritional deficits and neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy are hypothesized. PMID:26623207

  5. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  6. Nutrition Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockut, Joanne; Stumpe, Stephanie

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these instructional materials integrate elementary school-level nutrition education into other disciplines--biology, sociology, physiology, mathematics, and art. Contents include four units consisting of twelve activities. Unit 1, Why You Need Food, is a self-examination of what is needed for growth, health,…

  7. AUTOmatic Message PACKing Facility

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-07-01

    AUTOPACK is a library that provides several useful features for programs using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). Features included are: 1. automatic message packing facility 2. management of send and receive requests. 3. management of message buffer memory. 4. determination of the number of anticipated messages from a set of arbitrary sends, and 5. deterministic message delivery for testing purposes.

  8. Packing Them In.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Claudia

    1997-01-01

    This activity involves students investigating the mathematics of packaging and exploring various concepts in geometry, including area and the Pythagorean theorem. Mathematics comes out of the discussion of packaging cans into six-packs and focuses on the cost-effectiveness of the horizontal storage area used. Students learn how knowledge of…

  9. Sun Packs Double Punch

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 3, the sun packed a double punch, emitting a M6.0-class flare at 9:43 am EDT. This video is of the second, slightly stronger M9.3-class flare at 11:41 pm EDT. Both flares had significant ...

  10. Economics Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  11. Oropharyngeal Dermoid Cyst in an Infant with Intermittent Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Haileselassie, Bereketeab; Kannan, Sujatha; Chen, Cynthia; Poretti, Andrea; Tunkel, David E.; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dermoid cysts are benign epithelial inclusions and cystic lesions that may occur in several locations including the oropharynx. We describe the case of a two-month-old baby girl who presented with progressive respiratory distress, hypoxemia, and feeding difficulties because of an oropharyngeal dermoid cyst. The child had an airway work-up that included laryngoscopy. However, the mass remained undetected. This is most likely explained by the mobile nature of the lesion, prolapsing into the high nasopharynx in supine position. In our patient, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), initially performed to rule out brainstem pathology, revealed an oropharyngeal dermoid cyst. This case shows the potential role of neuroimaging in the diagnostic work-up of a young child presenting with respiratory distress by excluding a central nervous system lesion and diagnosing an “unexpected” nasopharyngeal mass lesion. In addition, MRI allowed exclusion of skull base lesions of neural origin such as an anterior meningoencephalocele or heterotopic neuroglial tissue which would be managed differently from pharyngeal masses. PMID:25260210

  12. Alterations in oropharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEP) with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Teresa; Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Sapienza, Christine M; Bolser, Donald C; Davenport, Paul W

    2016-07-15

    Movement of a food bolus from the oral cavity into the oropharynx activates pharyngeal sensory mechanoreceptors. Using electroencephalography, somatosensory cortical-evoked potentials resulting from oropharyngeal mechanical stimulation (PSEP) have been studied in young healthy individuals. However, limited information is known about changes in processing of oropharyngeal afferent signals with Parkinson's disease (PD). To determine if sensory changes occurred with a mechanical stimulus (air-puff) to the oropharynx, two stimuli (S1-first; S2-s) were delivered 500ms apart. Seven healthy older adults (HOA; 3 male and 4 female; 72.2±6.9 years of age), and thirteen persons diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD; 11 male and 2 female; 67.2±8.9 years of age) participated. Results demonstrated PSEP P1, N1, and P2 component peaks were identified in all participants, and the N2 peak was present in 17/20 participants. Additionally, the PD participants had a decreased N2 latency and gated the P1, P2, and N2 responses (S2/S1 under 0.6). Compared to the HOAs, the PD participants had greater evidence of gating the P1 and N2 component peaks. These results suggest that persons with PD experience changes in sensory processing of mechanical stimulation of the pharynx to a greater degree than age-matched controls. In conclusion, the altered processing of sensory feedback from the pharynx may contribute to disordered swallow in patients with PD. PMID:27090350

  13. Narrow band imaging: clinical applications in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vu, A; Farah, C S

    2016-07-01

    Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is an endoscopic optical imaging enhancement technology that improves the contrast of mucosal surface texture, and enhances visualisation of mucosal and submucosal vasculature. White light is filtered to emit two 30-nm narrow bands of blue (415 nm) and green light (540 nm) light simultaneously, the former corresponding to the main peak absorption spectrum of haemoglobin, and the latter allowing visualisation of blood vessels in the deeper mucosal and submucosal layers. NBI has been used to better assess oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD), identify oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and to define surgical margins of head and neck malignancies. NBI shows great potential in improving detection rates of OPMD, facilitating better assessment of oral and oropharyngeal SCC, and reducing the risk of recurrence for oral SCC. Although further research is required to better understand and define intrapapillary capillary loop (IPCL) patterns and to relate these with clinical, histopathological and molecular parameters especially for early mucosal changes, there is building evidence to recommend its use as the new gold standard for endoscopic assessment in head and neck oncology. PMID:26713751

  14. Oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap.

    PubMed

    Mashrah, Mubarak A; Zhou, Shang-Hui; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Ma, Chunyue; Xu, Liqun; He, Yue; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Locoregional flaps are widely used for reconstruction of small and medium defects in the oral cavity. The submandibular gland flap is a pedicled flap, which derives its blood supply from the facial artery, based on the submandibular gland. We describe the use of the flap in 20 patients who required oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap after resection of a tumour between July 2012 and October 2014. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma were excluded. All flaps were pedicled on the facial vessels (inferiorly in 17 patients and superiorly in 3). The indications were: reconstruction of intraoral mucosal defects (n=13), filling the parapharyngeal dead space (n=6), and obliteration of the mastoid (n=1). All the flaps atrophied, but with no clinical effect. One patient developed partial loss of the flap, and one early leakage. There were no cases of xerostomia, and no signs of recurrence during the postoperative follow-up period of 3-26 months. The flap is useful, as it is simple and reliable for reconstruction of small to medium oropharyngeal defects in carefully selected cases, and gives good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:26388070

  15. Effect of packing method on the randomness of disc packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. P.; Yu, A. B.; Oakeshott, R. B. S.

    1996-06-01

    The randomness of disc packings, generated by random sequential adsorption (RSA), random packing under gravity (RPG) and Mason packing (MP) which gives a packing density close to that of the RSA packing, has been analysed, based on the Delaunay tessellation, and is evaluated at two levels, i.e. the randomness at individual subunit level which relates to the construction of a triangle from a given edge length distribution and the randomness at network level which relates to the connection between triangles from a given triangle frequency distribution. The Delaunay tessellation itself is also analysed and its almost perfect randomness at the two levels is demonstrated, which verifies the proposed approach and provides a random reference system for the present analysis. It is found that (i) the construction of a triangle subunit is not random for the RSA, MP and RPG packings, with the degree of randomness decreasing from the RSA to MP and then to RPG packing; (ii) the connection of triangular subunits in the network is almost perfectly random for the RSA packing, acceptable for the MP packing and not good for the RPG packing. Packing method is an important factor governing the randomness of disc packings.

  16. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Review of Nursing Considerations.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Janet; Thom, Bridgette

    2016-08-01

    : The overall incidence of head and neck cancer-which includes laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, nasal cavity, paranasal sinus, nasopharyngeal, oral, oropharyngeal, and salivary gland cancers-has declined in the United States over the past 30 years with the concomitant reduction in tobacco use. Over that same period, however, the worldwide incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has escalated significantly, most notably among men and women under age 60 who live in developed countries. This epidemic rise in oropharyngeal cancer is largely attributed to certain genotypes of the human papillomavirus (HPV). In the United States, HPV prevalence in oropharyngeal tumors increased dramatically, from roughly 16% between 1984 and 1989 to nearly 73% between 2000 and 2004, and the annual incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer is expected to surpass that of HPV-related cervical cancer by 2020.This article provides an overview of head and neck cancer-its incidence, risk factors, treatment, and posttreatment sequelae-with a focus on HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Unlike other forms of head and neck cancer, HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer tends to affect younger patients with few or none of the traditional risk factors and has a distinctive presentation, histology, and natural course. In order to provide appropriate patient education and to help these patients monitor and manage late and long-term treatment effects, it is important for nurses to be aware of this disease and its treatment, and of the unique survivorship issues that arise for affected patients. PMID:27428508

  17. Palatopharyngoplasty with bilateral buccal mucosal graft repair to alleviate oropharyngeal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Jared J; Vaughn, Cory A; Shaikh, Faisal A; Stocks, Rose Mary; Thompson, Jerome W

    2015-09-01

    Oropharyngeal stenosis is rare, but known complication from tonsillectomy procedure. A 15-year-old female presented with refractory dyspnea, mild obstructive sleep apnea, and dysphagia. She underwent tonsillectomy 3 years prior. Severe cicatricial oropharyngeal scar involving soft palate, anterior tonsillar pillars, and base of tongue, resulted in 1-cm(2) airway. Case report describing lysis of severe palatopharyngeal scar bands from tonsillectomy misadventure with immediate buccal mucosal grafts to repair resultant oropharyngeal defects. Patient no longer complains of difficulty breathing or dysphagia. PMID:26145205

  18. Genome Damage in Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients Treated by Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gamulin, Marija; Kopjar, Nevenka; Grgić, Mislav; Ramić, Snježana; Bišof, Vesna; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2008-01-01

    Aim To estimate genome damage in oropharyngeal cancer patients before, during, and after radiotherapy and to measure the persistence of caused genome damage relevant in the evaluation of secondary cancer risk. Methods DNA damage was evaluated in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients using alkaline comet assay, analysis of structural chromosome aberrations, and micronucleus assay. Blood samples were taken 2 hours before irradiation on day 1 of the first radiotherapy cycle, 2 hours after the application of the first dose, in the middle of the radiotherapy cycle, within 2 hours after the last received radiotherapy dose, and after 6 and 12 months after radiotherapy. Results In most participants, the highest level of primary DNA damage was recorded in blood samples collected after the administration of first radiation dose (mean tail length 25.04 ± 6.23 μm). Most patients also had increased frequency of comets with long tail-nucleus (LTN comets) after the administration of the first radiation dose (mean, 10.50 ± 7.71 per 100 comets), which remained increased in the middle of radiotherapy (mean, 18.30 ± 27.62 per 100 comets). Later on, the levels of primary DNA damage as recorded by the comet assay, slightly diminished. The frequency of structural chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes gradually increased during the radiation cycle (26.50 ± 27.72 per 100 metaphases at the end of the therapy), as well as the frequency of micronuclei (mean total number of micronuclei 167.20 ± 35.69; per 1000 binuclear cells). Conclusion Oropharyngeal cancer patients had relatively high levels of primary DNA damage in their peripheral blood lymphocytes even before therapy. The frequency of complex structural chromosome aberrations and the frequency of micronuclei increased with the progression of the radiation cycle and the doses delivered. As the frequency of chromosomal aberrations a year after radiotherapy mostly did not return to pre

  19. A Case of Propofol-Induced Oropharyngeal Angioedema and Bronchospasm

    PubMed Central

    You, Byung-Chul; Han, Ji-Su; Cheon, Hong-Woo; Park, Jong-Suk; Lee, June-Hyuk; Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Do-Jin; Park, Choon-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is an ultrashort-acting sedative agent with sedative and amnestic effects that is used not only for anesthesia but also for sedation during minor outpatient procedures and endoscopic examinations. Rare cases of anaphylaxis following propofol administration have been reported in the medical literature. Documentation of anaphylaxis is often lacking because the cause and effect relationship is often hard to prove. Only a minority of patients get referred for allergy testing to confirm the offending drug. Here we report a 74-year-old woman who had an anaphylactic reaction with severe oropharyngeal edema and bronchospasm for a few minutes after receiving propofol during endoscopic examination. An allergy skin test was positive for both propofol and soybean. Soybean in the intralipid is one component of propofol, and we concluded that this anaphylaxis was caused by soybean. PMID:22211170

  20. Effects of different types of pharyngeal packing in patients undergoing nasal surgery: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Mohd Meesam; Singh, Raj Bahadur; Rasheed, Mohd Asim; Sarkar, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    Context: Postoperative throat complaints such as postoperative sore throat (POST), dysphagia, and hoarseness frequently arises after tracheal intubation and throat packing for patient undergoing general anesthesia. This condition is very disturbing to patient. Avoiding POST is a major priority for these patients because preventing postoperative complications contributes to patient satisfaction. Aims: To describe and analyze the postoperative throat effects of nasopharyngeal packing and oropharyngeal packing in patients undergoing nasal surgery. Settings and Design: A randomized comparative study. Subjects and Methods: After obtaining approval of Ethical Committee 40 patients were included in study. After this patient were randomly allocated into two groups of 20 each. Group A - in which the oropharynx was packed and Group B - inwhich the nasopharynx was packed. General anesthesia were given and throat packing was done and patients were interviewed postoperatively for any throat complications such as sore throat, difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia), hoarseness of voice, throat irritation, and any other symptom pertaining to the study were noted and data were analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: T-test to compare the age, while Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare sex distribution, sore throat, dysphagia, hoarseness, and throat irritation. Results: Results showed statistically significant difference in incidence and severity of POST in Group A patients when compared to Group B patients to be more. Patients in Group A had a higher incidence of dysphagia when compared to their Group B counterparts. With respect to the incidence of hoarseness and throat irritation, there was no statistical significance between the groups. Conclusion: We concluded that the site of pharyngeal packing influences the incidence and severity of POST and as well as the incidence of dysphagia after general anesthesia. The use of nasopharyngeal packing in the patients

  1. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TORS FOR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Summarize functional outcomes after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) ± adjuvant therapy for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). STUDY DESIGN A systematic review was conducted. The MEDLINE database was searched (MeSH terms: transoral robotic surgery, pharyngeal neoplasms, oropharyngeal neoplasms). METHODS Peer-reviewed human subject papers published through December, 2013 were included. Exclusion criteria were: 1) case report design (n<10), 2) review article, or 3) technical, animal or cadaver studies. Functional outcomes extracted included feeding tube dependence, swallow examination findings, speech ratings, velopharyngeal insufficiency, pneumonia, and oral intake measures. RESULTS Twelve papers comprising 441 patients with OPC treated with TORS ± adjuvant therapy were included. Feeding tube rates were the most commonly reported functional outcome. Excluding prophylactic placement, 18% to 39% of patients required gastrostomy placement, typically during adjuvant therapy. Chronic gastrostomy dependence ranged from 0% to 7% (mean follow-up: 11–26 months), regardless of disease stage. Composite MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) scores ranged from 65.2 to 78 (89 patients, 3 series, mean follow-up: 12–13 months). Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were not systematically reported. Incidence of postoperative pneumonia was 0% to 7%. Predictors of swallowing function included baseline function, T-stage, N-stage, tongue base primary tumors, and adjuvant chemoradiation. Rates of transient hypernasality were 4% to 9%. A single study suggested dose-dependent effects of adjuvant therapy (none, radiation alone, chemoradiation) on diet scores at 6- and 12-months. CONCLUSIONS Crude endpoints of functional recovery after TORS ± adjuvant therapy suggest promising swallowing outcomes, depending on the functional measure reported. PMID:24643851

  2. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  3. Avoidance of Cigarette Pack Health Warnings among Regular Cigarette Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Olivia M.; Attwood, Angela; O’Brien, Laura; Brooks, Sabrina; Hedge, Craig; Leonards, Ute; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous research with adults and adolescents indicates that plain cigarette packs increase visual attention to health warnings among non-smokers and non-regular smokers, but not among regular smokers. This may be because regular smokers: 1) are familiar with the health warnings, 2) preferentially attend to branding, or 3) actively avoid health warnings. We sought to distinguish between these explanations using eye-tracking technology. Method A convenience sample of 30 adult dependant smokers were recruited to participate in an eye-tracking study. Participants viewed branded, plain and blank packs of cigarettes with familiar and unfamiliar health warnings. The number of fixations to health warnings and branding on the different pack types were recorded. Results Analysis of variance indicated that regular smokers were biased towards fixating the branding location rather than the health warning location on all three pack types (p < 0.002). This bias was smaller, but still evident, for blank packs, where smokers preferentially attended the blank region over the health warnings. Time-course analysis showed that for branded and plain packs, attention was preferentially directed to the branding location for the entire 10 seconds of the stimulus presentation, while for blank packs this occurred for the last 8 seconds of the stimulus presentation. Familiarity with health warnings had no effect on eye gaze location. Conclusion Smokers actively avoid cigarette pack health warnings, and this remains the case even in the absence of salient branding information. Smokers may have learned to divert their attention away from cigarette pack health warnings. These findings have policy implications for the design of health warning on cigarette packs. PMID:24485554

  4. Interchange of entire communities: microbial community coalescence.

    PubMed

    Rillig, Matthias C; Antonovics, Janis; Caruso, Tancredi; Lehmann, Anika; Powell, Jeff R; Veresoglou, Stavros D; Verbruggen, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Microbial communities are enigmatically diverse. We propose a novel view of processes likely affecting microbial assemblages, which could be viewed as the Great American Interchange en miniature: the wholesale exchange among microbial communities resulting from moving pieces of the environment containing entire assemblages. Incidental evidence for such 'community coalescence' is accumulating, but such processes are rarely studied, likely because of the absence of suitable terminology or a conceptual framework. We provide the nucleus for such a conceptual foundation for the study of community coalescence, examining factors shaping these events, links to bodies of ecological theory, and we suggest modeling approaches for understanding coalescent communities. We argue for the systematic study of community coalescence because of important functional and applied consequences. PMID:26111582

  5. FLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF ORO-PHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA: ANATOMY, TECHNIQUE, AND COMMON ETIOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Edmund, Dr; Au, Frederick Wing-Fai; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Target Audience Radiologists and other professionals involved in imaging of oropharyngeal swallowing Objectives To review anatomy of the upper GI tract To review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx To provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia, and to link these to key findings in the clinical history to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis To provide self-assessment questions to reinforce key learning points PMID:25539237

  6. 16S community profiling identifies proton pump inhibitor related differences in gastric, lung and oropharyngeal microflora

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rachel; Hu, Lan; Amirault, Janine; Khatwa, Umakanth; Ward, Doyle V.; Onderdonk, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that PPI use results in changes in gastric microflora which, through full column reflux, results in lung and oropharyngeal microflora changes. Study design We performed a prospective, cross sectional cohort study of 116 children (57 off and 59 on PPIs) undergoing simultaneous bronchoscopy and upper endoscopy for the evaluation of chronic cough. We performed 16S sequencing on gastric, bronchoalveolar lavage and oropharyngeal fluid. Fifty patients also underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) testing. Results Streptococcus was more abundant in the gastric fluid of patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and there was a significant correlation with PPI dose (mg/kg/day) and abundance of gastric Streptococcus (p=0.01). There was also a significant difference in the abundance of oropharyngeal Streptococcus in PPI treated patients. Eight unique bacterial genera were found in the gastric and lung fluid but not in the oropharyngeal suggesting exchange between the two sites and two of the seven (Lactococcus, Acinetobacter) were more abundant in patients with more full column reflux, suggesting direct aspiration. Principal component analysis revealed greater overlap between gastric and lung than oropharyngeal microflora. Conclusions PPI use was associated with differences in gastric, lung and oropharyngeal microflora. Although microflora exchange can occur between all three sites, gastric and lung microflora are more closely related and the mechanism of exchange between sites may be aspiration of full column reflux. PMID:25661411

  7. Teeing Off With an Entirely New Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Liquidmetal(R) alloy is part of an entirely new class of vitrified metals, and is also known as metallic glass, or Vitreloy(R). A vitrified metal is a frozen liquid that fails to crystallize during solidification, unlike common metals such as titanium, steel, and aluminum. The technology takes the non-crystalline structure of glass and combines it with the properties of metal, a combination not found in nature, allowing for a product that offers the strength of a metal with the elasticity of a polymer. This unique technology is more than twice as strong as titanium and has a higher elastic limit. Liquidmetal(R) Golf presents this space-age development in a complete line golf clubs. Clubs made with this technology have a lower vibration response along with a softer, more solid feel. Because less energy is absorbed by the club's head upon impact, more energy is transferred directly to the ball. Vitreloy has potential commercial uses in sporting equipment: tennis rackets, bicycle frames, and baseball bats. The material may find applications in the medical industry for the manufacturing of surgical instruments and prosthetics. The Liquidmetal alloy is projected to replace many high performance materials, such as titanium, in the industries of aerospace, defense, military, automotives, medical instrumentation, and sporting goods

  8. Packing fraction of continuous distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, Jos

    2014-03-01

    This study addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with geometric and lognormal size distribution. It is demonstrated that a bimodal discrete particle distribution can be transformed into said continuous particle-size distributions. Furthermore, original and exact expressions are presented that predict the packing fraction of these particle assemblies. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable parameters are given. The closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fractions are thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.

  9. Method for dense packing discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  10. Granular packings and fault zones

    PubMed

    Astrom; Herrmann; Timonen

    2000-01-24

    The failure of a two-dimensional packing of elastic grains is analyzed using a numerical model. The packing fails through formation of shear bands or faults. During failure there is a separation of the system into two grain-packing states. In a shear band, local "rotating bearings" are spontaneously formed. The bearing state is favored in a shear band because it has a low stiffness against shearing. The "seismic activity" distribution in the packing has the same characteristics as that of the earthquake distribution in tectonic faults. The directions of the principal stresses in a bearing are reminiscent of those found at the San Andreas Fault. PMID:11017335

  11. Polarizable protein packing.

    PubMed

    Ng, Albert H; Snow, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol(-1)] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. PMID:21264879

  12. Packings of soft disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziherl, Primoz; Vidmar, Marija

    2011-03-01

    We explore the stability of 2D ordered structures formed by soft disks treated as isotropic solid bodies. Using a variational model, we compute the equilibrium shapes and the elastic energy of disks in regular columnar, honeycomb, square, and hexagonal lattice. The results reproduce the Hertzian interaction in the regime of small deformations. The phase diagram of elastic disks is characterized by broad regions of phase coexistence; its main feature is that the coordination number of the stable phases decreases with density. These results may provide an insight into structure of the non-close-packed lattices observed in certain nanocolloidal systems. This work was supported by Slovenian Research Agency (grant No. P1-0055) and by EU through ITN COMPLOIDS (grant FP7-People-ITN-2008 No. 234810).

  13. Random very loose packings.

    PubMed

    Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Coniglio, Antonio

    2008-09-19

    We measure the number Omega(phi) of mechanically stable states of volume fraction phi of a granular assembly under gravity. The granular entropy S(phi)=logOmega(phi) vanishes both at high density, at phi approximately equal to phi_rcp, and a low density, at phi approximately equal to phi_rvlp, where phi_rvlp is a new lower bound we call random very loose pack. phi_rlp is the volume fraction where the entropy is maximal. These findings allow for a clear explanation of compaction experiments and provide the first first-principle definition of the random loose volume fraction. In the context of the statistical mechanics approach to static granular materials, states with phi

  14. A Pilot Study to Determine the Safety and Feasibility of Oropharyngeal Administration of Own Mother’s Colostrum to Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nancy A.; Meier, Paula P.; Groer, Maureen W.; Zeller, Janice M.; Engstrom, Janet L.; Fogg, Lou

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety of oropharyngeal administration of own mother’s colostrum to ELBW infants in first days of life. A secondary purpose was to investigate the feasibility of (1) delivering this intervention to ELBW infants in the first days of life, and (2) measuring concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and lactoferrin in tracheal aspirate secretions and urine of these infants. Subjects Five ELBW infants (mean BW and gestational age = 657 grams and 25.5 weeks, respectively). Design Quasi experimental, one group, pretest-posttest design. Methods Subjects received 0.2 mL of OMC administered oropharyngeally every two hours for 48 consecutive hours, beginning at 48 hours of life. Concentrations of sIgA and lactoferrin were measured in tracheal aspirates and urine of each subject at baseline, at the completion of the intervention and again 2 weeks later. Results All infants completed the entire treatment protocol, each receiving 24 treatments. A total of 15 urine specimens were collected and 14 were sufficient in volume for analysis. A total of 15 tracheal aspirates were collected, but only 7 specimens (47%) were sufficient in volume for analysis. There was wide variation in concentrations of sIgA and lactoferrin in urine and tracheal aspirates among the five infants; however several results were outside the limits of assay detection. All infants began to suck on the endotracheal tube during the administration of colostrum drops. Oxygen saturation measures remained stable or increased slightly during each of the treatment sessions. There were no episodes of apnea, bradycardia, hypotension or other adverse effects associated with the administration of colostrum. Conclusions Oropharyngeal administration of OMC is easy, inexpensive, and well-tolerated by even the smallest and sickest ELBW infants. Future research should continue to examine the optimal procedure for measuring the direct immune effects of this therapy, as well as the clinical

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade >=3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  16. Toward an Ensemble Streamflow Forecast Over the Entire France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, F.; Habets, F.; Noilhan, J.; Morel, S.; Le Moigne, P.

    2004-12-01

    Since the year 2003, the French National Weather Service (Meteo-France) uses an operationnal real-time system that provides a daily monitoring of the water budget, streamflows and aquifer levels over the entire France : the SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM) system. This coupled model is composed of the ISBA surface scheme and of the distributed hydrological model MODCOU. The system is used in a forced mode, with the atmospheric forcing derived from observations through the use of the SAFRAN analysis system. Such a system has been validated over 3 large french basins~: the Rhone, the Adour-Garonne and the Seine basins. It was shown that the system satisfactorily reproduces the water and energy budgets, as well as the observed streamflows, aquifer levels and snow-packs. In particular, the main long-duration floods of the Seine are well simulated. The SIM system is also used for streamflow forecasting. As a first step, experiments of determinist forecasts have been performed over the Rhone basin, using 2- and 3-day quantitive precipitation forecast. The encouraging results showed the potential of SIM for flood forecasting. As a next step, an ensemble streamflow prediction system is now being built. The forecasts from the Ensemble Prediction System of the ECMWF are used to force the system. The initial conditions of soil moisture, aquifer levels, etc. are given by the operationnal run of SIM, and the results are analysed for each forecast day. This system is expected to give 10-day forecasts of the streamflow of the main french rivers with a measure of the associated confidence, which is greatly valuable for flood warning and water management.

  17. The first glacier inventory for entire Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastner, P.; Bolch, T.; Mölg, N.; Le Bris, R.; Paul, F.

    2012-04-01

    approximately 1'684'000 km2. The entire ice-covered area on Greenland is thus 1'813'000 km2. We will present the results of the GIC mapping along with an analysis of glacier inventory statistics.

  18. Packing Products: Polystyrene vs. Cornstarch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Packing materials such as polystyrene take thousands of years to decompose, whereas packing peanuts made from cornstarch, which some companies are now using, can serve the same purpose, but dissolve in water. The author illustrates this point to her class one rainy day using the sculptures students made from polystyrene and with the cornstarch…

  19. Serum trace elements in elderly frail patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Lubart, Emilia; Wainstein, Julio; Dror, Yosef; Segal, Refael

    2009-01-01

    Microelements have an important role in many vital enzymatic functions. Their optimal intake and serum concentration are not properly defined. For nursing home residents, this issue is further complicated by the high prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to measure microelement concentrations in 3 groups of elderly subjects that differ in their feeding methods and functional state. Forty-six frail elderly patients, in stable clinical condition, 15 on naso-gastric tube (NGT) feeding, 15 orally fed (OF), from skilled nursing departments were recruited to this study. As controls, we studied a group of 16 elderly independent ambulatory patients. A battery of 16 microelements was examined using the Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The OF frail elderly patients had significantly lower levels of chromium as compared to the NGT fed and the control group. Both frail elderly groups had lower levels of zinc and copper as compared to the controls. In contrast, in the nursing groups, we found higher levels of aluminum, boron, barium, bromine and nickel. Elderly, in particular frail and disabled subjects, are vulnerable to insufficiency or overload of microelements. There is a need to evaluate the actual requirements for each microelement for this population. PMID:19926926

  20. Antarctic pack ice: boundaries established from nimbus I pictures.

    PubMed

    Predoehl, M C

    1966-08-19

    Television and photofacsimile constructed infrared pictures taken by the Nimbus I meteorological satellite between 28 August and 22 September 1964 were analyzed for indications of the pack-ice boundary around Antarctica. Mean ice boundaries were established around the entire continent from both TV and infrared pictures, from which were estimated pack-ice areas of 19.81 by 10(6) and16.78 by 10(6) square kilometers, respectively; the difference is attributed to difference in subjective discernment of a boundary. PMID:17780643

  1. Heterogeneity of packing: structural approach.

    PubMed Central

    Kurochkina, N.; Privalov, G.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the heterogeneity of packing in proteins showed that different groups of the protein preferentially contribute to low- or high-density regions. Statistical distribution reveals the two preferable values for packing density in the form of two peaks. One peak occurs in the range of densities 0.55-0.65, the other occurs in the range 0.75-0.8. The high-density peak is originated primarily by high packing inside the hydrogen bonded backbone and to some extent by side chains. Polar/charged and apolar side chains both contribute to the low-density peak. The average packing density values of individual atomic groups significantly vary for backbone atoms as well as for side chain atoms. The carbonyl oxygen atoms of protein backbone and the end groups of side chains show lower packing density than the rest of the protein. The side-chain atomic groups of a secondary structure element when packed against the neighboring secondary structure element form stronger contacts with the side chains of this element than with its backbone. Analysis of the low-density regions around each buried peptide group was done for the set of proteins with different types of packing, including alpha-alpha, alpha-beta, and beta-beta packing. It was shown that cavities are regularly situated in the groove of secondary structure element packed against neighboring elements for all types of packing. Low density in the regions surrounding the peptide groups and the end groups of side chains can be explained by their positioning next to a cavity formed upon the association of secondary structure elements. The model proposed can be applied to the analysis of protein internal motions, mechanisms of cellular signal transduction, diffusion through protein matrix, and other events. PMID:9568896

  2. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and...

  3. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and...

  4. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and...

  5. Current trends in initial management of oropharyngeal cancer: the declining use of open surgery.

    PubMed

    Haigentz, Missak; Silver, Carl E; Corry, June; Genden, Eric M; Takes, Robert P; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2009-12-01

    The widespread availability of novel primary treatment approaches against oropharyngeal cancers has provided several potentially curative surgical and nonsurgical treatment options for patients, generating both hope and controversy. As treatment is usually curative in intent, management considerations must include consideration of primary tumor and nodal disease control as well as long-term toxicities and functional outcomes. Anatomical and functional organ preservation (speech and deglutition) remains of paramount importance to patients with oropharyngeal cancer and the physicians involved in their care, accounting for the growing popularity of chemoradiotherapy and transoral surgical techniques for this indication. These novel approaches have greatly diminished the role of open surgery as initial therapy for oropharyngeal cancers. Open surgery which is often reserved for salvage on relapse, may still be an appropriate therapy for certain early stage primary lesions. The growing treatment armamentarium requires careful consideration for optimal individualized care. The identification of oncogenic human papillomavirus as a predictive and prognostic marker in patients with oropharyngeal cancer has great potential to further optimize the choice of treatment. In this review, novel primary therapies against oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma are presented in the context of anatomical, quality of life, and emerging biological considerations. PMID:19866522

  6. Advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: Pathogenesis, treatment, and novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Paul L; Malloy, Kelly M; Worden, Francis P

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer accounts for approximately 2.8% of newly cancer cases. Although classically a tobacco related disease, most cases today are related to infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) and present with locally advanced tumors. HPV related tumors have been recognized as a molecularly distinct entity with higher response rates to therapy, lower rates of relapse, and improved overall survival. Treatment of oropharyngeal cancer entails a multi-disciplinary approach with concomitant chemoradiation. The role of induction chemotherapy in locally advanced tumors continues to be controversial however large studies have demonstrated no difference in survival or time to treatment failure. Surgical approaches may be employed with low volume oropharyngeal cancers and with development new endoscopic tools, more tumors are able to be resected via an endoscopic approach. Given advances in the understanding of HPV related oropharyngeal cancer, ongoing research is looking at ways to minimize toxicities via de-intensification of therapy. Unfortunately, some patients develop recurrent or metastatic disease. Novel therapeutics are currently being investigated for this patient population including immunotherapeutics. This review discusses the current understanding of the pathogenesis of oropharyngeal cancer and treatment. We also discuss emerging areas of research as it pertains to de-intensification as well novel therapeutics for the management of metastatic disease. PMID:26862488

  7. Dense periodic packings of tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Dense packings of nonoverlapping bodies in three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 are useful models of the structure of a variety of many-particle systems that arise in the physical and biological sciences. Here we investigate the packing behavior of congruent ring tori in R3, which are multiply connected nonconvex bodies of genus 1, as well as horn and spindle tori. Specifically, we analytically construct a family of dense periodic packings of unlinked tori guided by the organizing principles originally devised for simply connected solid bodies [22 Torquato and Jiao, Phys. Rev. E 86, 011102 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.011102]. We find that the horn tori as well as certain spindle and ring tori can achieve a packing density not only higher than that of spheres (i.e., π /√18 =0.7404...) but also higher than the densest known ellipsoid packings (i.e., 0.7707...). In addition, we study dense packings of clusters of pair-linked ring tori (i.e., Hopf links), which can possess much higher densities than corresponding packings consisting of unlinked tori.

  8. Method for packing chromatographic beds

    DOEpatents

    Freeman, David H.; Angeles, Rosalie M.; Keller, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Column chromatography beds are packed through the application of static force. A slurry of the chromatography bed material and a non-viscous liquid is filled into the column plugged at one end, and allowed to settle. The column is transferred to a centrifuge, and centrifuged for a brief period of time to achieve a predetermined packing level, at a range generally of 100-5,000 gravities. Thereafter, the plug is removed, other fixtures may be secured, and the liquid is allowed to flow out through the bed. This results in an evenly packed bed, with no channeling or preferential flow characteristics.

  9. Effect of perorally administered pivmecillinam on the normal oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, A; Edlund, C; Svenungsson, B; Emtestam, L; Nord, C E

    2001-06-01

    To study the ecological effects of pivmecillinam on the human oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora, 15 healthy volunteers were given pivmecillinam tablets 400 mg twice daily for 7 days. Saliva, stool and skin specimens were taken before (days -3 and 0) and on the 2nd, 4th and 7th days during the administration period and 14 and 21 days after the start of administration. Mecillinam caused no major changes in the aerobic or anaerobic oropharyngeal microflora. In the aerobic intestinal microflora there was a decrease in the numbers of Escherichia coli while no changes occurred in the anaerobic microflora. In the skin microflora there was a transient decrease in the numbers of Propionibacterium spp. underneath the wing of the nose. The major effect of pivmecillinam was seen on E. coli and to some extent on Propionibacterium spp. No further ecological disturbances were noticed in the oropharyngeal, intestinal or skin microflora. PMID:11450889

  10. The role for surgical management of HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M

    2012-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma has become the predominate cause of oropharyngeal carcinoma in the United States and Europe. Management of this disease is controversial. Traditional open surgical techniques gave way to concurrent chemoradiotherapy following several American and European organ-preservation trials suggesting that both modalities were equally efficacious. More recently, minimally invasive surgical techniques have gained popularity. These techniques provide an opportunity to achieve a complete surgical resection without the treatment-related morbidity associated with open surgery. Proponents of this technique contend that transoral surgical techniques provide a means to analyze the tumor tissue, prognosticate, and personally direct therapy. Skeptics suggest that HPV-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma responds well to chemoradiotherapy and that surgery may not provide a treatment advantage. Both approaches provide a unique perspective and both are currently being studied under trial. PMID:22782229

  11. Human papillomavirus prevalence in oropharyngeal cancer before vaccine introduction, United States.

    PubMed

    Steinau, Martin; Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T; Peters, Edward S; Watson, Meg; Cleveland, Jennifer L; Lynch, Charles F; Wilkinson, Edward J; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Copeland, Glen; Saber, Maria S; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Huang, Youjie; Cozen, Wendy; Lyu, Christopher; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2014-05-01

    We conducted a study to determine prevalence of HPV types in oropharyngeal cancers in the United States and establish a prevaccine baseline for monitoring the impact of vaccination. HPV DNA was extracted from tumor tissue samples from patients in whom cancer was diagnosed during 1995-2005. The samples were obtained from cancer registries and Residual Tissue Repository Program sites in the United States. HPV was detected and typed by using PCR reverse line blot assays. Among 557 invasive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, 72% were positive for HPV and 62% for vaccine types HPV16 or 18. Prevalence of HPV-16/18 was lower in women (53%) than in men (66%), and lower in non-Hispanic Black patients (31%) than in other racial/ethnic groups (68%-80%). Results indicate that vaccines could prevent most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, but their effect may vary by demographic variables. PMID:24751181

  12. Gastrostomy Tube Use after Transoral Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-khudari, Samer; Bendix, Scott; Lindholm, Jamie; Simmerman, Erin; Hall, Francis; Ghanem, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate factors that influence gastrostomy tube (g-tube) use after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for oropharyngeal (OP) cancer. Study Design/Methods. Retrospective review of TORS patients with OP cancer. G-tube presence was recorded before and after surgery at followup. Kaplan-Meier and Cox hazards model evaluated effects of early (T1 and T2) and advanced (T3, T4) disease, adjuvant therapy, and free flap reconstruction on g-tube use. Results. Sixteen patients had tonsillar cancer and 13 tongue base cancer. Of 22 patients who underwent TORS as primary therapy, 17 had T1 T2 stage and five T3 T4 stage. Seven underwent salvage therapy (four T1 T2 and three T3 T4). Nine underwent robotic-assisted inset free flap reconstruction. Seventeen received adjuvant therapy. Four groups were compared: primary early disease (PED) T1 and T2 tumors, primary early disease with adjunctive therapy (PEDAT), primary advanced disease (PAD) T3 and T4 tumors, and salvage therapy. Within the first year of treatment, 0% PED, 44% PEDAT, 40% PAD, and 57% salvage patients required a g-tube. Fourteen patients had a temporary nasoenteric tube (48.3%) postoperatively, and 10 required a g-tube (34.5%) within the first year. Four of 22 (18.2%) with TORS as primary treatment were g-tube dependent at one year and had received adjuvant therapy. Conclusion. PED can be managed without a g-tube after TORS. Similar feeding tube rates were found for PEDAT and PAD patients. Salvage patients have a high rate of g-tube need after TORS. PMID:23936676

  13. Association of marijuana smoking with oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancers: Pooled analysis from the INHANCE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Morgan A.; Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Kelsey, Karl; Straif, Kurt; Berthiller, Julien; Schwartz, Stephen M; Smith, Elaine; Wyss, Annah; Brennan, Paul; Olshan, Andrew F.; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Muscat, Joshua; Lazarus, Philip; McClean, Michael; Chen, Chu; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Matos, Elena; Menezes, Ana; Daudt, Alexander W.; Fernandez, Leticia; Posner, Marshall; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hashibe, Mia; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancers have increased over the last twenty years which parallels increased use of marijuana among individuals born after 1950. Methods Pooled analysis of individual-level data from nine case-control studies from the U.S. and Latin America in the INHANCE consortium. Self-reported information on marijuana smoking, demographic, and behavioral factors was obtained from 1,921 oropharyngeal cases, 356 oral tongue cases, and 7,639 controls. Results Compared with never marijuana smokers, ever marijuana smokers had an elevated risk of oropharyngeal (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 1.47) and a reduced risk of oral tongue cancer (aOR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.29, 0.75). The risk of oropharyngeal cancer remained elevated among never tobacco and alcohol users. The risk of oral tongue cancer decreased with increasing frequency (ptrend=0.005), duration (ptrend=0.002), and joint-years of marijuana use (ptrend=0.004), and was reduced among never users tobacco and alcohol users. Sensitivity analysis adjusting for potential confounding by HPV exposure attenuated the association of marijuana use with oropharyngeal cancer (aOR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.71, 1.25), but had no effect on the oral tongue cancer association. Conclusions These results suggest that the association of marijuana use with Head and Neck Carcinoma may differ by tumor site. Impact The associations of marijuana use with oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancer are consistent with both possible pro- and anti-carcinogenic effects of cannabinoids. Additional work is needed to rule out various sources of bias, including residual confounding by HPV infection and misclassification of marijuana exposure. PMID:24351902

  14. Heating Luggage Sends Bedbugs Packing

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160234.html Heating Luggage Sends Bedbugs Packing Just 6 minutes at about 160 degrees ... 3, 2016 WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bedbugs, those creepy crawly insects that feed on your ...

  15. Are proteins well-packed?

    PubMed

    Liang, J; Dill, K A

    2001-08-01

    The average packing density inside proteins is as high as in crystalline solids. Does this mean proteins are well-packed? We go beyond average densities, and look at the full distribution functions of free volumes inside proteins. Using a new and rigorous Delaunay triangulation method for parsing space into empty and filled regions, we introduce formal definitions of interior and surface packing densities. Although proteins look like organic crystals by the criterion of average density, they look more like liquids and glasses by the criterion of their free volume distributions. The distributions are broad, and the scalings of volume-to-surface, volume-to-cluster-radius, and numbers of void versus volume show that the interiors of proteins are more like randomly packed spheres near their percolation threshold than like jigsaw puzzles. We find that larger proteins are packed more loosely than smaller proteins. And we find that the enthalpies of folding (per amino acid) are independent of the packing density of a protein, indicating that van der Waals interactions are not a dominant component of the folding forces. PMID:11463623

  16. Pattern formations and optimal packing.

    PubMed

    Mityushev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Patterns of different symmetries may arise after solution to reaction-diffusion equations. Hexagonal arrays, layers and their perturbations are observed in different models after numerical solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problems. We demonstrate an intimate connection between pattern formations and optimal random packing on the plane. The main study is based on the following two points. First, the diffusive flux in reaction-diffusion systems is approximated by piecewise linear functions in the framework of structural approximations. This leads to a discrete network approximation of the considered continuous problem. Second, the discrete energy minimization yields optimal random packing of the domains (disks) in the representative cell. Therefore, the general problem of pattern formations based on the reaction-diffusion equations is reduced to the geometric problem of random packing. It is demonstrated that all random packings can be divided onto classes associated with classes of isomorphic graphs obtained from the Delaunay triangulation. The unique optimal solution is constructed in each class of the random packings. If the number of disks per representative cell is finite, the number of classes of isomorphic graphs, hence, the number of optimal packings is also finite. PMID:26852668

  17. A Geometric-Structure Theory for Maximally Random Jammed Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jianxiang; Xu, Yaopengxiao; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    Maximally random jammed (MRJ) particle packings can be viewed as prototypical glasses in that they are maximally disordered while simultaneously being mechanically rigid. The prediction of the MRJ packing density ϕMRJ, among other packing properties of frictionless particles, still poses many theoretical challenges, even for congruent spheres or disks. Using the geometric-structure approach, we derive for the first time a highly accurate formula for MRJ densities for a very wide class of two-dimensional frictionless packings, namely, binary convex superdisks, with shapes that continuously interpolate between circles and squares. By incorporating specific attributes of MRJ states and a novel organizing principle, our formula yields predictions of ϕMRJ that are in excellent agreement with corresponding computer-simulation estimates in almost the entire α-x plane with semi-axis ratio α and small-particle relative number concentration x. Importantly, in the monodisperse circle limit, the predicted ϕMRJ = 0.834 agrees very well with the very recently numerically discovered MRJ density of 0.827, which distinguishes it from high-density “random-close packing” polycrystalline states and hence provides a stringent test on the theory. Similarly, for non-circular monodisperse superdisks, we predict MRJ states with densities that are appreciably smaller than is conventionally thought to be achievable by standard packing protocols.

  18. A Geometric-Structure Theory for Maximally Random Jammed Packings

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianxiang; Xu, Yaopengxiao; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Maximally random jammed (MRJ) particle packings can be viewed as prototypical glasses in that they are maximally disordered while simultaneously being mechanically rigid. The prediction of the MRJ packing density ϕMRJ, among other packing properties of frictionless particles, still poses many theoretical challenges, even for congruent spheres or disks. Using the geometric-structure approach, we derive for the first time a highly accurate formula for MRJ densities for a very wide class of two-dimensional frictionless packings, namely, binary convex superdisks, with shapes that continuously interpolate between circles and squares. By incorporating specific attributes of MRJ states and a novel organizing principle, our formula yields predictions of ϕMRJ that are in excellent agreement with corresponding computer-simulation estimates in almost the entire α-x plane with semi-axis ratio α and small-particle relative number concentration x. Importantly, in the monodisperse circle limit, the predicted ϕMRJ = 0.834 agrees very well with the very recently numerically discovered MRJ density of 0.827, which distinguishes it from high-density “random-close packing” polycrystalline states and hence provides a stringent test on the theory. Similarly, for non-circular monodisperse superdisks, we predict MRJ states with densities that are appreciably smaller than is conventionally thought to be achievable by standard packing protocols. PMID:26568437

  19. Prediction of concurrent chemoradiotherapy outcome in advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, MASAHIRO; MAEDA, HIROYUKI; DENG, ZEYI; KIYUNA, ASANORI; GANAHA, AKIRA; YAMASHITA, YUKASHI; MATAYOSHI, SEN; AGENA, SHINYA; TOITA, TAKAFUMI; UEHARA, TAKAYUKI; SUZUKI, MIKIO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a predictor of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) response and indicator of planned neck dissection (PND) for patients with advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC; stage III/IV). Overall, 39 OPSCC patients (32 men, 7 women; median age 61 years, range 39–79 years) were enrolled. The primary lesion and whole neck were irradiated up to 50.4 Gy, and subsequently the primary site and metastatic lymph nodes were boosted with a further 16.2 Gy. Although several chemotherapy regimens were employed, 82.1% of OPSCC patients received the combination of nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil. HPV-related OPSCC (16 cases) was defined as both HPV DNA-positive status by polymerase chain reaction and p16INK4a overexpression by immunohistochemistry. Patients with N2 and N3 disease received PND 2–3 months after CCRT completion. Compared to non-responders, CCRT responders showed significantly lower nodal stage (N0 to N2b) and HPV-positive status in univariate analysis. Patients with HPV-related OPSCC had longer time to treatment failure (TTF) than those with HPV-unrelated OPSCC (p=0.040). Three-year TTF was 81.3 and 47.8% in the HPV-related and HPV-unrelated groups, respectively. There were also significant differences in disease-free survival (DFS) between the two OPSCC patient groups (p=0.042). Three-year DFS was 93.8 and 66.7% in patients with HPV-related and HPV-unrelated OPSCC, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis showed a lower risk of TTF event occurrence in HPV-related OPSCC (p=0.041) than in HPV-unrelated OPSCC. Thus, HPV testing in addition to nodal stage was useful for predicting CCRT response, especially in advanced OPSCC. Because patients who received PND showed moderate locoregional control, PND is an effective surgical procedure for controlling neck lesions in patients with advanced HPV-unrelated disease. PMID:24969413

  20. Use of the Primitive Unit Cell in Understanding Subtle Features of the Cubic Closest-Packed Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, John A.; Rittenhouse, Jeffrey L.; Soper, Linda M.; Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important crystal structures adopted by metals is characterized by the "abcabc"...stacking of close-packed layers. This structure is commonly referred to in textbooks as the cubic close-packed (ccp) or face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, since the entire lattice can be generated by replication of a face-centered cubic unit cell…

  1. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S. Standard bushel baskets, or half-bushel baskets,...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S....

  3. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S. Standard bushel baskets, or half-bushel baskets,...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S....

  5. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51.1527 Standard pack. (a) Packing. (1) All... plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be reasonably representative in quality and size of those in the remainder of the package. (3) “Well filled” means that the plums or prunes packed...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51.1527 Standard pack. (a) Packing. (1) All... plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be reasonably representative in quality and size of those in the remainder of the package. (3) “Well filled” means that the plums or prunes packed...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51.1527 Standard pack. (a) Packing. (1) All... plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be reasonably representative in quality and size of those in the remainder of the package. (3) “Well filled” means that the plums or prunes packed...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S. Standard bushel baskets, or half-bushel baskets,...

  9. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged.... 3 2 “Fairly tight” means that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in...

  10. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged.... 3 2 “Fairly tight” means that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in...

  11. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  12. Chronic Inflammation-Related HPV: A Driving Force Speeds Oropharyngeal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Ma, Xiangrui; Lei, Zhengge; Feng, Hao; Wang, Shasha; Cen, Xiao; Gao, Shiyu; Jiang, Yaping; Jiang, Jian; Chen, Qianming; Tang, Yajie; Tang, Yaling; Liang, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been known to be a highly aggressive disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. To investigate the relationship between HPV and chronic inflammation in oropharyngeal carcinogenesis, we collected 140 oral mucous fresh specimens including 50 OPSCC patients, 50 cancer in situ, 30 precancerous lesions, and 10 normal oral mucous. Our data demonstrated that there was a significantly higher proportion of severe chronic inflammation in dysplastic epithelia in comparison with that in normal tissues (P<0.001). The positive rate of HPV 16 was parallel with the chronic inflammation degrees from mild to severe inflammation (P<0.05). The positive rate of HPV 16 was progressively improved with the malignant progression of oral mucous (P<0.05). In addition, CD11b+ LIN- HLA-DR-CD33+ MDSCs were a critical cell population that mediates inflammation response and immune suppression in HPV-positive OPSCC. These indicated that persistent chronic inflammation-related HPV infection might drive oropharyngeal carcinogenesis and MDSCs might pay an important role during this process. Thus, a combination of HPV infection and inflammation expression might become a helpful biomedical marker to predict oropharyngeal carcinogenesis. PMID:26193368

  13. A Therapeutic Maneuver for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Corrêa, Sabrina Mello Alves; Soares, Renato José

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigates resources to provide better conditions for oropharyngeal swallowing for improvement in the quality of life of Parkinson’s disease patients. METHOD Three men and one woman with an average age of 70.25 years had been afflicted with Parkinson’s disease for an average of 9.25 years. The patients were submitted to a rehabilitation program for oropharyngeal dysphagia after a clinical evaluation of swallowing. The rehabilitation program consisted of daily sessions for two consecutive weeks during which a biofeedback resource adapted especially for this study was used. The patients were then reevaluated for swallowing ability at follow-up. RESULTS The patients presenting difficulties with swallowing water displayed no such problems after rehabilitation. Only one patient exhibited slow oral transit of food and other discrete oropharyngeal food remnants when swallowing a biscuit. The sample variance was used to analyze the pressure measurements, demonstrating a numerical similarity of the results obtained with the swallowing of saliva or of biscuits (VAR = 4.41). A statistical difference was observed between the swallowing of saliva and biscuits, showing a significant pressure increase at the end of the rehabilitation program (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION The effortful swallow maneuver reinforced by using biofeedback appears to be a therapeutic resource in the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease patients. PMID:18925327

  14. Oropharyngeal Tularemia Outbreak Associated with Drinking Contaminated Tap Water, Turkey, July–September 2013

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Bekir; Isik, Mehmet Emirhan; Tutus, Celal; Ozturk, Huseyin; Temel, Fehminaz; Kizilaslan, Mecit; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, an oropharyngeal tularemia outbreak in Turkey affected 55 persons. Drinking tap water during the likely exposure period was significantly associated with illness (attack rate 27% vs. 11% among non–tap water drinkers). Findings showed the tap water source had been contaminated by surface water, and the chlorination device malfunctioned. PMID:26584074

  15. Oral and oropharyngeal perceptions of fluid viscosity across the age span.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christina H; Logemann, Jeri A; Burghardt, Wesley R; Zecker, Steven G; Rademaker, Alfred W

    2006-10-01

    Research demonstrates that varying sensory input, including the characteristics of a bolus, changes swallow physiology. Altering the consistency of fluids is a common compensatory technique used in dysphagia management to facilitate change. However, it is not known what variations in viscosity can be perceived in the oral cavity or oropharynx or if age affects oral and oropharyngeal perceptions of fluid viscosity. This study aims to establish the ability of normal adults to perceive fluid viscosity in the oral cavity and oropharynx and to determine if, within this population, there are age-related changes in oral and oropharyngeal perceptions. Sensitivity was established by deriving the exponent for the psychophysical law for fluid viscosity in both the oral cavity and the oropharynx, using modulus-free magnitude estimation with Newtonian fluids of corn syrup and water. Sixty normal volunteers, aged 21-84 years, participated. Results indicate that the exponent for oral perception of fluid viscosity was 0.3298, while for oropharyngeal perception it was 0.3148. Viscosity perception deteriorates with increasing age. Men exhibited a more marked deterioration in sensitivity than women. This study contributes to the literature on oral and oropharyngeal perceptions and on aging. The results provide a basis for work with individuals with dysphagia. PMID:17203333

  16. The Utility of Pitch Elevation in the Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a pitch elevation task in the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Method: This study was a pilot prospective cohort study including 40 consecutive patients (16 male and 24 female) who were referred by their physician for a swallowing evaluation. Patients were evaluated with a noninstrumental clinical…

  17. Leptin receptor expression and Gln223Arg polymorphism as prognostic markers in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P R S; Maia, L L; Santos, M; Peterle, G T; Alves, L U; Takamori, J T; Souza, R P; Barbosa, W M; Mercante, A M C; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-01-01

    The leptin gene product is released into the blood stream, passes through the blood-brain barrier, and finds the leptin receptor (LEPR) in the central nervous system. This hormone regulates food intake, hematopoiesis, inflammation, immunity, differentiation, and cell proliferation. The LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism has been reported to alter receptor function and expression, both of which have been related with prognostics in several tumor types. Furthermore, several studies have shown a relationship between the Gln223Arg polymorphism and tumor development, and its role in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now well understood. In this study, 315 DNA samples were used for LEPR Gln223Arg genotyping and 87 primary oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas were used for immunohistochemical expression analysis, such that a relationship between these and tumor development and prognosis could be established. Homozygous LEPR Arg223 was found to be associated with a 2-fold reduction in oral and oropharyngeal cancer risk. In contrast, the presence of the Arg223 allele in tumors was associated with worse disease-free and disease-specific survival. Low LEPR expression was found to be an independent risk factor, increasing the risk for lymph node metastasis 4-fold. In conclusion, the Gln223Arg polymorphism and LEPR expression might be valuable markers for oral and oropharyngeal cancer, suggesting that LEPR might serve as a potential target for future therapies. PMID:26634459

  18. The Growing Epidemic of HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: A Clinical Review for Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kevin A; Mehta, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    While the rate of head and neck cancer has decreased in recent decades, the prevalence of oropharynx cancer has dramatically increased due to human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer. Three of 4 newly diagnosed oropharyngeal carcinomas are HPV-positive, and by 2020 it is projected that the prevalence of this disease will overtake that of HPV-related cervical cancer. Recognized in recent years as a malignant entity distinct from HPV-negative oropharyngeal carcinoma, HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer is associated with younger age at diagnosis, oral sexual behavior as a primary risk factor, nonspecific presentation, and improved treatment response compared with HPV-negative disease. Early recognition and referral for definitive treatment are paramount in decreasing morbidity and mortality, as well as improving the quality of life of these patients. Primary care providers are in an ideal position to improve patient outcomes through early recognition and referral, as well as coordination of comprehensive care of patients with this potentially devastating disease. Awareness of risk factors, a high index of suspicion, counseling patients and parents on the importance of vaccination against HPV, and coordinated care between primary care providers and specialists are vital to achieving improved outcomes for patients with this increasingly prevalent cancer. PMID:26152442

  19. Valve packings conquer fugitive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    In the early 1990s, when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA; Washington, D.C.) declared its intent to regulate fugitive emissions from valve-stem leakage, much of the chemical process industries (CPI) responded with fear and uncertainty. The biggest fear was that valve packing would not meet the required limits on leak rates and that expensive bellows seals may be required on many applications. The uncertainly was about how much it would cost. Today, for the most part, these concerns have been mitigated. It is estimated that about 80--90% of valves satisfy the emission requirements. The rest need some improvement in their packing systems to meet the regulations. Generally, these valves can be brought within compliance if the packing designers follow a few basic principles: Employ less-pliable outer rings and more-pliable inner rings; and don`t use excessive packing. While interest in valve packing remains high, mechanical seals continue to become more user-friendly. Many of those covered below are designed to run dry, and some can even tolerate high shaft-wobble without damage. Also look for improved flange gaskets and a host of seals to protect bearings. Twenty-one summaries are presented on new products and services.

  20. Hard sphere packings within cylinders.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Steinhardt, William; Zhao, Hao; Socolar, Joshua E S; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2016-02-23

    Arrangements of identical hard spheres confined to a cylinder with hard walls have been used to model experimental systems, such as fullerenes in nanotubes and colloidal wire assembly. Finding the densest configurations, called close packings, of hard spheres of diameter σ in a cylinder of diameter D is a purely geometric problem that grows increasingly complex as D/σ increases, and little is thus known about the regime for D > 2.873σ. In this work, we extend the identification of close packings up to D = 4.00σ by adapting Torquato-Jiao's adaptive-shrinking-cell formulation and sequential-linear-programming (SLP) technique. We identify 17 new structures, almost all of them chiral. Beyond D ≈ 2.85σ, most of the structures consist of an outer shell and an inner core that compete for being close packed. In some cases, the shell adopts its own maximum density configuration, and the stacking of core spheres within it is quasiperiodic. In other cases, an interplay between the two components is observed, which may result in simple periodic structures. In yet other cases, the very distinction between the core and shell vanishes, resulting in more exotic packing geometries, including some that are three-dimensional extensions of structures obtained from packing hard disks in a circle. PMID:26843132

  1. Sleeping distance in wild wolf packs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knick, S.T.; Mech, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    Sleeping distances were observed among members of 13 wild wolf (Canis lupus) packs and 11 pairs in northeastern Minnesota to determine if the distances correlated with pack size and composition. The study utilized aerial radio-tracking and observation during winter. Pack size and number of adults per pack were inversely related to pack average sleeping distance and variability. No correlation between sleeping distance and microclimate was observed. Possible relationships between social bonding and our results are discussed.

  2. Will targeting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea delay the further emergence of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains?

    PubMed

    Lewis, D A

    2015-06-01

    Gonorrhoea is an important sexually transmitted infection associated with serious complications and enhanced HIV transmission. Oropharyngeal infections are often asymptomatic and will only be detected by screening. Gonococcal culture has low sensitivity (<50%) for detecting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, and, although not yet approved commercially, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) are the assay of choice. Screening for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea should be performed in high-risk populations, such as men-who-have-sex-with-men(MSM). NAATs have a poor positive predictive value when used in low-prevalence populations. Gonococci have repeatedly thwarted gonorrhoea control efforts since the first antimicrobial agents were introduced. The oropharyngeal niche provides an enabling environment for horizontal transfer of genetic material from commensal Neisseria and other bacterial species to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This has been the mechanism responsible for the generation of mosaic penA genes, which are responsible for most of the observed cases of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). As antimicrobial-resistant gonorrhoea is now an urgent public health threat, requiring improved antibiotic stewardship, laboratory-guided recycling of older antibiotics may help reduce ESC use. Future trials of antimicrobial agents for gonorrhoea should be powered to test their efficacy at the oropharynx as this is the anatomical site where treatment failure is most likely to occur. It remains to be determined whether a combination of frequent screening of high-risk individuals and/or laboratory-directed fluoroquinolone therapy of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea will delay the further emergence of drug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains. PMID:25911525

  3. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  4. 1. Aerial view, looking northeast up Newark Bay, showing entire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Aerial view, looking northeast up Newark Bay, showing entire island Charles Wisniewski, photographer, January 1985 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  5. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  6. Computer simulations of particle packing

    SciTech Connect

    Cesarano, J. III; McEuen, M.J.; Swiler, T.

    1996-09-01

    Computer code has been developed to rapidly simulate the random packing of disks and spheres in two and three dimensions. Any size distribution may be packed. The code simulates varying degrees of inter particle conditions ranging from sticky to free flowing. The code will also calculate the overall packing density, density distributions, and void size distributions (in two dimensions). An important aspect of the code is that it is written in C++ and incorporates a user-friendly graphical interface for standard Macintosh and Power PC platforms. Investigations as to how well the code simulates the realistic random packing have begun. The code has been developed in consideration of the problem of filling a container (or die) with spray-dried granules of ceramic powder (represented by spheres). Although not presented here, the futuristic goal of this work is to give users the ability to predict homogeneity of filled dies prior to dry pressing. Additionally, this software has educational utility for studying relationships between particle size distributions and macrostructures.

  7. Ecology and Energy Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these elementary school-level instructional materials are for use as an introduction to existing units of study, supplements to a textbook, or a source of special projects for environmental education. Contents include these six units: Make Your Own Ecology Mini-spinner, Let's Look at a Food Chain, Drip the…

  8. Set covering, partition and packing

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, B.L.; Baca, L.S.

    1984-03-01

    Set covering problems are known to be solvable by Boolean algebraic methods. This report shows that set partition and set packing problems can be solved by the same algebraic methods because these problems can be converted into covering problems. Many applications are possible including security patrol assignment which is used as an example.

  9. Microfabricated packed gas chromatographic column

    DOEpatents

    Kottenstette, Richard; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-16

    A new class of miniaturized gas chromatographic columns has been invented. These chromatographic columns are formed using conventional micromachining techniques, and allow packed columns having lengths on the order of a meter to be fabricated with a footprint on the order of a square centimeter.

  10. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 protein is overexpressed in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koole, Koos; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Swartz, Justin E; Peeters, Ton; van Diest, Paul J; Koole, Ron; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase family. It has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in multiple types of cancer. We have investigated FGFR3 protein expression and FGFR3 gene copy-numbers in a single well-documented cohort of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Tissue microarray sets containing 452 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues were immunohistochemically stained with an anti-FGFR3 antibody and hybridized with a FGFR3 fluorescence in situ hybridization probe. FGFR3 protein expression was correlated with clinicopathological and survival data, which were retrieved from electronic medical records. FGFR3 mRNA data of 522 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) protein was overexpressed in 48% (89/185) of oral and 59% (124/211) of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Overexpression of FGFR3 protein was not related to overall survival or disease-free survival in oral (HR[hazard ratio]: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.64-1.39; P = 0.77, HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.65-1.36; P = 0.75) and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 0.81-1.80; P = 0.36, HR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.79-1.77; P = 0.42). FGFR3 mRNA was upregulated in 3% (18/522) of HNSCC from the TCGA. The FGFR3 gene was gained in 0.6% (1/179) of oral squamous cell carcinoma but no amplification was found in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, FGFR3 protein is frequently overexpressed in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, it may serve as a potential therapeutic target for FGFR3-directed therapies in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26711175

  11. Lab on a chip packing of submicron particles for high performance EOF pumping.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Collins, Greg E

    2010-11-01

    The packing of submicrometer sized silica beads inside a microchannel was enabled by a novel method which avoids the complication and limitations of generating a frit using conventional approaches and the restriction of flow using a submicrometer sized weir. A micrometer sized weir and two short columns of 5 μm and 800 nm silica beads packed in succession behind the weir together functioned as a high pressure frit to allow the construction of a primary packed bed of 390 nm silica beads. This packed bed microchannel was tested as an EOF pump, wherein it exhibited superior performance with regards to pressure tolerance, i.e., sustaining good flow rate under extremely high back pressure, and maximal pressure generation. Under a modest applied electric field strength of 150 V/cm, the flow rate against a back pressure of 1200 psi (∼8.3 MPa) was 40 nL/min, and the maximal pressure reached 1470 psi (∼10 MPa). This work has demonstrated that it is possible to create a high performance packed bed microchannel EOF pump using nanometer sized silica beads, as long as proper care is taken during the packing process to minimize the undesirable mixing of two different sized particles at the boundaries between particle segments and to maximize the packing density throughout the entire packed bed. PMID:20926092

  12. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  13. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  14. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  15. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  16. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  17. From HPV-positive towards HPV-driven oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Pawlita, Michael; Holzinger, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), which is both biologically and clinically distinct from tobacco- and alcohol-related OPSCC, is dramatically increasing. The finding that individuals with HPV-positive local/regionally advanced OPSCC have a significantly better prognosis than their negative counterparts have led to efforts to de-escalate treatment in those patients to avoid serious side effects and to improve their long-term quality of life, while maintaining treatment efficacy. Identifying diagnostic tests that are able to distinguish cancers etiologically associated with HPV is thus becoming a pressing challenge for researchers. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the diagnostic tools presently available to evaluate HPV status in patients with OPSCC and, in particular, to discuss their strengths and weaknesses in identifying those infections that are the real driving force in the oropharyngeal carcinogenesis process. PMID:26547133

  18. Oropharyngeal cancer and human papilloma virus: evolving diagnostic and management paradigms.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Lisa; Gupta, Ruta; Ashford, Bruce; Jabbour, Joe; Clark, Jonathan R

    2016-06-01

    The significant increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) over recent years has lead to a surge in research and an improved understanding of the disease. Most patients with HPV-associated OPC present with cystic nodal metastases with a small primary tumour, and respond well to all treatment modalities including primary surgery and primary chemoradiotherapy. Current research is evaluating treatment de-escalation to reduce long-term treatment-associated morbidities. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is particularly relevant as the transoral approach allows small primary tumours to be removed with lower morbidity than traditional surgical approaches. The current American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for oropharyngeal cancer does not appropriately stratify HPV-associated OPC; hence, alternative risk stratification and staging classifications are being proposed. PMID:26687076

  19. Prevention and treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis following cancer therapy: are there new approaches?

    PubMed

    Kwong, Karis K F

    2004-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is an acute and distressing toxic effect of chemotherapy and head and neck irradiation. This oral sequela significantly impairs the daily functioning and quality of life of patients. The biological basis of mucositis is quite complex, involving sequential interaction of chemotherapeutic drugs or irradiation on mitosis of proliferating epithelium, a number of cytokines, and elements of oral microbial environment. Various interventions based on biological attenuation have been tested for mucositis. Such interventions have been reviewed elsewhere; however, most reviews focus on biomedical outcomes. Little attention has been paid to mucositis outcomes with oral morbidity or psychosocial aspects. The purpose of this article is to review the current research studies on the prevention and treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis following chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and bone marrow transplantation with an emphasis on biomedical, oral symptomatic, and functional impairment outcomes. In addition, further avenues of mucositis management, including psychotherapeutic intervention and integrated and stage-based treatment approaches are discussed. PMID:15238805

  20. Oropharyngeal airway changes after rapid maxillary expansion: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ortu, Eleonora; Giannoni, Mario; Ortu, Maurizio; Gatto, Roberto; Monaco, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to elucidate the state of the art about how rapid maxillary expansion (RME) produces changes in the oropharyngeal airways in terms of CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) data during the growth period, according to the available literature. Electronic search was done from January 2009 to April 2014 on PubMed and Scopus databases; in addition manual search was conducted as well. According to keywords, seven papers were eligible for our purpose, but definitely five papers were selected in agreement with the inclusion/exclusion criteria. The current literature suggests that the potential relationship between RME and oropharyngeal airway changes is still unclear. In fact, although the pharyngeal airway changes after the rapid palatal expansion are evident clinically, current orthodontic literature does not provide conclusive evidence about the nature of this relationship. PMID:25126159

  1. Klebsiella pneumoniae Oropharyngeal Carriage in Rural and Urban Vietnam and the Effect of Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Trinh Tuyet; Liebenthal, Dror; Tran, Toan Khanh; Ngoc Thi Vu, Bich; Ngoc Thi Nguyen, Diep; Thi Tran, Huong Kieu; Thi Nguyen, Chuc Kim; Thi Vu, Huong Lan; Fox, Annette; Horby, Peter; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Wertheim, Heiman F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Community acquired K. pneumoniae pneumonia is still common in Asia and is reportedly associated with alcohol use. Oropharyngeal carriage of K. pneumoniae could potentially play a role in the pathogenesis of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. However, little is known regarding K. pneumoniae oropharyngeal carriage rates and risk factors. This population-based cross-sectional study explores the association of a variety of demographic and socioeconomic factors, as well as alcohol consumption with oropharyngeal carriage of K. pneumoniae in Vietnam. Methods and Findings 1029 subjects were selected randomly from age, sex, and urban and rural strata. An additional 613 adult men from a rural environment were recruited and analyzed separately to determine the effects of alcohol consumption. Demographic, socioeconomic, and oropharyngeal carriage data was acquired for each subject. The overall carriage rate of K. pneumoniae was 14.1% (145/1029, 95% CI 12.0%–16.2%). By stepwise logistic regression, K. pneumoniae carriage was found to be independently associated with age (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02–1.04), smoking (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3–2.9), rural living location (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4), and level of weekly alcohol consumption (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.8). Conclusion Moderate to heavy weekly alcohol consumption, old age, smoking, and living in a rural location are all found to be associated with an increased risk of K. pneumoniae carriage in Vietnamese communities. Whether K. pneumoniae carriage is a risk factor for pneumonia needs to be elucidated. PMID:24667800

  2. [Oropharyngeal form of the Lasthenie de Ferjol syndrome. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Eisenfiz, M; Chabolle, F; Ferreri, M; Meyer, B; Chouard, C H

    1988-01-01

    The Lasthenie de Ferjol Syndrome associates an iron-deficient anemia by blood auto-spoliation with mental disorders. In this paper, the authors present an oropharyngeal form of this disease. Based on this case review (and those reported in the literature), they remind us this syndrome's mains characteristics, underlying how exceptional and particular this clinical report is. At least they point out how to diagnose, manage, and treat patients with this strange illness. PMID:3260763

  3. Nasopharyngeal versus oropharyngeal sampling for detection of pneumococcal carriage in adults.

    PubMed

    Watt, James P; O'Brien, Katherine L; Katz, Scott; Bronsdon, Melinda A; Elliott, John; Dallas, Jean; Perilla, Mindy J; Reid, Raymond; Murrow, Laurel; Facklam, Richard; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2004-11-01

    Several studies have shown that nasopharyngeal sampling is more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling for the detection of pneumococcal carriage in children. The data for adults are limited and conflicting. This study was part of a larger study of pneumococcal carriage on the Navajo and White Mountain Apache Reservation following a clinical trial of a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Persons aged 18 years and older living in households with children enrolled in the vaccine trial were eligible. We collected both nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens by passing a flexible calcium alginate wire swab either nasally to the posterior nasopharynx or orally to the posterior oropharynx. Swabs were placed in skim milk-tryptone-glucose-glycerin medium and frozen at -70 degrees C. Pneumococcal isolation was performed by standard techniques. Analyses were based on specimens collected from 1,994 adults living in 1,054 households. Nasopharyngeal specimens (11.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8 and 12.6%) were significantly more likely to grow pneumococci than were oropharyngeal specimens (5.8%; 95% CI, 4.8 to 6.9%) (P < 0.0001). Few persons had pneumococcal growth from both specimens (1.7%). Therefore, both tests together were more likely to identify pneumococcal carriage (15.2%; 95% CI, 13.7 to 16.9%) than either test alone. Although we found that nasopharyngeal sampling was more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling, nasopharyngeal sampling alone would have underestimated the prevalence of pneumococcal carriage in this adult population. Sampling both sites may give more accurate results than sampling either site alone in studies of pneumococcal carriage in adults. PMID:15528682

  4. The Oropharyngeal Morphology in the Semiaquatic Giant Asian Pond Turtle, Heosemys grandis, and Its Evolutionary Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Monika; Weissenbacher, Anton; Heiss, Egon

    2012-01-01

    The oropharynx as a functional entity plays a fundamental role in feeding. Transitions from aquatic to terrestrial lifestyles in vertebrates demanded major changes of the oropharynx for the required adaptations to a different feeding environment. Extant turtles evolved terrestrial feeding modes in three families (testudinids, emydids, geoemydids)–independently from other amniotes–and are therefore important model organisms to reconstruct morpho-functional changes behind aquatic-terrestrial transitions. In this study we hypothesized that the oropharyngeal morphology in semiaquatic turtles of the geoemydid family shows parallels to testudinids, the only purely terrestrial extant lineage. We provide an in-depth description of the oropharynx in the semiaquatic geoemydid Heosemys grandis by using a combination of micro computed tomography (micro-CT) and subsequent digital in situ 3-D reconstruction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and histology. We show that H. grandis has a large tongue with rough papillose surface and well-developed lingual muscles. The attachment sites of the lingual muscles on the hyolingual skeleton and their courses within the tongue are nearly identical with testudinids. The hyolingual skeleton itself is mainly cartilaginous and shows distinct–but compared to testudinids rather small–anterior extensions of the hyoid body and hypoglossum. Oral glands are well developed in H. grandis but are smaller and simpler than in testudinids. Similarly, oropharyngeal keratinization was minimal and found only in the anterior palate, regions close to the beak, and tongue tip. We conclude that H. grandis shows distinct oropharyngeal morpho-functional adaptations for a terrestrial lifestyle but still retains characters typical for aquatic forms. This makes this species an important example showing the oropharyngeal adaptations behind aquatic-terrestrial transitions in turtles. PMID:23029486

  5. 7 CFR 966.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.11 Pack. Pack means any of the packs of tomatoes as defined and set forth in the United States Standards for Fresh Tomatoes issued by the United States Department of Agriculture (§§...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51... the approved and recognized methods. (2) The plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be...” means that the plums or prunes packed in loose or volume filled containers are packed within 1 inch...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51... the approved and recognized methods. (2) The plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be...” means that the plums or prunes packed in loose or volume filled containers are packed within 1 inch...

  8. Oropharyngeal 24-Hour pH Monitoring in Children With Airway-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Mesallam, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diagnosis and clinical presentation of pediatric laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is still controversial. The aims of this work were to study the possibility of performing 24-hour oropharyngeal pH monitoring for children in the outpatient clinic setup and to explore the results of this test in correlation to airway-related problems. Methods In this descriptive qualitative study, 26 children suffering from airway-related problems were included. Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring was performed for all subjects in the outpatient clinic setting. The distribution of airway diagnoses among the study group was studied versus the results of the pH monitoring. Results There were 16 males and 10 females participated in the study with a mean age of 6.88 (SD, ±5.77) years. Thirty-five percent of the patients were under the age of 3 years (range, 11 months to 3 years). Eight-five percent of the patients tolerated the pH probe insertion and completed 24-hour of pH recording. Laryngomalacia and subglottic stenosis (SGS) were more frequently reported in the positive LPR patients (77%). Conclusion Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring can be conducted for children in the outpatient setup even in young age children below 3 years old. Among the positive LPR group, SGS and laryngomalacia were the most commonly reported airway findings. PMID:27090271

  9. Helicobacter pylori in tonsillar and adenoid tissue and its possible role in oropharyngeal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lukes, P; Astl, J; Pavlík, E; Potuzníková, B; Sterzl, I; Betka, J

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a well-known gastric pathogen. It plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers, adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. HP infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. Recently, the oral cavity was proposed as an extragastric reservoir of HP infection. HP was detected by culture and PCR in both dental plaque and saliva. It is supposed that HP infection can cause the same immunological changes in the oropharyngeal mucosa as in gastric mucosa and can also contribute to the progression of oropharyngeal diseases. HP can induce production of different cytokines and regulatory molecules, which are suggested to play a role in carcinogenesis of the oropharynx. Only a few studies have explored the presence of HP in tonsillar and adenoid tissue, where MALT is present similar to the gastric mucosa. The results of these studies were inconsistent. The question of persistence of HP in tonsillar and adenoid tissue and its role in the pathogenesis of oropharyngeal diseases still remains unclear. In this review, recent findings about oral HP are considered. Possibilities of diagnostics of HP in oral specimens are discussed. PMID:18498719

  10. Transoral Surgery or Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Carcinoma - Is It Either Or…?

    PubMed

    Evans, M; Jones, T M

    2016-07-01

    The management of oropharyngeal carcinoma represents an increasing clinical challenge, because of its rising incidence, particularly in younger patients as a result of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and because significant technological advances have occurred in radiotherapy and surgery over the last 10 years that have increased treatment options for patients, with little robust evidence yet of their relative merits. As a result, there is a lack of clinical consensus on the optimum treatment modality, reflected in wide variation in practice between different cancer networks across the UK. Here, we consider the evidence base for minimally invasive transoral surgery and for intensity-modulated radiotherapy-based primary treatment for oropharyngeal cancer, in terms of both oncological and functional outcomes. Management strategies for HPV-positive and HPV-negative disease, and for different stages of the disease, are considered. There is currently an unparalleled opportunity to shape the future management of oropharyngeal cancer, which is dependent on recruiting patients to ongoing clinical trials, in order to build an evidence base to support a clinical consensus on the optimal treatment strategies. It appears likely that future evidence-based decision-making will use both primary radiotherapy and primary surgical treatment modalities to maximise patient benefit. PMID:26988463

  11. Geographic variation in human papillomavirus–related oropharyngeal cancer: Data from 4 multinational randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Natalie; Compton, Natalie; Robinson, Max; Powell, Ned; Biswas–Baldwin, Nigel; Paleri, Vindh; Hartley, Andrew; Fresco, Lydia; Al‐Booz, Hoda; Junor, Elizabeth; El‐Hariry, Iman; Roberts, Sally; Harrington, Kevin; Ang, K. Kian; Dunn, Janet; Woodman, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background There are variations in the proportions of head and neck cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) between countries and regions. It is unclear if these are true variations or due to different study designs and assays. Methods We tested formalin‐fixed paraffin‐embedded diagnostic biopsies for p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV‐DNA (by polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and in situ hybridization [ISH]) using validated protocols on samples from 801 patients with head and neck cancer recruited prospectively between 2006 and 2011 in 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Results Twenty‐one percent of patients (170 of 801) showed both HPV‐DNA and p16‐positivity, detected almost exclusively in oropharyngeal cancer (55%; 15 of 302); and only 1% of the patients (5 of 499) with nonoropharyngeal cancer were HPV positive. HPV‐positive oropharyngeal cancer differed between Western and Eastern Europe (37%, 155 of 422 vs 6%, 8 of 144; p < .0001) and between Western Europe and Asia (37% vs 2%; 4 of 217; p < .0001). Other independent determinants of HPV positivity were tumor site and smoking. Conclusion This is the first study to establish geographic variability as an independent risk factor in HPV‐positive oropharyngeal cancer prevalence, with higher prevalence in Western Europe. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1863–E1869, 2016 PMID:26749143

  12. Prognostic significance of NDRG1 expression in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marcelo; da Cunha Mercante, Ana Maria; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Leopoldino, Andréia Machado; de Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino; Gazito, Diana; López, Rossana Verónica Mendoza; Chiappini, Paula Blandina Olga; de Carvalho Neto, Paulo Bentes; Fukuyama, Erica Erina; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Louro, Iúri Drumond; da Silva, Adriana Madeira Álvares

    2012-12-01

    Human N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a metastasis suppressor gene with several potential functions, including cell differentiation, cell cycle regulation and response to hormones, nickel and stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunoexpression of NDRG1 in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas searching for its role in the clinical course of these tumors. We investigated immunohistochemical expression of NDRG1 protein in 412 tissue microarray cores of tumor samples from 103 patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and in 110 paraffin-embedded surgical margin sections. The results showed NDRG1 up-regulation in 101/103 (98.1 %) tumor samples, but no expression in any normal tissue sample. Western blot assays confirmed the immunohistochemical findings, suggesting that lower levels of NDRG1 are associated with a high mortality rate. NDRG1 overexpression was related to long-term specific survival (HR = 0.38; p = 0.009), whereas the presence of lymph-node metastasis showed the opposite association with survival (HR = 2.45; p = 0.013). Our findings reinforce the idea that NDRG1 plays a metastasis suppressor role in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and may be a useful marker for these tumors. PMID:22972152

  13. Comparison between bioluminescence imaging technique and CFU count for the study of oropharyngeal candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Elena; Roselletti, Elena; Luciano, Eugenio; Sabbatini, Samuele; Mosci, Paolo; Pericolini, Eva

    2015-05-01

    We recently described a bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique, representing a powerful tool to test the real-time progression of oropharyngeal candidiasis, hence potentially useful to evaluate the efficacy of antifungal therapies. In this study, the in vivo imaging technique was compared with CFU measurement of target organs (tongue, esophagus and stomach) for monitoring and quantifying oropharyngeal candidiasis. We have correlated these two analytical methods at different times post-infection using engineered, luminescent Candida albicans in mice rendered susceptible to oral candidiasis by cortisone-acetate. Scatter plots, Pearson correlation and Student's t test were used to compare the methods. We observed that the bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique was more reliable than CFU counts in detecting early infection of, and its extent in, the oral cavity of the mouse. This was also evident following the introduction of a variable such as treatment with fluconazole. The results described in this study could validate the bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique as a method to monitor and quantify oropharyngeal candidiasis and to assess early discovery of active compounds in vivo. PMID:25820122

  14. Aerial view of entire LTA base after completion of both ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of entire LTA base after completion of both LTA ship hangars. Date unknown but probably circa 1945. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  15. 18. A southeastward aerial view of entire complex. Area east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. A southeastward aerial view of entire complex. Area east of Cherles Street (behind water tower in view) is not part of this project. - American Chain & Cable Company, East Princess Street (400 Block), York, York County, PA

  16. 3. Looking West, view of the entire bridge from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Looking West, view of the entire bridge from the downstream side of thomes creek. The ends of structure are concealed by natural vegetation on the stream banks. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  17. General view of central span showing entire operating mechanism, counter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of central span showing entire operating mechanism, counter weights and roadbed. View southwest - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  18. 72. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, CONCENTRATING MILL, GENERAL SECTION OF ENTIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, CONCENTRATING MILL, GENERAL SECTION OF ENTIRE MILL, CONSTRUCTION 1911-1912 - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  19. 71. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, CONCENTRATING MILL, GENERAL SECTION OF ENTIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, CONCENTRATING MILL, GENERAL SECTION OF ENTIRE MILL, CONSTRUCTION 1911-1912 - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  20. 70. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, CONCENTRATING MILL, GENERAL SECTION OF ENTIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, CONCENTRATING MILL, GENERAL SECTION OF ENTIRE MILL, CONSTRUCTION 1911-1912 - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  1. 3. AERIAL VIEW SHOWING THE ENTIRE BRIDGE FROM EAST CABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW SHOWING THE ENTIRE BRIDGE FROM EAST CABLE ANCHORAGE (EXTREME LEFT) TO WEST CABLE ANCHORAGE (UPPER RIGHT CORNER). March 1987. - Verde River Sheep Bridge, Spanning Verde River (Tonto National Forest), Cave Creek, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING ENTIRE STRUCTURE: PENNSYLVANIA TRUSS MAIN SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING ENTIRE STRUCTURE: PENNSYLVANIA TRUSS MAIN SPANS AND PONY TRUSS APPROACH SPANS - Coraopolis Bridge, Spanning Ohio River back channel at Ferree Street & Grand Avenue, Coraopolis, Allegheny County, PA

  3. South side, entire, looking north across the quadrangle from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South side, entire, looking north across the quadrangle from the courtyard between the library and the life sciences building. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. 28. May 1974. GENERAL VIEW FROM SHORE, WEST OF ENTIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. May 1974. GENERAL VIEW FROM SHORE, WEST OF ENTIRE BRIDGE. 1 through PA-2-28 were previously transmitted to the Library of Congress. - Smithfield Street Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River on Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  5. 8. The entire south face of the Broad Street bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. The entire south face of the Broad Street bridge as seen from the flood levy in front of Central High School. - Broad Street Bridge, Spanning Scioto River at U.S. Route 40 (Broad Street), Columbus, Franklin County, OH

  6. Dense Regular Packings of Irregular Nonconvex Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Joost; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2011-10-01

    We present a new numerical scheme to study systems of nonconvex, irregular, and punctured particles in an efficient manner. We employ this method to analyze regular packings of odd-shaped bodies, both from a nanoparticle and from a computational geometry perspective. Besides determining close-packed structures for 17 irregular shapes, we confirm several conjectures for the packings of a large set of 142 convex polyhedra and extend upon these. We also prove that we have obtained the densest packing for both rhombicuboctahedra and rhombic enneacontrahedra and we have improved upon the packing of enneagons and truncated tetrahedra.

  7. Kinetics of pack aluminization of nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seigle, L. L.; Gupta, B. K.; Shankar, R.; Sarkhel, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of pack aluminization of unalloyed nickel in packs of varying aluminum activity with various halide activators were studied. Surface compositions of the coatings as functions of time, temperature, and pack composition were obtained in order to establish the boundary conditions for diffusion in the system. The structure of the packs was also examined in order to clarify the mechanism of aluminum transport. The results indicate that the kinetics of pack aluminization are controlled jointly by gas diffusion in the pack and solid diffusion in the coating. Levine and Caves' model for gas diffusion was combined with calculations of rates of diffusion in the solid to formulate a more complete theory for the kinetics of pack aluminization.

  8. Proteus mirabilis abscess involving the entire neural axis.

    PubMed

    Kamat, A S; Thango, N S; Husein, M Ben

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rare and potentially devastating lesions usually associated with other infective processes such as bacterial endocarditis, or pulmonary or urogenital infection. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with an infected dermal sinus leading to an intraspinal abscess. This abscess eventually spread and involved the entire neural axis leaving her quadriparetic. Drainage of the abscess resulted in recovery and the child regained normal function of her limbs. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of an intramedullary abscess involving the entire neural axis. PMID:26960264

  9. 4. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th District, File No. 62751-22 A.S. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. 5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th Coast Guard District, San Francisco. 1960. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. Response to 'pervasive sequence patents cover the entire human genome'.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shine; Holman, Christopher; Mossoff, Adam; Sichelman, Ted; Risch, Michael; Conteras, Jorge L; Heled, Yaniv; Dolin, Greg; Petherbridge, Lee

    2014-01-01

    A response to Pervasive sequence patents cover the entire human genome by J Rosenfeld and C Mason. Genome Med 2013, 5:27. See related Correspondence by Rosenfeld and Mason, http://genomemedicine.com/content/5/3/27 and related letter by Rosenfeld and Mason, http://genomemedicine.com/content/6/2/15. PMID:25031614

  12. Teaching Discrete Mathematics Entirely from Primary Historical Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Janet Heine; Bezhanishvili, Guram; Lodder, Jerry; Pengelley, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe teaching an introductory discrete mathematics course entirely from student projects based on primary historical sources. We present case studies of four projects that cover the content of a one-semester course, and mention various other courses that we have taught with primary source projects.

  13. ROOTBOX FOR QUANTITATIVE OBSERVATIONS ON INTACT ENTIRE ROOT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rootbox is described which allows observation of an intact, entire root system. oots are sandwiched against a plexiglass surface by a nylon mesh that is impermeable to roots, but permeable to water and nutrients. o quantify root growth non-destructively, roots of different size...

  14. 22. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING BUILDING H AT LEFT AND BUILDING F AT UPPER LEFT. 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographers unknown. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Warehouse, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. 21. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING BUILDING F AT RIGHT AND BUILDING H (HAER No. CA-329-B) AT UPPER LEFT. 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographers unknown. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Warehouse, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  17. Overview to northwest of entire project area, from the communications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview to northwest of entire project area, from the communications tower. At farthest left is warehouse A-141. Warehouse A-199 and magazine A-210 are just left of center, and the fresh water tanks are in the right distance. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Magazine, Corbett Road, southwest end of Kieper Road, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  18. Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River looking up river. The swing bridge, when open, permits river navigational traffic to ply the river. Construction of a replacement bridge, to be located 93.27 feet down river, has now started. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  19. Entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, Daniel R.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 meters and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

  20. The Packing of Granular Polymer Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling-Nan; Cheng, Xiang; Rivers, Mark L.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nagel, Sidney R.; UC

    2009-12-01

    Rigid particles pack into structures, such as sand dunes on the beach, whose overall stability is determined by the average number of contacts between particles. However, when packing spatially extended objects with flexible shapes, additional concepts must be invoked to understand the stability of the resulting structure. Here, we examine the disordered packing of chains constructed out of flexibly connected hard spheres. Using x-ray tomography, we find that long chains pack into a low-density structure whose mechanical rigidity is mainly provided by the backbone. On compaction, randomly oriented, semi-rigid loops form along the chain, and the packing of chains can be understood as the jamming of these elements. Finally, we uncover close similarities between the packing of chains and the glass transition in polymers.

  1. Risk Factors and Dose-Effect Relationship for Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik Jae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Yong Bae; Yoo, Sei Whan; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Choi, Eun Chang; Cha, In Ho

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze risk factors and the dose-effect relationship for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible after radiotherapy of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: One-hundred ninety-eight patients with oral (45%) and oropharyngeal cancer (55%) who had received external radiotherapy between 1990 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had a dental evaluation before radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 16-75 Gy), and the median biologically effective dose for late effects (BED{sub late}) in bone was 114 Gy{sub 2} (range, 30-167 Gy{sub 2}). Results: The frequency of ORN was 13 patients (6.6%). Among patients with mandibular surgery, eight had ORN at the surgical site. Among patients without mandibular surgery, five patients had ORN on the molar area of the mandible. The median time to ORN was 22 months (range, 1-69 months). Univariate analysis revealed that mandibular surgery and Co-60 were significant risk factors for ORN (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). In multivariate analysis, mandibular surgery was the most important factor (p = 0.001). High radiation doses over BED 102.6 Gy{sub 2} (conventional dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) were also a significant factor for ORN (p = 0.008) and showed a positive dose-effect relationship in logistic regression (p = 0.04) for patients who had undergone mandibular surgery. Conclusions: Mandibular surgery was the most significant risk factor for ORN of mandible in oral and oropharyngeal cancers patients. A BED of 102.6 Gy{sub 2} or higher to the mandible also significantly increases the risk of ORN.

  2. Dose Uncertainties in IMPT for Oropharyngeal Cancer in the Presence of Anatomical, Range, and Setup Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; Water, Steven van de; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties influence the dose delivered with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), but clinical quantification of these errors for oropharyngeal cancer is lacking. We quantified these factors and investigated treatment fidelity, that is, robustness, as influenced by adaptive planning and by applying more beam directions. Methods and Materials: We used an in-house treatment planning system with multicriteria optimization of pencil beam energies, directions, and weights to create treatment plans for 3-, 5-, and 7-beam directions for 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The dose prescription was a simultaneously integrated boost scheme, prescribing 66 Gy to primary tumor and positive neck levels (clinical target volume-66 Gy; CTV-66 Gy) and 54 Gy to elective neck levels (CTV-54 Gy). Doses were recalculated in 3700 simulations of setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties. Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate an adaptive planning strategy using nonrigid registration for dose accumulation. Results: For the recalculated 3-beam plans including all treatment uncertainty sources, only 69% (CTV-66 Gy) and 88% (CTV-54 Gy) of the simulations had a dose received by 98% of the target volume (D98%) >95% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed considerable spread around planned values. Causes for major deviations were mixed. Adaptive planning based on repeat imaging positively affected dose delivery accuracy: in the presence of the other errors, percentages of treatments with D98% >95% increased to 96% (CTV-66 Gy) and 100% (CTV-54 Gy). Plans with more beam directions were not more robust. Conclusions: For oropharyngeal cancer patients, treatment uncertainties can result in significant differences between planned and delivered IMPT doses. Given the mixed causes for major deviations, we advise repeat diagnostic CT scans during treatment, recalculation of the dose, and if required, adaptive

  3. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer O.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968–2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993–2012, APC = 1.9%, p<0.001; women 1968–2012, APC = 2.0%, p = 0.01) and was 5 times higher in men than women. In contrast, non-OP HNC incidence declined between 1968–2012 among men (APC = -1.6%, p<0.001) and women (APC = -0.4%, p = 0.06). ASCC and ANSCC were rare (ASR = 0.2 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively) and did not change significantly over time except for increasing ANSCCs in men (APC = 2.8%, p<0.001). ICC was the most common HPV-associated cancer (ASR = 19.9 per 100,000 person-years) but declined significantly between 1968–2012 (APC = -2.4%). Incidence of each cancer varied across ethnicities. Similar to trends in Western countries, OPSCC incidence increased in recent years, while non-OP HNC decreased. ICC remains the most common HPV-related cancer in Singapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  4. Species distribution & antifungal susceptibility pattern of oropharyngeal Candida isolates from human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Das, Partha Pratim; Saikia, Lahari; Nath, Reema; Phukan, Sanjib Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The changing spectrum of Candida species in causation of oropharyngeal candidiasis and their antifungal susceptibility pattern among the HIV infected individuals has made the identification to species level mandatory and detection of drug resistance necessary for patient care. The present study was carried out to determine the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profile of oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting both HIV seropositive and seronegative individuals. Methods: A case-control study was conducted including 141 consecutive, non-repeat HIV-seropositive individuals and an equal number of sex and age matched HIV-seronegative control. Speciation of the oropharyngeal Candida isolates was done using standard yeast identification protocol. Antifungal susceptibility testing was done by the disk-diffusion method as well as by Fungitest method. Results: From the 59 culture positive HIV seropositive cases, 61 Candida isolates were recovered; Candida albicans (n=47, 77.0%), C. dubliniensis (n=9, 14.7%), C. parapsilosis (n=2, 3.2%), C. glabrata (n=2, 3.2%), and C. famata (n=1, 1.6%). Candida colonization in HIV-seropositive individuals was significantly higher than that of HIV-seronegative (control) group. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed (n=6, 9.3%) C. albicans isolates resistant to voriconazole and fluconazole by disk-diffusion method whereas no resistance was seen by Fungitest method. Interpretation & conclusions: C. albicans was the commonest Candida species infecting or colonizing HIV seropositive individuals. Oropharyngeal Candida isolates had high level susceptibility to all the major antifungals commonly in use. Increased level of immunosuppression in HIV-seropositives and drug resistance of non-albicans Candida species makes identification and susceptibility testing of Candida species necessary in different geographical areas of the country. PMID:27377507

  5. Evidence of the causal role of human papillomavirus type 58 in an oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baboci, Lorena; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Holzinger, Dana; Bertorelle, Roberta; Biasini, Lorena; Michel, Angelika; Schmitt, Markus; Spinato, Giacomo; Bussani, Rossana; Alemany, Laia; Tirelli, Giancarlo; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Pawlita, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Persistent human papillomavirus infection (HPV) is recognized as an important etiologic factor for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), especially those arising from the oropharynx. Whereas HPV16 accounts for the majority of HPV DNA-positive oropharyngeal SCC, infections with other mucosal high-risk HPV types are quite rare and biological data demonstrating their causal involvement are insufficient. Here we present the first case of an oropharyngeal SCC driven by HPV type 58. A 69-year-old Caucasian woman presented with an enlarged and firm left tonsil. A computed tomography scan showed a left tonsillar mass, extending to the soft palate and the glossotonsillar sulcus. The patient underwent extended radical tonsillectomy and ipsilateral selective neck dissection. Pathology confirmed an infiltrating, poorly differentiated SCC of the left tonsil with node metastasis (pT2N1). Adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (60 Grays (Gy)) was administered. After 1 year of follow-up, the patient is well with no evidence of cancer recurrence. HPV analyses of the tumor tissue by BSGP5+/6+ -PCR/MPG, targeting 51 mucosal HPV types, showed single positivity for HPV type 58. Presence of HPV58 E6*I RNA demonstrated biological activity of the virus in the tumor tissue, and presence of serum antibodies to HPV58 oncoproteins E6 and E7 indicated presence of an HPV58-driven cancer. Overexpression of cellular protein p16INK4a and reduced expression of pRb, two cellular markers for HPV-induced cell transformation, were observed. Exons 4-10 of TP53 showed no mutations or polymorphisms. The presence of HPV58 as single HPV infection in combination with a broad variety of direct and indirect markers of HPV transformation provides comprehensive evidence that this oropharyngeal SCC was driven by HPV58. PMID:24220072

  6. Infrahyoid flap in oropharyngeal reconstruction following carcinoma resection: A study of 6 patients and literature review

    PubMed Central

    INFANTE-COSSIO, PEDRO; GONZALEZ-CARDERO, EDUARDO; LOPEZ-MARTOS, RICARDO; NUÑEZ-VERA, VICTORIA; OLMOS-JUAREZ, ERIKA; RUIZ-MOYA, ALEJANDRO; HARO-LUNA, JUAN-JOSE; TORRES-CARRRANZA, EUSEBIO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the techniques used and the results obtained with the infrahyoid flap for the reconstruction of medium-sized oropharyngeal defects following resection for advanced squamous cell cancer. During a period of 1 year, six patients with oropharyngeal defects were reconstructed using the infrahyoid flap. The tumor characteristics, location and size of the defect, resective and reconstructive techniques employed and the complications and outcomes of the speech and swallowing functions, as identified in the follow-up visits every 3 months, were evaluated. All flaps were performed simultaneously in association with tumoral excision and ipsilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection. The mean size of the skin paddle was 7.0×3.5 cm. The donor site was primarily sutured. The postoperative course was uneventful and all flaps were viable. One case of marginal skin paddle loss occurred without affecting the survival of the flap. Five patients received postoperative radiotherapy and one patient received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy. During the follow-up period (mean, 63 months), all patients showed excellent oral swallowing. Speech was excellent in five patients and in one patient speech was classified as good. The aesthetic results of the cervical donor site were good. Based on the present case report and the literature review, the infrahyoid flap is a simple and safe procedure for the reconstruction of the oropharynx, with a high success rate, minimal donor site morbidity and good aesthetic and functional results. The infrahyoid flap is a valid surgical option that may be considered in selected oncological patients undergoing reconstruction of medium-size oropharyngeal defects. PMID:27123141

  7. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With Helical Tomotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Result

    SciTech Connect

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Wu, Le-Jung; Chen, Shiou-Yi

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To review the experience with and evaluate the treatment plan for helical tomotherapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1, 2006 and January 31, 2009, 10 histologically confirmed oropharyngeal cancer patients were enrolled. All patients received definitive concurrent chemoradiation with helical tomotherapy. The prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume, the high-risk subclinical area, and the low-risk subclinical area was 70Gy, 63Gy, and 56Gy, respectively. During radiotherapy, all patients were treated with cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2}, plus 5-fluorouracil (425mg/m{sup 2})/leucovorin (30mg/m{sup 2}) intravenously weekly. Toxicity of treatment was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Several parameters, including maximal or median dose to critical organs, uniformity index, and conformal index, were evaluated from dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean survival was 18 months (range, 7-22 months). The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates at 18 months were 67%, 70%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. The average for uniformity index and conformal index was 1.05 and 1.26, respectively. The mean of median dose for right side and left side parotid glands was 23.5 and 23.9Gy, respectively. No Grade 3 toxicity for dermatitis and body weight loss and only one instance of Grade 3 mucositis were noted. Conclusion: Helical tomotherapy achieved encouraging clinical outcomes in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment toxicity was acceptable, even in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  8. Transoral Laser Microsurgery (TLM) ± Adjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Oropharyngeal Cancer: Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Jason T.; Milov, Simon; Lewis, James S.; Thorstad, Wade L.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Haughey, Bruce H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Document survival, prognostic variables, and functional outcomes of patients with AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer, treated with transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) ± adjuvant therapy. Study Design Analysis of prospectively assembled data pertaining to the above-described patient cohort. Methods Patients treated with TLM for AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer at Washington University School of Medicine from 1996 to 2006 were followed for a minimum of 2 years. Recurrence, survival, functional, and human papilloma virus data were analyzed. Results Eighty-four patients met inclusion criteria. Mean follow-up was 52.6 months. Overall AJCC stages were: III 15% and IV 85%. T stages were T1–2, 74%; T3–4, 26%. Eighty-three patients underwent neck dissection, 50 received adjuvant radiotherapy, and 28 received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival at 2 and 5 years was 94% and 88%, respectively. Disease-specific survival at 2 and 5 years was 96% and 92%, respectively. Six patients recurred (7%): locally (one), regionally (four), and distant (five). T stage, positive margins, and p16 status significantly impacted survival. The addition of adjuvant chemo-therapy in high-risk patients did not significantly impact survival. Five patients (6%) had major surgical complications, but without mortality. Eighty-one percent of patients had acceptable swallowing function at last follow-up. Immediately postoperatively, 17% required G-tubes, which dropped to 3.4% of living patients at 3 years. Conclusions In this population, our findings validate TLM ± adjuvant therapy as a highly effective strategy for survival, locoregional control, and swallowing recovery in AJCC stage III and IV oropharyngeal cancer. Our finding also show that p16 positivity improves survival. PMID:19572271

  9. The epidemic of human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal cancer in a Canadian population

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, A.C.; Palma, D.A.; Dhaliwal, S.S.; Tan, S.; Theuer, J.; Chow, W.; Rajakumar, C.; Um, S.; Mundi, N.; Berk, S.; Zhou, R.; Basmaji, J.; Rizzo, G.; Franklin, J.H.; Fung, K.; Kwan, K.; Wehrli, B.; Salvadori, M.I.; Winquist, E.; Ernst, S.; Kuruvilla, S.; Read, N.; Venkatesan, V.; Todorovic, B.; Hammond, J.A.; Koropatnick, J.; Mymryk, J.S.; Yoo, J.; Barrett, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infection with the human papillomavirus (hpv) is responsible for a significant burden of human cancers involving the cervix, anogenital tract, and oropharynx. Studies in the United States and Europe have demonstrated an alarming increase in the frequency of hpv-positive oropharyngeal cancer, but the same direct evidence does not exist in Canada. Methods Using the London Health Sciences Centre pathology database, we identified tonsillar cancers diagnosed between 1993 and 2011. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was then used on pre-treatment primary-site biopsy samples to test for dna from the high-risk hpv types 16 and 18. The study cohort was divided into three time periods: 1993–1999, 2000–2005, and 2006–2011. Results Of 160 tumour samples identified, 91 (57%) were positive for hpv 16. The total number of tonsillar cancers significantly increased from 1993–1999 to 2006–2011 (32 vs. 68), and the proportion of cases that were hpv-positive substantially increased (25% vs. 62%, p < 0.002). Those changes were associated with a marked improvement in 5-year overall survival (39% in 1993–1999 vs. 84% in 2006–2011, p < 0.001). When all factors were included in a multivariable model, only hpv status predicted treatment outcome. Interpretation The present study is the first to provide direct evidence that hpv-related oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in incidence in a Canadian population. Given the long lag time between hpv infection and clinically apparent malignancy, oropharyngeal cancer will be a significant clinical problem for the foreseeable future despite vaccination efforts. PMID:23904762

  10. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jennifer O; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968-2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993-2012, APC = 1.9%, p<0.001; women 1968-2012, APC = 2.0%, p = 0.01) and was 5 times higher in men than women. In contrast, non-OP HNC incidence declined between 1968-2012 among men (APC = -1.6%, p<0.001) and women (APC = -0.4%, p = 0.06). ASCC and ANSCC were rare (ASR = 0.2 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively) and did not change significantly over time except for increasing ANSCCs in men (APC = 2.8%, p<0.001). ICC was the most common HPV-associated cancer (ASR = 19.9 per 100,000 person-years) but declined significantly between 1968-2012 (APC = -2.4%). Incidence of each cancer varied across ethnicities. Similar to trends in Western countries, OPSCC incidence increased in recent years, while non-OP HNC decreased. ICC remains the most common HPV-related cancer in Singapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  11. Random packing of spheres in Menger sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-06-01

    Random packing of spheres inside fractal collectors of dimension 2 < d < 3 is studied numerically using Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper focuses mainly on the measurement of random packing saturation limit. Additionally, scaling properties of density autocorrelations in the obtained packing are analyzed. The RSA kinetics coefficients are also measured. Obtained results allow to test phenomenological relation between random packing saturation density and collector dimension. Additionally, performed simulations together with previously obtained results confirm that, in general, the known dimensional relations are obeyed by systems having non-integer dimension, at least for d < 3.

  12. Random packing of spheres in Menger sponge.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-06-01

    Random packing of spheres inside fractal collectors of dimension 2 < d < 3 is studied numerically using Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper focuses mainly on the measurement of random packing saturation limit. Additionally, scaling properties of density autocorrelations in the obtained packing are analyzed. The RSA kinetics coefficients are also measured. Obtained results allow to test phenomenological relation between random packing saturation density and collector dimension. Additionally, performed simulations together with previously obtained results confirm that, in general, the known dimensional relations are obeyed by systems having non-integer dimension, at least for d < 3. PMID:23758392

  13. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  14. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  15. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  16. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  17. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  18. The Oropharyngeal Airway in Young Adults with Skeletal Class II and Class III Deformities: A 3-D Morphometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jayaratne, Yasas Shri Nalaka; Zwahlen, Roger Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 1) To determine the accuracy and reliability of an automated anthropometric measurement software for the oropharyngeal airway and 2) To compare the anthropometric dimensions of the oropharyngeal airway in skeletal class II and III deformity patients. Methods Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans of 62 patients with skeletal class II or III deformities were used for this study. Volumetric, linear and surface area measurements retroglossal (RG) and retropalatal (RP) compartments of the oropharyngeal airway was measured with the 3dMDVultus software. Accuracy of automated anthropometric pharyngeal airway measurements was assessed using an airway phantom. Results The software was found to be reasonably accurate for measuring dimensions of air passages. The total oropharyngeal volume was significantly greater in the skeletal class III deformity group (16.7 ± 9.04 mm3) compared with class II subjects (11.87 ± 4.01 mm3). The average surface area of both the RG and RP compartments were significantly larger in the class III deformity group. The most constricted area in the RG and RP airway was significantly larger in individuals with skeletal class III deformity. The anterior-posterior (AP) length of this constriction was significantly greater in skeletal class III individuals in both compartments, whereas the width of the constriction was not significantly different between the two groups in both compartments. The RP compartment was larger but less uniform than the RG compartment in both skeletal deformities. Conclusion Significant differences were observed in morphological characteristics of the oropharyngeal airway in individuals with skeletal class II and III deformities. This information may be valuable for surgeons in orthognathic treatment planning, especially for mandibular setback surgery that might compromise the oropharyngeal patency. PMID:26901313

  19. The Impact of Tonsillectomy upon the Risk of Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Diagnosis and Prognosis in the Danish Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, Carole; Andersen, Klaus K; Christensen, Jane; Agrawal, Nishant; Eisele, David W

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal carcinoma, involving palatine and lingual tonsils, is increasing globally. This significant rise is driven by human papillomavirus. Whether palatine tonsillectomy affects risk of diagnosis with oropharyngeal carcinoma is unknown. The association between tonsillectomy and incidence of oropharyngeal carcinoma was explored in the Danish Cancer Registry. The association between tonsillectomy and oropharyngeal carcinoma was analyzed by time since first registration of tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy was a time-dependent variable. Individuals were censored for death, emigration, or tonsillectomy within incident year of diagnosis. Incidence rate ratios (RR) were estimated by Poisson regression models and adjusted for confounders. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were compared by the log-rank test, and HRs were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. From 1977 to 2012, the incidence of tonsillectomies significantly decreased, whereas the incidence of oropharyngeal carcinoma significantly increased. Tonsillectomy was not associated with risk of oropharyngeal carcinoma or malignancies of other anatomic sites, including base of tongue. However, tonsillectomy significantly reduced risk of diagnosis with tonsil carcinoma [RR, 0.40; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.70]. The risk of diagnosis with tonsil carcinoma at age <60 years was significantly decreased (RRadj, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.06-0.41) after tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy within 1 year of diagnosis with tonsil carcinoma was associated with significantly improved overall survival (HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.74). In conclusion, remote history of tonsillectomy reduces the risk of diagnosis with tonsil carcinoma. These data inform risk and benefit of tonsillectomy, a common procedure and design of secondary prevention trials. PMID:25896236

  20. Maté drinking and oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dasanayake, Ananda P; Silverman, Amanda J; Warnakulasuriya, Saman

    2010-02-01

    In Latin America, maté is consumed as a beverage regularly. Among the cancers that are associated with maté drinking is oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer, incidence of which is high in the region. In order to further understand this association between maté drinking and the risk of oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of related studies. All relevant studies published in English as original articles up to June 2009 were identified through a literature search using PubMed and Medline and by reviewing the references from the retrieved articles. Four case-control studies done in Latin America were identified. There were 879 maté users and 1128 non- or low-maté users in those studies with a total of 566 oral and oro-pharyngeal cancers. The adjusted association between maté drinking and oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer was significant within 3 of those studies. Meta-analysis yielded a significant summary odds ratio (OR) of 2.11 (95% confidence interval=1.39-3.19). Population Attributable Risk for maté drinking was 16%. While the epidemiological data indicate that maté users have an increased risk of oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer, little is known about whether this increased risk is due to the high temperature of the beverage when it is consumed or due to certain carcinogenic constituents that are present in maté. More human and animal studies are needed before a conclusion can be made on the oral and oro-pharyngeal carcinogenic risk of maté to humans. PMID:20036605

  1. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in oropharyngeal lymphatic tissue with real-time PCR and assessment of its carcinogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Lukeš, Petr; Pavlík, Emil; Potuznikova, Bela; Nartova, Eva; Foltynova, Eva; Plzak, Jan; Katra, Rami; Sterzl, Ivan; Bartunkova, Jirina; Betka, Jan; Astl, Jaromir

    2014-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is considered a major gastric pathogen with oncogenic potential. The aim of this study was to determine whether HP is present in oropharyngeal lymphoid tissue and whether oropharyngeal HP strains carry virulence factor genes known to be involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The study included 104 subjects (41 patients with tonsillar carcinoma, 38 with chronic tonsillitis and 25 with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome--OSAS). Detection of specific serum anti-HP antibodies was performed with an ELISA. The presence of HP in tissue was determined by culture and real-time PCR. Detection of virulence factors genes was also performed. Specific antibodies were found in 78.05% of tumour cases, 34.21% of chronic tonsillitis cases, and 72.0% of OSAS cases. The presence of HP in the tissue was detected in 73.91% of tonsillar tumours, 70.0% of tonsillitis cases, and 69.23% of OSAS specimens. The results of the virulence factor gene analysis showed the majority of the s1b (52.4%) and m2 (59.5%) alleles of vacA gene and limited abundance of cagA gene (12.5%). Results confirm that HP may colonise oropharyngeal lymphoid tissue. Oropharyngeal HP colonisation was frequently found in the oropharyngeal cancer group and in patients with benign oropharyngeal diseases. A virulence factor gene analysis showed differences from the predominant strains most commonly found in the stomach. The strains obtained from the oropharynx differed primarily by the lower abundance of the cagA gene and carried the less virulent vacA gene allele combination. PMID:23744180

  2. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis: Is it an oropharyngeal or a lung cancer complication?

    PubMed Central

    MOYANO, MARÍA SERENO; GUTIÉRREZ-GUTIÉRREZ, GERARDO; GÓMEZ-RAPOSO, CÉSAR; GÓMEZ, MIRIAM LÓPEZ; OJEDA, JOAQUÍN; MIRALLES, AMBROSIO; CASADO-SÁENZ, ENRIQUE

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with a locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer with a simultaneous paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis. To the best of our knowledge, a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome is a rare complication in head and neck cancer, and has previously not been reported in the literature. One year later, following initial treatment, a small cell lung cancer developed, a tumor frequently associated with this type of paraneoplastic syndrome. The dilemma, therefore, is whether this paraneoplastic symdrome was a secondary complication of the tonsilar concurrent cancer or a metachronous paraneoplastic syndrome prior to small cell lung cancer. PMID:22870148

  3. Azole resistance in oropharyngeal Candida albicans strains isolated from patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    He, X; Tiballi, R N; Zarins, L T; Bradley, S F; Sangeorzan, J A; Kauffman, C A

    1994-01-01

    For 212 oropharyngeal isolates of Candida albicans, the fluconazole MICs for 50 and 90% of strains tested were 0.5 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively, and those of itraconazole were 0.05 and 0.2 micrograms/ml, respectively. Of 16 isolates for which fluconazole MICs were > 64 micrograms/ml, itraconazole MICs for 14 were < or = 0.8 micrograms/ml and for 2 were > 6.4 micrograms/ml. Most fluconazole-resistant strains remained susceptible to itraconazole; whether itraconazole will prove effective for refractory thrush remains to be shown. PMID:7840596

  4. Minimally packed phases in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2016-03-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of D = 4 Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled to a pseudoscalar. The solutions are holographically dual to d = 3 CFTs at finite chemical potential and in a constant magnetic field, which spontaneously break translation invariance leading to the spontaneous formation of abelian and momentum magnetisation currents flowing around the plaquettes of a periodic Bravais lattice. We analyse the three-dimensional moduli space of lattice solutions, which are generically oblique, and show, for a specific value of the magnetic field, that the free energy is minimised by the triangular lattice, associated with minimal packing of circles in the plane. We show that the average stress tensor for the thermodynamically preferred phase is that of a perfect fluid and that this result applies more generally to spontaneously generated periodic phases. The triangular structure persists at low temperatures indicating the existence of novel crystalline ground states.

  5. X-ray spectrum of the entire Cygnus Loop.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J. C.; Riegler, G. R.; Garmire, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The spectrum of the entire Cygnus Loop has been obtained using gas-filled proportional counters and filters flown on a Nike-Aerobee rocket. The results indicate an average spectral temperature of (2.8 plus or minus 0.2) x 1,000,000 K and the presence of excess emission in the energy range from 0.530 to 0.693 keV. If the excess emission originates in a single line at 0.658 keV, the intensity at the earth corresponds to 1.8 plus or minus 0.7 photons per sq cm per sec, or about 10% of the total energy received from the Loop. The spectrum of the entire Loop is found to be attenuated by an average of (4.8 plus or minus 0.2) x 10 to the 20th hydrogen atoms per sq cm.

  6. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  7. Inequalities for formal power series and entire functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinshpan, Arcadii Z.

    2008-02-01

    We present several integral and exponential inequalities for formal power series and for both arbitrary entire functions of exponential type and generalized Borel transforms. They are obtained through certain limit procedures which involve the multiparameter binomial inequalities, integral inequalities for continuous functions, and weighted norm inequalities for analytic functions. Some applications to the confluent hypergeometric functions, Bessel functions, Laguerre polynomials, and trigonometric functions are discussed. Also some generalizations are given.

  8. Entire Western Hemisphere visible from Apollo 8 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    A striking view from the Apollo 8 spacecraft showing nearly the entire Western Hemisphere, from the mouth of the St. Lawrence River, including nearby Newfoundland, extending to Tierra del Fuego at the southern tip of South America. Central America is clearly outlined. Nearly all of South America is covered by clouds, except the high Andes Mountain chain along the west coast. A small portion of the bulge of west Africa shows along the sunset terminator.

  9. A novel method for visualization of entire coronary arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Wischgoll, Thomas; Meyer, Joerg; Kaimovitz, Benjamin; Lanir, Yoram; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2007-05-01

    The complexity of the coronary circulation especially in the deep layers largely evades experimental investigations. Hence, virtual/computational models depicting structure-function relation of the entire coronary vasculature including the deep layer are imperative. In order to interpret such anatomically based models, fast and efficient visualization algorithms are essential. The complexity of such models, which include vessels from the large proximal coronary arteries and veins down to the capillary level (3 orders of magnitude difference in diameter), is a challenging visualization problem since the resulting geometrical representation consists of millions of vessel segments. In this study, a novel method for rendering the entire porcine coronary arterial tree down to the first segments of capillaries interactively is described which employs geometry reduction and occlusion culling techniques. Due to the tree-shaped nature of the vasculature, these techniques exploit the geometrical topology of the object to achieve a faster rendering speed while still handling the full complexity of the data. We found a significant increase in performance combined with a more accurate, gap-less representation of the vessel segments resulting in a more interactive visualization and analysis tool for the entire coronary arterial tree. The proposed techniques can also be applied to similar data structures, such as neuronal trees, airway structures, bile ducts, and other tree-like structures. The utility and future applications of the proposed algorithms are explored. PMID:17334680

  10. Nanometer-scale anatomy of entire Stardust tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Keller, Lindsay P.; Clemett, Simon J.; Messenger, Scott; Ito, Motoo

    2011-07-01

    We have developed new sample preparation and analytical techniques tailored for entire aerogel tracks of Wild 2 sample analyses both on "carrot" and "bulbous" tracks. We have successfully ultramicrotomed an entire track along its axis while preserving its original shape. This innovation allowed us to examine the distribution of fragments along the entire track from the entrance hole all the way to the terminal particle. The crystalline silicates we measured have Mg-rich compositions and O isotopic compositions in the range of meteoritic materials, implying that they originated in the inner solar system. The terminal particle of the carrot track is a 16O-rich forsteritic grain that may have formed in a similar environment as Ca-, Al-rich inclusions and amoeboid olivine aggregates in primitive carbonaceous chondrites. The track also contains submicron-sized diamond grains likely formed in the solar system. Complex aromatic hydrocarbons distributed along aerogel tracks and in terminal particles. These organics are likely cometary but affected by shock heating.

  11. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  12. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  13. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  15. Record high Wolf, Canis lupus, pack density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Tracy, S.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents a year-around Wolf (Canis lupus) density of 18.2/100 km2 and a summer density of 30.8/100 km2, in a northeastern Minnesota Wolf pack. The previous record was a summer density of 14.1/100 km2, for a Wolf pack on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

  16. Record high wolf, Canis lupus, pack density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Tracy, S.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents a year-around wolf (Canis lupus) density of 18.2/100 m2 and summer density of 30.8/100 km2, in a northeastern Minnesota wolf pack. The previous record was a summer density of 14.1/100 km2, for a wolf pack on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada.

  17. Development of an effective valve packing program

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, K.A.

    1996-12-01

    Current data now shows that graphite valve packing installed within the guidance of a controlled program produces not only reliable stem sealing but predictable running loads. By utilizing recent technological developments in valve performance monitoring for both MOV`s and AOV`s, valve packing performance can be enhanced while reducing maintenance costs. Once known, values are established for acceptable valve packing loads, the measurement of actual valve running loads via the current MOV/AOV diagnostic techniques can provide indication of future valve stem sealing problems, improper valve packing installation or identify the opportunity for valve packing program improvements. At times the full benefit of these advances in material and predictive technology remain under utilized due to simple past misconceptions associated with valve packing. This paper will explore the basis for these misconceptions, provide general insight into the current understanding of valve packing and demonstrate how with this new understanding and current valve diagnostic equipment the key aspects required to develop an effective, quality valve packing program fit together. The cost and operational benefits provided by this approach can be significant impact by the: elimination of periodic valve repacking, reduction of maintenance costs, benefits of leak-free valve operation, justification for reduced Post Maintenance Test Requirements, reduced radiation exposure, improved plant appearance.

  18. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  19. Pack rats (Neotoma spp.): Keystone ecological engineers?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential role of two species of pack rats (Neotoma albigula and Neotoma micropus) as keystone ecological engineers was examined by estimating the species diversity of invertebrates living in the nest middens, and nitrogen mineralization rates in soils associated with the middens. Although pack-...

  20. Kid's PACK: Population Awareness Campaign Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This fun and educational kit is designed specifically for elementary students. The "Kid's PACK" (Population Awareness Campaign Kit) entertains and informs children on the environment and human population growth through stories, games, and concrete ideas for making a difference. In three booklets, the "Kid's PACK" offers elementary students…

  1. Method of gravel packing a well

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, S. W.; Himes, R. E.

    1985-11-12

    The present invention relates to a thermally stable crosslinked gel gravel packing fluid for use in the treatment of highly deviated well bores penetrating a subterranean formation. The gravel packing fluid comprises an aqueous liquid, a gelling agent comprising a selected modified cellulose ether, a crosslinking agent, a breaker, a particulate agent and any additional additives that may be present.

  2. Pack Density Limitations of Hybrid Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwicker, Matthew L.; Sinclair, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The development and testing of the Orion crew capsule parachute system has provided a unique opportunity to study dense parachute packing techniques and limits, in order to establish a new baseline for future programs. The density of parachute packs has a significant influence on vibration loads, retention system stresses, and parachute mortar performance. Material compositions and pack densities of existing designs for space capsule recovery were compared, using the pack density of the Apollo main parachutes as the current baseline. The composition of parachutes has changed since Apollo, incorporating new materials such as Kevlar , Vectran , Teflon and Spectra . These materials have different specific densities than Nylon, so the densities of hybrid parachute packs cannot be directly compared to Nylon parachutes for determination of feasibility or volume allocation. Six parachute packs were evaluated in terms of weighted average solid density in order to achieve a non-dimensional comparison of packing density. Means of mitigating damage due to packing pressure and mortar firing were examined in light of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) and Apollo experience. Parachute design improvements including incorporation of modern materials and manufacturing processes serves to make CPAS the new knowledge base on which future spacecraft parachute systems will be built.

  3. New value packing technology extends service life

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.; Jackson, R. )

    1993-10-01

    New packing techniques can extend packing life and retain low stem leakage. The HPI can use these designs to avoid mandatory monitoring and repair schedules for valves that exceed the 500-ppm emission threshold. New EPA leakage limits will enforce monitoring and maintenance programs if more than 2% of the facility's valves exceed this limit. Because valves are dynamic, their control actions are prone to leakage. Also, the best fire-resistant packing material, graphite, has inherent deficiencies such as high compression stress and a high-friction coefficient that shortens its service life. Four basic principles overcome graphite packing's shortcomings for control valve applications. Examples show how these criteria improve sliding stem and rotary valve performance. Incorporating these principles into valve-packing designs can ensure long, low-maintenance service life, and the added benefit of low leakage. Graphite is a very important packing material for the HPI. Unlike fluoropolymer (e.g., PTFE) packing, graphite can tolerate high process temperature without decomposing or losing its sealing properties. More importantly, graphite packing is fire safe. It can survive a fire without a catastrophic failure that could add more flammable materials.

  4. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Dial, R.E.; Finnell, W.F.R.

    1988-02-16

    This patent describes a gamma thermometer probe for detecting heat produced within the thermometer probe. It comprises: an outer elongate thermometer sheath; an elongate rod; annular recesses; a longitudinal bore; and an integrated thermocouple pack. The thermocouple pack comprises: a first type wire, and second type wires. The second type wires comprises: an outer section; and an inner segment.

  5. Evolution of oropharyngeal patterning mechanisms involving Dlx and endothelins in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Takio, Yoko; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Takechi, Masaki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2010-05-01

    In jawed vertebrates, the Dlx code, or nested expression patterns of Dlx genes, specify the dorsoventral polarity of pharyngeal arches, downstream of endothelin-1 (Edn-1) and its effectors, Bapx1 (Nkx3.2) and dHand (Hand2). To elucidate the evolution of the specification mechanism of the oropharyngeal skeletal system, lamprey homologs of Dlx, Edn, endothelin receptor (Ednr), Bapx1, and dHand were identified. Our analysis suggested that the Edn gene family emerged at the advent of vertebrates, and that gene duplications leading to the different Edn gnathostome subtypes (Edn1-3) occurred before the cyclostome-gnathostome split. This timing of gene duplications, giving rise to multiple subtypes, was also implied for Dlx, Ednr, Hand, and Bapx. In lamprey embryos, nested expressions of Dlx genes were not observed in pharyngeal arches, nor was any focal expression of Bapx1, known in gnathostomes to specify the jaw joint. The dHand homolog, however, was expressed more intensively ventrally, as in gnathostomes. Lamprey homologs of Edn-1 and EdnrA were also shown to be expressed as described in mice, indicating involvement of this signaling pathway in the craniofacial patterning early in vertebrate evolution. These results suggest that the last common ancestor of all the extant vertebrates would have possessed basic gene repertoires involved in oropharyngeal patterning in gnathostomes, but the elaborate genetic program leading to the Dlx code is likely to have been acquired uniquely in gnathostomes. PMID:20171204

  6. The effects of oropharyngeal-lingual exercises in patients with primary snoring.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Shadman; Gerami, Hooshang; Soltanipour, Soheil; Saberi, Alia; Moghadam, Solmaz Khorasani; Setva, Fatemeh

    2015-04-01

    Primary snoring (PS) is one of the sleep breathing disorders with suboptimal results of treatment. It is recommended that Oropharyngeal exercises can be a therapeutic choice for the patients with mild to moderate degrees of PS. We assessed the effects of oropharyngeal-lingual (OPL) exercises on patients with primary snoring (PS) referred to Amiralmomenin University Hospital, Rasht, Iran in 2012. Fifty-three patients with PS underwent the sets of OPL exercises for 3 months, 5 days a week, and 30 min a day under the supervision of a speech therapist. Severity of the snoring was assessed by use of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Snoring Scale Score (SSS) criteria before and after the exercises, and data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Mean SSS before the study was 7.01 ± 1.72, while it was 3.09 ± 2.7 after the study; and the mean VAS scores were 8.54 ± 1.89 and 4.69 ± 2.94 before and after the study, respectively (P = 0.0001). There was a significant relationship between having conflicts with roommates (P = 0.0001), duration of snoring occurrence (P = 0.0001), severity of snoring (P = 0.0001) before and after the intervention. In conclusion, doing the OPL exercises significantly decreases the severity of PS. PMID:25370601

  7. [Retrospective Study of Induction Chemotherapy and Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Asakage, Takahiro; Ando, Mizuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Saito, Yuki; Omura, Go; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    We carried out this study to clarify the treatment outcomes and problems associated with induction chemotherapy (using taxotere, cisplatin and 5-FU [TPF therapy]) and chemoradiotherapy in patients with oropharyngeal cancer. The data of 44 patients receiving their initial treatment for oropharyngeal cancer (including 2, 9 and 33 patients with stage II, stage III and stage IV disease, respectively, and 31, 8 and 3 patients with side wall, front wall and upper wall (soft palate and uvula) involvement) were examined. Of the 44 patients, 33 received induction chemotherapy and 11 received chemoradiotherapy. The feasibility, incidence of neutropenia, response rate, and 3 year disease-specific survival rate in the induction chemotherapy group vs. chemoradiotherapy group were 70%, 88%, 82% and 73%, respectively, vs. 63%, 91%, 82% and 55%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in the 3-year disease-specific survival rate was seen between the p16-positive and p16-negative patients in the induction chemotherapy group: while the rate was 100% in the p16-positive patients, it was only 51% in the p16-negative patients (p=0.004). Of the patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy, 3 developed mandibular osteomyelitis, which was considered as one of the important problems associated with this therapy. PMID:26727822

  8. Effect of ceftazidime and gentamicin on the oropharyngeal and faecal flora of patients with haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, D A; Gibbs, S; Price, C G; Easmon, S; Franklin, J; Lister, T A; Tabaqchali, S

    1990-09-01

    Thirty-four patients with haematological malignancies were studied to investigate the effect of empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy (ceftazidime and gentamicin) on the gastro-intestinal flora. Twenty-five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia or post-autologous bone-marrow transplantation were given framycetin, nystatin and colistin (Fracon), and two patients with non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma were on co-trimoxazole, as long-term gut prophylaxis. Semi-quantitative microbiology was carried out on oropharyngeal swabs and quantitative microbiology on faecal specimens. The oropharyngeal flora consisted mainly of streptococci, coagulase-negative staphylococci and coryneforms, and was little affected by ceftazidime/gentamicin. A strain of Enterobacter cloacae resistant to ceftazidime and gentamicin colonized one patient, who later developed septicaemia. The faecal flora of patients on Fracon was dominated by enterococci; the few enterobacteria present were eliminated by ceftazidime/gentamicin. The anaerobic flora was absent in 15% of patients; in the remainder, it consisted mainly of Bacteroides spp., and was little affected by ceftazidime/gentamicin. The faecal flora of patients not on Fracon always contained anaerobes, and some strains of enterobacteria persisted throughout antibiotic treatment. None of the patients was colonized by Clostridium difficile or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Broad-spectrum therapy with ceftazidime and gentamicin appeared to have little effect on the gastro-intestinal flora, except to encourage the overgrowth of enterococci and reduce the numbers of enterobacteria. PMID:2228830

  9. Exposure to cigarette smoke causes DNA damage in oropharyngeal tissue in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Natalia; Berrío, Alina; Jaramillo, Jairo Enrique; Urrego, Rodrigo; Arias, María Patricia

    2014-07-15

    More than 40 mutagenic and carcinogenic agents present in cigarette smoke have been identified as causative factors of human cancer, but no relation has been clearly documented in companion animals. In dogs, in addition to smoke inhalation and transdermic absorption, exposure to smoke includes oral ingestion of particles adhered to the animal's fur. This study evaluates the presence and type of histological alterations and DNA integrity in oropharyngeal tissue in dogs exposed and non-exposed to household cigarette smoke by means of histopathology and comet assay studies on biopsy and swab samples. A non-probabilistic convenience sample of 12 dogs were selected and classified in two groups: exposed and non-exposed to cigarette smoke. Non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was carried out on biopsy and swab data and a Chi(2) test was performed on the information obtained by histopathology. A significance level was set at P<0.05. Statistically significant differences were found between groups in comet assays carried out on biopsy samples. No differences (P>0.05) were found between groups based on comet assays swab samples and histopathology assessment. In conclusion, exposure to cigarette smoke causes DNA damage in dog oropharyngeal tissue. The use of dogs as sentinels for early DNA damage caused by exposure to environmental genotoxic agents like cigarette smoke is reported for the first time. PMID:25344107

  10. Volumetric Change of Selected Organs at Risk During IMRT for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ricchetti, Francesco; Wu Binbin; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Forastiere, Arlene; Marur, Shanthi; Starmer, Heather; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess volumetric changes of selected organs at risk (OAR) during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six consecutive patients that were treated with definitive IMRT {+-} chemotherapy between November 2007 and November 2008 were selected for the present study. As part of an internal quality assurances program, a repeat kilovolt (KV) computed tomography was planned weekly during the 7-week treatment course. On each available scan, a single observer contoured the parotid submandibular, and thyroid glands (PG/SMG/TG), larynx (L), and constrictor, masticatory, and sternocleidomastoid muscles (CM/MM/SCM) as appropriate. The volume at each scan was compared with the one at planning CT in a pair-wise fashion. p values <0.05 after correction for multiple testing were considered significant. Results: A total of 159 scans was obtained during treatment for a total of 185 scans, including the baseline imaging. All OARs showed statistically significant changes over baseline by week 5. At week 7, the PG showed the largest absolute change with an average reduction of {approx}10 mL followed by both the SCM and MM ({approx}-5 mL). The largest ({approx}-30%) relative change was observed for the salivary glands. L and CM showed a {approx}15% increase in volume during treatment. Conclusion: All selected OAR undergo significant volumetric changes during a course of IMRT for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

  11. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.

  12. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubblesmore » shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.« less

  13. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. The surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter. PMID:25583640

  14. ENGINES: exploring single nucleotide variation in entire human genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Next generation ultra-sequencing technologies are starting to produce extensive quantities of data from entire human genome or exome sequences, and therefore new software is needed to present and analyse this vast amount of information. The 1000 Genomes project has recently released raw data for 629 complete genomes representing several human populations through their Phase I interim analysis and, although there are certain public tools available that allow exploration of these genomes, to date there is no tool that permits comprehensive population analysis of the variation catalogued by such data. Description We have developed a genetic variant site explorer able to retrieve data for Single Nucleotide Variation (SNVs), population by population, from entire genomes without compromising future scalability and agility. ENGINES (ENtire Genome INterface for Exploring SNVs) uses data from the 1000 Genomes Phase I to demonstrate its capacity to handle large amounts of genetic variation (>7.3 billion genotypes and 28 million SNVs), as well as deriving summary statistics of interest for medical and population genetics applications. The whole dataset is pre-processed and summarized into a data mart accessible through a web interface. The query system allows the combination and comparison of each available population sample, while searching by rs-number list, chromosome region, or genes of interest. Frequency and FST filters are available to further refine queries, while results can be visually compared with other large-scale Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) repositories such as HapMap or Perlegen. Conclusions ENGINES is capable of accessing large-scale variation data repositories in a fast and comprehensive manner. It allows quick browsing of whole genome variation, while providing statistical information for each variant site such as allele frequency, heterozygosity or FST values for genetic differentiation. Access to the data mart generating scripts and to

  15. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-09-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence. PMID:26793538

  16. A general elevation view of the entire railroad bridge crossing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A general elevation view of the entire railroad bridge crossing the Tennessee River with the center/pivot pier of the 364' - 0-1/2' swing bridge positioned in the center of the river. With the bridge in the open position, navigational river traffic can continue down river by going through a 145-foot horizontal opening on each side of the pivot pier, provided the opening provides the necessary clearance required. Note: The two (2) middle supports on the center/pivot round pier. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  17. Entire STS-77 Crew at Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The STS-77 astronauts take time to address the news media following their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Mission Specialists Andrew S. W. Thomas and Marc Garneau (who represents the Canadian Space Agency); Pilot Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Commander John H. Casper; and Mission Specialists Mario Runco Jr. and Daniel W. Bursch. Over the next several days, the six-member crew will participate in emergency egress training at the pad and a simulated launch countdown that includes the entire launch team. The Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to lift off on Mission STS-77, the fourth Shuttle flight of 1996, around May 16.

  18. Condensation in Nanoporous Packed Beds.

    PubMed

    Ally, Javed; Molla, Shahnawaz; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-05-10

    In materials with tiny, nanometer-scale pores, liquid condensation is shifted from the bulk saturation pressure observed at larger scales. This effect is called capillary condensation and can block pores, which has major consequences in hydrocarbon production, as well as in fuel cells, catalysis, and powder adhesion. In this study, high pressure nanofluidic condensation studies are performed using propane and carbon dioxide in a colloidal crystal packed bed. Direct visualization allows the extent of condensation to be observed, as well as inference of the pore geometry from Bragg diffraction. We show experimentally that capillary condensation depends on pore geometry and wettability because these factors determine the shape of the menisci that coalesce when pore filling occurs, contrary to the typical assumption that all pore structures can be modeled as cylindrical and perfectly wetting. We also observe capillary condensation at higher pressures than has been done previously, which is important because many applications involving this phenomenon occur well above atmospheric pressure, and there is little, if any, experimental validation of capillary condensation at such pressures, particularly with direct visualization. PMID:27115446

  19. Electromechanics of packed granular beds

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Strong, electrical, interparticle forces are induced by applied electric fields within packed beds of dielectric particles. Proposed applications utilizing electropacked beds (EPBs) or electrofluidized beds (EFBs) include air filtration and gas clean-up, fine particle separation, commercial drying and coating processes, heat and mass transfer, and bulk bed control. A new distributed circuit model of the electrical interparticle force is presented that identifies the role of surface roughness as determining the interparticle spacing. The dc steady state force is predicted to increase nearly linearly with the applied electric field and is theoretically independent of particle surface conductivity. The electric stress is found to vary nearly linearly with the applied electric field. Data are generally consistent with the theoretical contention that increased surface roughness decreases electromechanical effects. Surface conductivity variations of three to four times have no measurable effect on the dc steady state electric stress. The electric stress is insensitive to the dielectric properties of the interstitial gas eliminating Townsend discharge as a candidate for the nonlinear charge transport process thought to occur near interparticle contacts. The theoretical upper bound of the electric stress calculated using the distributed circuit model falls within the scatter of the data if a limit on the electric field in the interparticle gap which models nonlinear charge transport is in the range of 1 to 6 x 10/sup 7/ V/m. Estimates of the charge relaxation time using transient angle of repose experiments are somewhat smaller but comparable with theoretical values calculated by ignoring nonlinear charge transport.

  20. HPV genotypes detected in the oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, M; Mazza, F; Frati, E R; Fasolo, M M; Colzani, D; Bianchi, S; Fasoli, E; Amendola, A; Orlando, G; Tanzi, E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological profile of HPV oropharyngeal infections in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. A total of 135 subjects were enrolled at the L. Sacco University Hospital (Milan, Italy) to evaluate their HPV oropharyngeal infection status at baseline and at a follow-up visit at least 12 months later. HPV DNA was detected from oropharyngeal swabs using an in-house nested PCR that amplifies a segment of the L1 gene. The PCR products were then sequenced and genotyped. A greater percentage of high-risk genotypes was identified compared to low-risk genotypes (13·7% vs. 6·9%, P < 0·05), and two uncommon alpha-HPV genotypes were detected, i.e. HPV-102 and HPV-114. HPV infection prevalence was 24·4% and the cumulative incidence was 24·1%. During the follow-up period, one case of HPV infection (HPV-33) persisted, while the overall rate of infection clearance was 58·3%. HPV oropharyngeal infection was widespread in the cohort examined, and most of the infections were transient and cleared within 12 months. These results may help to clarify the role of HPV in the oropharynx and may also improve our understanding of the need to implement preventive strategies in at-risk populations. PMID:27267944

  1. Viewing The Entire Sun With STEREO And SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, William T.; Gurman, J. B.; Kucera, T. A.; Howard, R. A.; Vourlidas, A.; Wuelser, J.; Pesnell, D.

    2011-05-01

    On 6 February 2011, the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft were at 180 degrees separation. This allowed the first-ever simultaneous view of the entire Sun. Combining the STEREO data with corresponding images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) allows this full-Sun view to continue for the next eight years. We show how the data from the three viewpoints are combined into a single heliographic map. Processing of the STEREO beacon telemetry allows these full-Sun views to be created in near-real-time, allowing tracking of solar activity even on the far side of the Sun. This is a valuable space-weather tool, not only for anticipating activity before it rotates onto the Earth-view, but also for deep space missions in other parts of the solar system. Scientific use of the data includes the ability to continuously track the entire lifecycle of active regions, filaments, coronal holes, and other solar features. There is also a significant public outreach component to this activity. The STEREO Science Center produces products from the three viewpoints used in iPhone/iPad and Android applications, as well as time sequences for spherical projection systems used in museums, such as Science-on-a-Sphere and Magic Planet.

  2. Zonated quantification of steatosis in an entire mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Homeyer, André; Schwier, Michael; Dahmen, Uta; Dirsch, Olaf; Schenk, Arne; Kuepfer, Lars; Preusser, Tobias; Schenk, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Many physiological processes and pathological conditions in livers are spatially heterogeneous, forming patterns at the lobular length scale or varying across the organ. Steatosis, a common liver disease characterized by lipids accumulating in hepatocytes, exhibits heterogeneity at both these spatial scales. The main goal of the present study was to provide a method for zonated quantification of the steatosis patterns found in an entire mouse liver. As an example application, the results were employed in a pharmacokinetics simulation. For the analysis, an automatic detection of the lipid vacuoles was used in multiple slides of histological serial sections covering an entire mouse liver. Lobuli were determined semi-automatically and zones were defined within the lobuli. Subsequently, the lipid content of each zone was computed. The steatosis patterns were found to be predominantly periportal, with a notable organ-scale heterogeneity. The analysis provides a quantitative description of the extent of steatosis in unprecedented detail. The resulting steatosis patterns were successfully used as a perturbation to the liver as part of an exemplary whole-body pharmacokinetics simulation for the antitussive drug dextromethorphan. The zonated quantification is also applicable to other pathological conditions that can be detected in histological images. Besides being a descriptive research tool, this quantification could perspectively complement diagnosis based on visual assessment of histological images. PMID:27104496

  3. A composite CO survey of the entire Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, T. M.; Ungerechts, H.; Cohen, R. S.; de Geus, E. J.; Grenier, I. A.; May, J.; Murphy, D. C.; Nyman, L.-A.; Thaddeus, P.

    1987-11-01

    Large-scale CO surveys of the entire Galactic plane and specific nearby clouds have been combined to produce a panorama of the entire Milky Way in molecular clouds at an angular resolution of 1/2°. Covering 10° - 20° in latitude at all longitudes and all or nearly all large, nearby clouds at higher latitude, the composite survey is the only molecular line survey to date with sky coverage and resolution comparable to that of the early 21 cm surveys. The inner Galaxy spiral arms produce, as expected, a thin, intense ridge of emission along the Galactic plane within ≡60° of the Galactic center. The local emission shows the same large-scale features as the distribution of dark clouds. The survey provides a thorough inventory of large molecular clouds near the Sun. The overall distribution of clouds within 1 kpc is consistent with the Sun lying near the inner edge of a local spiral arm or spur. The half-thickness at half-intensity of the local molecular cloud layer is 87 pc.

  4. Jamming and crystallization in athermal polymer packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayiannis, Nikos Ch.; Foteinopoulou, Katerina; Laso, Manuel

    2013-11-01

    Dense packings of chains of hard spheres possess characteristic features that do not have a counterpart in corresponding packings of monomeric spheres especially near the maximally random jammed (MRJ) state. From the modelling perspective the additional requirement that spheres keep their connectivity while maximizing the occupied volume fraction imposes severe constraints on generation algorithms of dense chain configurations. The extremely sluggish dynamics imposed by the uncrossability of chains precludes the use of deterministic or stochastic dynamics to generate all but dilute polymer packings. As a viable alternative, especially tailored chain-connectivity-altering Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms have been developed that bypass this kinetic hindrance and have actually been able to produce packings of hard-sphere chains in a volume fraction range spanning from infinite dilution up to the MRJ state. Such very dense athermal polymer packings share a number of structural features with packings of monomeric hard spheres, but also display unique characteristics due to the constraints imposed by connectivity. We give an overview of the most relevant results of our recent modeling work on packings of freely-jointed chains of tangent hard spheres about the MRJ state, local structure, chain dimensions and their scaling with density, topological constraints in the form of entanglements and knots, contact network at jamming, and entropically driven crystallization.

  5. Infected or not: are PCR-positive oropharyngeal swabs indicative of low pathogenic influenza A virus infection in the respiratory tract of Mallard Anas platyrhynchos?

    PubMed

    Wille, Michelle; van Run, Peter; Waldenström, Jonas; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Detection of influenza virus in oropharyngeal swabs collected during wild bird surveillance is assumed to represent respiratory infection, although intestine is the main site of infection. We tested this assumption by histological examination of the respiratory tract of wild Mallards with virus-positive oropharyngeal swabs. Thirty-two of 125 Mallards tested had viral-RNA positive oropharyngeal swabs. The respiratory tracts of four Mallards with the most virus were examined in detail by immunohistochemistry. None had detectable virus antigen in the respiratory tract, suggesting it was not infected. An alternative explanation is that the oropharynx was contaminated with virus through feeding in surface water or through preening. PMID:24885647

  6. What Is the Added Benefit of Oropharyngeal Swabs Compared to Nasal Swabs Alone for Respiratory Virus Detection in Hospitalized Children Aged <10 Years?

    PubMed

    Dawood, Fatimah S; Jara, Jorge; Estripeaut, Dora; Vergara, Ofelina; Luciani, Kathia; Corro, Mary; de León, Tirza; Saldaña, Ricardo; Castillo Baires, Juan Miguel; Rauda Flores, Rafael; Cazares, Rafael A; Brizuela de Fuentes, Yarisa Sujey; Franco, Danilo; Gaitan, Melissa; Schneider, Eileen; Berman, LaShondra; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-11-15

    We evaluated the added value of collecting both nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, compared with collection of nasal swabs alone, for detection of common respiratory viruses by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in hospitalized children aged <10 years. Nasal swabs had equal or greater sensitivity than oropharyngeal swabs for detection of respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus, rhinovirus, and influenza virus but not parainfluenza virus. The addition of an oropharyngeal swab, compared with use of a nasal swab alone, increased the frequency of detection of each respiratory virus by no more than 10% in children aged <10 years. PMID:25943205

  7. Leadership in wolf, Canis lupus, packs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    I examine leadership in Wolf (Canis lupus) packs based on published observations and data gathered during summers from 1986 to 1998 studying a free-ranging pack of Wolves on Ellesmere Island that were habituated to my presence. The breeding male tended to initiate activities associated with foraging and travel, and the breeding female to initiate, and predominate in, pup care and protection. However, there was considerable overlap and interaction during these activities such that leadership could be considered a joint function. In packs with multiple breeders, quantitative information about leadership is needed.

  8. Random sphere packing model of heterogeneous propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochevets, Sergei Victorovich

    It is well recognized that combustion of heterogeneous propellants is strongly dependent on the propellant morphology. Recent developments in computing systems make it possible to start three-dimensional modeling of heterogeneous propellant combustion. A key component of such large scale computations is a realistic model of industrial propellants which retains the true morphology---a goal never achieved before. The research presented develops the Random Sphere Packing Model of heterogeneous propellants and generates numerical samples of actual industrial propellants. This is done by developing a sphere packing algorithm which randomly packs a large number of spheres with a polydisperse size distribution within a rectangular domain. First, the packing code is developed, optimized for performance, and parallelized using the OpenMP shared memory architecture. Second, the morphology and packing fraction of two simple cases of unimodal and bimodal packs are investigated computationally and analytically. It is shown that both the Loose Random Packing and Dense Random Packing limits are not well defined and the growth rate of the spheres is identified as the key parameter controlling the efficiency of the packing. For a properly chosen growth rate, computational results are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data. Third, two strategies are developed to define numerical samples of polydisperse heterogeneous propellants: the Deterministic Strategy and the Random Selection Strategy. Using these strategies, numerical samples of industrial propellants are generated. The packing fraction is investigated and it is shown that the experimental values of the packing fraction can be achieved computationally. It is strongly believed that this Random Sphere Packing Model of propellants is a major step forward in the realistic computational modeling of heterogeneous propellant of combustion. In addition, a method of analysis of the morphology of heterogeneous

  9. [Review: pathophysiology and methodology of nasal packing].

    PubMed

    Beule, A G; Weber, R K; Kaftan, H; Hosemann, W

    2004-08-01

    Nasal packing is a frequent procedure to control spontaneous nasal bleeding or postoperative oozing following different types of nasal surgery. It strives for internal stabilization of the nasal framework and for optimizing wound healing by prevention of stenosis or synechia. A lot of different materials is used and there is no accepted standard concerning the type and application. A review on pathophysiology of the packed nose is given together with a survey on customary packing materials focussing on the specific merits, demerits and side-effects including economical aspects. PMID:15316896

  10. Improved Taxation Rate for Bin Packing Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Walter; Qiu, Xian

    A cooperative bin packing game is a N-person game, where the player set N consists of k bins of capacity 1 each and n items of sizes a 1, ⋯ ,a n . The value of a coalition of players is defined to be the maximum total size of items in the coalition that can be packed into the bins of the coalition. We present an alternative proof for the non-emptiness of the 1/3-core for all bin packing games and show how to improve this bound ɛ= 1/3 (slightly). We conjecture that the true best possible value is ɛ= 1/7.

  11. Coconut Atrium: Transmural Calcification of the Entire Left Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Carlos Del; Weinstein, Paul; Kunnelis, Constantine; DiStefano, Peter; Ebers, Gloria M.

    2000-01-01

    Massive calcification of the left atrium usually spares the interatrial septum, which provides a cleavage plane for surgical access to the mitral valve. Endoatriectomy with mitral valve replacement is the currently accepted corrective procedure because it affords maximum exposure while decreasing the risk of embolization and intraoperative hemorrhage. We describe a case in which the entire left atrium, including the septum, was thickly calcified and resembled a coconut shell. This condition prevented surgical correction of severe mitral stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the most severe case of left atrial calcification yet reported in the literature. Although it is not possible to establish preoperatively that the atrium is completely calcified and impossible to incise, when predisposing factors and evidence of complete transmural calcification are present, the surgeon should be aware of this possibility and should weigh carefully the decision to operate. PMID:10830629

  12. Knowledge-based classification of neuronal fibers in entire brain.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Turken, U; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan L; Gabrieli, John D

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a framework driven by parcellation of brain gray matter in standard normalized space to classify the neuronal fibers obtained from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in entire human brain. Classification of fiber bundles into groups is an important step for the interpretation of DTI data in terms of functional correlates of white matter structures. Connections between anatomically delineated brain regions that are considered to form functional units, such as a short-term memory network, are identified by first clustering fibers based on their terminations in anatomically defined zones of gray matter according to Talairach Atlas, and then refining these groups based on geometric similarity criteria. Fiber groups identified this way can then be interpreted in terms of their functional properties using knowledge of functional neuroanatomy of individual brain regions specified in standard anatomical space, as provided by functional neuroimaging and brain lesion studies. PMID:16685847

  13. Computational simulation of flows in an entire centrifugal heart pump.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Yano, K

    1999-06-01

    A prototype computational code to numerically simulate the blood flows in an entire centrifugal heart pump has been developed. The unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved on a parallel computer, the Cray T3E. By domain decomposition, the whole flow space is decomposed to a number of subdomains for each of which a structured algebraic grid is assigned. The grids for the inlet eye and blade regions are on the rotating frame while grids for other regions are on the nonrotating frame, and the edge of the rotating grids slides over the edge of the nonrotating frame, and the edge of the rotating grids slides over the edge of the nonrotating grids. The code is able to simulate the flows in the rotor, volute, and diffuser as well as to find pump performance indicators. The present paper presents an overview of the code and describes a study on the effect of volute width. PMID:10392287

  14. 7 CFR 51.3152 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Nectarines packed in containers equipped with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be... angles to a line from stem to blossom end of the fruit. (h) Tolerances. In order to allow for...

  15. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of proper size... angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In order to allow for variations incident to proper...

  16. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of proper size... angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In order to allow for variations incident to proper...

  17. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (c) Boxes, flats, lugs, or cartons: (1) Fruit packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard...” means the greatest dimension measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (c) Boxes, flats, lugs, or cartons: (1) Fruit packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard...” means the greatest dimension measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of proper size... angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In order to allow for variations incident to proper...

  20. 7 CFR 51.3152 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Nectarines packed in containers equipped with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be... angles to a line from stem to blossom end of the fruit. (h) Tolerances. In order to allow for...

  1. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  2. Mechanical Characterization of Partially Crystallized Sphere Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifpour, M.; Francois, N.; Vaez Allaei, S. M.; Senden, T.; Saadatfar, M.

    2014-10-01

    We study grain-scale mechanical and geometrical features of partially crystallized packings of frictional spheres, produced experimentally by a vibrational protocol. By combining x-ray computed tomography, 3D image analysis, and discrete element method simulations, we have access to the 3D structure of internal forces. We investigate how the network of mechanical contacts and intergranular forces change when the packing structure evolves from amorphous to near perfect crystalline arrangements. We compare the behavior of the geometrical neighbors (quasicontracts) of a grain to the evolution of the mechanical contacts. The mechanical coordination number Zm is a key parameter characterizing the crystallization onset. The high fluctuation level of Zm and of the force distribution in highly crystallized packings reveals that a geometrically ordered structure still possesses a highly random mechanical backbone similar to that of amorphous packings.

  3. Think Safety When Picking, Packing School Backpacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160523.html Think Safety When Picking, Packing School Backpacks Heavy, unbalanced loads can cause injury that is ... Aug. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many students use backpacks to carry their school books and supplies, but ...

  4. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  5. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Holdren, Jr., George R.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  6. Packing and Entanglements in Polymer Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozisik, Rahmi; Sternstein, Sandy S.

    2004-03-01

    The idea of obtaining the properties of polymers simply from the chemical structure is a very attractive one. Recent work on entanglements and packing indicates that the entanglement molecular weight is related to packing length (= M/(ρ N_a), where M is the molecular weight, ρ is the density, R is the end-to-end vector, and Na is the Avogadro number). The exact relationship is given as follows: Me = 218 ρ p^3. This simple equation holds for a very large group of polymers and is temperature insensitive. In this study, we studied the packing and tried to obtain a scaling between packing and M_e, and extended the concept to cyclic polymers.

  7. Contact breaking in frictionless granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qikai; Bertrand, Thibault; O'Hern, Corey; Shattuck, Mark

    We numerically study the breaking of interparticle contact networks in static granular packings of frictionless bidisperse disks that are subjected to vibrations. The packings are created using an isotropic compression protocol at different values of the total potential energy per particle Ep. We first add displacements along a single vibrational mode i of the dynamical matrix to a given packing and calculate the minimum amplitude Ai of the perturbation at which the first interparticle contact breaks. We then identify the minimum amplitude Amin over all perturbations along each mode and study the distribution of Amin from an ensemble of packings at each Ep. We then study two-, three-, and multi-mode excitations and determine the dependence of Amin on the number of modes that are included in the perturbation. W. M. Keck Foundation Science and Engineering Grant.

  8. Software For Nearly Optimal Packing Of Cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennel, Theron R.; Daughtrey, Rodney S.; Schwaab, Doug G.

    1994-01-01

    PACKMAN computer program used to find nearly optimal arrangements of cargo items in storage containers, subject to such multiple packing objectives as utilization of volumes of containers, utilization of containers up to limits on weights, and other considerations. Automatic packing algorithm employed attempts to find best positioning of cargo items in container, such that volume and weight capacity of container both utilized to maximum extent possible. Written in Common LISP.

  9. Modular vaccine packaging increases packing efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Bryan A.; Rajgopal, Jayant; Lim, Jung; Gorham, Katrin; Haidari, Leila; Brown, Shawn T.; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Within a typical vaccine supply chain, vaccines are packaged into individual cylindrical vials (each containing one or more doses) that are bundled together in rectangular “inner packs” for transport via even larger groupings such as cold boxes and vaccine carriers. The variability of vaccine inner pack and vial size may hinder efficient vaccine distribution because it constrains packing of cold boxes and vaccine carriers to quantities that are often inappropriate or suboptimal in the context of country-specific vaccination guidelines. Methods We developed in Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) a spreadsheet model that evaluated the impact of different packing schemes for the Benin routine regimen plus the introduction of the Rotarix vaccine. Specifically, we used the model to compare the current packing scheme to that of a proposed modular packing scheme. Results Conventional packing of a Dometic RCW25 that aims to maximize fully-immunized children (FICs) results in 123 FICs and a packing efficiency of 81.93% compared to a maximum of 155 FICs and 94.1% efficiency for an alternative modular packaging system. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that modular packaging systems could offer significant advantages over conventional vaccine packaging systems with respect to space efficiency and potential FICs, when they are stored in standard vaccine carrying devices. This allows for more vaccines to be stored within the same volume while also simplifying the procedures used by field workers to pack storage devices. Ultimately, modular packaging systems could be a simple way to help increase vaccine coverage worldwide. PMID:25957666

  10. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: what the clinician should know.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Sambur, Ian M; de Almeida, John R; Posner, Marshall; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Rodrigo, Juan P; Strojan, Primož; Takes, Robert P; Ferlito, Alfio

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is rising in contrast to the decreasing incidence of carcinomas arising in other subsites of the head and neck. The human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has played an increasing role in these epidemiological changes and as the etiology for a significant fraction of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, OPSCC in particular. Most importantly, many retrospective studies have shown that the prognosis differs significantly between patients with HPV-associated tumors and non-HPV associated tumors. Thus, questions arise on the choices of treatment for patients based on HPV status and the consequences of therapy. Given the recognized relevance of HPV status in OPSCC, many new questions concerning the biology, treatment, and prevention of HPV infection arise. This review is intended to highlight some of the major issues and frequently asked questions relevant for the clinician dealing with patients with OPSCC. PMID:22752642

  11. The Role of Transoral Robotic Surgery in the Management of HPV Negative Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sload, Ryan; Silver, Natalie; Jawad, Basit Abjul; Gross, Neil D

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is on the rise. This is largely due to the rapid increase in HPV positive OPSCC, which has been shown to confer a survival advantage. HPV negative OPSCC, however, has a more aggressive tumor biology and is a challenge to treat with standard current therapies. Chemoradiation has demonstrated poor locoregional control in HPV negative OPSCC, and open surgeries are associated with high morbidity. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has been proposed as an option to both intensify treatment and decrease surgical morbidity for patients with HPV negative OPSCC. TORS can be utilized as a primary treatment or in persistent, recurrent, or second primary OPSCC. There is emerging data showing improved functional outcomes with TORS versus open surgery or chemoradiation. Unfortunately, there have been no randomized trials comparing TORS to chemoradiation in HPV negative OPSCC. This article will review utility of TORS for HPV negative OPSCC. PMID:27469262

  12. Treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma: ongoing trials, critical issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Blanchard, P; Moreau, F; Guigay, J; Hartl, D M; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-04-01

    Due to the generally poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), treatment has been intensified, these last decades, leading to an increase of serious side effects. High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection has been recently etiologically linked to a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), which is on the increase. These tumors are different, at the clinical and molecular level, when compared to tumors caused by traditional risk factors. Additionally, their prognosis is much more favorable which has led the medical community to consider new treatment strategies. Indeed, it is possible that less intensive treatment regimens could achieve similar efficacy with less toxicity and improved quality of life. Several clinical trials, investigating different ways to de-escalate treatment, are currently ongoing. In this article, we review these main approaches, discuss the rationale behind them and the issues raised by treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive OPSCC. PMID:24622970

  13. The use of cultures and immunologic procedures to predict oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients on steroid aerosols.

    PubMed

    Spector, S L; Wangaard, C; Bardana, E J

    1982-05-01

    Sixty-seven asthmatic individuals treated with either beclomethasone diproprionate or flunisolide were sequentially evaluated for up to 32 months to determine the incidence of oropharyngeal candidiasis as well as laboratory parameters which might be predictive of this complication. Throat cultures and measurements of Candida antibody by immunodiffusion and radioimmunoassay were performed and compared over time and treatment groups. Unlike other studies, pre-treatment Candida precipitins did not predict increased risk for clinical thrush nor did quantitative determinations of Candida antibody. Those patients with positive cultures pre-trial, however, had a significantly higher incidence of clinical thrush than those with negative cultures (P less than 0.01). No significant changes occurred over time or between drugs for any of the parameters. Symptomatic thrush, however, was slightly more common in those patients treated with beclomethasone. PMID:7105391

  14. [Oropharyngeal tumors of dogs--a clinical study of 79 cases].

    PubMed

    Hörsting, N; von Reiswitz, A; Wohlsein, P; Bullerdiek, J; Reimann, N; Nolte, I

    1998-01-01

    This study presents the data on incidence, TNM-classification and therapy outcome of 79 dogs with oropharyngeal tumors, which were admitted to the Clinic of Small Animals, Hannover School of Veterinary Medicine. 52 neoplasms were examined histologically. The most common tumors were malignant melanoma (n = 17), fibrosarcoma (n = 5), squamous cell carcinoma and peripheral odontogenic fibroma (n = 4). It could be determined that dogs treated by surgery, regardless of tumor type and type of surgery, had longer survival times than untreated dogs. With regard to survival time and the rate of local tumor recurrence, radical surgery (partial mandibulectomy/maxillectomy) led to good results in squamous cell carcinomas and invasive odontogenic tumors, but, keeping in mind the small number of cases, showed no advantage over conservative surgery in malignant melanomas, fibrosarcomas, neurofibrosarcomas and non invasive odontogenic tumors. It could be shown that the clinical staging of the patients was of prognostic relevance. PMID:9741178

  15. A patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome treated with chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew K; Teoh, Daren; Matthews, Paul; Fresco, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We present the first published case of a patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) who was treated with radical chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma. In view of this newly recognised connective tissue disease, the uncertainty of severe toxicity from chemoradiotherapy to treat a potentially curative cancer posed a management challenge. The patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy and remains well with no evidence of recurrence at 3 years. Furthermore, we have observed minimal late effects secondary to chemoradiotherapy at 3 years following the completion of treatment suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis of LDS may provide an interesting human model to further elucidate the complex interactions of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and tissue fibrosis secondary to chemoradiotherapy. A review of LDS as well as the association of TGF-β1 expression and tissue fibrosis is presented. PMID:24045763

  16. Pharyngeal Packing during Rhinoplasty: Advantages and Disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Majid; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar; Bameshki, Ali Reza; Behdani, Reza; Khadivi, Ehsan; Bakhshaee, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Controversy remains as to the advantages and disadvantages of pharyngeal packing during septorhinoplasty. Our study investigated the effect of pharyngeal packing on postoperative nausea and vomiting and sore throat following this type of surgery or septorhinoplasty. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I or II patients who were candidates for septorhinoplasty. They were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in the study group had received pharyngeal packing while those in the control group had not. The incidence of nausea and vomiting and sore throat based on the visual analog scale (VAS) was evaluated postoperatively in the recovery room as well as at 2, 6 and 24 hours. Results: The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) was 12.3%, with no significant difference between the study and control groups. Sore throat was reported in 50.5% of cases overall (56.8% on pack group and 44.4% on control). Although the severity of pain was higher in the study group at all times, the incidence in the two groups did not differ significantly. Conclusion: The use of pharyngeal packing has no effect in reducing the incidence of nausea and vomiting and sore throat after surgery. Given that induced hypotension is used as the routine method of anesthesia in septorhinoplasty surgery, with a low incidence of hemorrhage and a high risk of unintended retention of pharyngeal packing, its routine use is not recommended for this procedure. PMID:26788486

  17. Packing of elastic wires in flexible shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, R.; Wittel, F. K.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    The packing problem of long thin filaments that are injected into confined spaces is of fundamental interest for physicists and biologists alike. How linear threads pack and coil is well known only for the ideal case of rigid containers, though. Here, we force long elastic rods into flexible spatial confinement borne by an elastic shell to examine under which conditions recently acquired knowledge on wire packing in rigid spheres breaks down. We find that unlike in rigid cavities, friction plays a key role by giving rise to the emergence of two distinct packing patterns. At low friction, the wire densely coils into an ordered toroidal bundle with semi-ellipsoidal cross-section, while at high friction, it packs into a highly disordered, hierarchic structure. These two morphologies are shown to be separated by a continuous phase transition. Our findings demonstrate the dramatic impact of friction and confinement elasticity on filamentous packing and might drive future research on such systems in physics, biology and even medical technology toward including these mutually interacting effects.

  18. Decontamination of pesticide packing using ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, C. L.; Mori, M. N.; Kodama, Yasko; Oikawa, H.; Sampa, M. H. O.

    2007-11-01

    The Brazilian agriculture activities have consumed about 288,000 tons of pesticides per year conditioned in about 107,000,000 packing with weight of approximately 23,000 tons. The discharge of empty plastic packing of pesticides can be an environmental concern causing problems to human health, animals, and plants if done without inspection and monitoring. The objective of this work is to study the ionizing radiation effect in the main pesticides used in Brazil for plastic packing decontamination. Among the commercial pesticides, chlorpyrifos has significant importance because of its wide distribution and extensive use and persistence. The radiation-induced degradation of chlorpyrifos in liquid samples and in polyethylene pack was studied by gamma radiolysis. Packing of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) three layer coextruded, named COEX, contaminated with chlorpyrifos, were irradiated using both a multipurpose Co-60 gamma irradiator and a gamma source with 5000 Ci total activity Gamma cell type. The chemical analysis of the chlorpyrifos was made using a gas chromatography associated to the Mass Spectrometry—GCMS from Shimadzu Model QP 5000. Gamma radiation was efficient for removing chlorpyrifos from the plastic packing, in all studied cases.

  19. Satellite altimetry based rating curves throughout the entire Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, A.; Calmant, S.; Paiva, R. C.; Collischonn, W.; Silva, J. S.; Bonnet, M.; Seyler, F.

    2013-05-01

    The Amazonian basin is the largest hydrological basin all over the world. In the recent past years, the basin has experienced an unusual succession of extreme draughts and floods, which origin is still a matter of debate. Yet, the amount of data available is poor, both over time and space scales, due to factor like basin's size, access difficulty and so on. One of the major locks is to get discharge series distributed over the entire basin. Satellite altimetry can be used to improve our knowledge of the hydrological stream flow conditions in the basin, through rating curves. Rating curves are mathematical relationships between stage and discharge at a given place. The common way to determine the parameters of the relationship is to compute the non-linear regression between the discharge and stage series. In this study, the discharge data was obtained by simulation through the entire basin using the MGB-IPH model with TRMM Merge input rainfall data and assimilation of gage data, run from 1998 to 2010. The stage dataset is made of ~800 altimetry series at ENVISAT and JASON-2 virtual stations. Altimetry series span between 2002 and 2010. In the present work we present the benefits of using stochastic methods instead of probabilistic ones to determine a dataset of rating curve parameters which are consistent throughout the entire Amazon basin. The rating curve parameters have been computed using a parameter optimization technique based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler and Bayesian inference scheme. This technique provides an estimate of the best parameters for the rating curve, but also their posterior probability distribution, allowing the determination of a credibility interval for the rating curve. Also is included in the rating curve determination the error over discharges estimates from the MGB-IPH model. These MGB-IPH errors come from either errors in the discharge derived from the gage readings or errors in the satellite rainfall estimates. The present

  20. Prognostic value of pretherapy platelet elevation in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Shoultz-Henley, Sara; Garden, Adam S; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Sheu, Tommy; Kroll, Michael H; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Hayes, Amos J; French, Chloe; Eichelberger, Hillary; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Smith, Blaine D; Phan, Jack; Ayoub, Zeina; Lai, Stephen Y; Pham, Brian; Kies, Merrill; Gold, Kathryn A; Sturgis, Erich; Fuller, Clifton D

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential associations between increased platelets and oncologic outcomes in oropharyngeal cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation. A total of 433 oropharyngeal cancer patients (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were included under an approved IRB protocol. Complete blood count (CBC) data were extracted. Platelet and hemoglobin from the last phlebotomy (PLTpre-chemoRT, Hgbpre-chemoRT ) before start of treatment were identified. Patients were risk-stratified using Dahlstrom-Sturgis criteria and were tested for association with survival and disease-control outcomes. Locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) and overall survival (OS) were decreased (p < 0.03, p < 0.04 and p < 0.0001, respectively) for patients with PLTpre-chemoRT value of ≥350 × 10(9) /L. Actuarial 5-year locoregional control (LRC) and FDM were 83 and 85% for non-thrombocythemic patients while patient with high platelets had 5-year LRC and FDM of 73 and 74%, respectively. Likewise, 5-year OS was better for patients with normal platelet counts by comparison (76 vs. 57%; p < 0.0001). Comparison of univariate parametric models demonstrated that PLTpre-chemoRT was better among tested models. Multivariate assessment demonstrated improved performance of models which included pretherapy platelet indices. On Bayesian information criteria analysis, the optimal prognostic model was then used to develop nomograms predicting 3-, 5- and 10-year OS. In conclusion, pretreatment platelet elevation is a promising predictor of prognosis, and further work should be done to elucidate the utility of antiplatelets in modifying risk in OPC patients. PMID:26414107

  1. Ipsilateral Irradiation for Oral and Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Primary Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vergeer, Marije R.; Doornaert, Patricia; Jonkman, Anja; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Ende, Piet L.A. van den; Jong, Martin A. de; Leemans, C. Rene; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the contralateral nodal control (CLNC) in postoperative patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with ipsilateral irradiation of the neck and primary site. Late radiation-induced morbidity was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: The study included 123 patients with well-lateralized squamous cell carcinomas treated with surgery and unilateral postoperative irradiation. Most patients had tumors of the gingiva (41%) or buccal mucosa (21%). The majority of patients underwent surgery of the ipsilateral neck (n = 102 [83%]). The N classification was N0 in 73 cases (59%), N1 or N2a in 23 (19%), and N2b in 27 cases (22%). Results: Contralateral metastases developed in 7 patients (6%). The 5-year actuarial CLNC was 92%. The number of lymph node metastases was the only significant prognostic factor with regard to CLNC. The 5-year CLNC was 99% in N0 cases, 88% in N1 or N2a cases, and 73% in N2b cases (p = 0.008). Borderline significance (p = 0.06) was found for extranodal spread. Successful salvage could be performed in 71% of patients with contralateral metastases. The prevalence of Grade 2 or higher xerostomia was 2.6% at 5 years. Conclusions: Selected patients with oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma treated with primary surgery and postoperative ipsilateral radiotherapy have a very high CLNC with a high probability of successful salvage in case of contralateral metastases. However, bilateral irradiation should be applied in case of multiple lymph node metastases in the ipsilateral neck, particularly in the presence of extranodal spread. The incidence of radiation-induced morbidity is considerably lower as observed after bilateral irradiation.

  2. Biologic Predictors of Serologic Responses to HPV in Oropharyngeal Cancer: The HOTSPOT Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Gerber, Jennifer E.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Pai, Sara I.; Cheng, Julia N.; Alam, Rizwan; Kesiraju, Sailaja; Chowell, Diego; Gross, Neil D.; Haddad, Robert; Gillison, Maura L.; Posner, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that viral and host factors impact the serologic responses to HPV early antigens in HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPVOPC). Materials and methods We conducted a multicenter study to measure HPV16-specific IgG among patients with HPVOPC, their long-term sexual partners, and healthy volunteers. Risk factor surveys and rinse and gargle specimens were collected. Peripheral blood samples at diagnosis were evaluated for IgG Abs to HPV16 antigens using a programmable ELISA assay. Predictors for HPV16 serologic responses were evaluated using univariate and multivariable linear regression. Results 116 patients with HPVOPC, 43 partners, and 81 healthy volunteers were enrolled and had baseline sera for analysis. Cases were primarily male (90%), with a median age of 56 years. Abs to E1, E2, E6 or E7 antigens were detected more often in HPVOPC compared with volunteers or partner sera (p<0.0001). HPV16 Abs to at least one early protein (E1, E2, E4, E5, E6, or E7) were detected in the sera of 90.6% of cases, 0% of partners and 7.4% of healthy volunteers. Gender, race, sexual behavior, and viral integration were not associated with antibody response. Younger age and higher oral HPV16 copy number were associated with higher HPV16 E6 and NE2 antibody levels. Conclusions HPV16 seroreactivity is commonly detected among patients with HPVOPC at diagnosis, but not among partners or healthy volunteers. Seroreactivity among cases are correlated with viral load and stage and not with other demographic or behavioral factors. Positive HPV16 serology was strongly associated with HPV 16 oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:26094591

  3. [Oropharyngeal bacteria in asthmatic patients in the city of Maracaibo, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Arocha-Sandoval, Francisco; Parra-Quevedo, Katynna

    2002-09-01

    Bronchial asthma is an intercurrent disease that affects a major portion of the population. Neither its etiopathogenesis nor its complications have been fully established. The purpose of this study was to determine the composition of oropharyngeal bacterial flora in asthmatic patients and compare it with oropharyngeal bacterial flora in a group of healthy patients in order to establish its relationship with the pathogenesis of asthma and its complications. A sample consisting of 116 pharyngeal swabs was analysed from march 1995 to december 1996. 58 of the total amount of pharyngeal swabs corresponded to asthmatic patients (during asthmatic crisis), while the other 58 corresponded to healthy subjects. Common bacteriological culture techniques were carried out in order to obtain the bacteriological diagnosis. The results showed that isolation of transitory flora bacteria in asthmatic patients was 75.8%, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in the control group (27.5%). Streptococcus pyogenes was the most frequent isolated bacteria in the group of asthmatic patients (17.2%), while Escherichia coli was the most frequent bacteria in the control group. No significant difference was found regarding sex and the presence of transitory flora bacteria. It was also found that enterobacteria and non fermenting negative gram bacillus increased with age in both groups; a higher incidence was observed in the group of 40-year-old subjects. These finding confirm the existence of a relationship between the asthmatic condition and the percentage of transitory bacterial flora carriers. The explanation to this phenomenon might be the frequent use of antibiotics and the possible contamination of the micro-nebulization equipment used for the treating the asthma crisis. This data must be considered when applying empiric therapy in asthmatic patients complicated with pneumonia. The possibility that certain infectious agents, including bacteria, could play a role in asthma

  4. A Comparative Study Between Modified Starch and Xanthan Gum Thickeners in Post-Stroke Oropharyngeal Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Vilardell, N; Rofes, L; Arreola, V; Speyer, R; Clavé, P

    2016-04-01

    Thickeners are used in post-stroke oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) as a compensatory therapeutic strategy against aspirations. To compare the therapeutic effects of modified starch (MS) and xanthan gum (XG) thickeners on swallow safety and efficacy in chronic post-stroke OD patients using clinical and videofluoroscopic (VFS) assessment. Patients were studied by clinical assessment (volume-viscosity swallow test, V-VST) and VFS using 3 volumes (5, 10, 20 mL) and 3 viscosities (liquid, nectar and spoon thick), comparing MS and XG. We studied 122 patients (46MS, 76XG). (A) V-VST showed that both thickeners similarly improved safety of swallow. Prevalence of safe swallowing significantly increased with enhanced viscosity (P < 0.001 vs liquid), MS: 47.83 % at liquid, 84.93 % at nectar and 92.96 % at spoon thick; XG: 55.31 % at liquid, 77.78 % at nectar and 97.84 % at spoon thick. Patients on MS reported higher prevalence of pharyngeal residue at spoon-thick viscosities. (B) VFS: increasing bolus viscosity with either thickener increased prevalence of safe swallows (P < 0.001 vs liquid), MS: 30.25 % liquid, 61.07 % nectar and 92.64 % spoon thick; XG: 29.12 % liquid, 71.30 % nectar and 89.91 % spoon thick. Penetration-aspiration scale score was significantly reduced with increased viscosity with both thickeners. MS increased oral and pharyngeal residues at nectar and spoon-thick viscosities but XG did not. Timing of airway protection mechanisms and bolus velocity were not affected by either thickener. Increasing bolus viscosity with MS and XG thickeners strongly and similarly improved safety of swallow in chronic post-stroke OD by a compensatory mechanism; in contrast only MS thickeners increased oropharyngeal residue. PMID:26607158

  5. Candidate Dosimetric Predictors of Long-Term Swallowing Dysfunction After Oropharyngeal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Hutcheson, Katherine; Barringer, Denise; Tucker, Susan L.; Kies, Merrill; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Dong Lei; Lewin, Jan S.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate long-term swallowing function in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and to identify novel dose-limiting criteria predictive for dysphagia. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with Stage IV oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma enrolled on a Phase II trial were prospectively evaluated by modified barium swallow studies at baseline, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-IMRT treatment. Candidate dysphagia-associated organs at risk were retrospectively contoured into original treatment plans. Twenty-one (68%) cases were base of tongue and 10 (32%) were tonsil. Stage distribution was T1 (12 patients), T2 (10), T3 (4), T4 (2), and TX (3), and N2 (24), N3 (5), and NX (2). Median age was 52.8 years (range, 42-78 years). Thirteen patients (42%) received concurrent chemotherapy during IMRT. Thirteen (42%) were former smokers. Mean dose to glottic larynx for the cohort was limited to 18 Gy (range, 6-39 Gy) by matching IMRT to conventional low-neck fields. Results: Dose-volume constraints (V30 < 65% and V35 < 35% for anterior oral cavity and V55 < 80% and V65 < 30% for high superior pharyngeal constrictors) predictive for objective swallowing dysfunction were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Aspiration and feeding tube dependence were observed in only 1 patient at 24 months. Conclusions: In the context of glottic laryngeal shielding, we describe candidate oral cavity and superior pharyngeal constrictor organs at risk and dose-volume constraints associated with preserved long-term swallowing function; these constraints are currently undergoing prospective validation. Strict protection of the glottic larynx via beam-split IMRT techniques promises to make chronic aspiration an uncommon outcome.

  6. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, Adam S.; Dong, Lei; Morrison, William H.; Stugis, Erich M.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Schwartz, David L.; Kies, Merill S.; Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  7. GOCE: precise orbit determination for the entire mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Heike; Jäggi, Adrian; Beutler, Gerhard; Meyer, Ulrich

    2014-07-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) was the first Earth explorer core mission of the European Space Agency. It was launched on March 17, 2009 into a Sun-synchronous dusk-dawn orbit and re-entered into the Earth's atmosphere on November 11, 2013. The satellite altitude was between 255 and 225 km for the measurement phases. The European GOCE Gravity consortium is responsible for the Level 1b to Level 2 data processing in the frame of the GOCE High-level processing facility (HPF). The Precise Science Orbit (PSO) is one Level 2 product, which was produced under the responsibility of the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern within the HPF. This PSO product has been continuously delivered during the entire mission. Regular checks guaranteed a high consistency and quality of the orbits. A correlation between solar activity, GPS data availability and quality of the orbits was found. The accuracy of the kinematic orbit primarily suffers from this. Improvements in modeling the range corrections at the retro-reflector array for the SLR measurements were made and implemented in the independent SLR validation for the GOCE PSO products. The satellite laser ranging (SLR) validation finally states an orbit accuracy of 2.42 cm for the kinematic and 1.84 cm for the reduced-dynamic orbits over the entire mission. The common-mode accelerations from the GOCE gradiometer were not used for the official PSO product, but in addition to the operational HPF work a study was performed to investigate to which extent common-mode accelerations improve the reduced-dynamic orbit determination results. The accelerometer data may be used to derive realistic constraints for the empirical accelerations estimated for the reduced-dynamic orbit determination, which already improves the orbit quality. On top of that the accelerometer data may further improve the orbit quality if realistic constraints and state-of-the-art background models such as gravity field

  8. Snow Pack and Lake Ice Pack Remote Sensing using Wideband Autocorrelation Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S.; De Roo, R. D.; Sarabandi, K.; England, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A novel microwave radiometric technique, wideband autocorrelation radiometry (WiBAR), offers a deterministic method of remotely sensing the propagation time τdelay of microwaves through low loss layers at the bottom of the atmosphere. Terrestrial examples are the snow and lake ice packs. This technique is based on the Planck radiation from the surface beneath the pack which travels upwards through the pack towards the radiometer; such a signal we call a direct signal. On the other hand, part of this radiation reflects back from the pack's upper interface then from its lower interface, before traveling towards the radiometer's antenna. Thus, there are two signals received by the radiometer, the direct signal and a delayed copy of it. The microwave propagation time τdelay through the pack yields a measure of its vertical extent. We report a time series of measurements of the ice pack on Lake Superior from February to April 2014 to demonstrate this technique. The observations are done at frequencies from 7 to 10 GHz. At these frequencies, the volume and surface scattering are small in the ice pack. This technique is inherently low-power since there is no transmitter as opposed to active remote sensing techniques. The results of this paper is to present the WiBAR technique and show that the microwave travel time within a dry snow pack and lake ice pack can be deterministically measured for different thicknesses using this technique.

  9. No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jessica R; Levchenko, Vladimir A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W; Williams, Alan; Truscott, Roger JW

    2015-01-01

    Lipids are critical to cellular function and it is generally accepted that lipid turnover is rapid and dysregulation in turnover results in disease (Dawidowicz 1987; Phillips et al., 2009; Liu et al., 2013). In this study, we present an intriguing counter-example by demonstrating that in the center of the human ocular lens, there is no lipid turnover in fiber cells during the entire human lifespan. This discovery, combined with prior demonstration of pronounced changes in the lens lipid composition over a lifetime (Hughes et al., 2012), suggests that some lipid classes break down in the body over several decades, whereas others are stable. Such substantial changes in lens cell membranes may play a role in the genesis of age-related eye disorders. Whether long-lived lipids are present in other tissues is not yet known, but this may prove to be important in understanding the development of age-related diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06003.001 PMID:25760082

  10. Recent advances in the entirely subcutaneous ICD System.

    PubMed

    Bettin, Markus; Reinke, Florian; Rath, Benjamin; Köbe, Julia; Eckardt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD(®)) is emerging as a widely accepted therapeutic alternative to a conventional implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for prevention of sudden cardiac death. Essentially, the S-ICD(®) is promising in terms of reduction of electrode-related complications such as lead failure and infections. The conventional transvenous ICD has proven efficacy in various randomized clinical trials. The first results of S-ICD(®) studies confirm efficacy and safety in primary and secondary prevention as well. Owing to basic differences between S-ICD(®) and transvenous ICD-such as limited programming options and lack of pacing-not all patients are eligible for the S-ICD(®). Concerns exist regarding inappropriate shocks due to T-wave oversensing, dimensions of the device, and shorter battery longevity. However, the S-ICD(®) should be considered a useful supplementation of ICD therapy in those patients at risk for sudden cardiac death who are not expected to require pacing due to bradycardia or antitachycardic pacing. PMID:26097719

  11. An Exon-Capture System for the Entire Class Ophiuroidea

    PubMed Central

    Hugall, Andrew F.; O’Hara, Timothy D.; Hunjan, Sumitha; Nilsen, Roger; Moussalli, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Exon-capture studies have typically been restricted to relatively shallow phylogenetic scales due primarily to hybridization constraints. Here, we present an exon-capture system for an entire class of marine invertebrates, the Ophiuroidea, built upon a phylogenetically diverse transcriptome foundation. The system captures approximately 90% of the 1,552 exon target, across all major lineages of the quarter-billion-year-old extant crown group. Key features of our system are 1) basing the target on an alignment of orthologous genes determined from 52 transcriptomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity and trimmed to remove anything difficult to capture, map, or align; 2) use of multiple artificial representatives based on ancestral state reconstructions rather than exemplars to improve capture and mapping of the target; 3) mapping reads to a multi-reference alignment; and 4) using patterns of site polymorphism to distinguish among paralogy, polyploidy, allelic differences, and sample contamination. The resulting data give a well-resolved tree (currently standing at 417 samples, 275,352 sites, 91% data-complete) that will transform our understanding of ophiuroid evolution and biogeography. PMID:26474846

  12. Spacecraft Conceptual Design for Returning Entire Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Oleson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    In situ resource utilization (ISRU) in general, and asteroid mining in particular are ideas that have been around for a long time, and for good reason. It is clear that ultimately human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit will have to utilize the material resources available in space. Historically, the lack of sufficiently capable in-space transportation has been one of the key impediments to the harvesting of near-Earth asteroid resources. With the advent of high-power (or order 40 kW) solar electric propulsion systems, that impediment is being removed. High-power solar electric propulsion (SEP) would be enabling for the exploitation of asteroid resources. The design of a 40-kW end-of-life SEP system is presented that could rendezvous with, capture, and subsequently transport a 1,000-metric-ton near-Earth asteroid back to cislunar space. The conceptual spacecraft design was developed by the Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team at the Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) team assembled to investigate the feasibility of an asteroid retrieval mission. Returning such an object to cislunar space would enable astronaut crews to inspect, sample, dissect, and ultimately determine how to extract the desired materials from the asteroid. This process could jump-start the entire ISRU industry.

  13. An Exon-Capture System for the Entire Class Ophiuroidea.

    PubMed

    Hugall, Andrew F; O'Hara, Timothy D; Hunjan, Sumitha; Nilsen, Roger; Moussalli, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Exon-capture studies have typically been restricted to relatively shallow phylogenetic scales due primarily to hybridization constraints. Here, we present an exon-capture system for an entire class of marine invertebrates, the Ophiuroidea, built upon a phylogenetically diverse transcriptome foundation. The system captures approximately 90% of the 1,552 exon target, across all major lineages of the quarter-billion-year-old extant crown group. Key features of our system are 1) basing the target on an alignment of orthologous genes determined from 52 transcriptomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity and trimmed to remove anything difficult to capture, map, or align; 2) use of multiple artificial representatives based on ancestral state reconstructions rather than exemplars to improve capture and mapping of the target; 3) mapping reads to a multi-reference alignment; and 4) using patterns of site polymorphism to distinguish among paralogy, polyploidy, allelic differences, and sample contamination. The resulting data give a well-resolved tree (currently standing at 417 samples, 275,352 sites, 91% data-complete) that will transform our understanding of ophiuroid evolution and biogeography. PMID:26474846

  14. Radiotherapy and Concomitant Intra-Arterial Docetaxel Combined With Systemic 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Report-Improvement of Locoregional Control of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, Hirobumi Nakamura, Ryuji; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Kohji; Sato, Hiroaki; Ehara, Shigeru

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To confirm the advantage of chemoradiotherapy using intra-arterial docetaxel with intravenous cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 oropharyngeal cancer patients (1, 2, 2, and 21 patients had Stage I, II, III, and IVa-IVc, respectively) were treated with two sessions of this chemoradiotherapy regimen. External beam radiotherapy was delivered using large portals that included the primary site and the regional lymph nodes initially (range, 40-41.4 Gy) and the metastatic lymph nodes later (60 or 72 Gy). All tumor-supplying branches of the carotid arteries were cannulated, and 40 mg/m{sup 2} docetaxel was individually infused on Day 1. The other systemic chemotherapy agents included 60 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin on Day 2 and 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil on Days 2-6. Results: The primary response of the tumor was complete in 21 (81%), partial in 4 (15%), and progressive in 1 patient. Grade 4 mucositis, leukopenia, and dermatitis was observed in 3, 2, and 1 patients, respectively. During a median follow-up of 10 months, the disease recurred at the primary site and at a distant organ in 2 (8%) and 3 (12%) patients, respectively. Three patients died because of cancer progression. Two patients (8%) with a partial response were compromised by lethal bleeding from the tumor bed or chemotherapeutic toxicity. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate was 73% and 77%, respectively. Conclusion: This method resulted in an excellent primary tumor response rate (96%) and moderate acute toxicity. Additional follow-up is required to ascertain the usefulness of this modality.

  15. Envelope glycans of immunodeficiency virions are almost entirely oligomannose antigens

    PubMed Central

    Doores, Katie J.; Bonomelli, Camille; Harvey, David J.; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Dwek, Raymond A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Crispin, Max; Scanlan, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    The envelope spike of HIV is one of the most highly N-glycosylated structures found in nature. However, despite extensive research revealing essential functional roles in infection and immune evasion, the chemical structures of the glycans on the native viral envelope glycoprotein gp120—as opposed to recombinantly generated gp120—have not been described. Here, we report on the identity of the N-linked glycans from primary isolates of HIV-1 (clades A, B, and C) and from the simian immunodeficiency virus. MS analysis reveals a remarkably simple and highly conserved virus-specific glycan profile almost entirely devoid of medial Golgi-mediated processing. In stark contrast to recombinant gp120, which shows extensive exposure to cellular glycosylation enzymes (>70% complex type glycans), the native envelope shows barely detectable processing beyond the biosynthetic intermediate Man5GlcNAc2 (<2% complex type glycans). This oligomannose (Man5–9GlcNAc2) profile is conserved across primary isolates and geographically divergent clades but is not reflected in the current generation of gp120 antigens used for vaccine trials. In the context of vaccine design, we also note that Manα1→2Man-terminating glycans (Man6–9GlcNAc2) of the type recognized by the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibody 2G12 are 3-fold more abundant on the native envelope than on the recombinant monomer and are also found on isolates not neutralized by 2G12. The Manα1→2Man residues of gp120 therefore provide a vaccine target that is physically larger and antigenically more conserved than the 2G12 epitope itself. This study revises and extends our understanding of the glycan shield of HIV with implications for AIDS vaccine design. PMID:20643940

  16. Rockfall risk mapping for the entire Swiss national road network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorren, L.; Sandri, A.; Raetzo, H.; Arnold, P.

    2009-04-01

    Since January 2008, the federal roads office (FEDRO) is responsible for the entire national road/highway network of Switzerland. Until then, the national roads were managed by Cantonal road services until 2008. As a result, Swiss-wide, standardized information on natural hazards that threaten national roads was not available. The FEDRO therefore decided to initiate a four year project, with the technical support of the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN), aiming at quantifying and mapping all risks due to natural hazards threatening Swiss national roads (total length = 1892 km). For rockfall, the frequency and intensity should be determined by geotechnical bureaus that carry out the field investigations and the subsequent hazard and risk modeling. To aim for a homogeneous and comparable dataset, a working method consisting of three steps has been developed. The first step defines how and which event-size scenarios (return period 0 - 10 yrs, 10 - 30 yrs, 30 - 100 yrs, 100 - 300 yrs.) should be determined. The second defines how the potentially affected area given the 4 scenarios and existing protective measures (nets, dams, forest, etc.) should be delimited. The third defines how the risk of having highway closure, damage to cars and infrastructure or casualties due to rockfall affecting the national roads and surroundings should be calculated and visualized. A pilot study started in July 2008, which covers 20 km of the Gotthard highway, in which 2 groups of jointly working geotechnical bureaus are studying the rockfall hazards. Their first results are currently available. We will present the details of each step of the developed method illustrated by the first project results and subsequently discuss gaps in knowledge and methodological differences that emerged and, if possible, potential solutions.

  17. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  19. Quasistatic packings of droplets in flat microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadivar, Erfan

    2016-02-01

    As observed in recent experiments, monodisperse droplets self-assemble spontaneously in different ordered packings. In this work, we present a numerical study of the droplet packings in the flat rectangular microfluidic channels. Employing the boundary element method, we numerically solve the Stokes equation in two-dimension and investigate the appearance of droplet packing and transition between one and two-row packings of monodisperse emulsion droplets. By calculating packing force applied on the droplet interface, we investigate the effect of flow rate, droplet size, and surface tension on the packing configurations of droplets and transition between different topological packings.

  20. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  1. Claw grip contact probe for flat packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, J. W., Jr.

    1985-09-01

    A probe device including a unitary body 2 and a sliding plate means 44 for testing and diagnosing multi-lead electrical flat packs. The sliding plate means contains two sets of holes 52 into which are inserted spring-loaded electrical contact probes for making contact with the leads of the electrical flat pack. The unitary body 2 includes comb teeth for orienting the unitary body over the leads of the electrical flat pack, as well as gripping means having hook ends for securely fastening the probe device to the electrical flat pack being tested or diagnosed. The gripping means include an outwardly flared portion against which the sliding plate means exerts inward lateral pressure causing the hook ends to grip underneath the electrical flat pack at each corner thereof to securely clamp it in place. Included in unitary body 2 is at least one threaded hole which is sufficiently large to allow a size 4 to 40 machine screw to pass therethrough.

  2. [Clinical significance and functional outcomes of ligation of exterior carotid artery in surgical treatment of oropharyngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Klochikhin, A L; Trofimov, E I; Gamilovskaia, Iu V; Chistiakov, A L

    2010-01-01

    This work was designed to analyse outcomes of the treatment of 65 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer who had received combined treatment including radical resection of the tumour. Thirty three patients underwent surgery without ligation of exterior carotid artery while the remaining 32 (control group) were operated after preceding ligation of this vessel. The influence of ligation of exterior carotid artery on cerebral circulation was evaluated by the following methods: estimation of the intraoperative blood loss from A.T. Staroverov's formula, ultrasound dopplerography of extracranial carotid segments, electroencephalography, measurement of the fields of vision using statistical quantitative perimetry, evaluation of the patients' neurologic status. It was shown that ligation of exterior carotid artery has no apparent effect on the intraoperative blood loss during radical surgery for the management of oropharyngeal cancer nor does it influence healing of the postoperative wound and oncological outcome of this treatment. PMID:20436415

  3. Deterioration of organic packing materials commonly used in air biofiltration: effect of VOC-packing interactions.

    PubMed

    Lebrero, Raquel; Estrada, José M; Muñoz, Raúl; Quijano, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    The abiotic deterioration of three conventional organic packing materials used in biofiltration (compost, wood bark and Macadamia nutshells) caused by their interaction with toluene (used as a model volatile organic compound) was here studied. The deterioration of the materials was evaluated in terms of structural damage, release of co-substrates and increase of the packing biodegradability. After 21 days of exposure to toluene, all packing materials released co-substrates able to support microbial growth, which were not released by the control materials not exposed to toluene. Likewise, the exposure to toluene increased the packing material biodegradability by 26% in wood bark, 20% in compost and 17% in Macadamia nutshells. Finally, scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the deterioration in the structure of the packing materials evaluated due to the exposure to toluene, Macadamia nutshells being the material with the highest resistance to volatile organic compound attack. PMID:24603032

  4. Betel quid chewing and the risk of oral and oropharyngeal cancers: a meta-analysis with implications for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Guha, Neela; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Straif, Kurt

    2014-09-15

    We conducted a random-effects meta-analysis of 50 publications assessing the relationship between oral/oropharyngeal cancer and chewing betel quid, with (BQ+T) or without added tobacco (BQ-T), a common practice in many parts of Asia and globally among Asian immigrants. Exposure-response, by daily amount and years of BQ chewed, was assessed using spline models. Attributable fractions (PAF%) were calculated to estimate the public health impact if BQ were no longer chewed. The meta-relative risk (mRR) for oral/oropharyngeal cancer in the Indian subcontinent was 2.56 (95%CI, 2.00-3.28; 15 studies) for BQ-T and 7.74 (95%CI, 5.38-11.13; 31 studies) for BQ+T; in Taiwan, China, the mRR for BQ-T was 10.98 (95%CI, 4.86-24.84; 13 studies). Restricting to studies that adjusted for tobacco and alcohol use had only a small effect on the risk estimates. For BQ+T in the Indian subcontinent, the mRR was much higher in women (mRR, 14.56; 95%CI, 7.63-27.76) than in men. Exposure-response analyses showed that the risk of oral/oropharyngeal cancer increased with increasing daily amount and duration (years) of chewing BQ in India and Taiwan, China. Roughly half of oral cancers in these countries could be prevented if BQ were no longer chewed (PAF%=53.7% for BQ-T in Taiwan, China; PAF%=49.5% for BQ+T in India). We demonstrate that betel quid chewing, with or without added tobacco, increases the risk of oral/oropharyngeal cancer in an exposure-dependent manner, independently of tobacco and alcohol use. Further work is needed to explain the higher risks associated with chewing BQ-T in Taiwan, China. PMID:24302487

  5. GraSPI (Graphical Structured Packing Interface)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-06-10

    GraSPI is a collection of macros (computer programs) written to work in concert with Fluent Inc. software GAMBIT and FLUENT for modeling and design of structured packing columns used in the chemical industry (the application focus is in distillation but other applications such as gas absorbers, and other chemical contactors can also be analyzed). GraSPI is an accessory to GAMBIT and FLUENT that drives the process of complex geometry creation, domain setup, and mesh generation.more » In addition, GraSPI manages automatic flow analysis in the aforementioned domain via either serial or parallel computing using FLUENT. A library of typical commercial structured packing elements is included in GraSPI, so is the capability for user-defined creation of new packings.« less

  6. Method for packed column separations and purifications

    DOEpatents

    Holman, David A.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2006-08-15

    The invention encompasses a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber. A mixture of a fluid and a matrix material are introduced through a column chamber inlet so that the matrix material is packed within a column chamber to form a packed column. The column chamber having the column chamber inlet or first port for receiving the mixture further has an outlet port and an actuator port. The outlet port is partially closed for capturing the matrix material and permitting the fluid to flow therepast by rotating relative one to the other of a rod placed in the actuator port. Further rotation relative one to the other of the rod and the column chamber opens the outlet and permits the matrix material and the fluid to flow therethrough thereby unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber.

  7. Spontaneous Crystallization in Athermal Polymer Packings

    PubMed Central

    Karayiannis, Nikos Ch.; Foteinopoulou, Katerina; Laso, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    We review recent results from extensive simulations of the crystallization of athermal polymer packings. It is shown that above a certain packing density, and for sufficiently long simulations, all random assemblies of freely-jointed chains of tangent hard spheres of uniform size show a spontaneous transition into a crystalline phase. These polymer crystals adopt predominantly random hexagonal close packed morphologies. An analysis of the local environment around monomers based on the shape and size of the Voronoi polyhedra clearly shows that Voronoi cells become more spherical and more symmetric as the system transits to the ordered state. The change in the local environment leads to an increase in the monomer translational contribution to the entropy of the system, which acts as the driving force for the phase transition. A comparison of the crystallization of hard-sphere polymers and monomers highlights similarities and differences resulting from the constraints imposed by chain connectivity. PMID:23263666

  8. Safety considerations for fabricating lithium battery packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium cell safety is a major issue with both manufacturers and end users. Most manufacturers have taken great strides to develop the safest cells possible while still maintaining performance characteristics. The combining of lithium cells for higher voltages, currents, and capacities requires the fabricator of lithium battery packs to be knowledgable about the specific electrochemical system being used. Relatively high rate, spirally wound (large surface area) sulfur oxychloride cells systems, such as Li/Thionyl or Sulfuryl chloride are considered. Prior to the start of a design of a battery pack, a review of the characterization studies for the cells should be conducted. The approach for fabricating a battery pack might vary with cell size.

  9. Central nervous system integration of sensorimotor signals in oral and pharyngeal structures: oropharyngeal kinematics response to recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Lammers, Andrew R; Gross, Andrew; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; German, Rebecca Z

    2016-03-01

    Safe, efficient liquid feeding in infant mammals requires the central coordination of oropharyngeal structures innervated by multiple cranial and spinal nerves. The importance of laryngeal sensation and central sensorimotor integration in this system is poorly understood. Recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion (RLN) results in increased aspiration, though the mechanism for this is unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of unilateral RLN lesion on the motor coordination of infant liquid feeding. We hypothesized that 1) RLN lesion results in modified swallow kinematics, 2) postlesion oropharyngeal kinematics of unsafe swallows differ from those of safe swallows, and 3) nonswallowing phases of the feeding cycle show changed kinematics postlesion. We implanted radio opaque markers in infant pigs and filmed them pre- and postlesion with high-speed videofluoroscopy. Markers locations were digitized, and swallows were assessed for airway protection. RLN lesion resulted in modified kinematics of the tongue relative to the epiglottis in safe swallows. In lesioned animals, safe swallow kinematics differed from unsafe swallows. Unsafe swallow postlesion kinematics resembled prelesion safe swallows. The movement of the tongue was reduced in oral transport postlesion. Between different regions of the tongue, response to lesion was similar, and relative timing within the tongue was unchanged. RLN lesion has a pervasive effect on infant feeding kinematics, related to the efficiency of airway protection. The timing of tongue and hyolaryngeal kinematics in swallows is a crucial locus for swallow disruption. Laryngeal sensation is essential for the central coordination in feeding of oropharyngeal structures receiving motor inputs from different cranial nerves. PMID:26679618

  10. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000–40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977–2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09%) addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5%) were from Canada, 3 (13.6%) were from Japan, 2 (9%) were from Brazil, 2 (9%) were from Germany, 1 (4.5%) was from the USA, 1 (4.5%) was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5%) was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (re)habilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children. PMID:25991964

  11. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, and Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Claire; Gemmell, Elizabeth; Kenworthy, James; Speyer, Renée

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common condition after stroke, Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can cause serious complications including malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and premature mortality. Despite its high prevalence among the elderly and associated serious complications, dysphagia is often overlooked and under-diagnosed in vulnerable patient populations. This systematic review aimed to improve understanding and awareness of the prevalence of dysphagia in susceptible patient populations. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, PROSPERO, and disease-specific websites were systematically searched for studies reporting oropharyngeal dysphagia prevalence or incidence in people with stroke, PD, AD, traumatic brain injury, and community-acquired pneumonia, from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Japan, China, and regional studies. The quality of study descriptions were assessed based on STROBE guidelines. A total of 1207 publications were identified and 33 met inclusion criteria: 24 in stroke, six in PD, two in traumatic brain injury, and one in patients with traumatic brain injury. Dysphagia was reported in 8.1-80 % of stroke patients, 11-81 % of PD, 27-30 % of traumatic brain injury patients, and 91.7 % of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. No relevant studies of dysphagia in AD were identified. This review demonstrates that dysphagia is highly prevalent in these populations, and highlights discrepancies between studies, gaps in dysphagia research, and the need for better dysphagia management starting with a reliable, standardized, and validated method for oropharyngeal dysphagia identification. PMID:26970760

  12. Effect of IQoro® training on impaired postural control and oropharyngeal motor function in patients with dysphagia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired postural control in patients with stroke-related dysphagia and if IQS training has any effect on impaired postural control in parallel with effect on OPMD. Method A prospective clinical study was carried out with 26 adult patients with stroke-related dysphagia. The training effect was compared between patients consecutively investigated at two different time periods, the first period with 15 patients included in the study more than half a year after stroke, the second period with 11 patients included within 1 month after stroke. Postural control tests and different oropharyngeal motor tests were performed before and after 3 months of oropharyngeal sensorimotor training with an IQS, and at a late follow-up (median 59 weeks after end of training). Result All patients had impaired postural control at baseline. Significant improvement in postural control and OPMD was observed after the completion of IQS training in both intervention groups. The improvements were still present at the late follow-up. PMID:26924256

  13. Early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Annelise; Jarden, Mary

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to explore early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and to investigate the factors that influence these effects. PubMed, Cinahl, and PsycInfo were searched for studies concerning patients diagnosed with oral and oropharyngeal cancers and treated with primary surgery and which followed the treatment trajectory from time of diagnosis to 10 years after surgery; these studies reported the quantitative assessments and qualitative experiences of the patient's physical and psychosocial well-being. Of the 438 articles accessed, 20 qualified for inclusion, of which 16 and 4 were quantitative and qualitative articles, respectively, and mainly quality-of-life assessments. Time of measurement ranged from time of diagnosis to 9 years after the surgical procedure. The total number of patients included in this review was 3386; of these, 1996 were treated by surgery alone and 1390 with combined surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. The studies showed that because of the nature of their disease, patients are negatively affected by the different types of surgical treatment for oral and oropharyngeal cancers, with both early and late interrelated effects, and by the side effects of adjuvant therapy. PMID:26948021

  14. Longitudinal evaluation of restricted mouth opening (trismus) in patients following primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Scott, B; D'Souza, J; Perinparajah, N; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2011-03-01

    Trismus is a serious problem for some patients after oral and oropharyngeal cancer, and it has a detrimental impact on quality of life and function. We know of few published papers that include preoperative assessment in reports on the longitudinal outcomes of mouth opening after oral and oropharyngeal surgery. We prospectively measured mouth opening in patients who had primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancer from baseline to six months to find out the characteristics at baseline and at discharge of those who develop trismus at six months. Ninety-eight patients were eligible between February 2007 and March 2008, and 64 (65%) were recruited into the study. The range of mouth opening was measured on three occasions: before operation, on the ward before discharge from hospital, and at follow-up six months after operation. Using a criterion of 35 mm or less as an indication of trismus, 30% (19/63) had trismus before operation, 65% (37/57) at hospital discharge, and 54% (26/48) at six month follow-up. Patients at high risk of trismus were those with T stage 3 or 4 cancers who required free flap reconstruction and adjuvant radiotherapy; radiotherapy was the most significant factor at six months. Trismus at discharge was a prediction of trismus at six months. Interventions such as spatulas or a passive jaw mobiliser should be targeted at patients at high risk early in the postoperative phase. The efficacy of such interventions needs further research. PMID:20236743

  15. Effect of probiotic bacteria on prevalence of yeasts in oropharyngeal biofilms on silicone rubber voice prostheses in vitro.

    PubMed

    van der Mei, H C; Free, R H; Elving, G J; Van Weissenbruch, R; Albers, F W; Busscher, H J

    2000-08-01

    The proliferation of yeasts in the mixed bacterial and fungal biofilms colonising silicone rubber voice prostheses in laryngectomised patients is the main cause of malfunctioning of the valve mechanism on the oesophageal side of the prostheses. Indwelling voice prostheses usually have to be replaced every 3-4 months. The consumption of probiotic bacteria is largely motivated by health claims related to the urogenital and lower digestive tract, but not to the upper digestive tract. The present study examined the influence of probiotic bacteria on the prevalence of yeasts in oropharyngeal biofilms on silicone rubber voice prostheses, as formed in a modified Robbins device. Exposure of oropharyngeal biofilms on voice prostheses to suspensions of Bifidobacterium infantis 420 or Enterococcus faecium 603 did not significantly reduce the number of yeasts in the biofilm. However, suspensions of Lactobacillus fermentum B54, L. rhamnosus 744 or L. lactis cremoris SK11 led to a reduction in the number of yeasts harvested from the voice prostheses. Suspensions of L. casei Shirota and Streptococcus thermophilus B significantly reduced the number of yeasts in the biofilm to 39% and 33%, respectively. The reduction brought about in yeast prevalence in the mixed biofilm was greatest by exposure to a suspension of L. lactis 53, with yeast prevalence only 4% of the control. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that the prevalence of yeasts in oropharyngeal biofilms on silicone rubber voice prostheses might be controlled by consumption of probiotic bacteria. PMID:10933256

  16. Dense packing: surgical indications and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Farjo, Bessam; Farjo, Nilofer

    2013-08-01

    Dense packing is the philosophy of fitting more than 30 to 35 follicular unit grafts per square centimeter in one operation. The aim is to produce a more even, consistent, and natural looking flow of hair after just one procedure. Although desirable in principle, not all patients are suitable candidates nor is it possible to achieve in certain patients (eg, coarse or curly hair). Patients who have sufficient donor availability, reasonably stable hair loss, and high hair-to-skin color ratios are the ideal candidates. The authors highlight their philosophies and strategies for dense packing. PMID:24017984

  17. Imaging of drug smuggling by body packing.

    PubMed

    Sica, Giacomo; Guida, Franco; Bocchini, Giorgio; Iaselli, Francesco; Iadevito, Isabella; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-02-01

    Body packing, pushing, and stuffing are hazardous practices with complex medicolegal and social implications. A radiologist plays both a social and a medicolegal role in their assessment, and it should not be limited only to the identification of the packages but must also provide accurate information about their number and their exact location so as to prevent any package remains in the body packer. Radiologists must also be able to recognize the complications associated with these risky practices. Imaging assessment of body packing is performed essentially through plain abdominal X-ray and computed tomography scans. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, although with some advantages, actually have a limited use. PMID:25639176

  18. Molecular predictors of locoregional and distant metastases in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increasing due to fundamental changes in oncogenesis related to effects of the human papilomavirus (HPV). Virally-mediated tumours behave and respond to treatment differently than their classic, carcinogenically-mediated counterparts despite similar stage and grade of disease. This difference in behaviour has lead to investigation of etiologies of OPSCC at the molecular level. Molecular biomarkers offer potential insight into the behaviour of OPSCC. Identifying a subset of patients that are more likely to have recurrence and distant metastasis is valuable for prognostication and treatment planning. There is limited information regarding the profiles of these biomarkers in locoregional and distant metastases in OPSCC. Objective This study was designed to identify biomarker profiles predictive of locoregional and distant metastases and recurrence in OPSCC. Methods Cross-sectional study of a prospectively-collected oropharyngeal tumour database was undertaken. All patients with OPSCC presenting to the University of Alberta Hospital from 2002-2009 were included in the study. Data collection from the Alberta Cancer Registry, including demographics, nodal status, distant metastases, treatment, recurrence, and survival, was undertaken. Tissue micro-arrays (TMAs) were constructed for each tumour specimen using triplicate cores (0.6mm) of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) pre-treatment tumour tissue. TMAs were processed using immunohistochemistry for p16, EGFR, Ki67, p53, and Bcl-XL. Positivity for each biomarker was determined using quantified AQUAnalysis ® scores on histoplots. Multivariate statistics were utilized to assess the relationship between each biomarker and locoregional and distant metastases, as well as recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results High expression of p16 (p=0.000) and Bcl-XL (p=0.039) independently demonstrated a significant association with nodal disease at

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae oropharyngeal colonization in school-age children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Impact of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Cappa, Marco; Maffeis, Claudio; Chiarelli, Franco; Bona, Gianni; Gambino, Monia; Ruggiero, Luca; Patianna, Viviana; Matteoli, Maria Cristina; Marigliano, Marco; Cipriano, Paola; Parlamento, Silvia; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) to investigate the theoretical risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in these patients and the potential protective efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs). An oropharyngeal swab was obtained from 299 patients aged 6-17 y with DM1 who were enrolled during routine clinical visits. DNA from swabs was analyzed for S. pneumoniae using real-time polymerase chain reaction. S. pneumoniae was identified in the swabs of 148 subjects (49.8%). Colonization was strictly age-related and declined significantly in the group aged ≥15 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.57). Carriage was also significantly influenced by sex (lower in females: OR 0.56; 95% CI, 0.35-0.91), ethnicity (less common among non-Caucasians: OR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13-0.89), parental smoking habit (more frequent among children with at least one smoker between parents: OR 1.76; 95% CI, 0.90-2.07), and the administration of antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months (less frequent among patients who received antibiotics: OR 0.21; 95% CI, 0.07-0.62). Multivariate analyses of the entire study population showed no association between carriage and PCV7 vaccination status. Serotypes 19F, 9V, and 4 were the most frequently identified serotypes. In conclusion, school-age children and adolescents with DM1 are frequently colonized by S. pneumoniae, and protection against pneumococcal carriage following infant and toddler vaccination was not effective after several years. Together with the need to increase vaccine uptake in all the children aged <2 years, these results suggest that PCV booster doses are needed in DM1 patients to maintain the protection offered by these vaccinations. PMID:26575615

  20. Effects of epidermal growth factor and keratinocyte growth factor on the growth of oropharyngeal keratinocytes in coculture with autologous fibroblasts in a three-dimensional matrix.

    PubMed

    Blaimauer, Karin; Watzinger, Elisabeth; Erovic, Boban M; Martinek, Helga; Jagersberger, Tamara; Thurnher, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering of oropharyngeal mucosa is rendered complex by the fact that oropharyngeal keratinocytes are difficult to culture in the long term and do not grow well after several subcultivations. Three populations of oropharyngeal keratinocytes were isolated by a method based on different levels of beta(1)-integrin expression. In particular, keratinocytes were isolated between cell fractions that adhere rapidly on collagen-IV-coated culture dishes (RAC-IV) and populations that are less adherent (RAC-IV-D). The total fraction of both subpopulations served as a control (RAC-IV-T). The epidermal growth factor (EGF) and the keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) were examined with regard to their effects on the growth of the three populations. Growth curves of all three cell fractions grown with or without EGF were generated, and different concentrations of EGF and KGF were tested. EGF did not change any growth characteristics of the cells, with the exception of the speed of growth. Best growth was achieved with a physiologic EGF concentration of 0.15-1.5 ng/ml and a KGF concentration of 15 ng/ml. Finally, we cocultured oropharyngeal keratinocytes and their autologous fibroblasts in a three-dimensional matrix using Matrigeltrade mark. Oropharyngeal keratinocytes grown in coculture formed larger colonies than keratinocytes grown without fibroblasts. In conclusion, we were able to optimize the supplement of EGF and KGF in standard medium for the long-term culture of primary oropharyngeal keratinocytes. The use of Matrigel as a scaffold for three-dimensional cocultures of oropharyngeal keratinocytes and fibroblasts might signify a step forward in the development of a transplantable mucosa construct. PMID:16804300

  1. The benefits of using customized procedure packs.

    PubMed

    Baines, R; Colquhoun, G; Jones, N; Bateman, R

    2001-01-01

    Discrete item purchasing is the traditional approach for hospitals to obtain consumable supplies for theatre procedures. Although most items are relatively low cost, the management and co-ordination of the supply chain, raising orders, controlling stock, picking and delivering to each operating theatre can be complex and costly. Customized procedure packs provide a solution. PMID:11892113

  2. Radiological and practical aspects of body packing.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A; Reginelli, A; Pinto, F; Sica, G; Scaglione, M; Berger, F H; Romano, L; Brunese, L

    2014-04-01

    Body packing represents the concealment of illegal substances in a person's body with the aim of smuggling. "Body packers" either swallow drug-filled packets or introduce drug-filled packets into their bodies rectally or vaginally with the purpose of concealing them. The three main smuggled drugs are cocaine, heroin and cannabis products. Body packing represents a serious risk of acute narcotic toxicity from drug exposure, intestinal obstruction owing to pellet impaction and bowel perforation with consequent abdominal sepsis. A suspected body packer is generally admitted to hospital to perform imaging investigations and confirm the presence of drugs in his/her body. Radiological imaging methods are essential to diagnose body packing and to detect potential complications. Increasing sophistication of traffickers and improvements in packaging add to the detection difficulty. Radiologists should be aware of the appearance of drug packets in a range of imaging modalities. This article informs physicians about the challenging aspects of body packing, its background and medicolegal issues, what imaging methods can be used and what criteria are necessary to perform a correct diagnosis. PMID:24472727

  3. Radiological and practical aspects of body packing

    PubMed Central

    Reginelli, A; Pinto, F; Sica, G; Scaglione, M; Berger, F H; Romano, L; Brunese, L

    2014-01-01

    Body packing represents the concealment of illegal substances in a person's body with the aim of smuggling. “Body packers” either swallow drug-filled packets or introduce drug-filled packets into their bodies rectally or vaginally with the purpose of concealing them. The three main smuggled drugs are cocaine, heroin and cannabis products. Body packing represents a serious risk of acute narcotic toxicity from drug exposure, intestinal obstruction owing to pellet impaction and bowel perforation with consequent abdominal sepsis. A suspected body packer is generally admitted to hospital to perform imaging investigations and confirm the presence of drugs in his/her body. Radiological imaging methods are essential to diagnose body packing and to detect potential complications. Increasing sophistication of traffickers and improvements in packaging add to the detection difficulty. Radiologists should be aware of the appearance of drug packets in a range of imaging modalities. This article informs physicians about the challenging aspects of body packing, its background and medicolegal issues, what imaging methods can be used and what criteria are necessary to perform a correct diagnosis. PMID:24472727

  4. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, Jennifer C.; Smith, W. Wendell; Regan, Lynne; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2016-03-01

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ≈0.75 , a value that is similar to close packing of equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of extended atom models, rather than the more physically accurate explicit hydrogen model. The validity of the explicit hydrogen model was proved in our previous studies by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. In contrast, the extended atom model is not able to recapitulate the side chain dihedral angle distributions, and gives rise to large atomic clashes at side chain dihedral angle combinations that are highly probable in protein crystal structures. Here, we employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high-resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ≈0.56 , which is similar to results obtained from simulations of random packings of individual amino acids. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations to protein cores and interfaces of known structure.

  5. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  6. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets. PMID:27131565

  7. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  8. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  9. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  10. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  11. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  12. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  13. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-01

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile - each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  14. Characteristics of Stratified Bedded Pack Dairy Manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    "Compost" dairy barns are a relatively new housing system that generates a deep (0.9 to 1.5 m), stratified bedded pack (SBP) manure source. Bedding composed of sawdust, wood chips, or crop residues accumulates as additions are made to maintain a dry surface. Surface drying is promoted by a combinati...

  15. Porous bead packings for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Woeller, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    Porous polyaromatic packing beads have low polarity, high efficiency, short retention time, and may be synthesized in size range of 50 to 150 micrometers (100 to 270 mesh). Mechanically strong beads may be produced using various materials depending on elements and compounds to be identified.

  16. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  17. Stuffed Derivatives of Close-Packed Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bodie E.

    2007-01-01

    Decades ago Buerger described and later Palmer reviewed stuffed silica crystal structures widely used by mineralogists. Many publications and books have discussed common crystal structures in terms of close-packing of one set of atoms or ions (P sites) with other atoms or ions in tetrahedral (T) or octahedral (O) sites. Douglas and Ho described…

  18. PROTEIN RECOVERY FROM BEEF PACKING EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The wastewater from a beef packing plant contained 4,600 mg/1 COD and 2,500 mg/1 of suspended solids. A physiochemical wastewater treatment process that recovers protein removed 80% of the oxygen demand and suspended solids, and 94% of the fat, oil, and grease. Total cost was $3 ...

  19. 7 CFR 947.14 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pack. 947.14 Section 947.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND...

  20. 7 CFR 947.14 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pack. 947.14 Section 947.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND...

  1. 7 CFR 947.14 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pack. 947.14 Section 947.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND...

  2. 7 CFR 947.14 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pack. 947.14 Section 947.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND...

  3. 7 CFR 947.14 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pack. 947.14 Section 947.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND...

  4. Packing morphology of wavy nanofiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Stein, Itai Y; Wardle, Brian L

    2016-01-14

    Existing theories for quantifying the morphology of nanofibers (NFs) in aligned arrays either neglect or assume a simple functional form for the curvature of the NFs, commonly known as the NF waviness. However, since such assumptions cannot adequately describe the waviness of real NFs, errors that can exceed 10% in the predicted inter-NF separation can result. Here we use a theoretical framework capable of simulating >10(5) NFs with stochastic three-dimensional morphologies to quantify NF waviness on an easily accessible measure of the morphology, the inter-NF spacing, for a range of NF volume fractions. The presented scaling of inter-NF spacing with waviness is then used to study the morphology evolution of aligned carbon nanotube (A-CNT) arrays during packing, showing that the effective two-dimensional coordination number of the A-CNTs increases much faster than previously reported during close packing, and that hexagonal close packing can successfully describe the packing morphology of the A-CNTs at volume fractions greater than 40 vol%. PMID:26658525

  5. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  6. Monkey Baker in bio-pack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Baker, in bio-pack couch being readied for Jupiter (AM-18 flight). Jupiter, AM-18 mission, also carried an American-born rhesus monkey, Able into suborbit. The flight was successful and both monkeys were recovered in good condition. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959.

  7. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  8. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  9. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  10. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohern, Corey

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ~ 0 . 75 , a value that is similar to close packing equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of `extended atom' models, rather than the more physically accurate `explicit hydrogen' model. The validity of using the explicit hydrogen model is proved by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. We employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ~ 0 . 55 , which is comparable to random close-packing of non-spherical particles. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations and design of new functional proteins. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences, National Library of Medicine training grant T15LM00705628 (J.C.G.), and National Science Foundation DMR-1307712 (L.R.).

  11. Action Pack: Financial Resources for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelock Coll., Boston, MA. Center for Career Development in Early Care and Education.

    In order to successfully implement an early childhood career development system, it is necessary to coordinate funds and training opportunities from many different sources. This action pack is designed to help individuals involved in such statewide efforts learn how to navigate the financing system that currently supports training for early care…

  12. Human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal cancer in the HIV-infected population.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Palefsky, J M

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted virus and an important etiologic factor in head and neck cancers. HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of developing oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) compared with the general population. HPV-positive OPC are also increasingly a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for HIV-infected individuals in the era of effective combination antiretroviral therapy. The epidemiology and natural history of oral HPV infection have not been well established, but it appears that oral HPV infection is less common than anal infection, and more common among HIV-infected persons than the general population. Prevention of OPC is therefore increasingly important in HIV-infected individuals. Although not demonstrated in randomized controlled trials, HPV vaccination may prevent oral HPV infection as well. The focus of organized HPV cancer prevention programs should include prophylactic HPV vaccination to reduce the burden of high-risk HPV and low-risk HPV types who have not yet been exposed. PMID:27109278

  13. Oropharyngeal swallowing after stroke in the left basal ganglion/internal capsule.

    PubMed

    Logemann, J A; Shanahan, T; Rademaker, A W; Kahrilas, P J; Lazar, R; Halper, A

    1993-01-01

    One of the foci of Martin Donner's work was the neural control of swallowing. This present investigation continues that work by examining oropharyngeal swallowing in 8 patients identified with a single, small, left-basal ganglion/internal capsule infarction and 8 age-matched normal subjects. Stroke patients were assessed with a bedside clinical and radiographic swallowing assessment, and normal subjects received only the radiographic study. Results revealed disagreement between the bedside and radiographic assessments in one of the 8 stroke patients. Stroke and normal subjects differed significantly on some swallow measures on various bolus viscosities, but behaved the same as normal subjects on a number of measures. Differences in swallowing in the stroke subjects were not enough to prevent them from eating orally. The significant differences seen in the basal ganglia/internal capsule stroke subjects may result from damage to the sensorimotor pathways between the cortex and brainstem. These differences emphasize the importance of cortical input to the brainstem swallowing center in maintaining the systematic modulations characteristic of normal swallowing physiology. PMID:8359043

  14. DNA repair and mutagen sensitivity of epithelial cells and lymphocytes in oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    REITER, MAXIMILIAN; BAUMEISTER, PHILIPP; JAISER, SONJA; REISS, ANDREAS; SCHWENK-ZIEGER, SABINA; KLEINSASSER, NORBERT; HARRÉUS, ULRICH

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco-associated nitrosamines are known carcinogens causing DNA damage in epithelial cells of the head and neck. A matched case-control study was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the oropharynx, and controls to tobacco-associated nitrosamines. Quantitative DNA repair was evaluated following a period of 15 and 30 min. Fresh biopsies from 100 male donors of macroscopically healthy oropharyngeal cells and lymphocytes (50 SCC patients and 50 controls) were incubated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) or N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN). DNA damage in epithelial cells and lymphocytes was assessed using the comet assay. Following incubation with NDEA, cells underwent a period of DNA repair. All of the nitrosamines caused equivalent genotoxic damage in mucosal cells and lymphocytes of the two groups. Lymphocyte DNA repair capacity in the control group (26.8 and 37.1% after 15 and 30 min) was comparable to the tumor group (23.6 and 40.6%). However, epithelial cell DNA repair capacity of carcinoma patients was significantly reduced to 17.1% (15 min) and 23% (30 min) compared to the DNA repair of the control group (36.2%, 15 min and 46.0%, 30 min). Mutagen sensitivity was comparable in patients and controls. Thus, reduced epithelial cell DNA repair capacity of tumor patients is a possible endogenous risk factor for the development of head and neck squamous cell cancer. PMID:22740863

  15. Prognostic Impact of Pretreatment Plasma Fibrinogen in Patients with Locally Advanced Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Daniel; Danilovic, Ivan; Seemann, Rudolf; Kornek, Gabriela; Engelmann, Johannes; Pillerstorff, Robert; Holawe, Simone; Psyrri, Amanda; Erovic, Boban M.; Farwell, Gregory; Perisanidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment plasma fibrinigen in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Methods A cohort of 183 patients with locally advanced OOSCC receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy was retrospectively examined. Using ROC curve analysis, a pretreatment plasma fibrinogen cutoff value of 447mg/dL was determined. The primary endpoints were overall survival and recurrence-free survival. A secondary endpoint was to determine whether pretreatment plasma fibrinogen could predict treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Cox regression models and Kaplan–Meier curves were used for survival analyses. Results Seventy-one patients had an elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen >447mg/dL). Patients with high fibrinogen showed significantly higher pathologic stages after neoadjuvant treatment than those with low fibrinogen (p = 0.037). In univariate analysis, elevated fibrinogen was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.005) and recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008) Multivariate analysis revealed that elevated fibrinogen remained an independent risk factor for death (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.09–2.90, p = 0.021) and relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.11–2.86, p = 0.016). Conclusion Elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen is associated with lack of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and reduced OS and RFS in patients with OOSCC. Thus, plasma fibrinogen may emerge as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in OOSCC. PMID:27362659

  16. HPV-related methylation signature predicts survival in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kostareli, Efterpi; Holzinger, Dana; Bogatyrova, Olga; Hielscher, Thomas; Wichmann, Gunnar; Keck, Michaela; Lahrmann, Bernd; Grabe, Niels; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Schmidt, Christopher R; Seiwert, Tanguy; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Dietz, Andreas; Höfler, Daniela; Pawlita, Michael; Benner, Axel; Bosch, Franz X; Plinkert, Peter; Plass, Christoph; Weichenhan, Dieter; Hess, Jochen

    2013-06-01

    High-risk types of human papilloma virus (HPV) are increasingly associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Strikingly, patients with HPV-positive OPSCC are highly curable with ionizing radiation and have better survival compared with HPV-negative patients, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We applied an array-based approach to monitor global changes in CpG island hypermethylation between HPV-negative and HPV-positive OPSCCs and identified a specific pattern of differentially methylated regions that critically depends on the presence of viral transcripts. HPV-related alterations were confirmed for the majority of candidate gene promoters by mass spectrometric, quantitative methylation analysis. There was a significant inverse correlation between promoter hypermethylation of ALDH1A2, OSR2, GATA4, GRIA4, and IRX4 and transcript levels. Interestingly, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that a combined promoter methylation pattern of low methylation levels in ALDH1A2 and OSR2 promoters and high methylation levels in GATA4, GRIA4, and IRX4 promoters was significantly correlated with improved survival in 3 independent patient cohorts. ALDH1A2 protein levels, determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, confirmed the association with clinical outcome. In summary, our study highlights specific alterations in global gene promoter methylation in HPV-driven OPSCCs and identifies a signature that predicts the clinical outcome in OPSCCs. PMID:23635773

  17. The potential impact of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccination on oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Theresa; Eisele, David W; Fakhry, Carole

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is significantly increasing in the United States. Given that these epidemiologic trends are driven by human papillomavirus (HPV), the potential impact of prophylactic HPV vaccines on the prevention of OPC is of interest. The primary evidence supporting the approval of current prophylactic HPV vaccines is from large phase 3 clinical trials focused on the prevention of genital disease (cervical and anal cancer, as well as genital warts). These trials reported vaccine efficacy rates of 89% to 98% for the prevention of both premalignant lesions and persistent genital infections. However, these trials were designed before the etiologic relationship between HPV and OPC was established. There are differences in the epidemiology of oral and genital HPV infection, such as differences in age and sex distributions, which suggest that the vaccine efficacy observed in genital cancers may not be directly translatable to the cancers of the oropharynx. Evaluation of vaccine efficacy is challenging in the oropharynx because no premalignant lesion analogous to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in cervical cancer has yet been identified. To truly investigate the efficacy of these vaccines in the oropharynx, additional clinical trials with feasible endpoints are needed. Cancer 2016;122:2313-2323. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27152637

  18. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  19. Prevalence and Treatment Management of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Cancer Patients: Results of the French Candidoscope Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gligorov, Joseph; Bastit, Laurent; Gervais, Honorine; Henni, Mehdi; Kahila, Widad; Lepille, Daniel; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Sasso, Giuseppe; Varette, Charles; Azria, David

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pharmaco-epidemiological study was to evaluate the prevalence of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Signs and symptoms of OPC were noted for all patients. Antifungal therapeutic management was recorded in OPC patients. Patients receiving local antifungal treatments were monitored until the end of treatment. Results: Enrolled in the study were 2,042 patients with solid tumor and/or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and/or another systemic cancer treatment and/or radiotherapy. The overall prevalence of OPC was 9.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.4%-11.0%]in this population. It was most frequent in patients treated with combined chemoradiotherapy (22.0%) or with more than two cytotoxic agents (16.9%). Local antifungal treatments were prescribed in 75.0% of OPC patients as recommended by guidelines. The compliance to treatment was higher in patients receiving once-daily miconazole mucoadhesive buccal tablet (MBT; 88.2%) than in those treated with several daily mouthwashes of amphotericin B (40%) or nystatin (18.8%). Conclusion: OPC prevalence in treated cancer patients was high. Local treatments were usually prescribed as per guidelines. Compliance to local treatments was better with once-daily drugs.

  20. Oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer therapy. Review of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Schubert, Mark M

    2003-12-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is a common and treatment-limiting side effect of cancer therapy. Severe oral mucositis can lead to the need to interrupt or discontinue cancer therapy and thus may have an impact on cure of the primary disease. Mucositis may also increase the risk of local and systemic infection and significantly affects quality of life and cost of care. Current care of patients with mucositis is essentially palliative and includes appropriate oral hygiene, nonirritating diet and oral care products, topical palliative mouth rinses, topical anesthetics, and opioid analgesics. Systemic analgesics are the mainstay of pain management. Topical approaches to pain management are under investigation. The literature supports use of benzydamine for prophylaxis of mucositis caused by conventional fractionationated head and neck radiotherapy, and cryotherapy for short-half-life stomatoxic chemotherapy, such as bolus fluorouracil. Continuing studies are investigating the potential use of biologic response modifiers and growth factors, including topical and systemic delivery of epithelial growth factors and agents. Progress in the prevention and management of mucositis will improve quality of life, reduce cost of care, and facilitate completion of more intensive cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols. In addition, improved management of mucositis may allow implementation of cancer treatment protocols that are currently excessively mucotoxic but may produce higher cure rates. Continuing research related to the pathogenesis and management of mucositis will undoubtedly lead to the development of potential interventions and improved patient care. PMID:14723014

  1. Vocal Variability Post Swallowing in Individuals with and without Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Karoline Weber dos; Scheeren, Betina; Maciel, Antonio Carlos; Cassol, Mauriceia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Voice modification after swallowing may indicate changes in the transit of the bolus. Objective The aim of this study is to verify the use of perceptual voice analysis to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia. Study Design Case series. Methods Twenty-seven patients with dysphagia as diagnosed by videofluoroscopy and 25 without were evaluated. The sustained vowel /a/ was recorded before this exam and after swallowing different consistencies (pasty, liquid and solid). For the voice evaluation, the GRBAS scale (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain) and the parameter “wet voice” were used. Three judges blinded to study group and time of emission performed voice analysis. Results Individuals with dysphagia showed significant decrease in grade of voice and asthenia and increase in strain after swallowing pasty substances, differing from individuals without dysphagia who showed no modification of the parameters after swallowing. The wet voice parameter showed no difference after swallowing in both study groups. Conclusion The decrease in grade and asthenia and increased strain are indicative of a swallowing disorder, indicating increased vocal strain to clean the vocal tract of food. The modification of vocal production after swallowing proved to be a trusted resource for detection of swallowing disorders. PMID:25992153

  2. Current Technologies and Recent Developments for Screening of HPV-Associated Cervical and Oropharyngeal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sunny S; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Klacsmann, Flora; Miller, Daniel L; Johnson, Jeff J; Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Stack, M Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal infection by the human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for a growing number of malignancies, predominantly represented by cervical cancer and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the prevalence of the virus, persistence of infection, and long latency period, novel and low-cost methods are needed for effective population level screening and monitoring. We review established methods for screening of cervical and oral cancer as well as commercially-available techniques for detection of HPV DNA. We then describe the ongoing development of microfluidic nucleic acid-based biosensors to evaluate circulating host microRNAs that are produced in response to an oncogenic HPV infection. The goal is to develop an ideal screening platform that is low-cost, portable, and easy to use, with appropriate signal stability, sensitivity and specificity. Advances in technologies for sample lysis, pre-treatment and concentration, and multiplexed nucleic acid detection are provided. Continued development of these devices provides opportunities for cancer screening in low resource settings, for point-of-care diagnostics and self-screening, and for monitoring response to vaccination or surgical treatment. PMID:27618102

  3. Clinical relevance of copy number profiling in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Pauline M W; Noorlag, Rob; Braunius, Weibel W; Moelans, Cathy B; Rifi, Widad; Savola, Suvi; Koole, Ronald; Grolman, Wilko; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2015-10-01

    Current conventional treatment modalities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are nonselective and have shown to cause serious side effects. Unraveling the molecular profiles of head and neck cancer may enable promising clinical applications that pave the road for personalized cancer treatment. We examined copy number status in 36 common oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a cohort of 191 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) and 164 oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) using multiplex ligation probe amplification. Copy number status was correlated with human papillomavirus (HPV) status in OPSCC, with occult lymph node status in OSCC and with patient survival. The 11q13 region showed gain or amplifications in 59% of HPV-negative OPSCC, whereas this amplification was almost absent in HPV-positive OPSCC. Additionally, in clinically lymph node-negative OSCC (Stage I-II), gain of the 11q13 region was significantly correlated with occult lymph node metastases with a negative predictive value of 81%. Multivariate survival analysis revealed a significantly decreased disease-free survival in both HPV-negative and HPV-positive OPSCC with a gain of Wnt-induced secreted protein-1. Gain of CCND1 showed to be an independent predictor for worse survival in OSCC. These results show that copy number aberrations, mainly of the 11q13 region, may be important predictors and prognosticators which allow for stratifying patients for personalized treatment of HNSCC. PMID:26194878

  4. [A Case of Severe Hyponatremia Caused by Renal Salt Wasting Syndrome in Oropharyngeal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Taro; Shirakura, Satoru; Hatanaka, Akio; Okano, Wataru; Tokumaru, Takao; Yamada, Masato; Saito, Yoshihiro; Beppu, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the electrolyte abnormalities frequently encountered in cancer therapy. Cisplatin is a well-known drug which can raise various adverse events, including hyponatremia. A male with advanced oropharyngeal cancer is presented in the present report, who was treated with radiotherapy with concurrent administration of cisplatin and who underwent a total of three episodes of severe hyponatremia in the course of therapy. The first two attacks of hyponatremia following cisplatin administration were accompanied by dehydration and excessive urination, and the patient recovered in one week with rehydration and salt supplementation. Excessive loss of salt in urine confirmed that these events were caused by renal salt wasting syndrome after cisplatin administration. On the other hand, the third attack was due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion after surgery for a bone fracture. Estimation of the extracellular fluid volume and salt intake/output balance is always believed to be necessary for the diagnosis and proper management of severe hyponatremia after chemotherapy-based treatment with cisplatin. PMID:26548098

  5. Management of the node-positive neck in the patient with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, Gary B.; Hessel, Amy; Beadle, Beth M.; Ahmed, Salmaan; El-naggar, Adel; Fuller, Clifton D.; Byers, Lauren A.; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Kies, Merill S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to assess the rates of recurrence in the neck for node-positive patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer treated with definitive radiation (with or without chemotherapy). Methods This is a single institutional retrospective study. Methodology included database search, and statistical testing including frequency analysis, Kaplan-Meier tests, and comparative tests including chi-square, logistic regression and log-rank. Results The cohort consisted of 401 node-positive patients irradiated between 2006 – June 2012. Three hundred eighty eight patients had CT restaging, and 251 had PET and/or US as a component of their post radiation staging. Eighty patients (20%) underwent neck dissection, and 21 (26%) had a positive specimen. The rate of neck dissection increased with increasing nodal stage, and was lower in patients who had PET scans or ultrasound in addition to CT restaging. The median follow-up was 30 months. The 2-year actuarial neck recurrence rate was 7% and 5% in all patients and those with local control, respectively. Nodal recurrence rates were greater in current smokers (p=.008). There was no difference in nodal recurrences rates in patients who did or did not have a neck dissection (p = .4) Conclusions A treatment strategy of (chemo)radiation with neck dissection performed based on response resulted in high rates of regional disease control in patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:24898672

  6. Barrier properties of k-mer packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebovka, N.; Khrapatiy, S.; Vygornitskyi; Pivovarova, N.

    2014-08-01

    This work discusses numerical studies of the barrier properties of k-mer packings by the Monte Carlo method. The studied variants of regular and non-regular arrangements on a square lattice included models of random sequential adsorption (RSA) and random deposition (RD). The discrete problem of diffusion through the bonds of a square lattice was considered. The k-mers were perfectly oriented perpendicular to the diffusion direction and blocked certain fraction of bonds fb against diffusion. The barrier efficiency was estimated by calculation of the ratio D/Do where D is diffusion coefficient in direction perpendicular to the orientation of k-mers and Do is the same value for diffusion on the square lattice without blocked bonds, i.e., at fb=0. The value of k varied from 1 to 512 and different lattice sizes up to L=8192 lattice units were used. For dense packings (p=1), the obtained D/Do versus fb dependences deviated from the theoretical prediction of effective medium (EM) theory and deviation was the most obvious for the regular non-staggered arrangement. For loose RSA and RD packings, the percolation like-behavior of D/Do with threshold at fb=p∞ was observed and the data evidenced that their barrier properties at large values of k may be more effective than those of some dense packings. Such anomalous behavior can reflect the details of k-mer spatial organization (aggregation) and structure of pores in RD and RSA packings. The contradictions between simulation data and predictions of EM theory were also discussed.

  7. Experimental demonstration of nonuniform frequency distributions of granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Jie; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; O'Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark

    2009-12-01

    We developed an experimental method to generate mechanically stable (MS) packings of frictionless disks and performed coordinated experiments and simulations to characterize MS packings in small systems. For a given system geometry, MS packings occur as discrete, well-separated points in configuration space with probabilities that vary by many orders of magnitude and are robust with respect to the packing preparation. Over a continuous range of system geometries, MS packings occur as distinct geometrical families and only a small fraction of families are sampled via quasistatic dynamics. These results suggest that the most frequent MS packings may dominate the structural and mechanical properties of dense granular media.

  8. Laurdan generalized polarization fluctuations measures membrane packing micro-heterogeneity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Susana A.; Tricerri, Maria A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Cellular membranes are heterogeneous in composition, and the prevailing theory holds that the structures responsible for this heterogeneity in vivo are small structures (10–200 nm), sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched, of different sizes, highly dynamic denominated rafts. Rafts are postulated to be platforms, which by sequestering different membrane components can compartmentalize cellular processes and regulate signaling pathways. Despite an enormous effort in this area, the existence of these domains is still under debate due to the characteristics of the structures itself: small in size and highly mobile, which from the technical point of view implies using techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution. In this report we measured rapid fluctuations of the normalized ratio of the emission intensity at two wavelengths of Laurdan, a membrane fluorescent dye sensitive to local membrane packing. We observed generalized polarization fluctuations in the plasma membrane of intact rabbit erythrocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells that can be explained by the existence of tightly packed micro-domains moving in a more fluid background phase. These structures, which display different lipid packing, have different sizes; they are found in the same cell and in the entire cell population. The small size and characteristic high lipid packing indicate that these micro-domains have properties that have been proposed for lipid rafts. PMID:22529342

  9. Experimental study of bolted connections using light gauge channel sections and packing plates at the joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Ravindra B.; Vaghe, Vishal M.

    2014-12-01

    Cold-formed structural members are being used more widely in routine structural design as the world steel industry moves from the production of hot-rolled section and plate to coil and strip, often with galvanized and/or painted coatings. Steel in this form is more easily delivered from the steel mill to the manufacturing plant where it is usually cold-rolled into open and closed section members. In the present experimental study, the use of packing plate at the joints in cold-formed channel sections may increase the load carrying capacity and also reduce the buckling of unconnected cold form channel steel plate at joints. The present study focuses on examining the experimental investigation to use mild steel as a packing plate with cold-formed channel sections by bolted connection at the joints and the connection subjected to axial tension. Series of tests are carried out with increase in the thickness of packing plate and results are observed and analyzed. Total Twelve experimental tests have been carried out on cold-formed channel tension members fastened with single as well as three numbers of bolts at the connection and from the observations the strength of the joint is increased by increasing the various thicknesses of packing plates and also the buckling of unconnected leg of channel specimen is reduced. It is analyzed by plotting the entire load versus elongation path, so that the behavior of the connection is examined.

  10. Experimental study of bolted connections using light gauge channel sections and packing plates at the joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Ravindra B.; Vaghe, Vishal M.

    2014-09-01

    Cold-formed structural members are being used more widely in routine structural design as the world steel industry moves from the production of hot-rolled section and plate to coil and strip, often with galvanized and/or painted coatings. Steel in this form is more easily delivered from the steel mill to the manufacturing plant where it is usually cold-rolled into open and closed section members. In the present experimental study, the use of packing plate at the joints in cold-formed channel sections may increase the load carrying capacity and also reduce the buckling of unconnected cold form channel steel plate at joints. The present study focuses on examining the experimental investigation to use mild steel as a packing plate with cold-formed channel sections by bolted connection at the joints and the connection subjected to axial tension. Series of tests are carried out with increase in the thickness of packing plate and results are observed and analyzed. Total Twelve experimental tests have been carried out on cold-formed channel tension members fastened with single as well as three numbers of bolts at the connection and from the observations the strength of the joint is increased by increasing the various thicknesses of packing plates and also the buckling of unconnected leg of channel specimen is reduced. It is analyzed by plotting the entire load versus elongation path, so that the behavior of the connection is examined.

  11. 21 CFR 133.124 - Cold-pack cheese food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cold-pack cheese food. 133.124 Section 133.124... Cheese and Related Products § 133.124 Cold-pack cheese food. (a)(1) Cold-pack cheese food is the food... specified in paragraph (e) of this section may be used. (2) All cheeses used in a cold-pack cheese food...

  12. Use of succinoglycan biopolymer for gravel packing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, G.P.; Gunningham, M.C.; Samuel, A.J. . E P Lab.); Lau, H.C.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory experiments and field trials on a polysaccharide biopolymer, succinoglycan, for use in gravel packing. This biopolymer causes minimal formation damage and has unique rheological properties that combine high shear-thinning behavior with temperature-induced viscosity breakback; thus, it can be used without breakers. A scouting study has been carried out at KSEPL to identify new viscosifiers with better rheological properties that cause minimal formation damage. Ideally, breakers should not be required and on-site polymer preparation procedures should be simple enough to give reliable, repeatable performances. For slurry-pack-type operations, the polysaccharide biopolymer succinoglycan was identified as the best candidate. The biopolymer was developed for EOR during 1980--83 at the Sittingbourne Research Centre, Shell Research Ltd., U.K., and is marketed by Shell Intl. Chemical Co. Ltd. as Shellflo-S.''

  13. USDC based rapid penetrator of packed soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea

    2006-01-01

    Environment protection requires more testing and analysis tools. To detect buried chemical containers or other objects embedded in soil and avoid possible damages of them, a penetrator of packed soil operated using low pushing force was developed. The design was based on a novel driving mechanism of the ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer (USDC) device developed in the NDEAA lab at JPL [Bar-Cohen et al 2001, Bao et al 2003]. In the penetrator, a small free-flying mass is energized by a piezoelectric transducer and impacts a rod probe on its shoulder at frequencies of hundreds times per second. The impacts help the probe to penetrate the packed soil rapidly. A great reduction of the needed pushing force for penetration was achieved. The details of the design of the prototype penetrator and the results of performance tests are presented.

  14. Is incest common in gray wolf packs?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.; Meier, T.; Geffen, E.; Mech, L.D.; Burch, J.W.; Adams, L.G.; Wayne, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Wolf packs generally consist of a breeding pair and their maturing offspring that help provision and protect pack young. Because the reproductive tenure in wolves often is short, reproductively mature offspring might replace their parents, resulting in sibling or parent-offspring matings. To determine the extent of incestuous pairings, we measure relatedness based on variability in 20 microsatellite loci of mated pairs, parent-offspring pairs and siblings in two populations of gray wolves. Our 16 sampled mated pairs had values of relatedness not overlapping those of known parent-offspring or sibling dyads, which is consistent with their being unrelated or distantly related. These results suggest that full siblings or a parent and their offspring rarely mate and that incest avoidance is an important constraint on gray wolf behavioral ecology.

  15. Body packing: from seizures to laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Janczak, Joanna M; Beutner, Ulrich; Hasler, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25883813

  16. Body Packing: From Seizures to Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Joanna M.; Beutner, Ulrich; Hasler, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25883813

  17. Sorption-capacity limited retardation of radionuclides transport in water-saturated packing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclides breakthrough times as calculated through constant retardation factors obtained in dilute solutions are non-conservative. The constant retardation approach regards the solid as having infinite sorption capacity throughout the solid. However, as the solid becomes locally saturated, such as in the proximity of the waste form-packing materials interface, it will exhibit no retardation properties, and transport will take place as if the radionuclides were locally non-reactive. The magnitude of the effect of finite sorption capacity of the packing materials on radionuclide transport is discussed with reference to high-level waste package performance. An example based on literature sorption data indicates that the breakthrough time may be overpredicted by orders of magnitude using a constant retardation factor as compared to using the entire sorption isotherm to obtain a concentration-dependent retardation factor. 8 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Evolution of the local packing density in a sheared granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; van Hecke, Martin; Sakaie, Ken

    2005-11-01

    The local particle packing density, η, in a bed of poppy seeds sheared in a vertical, split-bottom cylindrical container is measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Wide shear zones away from the wall are generated when a thin concentric disk at the bottom of the cylinder, and with radius less than the cylinder radius, is rotated slowly. Experiments reveal that, initially, a shear band forms at the outer edge of the disk which decreases in radius with decreasing depth. Material near the shear zone dilates with a corresponding decrease in η of about 15%. The radial extent of the dilated region increases approximately logarithmically with increasing rotation in shallow layers. In relatively deep layers, the shear zone is at first entirely below the free surface, but with further rotation grows vertically creating a low η core. We discuss the relation between the previously reported universal velocity profiles across the shear zone and the spatial and temporal evolution of the packing density.

  19. Breakup of Pack Ice, Antarctic Ice Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Breakup of Pack Ice along the periphery of the Antarctic Ice Shelf (53.5S, 3.0E) produced this mosaic of ice floes off the Antarctic Ice Shelf. Strong offshore winds, probably associated with strong katabatic downdrafts from the interior of the continent, are seen peeling off the edges of the ice shelf into long filamets of sea ice, icebergs, bergy bits and growlers to flow northward into the South Atlantic Ocean. 53.5S, 3.0E

  20. On the perfect hexagonal packing of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.

    2006-04-01

    In most cases the hexagonal packing of fibrous structures or rods extremizes the energy of interaction between strands. If the strands are not straight, then it is still possible to form a perfect hexatic bundle. Conditions under which the perfect hexagonal packing of curved tubular structures may exist are formulated. Particular attention is given to closed or cycled arrangements of the rods like in the DNA toroids and spools. The closure or return constraints of the bundle result in an allowable group of automorphisms of the cross-sectional hexagonal lattice. The structure of this group is explored. Examples of open helical-like and closed toroidal-like bundles are presented. An expression for the elastic energy of a perfectly packed bundle of thin elastic rods is derived. The energy accounts for both the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the rods. It is shown that equilibria of the bundle correspond to solutions of a variational problem formulated for the curve representing the axis of the bundle. The functional involves a function of the squared curvature under the constraints on the total torsion and the length. The Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained in terms of curvature and torsion and due to the existence of the first integrals the problem is reduced to the quadrature. The three-dimensional shape of the bundle may be readily reconstructed by integration of the Ilyukhin-type equations in special cylindrical coordinates. The results are of universal nature and are applicable to various fibrous structures, in particular, to intramolecular liquid crystals formed by DNA condensed in toroids or packed inside the viral capsids. International Workshop on Biopolymers: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Mechanics of DNA, RNA and Proteins, 30.05.2005-3.06.2005, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy.

  1. Partitioning And Packing Equations For Parallel Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpasi, Dale J.; Milner, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithm developed to identify parallelism in set of coupled ordinary differential equations that describe physical system and to divide set into parallel computational paths, along with parts of solution proceeds independently of others during at least part of time. Path-identifying algorithm creates number of paths consisting of equations that must be computed serially and table that gives dependent and independent arguments and "can start," "can end," and "must end" times of each equation. "Must end" time used subsequently by packing algorithm.

  2. 7 CFR 51.2840 - Export packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export packing requirements. 51.2840 Section 51.2840 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards...) Export Packing Requirements § 51.2840 Export packing requirements. Onions specified as meeting...

  3. 1. Contextual view looking west, showing packing house and Union ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Contextual view looking west, showing packing house and Union Ice building, which is located to the north of Packing House (right hand side in photo) - College Heights Lemon Packing House, 519-532 West First Street, Claremont, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 48 CFR 211.272 - Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., packaging, and packing. 211.272 Section 211.272 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Requirements Documents 211.272 Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing. Use the provision at 252.211-7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing, in solicitations which include...

  5. 48 CFR 211.272 - Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., packaging, and packing. 211.272 Section 211.272 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Requirements Documents 211.272 Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing. Use the provision at 252.211-7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing, in solicitations which include...

  6. 48 CFR 211.272 - Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., packaging, and packing. 211.272 Section 211.272 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Requirements Documents 211.272 Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing. Use the provision at 252.211-7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing, in solicitations which include...

  7. 48 CFR 211.272 - Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., packaging, and packing. 211.272 Section 211.272 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Requirements Documents 211.272 Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing. Use the provision at 252.211-7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing, in solicitations which include...

  8. 48 CFR 211.272 - Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., packaging, and packing. 211.272 Section 211.272 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Requirements Documents 211.272 Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing. Use the provision at 252.211-7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing, in solicitations which include...

  9. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  10. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  11. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  12. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  13. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  14. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals... horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their use. (c) The use of...

  15. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited... equipment. (b) The use of horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their...

  16. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited... equipment. (b) The use of horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their...

  17. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited... equipment. (b) The use of horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their...

  18. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals... horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their use. (c) The use of...

  19. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited... equipment. (b) The use of horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their...

  20. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals... horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their use. (c) The use of...

  1. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals... horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their use. (c) The use of...

  2. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals... horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their use. (c) The use of...

  3. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited... equipment. (b) The use of horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their...

  4. [Evaluation of the oropharyngeal tularemia cases admitted to our hospital from the provinces of Central Anatolia].

    PubMed

    Uyar, Melek; Cengiz, Buğra; Unlü, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk; Eryılmaz, Adil

    2011-01-01

    Tularemia caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic infection which has re-emerged in Turkey in recent years as water-borne endemics. Oropharyngeal form is the most frequently reported form of the disease from Turkey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of oropharyngeal tularemia patients admitted to ear, nose & throat outpatient clinic between January-March 2010. A total of 10 patients (age range: 16-80 years, mean age: 43.9 years; nine were male) inhabiting in the provinces in Central Anatolia, Turkey, were admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, sore throat and painful cervical lump. They have been previously diagnosed as tonsillo-pharyngitis at different medical centers and empirical antibiotic therapy has initiated, however, their complaints have not recovered. Endoscopic laryngoscopic examination revealed that oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx were normal. Physical examination of the neck yielded localized fixed masses with diameters between 2-7 cm. The lesions were localized at right submandibular (n= 4), upper jugular (n=3) and one of each at left posterior cervical, left submandibular and left jugulodigastric regions. The patients were hospitalized with the pre-diagnosis of "neck mass with unknown origin" for further investigation and treatment. The mean white blood cell count of the cases was 9730 (7500-15.100) cells/µl; the mean erythrocyte sedimantation rate was 68.7 (46-85) mm3/hours and the mean C-reactive protein level was 4.3 (1.5-7.4) µg/dl. Salmonella, Brucella, Toxoplasma gondii, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus and viral hepatitis serology did not indicate acute infections. Serum and tissue samples were sent to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency in order to test for tularemia, namely culture, microagglutination test (MAT), direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) test and in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All of the patients

  5. Symmetric scrolled packings of multilayered carbon nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, A. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Lobzenko, I. P.; Baimova, Yu. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    Scrolled packings of single-layer and multilayer graphene can be used for the creation of supercapacitors, nanopumps, nanofilters, and other nanodevices. The full atomistic simulation of graphene scrolls is restricted to consideration of relatively small systems in small time intervals. To overcome this difficulty, a two-dimensional chain model making possible an efficient calculation of static and dynamic characteristics of nanoribbon scrolls with allowance for the longitudinal and bending stiffness of nanoribbons is proposed. The model is extended to the case of scrolls of multilayer graphene. Possible equilibrium states of symmetric scrolls of multilayer carbon nanotribbons rolled up so that all nanoribbons in the scroll are equivalent are found. Dependences of the number of coils, the inner and outer radii, lowest vibrational eigenfrequencies of rolled packages on the length L of nanoribbons are obtained. It is shown that the lowest vibrational eigenfrequency of a symmetric scroll decreases with a nanoribbon length proportionally to L -1. It is energetically unfavorable for too short nanoribbons to roll up, and their ground state is a stack of plane nanoribbons. With an increasing number k of layers, the nanoribbon length L necessary for creation of symmetric scrolls increases. For a sufficiently small number of layers k and a sufficiently large nanoribbon length L, the scrolled packing has the lowest energy as compared to that of stack of plane nanoribbons and folded structures. The results can be used for development of nanomaterials and nanodevices on the basis of graphene scrolled packings.

  6. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, Reg W.; Dial, Ralph E.; Finnell, Wilber K. R.

    1990-01-01

    A probe for measuring heat includes an elongate rod fitted within a sheath, and a plurality of annular recesses are formed on the surface of the rod in a spaced-apart relationship to form annular chambers that are resistant to heat flow. A longitudinal bore extends axially into the rod and within the cylinders defined by the annular chambers, and an integrated heater and thermocouple pack is dimensioned to fit within the bore. In construction, the integrated pack includes a plurality of wires disposed in electrical insulation within a sheath and a heater cable. These wires include one common wire and a plurality of thermocuple wires. The common wire is constructed of one type of conductive material while the thermocouple wires are each constructed of two types of materials so that at least one thermocouple junction is formed therein. All of the wires extend the length of the integrated pack and are connected together at their ends. The thermocouple wires are constructed to form thermocouple junctions proximate to each annular chamber for producing electromotive forces corresponding to the temperature of the rod within the annular chambers relative to outside the chambers. In the preferred embodiment, each thermocouple wire forms two thermocouple junctions, one junction being disposed within an annular chamber and the second junction being disposed outside of, but proximate to, the same annular chamber. In one embodiment two thermocouple wires are configured to double the sensitivity of the probe in one region.

  7. Dynamics of random packings in granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Grest, Gary S.; Landry, James W.

    2006-05-01

    We present a multiscale simulation algorithm for amorphous materials, which we illustrate and validate in a canonical case of dense granular flow. Our algorithm is based on the recently proposed spot model, where particles in a dense random packing undergo chainlike collective displacements in response to diffusing “spots” of influence, carrying a slight excess of interstitial free volume. We reconstruct the microscopic dynamics of particles from the “coarse grained” dynamics of spots by introducing a localized particle relaxation step after each spot-induced block displacement, simply to enforce packing constraints with a (fairly arbitrary) soft-core repulsion. To test the model, we study to what extent it can describe the dynamics of up to 135 000 frictional, viscoelastic spheres in granular drainage simulated by the discrete-element method (DEM). With only five fitting parameters (the radius, volume, diffusivity, drift velocity, and injection rate of spots), we find that the spot simulations are able to largely reproduce not only the mean flow and diffusion, but also some subtle statistics of the flowing packings, such as spatial velocity correlations and many-body structural correlations. The spot simulations run over 100 times faster than the DEM and demonstrate the possibility of multiscale modeling for amorphous materials, whenever a suitable model can be devised for the coarse-grained spot dynamics.

  8. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  9. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    DOEpatents

    McCulloch, Reginald W.; Dial, Ralph E.; Finnell, Wilber K. R.

    1988-01-01

    A probe for measuring heat includes an elongate rod fitted within a sheath, and a plurality of annular recesses are formed on the surface of the rod in a spaced-apart relationship to form annular chambers that are resistant to heat flow. A longitudinal bore extends axially into the rod and within the cylinders defined by the annular chambers, and an integrated heater and thermocouple pack is dimensioned to fit within the bore. In construction, the integrated pack includes a plurality of wires disposed in electrical insulation within a sheath and a heater cable. These wires include one common wire and a plurality of thermocouple wires. The common wire is constructed of one type of conductive material while the thermocouple wires are each constructed of two types of materials so that at least one thermocouple junction is formed therein. All of the wires extend the length of the integrated pack and are connected together at their ends. The thermocouple wires are constructed to form thermocouple junctions proximate to each annular chamber for producing electromotive forces corresponding to the temperature of the rod within the annular chambers relative to outside the chambers. In the preferred embodiment, each thermocouple wire forms two thermocouple junctions, one junction being disposed within an annular chamber and the second junction being disposed outside of, but proximate to, the same annular chamber. In one embodiment two thermocouple wires are configured to double the sensitivity of the probe in one region.

  10. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes Following IMRT Versus Conventional Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min Karnell, Lucy H.; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Dornfeld, Ken; Buatti, John M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To compare health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were extracted from the database of an ongoing longitudinal Outcome Assessment Project. Eligible criteria included (1) treated with definitive radiation, and (2) provided 12-month posttreatment HRQOL data. Excluded were 7 patients who received IMRT before October 1, 2002, during this institution's developmental phase of the IMRT technique. The HRQOL outcomes of patients treated with IMRT were compared with those of patients who received CRT. Results: Twenty-six patients treated using IMRT and 27 patients treated using CRT were included. Patients in the IMRT group were older and had more advanced-stage diseases and more patients received concurrent chemotherapy. However, the IMRT group had higher mean Head and Neck Cancer Inventory scores (which represent better outcomes) for each of the four head-and-neck cancer-specific domains, including eating, speech, aesthetics, and social disruption, at 12 months after treatment. A significantly greater percentage of patients in the CRT group had restricted diets compared with those in the IMRT group (48.0% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.032). At 3 months after treatment, both groups had significant decreases from pretreatment eating scores. However, the IMRT group had a significant improvement during the first year, but the CRT group had only small improvement. Conclusions: Proper delivery of IMRT can improve HRQOL for patients with oropharyngeal cancer compared with CRT.

  11. Variations in the Contouring of Organs at Risk: Test Case From a Patient With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Robinson, Greg; Wheeler, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomy contouring is critical in radiation therapy. Inaccuracy and variation in defining critical volumes will affect everything downstream: treatment planning, dose-volume histogram analysis, and contour-based visual guidance used in image-guided radiation therapy. This study quantified: (1) variation in the contouring of organs at risk (OAR) in a clinical test case and (2) corresponding effects on dosimetric metrics of highly conformal plans. Methods and Materials: A common CT data set with predefined targets from a patient with oropharyngeal cancer was provided to a population of clinics, which were asked to (1) contour OARs and (2) design an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Thirty-two acceptable plans were submitted as DICOM RT data sets, each generated by a different clinical team. Using those data sets, we quantified: (1) the OAR contouring variation and (2) the impact this variation has on dosimetric metrics. New technologies were employed, including a software tool to quantify three-dimensional structure comparisons. Results: There was significant interclinician variation in OAR contouring. The degree of variation is organ-dependent. We found substantial dose differences resulting strictly from contouring variation (differences ranging from -289% to 56% for mean OAR dose; -22% to 35% for maximum dose). However, there appears to be a threshold in the OAR comparison metric beyond which the dose differences stabilize. Conclusions: The effects of interclinician variation in contouring organs-at-risk in the head and neck can be large and are organ-specific. Physicians need to be aware of the effect that variation in OAR contouring can play on the final treatment plan and not restrict their focus only to the target volumes.

  12. Clinical Impact of Prolonged Diagnosis to Treatment Interval (DTI) Among Patients with Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonam; Bekelman, Justin; Lin, Alexander; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Roman, Benjamin R.; Mitra, Nandita; Swisher-McClure, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We examined practice patterns using the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to determine risk factors for prolonged diagnosis to treatment interval (DTI) and survival outcomes in patients receiving chemoradiation for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and Materials We identified 6,606 NCDB patients with Stage III-IV OPSCC receiving chemoradiation from 2003-2006. We determined risk factors for prolonged DTI (>30 days) using univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. We examined overall survival (OS) using Kaplan Meier and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Results 3,586 (54.3%) patients had prolonged DTI. Race, IMRT, insurance status, and high volume facilities were significant risk factors for prolonged DTI. Patients with prolonged DTI had inferior OS compared to DTI ≤ 30 days (Hazard Ratio (HR)=1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.20, p=0.005). For every week increase in DTI there was a 2.2% (95% CI 1.1%-3.3%, p<0.001) increase in risk of death. Patients receiving IMRT, treatment at academic, or high-volume facilities were more likely to experience prolonged DTI (High vs. Low volume: 61.5% vs. 51.8%, adjusted OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.21-1.58; Academic vs. Community: 59.5% vs. 50.6%, adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.13-1.42; non-IMRT vs. IMRT: 53.4% vs. 56.5%; adjusted OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04-1.31). Conclusions Our results suggest that prolonged DTI has a significant impact on survival outcomes. We observed disparities in DTI by socioeconomic factors. However, facility level factors such as academic affiliation, high volume, and IMRT also increased risk of DTI. These findings should be considered in developing efficient pathways to mitigate adverse effects of prolonged DTI. PMID:27086482

  13. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Romesser, Paul B.; Romanyshyn, Jonathan C.; Schupak, Karen D.; Setton, Jeremy; Riaz, Nadeem; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Sherman, Eric J.; Kraus, Dennis; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The clinical benefit of routine placement of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (pPEG) tubes was assessed in patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) who are undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy. METHODS From 1998 through 2009, 400 consecutive patients with OPC who underwent chemoradiation were included. Of these, 325 had a pPEG and 75 did not (nPEG). Weight and albumin change from baseline to mid-IMRT, end of IMRT, 1 month post-IMRT, and 3 months post-IMRT were evaluated. The treating physicians prospectively recorded acute and late toxicities. RESULTS Significantly lower absolute weight loss at end of IMRT (6.80 kg vs 8.38 kg, P = .007), 1 month post-IMRT (9.06 kg vs 11.33 kg, P = .006), and 3 months post-IMRT (11.10 kg vs 13.09 kg, P = .044) was noted in the pPEG versus nPEG groups. This benefit in reduction of percent weight loss was consistently significant only among patients with BMI < 25. Significant differences were noted in hospital admission rate (15.1% vs 26.7%, P = .026) and volume of nonchemotherapy hydration (8.9 liters vs 17.2 liters, P = .004). There were no differences in percent albumin change, acute dysphagia, acute mucositis, acute xerostomia, chronic dysphagia, radiation treatment duration, and overall survival. Multivariate analysis noted age >55 years (P < .001), female sex (P < .001), and T3/4 category disease (P < .001) were significantly associated with prolonged PEG use. CONCLUSIONS Although pPEG reduced absolute and percent weight loss and need for hospitalizations in our cohort of patients with OPC undergoing chemoradiation, no differences were noted in radiation treatment duration, toxicity, and overall survival. Prolonged PEG use correlated with age >55 years, female sex, and T3/T4 tumors. PMID:22707358

  14. Characterization of functionally active gene fusions in human papillomavirus related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Theresa; Gaykalova, Daria A; Considine, Michael; Wheelan, Sarah; Pallavajjala, Aparna; Bishop, Justin A; Westra, William H; Ideker, Trey; Koch, Wayne M; Khan, Zubair; Fertig, Elana J; Califano, Joseph A

    2016-07-15

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) sequencing analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) recently reported on gene fusions, however, few human papillomavirus (HPV) positive samples were included, and the functional relevance of identified fusions was not explored. We therefore performed an independent analysis of gene fusions in HPV-positive oropharyngeal SCC (OPSCC). RNA sequencing was performed on 47 HPV-positive OPSCC primary tumors and 25 normal mucosal samples from cancer unaffected controls on an Illumina TruSeq platform. MapSplice2 was used for alignment and identification of fusion candidates. Putative fusions with less than five spanning reads, detected in normal tissues, or that mapped to the same gene were filtered out. Selected fusions were validated by RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Within 47 HPV-positive OPSCC tumors, 282 gene fusions were identified. Most fusions (85.1%) occurred in a single tumor, and the remaining fusions recurred in 2-16 tumors. Gene fusions were associated with significant up regulation of 16 genes (including EGFR and ERBB4) and down regulation of four genes (PTPRT, ZNF750, DLG2, SLCO5A1). Expression of these genes followed similar patterns of up regulation and down regulation in tumors without these fusions compared to normal tissue. Five of six gene fusions selected for validation were confirmed through RT-PCR and sequencing. This integrative analysis provides a method of prioritizing functionally relevant gene fusions that may be expanded to other tumor types. These results demonstrate that gene fusions may be one mechanism by which functionally relevant genes are altered in HPV-positive OPSCC. PMID:26949921

  15. Primary surgery versus chemoradiotherapy for advanced oropharyngeal cancers: a longitudinal population study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment for advanced stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) includes combined chemoradiation therapy or surgery followed by radiation therapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The goal of this study was to utilize available evidence to examine survival outcome differences in patients with advanced stage OPSCC treated with these different modalities. Methods Patients with advanced stage OPSCC were identified. Primary outcome measurements were disease specific and overall survival rates with differences examined via Kaplan-Meier and logistic regression analysis. Results 344 patients were enrolled. 94 patients underwent triple modality therapy inclusive of surgery followed by adjuvant combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (S-CRT). 131 had surgery and radiation therapy (S-RT), while 56 had chemoradiation (CRT) therapy as their primary treatment. A total of 63 patients had single modality radiation therapy and were excluded from analysis due to the large number of palliative patients. Kaplan-Meier overall survival analysis showed that therapy with S-CRT had the highest disease specific survival at five years (71.1%). This is contrasted against S-RT and CRT, with five year survival rates at 53.9%, and 48.6%, respectively. Cox regression showed that the comparison of S-CRT vs. S-RT, and CRT is associated with statistically significant increased hazard ratios of 1.974, and 2.785, indicating that both S-RT and CRT are associated with a reduced likelihood of survival at 5 years when compared to S-CRT. Conclusions In this population based cohort study S-CRT is associated with a 17–22% 5 year disease specific survival benefit compared to CRT or S-RT. PMID:23663568

  16. Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Garden, Adam S.; Lindberg, Mary E.; Wei Qingyi; Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

  17. Lateral Oropharyngeal Wall and Supraglottic Airway Collapse Associated With Failure in Sleep Apnea Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Danny; Sinawe, Hadeer; Folbe, Adam J.; Yoo, George; Badr, Safwan; Rowley, James A.; Lin, Ho-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis To identify patterns of airway collapse during preoperative drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) as predictors of surgical failure following multilevel airway surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Study Design Retrospective clinical chart review. Methods Medical records of patients who underwent site-specific surgical modification of the upper airway for treatment of OSHAS were reviewed. Patients were included in this study if they had a preoperative airway evaluation with DISE as well as preoperative and postoperative polysomnography. Airway obstruction on DISE was described according to airway level, severity, and axis of collapse. Severe airway obstruction was defined as >75% collapse on endoscopy. Surgical success was described as a postoperative apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of <20 and a >50% decrease in preoperative AHI. Results A total of 34 patients were included in this study. The overall surgical success rate was 56%. Surgical success (n = 19) and surgical failure (n = 15) patients were similar with regard to age, gender, body mass index, preoperative AHI, Friedman stage, adenotonsillar grades, and surgical management. DISE findings in the surgical failure group demonstrated greater incidence of severe lateral oropharyngeal wall collapse (73.3% vs. 36.8%, P = .037) and severe supraglottic collapse (93.3% vs. 63.2%, P = .046) as compared to the surgical success group. Conclusions The presence of severe lateral pharyngeal wall and/or supraglottic collapse on preoperative DISE is associated with OSAHS surgical failure. The identification of this failure-prone collapse pattern may be useful in preoperative patient counseling as well as in directing an individualized and customized approach to the treatment of OSHAS. PMID:22253047

  18. Forecasting longitudinal changes in oropharyngeal tumor morphology throughout the course of head and neck radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To create models that forecast longitudinal trends in changing tumor morphology and to evaluate and compare their predictive potential throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Two morphology feature vectors were used to describe 35 gross tumor volumes (GTVs) throughout the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal tumors. The feature vectors comprised the coordinates of the GTV centroids and a description of GTV shape using either interlandmark distances or a spherical harmonic decomposition of these distances. The change in the morphology feature vector observed at 33 time points throughout the course of treatment was described using static, linear, and mean models. Models were adjusted at 0, 1, 2, 3, or 5 different time points (adjustment points) to improve prediction accuracy. The potential of these models to forecast GTV morphology was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and the accuracy of the models was compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: Adding a single adjustment point to the static model without any adjustment points decreased the median error in forecasting the position of GTV surface landmarks by the largest amount (1.2 mm). Additional adjustment points further decreased the forecast error by about 0.4 mm each. Selection of the linear model decreased the forecast error for both the distance-based and spherical harmonic morphology descriptors (0.2 mm), while the mean model decreased the forecast error for the distance-based descriptor only (0.2 mm). The magnitude and statistical significance of these improvements decreased with each additional adjustment point, and the effect from model selection was not as large as that from adding the initial points. Conclusions: The authors present models that anticipate longitudinal changes in tumor morphology using various models and model adjustment schemes. The accuracy of these models depended on their form, and the utility of these models

  19. Primary nasal-paranasal oropharyngeal lymphoma in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Wollner, N; Mandell, L; Filippa, D; Exelby, P; McGowan, N; Lieberman, P

    1990-03-15

    Nasal-paranasal oropharyngeal (NPOP) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is a disease of the very young (median age, 5 years) and of the aging adult (median age, 50-60 years). Of a total of 208 pediatric patients with NHL studied, 20 (9.6%) had primary NPOP. Sixty percent of the patients had Stage I and II disease. Primary sites were maxillary sinus in eight patients; tonsils in eight; posterior pharynx in two; mandible in one; and orbit in one patient. Histologically, the disease is different than that of the adults since most patients had B-cell lymphomas of the diffuse undifferentiated type (Rappaport) or small cell non-cleaved types (Lukes-Collins, Kiel, and Working Formulation). None of these patients had gastrointestinal involvement. All patients were treated with the LSA2-L2 regimen and radiation therapy was given to primary unresectable tumors and regional metastases. The lymphoma event-free survival was 75%, with a median observation period of 99+ months. In staging systems that refer mostly to amount of disease outside of the primary (such as ours, Murphy's, and the Ann Arbor staging systems) stage did not correlate well with disease-free survival. In the TNM staging of 1977, a staging system that refers to size of primary tumor as well as regional and systemic disease, stage correlated better with prognosis and survival. In our staging system, eight of 12 patients (66.7%) with Stage I and II disease; four of four with Stage III; two of two with Stage IVA; and zero of two with Stage IVB survived. In the TNM staging system, three of three patients with Stage II and III disease and 12 of 18 patients (67%) with Stage IV disease survived. All recurrences occurred early suggesting that early intensification of chemotherapy may produce better results. PMID:2306688

  20. Transoral Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal and Tongue Cancer in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Thomas K.; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Carroll, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the clinical and cost effectiveness of TORS versus open procedures following FDA approval in December 2009. Study Design Retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2008 to 2011. Methods Elective partial pharyngectomies and partial glossectomies for neoplasm were identified by ICD-9-CM code. Results TORS represented 2.1% in 2010 and 2.2% in 2011 of all transoral ablative procedures. Patients undergoing open partial pharyngectomy for oropharyngeal neoplasms (n=1426) had more severe illness compared to TORS (n=641). However, after controlling for minor-to-moderate severity of illness, open partial pharyngectomy was associated with longer hospital stay (5.2 vs 3.7 days,p<0.001), higher charge ($98,228 vs $67,317,p<0.001), higher cost ($29,365 vs $20,706,p<0.001), higher rates of tracheostomy and gastrostomy tube placement and more wound and bleeding complications. TORS was associated with a higher rate of dysphagia (19.5% vs 8.0%,p<0.001). The lower cost of TORS remained significant in the major-to-extreme severity of illness group but was associated with higher complication rates when compared to open cases of the same severity of illness. A similar analysis of TORS partial glossectomy for base of tongue tumors had similar cost and length of stay benefits, while TORS partial glossectomy for anterior tongue tumors revealed longer hospital stays and no benefit in charge or cost compared to open. Conclusions Early data demonstrate cost effectiveness of TORS partial pharyngectomy and partial glossectomy for the base of tongue but no benefit in partial glossectomy of the anterior tongue. Anatomic accessibility and extent of surgery likely factor into the effectiveness of TORS. PMID:25093603

  1. Review of the Complications Associated with Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Guide to the Dental Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lena; Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Akintoye, Sunday O

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Focus on risk factors, improved diagnostic methods and effective management strategies have made it possible to successfully treat OPC. However, the 5-year survival rate has not improved for several years due to multiple treatment complications, tissue morbidity, loss of function and diminished quality of life. Survivors are faced with complications like oral mucositis, hyposalivation, osteoradionecrosis; tissue fibrosis, morbidity from jaw resection; disfigurement and loss of function that further diminish quality of life. The aim of this review is to highlight major complications associated with treatment of OPC via a literature search and review of available options for identification and management of these complications. Data Sources Relevant publications on oral complications of OPC therapy were thoroughly reviewed from the literature published between the years 1988 and 2012. Material and Method We evaluated reported incidence, prevalence and risk factors for oral complications of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for OPC. The authors conducted electronic search using English language databases namely PubMed Plus, Medline (Pre-Medline and Medline), Cochrane Database of systematic reviews (evidence-based medicine), Dentistry & Oral sciences source, AccessScience, Embase, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews Multifile, Google Scholar, ISI Journal Citation Reports, Ovid Multi-Database. Conclusion We identified the most common complications associated with the treatment of oral cancers. Based on the information gathered, there is evidence that survival of OPC extends beyond eradication of the diseased tissue. Understanding the potential treatment complications and utilizing available resources to prevent and minimize them are important. Caring for OPC survivors should be a multidisciplinary team approach involving the dentist, oncologist, internist and social worker to improve the currently

  2. Oropharyngeal dysphagia, free water protocol and quality of life: an update from a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Martha; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia, typically associated with older adults, represents a spectrum of swallowing disorders with potentially serious complications and a negative impact on quality of life. A major complication of dysphagia is caused by aspiration, predominantly of thin liquids, which may cause aspiration pneumonia. Given that thin liquids are typically aspirated, the conventional therapy involves altering the diet to one consisting of modified solid consistencies and thickened fluids. While it is well known that this approach is appropriate for aspiration, it does represent difficulties with compliancy and quality of life. We have undertaken a relatively large scale clinical trial to investigate the relationships between the effects of free access to water and the development of aspiration, aspects of hydration and issues related to quality in people with dysphagia. Along with clinical observations and findings from others we have previously stratified people with dysphagia, namely those that are immobile or who have low mobility and severe degenerative neurological dysfunction, at highest risk of developing aspiration pneumonia following intake of water. In the present study, we have extended our previous clinical results. Our findings indicate that following purposeful selection of people with dysphagia with their own mobility and relatively healthy cognitive function, free access to water did not result in aspiration pneumonia, improved measures of hydration and in particular, significantly increased quality of life when compared to a diet consisting of thickened fluids only. Overall, we conclude that in people with good mobility and cognitive ability, there is no need to deviate from the Frazier Rehabilitation Centre free water protocol, which allows for the provision of water to people with dysphagia with strict guidelines particularly in relation to good physical ability. PMID:24392465

  3. SU-E-T-352: Why Is the Survival Rate Low in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Rasmussen, K; Rice, J; Stephenson, S; Ferreira, Maria C; Liu, T; Yuh, K; Wang, R; Grecula, J; Lo, S; Mayr, N; Yuh, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors are composed of a large number of clonogens that have the capability of indefinite reproduction. Even when there is complete clinical or radiographic regression of the gross tumor mass after treatment, tumor recurrence can occur if the clonogens are not completely eradicated by radiotherapy. This study was to investigate the colonogen number and its association with the tumor control probability (TCP) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCCA). Methods: A literature search was conducted to collect clinical information of patients with OSCCA, including the prescription dose, tumor volume and survival rate. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was incorporated into TCP model for clinical data analysis. The total dose ranged from 60 to 70 Gy and tumor volume ranged from 10 to 50 cc. The TCP was calculated for each group according to tumor size and dose. The least χ{sup 2} method was used to fit the TCP calculation to clinical data while other LQ model parameters (α, β) were adopted from the literature, due to the limited patient data. Results: A total of 190 patients with T2–T4 OSCCA were included. The association with HPV was not available for all the patients. The 3-year survival rate was about 82% for T2 squamous cell carcinoma and 40% for advanced tumors. Fitting the TCP model to the survival data, the average clonogen number was 1.56×10{sup 12}. For the prescription dose of 70 Gy, the calculated TCP ranged from 40% to 90% when the tumor volume varied from 10 to 50 cc. Conclusion: Our data suggests variation between the clonogen number and TCP in OSCCA. Tumors with larger colonogen number tend to have lower TCP and therefore dose escalation above 70 Gy may be indicated in order to improve the TCP and survival rate. Our result will require future confirmation with a large number of patients.

  4. Quantitation of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Plasma of Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Hongbin; Banh, Alice; Kwok, Shirley; Shi Xiaoli; Wu, Simon; Krakow, Trevor; Khong, Brian; Bavan, Brindha; Bala, Rajeev; Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Colevas, Dimitrios; Pourmand, Nader; Koong, Albert C.; Kong, Christina S.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA can be detected in the plasma of patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) and to monitor its temporal change during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We used polymerase chain reaction to detect HPV DNA in the culture media of HPV-positive SCC90 and VU147T cells and the plasma of SCC90 and HeLa tumor-bearing mice, non-tumor-bearing controls, and those with HPV-negative tumors. We used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to quantify the plasma HPV DNA in 40 HPV-positive OPC, 24 HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients and 10 non-cancer volunteers. The tumor HPV status was confirmed by p16{sup INK4a} staining and HPV16/18 polymerase chain reaction or HPV in situ hybridization. A total of 14 patients had serial plasma samples for HPV DNA quantification during radiotherapy. Results: HPV DNA was detectable in the plasma samples of SCC90- and HeLa-bearing mice but not in the controls. It was detected in 65% of the pretreatment plasma samples from HPV-positive OPC patients using E6/7 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. None of the HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients or non-cancer controls had detectable HPV DNA. The pretreatment plasma HPV DNA copy number correlated significantly with the nodal metabolic tumor volume (assessed using {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography). The serial measurements in 14 patients showed a rapid decline in HPV DNA that had become undetectable at radiotherapy completion. In 3 patients, the HPV DNA level had increased to a discernable level at metastasis. Conclusions: Xenograft studies indicated that plasma HPV DNA is released from HPV-positive tumors. Circulating HPV DNA was detectable in most HPV-positive OPC patients. Thus, plasma HPV DNA might be a valuable tool for identifying relapse.

  5. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Daniel W; Coppock, Joseph D; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M; Spanos, William C; Onken, Michael D; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H; Vermeer, Paola D

    2016-04-26

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60-80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  6. Oropharyngeal Carriage of Meningococcus in Portugal by Group and Clonal Complex 6 Years After Adolescent Vaccine Campaign.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda; Morales-Aza, Begonia; Christensen, Hannah; Giles, Jessica; Ferreira, Muriel; Sikora, Paulina; Madanelo, Ines; Lucidarme, Jay; Januário, Luis; Finn, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Portugal introduced (2+1) conjugate Meningococcal group C vaccine in 2006 with high coverage catch up to 18 years and has given only 1 dose at 1 year since 2012. Among 601 student oropharyngeal swabs, meningococcal carriage rate was 13.3% (A-0%, B-5.3%, C-0.3%, W-0.2%, X-0.2% and Y-1.7%). C and W strains were of potentially disease-causing clonal complexes (cc) but not the hyperinvasive cc11. PMID:26222062

  7. Eating less from bigger packs: Preventing the pack size effect with diet primes.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Iris; Papies, Esther K

    2016-05-01

    An increase in the package size of food has been shown to lead to an increase in energy intake from this food, the so-called pack size effect. Previous research has shown that providing diet-concerned individuals with a reminder, or prime, of their dieting goal can help them control their consumption. Here, we investigated if providing such a prime is also effective for reducing the magnitude of the pack size effect. We conducted two experiments in which the cover of a dieting magazine (Experiment 1) and diet-related commercials (Experiment 2) served as diet goal primes. Both experiments had a 2 (pack size: small vs. large) × 2 (prime: diet vs. control) × 2 (dietary restraint: high vs. low) between participants design. We measured expected consumption of four snack foods in Experiment 1 (N = 477), and actual consumption of M&M's in Experiment 2 (N = 224). Results showed that the diet prime reduced the pack size effect for both restrained and unrestrained eaters in Experiment 1 and for restrained eaters only in Experiment 2. Although effect sizes were small, these findings suggest that a diet prime motivates restrained eaters to limit their consumption, and as a result the pack size has less influence on the amount consumed. We discuss limitations of this research as well as potential avenues for further research and theoretical and practical implications. PMID:26876911

  8. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  9. Dense packings of polyhedra: Platonic and Archimedean solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torquato, S.; Jiao, Y.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the nature of dense particle packings is a subject of intense research in the physical, mathematical, and biological sciences. The preponderance of previous work has focused on spherical particles and very little is known about dense polyhedral packings. We formulate the problem of generating dense packings of nonoverlapping, nontiling polyhedra within an adaptive fundamental cell subject to periodic boundary conditions as an optimization problem, which we call the adaptive shrinking cell (ASC) scheme. This optimization problem is solved here (using a variety of multiparticle initial configurations) to find the dense packings of each of the Platonic solids in three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 , except for the cube, which is the only Platonic solid that tiles space. We find the densest known packings of tetrahedra, icosahedra, dodecahedra, and octahedra with densities 0.823…, 0.836…, 0.904…, and 0.947…, respectively. It is noteworthy that the densest tetrahedral packing possesses no long-range order. Unlike the densest tetrahedral packing, which must not be a Bravais lattice packing, the densest packings of the other nontiling Platonic solids that we obtain are their previously known optimal (Bravais) lattice packings. We also derive a simple upper bound on the maximal density of packings of congruent nonspherical particles and apply it to Platonic solids, Archimedean solids, superballs, and ellipsoids. Provided that what we term the “asphericity” (ratio of the circumradius to inradius) is sufficiently small, the upper bounds are relatively tight and thus close to the corresponding densities of the optimal lattice packings of the centrally symmetric Platonic and Archimedean solids. Our simulation results, rigorous upper bounds, and other theoretical arguments lead us to the conjecture that the densest packings of Platonic and Archimedean solids with central symmetry are given by their corresponding densest lattice packings. This can be

  10. Non-Euclidean geometry of twisted filament bundle packing

    PubMed Central

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    Densely packed and twisted assemblies of filaments are crucial structural motifs in macroscopic materials (cables, ropes, and textiles) as well as synthetic and biological nanomaterials (fibrous proteins). We study the unique and nontrivial packing geometry of this universal material design from two perspectives. First, we show that the problem of twisted bundle packing can be mapped exactly onto the problem of disc packing on a curved surface, the geometry of which has a positive, spherical curvature close to the center of rotation and approaches the intrinsically flat geometry of a cylinder far from the bundle center. From this mapping, we find the packing of any twisted bundle is geometrically frustrated, as it makes the sixfold geometry of filament close packing impossible at the core of the fiber. This geometrical equivalence leads to a spectrum of close-packed fiber geometries, whose low symmetry (five-, four-, three-, and twofold) reflect non-Euclidean packing constraints at the bundle core. Second, we explore the ground-state structure of twisted filament assemblies formed under the influence of adhesive interactions by a computational model. Here, we find that the underlying non-Euclidean geometry of twisted fiber packing disrupts the regular lattice packing of filaments above a critical radius, proportional to the helical pitch. Above this critical radius, the ground-state packing includes the presence of between one and six excess fivefold disclinations in the cross-sectional order. PMID:22711799

  11. Improved Absolute Approximation Ratios for Two-Dimensional Packing Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harren, Rolf; van Stee, Rob

    We consider the two-dimensional bin packing and strip packing problem, where a list of rectangles has to be packed into a minimal number of rectangular bins or a strip of minimal height, respectively. All packings have to be non-overlapping and orthogonal, i.e., axis-parallel. Our algorithm for strip packing has an absolute approximation ratio of 1.9396 and is the first algorithm to break the approximation ratio of 2 which was established more than a decade ago. Moreover, we present a polynomial time approximation scheme (mathcal{PTAS}) for strip packing where rotations by 90 degrees are permitted and an algorithm for two-dimensional bin packing with an absolute worst-case ratio of 2, which is optimal provided mathcal{P} not= mathcal{NP}.

  12. Structural characterization of the packings of granular regular polygons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuncheng; Dong, Kejun; Yu, Aibing

    2015-12-01

    By using a recently developed method for discrete modeling of nonspherical particles, we simulate the random packings of granular regular polygons with three to 11 edges under gravity. The effects of shape and friction on the packing structures are investigated by various structural parameters, including packing fraction, the radial distribution function, coordination number, Voronoi tessellation, and bond-orientational order. We find that packing fraction is generally higher for geometrically nonfrustrated regular polygons, and can be increased by the increase of edge number and decrease of friction. The changes of packing fraction are linked with those of the microstructures, such as the variations of the translational and orientational orders and local configurations. In particular, the free areas of Voronoi tessellations (which are related to local packing fractions) can be described by log-normal distributions for all polygons. The quantitative analyses establish a clearer picture for the packings of regular polygons. PMID:26764678

  13. Summary of Calculations Performed to Evaluate the Structural Integrity of the 6-Pack Container Pallet

    SciTech Connect

    Hrousis, C.A.

    1999-10-01

    The 6-Pack Container Pallet is a space-frame structure, designed by Mason & Hanger Corp. to hold six AL-R8 containers together in a convenient bundle. The AL-R8 containers hold nuclear weapon components that require special care and consideration. The primary purpose of the 6-pack assembly is storage, but there is some manipulation as the 6-pack is loaded, moved and stacked. Recently, there has been an upgrade to a new AL-R8-SI container that is heavier than its predecessor was. The analysis discussed herein was conducted to ensure that the increased stresses due to the heavier containers are within design safety limits. At this time, however, there is disagreement as to what the strength requirements for the 6-pack pallet are. Depending on which classification applies to the structure, a factor of safety (yield stress over design stress) of 3.0 or more may need to be satisfied. This report documents strength analyses of loaded 6-packs performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The entire 6-pack assembly was discretized into a mesh with a total of 38682 first-order finite elements. The stresses were found for four characteristic load cases using the implicit code NIKE3D. This was a static strength analysis only. Dynamic loading was not considered. Stability, also, was not addressed. There are two 6-pack pallet designs under consideration: one that uses 1/2 inch diameter bolts and one with 3/8 inch bolts. In both cases, the maximum torque applied to the bolts is 55 in-lbf. This analysis finds the minimum factor of safety based on yield to be less than 3.0 in the main load path of both the 1/2 inch and 3/8 inch diameter bolt designs. In general, the peak stresses found in the 1/2 inch bolt design are less than those of the 3/8 inch bolt design. At the welded ends of the main tube section that spans the length of the pallet, the minimum safety factor is 2.14 when 1/2 inch bolts are used and 1.77 when 3/8 inch bolts are used. Minimum safety factors of

  14. RESPIRATORY–SWALLOW PHASE PATTERNS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO SWALLOWING IMPAIRMENT IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Martin B.; McFarland, David H.; Dozier, Thomas S.; Blair, Julie; Ayers, Christopher; Michel, Yvonne; Gillespie, M. Boyd; Day, Terry A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Unstable respiratory–swallowing coordination has been associated with disorders and disease. The goals of this study were (1) to describe respiratory–swallow patterns in patients with dysphagia consequent to treatments for cancers of the oropharynx and (2) to determine the association between respiratory–swallow patterns, airway invasion, and overall severity of swallowing impairment. Methods This prospective, cross-sectional design compared respiratory–swallow patterns in 20 patients treated for oropharyngeal cancer and 20 healthy, age-matched control participants. Nasal airflow direction was synchronously recorded with videofluoroscopic imaging in participants who swallowed 5-mL thin liquid barium boluses. Results Respiratory–swallow patterns differed between groups. Most control participants initiated and completed swallowing bracketed by expiratory airflow. Swallowing in patients often interrupted inspiratory flow and was associated with penetration or aspiration of the bolus. Conclusions We suggest nonexpiratory bracketed respiratory–swallowing phase patterns in patients with oropharyngeal cancer may place patients at greater risk of airway penetration or aspiration during swallowing. PMID:19780056

  15. [New Combination Therapy to Improve the Functional Preservation Rate of the Larynx in Laryngeal, Oropharyngeal, and Hypopharyngeal Cancers].

    PubMed

    Furusaka, Tohru

    2015-10-01

    A new combination therapy has been developed to achieve high overall survival and functional laryngeal preservation rates in head and neck cancers, which require laryngectomy. In order to treat the primary site without resection, superselective intra-arterial infusions with DCF anterogradely and 60 mg/m2 of DOC and 60 mg/m2 of CDDP via the femoral artery on day 1 were administered, followed by continuous intravenous instillation of 750 mg/m2/day of 5-FU for 5 days from day 2. The 5- year survival rate was 70.4% in laryngeal cancer, 72.8% in oropharyngeal cancer, and 68.5% in hypopharyngeal cancer. The 5-year functional laryngeal preservation rate was 71.0% in laryngeal cancer, 63.4% in oropharyngeal cancer, and 65.2% in hypopharyngeal cancer. In addition to regional lymph node control, a thorough neck dissection was performed. Good overall survival and functional laryngeal preservation rates were achieved. PMID:26489542

  16. Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy for Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: A Dosimetric and Delivery Efficiency Comparison with Static-Field IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaofang; Zhao, Yingchao; Liang, Zhiwen; Dassarath, Meera; Wang, Lu; Jin, Lihui; Chen, Lili; Dong, James; Price, Robert A.; Ma, C.-M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment plan adequacy and delivery efficiency among volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with one or two arcs and the conventional static-field dynamic multileaf collimator (dMLC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients undergoing oropharyngeal carcinoma. Fifteen patient cases were included in this investigation. Each of the cases was planned using step-and-shoot IMRT, VMAT with a single arc (Arc1) and VMAT with double arcs (Arc2). A two-dose level prescription for planning target volumes (PTVs) was delivered with 70 Gy/56 Gy in 30 fractions. Comparisons were performed of the dose-volume histograms (DVH) for PTVs, the DVH for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. IMRT and Arc2 achieved similar target coverage, but superior to Arc1. Apart from the oral cavity, Arc1 showed no advantage in sparing of OARs compared with IMRT, while Arc2 obtained equivalent or better sparing of OARs among the three techniques. VMAT reduced MU/fx and shortened delivery time remarkably compared with IMRT. Our results demonstrated that for oropharyngeal cases, Arc2 can achieve superior target coverage and normal tissue sparing, as well as a significant reduction in treatment time. PMID:25284321

  17. Effects of age and non-oropharyngeal proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensation on the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating.

    PubMed

    Shune, S E; Moon, J B

    2016-09-01

    To best prevent and treat eating/swallowing problems, it is essential to understand how components of oral physiology contribute to the preservation and/or degradation of eating/swallowing in healthy ageing. Anticipatory, pre-swallow motor movements may be critical to safe and efficient eating/swallowing, particularly for older adults. However, the nature of these responses is relatively unknown. This study compared the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating in healthy older (aged 70-85) and younger (aged 18-30) adults under four eating conditions: typical self-feeding, typical assisted feeding (being fed by a research assistant resulting in proprioceptive loss), sensory loss self-feeding (wearing blindfold/headphones resulting in exteroceptive loss) and sensory loss assisted feeding (proprioceptive and exteroceptive loss). Older adults opened their mouths wider than younger adults in anticipation of food intake under both typical and most non-oropharyngeal sensory loss conditions. Further, the loss of proprioceptive and exteroceptive cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening for all participants. Greater mouth opening in older adults may be a protective compensation, contributing to the preservation of function associated with healthy ageing. Our finding that the loss of non-oropharyngeal sensory cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening highlights how important proprioception, vision, and hearing are in pre-swallow behaviour. Age- and disease-related changes in vision, hearing, and the ability to self-feed may reduce the effectiveness of these pre-swallow strategies. PMID:27377757

  18. Concurrent Chemoradiation With Carboplatin-5-Fluorouracil Versus Cisplatin in Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancers: Is More Always Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Barkati, Maroie; Fortin, Bernard; Soulieres, Denis; Clavel, Sebastien; Despres, Phillipe; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Guertin, Louis; Olivier, Marie-Jo; Coulombe, Genevieve; Donath, David; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The optimal chemotherapy regimen remains undefined in the treatment of locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer by concomitant chemoradiation. This article compares two platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Methods and Materials: In this retrospective study, we reviewed all consecutive patients treated for Stage III or IVA-B oropharyngeal cancer using either a combination of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) every 3 weeks or high-dose cisplatin every 3 weeks concomitant with definitive radiation therapy. Results: A total of 200 patients were treated with carboplatin-5FU and 53 patients with cisplatin. Median potential follow-up was 43 months. The 3-year overall survival rates for carboplatin-5FU and cisplatin respectively were 79.1% and 74.9% (p = 0.628), the 3-year disease-free survival rates were 76.0% and 71.3% (p = 0.799), and the 3-year locoregional control rates were 88.4% and 94.2% (p = 0.244). Conclusions: We could not demonstrate differences between these two regimens, which both proved efficacious. Polychemotherapy and monochemotherapy therefore seem comparable in this retrospective analysis.

  19. Development and application of a hybrid inert/organic packing material for the biofiltration of composting off-gases mimics.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jerónimo; Prado, Oscar J; Almarcha, Manuel; Lafuente, Javier; Gabriel, David

    2010-06-15

    The performance of three biofilters (BF1-BF3) packed with a new hybrid (inert/organic) packing material that consists of spherical argyle pellets covered with compost was examined in different operational scenarios and compared with a biofilter packed with pine bark (BF4). BF1, BF2 and BF4 were inoculated with an enriched microbial population, while BF3 was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant. A gas mixture containing ammonia and six VOCs was fed to the reactors with N-NH(3) loads ranging from 0 to 10 g N/m(3)h and a VOCs load of around 10 g C/m(3)h. A profound analysis of the fate of nitrogen was performed in all four reactors. Results show that the biofilters packed with the hybrid packing material and inoculated with the microbial pre-adapted population (BF1 and BF2) achieved the highest nitrification rates and VOCs removal efficiencies. In BF3, nitratation was inhibited during most of the study, while only slight evidence of nitrification could be observed in BF4. All four reactors were able to treat the VOCs mixture with efficiencies greater than 80% during the entire experimental period, regardless of the inlet ammonia load. PMID:20188468

  20. Base-Bleed Effect on X-33 Aerospike Plume Induced Base-Heating Environment During Power-Pack Out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Tee-See; Droege, Alan; D'Agostino, Mark; Lee, Young-Ching; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A computational heat transfer methodology was developed to study the dual-engine linear aerospike plume induced base-heating environment during one power-pack out, in ascent flight. One power-pack out results in reduction of power levels for both engines. That, in turn, reduces the amount of base-bleed and changes the distribution of base-bleed on the two pillows. Hence, the concern of increased base-heating during power-pack out. The thermo-flowfield of the entire vehicle was computed. The computational methodology for the convective heating is based on a three-dimensional, finite-volume, viscous, chemically reacting, and pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. The computational methodology for the radiative heating is based on a three-dimensional, finite-volume, and spectral-line-based weighted-sum-of-gray-gases absorption computational radiation heat transfer formulation. A separate radiation model was used for diagnostic purposes. The computational methodology was systematically benchmarked. In this study, near-base radiative heat fluxes were computed and they compared well with those measured from an installed linear aerospike engine tests. The base-heating environment of 18 trajectory points selected from three power-pack out ascent scenarios was computed and is presented here. The power-pack out condition has the most impact on convective base-heating when it happens early in flight. The some of its impact comes from the asymmetric and reduced base-bleed.

  1. Packed fluidized bed blanket for fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Chi, John W. H.

    1984-01-01

    A packed fluidized bed blanket for a fusion reactor providing for efficient radiation absorption for energy recovery, efficient neutron absorption for nuclear transformations, ease of blanket removal, processing and replacement, and on-line fueling/refueling. The blanket of the reactor contains a bed of stationary particles during reactor operation, cooled by a radial flow of coolant. During fueling/refueling, an axial flow is introduced into the bed in stages at various axial locations to fluidize the bed. When desired, the fluidization flow can be used to remove particles from the blanket.

  2. Simple cloud chambers using gel ice packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-07-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry ice or liquid nitrogen. The gel can be frozen in normal domestic freezers, and can be used repeatedly by re-freezing. The tracks of alpha-ray particles can be observed continuously for about 20 min, and the operation is simple and easy.

  3. Techdrill`s Drill Soft Pack One

    SciTech Connect

    Prieur, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    This article presents the main features of Drill Soft Pack One (DSP-One) version 1.4 developed by Techdrill (Paris, France). DSP-One is an integrated drilling engineering package that covers most aspects of drilling engineering. The package has been used for 6 months to prepare drilling programs and monitor wells. DSP-One is a PC-based, fully menu-driven program that runs on any IBM PC compatible. The program requires 550 KB of memory and 6 MB of hard-disk space. The software manufacture recommends a math coprocessor for speed and a VGA color monitor to achieve full benefit from the color graphic displays.

  4. Gastrostomy in oropharyngeal cancer patients with ERCC4 (XPF) germline variants

    SciTech Connect

    Kornguth, David G.; Garden, Adam S.; Zheng Yuxin; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Wei Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M. . E-mail: esturgis@mdanderson.org

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: ERCC4 (XPF) plays a role in both recombinant DNA repair and nucleotide excision repair, which involve repairing radiation-induced genetic damage. We hypothesized that two ERCC4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with normal-tissue toxicity in patients treated with radiotherapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of the medical records of 130 patients with OPSCC who were prospectively recruited into a molecular epidemiologic study was performed to determine whether a long-term percutaneous feeding gastrostomy (LPFG) tube (a tube required for more than 180 days) had been used during and after definitive radiotherapy. We determined the genotype of the ERCC4 G1244A and T2505C polymorphisms using standard polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism techniques on DNA extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results: Of 130 patients, 100 (77%) were evaluable for the ERCC4 G1244A polymorphism in exon 8, and 122 (94%) were evaluable for the ERCC4 T2505C polymorphism in exon 11. The ERCC4 G1244A polymorphism was associated with a decreased need for LPFG, but this was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio = 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-2.78). Sixteen (32%), 9 (14%), and 1 (10%) of patients with the wild-type homozygous TT genotype of ERCC4 T2505C, the heterozygous TC genotype, and the homozygous CC polymorphic genotype, respectively, required LPFG. These results suggest that the ERCC4 2505C allele was associated with a reduced need for LPFG (adjusted odds ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.67). Furthermore, the need for LPFG was reduced by having more than 1 ERCC4 2505C allele and further for having both the ERCC4 1244A and 2505C polymorphic alleles, but this was not statistically significant. In addition, the actual time of gastrostomy dependence was associated with the T2505C polymorphism based on the Kaplan-Meier method (p = 0

  5. Surgery Versus Radiotherapy for Early Oropharyngeal Tumors: a Never-Ending Debate.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Yan; Simon, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Therapeutic options for early stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) include both surgery and radiotherapy as single treatment modality. Retrospective data reporting on locoregional control and survival rates in early stage OPSCC have shown equivalent efficacy, although no prospective randomized trials are available to confirm these results. Given the assumed comparable oncologic results in both groups, complication rates and functional outcomes associated with each modality play a major role when making treatment decisions. Radiotherapy is used preferentially in many centers because few trials have reported higher complication rates in surgical patients. However, these adverse effects were mainly due to traditional invasive open surgical approaches used for access to the oropharynx. In order to decrease the morbidity of these techniques, transoral surgical (TOS) approaches have been developed progressively. They include transoral laser microsurgery (TLM), transoral robotic surgery (TORS), and conventional transoral techniques. Meta-analysis comparing these new approaches with radiotherapy showed equivalent efficacy in terms of oncologic results. Furthermore, studies reporting on functional outcomes in patients undergoing TOS for OPSCC did not show major long-term functional impairment following treatment. Given the abovementioned statements, it is our practice to treat early stage OPSCC as follows: whenever a single modality treatment seems feasible (T1-2 and N0-1), we advocate TOS resection of the primary tumor associated with selective neck dissection, as indicated. In our opinion, the advantage of this approach relies on the possibility to stratify the risk of disease progression based on the pathological features of the tumor. Depending on the results, adjuvant radiation treatment or chemoradiotherapy can be chosen for high-risk patients. For tumors without adverse features, no adjuvant treatment is given. This approach also allows prevention of

  6. Ecological Effect of Solithromycin on Normal Human Oropharyngeal and Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Rosenborg, Staffan; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Holm, Johan; Söderberg Löfdal, Karin; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-07-01

    Solithromycin is a new fluoroketolide. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of orally administered solithromycin on the human oropharyngeal and intestinal microbiota. Thirteen healthy volunteers (median age, 27.3 years) received oral solithromycin at 800 mg on day 1 followed by 400 mg daily on days 2 to 7. Fecal and saliva samples were collected at baseline and on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21 for pharmacokinetic and microbiological analyses. Plasma samples were collected predose on days 2, 5, and 7 as proof of exposure, and solithromycin concentration ranges were 21.9 to 258 ng/ml, 18.0 to 386 ng/ml, and 16.9 to 417 ng/ml, respectively. The solithromycin concentrations in feces were 15.8 to 65.4 mg/kg, 24.5 to 82.7 mg/kg, 21.4 to 82.7 mg/kg, 12.1 to 72.4 mg/kg, 0.2 to 25.6 mg/kg, and 0 to 0.5 mg/kg on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21, respectively. The numbers of enterobacteria and enterococci decreased and were normalized on day 14. The numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria decreased from day 2 to day 14 and were normalized on day 21. The clostridia decreased on days 2, 7, and 14 and were normalized on day 21. No Clostridium difficile strains or toxins were detected during the study period. The number of Bacteroides strains was not significantly changed. The solithromycin concentrations in saliva were 0 to 1.2 mg/liter, 0 to 0.5 mg/liter, 0 to 0.5 mg/liter, and 0 to 0.1 mg/liter on days 2, 5, 7, and 9, respectively. The numbers of streptococci decreased on day 2 and were normalized on day 5. The numbers of lactobacilli, prevotellae, fusobacteria, and leptotrichiae decreased from day 2 and were normalized on day 21. PMID:27139483

  7. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Lin, Haibo; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland; Dutta, Pinaki R.; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  8. [An oropharyngeal tularemia case diagnosed by the isolation of Francisella tularensis on human blood agar].

    PubMed

    Ozel, Gönül; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Yeşilyurt, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2010-10-01

    Tularemia which is a multisystem disease of humans and some animals, is endemic in North America, some parts of Europe and Asia. The causative agent, Francisella tularensis, is a fastidious gram-negative, intracellular bacterium which requires supplementation with sulphydryl compounds (cysteine, cystine, thiosulphate, isoVitaleX) for growth on common laboratory media. In this report, a case of oropharyngeal tularemia diagnosed by the isolation of the causative agent on non-selective-common microbiological agar, has been presented. The patient was from Yozgat located in central Anatolia where tularemia has not been reported so far. Forty-two years old male was admitted to the hospital with two weeks history of sudden onset fever, headache, generalized aches, sore throat, and cervical tender lump on the left. Physical examination revealed bilateral exudative tonsillitis and tender posterior cervical lymphadenopathy. He has been empirically treated with amoxicilin-clavulanic acid for 7 days with initial diagnosis of acute tonsillopharyngitis. However, he was admitted to the hospital since the symptoms persisted and swelling increased despite antibiotic therapy. Microscopical examination of the Gram and Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen stained smears prepared from the surgically drained lymph node revealed PMNL, with no evidence of bacteria. Routine cultures of the lymph node material yielded growth of gram-negative coccobacilli only on human blood agar and the cultures were negative for pyogenic bacteria, acid-fast organisms and fungi. Pathologic examination of the drainage material revealed suppurative inflammation. Lymph node aspirate and serum samples of the patient together with the isolated strain were sent to reference laboratory for further investigation in accordance to the clinical and laboratory findings compatible with tularemia. The isolate was confirmed as F.tularensis by slide agglutination and direct immunofluorescence antibody tests, and identified as F

  9. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: Effect of Tumor Volume on Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lok, Benjamin H.; Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Park, Jeffery; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Ho, Alan; Pfister, David G.; Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Zhang, Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary gross tumor volume (pGTV) and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV) on treatment outcomes in patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, a total of 442 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were treated with IMRT with curative intent at our center. Thirty patients treated postoperatively and 2 additional patients who started treatment more than 6 months after diagnosis were excluded. A total of 340 patients with restorable treatment plans were included in this present study. The majority of the patients underwent concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The pGTV and nGTV were calculated using the original clinical treatment plans. Cox proportional hazards models and log-rank tests were used to evaluate the correlation between tumor volumes and overall survival (OS), and competing risks analysis tools were used to evaluate the correlation between local failure (LF), regional failure (RF), distant metastatic failure (DMF) vs. tumor volumes with death as a competing risk. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 34 months (range, 5-67). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LF, RF and DF in this cohort of patients was 6.1%, 5.2%, and 12.2%, respectively. The 2-year OS rate was 88.6%. Univariate analysis determined pGTV and T-stage correlated with LF (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.004, respectively), whereas nGTV was not associated with RF. On multivariate analysis, pGTV and N-stage were independent risk factors for overall survival (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0073, respectively) and distant control (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients with OPC treated with IMRT, pGTV was found to be associated with overall survival, local failure, and distant metastatic failure.

  10. Target Volume Delineation in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Impact of PET, MRI, and Physical Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Caria, Nicola; Schoeder, Heiko; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Wolden, Suzanne; Wong, Richard J.; Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy

    2012-05-01

    Introduction: Sole utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for head-and-neck cancers is subject to inaccuracies. This study aims to evaluate contributions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and physical examination (PE) to GTV delineation in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: Forty-one patients with OPC were studied. All underwent contrast-enhanced CT simulation scans (CECTs) that were registered with pretreatment PETs and MRIs. For each patient, three sets of primary and nodal GTV were contoured. First, reference GTVs (GTVref) were contoured by the treating radiation oncologist (RO) using CT, MRI, PET, and PE findings. Additional GTVs were created using fused CT/PET scans (GTVctpet) and CT/MRI scans (GTVctmr) by two other ROs blinded to GTVref. To compare GTVs, concordance indices (CI) were calculated by dividing the respective overlap volumes by overall volumes. To evaluate the contribution of PE, composite GTVs derived from CT, MRI, and PET (GTVctpetmr) were compared with GTVref. Results: For primary tumors, GTVref was significantly larger than GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p < 0.001). Although no significant difference in size was noted between GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p = 0.39), there was poor concordance between them (CI = 0.62). In addition, although CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) was low, it was significantly higher than CI (ctpet vs. ref) and CI (ctmr vs. ref) (p < 0.001), suggesting that neither modality should be used alone. Qualitative analyses to explain the low CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) revealed underestimation of mucosal disease when GTV was contoured without knowledge of PE findings. Similar trends were observed for nodal GTVs. However, CI (ctpet vs. ref), CI (ctmr vs. ref), and CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) were high (>0.75), indicating that although the modalities were complementary, the added benefit was small in the context of CECTs. In addition, PE did not aid greatly in nodal GTV delineation

  11. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S.; Dehnad, Homan; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Braunius, Weibel; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured ('volumetric approach') and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The COM model is practical and specific for recurrence assessment. Most

  12. Human Papillomavirus and Cystic Node Metastasis in Oropharyngeal Cancer and Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Toshimichi; Morii, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Yoshii, Tadashi; Takenaka, Yukinori; Nakahara, Susumu; Todo, Takeshi; Inohara, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    The clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) in neck node metastasis from cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is not well established. We aimed to address the relationship of HPV status between node metastasis and the primary tumor, and also the relevance of HPV status regarding radiographically detected cystic node metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and CUP. HPV DNA was examined in 68 matched pairs of node metastasis and primary tumor, and in node metastasis from 27 CUPs. In surgically treated CUPs, p16 was examined immunohistochemically. When tonsillectomy proved occult tonsillar cancer in CUP, HPV DNA and p16 were also examined in the occult primary. Cystic node metastasis on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans was correlated with the primary site and HPV status in another series of 255 HNSCCs and CUPs with known HPV status. Node metastasis was HPV-positive in 19/37 (51%) oropharyngeal SCCs (OPSCCs) and 10/27 (37%) CUPs, but not in non-OPSCCs. Fluid was collected from cystic node metastasis using fine needle aspiration in two OPSCCs and one CUP, and all fluid collections were HPV-positive. HPV status, including the presence of HPV DNA, genotype, and physical status, as well as the expression pattern of p16 were consistent between node metastasis and primary or occult primary tumor. Occult tonsillar cancer was found more frequently in p16-positive CUP than in p16-negative CUP (odds ratio (OR), 39.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4–377.8; P = 0.02). Radiographically, cystic node metastasis was specific to OPSCC and CUP, and was associated with HPV positivity relative to necrotic or solid node metastasis (OR, 6.2; 95% CI, 1.2–45.7; P = 0.03). In conclusion, HPV status remains unchanged after metastasis. The occult primary of HPV-positive CUP is most probably localized in the oropharynx. HPV status determined from fine needle aspirates facilitates the diagnosis of cystic node metastasis. PMID:24752007

  13. Moisture flux changes and trends for the entire Arctic in 2003-2011 derived from EOS Aqua data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, L. N.; Markus, T.; Vihma, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice acts as a barrier between the ocean and lower atmosphere, reducing the exchange of heat and moisture. In recent years the ice pack has undergone many changes, in particular a rapid reduction in sea ice extent and compactness in summer and autumn. This, along with modeling studies, would cause one to believe that the moisture flux would be increasing. We estimate the daily moisture flux from 2003-2011 using geophysical data from multiple sensors onboard NASA's Aqua satellite, taking advantage of observations being collected at the same time and along the same track. Our findings show the moisture flux, averaged over the entire Arctic, has had large interannual variations. Increases in air specific humidity tend to reduce the moisture flux, whereas the decrease in sea ice cover tends to increase the flux. Statistically significant seasonal decreasing trends are seen in December, January and February because of the dominating effect of increase in 2m air specific humidity increasing, reducing the surface-air specific humidity difference by -0.0547 kg/kg in the Kara/Barents Seas, E. Greenland Sea and Baffin Bay regions where there is some open water year round. Our results also show that the contribution of the sea ice zone to the total moisture flux has increased by 3.6% because the amount of open water within the sea ice has increased by 4.3%.

  14. The effect of nanoparticle packing on capacitive electrode performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghee; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Min-Sik; Kong, Hye Jeong; Im, Kyungun; Kwon, Oh Seok; Kim, Sungmin; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles pack together to form macro-scale electrodes in various types of devices, and thus, optimization of the nanoparticle packing is a prerequisite for the realization of a desirable device performance. In this work, we provide in-depth insight into the effect of nanoparticle packing on the performance of nanoparticle-based electrodes by combining experimental and computational findings. As a model system, polypyrrole nanospheres of three different diameters were used to construct pseudocapacitive electrodes, and the performance of the electrodes was examined at various nanosphere diameter ratios and mixed weight fractions. Two numerical algorithms are proposed to simulate the random packing of the nanospheres on the electrode. The binary nanospheres exhibited diverse, complicated packing behaviors compared with the monophasic packing of each nanosphere species. The packing of the two nanosphere species with lower diameter ratios at an optimized composition could lead to more dense packing of the nanospheres, which in turn could contribute to better device performance. The dense packing of the nanospheres would provide more efficient transport pathways for ions because of the reduced inter-nanosphere pore size and enlarged surface area for charge storage. Ultimately, it is anticipated that our approach can be widely used to define the concept of "the best nanoparticle packing" for desirable device performance. PMID:27242155

  15. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N. Khalid; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2014-01-01

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. Here, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We define DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy (kBT) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. We show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa. PMID:25344532

  16. Maximizing Singlet Fission by Intermolecular Packing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linjun; Olivier, Yoann; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Beljonne, David

    2014-10-01

    A novel nonadiabatic molecular dynamics scheme is applied to study the singlet fission (SF) process in pentacene dimers as a function of longitudinal and lateral displacements of the molecular backbones. Detailed two-dimensional mappings of both instantaneous and long-term triplet yields are obtained, characterizing the advantageous and unfavorable stacking arrangements, which can be achieved by chemical substitutions to the bare pentacene molecule. We show that the SF rate can be increased by more than an order of magnitude through tuning the intermolecular packing, most notably when going from cofacial to the slipped stacked arrangements encountered in some pentacene derivatives. The simulations indicate that the SF process is driven by thermal electron-phonon fluctuations at ambient and high temperatures, expected in solar cell applications. Although charge-transfer states are key to construct continuous channels for SF, a large charge-transfer character of the photoexcited state is found to be not essential for efficient SF. The reported time domain study mimics directly numerous laser experiments and provides novel guidelines for designing efficient photovoltaic systems exploiting the SF process with optimum intermolecular packing. PMID:26278443

  17. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N Khalid; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2014-11-11

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. Here, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We define DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy ([Formula: see text]) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. We show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa. PMID:25344532

  18. Drag coefficients for winter Antarctic pack ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wamser, Christian; Martinson, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    Air-ice and ice-water drag coefficients referenced to 10-m-height winds for winter Antarctic pack ice based on measurements made from R/V Polarstern during the Winter Weddell Sea Project, 1986 (WWSP-86), and from R/V Akademik Fedorov during the Winter Weddell Gyre Study, 1989 (WWGS-89), are presented. The optimal values of the air-ice drag coefficients, made from turbulent flux measurements, are (1.79 +/- 0.06) x 10 exp -3 for WWSP-86 and (1.45 +/- 0.09) x 10 exp -3 for WWGS-89. A single ice-water drag coefficient for both WWSP-86 and WWGS-89, estimated from periods of ice drift throught to represent free-drift conditions, is (1.13 +/- 0.26) x 10 exp -3, and the ice-water turning angle is 18 +/- 18 deg. It is suggested that for a typical Antarctic winter pack ice cover, the ice cover reduces the momentum flux from the atmosphere to the ocean by about 33 percent.

  19. Immersion Calorimetry: Molecular Packing Effects in Micropores.

    PubMed

    Madani, S Hadi; Silvestre-Albero, Ana; Biggs, Mark J; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Pendleton, Phillip

    2015-12-21

    Repeated and controlled immersion calorimetry experiments were performed to determine the specific surface area and pore-size distribution (PSD) of a well-characterized, microporous poly(furfuryl alcohol)-based activated carbon. The PSD derived from nitrogen gas adsorption indicated a narrow distribution centered at 0.57±0.05 nm. Immersion into liquids of increasing molecular sizes ranging from 0.33 nm (dichloromethane) to 0.70 nm (α-pinene) showed a decreasing enthalpy of immersion at a critical probe size (0.43-0.48 nm), followed by an increase at 0.48-0.56 nm, and a second decrease at 0.56-0.60 nm. This maximum has not been reported previously. After consideration of possible reasons for this new observation, it is concluded that the effect arises from molecular packing inside the micropores, interpreted in terms of 2D packing. The immersion enthalpy PSD was consistent with that from quenched solid density functional theory (QSDFT) analysis of the nitrogen adsorption isotherm. PMID:26394883

  20. Optimal packing of a rotating packed bed for H(2)S removal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Wen, Jiawu; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Li, Zongxiang; Qian, Zhi

    2014-06-17

    The existence of H2S in a system could lead to catalyst deactivation, pipeline corrosion, and environmental pollution. A rotating packed bed (RPB), a novel reactor with high mass transfer efficiency and small dimension, is employed in this study to remove H2S. For RPB, the most significant section for mass transfer is the end-effect zone of packing. A mathematical model for liquid flow in the packing is established to quantify the length of the end-effect zone. A simple and effective visual experimental method is then proposed to investigate the end-effect zone in the RPB. A gas-liquid mass transfer experiment is finally employed to confirm the validity of the proposed mathematical model. With the aid of this model, the length of packing of a RPB used for pilot-scale H2S removal is optimized. The optimized RPB removes 99.8% of H2S (15 vol % to 0.03 vol %) from the system. The proposed model can help optimize the design of a RPB reactor. PMID:24798198

  1. The Powder-Pack Nitriding Process: Growth Kinetics of Nitride Layers on Pure Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Ortiz-Dominguez, M.; Elias-Espinosa, M.; Vega-Morón, R. C.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Figueroa-López, U.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of nitride layers that develop during the powder-pack nitriding process on the surface of ARMCO pure iron was estimated. The powder-pack nitriding of pure iron was performed according to the Pulnieren© (H.E.F. Durferrit) method using a "Pulnier" powder and an activator, at 798-848 K with different exposure times (2-12 h) for each temperature. In addition, for the entire set of nitriding conditions, three different activator/"Pulnier" powder ratios (0.20, 0.25, and 0.35) were used to evaluate the activation level during the growth of nitride layers. The kinetics of the nitride layers over the surface of ARMCO pure iron were estimated by two mathematical approaches, that consider the mass balance equations at the growth interphases. The resulting expressions for the effective diffusion coefficients in the nitride layers were evaluated as a function of nitriding temperatures and activator/"Pulnier" powder ratio. Finally, based on the experimental parameters ascribed to the powder-pack nitriding process, two expressions were proposed to estimate the nitride layer thicknesses at 798 and 823 K after 9 h of exposure for each temperature, to validate the diffusion models used in this work.

  2. Howling at two Minnesota wolf pack summer homesites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrington, F.H.; Mech, L.D.

    1978-01-01

    Howling sessions were monitored at two Minnesota wolf pack homesites for 2255 h between 29 April and 3 August 1973. All sessions recorded occurred from dusk through early morning, with an evening peak for one pack. Within a night, multiple sessions were grouped temporally, most occurring within an hour of one another. Howling rates for both packs increased throughout the homesite season, with the larger pack howling twice as frequently. The role of howling in both intrapack and interpack contexts was considered. Much of the howling seemed to be involved in the coordination of pack activities. Further, the low frequency and clumped temporal distribution of sessions suggest that howling plays a secondary role in interpack contexts to other modes such as scent marking during the homesite season, but may increase in relative importance once homesites are abandoned and pack travel becomes nomadic.

  3. Simulation of abuse tolerance of lithium-ion battery packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotnitz, Robert M.; Weaver, James; Yeduvaka, Gowri; Doughty, D. H.; Roth, E. P.

    A simple approach for using accelerating rate calorimetry data to simulate the thermal abuse resistance of battery packs is described. The thermal abuse tolerance of battery packs is estimated based on the exothermic behavior of a single cell and an energy balance than accounts for radiative, conductive, and convective heat transfer modes of the pack. For the specific example of a notebook computer pack containing eight 18650-size cells, the effects of cell position, heat of reaction, and heat-transfer coefficient are explored. Thermal runaway of the pack is more likely to be induced by thermal runaway of a single cell when that cell is in good contact with other cells and is close to the pack wall.

  4. Subsite, T Class, and N Class Cannot be Used to Exclude the Retropharyngeal Nodes From Treatment De-Intensification in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Matthew E.; Chinn, Steven B.; Bellile, Emily; Gallagher, K. Kelly; Kang, Stephen Y.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Carey, Thomas E.; Worden, Francis P.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Chepeha, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Understanding the drainage patterns to the retropharyngeal nodes is an important consideration in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) because treatment of these nodes is related to increased morbidity. Prediction of these drainage patterns could not only help minimize treatment morbidity, but could also prevent failures in at-risk patients, as de-escalation trials are underway for this disease. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of pathologic retropharyngeal adenopathy (RPA) in OPSCC relative to involvement of the oropharyngeal subsite, number of neck nodes, T classification and N classification. Design Retrospective review from 2003–2010 Setting Academic Referral Center Participants 205 previously untreated, advanced stage (III, IV), pathologically confirmed patients with OPSCC Exposure: Concurrent chemoradiation Main Outcome Measures Radiologic evidence of pathologic RPA was tabulated and related to involvement of the oropharyngeal subsite, number of neck nodes, T classification and N classification. Results Pathologic RPA was identified in 18% of patients. There were pathologic retropharyngeal lymph nodes in 12/89 (13%) base of tongue cancers, 24/109 (22%) tonsil cancers, and 1/7 (14%) other oropharyngeal subsite cancers. Increasing prevalence of RPA was positively correlated with closer proximity to the posterior tonsillar pillar. A multivariate predictive regression model using the oropharyngeal subsite, involvement of the posterior tonsillar pillar, number of metastatic nodes, T classification, and N classification, showed that the number of metastatic nodes was statistically significant with an odds ratio of 1.436 (p=0.0001, 95% confidence interval: 1.203 – 1.714). Conclusions and Relevance The prevalence of pathologic RPA in this cohort was 18% and patients with multiple nodes had the highest risk for pathologic RPA, followed by involvement of the posterior tonsillar pillar. However, this data suggests that there is no clear

  5. LC packing materials for pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis.

    PubMed

    Haginaka, Jun

    2002-11-01

    The author has prepared novel liquid chromatography (LC) packing materials for pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis. Those include LC packing materials for direct serum injection assays of drugs and their metabolites, LC packing materials for resolution of enantiomeric drugs, and uniformly sized molecularly imprinted polymers for drugs and their metabolites. This review article deals with the preparation of these materials and the pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of them in recognition of The Society of Chromatographic Sciences Award. PMID:12682997

  6. Fixed Packed Bed Reactors in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; McCready, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental data on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid flow through packed columns in microgravity. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under microgravity conditions compared to 1-g and the widely used Talmor map in 1-g is not applicable for predicting the transition boundaries. A new transition criterion between bubble and pulse flow in microgravity is proposed and tested using the data. Since there is no static head in microgravity, the pressure drop measured is the true frictional pressure drop. The pressure drop data, which has much smaller scatter than most reported 1-g data clearly shows that capillary effects can enhance the pressure drop (especially in the bubble flow regime) as much as 200% compared to that predicted by the single phase Ergun equation. The pressure drop data are correlated in terms of a two-phase friction factor and its dependence on the gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and the Suratman number. The influence of gravity on the pulse amplitude and frequency is also discussed and compared to that under normal gravity conditions. Experimental work is planned to determine the gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients. Because of enhanced interfacial effects, we expect the gas-liquid transfer coefficients k(L)a and k(G)a (where a is the gas-liquid interfacial area) to be higher in microgravity than in normal gravity at the same flow conditions. This will be verified by gas absorption experiments, with and without reaction in the liquid phase, using oxygen, carbon dioxide, water and dilute aqueous amine solutions. The liquid-solid mass transfer coefficient will also be determined in the bubble as well as the pulse flow regimes using solid benzoic acid particles in the packing and measuring their rate of dissolution. The mass transfer coefficients in microgravity will be compared to those in normal

  7. Fixed Packed Bed Reactors in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; McCready, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental data on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid flow through packed columns in microgravity. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under microgravity conditions compared to 1-g and the widely used Talmor map in 1-g is not applicable for predicting the transition boundaries. A new transition criterion between bubble and pulse flow in microgravity is proposed and tested using the data. Since there is no static head in microgravity, the pressure drop measured is the true frictional pressure drop. The pressure drop data, which has much smaller scatter than most reported 1-g data clearly shows that capillary effects can enhance the pressure drop (especially in the bubble flow regime) as much as 200% compared to that predicted by the single phase Ergun equation. The pressure drop data are correlated in terms of a two-phase friction factor and its dependence on the gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and the Suratman number. The influence of gravity on the pulse amplitude and frequency is also discussed and compared to that under normal gravity conditions. Experimental work is planned to determine the gas-liquid and liquid-solid mass transfer coefficients. Because of enhanced interfacial effects, we expect the gas-liquid transfer coefficients kLa and kGa (where a is the gas-liquid interfacial area) to be higher in microgravity than in normal gravity at the same flow conditions. This will be verified by gas absorption experiments, with and without reaction in the liquid phase, using oxygen, carbon dioxide, water and dilute aqueous amine solutions. The liquid-solid mass transfer coefficient will also be determined in the bubble as well as the pulse flow regimes using solid benzoic acid particles in the packing and measuring their rate of dissolution. The mass transfer coefficients in microgravity will be compared to

  8. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  9. Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, P.C.; Rodriguez, P.J.; Pereyra, R.A.

    1999-06-29

    Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object is disclosed. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries. 4 figs.

  10. Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Patrick J.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    1999-01-01

    Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries.

  11. Human Error in Throat Pack Management: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Baranger, Violaine; Bon Mardion, Nicolas; Dureuil, Bertrand; Compère, Vincent

    2016-06-15

    Throat packs are frequently used after tracheal intubation during ear, nose, and throat surgery. We report 2 cases of complications related to throat packs retained at the end of surgery. Miscommunication between anesthesiology and surgery teams on throat pack management led to an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy examination under general anesthesia in the first case and to severe respiratory distress requiring tracheal reintubation in the second case. Our 2 case reports highlight the importance of good communication between anesthesiology and surgery teams and of standardized procedures and checklists for the management of throat packs to ensure patient safety. PMID:27301056

  12. Voronoi tessellation of the packing of fine uniform spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R. Y.; Zou, R. P.; Yu, A. B.

    2002-04-01

    The packing of uniform fine spherical particles ranging from 1 to 1000 μm has been simulated by means of discrete particle simulation. The packing structure is analyzed, facilitated by the well established Voronoi tessellation. The topological and metric properties of Voronoi polyhedra are quantified as a function of particle size and packing density. The results show that as particle size or packing density decreases, (i) the average face number of Voronoi polyhedra decreases, and the distributions of face number and edge number become broader and more asymmetric; (ii) the average perimeter and area of polyhedra increase, and the distributions of polyhedron surface area and volume become more flat and can be described by the log-normal distribution. The topological and metric properties depicted for the packing of fine particles differ either quantitatively or qualitatively from those reported in the literature although they all can be related to packing density. In particular, our results show that the average sphericity coefficient of Voronoi polyhedra varies with packing density, and although Aboav-Weaire's law is generally applicable, Lewis's law is not valid when packing density is low, which are contrary to the previous findings for other packing systems.

  13. Voronoi tessellation of the packing of fine uniform spheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, R Y; Zou, R P; Yu, A B

    2002-04-01

    The packing of uniform fine spherical particles ranging from 1 to 1000 microm has been simulated by means of discrete particle simulation. The packing structure is analyzed, facilitated by the well established Voronoi tessellation. The topological and metric properties of Voronoi polyhedra are quantified as a function of particle size and packing density. The results show that as particle size or packing density decreases, (i) the average face number of Voronoi polyhedra decreases, and the distributions of face number and edge number become broader and more asymmetric; (ii) the average perimeter and area of polyhedra increase, and the distributions of polyhedron surface area and volume become more flat and can be described by the log-normal distribution. The topological and metric properties depicted for the packing of fine particles differ either quantitatively or qualitatively from those reported in the literature although they all can be related to packing density. In particular, our results show that the average sphericity coefficient of Voronoi polyhedra varies with packing density, and although Aboav-Weaire's law is generally applicable, Lewis's law is not valid when packing density is low, which are contrary to the previous findings for other packing systems. PMID:12005816

  14. Understanding aging mechanisms in lithium-ion battery packs: From cell capacity loss to pack capacity evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuejiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Lu, Languang; Li, Jianqiu

    2015-03-01

    Battery cell capacity loss is extensively studied so as to extend battery life in varied applications from portable consumer electronics to energy storage devices. Battery packs are constructed especially in energy storage devices to provide sufficient voltage and capacity. However, engineering practice indicates that battery packs always fade more critically than cells. We investigate the evolution of battery pack capacity loss by analyzing cell aging mechanisms using the "Electric quantity - Capacity Scatter Diagram (ECSD)" from a system point of view. The results show that cell capacity loss is not the sole contributor to pack capacity loss. The loss of lithium inventory variation at anodes between cells plays a significant role in pack capacity evolution. Therefore, we suggest more attention could be paid to the loss of lithium inventory at anodes in order to mitigate pack capacity degradation.

  15. Volatile Components from Packing Matrials, Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    An outgassing study was conducted on five packing materials, comprising two experiments. These materials comprised 277-4 borated concrete, Borobond4 concrete, polyethylene bags, silica-filled silicone rubber seals, and silicone foam padding. The purpose was measure the volume of gases which diffuse from packaging materials when sealed in containers. Two heating profiles were used to study the offgassing quantities in a set of accelerated aging tests. It was determined that the concretes contain a large quantity of water. The plastic materials hold much less moisture, with the silicone materials even consuming water, possibly due to the presence of silica filler. Polyethylene tends to degrade as the temperature is elevated and the foam stiffens.

  16. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  17. COLLOIDS. Colloidal matter: Packing, geometry, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-08-28

    Colloidal particles with well-controlled shapes and interactions are an ideal experimental system for exploring how matter organizes itself. Like atoms and molecules, these particles form bulk phases such as liquids and crystals. But they are more than just crude analogs of atoms; they are a form of matter in their own right, with complex and interesting collective behavior not seen at the atomic scale. Their behavior is affected by geometrical or topological constraints, such as curved surfaces or the shapes of the particles. Because the interactions between the particles are often short-ranged, we can understand the effects of these constraints using geometrical concepts such as packing. The geometrical viewpoint gives us a window into how entropy affects not only the structure of matter, but also the dynamics of how it forms. PMID:26315444

  18. New Packing Structure of Concentration Solar Receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shang-Yu; Lee, Yueh-Mu; Shih, Zun-Hao; Hong, Hwen-Fen; Shin, Hwa-Yuh; Kuo, Cherng-Tsong

    2010-10-14

    This paper presents a solution to the temperature issue in High Concentration Photovoltaic (HCPV) module device by using different thermal conductive material and packing structure. In general, the open-circuited voltage of a device reduces with the increase of temperature and therefore degrades its efficiency. The thermal conductive material we use in this paper, silicon, has a high thermal conductive coefficient (149 W/m{center_dot}K) and steady semiconductor properties which are suitable for the application of solar receiver in HCPV module. Solar cell was soldered on a metal-plated Si substrate with a thicker SiO{sub 2} film which acts as an insulating layer. Then it was mounted on an Al-based plate to obtain a better heat dissipating result.

  19. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Dial, R.E.; Finnell, W.R.

    1988-02-16

    A gamma thermometer probe for detecting heat produced within the thermometer probe is described comprising: an outer elongate thermometer sheath having a cylindrical cross-section, a length, an outer end and an inner end; an elongate rod having a cylindrical cross-section fitted within the elongate thermometer sheath, the rod being constructed of material that absorbs radiation and produces heat; annular recesses formed between the rod, and sheath and being spaced apart along the length of the rod, the recesses forming annular chambers that are resistive to heat flow; a longitudinal bore extending axially into the rod and being positioned to extend through the cylinders defined by the annular chambers; and an integrated thermocouple pack dimensioned to fit within the longitudinal bore and extending through the cylinders defined by the annular chambers.

  20. GlobiPack v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-31

    GlobiPack contains a small collection of optimization globalization algorithms. These algorithms are used by optimization and various nonlinear equation solver algorithms.Used as the line-search procedure with Newton and Quasi-Newton optimization and nonlinear equation solver methods. These are standard published 1-D line search algorithms such as are described in the book Nocedal and Wright Numerical Optimization: 2nd edition, 2006. One set of algorithms were copied and refactored from the existing open-source Trilinos package MOOCHO where themore » linear search code is used to globalize SQP methods. This software is generic to any mathematical optimization problem where smooth derivatives exist. There is no specific connection or mention whatsoever to any specific application, period. You cannot find more general mathematical software.« less