Science.gov

Sample records for environment design requirements

  1. Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Keller, Vernon W.; Vaughan, William W.

    2006-01-01

    The terrestrial environment is an important driver of space vehicle structural, control, and thermal system design. NASA is currently in the process of producing an update to an earlier Terrestrial Environment Guidelines for Aerospace Vehicle Design and Development Handbook. This paper addresses the contents of this updated handbook, with special emphasis on new material being included in the areas of atmospheric thermodynamic models, wind dynamics, atmospheric composition, atmospheric electricity, cloud phenomena, atmospheric extremes, and sea state. In addition, the respective engineering design elements are discussed relative to terrestrial environment inputs that require consideration. Specific lessons learned that have contributed to the advancements made in the application and awareness of terrestrial environment inputs for aerospace engineering applications are presented.

  2. Natural environment design requirements for the Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, G. S.; Wright, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The natural environment design requirements for the Spacelab, carried to orbital altitudes as cargo in the space shuttle bay, were presented. This includes consideration of the following: neutral atmosphere, charged particles, radiation (galactic cosmic, trapped, and solar particle events), meteoroids, and astrodynamic constants.

  3. Natural environment design requirements for the Space Telescope (revision A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, G. S.; Wright, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The natural environment design requirements for the Space Telescope are presented. Because the Space Telescope is to be carried as cargo to orbital altitudes in the space shuttle bay, orbital environment impacts are the main concern.

  4. Natural environment design requirements for the space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, G. S.; Wright, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The natural environment design requirements for the Large Space Telescope are presented. Because the Large Space Telescope is to be carried as cargo to orbital altitudes in the space shuttle bay, orbital environment impacts are emphasized.

  5. Natural environment design requirements for the space tug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, G. S., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The natural environment design requirements for the space tug are presented. Since the Space Tug is carried as cargo to orbital altitudes in the space shuttle bay, orbital environmental impacts and short-period atmospheric density variations are the main concerns. The subjects discussed are: (1) natural environment, (2) neutral environment, (3) charged particles, (4) radiation, and (5) meteoroid hazards.

  6. Natural environment design requirements for the Solar Electric Propulsion Stage (SEPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The natural environment design requirements for the solar electric propulsion stage are presented. Environment criteria for the SEP stage will cover earth orbital operations out to geosynchronous altitudes and also interplanetary missions including comet and asteroid missions.

  7. A New Handbook for the Development of Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Vaughan, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A new NASA document entitled "Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development (NASA-HDBK-IOO1A) has been developed. The Handbook provides terrestrial environment information, data bases, models, recommendations, etc. for use in the design, development, trade studies, testing, and mission analyses for space (or launch) vehicles. This document is organized into fourteen specific natural environment disciplines of which some are winds, atmospheric models, thermal radiation, precipitation-for-icing, cloud cover, atmospheric electricity, geologic hazards, toxic chemical release by propulsion systems, and sea state. Atmospheric phenomena play a significant role in the design and flight of aerospace vehicles and in the integrity of the associated aerospace systems and structures. Environmental design criteria guidelines in this document are based on measurements and observations of atmospheric and climatic phenomena relative to various aerospace development, operational, and vehicle launch locations. The natural environment criteria guidelines data presented in this Handbook were formulated based on discussions with and requests from engineers involved in aerospace vehicle development and operations. Therefore, they represent responses to actual engineering problems and are not just a general compilation of environmental data. The Handbook addresses the basis for the information presented, the interpretations of the terrestrial environment guideline given in the Handbook, and its application to the development of aerospace vehicle design requirements. Specific examples of the Handbook content and associated "lessons lenmed" are given in this paper.

  8. A New Handbook for the Development of Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Vaughan, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A new NASA document entitled "Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development (NASA-HDBK-1001A) has been developed. The Handbook provides terrestrial environment information, data bases, models, recommendations, etc. for use in the design, development, trade studies, testing, and mission analyses for space (or launch) .vehicles. This document is organized into fourteen specific natural environment disciplines of which some are winds, atmospheric models, thermal radiation, precipitation-for-icing, cloud cover, atmospheric electricity, geologic hazards, toxic chemical release by propulsion systems, and sea state. Atmospheric phenomena play a significant role in the design and flight of aerospace vehicles and in the integrity of the associated aerospace systems and structures. Environmental design criteria guidelines in this document are based on measurements and observations of atmospheric and climatic phenomena relative to various aerospace development, operational, and vehicle launch locations. The natural environment criteria guidelines data presented in this Handbook were formulated based on discussions with and requests from engineers involved in aerospace vehicle development and operations. Therefore, they represent responses to actual engineering problems and are not just a general compilation of environmental data. The Handbook addresses the basis for the information presented, the interpretations of the terrestrial environment guideline given in the Handbook, and its application to the development of aerospace vehicle design requirements. Specific examples of the Handbook content and associated "lessons lenmed" are given in this paper.

  9. Using Activity Theory to Understand Learning Design Requirements of Patient Self-Management Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Scott P.; Reyes, Lisette; Kim, Hannah; Collins, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Learning designs aimed at supporting transformational change could significantly benefit from the adoption of socio-historical and socio-cultural analysis approaches. Such systemic perspectives are gaining more importance in education as they facilitate understanding of complex interactions between learning environments and human activity. The…

  10. Space Station Furnace Facility. Volume 2: Requirements definition and conceptual design study. Appendix 3: Environment analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A Preliminary Safety Analysis (PSA) is being accomplished as part of the Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) contract. This analysis is intended to support SSFF activities by analyzing concepts and designs as they mature to develop essential safety requirements for inclusion in the appropriate specifications, and designs, as early as possible. In addition, the analysis identifies significant safety concerns that may warrant specific trade studies or design definition, etc. The analysis activity to date concentrated on hazard and hazard cause identification and requirements development with the goal of developing a baseline set of detailed requirements to support trade study, specifications development, and preliminary design activities. The analysis activity will continue as the design and concepts mature. Section 2 defines what was analyzed, but it is likely that the SSFF definitions will undergo further changes. The safety analysis activity will reflect these changes as they occur. The analysis provides the foundation for later safety activities. The hazards identified will in most cases have Preliminary Design Review (PDR) applicability. The requirements and recommendations developed for each hazard will be tracked to ensure proper and early resolution of safety concerns.

  11. Space Station Furnace Facility. Volume 2: Requirements definition and conceptual design study. Appendix 3: Environment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-05-01

    A Preliminary Safety Analysis (PSA) is being accomplished as part of the Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) contract. This analysis is intended to support SSFF activities by analyzing concepts and designs as they mature to develop essential safety requirements for inclusion in the appropriate specifications, and designs, as early as possible. In addition, the analysis identifies significant safety concerns that may warrant specific trade studies or design definition, etc. The analysis activity to date concentrated on hazard and hazard cause identification and requirements development with the goal of developing a baseline set of detailed requirements to support trade study, specifications development, and preliminary design activities. The analysis activity will continue as the design and concepts mature. Section 2 defines what was analyzed, but it is likely that the SSFF definitions will undergo further changes. The safety analysis activity will reflect these changes as they occur. The analysis provides the foundation for later safety activities. The hazards identified will in most cases have Preliminary Design Review (PDR) applicability. The requirements and recommendations developed for each hazard will be tracked to ensure proper and early resolution of safety concerns.

  12. Rotorcraft Conceptual Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Sinsay, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Requirements for a rotorcraft conceptual design environment are discussed, from the perspective of a government laboratory. Rotorcraft design work in a government laboratory must support research, by producing technology impact assessments and defining the context for research and development; and must support the acquisition process, including capability assessments and quantitative evaluation of designs, concepts, and alternatives. An information manager that will enable increased fidelity of analysis early in the design effort is described. This manager will be a framework to organize information that describes the aircraft, and enable movement of that information to and from analyses. Finally, a recently developed rotorcraft system analysis tool is described.

  13. Rotorcraft Conceptual Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Sinsay, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Requirements for a rotorcraft conceptual design environment are discussed, from the perspective of a government laboratory. Rotorcraft design work in a government laboratory must support research, by producing technology impact assessments and defining the context for research and development; and must support the acquisition process, including capability assessments and quantitative evaluation of designs, concepts, and alternatives. An information manager that will enable increased fidelity of analysis early in the design effort is described. This manager will be a framework to organize information that describes the aircraft, and enable movement of that information to and from analyses. Finally, a recently developed rotorcraft system analysis tool is described.

  14. Visualization Design Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pomplun, A.R.; Templet, G.J.; Jortner, J.N.; Friesen, J.A.; Schwegel, J.; Hughes, K.R.

    1999-02-01

    Improvements in the performance and capabilities of computer software and hardware system, combined with advances in Internet technologies, have spurred innovative developments in the area of modeling, simulation and visualization. These developments combine to make it possible to create an environment where engineers can design, prototype, analyze, and visualize components in virtual space, saving the time and expenses incurred during numerous design and prototyping iterations. The Visualization Design Centers located at Sandia National Laboratories are facilities built specifically to promote the ''design by team'' concept. This report focuses on designing, developing and deploying this environment by detailing the design of the facility, software infrastructure and hardware systems that comprise this new visualization design environment and describes case studies that document successful application of this environment.

  15. GLobal Integrated Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunkel, Matthew; McGuire, Melissa; Smith, David A.; Gefert, Leon P.

    2011-01-01

    The GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE) is a collaborative engineering application built to resolve the design session issues of real-time passing of data between multiple discipline experts in a collaborative environment. Utilizing Web protocols and multiple programming languages, GLIDE allows engineers to use the applications to which they are accustomed in this case, Excel to send and receive datasets via the Internet to a database-driven Web server. Traditionally, a collaborative design session consists of one or more engineers representing each discipline meeting together in a single location. The discipline leads exchange parameters and iterate through their respective processes to converge on an acceptable dataset. In cases in which the engineers are unable to meet, their parameters are passed via e-mail, telephone, facsimile, or even postal mail. The result of this slow process of data exchange would elongate a design session to weeks or even months. While the iterative process remains in place, software can now exchange parameters securely and efficiently, while at the same time allowing for much more information about a design session to be made available. GLIDE is written in a compilation of several programming languages, including REALbasic, PHP, and Microsoft Visual Basic. GLIDE client installers are available to download for both Microsoft Windows and Macintosh systems. The GLIDE client software is compatible with Microsoft Excel 2000 or later on Windows systems, and with Microsoft Excel X or later on Macintosh systems. GLIDE follows the Client-Server paradigm, transferring encrypted and compressed data via standard Web protocols. Currently, the engineers use Excel as a front end to the GLIDE Client, as many of their custom tools run in Excel.

  16. Siphon breaker design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, D.T.; Stephens, A.G.

    1993-03-01

    The Siphon Breaker Design Requirements Project was intended to provide experimental data on siphon flow effects. In addition, the experimental system was to be modeled with the RELAP code and the predicted and measured performances compared. This report describes the design and operation of the siphon breaker experimental equipment from 1989 to 1991. In addition the test results for all the experimental runs made in 1990 and 1991 are presented and described. Unfortunately, we have not been able to obtain useful results from a RELAP 5 model of the siphon system; consequently, we are unable to present any predictive calculations for comparison with the data presented. We have had lots of expert advice from several sources on using the RELAP code but to date our efforts have remained unsuccessful. After an extra year of effort, admittedly part-time but a lot of that, we choose to abandon the modeling efforts and produce this report describing the experimental equipment and test results.

  17. 40 CFR 65.82 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Design requirements. 65.82 Section 65...) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Transfer Racks § 65.82 Design requirements. (a) The owner or operator shall equip... shall be designed to collect the regulated material displaced from tank trucks or railcars...

  18. 40 CFR 65.82 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Design requirements. 65.82 Section 65...) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Transfer Racks § 65.82 Design requirements. (a) The owner or operator shall equip... shall be designed to collect the regulated material displaced from tank trucks or railcars...

  19. 40 CFR 65.82 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Design requirements. 65.82 Section 65...) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Transfer Racks § 65.82 Design requirements. (a) The owner or operator shall equip... shall be designed to collect the regulated material displaced from tank trucks or railcars...

  20. 40 CFR 65.82 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Design requirements. 65.82 Section 65...) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Transfer Racks § 65.82 Design requirements. (a) The owner or operator shall equip... shall be designed to collect the regulated material displaced from tank trucks or railcars...

  1. 40 CFR 65.82 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Design requirements. 65.82 Section 65...) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Transfer Racks § 65.82 Design requirements. (a) The owner or operator shall equip... shall be designed to collect the regulated material displaced from tank trucks or railcars...

  2. Design, dimensioning, and performance of a research facility for studies on the requirements of fish in RAS environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) are increasingly being used for Atlantic salmon smolt production. However, knowledge of how the RAS environment affects welfare and performance of Atlantic salmon is limited. For instance, safe limits for chronic exposure to typical compounds in RAS, such as N...

  3. The Johnson Space Center Management Information Systems (JSCMIS). 1: Requirements Definition and Design Specifications for Versions 2.1 and 2.1.1. 2: Documented Test Scenario Environments. 3: Security Design and Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center Management Information System (JSCMIS) is an interface to computer data bases at NASA Johnson which allows an authorized user to browse and retrieve information from a variety of sources with minimum effort. This issue gives requirements definition and design specifications for versions 2.1 and 2.1.1, along with documented test scenario environments, and security object design and specifications.

  4. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the Space Station Advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related extravehicular activity (EVA) support equipment were defined and established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as opertional, procedures, and training issues were considered.

  5. Integrated simulation environment for lighting design

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Vineeta; Papamichael, Konstantinos

    2001-05-24

    Lighting design involves the consideration of multiple performance criteria, from the earliest stages of conceptual design, through various stages of controls and operation in a project's life cycle. These criteria include: (1) the quantitative analysis of illuminance and luminance distribution due to daylighting and electric lighting; (2) qualitative analysis of the lighting design with photometrically accurate renderings of the designed environment; (3) analysis of energy implications of daylighting and electric lighting design and operation;, and (4) analysis of control strategies and sensor placement for maximizing energy savings from lighting control while providing visual comfort. In this paper we describe the development of an integrated decision-making environment that brings together several different tools, and provides the data management and process control required for a multi-criterion support of the design and operation of daylighting and electric lighting systems. The result is a powerful design and decision-making environment to meet the diverse and evolving needs of lighting designers and operators.

  6. Designing Electronic Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Kreijns, Karel; Beers, Pieter Jelle

    2004-01-01

    Electronic collaborative learning environments for learning and working are in vogue. Designers design them according to their own constructivist interpretations of what collaborative learning is and what it should achieve. Educators employ them with different educational approaches and in diverse situations to achieve different ends. Students use…

  7. Design Standards for Children's Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Linda Cain

    This three-part book addresses the design or maintenance of spaces where children are the primary users, covering both commercial and residential designs and products. Part 1 provides anthropometric data of children from birth to age 18; offers dimensions for typical objects within the child's built environment; synthesizes the Consumer Product…

  8. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

  9. RNEDE: Resilient Network Design Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Venkat Venkatasubramanian, Tanu Malik, Arun Giridh; Craig Rieger; Keith Daum; Miles McQueen

    2010-08-01

    Modern living is more and more dependent on the intricate web of critical infrastructure systems. The failure or damage of such systems can cause huge disruptions. Traditional design of this web of critical infrastructure systems was based on the principles of functionality and reliability. However, it is increasingly being realized that such design objectives are not sufficient. Threats, disruptions and faults often compromise the network, taking away the benefits of an efficient and reliable design. Thus, traditional network design parameters must be combined with self-healing mechanisms to obtain a resilient design of the network. In this paper, we present RNEDEa resilient network design environment that that not only optimizes the network for performance but tolerates fluctuations in its structure that result from external threats and disruptions. The environment evaluates a set of remedial actions to bring a compromised network to an optimal level of functionality. The environment includes a visualizer that enables the network administrator to be aware of the current state of the network and the suggested remedial actions at all times.

  10. A synthetic design environment for ship design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Richard R.

    1995-01-01

    Rapid advances in computer science and information system technology have made possible the creation of synthetic design environments (SDE) which use virtual prototypes to increase the efficiency and agility of the design process. This next generation of computer-based design tools will rely heavily on simulation and advanced visualization techniques to enable integrated product and process teams to concurrently conceptualize, design, and test a product and its fabrication processes. This paper summarizes a successful demonstration of the feasibility of using a simulation based design environment in the shipbuilding industry. As computer science and information science technologies have evolved, there have been many attempts to apply and integrate the new capabilities into systems for the improvement of the process of design. We see the benefits of those efforts in the abundance of highly reliable, technologically complex products and services in the modern marketplace. Furthermore, the computer-based technologies have been so cost effective that the improvements embodied in modern products have been accompanied by lowered costs. Today the state-of-the-art in computerized design has advanced so dramatically that the focus is no longer on merely improving design methodology; rather the goal is to revolutionize the entire process by which complex products are conceived, designed, fabricated, tested, deployed, operated, maintained, refurbished and eventually decommissioned. By concurrently addressing all life-cycle issues, the basic decision making process within an enterprise will be improved dramatically, leading to new levels of quality, innovation, efficiency, and customer responsiveness. By integrating functions and people with an enterprise, such systems will change the fundamental way American industries are organized, creating companies that are more competitive, creative, and productive.

  11. Evolution design requirements and design strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monell, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Space Station Freedom (SSF) has undergone numerous design changes during the rephasing and restructuring activities occurring in 1989 and 1990/91, respectively. One direct result of these changes is that the Station has become more complex and compact which requires that future modifications to the Station be carefully planned and analyzed in conjunction with the baseline design process. This will ensure that the configuration has adequate design features and flexibility to accommodate the future capability and element upgrades. Six critical growth requirements (electrical power, thermal control, pressurized volume, structures, EVA equipment, and data management) have been identified and baselined in the Level I Program Requirements Document (PRD) and the Level II Program Definition and Requirements Document (PDRD). The approach to meeting the growth requirements will be to minimize the impact on the baseline design in the areas of weight, power, and development cost. The specifics of these requirements, with regard to scarring and implementation during the Follow-On and Evolution phases of SSF, are detailed in this paper.

  12. Requirements for Reactor Physics Design

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond,D.J.

    2008-04-11

    It has been recognized that there is a need for requirements and guidance for design and operation of nuclear power plants. This is becoming more important as more reactors are being proposed to be built. In parallel with activities in individual countries are norms established by international organizations. This paper discusses requirements/guidance for neutronic design and operation as promulgated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). As an example, details are given for one reactor physics parameter, namely, the moderator temperature reactivity coefficient. The requirements/guidance from the NRC are discussed in the context of those generated for the International Atomic Energy Agency. The requirements/guidance are not identical from the two sources although they are compatible.

  13. Hypobaric decompression prebreathe requirements and breathing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    To reduce incidence of decompression sickness (DCS), prebreathing 100 percent oxygen to denitrogenate is required prior to hypobaric decompressions from a sea level pressure breathing environment to pressures lower than 350 mm Hg (20,000 ft; 6.8 psia). The tissue ratio (TR) of such exposures equals or exceeds 1.7; TR being the tissue nitrogen pressure prior to decompression divided by the total pressure after decompression (((0.781)(14.697))/6.758). Designing pressure suits capable of greater pressure differentials, lower TR's, and procedures which limit the potential for DCS occurrence would enhance operational efficiency. The current 10.2 psia stage decompression prior to extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Shuttle in the 100 percent oxygen, 4.3 psia suit, results in a TR of 1.65 and has proven to be relatively free of DCS. Our recent study of zero-prebreathe decompressions to 6.8 psia breathing 100 percent oxygen (TR = 1.66) also resulted in no DCS (N = 10). The level of severe, Spencer Grades 3 or 4, venous gas emboli (VGE) increased from 0 percent at 9.5 psia to 40 percent at 6.8 psia yielding a Probit curve of VGE risk for the 51 male subjects who participated in these recent studies. Earlier, analogous decompressions using a 50 percent oxygen, 50 percent nitrogen breathing mixture resulted in one case of DCS and significantly higher levels of severe VGE, e.g., at 7.8 psia, the mixed gas breathing environment resulted in a 56 percent incidence of severe VGE versus 10 percent with use of 100 percent oxygen. The report of this study recommended use of 100 percent oxygen during zero-prebreathe exposure to 6.8 psia if such a suit could be developed. For future, long-term missions, we suggest study of the effects of decompression over several days to a breathing environment of 150 mmHg O2 and approximately 52 mmHg He as a means of eliminating DCS and VGE hazards during subsequent excursions. Once physiologically adapted to a 4 psia vehicle, base, or space

  14. Software support environment design knowledge capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollman, Tom

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this task is to assess the potential for using the software support environment (SSE) workstations and associated software for design knowledge capture (DKC) tasks. This assessment will include the identification of required capabilities for DKC and hardware/software modifications needed to support DKC. Several approaches to achieving this objective are discussed and interim results are provided: (1) research into the problem of knowledge engineering in a traditional computer-aided software engineering (CASE) environment, like the SSE; (2) research into the problem of applying SSE CASE tools to develop knowledge based systems; and (3) direct utilization of SSE workstations to support a DKC activity.

  15. Microrover Design for Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, R.; van Winnendael, M.

    2003-04-01

    With the emergence of ESA's BepiColombo cornerstone mission to the Planet Mercury, a new class of operational environment has become relevant for the design of planetary surface systems. In the past years, Mars was a primary focus for planetary landers, planetary mobility elements such as rovers or moles, and payload instruments. The typical environmental conditions were characterized by a temperature range between -120 and +20°C, low atmospheric pressure in the range of 7 hPa, and a dust/regolith environment. For a Mercury mission including a planetary landing, this situation can change dramatically, depending on the landing site and landing season. Local temperatures can be as low as -170°C in shadow or during night, and they can easily reach 200 to 250°C in sun light, even in temperate zones, e.g. at high latitudes of 85°. Such an environment is of course a particular challenge for both, the payload instruments and the accommodating microrobotic system. The strong limitation in size, mass, and power does not allow to apply classical, large sized passive thermal control mechanisms, or to implement active thermal control techniques with high power demand. The situation is even worse, if - as in the case of the BepiColombo Surface Element - the system is powered by primary batteries, resulting in a severe limitation of energy and on-surface life time. In the last years, the Nanokhod microrover has been developed to the state of an advanced laboratory model with the primary focus of an Mars mission application. For BepiColombo, Nanokhod became part of the lander's model payload. As a consequence, the related ESA technology development activity "Robotic Technology for Planetary Exploration" (RTPE) has been re-oriented towards a Mercury mission application. This paper presents the results of the RTPE activity in the context of an application of the Nanokhod microrover in an extreme environment. It describes the design approach, focusing on the thermal and

  16. 40 CFR 265.254 - Design and operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Design and operating requirements. 265.254 Section 265.254 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 265.254 Design and operating requirements. The owner or operator of...

  17. Requirements and Designs for Mars Rover RTGs

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred; Shirbacheh, M; Sankarankandath, V

    2012-01-19

    The current-generation RTGs (both GPHS and MOD) are designed for operation in a vacuum environment. The multifoil thermal insulation used in those RTGs only functions well in a good vacuum. Current RTGs are designed to operate with an inert cover gas before launch, and to be vented to space vacuum after launch. Both RTGs are sealed with a large number of metallic C-rings. Those seals are adequate for retaining the inert-gas overpressure during short-term launch operations, but would not be adequate to prevent intrusion of the Martian atmospheric gases during long-term operations there. Therefore, for the Mars Rover application, those RTGs just be modified to prevent the buildup of significant pressures of Mars atmosphere or of helium (from alpha decay of the fuel). In addition, a Mars Rover RTG needs to withstand a long-term dynamic environment that is much more severe than that seen by an RTG on an orbiting spacecraft or on a stationary planetary lander. This paper describes a typical Rover mission, its requirements, the environment it imposes on the RTG, and a design approach for making the RTG operable in such an environment. Specific RTG designs for various thermoelectric element alternatives are presented.; Reference CID #9268 and CID #9276.

  18. Requirements Development for the NASA Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Eric; Hale, Joseph P.; Zook, Keith; Gowda, Sanjay; Salas, Andrea O.

    2003-01-01

    The requirements development process for the Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is presented. This environment has been developed to allow NASA to perform independent analysis and design of space transportation architectures and technologies. Given the highly collaborative and distributed nature of AEE, a variety of organizations are involved in the development, operations and management of the system. Furthermore, there are additional organizations involved representing external customers and stakeholders. Thorough coordination and effective communication is essential to translate desired expectations of the system into requirements. Functional, verifiable requirements for this (and indeed any) system are necessary to fulfill several roles. Requirements serve as a contractual tool, configuration management tool, and as an engineering tool, sometimes simultaneously. The role of requirements as an engineering tool is particularly important because a stable set of requirements for a system provides a common framework of system scope and characterization among team members. Furthermore, the requirements provide the basis for checking completion of system elements and form the basis for system verification. Requirements are at the core of systems engineering. The AEE Project has undertaken a thorough process to translate the desires and expectations of external customers and stakeholders into functional system-level requirements that are captured with sufficient rigor to allow development planning, resource allocation and system-level design, development, implementation and verification. These requirements are maintained in an integrated, relational database that provides traceability to governing Program requirements and also to verification methods and subsystem-level requirements.

  19. 40 CFR 264.251 - Design and operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Design and operating requirements. 264.251 Section 264.251 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 264.251 Design...

  20. 10 CFR 36.39 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Design requirements. 36.39 Section 36.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.39 Design requirements. Irradiators whose construction begins after July...

  1. 10 CFR 36.39 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Design requirements. 36.39 Section 36.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.39 Design requirements. Irradiators whose construction begins after July...

  2. 10 CFR 36.39 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Design requirements. 36.39 Section 36.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.39 Design requirements. Irradiators whose construction begins after July...

  3. 10 CFR 36.39 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Design requirements. 36.39 Section 36.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.39 Design requirements. Irradiators whose construction begins after July...

  4. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  5. Designing Communication and Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayeski, Diane M., Ed.

    Designing and remodeling educational facilities are becoming more complex with options that include computer-based collaboration, classrooms with multimedia podiums, conference centers, and workplaces with desktop communication systems. This book provides a collection of articles that address educational facility design categorized in the…

  6. (Re)Designing Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edutopia, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This 20-page issue explores the opportunity for creating 21st century learning environments that not only focus on different kinds of educational architecture but also emphasize how time is used, teacher-student relationships, collaboration, the benefits of real-world projects, and community involvement. In Minnesota, high school juniors and…

  7. 49 CFR 229.206 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design requirements. 229.206 Section 229.206..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.206 Design requirements. Each locomotive used in occupied service must meet the minimum...

  8. 49 CFR 229.206 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design requirements. 229.206 Section 229.206..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.206 Design requirements. Each locomotive used in occupied service must meet the minimum...

  9. 49 CFR 229.206 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design requirements. 229.206 Section 229.206..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.206 Design requirements. Each locomotive used in occupied service must meet the minimum...

  10. 49 CFR 229.206 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design requirements. 229.206 Section 229.206..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.206 Design requirements. Each locomotive used in occupied service must meet the minimum...

  11. 49 CFR 229.206 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design requirements. 229.206 Section 229.206..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.206 Design requirements. Each locomotive used in occupied service must meet the minimum...

  12. The Ames Virtual Environment Workstation: Implementation issues and requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Jacoby, R.; Bryson, S.; Stone, P.; Mcdowall, I.; Bolas, M.; Dasaro, D.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Coler, C.; Kerr, D.

    1991-01-01

    This presentation describes recent developments in the implementation of a virtual environment workstation in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division of NASA's Ames Research Center. Introductory discussions are presented on the primary research objectives and applications of the system and on the system's current hardware and software configuration. Principle attention is then focused on unique issues and problems encountered in the workstation's development with emphasis on its ability to meet original design specifications for computational graphics performance and for associated human factors requirements necessary to provide compelling sense of presence and efficient interaction in the virtual environment.

  13. Advanced EVA system design requirements study, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the space station advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related EVA support equipment were established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as operational, procedures and training issues were considered.

  14. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1997-09-24

    This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

  15. SES cupola interactive display design environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bang Q.; Kirkhoff, Kevin R.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Simulator, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, is tasked with providing a real-time simulator for developing displays and controls targeted for the Space Station Freedom. These displays and controls will exist inside an enclosed workstation located on the space station. The simulation is currently providing the engineering analysis environment for NASA and contractor personnel to design, prototype, and test alternatives for graphical presentation of data to an astronaut while he performs specified tasks. A highly desirable aspect of this environment is to have the capability to rapidly develop and bring on-line a number of different displays for use in determining the best utilization of graphics techniques in achieving maximum efficiency of the test subject fulfilling his task. The Systems Engineering Simulator now has available a tool which assists in the rapid development of displays for these graphic workstations. The Display Builder was developed in-house to provide an environment which allows easy construction and modification of displays within minutes of receiving requirements for specific tests.

  16. Design of Training Systems Utility Assessment: The Training Process Flow and System Capabilities/Requirements and Resources Models Operating in the TRAPAC Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Larry R.

    The report summarizes the results of a field test conducted for the purpose of determining the utility to Naval training of the Systems Capabilities/Requirements and Resources (SCRR) and the Training Process Flow (TPF) computer-based mathematical models. Basic descriptions of the SCRR and the TPF and their development are given. Training…

  17. Managing consistency in collaborative design environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Chunyan; Yang, Zhonghua; Goh, Angela; Sun, Chengzheng; Sattar, Abdul

    1999-08-01

    In today's global economy, there is a significant paradigm shift to collaborative engineering design environments. One of key issues in the collaborative setting is the consistency model, which governs how to coordinate the activities of collaborators to ensure that they do not make inconsistent changes or updates to the shared objects. In this paper, we present a new consistency model which requires that all update operations will be executed in the casual order (causality) and all participants have the same view on the operations on the shared objects (view synchrony). A simple multicast-based protocol to implement the consistency model is presented. By employing vector time and token mechanisms, the protocol brings the shared objects from one consistent state to another, thus providing collaborators with a consistent view of the shared objects. A CORBA-based on-going prototyping implementation is outlined. Some of the related work are also discussed.

  18. The Instructional Design Environment: Technology to Support Design Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirolli, Peter; Russell, Daniel M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Instructional Design Environment (IDE), a hypermedia system for designing and developing instructional material, including texts, interactive video disks, and intelligent tutoring systems. Highlights include the problem-solving nature of instructional design; other computer-based systems for instructional design; and the use of IDE…

  19. A coherent VLSI design environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penfield, P., Jr.; Glasser, L. A.; Knight, T. F., Jr.; Leiserson, C. E.; Rivest, R. L.

    1985-09-01

    The research discussed here is described in more detail in several published and unpublished reports cited. The CAD frame Schema has progressed to the point where it is useful for ample chip designs. The interface to CIF is complete, and work has begun on importing layout libraries. An interface to EDIF is being installed. Simulators can now be connected, and thought is going into organization of VLSI libraries. A plan for the distribution of Schema is now being worked out. Previous results on waveform bounding have been generalized to large classes of problems described in canonical control-theory form. Work has begun on models for interconnect taking account of line inductance. This domain is less general than RLC networks, and there is hope that some of the previously derived bounds still apply. During this period a novel device, the UV write-enabled PROM, was reported at a conference. Work continues on developing useful circuits employing this device.

  20. 40 CFR 264.221 - Design and operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Design and operating requirements. 264.221 Section 264.221 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Surface Impoundments §...

  1. 40 CFR 265.301 - Design and operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Design and operating requirements. 265.301 Section 265.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills §...

  2. Natural environment design criteria for the Space Station definition and preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.; Green, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    The natural environment design criteria for the Space Station Program (SSP) definition and preliminary design are presented. Information on the atmospheric, dynamic and thermodynamic environments, meteoroids, radiation, magnetic fields, physical constants, etc. is provided with the intension of enabling all groups involved in the definition and preliminary design studies to proceed with a common and consistent set of natural environment criteria requirements. The space station program elements (SSPE) shall be designed with no operational sensitivity to natural environment conditions during assembly, checkout, stowage, launch, and orbital operations to the maximum degree practical.

  3. Office Design: A Study of Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Peter, Ed.

    Reporting upon a study of environment which was based on the design of office buildings and office space, the study forms part of a continuing program of environmental research sponsored by Pilkington Brothers Limited of St. Helens, England. In this report the word 'environment' is used in the sense of the sum of the physical and emotional…

  4. FPGAs in Space Environment and Design Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard B.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) in the space environment and design techniques. Details are given on the effects of the space radiation environment, total radiation dose, single event upset, single event latchup, single event transient, antifuse technology and gate rupture, proton upsets and sensitivity, and loss of functionality.

  5. Investigation of expert system design approaches for electronic design environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppens, Susan A.

    1987-12-01

    Various schemes were investigated that are available for the design effort of electronic systems. The information is to be incorporated into a knowledge base to determine approaches for a particular design. Various design methodologies are to be investigated for their appropriateness and application in the aforesaid design environment. The second phase is to focus on the knowledge base gathered in the design effort for electronic design. This knowledge base is to be incorporated into a rule based expert system which can be utilized by the design engineer in the design/development of functional specifications.

  6. Review of the mechanical design requirements for offshore pedestal cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, P.E.; Wong, W.

    1984-02-01

    Modern design philosophies for offshore cranes require the structural components to be designed for the dynamic loadings experienced in the offshore environment. If these predicted impact loads are applied to the relevant winch load-paths, then the components in those load-paths can be appropriately designed. Specifications do not at present, require the operator to predict at the enquiry stage, the service duty and load spectrums for the crane. When these are specified by the operator, the designer is able to apply appropriate stress levels to the components to attain the required crane life.

  7. A designer's viewpoint: Requirements for reducing helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Functional requirements of helicopter noise reduction are discussed from the work environment point by view, i.e., what conditions must exist before the designer can take aim, without too many restraints, at reducing noise, community demand for noise reduction, regulatory requirements, competition, and penalties are among the topics discussed.

  8. Deep Space Design Environments for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Tripathi, R. K.; Nealy, J. E.; DeAngelis, G.

    2002-01-01

    Mission scenarios outside the Earth's protective magnetic shield are being studied. Included are high usage assets in the near-Earth environment for casual trips, for research, and for commercial/operational platforms, in which career exposures will be multi-mission determined over the astronaut's lifetime. The operational platforms will serve as launching points for deep space exploration missions, characterized by a single long-duration mission during the astronaut's career. The exploration beyond these operational platforms will include missions to planets, asteroids, and planetary satellites. The interplanetary environment is evaluated using convective diffusion theory. Local environments for each celestial body are modeled by using results from the most recent targeted spacecraft, and integrated into the design environments. Design scenarios are then evaluated for these missions. The underlying assumptions in arriving at the model environments and their impact on mission exposures within various shield materials will be discussed.

  9. Virtual Learning Environments Designed in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Marcelo L.; Goncalves, Mario R.; da Silva, Flavia O. M.; Junges, Fernando; Del Pino, Jose C.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses instructional design for computerized pedagogic materials and emphasizes the elements of activity and discovery in creating effective learning experiences. Describes a virtual learning environment designed in Brazil that is open to different forms of use so teachers and students can decide on the best ways of using it. (LRW)

  10. 7 CFR 3560.60 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Direct Loan and Grant Origination § 3560.60 Design requirements. (a) Standards. All Agency-financed MFH will be constructed in accordance with 7 CFR part 1924... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Design requirements. 3560.60 Section...

  11. 7 CFR 3560.60 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Direct Loan and Grant Origination § 3560.60 Design requirements. (a) Standards. All Agency-financed MFH will be constructed in accordance with 7 CFR part 1924... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Design requirements. 3560.60 Section...

  12. 7 CFR 3560.60 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Direct Loan and Grant Origination § 3560.60 Design requirements. (a) Standards. All Agency-financed MFH will be constructed in accordance with 7 CFR part 1924... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Design requirements. 3560.60 Section...

  13. 7 CFR 3560.60 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Direct Loan and Grant Origination § 3560.60 Design requirements. (a) Standards. All Agency-financed MFH will be constructed in accordance with 7 CFR part 1924... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Design requirements. 3560.60 Section...

  14. Resource Requirements for Online Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dringus, Laurie P.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of online instruction that is delivered via dedicated Web-based hypertext systems on the Internet focuses on the human resources (including faculty, students, administration, and staff), information and learning resources, and technical resources that are needed to produce and manage online learning environments. Describes future…

  15. Seal designing of theodolite used in seaside environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Humin; Yan, Xiaoxu; Hao, Wei; Zhou, Sizhong

    2014-08-01

    Based on the environment requirements in seaside there exists static and dynamic seal designing for the photoelectric Theodolite. Static seal designing emphatically includes the designing of o-ring size and mechanical property analysis of o-ring seal, which is difficult to adopt conventional dynamic seal to meet the requirements. According to practical application, the combination of the radial labyrinth seal and high quality felt seal are designed. The combination seal which better solves the seal problem of narrow radial size is a good way of dynamic seal. At the same time, there is engineering practice needing to proof the radial labyrinth seal.

  16. Principled design for an integrated computational environment

    SciTech Connect

    Disessa, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    Boxer is a computer language designed to be the base of an integrated computational environment providing a broad array of functionality -- from text editing to programming -- for naive and novice users. It stands in the line of Lisp inspired languages (Lisp, Logo, Scheme), but differs from these in achieving much of its understandability from pervasive use of a spatial metaphor reinforced through suitable graphics. This paper describes a set of learnability and understandability issues first and then uses them to motivate design decisions made concerning Boxer and the environment in which it is embedded.

  17. NASP natural environment definitions for design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Orvel E.; Johnson, Dale L.; Smith, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Problems that emerged during the development of the natural environment definitions for the design of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) are discussed. The NASP program objectives are reviewed. It is found that some of the data needed to determine the environmental parameters for designing the aircraft are unavailable. It is suggested that this is due to a lack of technology for making the necessary measurements.

  18. Space Station Freedom natural environment design models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom program has established a series of natural environment models and databases for utilization in design and operations planning activities. The suite of models and databases that have either been selected from among internationally recognized standards or developed specifically for spacecraft design applications are presented. The models have been integrated with an orbit propagator and employed to compute environmental conditions for planned operations altitudes of Space Station Freedom.

  19. Design versus manufacturing data base management requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenna, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Data base management systems are valuable manufacturing and design tools as these disciplines are exceptionally information intensive, requiring precise organization and control of data processing and utilization. One such data base manager is the IPAD* system, which was originally developed to support the design process but was expanded to incorporate the additional needs of manufacturing. To set the stage, an overview of the design and manufacturing process is presented. The different functions of computers in these processes are then discussed. Finally, the design and manufacturing requirements for a data base manager are compared and contrasted.

  20. Application requirements for Robotic Nursing Assistants in hospital environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Sven; Doelling, Kris; Lundberg, Cody L.; McNair, Mike; Shin, Jeongsik; Popa, Dan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report on analysis toward identifying design requirements for an Adaptive Robotic Nursing Assistant (ARNA). Specifically, the paper focuses on application requirements for ARNA, envisioned as a mobile assistive robot that can navigate hospital environments to perform chores in roles such as patient sitter and patient walker. The role of a sitter is primarily related to patient observation from a distance, and fetching objects at the patient's request, while a walker provides physical assistance for ambulation and rehabilitation. The robot will be expected to not only understand nurse and patient intent but also close the decision loop by automating several routine tasks. As a result, the robot will be equipped with sensors such as distributed pressure sensitive skins, 3D range sensors, and so on. Modular sensor and actuator hardware configured in the form of several multi-degree-of-freedom manipulators, and a mobile base are expected to be deployed in reconfigurable platforms for physical assistance tasks. Furthermore, adaptive human-machine interfaces are expected to play a key role, as they directly impact the ability of robots to assist nurses in a dynamic and unstructured environment. This paper discusses required tasks for the ARNA robot, as well as sensors and software infrastructure to carry out those tasks in the aspects of technical resource availability, gaps, and needed experimental studies.

  1. Kapton pyrolysis, the space environment and wiring requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1994-01-01

    New Low Earth Orbit (LEO) requirements of space environment wiring are compared with traditional requirements. The pyrolysis of Kapton is reviewed for the LeRc vacuum chamber and the 1989 SSF. SEEB modeling of Kapton pyrolysis is also presented.

  2. Programming Not Required: Skills and Knowledge for the Digital Library Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Education for Library and Information professionals in managing the digital environment has been a key topic for discussion within the LIS environment for some time. However, before designing and implementing a program for digital library education, it is prudent to ensure that the skills and knowledge required to work in this environment are…

  3. Fermilab Recycler damper requirements and design

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.; Hu, M.; Tupikov, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The design of transverse dampers for the Fermilab Recycler storage ring is described. An observed instability and analysis of subsequent measurements where used to identify the requirements. The digital approach being implemented is presented.

  4. An Experiential Exercise in Service Environment Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Kendra; Bridges, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    A new experiential exercise affords marketing students the opportunity to learn to design service environments. The exercise is appropriate for a variety of marketing courses and is especially beneficial in teaching services marketing because the proposed activity complements two other exercises widely used in this course. Service journal and…

  5. Preparing Instructional Designers for Different Career Environments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Miriam B.; Lockee, Barbara B.

    2009-01-01

    The competency requirements, content, culture, and value systems of business and industry career environments can differ significantly from that of the higher education context where instructional design and technology (IDT) students receive their formal training. Therefore, faculty should consider how they might provide flexibility in their…

  6. 10 CFR 36.39 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... concrete and design the walls, wall penetrations, and entranceways to meet the radiation shielding... licensee shall design the reinforced concrete radiation shields to retain their integrity in the event of... Concrete Institute Standard ACI 318-89, “Building Code Requirements for Reinforced Concrete,” Chapter...

  7. DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Society (as mandated by the clean Air Act) requires that we protect our environment and minimize human exposure to harmful air pollutants with National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). e al:o seek to minimize the economic costs of the necessary pollution control to meet the...

  8. Requirements for effective use of CFD in aerospace design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Pradeep

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a perspective on the requirements that Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology must meet for its effective use in aerospace design. General observations are made on current aerospace design practices and deficiencies are noted that must be rectified for the U.S. aerospace industry to maintain its leadership position in the global marketplace. In order to rectify deficiencies, industry is transitioning to an integrated product and process development (IPPD) environment and design processes are undergoing radical changes. The role of CFD in producing data that design teams need to support flight vehicle development is briefly discussed. An overview of the current state of the art in CFD is given to provide an assessment of strengths and weaknesses of the variety of methods currently available, or under development, to produce aerodynamic data. Effectiveness requirements are examined from a customer/supplier view point with design team as customer and CFD practitioner as supplier. Partnership between the design team and CFD team is identified as an essential requirement for effective use of CFD. Rapid turnaround, reliable accuracy, and affordability are offered as three key requirements that CFD community must address if CFD is to play its rightful role in supporting the IPPD design environment needed to produce high quality yet affordable designs.

  9. Earth transportation node requirements and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, W. Ray; Ayers, J. Kirk; Cirillo, William M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish the requirements for an inhabited earth orbiting transportation node and to develop design concepts for such a facility. The use of an earth orbiting transportation node is required to support many of the space flight projects proposed for the beginning of the 21st century. The requirements for such an orbiting facility are derived from the missions which they support. Future missions investigated include automated and human exploration of the solar system, support of a lunar base, and missions to planet earth. Design concepts are presented for transportation nodes based on a variation of the current Space Station Freedom design. Designs accommodate a variety of earth-to-orbit, orbit-to-orbit, and deep-space probe transportation systems. Finally, the technology needed to develop such a transportation node is summarized.

  10. Natural environment design criteria for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) definition and preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. M.; Vaughan, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    This document provides the natural environment design criteria requirements for use in the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) definition and preliminary design studies. The atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic environments, meteoroids, radiation, magnetic fields, and physical constants are all addressed. This information will enable all groups involved in the definition and preliminary design studies to proceed with a common and consistent set of natural environment criteria requirements.

  11. Designing Assessments and Assessing Designs in Virtual Educational Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Daniel T.; Ingram-Goble, Adam A.; Jameson, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    This study used innovative assessment practices to obtain and document broad learning outcomes for a 15-hour game-based curriculum in Quest Atlantis, a multi-user virtual environment that supports school-based participation in socio scientific inquiry in ecological sciences. Design-based methods were used to refine and align the enactment of…

  12. Robot design for a vacuum environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belinski, S.; Trento, W.; Imani-Shikhabadi, R.; Hackwood, S.

    1987-01-01

    The cleanliness requirements for many processing and manufacturing tasks are becoming ever stricter, resulting in a greater interest in the vacuum environment. Researchers discuss the importance of this special environment, and the development of robots which are physically and functionally suited to vacuum processing tasks. Work is in progress at the Center for robotic Systems in Microelectronics (CRSM) to provide a robot for the manufacture of a revolutionary new gyroscope in high vacuum. The need for vacuum in this and other processes is discussed as well as the requirements for a vacuum-compatible robot. Finally, researchers present details on work done at the CRSM to modify an existing clean-room compatible robot for use at high vacuum.

  13. Design of supply chain in fuzzy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Kandukuri Narayana; Subbaiah, Kambagowni Venkata; Singh, Ganja Veera Pratap

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, customer expectations are increasing and organizations are prone to operate in an uncertain environment. Under this uncertain environment, the ultimate success of the firm depends on its ability to integrate business processes among supply chain partners. Supply chain management emphasizes cross-functional links to improve the competitive strategy of organizations. Now, companies are moving from decoupled decision processes towards more integrated design and control of their components to achieve the strategic fit. In this paper, a new approach is developed to design a multi-echelon, multi-facility, and multi-product supply chain in fuzzy environment. In fuzzy environment, mixed integer programming problem is formulated through fuzzy goal programming in strategic level with supply chain cost and volume flexibility as fuzzy goals. These fuzzy goals are aggregated using minimum operator. In tactical level, continuous review policy for controlling raw material inventories in supplier echelon and controlling finished product inventories in plant as well as distribution center echelon is considered as fuzzy goals. A non-linear programming model is formulated through fuzzy goal programming using minimum operator in the tactical level. The proposed approach is illustrated with a numerical example.

  14. Olfactory Environment Design for Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, C. S.; Holland, F. J.

    2002-01-01

    Smell is usually deemed the least important of the five senses. To contradict this assertion, however, there is no shortage of scientific literature which concludes that olfaction is of very great significance to humans. Odours have been shown to have a variety of effects on humans, and are capable of changing both behaviour and cognitive processing in ways that we are frequently completely unconscious of. Examples of this include alertness, alteration of mood, capacity for ideation and intellectual performance. To date, the design of human spacecraft has concentrated on making their olfactory environments, where possible, `odour neutral' - that is ensuring that all unpleasant and/or offensive odours are removed. Here it suggested that spacecraft (and other extraterrestrial facilities for human inhabitation) might benefit from having their olfactory environments designed to be `odour positive', that is to use odours and olfaction for the positive benefit of their residents. This paper presents a summary of current olfactory research and considers both its positive and negative implications for humans in space. It then discusses `odour positive' design of spacecraft olfactory environments and the possible benefits accruing from this approach before examining its implications for the architecture of spacecraft environmental control systems.

  15. IMCS reflight certification requirements and design specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The requirements for reflight certification are established. Software requirements encompass the software programs that are resident in the PCC, DEP, PDSS, EC, or any related GSE. A design approach for the reflight software packages is recommended. These designs will be of sufficient detail to permit the implementation of reflight software. The PDSS/IMC Reflight Certification system provides the tools and mechanisms for the user to perform the reflight certification test procedures, test data capture, test data display, and test data analysis. The system as defined will be structured to permit maximum automation of reflight certification procedures and test data analysis.

  16. Civil helicopter design and operational requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, K. T.

    1978-01-01

    Design and operational requirements and other factors that have a restraining influence on expansion of the helicopter market are discussed. The needs of operators, users, pilots and the community at large are examined. The impact of future technology developments and other trends such as use, energy shortages, and civil and military helicopter requirements and development is assessed. Areas where research and development are needed to provide opportunities for lowering life cycle costs and removing barriers to further expansion of the industry are analyzed.

  17. 7 CFR 1724.51 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (41 CFR part 101-19, subpart 101-19.6, appendix A) are the... of Federal and Federally Assisted or Regulated New Building Construction (3 CFR 1990 Comp., p. 269... design, guying requirements, and vibration considerations. For lines composed of steel or concrete...

  18. THE DEFINITION AND INTERPRETATION OF TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT DESIGN INPUTS FOR VEHICLE DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Keller, Vernon W.; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    The description and interpretation of the terrestrial environment (0-90 km altitude) is an important driver of aerospace vehicle structural, control, and thermal system design. NASA is currently in the process of reviewing the meteorological information acquired over the past decade and producing an update to the 1993 Terrestrial Environment Guidelines for Aerospace Vehicle Design and Development handbook. This paper addresses the contents of this updated handbook, with special emphasis on new material being included in the areas of atmospheric thermodynamic models, wind dynamics, atmospheric composition, atmospheric electricity, cloud phenomena, atmospheric extremes, sea state, etc. In addition, the respective engineering design elements will be discussed relative to the importance and influence of terrestrial environment inputs that require consideration and interpretation for design applications. Specific lessons learned that have contributed to the advancements made in the acquisition, interpretation, application and awareness of terrestrial environment inputs for aerospace engineering applications are discussed.

  19. FLASH requirements for the high intensity radiated field electromagnetic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    The worldwide proliferation of high intensity emitting sources and the more electric aircraft increase the intensity of the Electromagnetic Environment (EME) in which aircraft must operate. A FLASH program HIRF (High Intensity Radiated Field) EME requirement is derived to cover both commercial and military fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This requirement is derived from the radiated susceptibility requirement documents of both the FAA and U.S. military. Specific test data and analysis will show that we can meet this requirement.

  20. ULYSSES - an expert-system-based VLSI design environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Ulysses is a VLSI computer-aided design (CAD) environment which effectively addresses the problems associated with CAD tool integration. Specifically, Ulysses allows the integration of CAD tools into a design automation (DA) system, the codification of a design methodology, and the representation of a design space. Ulysses keeps track of the progress of a design and allows exploration of the design space. The environment employs artificial intelligence techniques, functions as an interactive expert system, and interprets descriptions of design tasks encoded in the scripts language. An integrated-circuit silicon compilation task is presented as an example of the ability of Ulysses to automatically execute CAD tools to solve a problem where inferencing is required to obtain a viable VLSI layout. The inferencing mechanism, in the form of a controlled production system, allows Ulysses to recover when routing channel congestion or over-constrained leaf-cell boundary conditions make it impossible for CAD tools to complete layouts. Also, Ulysses allows the designer to intervene while design activities are being carried out. Consistency-maintenance rules encoded in the scripts language enforce geometric floor-plan consistency when CAD tools fail and when the designer makes adjustments to a VLSI chip layout.

  1. Designing Law-Compliant Software Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siena, Alberto; Mylopoulos, John; Perini, Anna; Susi, Angelo

    New laws, such as HIPAA and SOX, are increasingly impacting the design of software systems, as business organisations strive to comply. This paper studies the problem of generating a set of requirements for a new system which comply with a given law. Specifically, the paper proposes a systematic process for generating law-compliant requirements by using a taxonomy of legal concepts and a set of primitives to describe stakeholders and their strategic goals. Given a model of law and a model of stakeholders goals, legal alternatives are identified and explored. Strategic goals that can realise legal prescriptions are systematically analysed, and alternative ways of fulfilling a law are evaluated. The approach is demonstrated by means of a case study. This work is part of the Nomos framework, intended to support the design of law-compliant requirements models.

  2. Telemedicine Workplace Environments: Designing for Success

    PubMed Central

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    When designing a facility for telemedicine, there are several things to consider from a human factors point of view, as well as from a practicality point of view. Although the future practice of telemedicine is likely to be more of a mobile-based practice and centered more in the home than it is now, it is still very important to consider ways to optimize the design of clinic-based telemedicine facilities. This is true on both ends of a consultation—where the patient is and where the consultant is. On the patient side, the first thing to realize is that most telemedicine clinics are not going to be newly designed and built. In all likelihood they will be existing rooms converted to telemedicine clinic rooms. Quite often the former room will not even have been used for clinical purposes, but may have simply been a storage area cleared out for telemedicine use. Therefore, design is often a challenge but there are a few basic principles that can be followed to create a workable clinical space. This paper will review some of the basic human factors principles to take into account when designing a working telemedicine environment. PMID:27429263

  3. Manned Mars mission vehicle design requirements for aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Oliver; Wallace, Rodney O.

    1986-01-01

    Vehicle design requirements of a reusable system for manned Mars missions which employ aerocapturing techniques to obtain desired orbital velocities are defined. Requirements for vehicle L/D and ballistic coefficient are determined for expected aerocapture velocities. Conclusions are presented concerning g-loads environment and TPS requirements for a vehicle that aerocaptures at Mars and Earth. Although the goal of a reusable system (based on current state-of-art technologies) was not obtained, the viability of aerocapture at Mars and Earth was established.

  4. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MW{sub th}, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS.

  5. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of a study to identify specific criteria regarding space station extravehicular activity system (EVAS) hardware requirements. Key EVA design issues include maintainability, technology readiness, LSS volume vs. EVA time available, suit pressure/cabin pressure relationship and productivity effects, crew autonomy, integration of EVA as a program resource, and standardization of task interfaces. A variety of DOD EVA systems issues were taken into consideration. Recommendations include: (1) crew limitations, not hardware limitations; (2) capability to perform all of 15 generic missions; (3) 90 days on-orbit maintainability with 50 percent duty cycle as minimum; and (4) use by payload sponsors of JSC document 10615A plus a Generic Tool Kit and Specialized Tool Kit description. EVA baseline design requirements and criteria, including requirements of various subsystems, are outlined. Space station/EVA system interface requirements and EVA accommodations are discussed in the areas of atmosphere composition and pressure, communications, data management, logistics, safe haven, SS exterior and interior requirements, and SS airlock.

  6. Design Environment for Multifidelity and Multidisciplinary Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges when developing propulsion systems is predicting the interacting effects between the fluid loads, thermal loads, and structural deflection. The interactions between technical disciplines often are not fully analyzed, and the analysis in one discipline often uses a simplified representation of other disciplines as an input or boundary condition. For example, the fluid forces in an engine generate static and dynamic rotor deflection, but the forces themselves are dependent on the rotor position and its orbit. It is important to consider the interaction between the physical phenomena where the outcome of each analysis is heavily dependent on the inputs (e.g., changes in flow due to deflection, changes in deflection due to fluid forces). A rigid design process also lacks the flexibility to employ multiple levels of fidelity in the analysis of each of the components. This project developed and validated an innovative design environment that has the flexibility to simultaneously analyze multiple disciplines and multiple components with multiple levels of model fidelity. Using NASA's open-source multidisciplinary design analysis and optimization (OpenMDAO) framework, this multifaceted system will provide substantially superior capabilities to current design tools.

  7. A study of component design loads due to dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The random vibration of the components of the space shuttle causing internal cargo bay acoustic impingement on the payload was investigated. The import factors to be considered in the design of acoustically loaded structures are the prediction of acoustic environment, prediction of structural response to this environment, and to determine the effect of the response on the structural strength requirements. Two basic responses were analyzed. The primary structure response due to random vibration is first analyzed. The output of primary structure response is used as an input to the secondary structure to calculate the component response.

  8. Collaborative virtual reality environments for computational science and design.

    SciTech Connect

    Papka, M. E.

    1998-02-17

    The authors are developing a networked, multi-user, virtual-reality-based collaborative environment coupled to one or more petaFLOPs computers, enabling the interactive simulation of 10{sup 9} atom systems. The purpose of this work is to explore the requirements for this coupling. Through the design, development, and testing of such systems, they hope to gain knowledge that allows computational scientists to discover and analyze their results more quickly and in a more intuitive manner.

  9. Scheduler Design Criteria: Requirements and Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hanbong

    2016-01-01

    This presentation covers fundamental requirements and considerations for developing schedulers in airport operations. We first introduce performance and functional requirements for airport surface schedulers. Among various optimization problems in airport operations, we focus on airport surface scheduling problem, including runway and taxiway operations. We then describe a basic methodology for airport surface scheduling such as node-link network model and scheduling algorithms previously developed. Next, we explain how to design a mathematical formulation in more details, which consists of objectives, decision variables, and constraints. Lastly, we review other considerations, including optimization tools, computational performance, and performance metrics for evaluation.

  10. Natural environment design criteria for the space station program definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The natural environment design criteria requirements for use in the Space Station and its Elements (SSPE) definition phase studies are presented. The atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic environments, meteoroids, radiation, physical constants are addressed. It is intended to enable all groups involved in the definition phase studies to proceed with a common and consistent set of natural environment criteria requirements.

  11. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Philips, John; Hartenstein, Ray; Bassman, Mitchell; Ruskin, Leslie; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1991-01-01

    A set of procedural and functional requirements are presented for the interface between software development environments and software integration and test systems used for space station ground systems software. The requirements focus on the need for centralized configuration management of software as it is transitioned from development to formal, target based testing. This concludes the GSDE Interface Requirements study. A summary is presented of findings concerning the interface itself, possible interface and prototyping directions for further study, and results of the investigation of the Cronus distributed applications environment.

  12. Requirements analysis, domain knowledge, and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potts, Colin

    1988-01-01

    Two improvements to current requirements analysis practices are suggested: domain modeling, and the systematic application of analysis heuristics. Domain modeling is the representation of relevant application knowledge prior to requirements specification. Artificial intelligence techniques may eventually be applicable for domain modeling. In the short term, however, restricted domain modeling techniques, such as that in JSD, will still be of practical benefit. Analysis heuristics are standard patterns of reasoning about the requirements. They usually generate questions of clarification or issues relating to completeness. Analysis heuristics can be represented and therefore systematically applied in an issue-based framework. This is illustrated by an issue-based analysis of JSD's domain modeling and functional specification heuristics. They are discussed in the context of the preliminary design of simple embedded systems.

  13. MarFS-Requirements-Design-Configuration-Admin

    SciTech Connect

    Kettering, Brett Michael; Grider, Gary Alan

    2015-07-08

    This document will be organized into sections that are defined by the requirements for a file system that presents a near-POSIX (Portable Operating System Interface) interface to the user, but whose data is stored in whatever form is most efficient for the type of data being stored. After defining the requirement the design for meeting the requirement will be explained. Finally there will be sections on configuring and administering this file system. More and more, data dominates the computing world. There is a “sea” of data out there in many different formats that needs to be managed and used. “Mar” means “sea” in Spanish. Thus, this product is dubbed MarFS, a file system for a sea of data.

  14. Purple Computational Environment With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, B; Shuler, J

    2006-08-21

    Purple is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Purple Computational Environment documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY06 LLNL Level 1 General Availability Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories, but also documents needs of the LLNL and Alliance users working in the unclassified environment. Additionally, the Purple Computational Environment maps the provided capabilities to the Trilab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the General Availability user environment capabilities of the ASC community. Appendix A lists these requirements and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met for each section of this document. The Purple Computing Environment, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and reviewed throughout the Tri-lab community.

  15. Designing Collaborative E-Learning Environments Based upon Semantic Wiki: From Design Models to Application Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yanyan; Dong, Mingkai; Huang, Ronghuai

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge society requires life-long learning and flexible learning environment that enables fast, just-in-time and relevant learning, aiding the development of communities of knowledge, linking learners and practitioners with experts. Based upon semantic wiki, a combination of wiki and Semantic Web technology, this paper designs and develops…

  16. ELISA, a demonstrator environment for information systems architecture design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panem, Chantal

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an approach of reusability of software engineering technology in the area of ground space system design. System engineers have lots of needs similar to software developers: sharing of a common data base, capitalization of knowledge, definition of a common design process, communication between different technical domains. Moreover system designers need to simulate dynamically their system as early as possible. Software development environments, methods and tools now become operational and widely used. Their architecture is based on a unique object base, a set of common management services and they host a family of tools for each life cycle activity. In late '92, CNES decided to develop a demonstrative software environment supporting some system activities. The design of ground space data processing systems was chosen as the application domain. ELISA (Integrated Software Environment for Architectures Specification) was specified as a 'demonstrator', i.e. a sufficient basis for demonstrations, evaluation and future operational enhancements. A process with three phases was implemented: system requirements definition, design of system architectures models, and selection of physical architectures. Each phase is composed of several activities that can be performed in parallel, with the provision of Commercial Off the Shelves Tools. ELISA has been delivered to CNES in January 94, currently used for demonstrations and evaluations on real projects (e.g. SPOT4 Satellite Control Center). It is on the way of new evolutions.

  17. Analysis of Indoor Environment in Classroom Based on Hygienic Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorček, Miroslav; Sternová, Zuzana

    2016-06-01

    The article contains the analysis of experimental ventilation measurement in selected classrooms of the Elementary School Štrba. Mathematical model of selected classroom was prepared according to in-situ measurements and air exchange was calculated. Interior air temperature and quality influences the students ´ comfort. Evaluated data were compared to requirements of standard (STN EN 15251,2008) applicable to classroom indoor environment during lectures, highlighting the difference between required ambiance quality and actually measured values. CO2 concentration refers to one of the parameters indicating indoor environment quality.

  18. Siphon breaker design requirements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, D.T.; Stephens, A.G.

    1993-03-01

    The Siphon Breaker Design Requirements Project was intended to provide experimental data on siphon flow effects. In addition, the experimental system was to be modeled with the RELAP code and the predicted and measured performances compared. This report describes the design and operation of the siphon breaker experimental equipment from 1989 to 1991. In addition the test results for all the experimental runs made in 1990 and 1991 are presented and described. Unfortunately, we have not been able to obtain useful results from a RELAP 5 model of the siphon system; consequently, we are unable to present any predictive calculations for comparison with the data presented. We have had lots of expert advice from several sources on using the RELAP code but to date our efforts have remained unsuccessful. After an extra year of effort, admittedly part-time but a lot of that, we choose to abandon the modeling efforts and produce this report describing the experimental equipment and test results.

  19. ALS beamline design requirements: A guide for beamline designers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This manual is written as a guide for researchers in designing beamlines and endstations acceptable for use at the ALS. It contains guidelines and policies related to personnel safety and equipment and vacuum protection. All equipment and procedures must ultimately satisfy the safety requirements set aside in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000) which is available from the ALS User Office or on the World WideWeb from the LBNL Homepage (http:// www.lbl.gov).

  20. Conservatism implications of shock test tailoring for multiple design environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baca, Thomas J.; Bell, R. Glenn; Robbins, Susan A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for analyzing shock conservation in test specifications that have been tailored to qualify a structure for multiple design environments is discussed. Shock test conservation is qualified for shock response spectra, shock intensity spectra and ranked peak acceleration data in terms of an Index of Conservation (IOC) and an Overtest Factor (OTF). The multi-environment conservation analysis addresses the issue of both absolute and average conservation. The method is demonstrated in a case where four laboratory tests have been specified to qualify a component which must survive seven different field environments. Final judgment of the tailored test specification is shown to require an understanding of the predominant failure modes of the test item.

  1. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements and prototyping plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Philips, John; Bassman, Mitchell; Williams, C.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the data collection and requirements analysis effort of the Ground System Development Environment (GSDE) Interface Requirements study. It identifies potential problems in the interfaces among applications and processors in the heterogeneous systems that comprises the GSDE. It describes possible strategies for addressing those problems. It also identifies areas for further research and prototyping to demonstrate the capabilities and feasibility of those strategies and defines a plan for building the necessary software prototypes.

  2. A Design of Decentralized Control System in Unstructured Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daiki; Kageyama, Takashi; Suzuki, Jun; Tsuji, Toshiaki; Morisawa, Mitsuharu; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Motion control is developed in control of industrial machines. However, some kind of machines working in an open environment are required in our future society. Then it is necessary to design general methodology for motion controller in open environment. In this paper, decentralized control system is applied as a motion controller for this purpose. This paper is constructed from two parts roughly: the first is a method to abstract environmental mode from environmental information, and the second is a method to design the motion controller with the environmental information. This paper applied this method to biped robot as a model case. The effectiveness of proposed method is confirmed by several simulation and experimental results.

  3. Design of a rotary stepped auger for a lunar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardet, Eduardo; Hart, Derek; Herod, Chris; Homiller, Stephen; Meeks, Mickey; Platt, Kirsten

    1988-01-01

    A lunar outpost will have need for deep drilling operations for both explorative and practical purposes. As in any drilling operation, the cuttings must be cleared from the hole. The hard vacuum of the lunar environment renders conventional flushing methods of cutting removal unfeasible, and requires a new system of removal. A rotary stepped auger (RSA) is a simple mechanical method of removing dry cuttings from a deep hole, and is ideally suited to the lunar environment. The RSA consists of a helical auger with stepped ramps which allow cuttings to slide up the helix, but will prevent them from sliding back down. The auger is driven in a pulsed manner by applying a periodic function of acceleration to the auger shaft. These pulses will compel the cuttings to slide up the auger's helix while the stepped ramps prevent the cuttings from backsliding while the auger accelerates. A mathematical model of the RSA was developed and experimentally evaluated. The math model produced a good baseline design, but the experimental model required some tuning to account for the approximations made in the math model. This design is suited for lunar drilling because it is mechanically simple, integral to the drill string, requires no fluids, is suited to the dry soil, and has relatively low weight and power requirements.

  4. CAD tool environment for MEMS process design support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Wagener, A.; Popp, J.; Hahn, K.; Bruck, R.

    2005-07-01

    MEMS fabrication processes are characterized by a numerous useable process steps, materials and effects to fabricate the intended microstructure. Up to now CAD support in this domain concentrates mainly on the structural design (e.g. simulation programs on FEM basis). These tools often assume fixed interfaces to fabrication process like material parameters or design rules. Taking into account that MEMS design requires concurrently structural design (defining the lateral 2-dim shapes) as well as process design (responsible for the third dimension) it turns out that technology interfaces consisting only of sets of static data are no longer sufficient. For successful design flows in these areas it is necessary to incorporate a higher degree of process related data. A broader interface between process configuration on the one side and the application design on the other side seems to be needed. This paper proposes a novel approach. A process management system is introduced. It allows the specification of processes for specific applications. The system is based on a dedicated database environment that is able to store and manage all process related design constraints linked to the fabrication process data itself. The interdependencies between application specific processes and all stages of the design flow will be discussed and the complete software system PRINCE will be introduced meeting the requirements of this new approach. Based on a concurrent design methodology presented in the beginning of this paper, a system is presented that supports application specific process design. The paper will highlight the incorporated tools and the present status of the software system. A complete configuration of an Si-thin film process example will demonstrate the usage of PRINCE.

  5. Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study

    SciTech Connect

    Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

    1980-07-01

    Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. This volume of the report contains the executive summary. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors: remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

  6. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  7. Integrating Adults' Characteristics and the Requirements for Their Effective Learning in an e-Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korres, Maria Pavlis; Karalis, Thanassis; Leftheriotou, Piera; Barriocanal, Elena García

    Learning technology, through e-learning, allows adults to adapt learning to their own time, place and pace. On the other hand, the adults' specific characteristics as learners and the requirements for their effective learning must be integrated in the design and the development of any learning environment addressed to them. Adults in an online environment have also to deal with new barriers related to access to the courses, the sense of isolation and the sense of immediacy with educator and other learners. This paper is dealing with the way through which an online environment can overcome these barriers and can integrate adults' characteristics and requirements for effective learning. The use of the appropriate communication tools by designers, developers and educators seem to provide the answers as these tools promote immediacy and interaction, both considered very important factors in online educational environments and affect the nature and the quality of communication and learning.

  8. Designing a Web-Based Constructivist Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qiyun

    2009-01-01

    The constructivist learning environment was designed on three perspectives: pedagogical, social and technological. A group of 24 trainee teachers used the environment and participated in the formative evaluation. Results showed that the trainee teachers liked the design specifications and perceived the learning environment to be useful. The…

  9. Designing Multimedia Environments for Children: Computers, Creativity, and Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druin, Allison; Solomon, Cynthia

    This book and the accompanying CD-ROM examine the process of designing multimedia learning environments and the results of and the impact on children of these environments. After an introduction, chapter 1 discusses the origins of educational multimedia environments, presenting initial thoughts on being a designer and focusing on the logo…

  10. Designing Environment for Teaching Internet of Things

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Konstantin; Vujin, Vladimir; Labus, Aleksandra; Stepanic, Ðorde; Stevanovic, Mladen

    2014-01-01

    One of the new topics taught at technical universities is Internet of Things. In this paper, a workshop for organizing a lab in academic environment for the subject Internet of Things is described. The architecture of the platform, scenario and a description of components used for creating the environment for learning Internet of things are also…

  11. Optimal Living Environments for the Elderly: A Design Simulation Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Stephanie B.; And Others

    PLANNED AGE (Planned Alternatives for Gerontological Environments) is a consumer/advocate-oriented design simulation package that provides: (a) a medium for user-planner interaction in the design of living and service environments for the aged; (b) an educational, planning, design, and evaluation tool that can be used by the elderly, their…

  12. Effects of Screen Designs in CBI Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikegulu, Patricia R.

    This article focuses on the effectiveness of computer-based instruction (CBI) screen designs, including their benefits and limitations, as well as human constraints in designing effective CBI. The paper begins with an overview of what comprises an effective CBI screen design, including characteristics of human factors, how information must be…

  13. AOTV Low L/D Preliminary Aeroheating Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    The aerothermal environment to a configuration with a brake face which exhibits a low lift to drag ratio (L/D) of below 0.75 is emphasized. The five times geosynchronous (5 x Geo) orbit entry was selected as the design trajectory. The available data base and math model is discussed. The resulting preliminary design environment is documented. Recommendations as to how the design environment may be improved through technological advances are given.

  14. PROCESS DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENT: A MULTI-OBJECTIVE FRAMEWORK UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Designing chemical processes for environment requires consideration of several indexes of environmental impact including ozone depletion and global warming potentials, human and aquatic toxicity, and photochemical oxidation, and acid rain potentials. Current methodologies like t...

  15. User-centered virtual environment design for virtual rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As physical and cognitive rehabilitation protocols utilizing virtual environments transition from single applications to comprehensive rehabilitation programs there is a need for a new design cycle methodology. Current human-computer interaction designs focus on usability without benchmarking technology within a user-in-the-loop design cycle. The field of virtual rehabilitation is unique in that determining the efficacy of this genre of computer-aided therapies requires prior knowledge of technology issues that may confound patient outcome measures. Benchmarking the technology (e.g., displays or data gloves) using healthy controls may provide a means of characterizing the "normal" performance range of the virtual rehabilitation system. This standard not only allows therapists to select appropriate technology for use with their patient populations, it also allows them to account for technology limitations when assessing treatment efficacy. Methods An overview of the proposed user-centered design cycle is given. Comparisons of two optical see-through head-worn displays provide an example of benchmarking techniques. Benchmarks were obtained using a novel vision test capable of measuring a user's stereoacuity while wearing different types of head-worn displays. Results from healthy participants who performed both virtual and real-world versions of the stereoacuity test are discussed with respect to virtual rehabilitation design. Results The user-centered design cycle argues for benchmarking to precede virtual environment construction, especially for therapeutic applications. Results from real-world testing illustrate the general limitations in stereoacuity attained when viewing content using a head-worn display. Further, the stereoacuity vision benchmark test highlights differences in user performance when utilizing a similar style of head-worn display. These results support the need for including benchmarks as a means of better understanding user outcomes

  16. Successful Web Learning Environments: New Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Margaret

    The Web offers the perfect technology and environment for precision learning because learners can be uniquely identified, relevant content can be specifically personalized, and subsequent response and progress can be monitored, supported, and assessed. Technologically, researchers are making rapid progress realizing the personalized learning dream…

  17. Designing a Networked-Sharing Construction Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sunny; Sun, Chuen-Tsai; Kao, Gloria

    2002-01-01

    Discusses group learning on the Internet and problems of unequal participation and describes the development of a Web-based learning system called NetShare (Networked Sharing Construction Environment) that uses a cooperative-competitive learning strategy to facilitate participants' equal contributions. Reports preliminary results of a study with…

  18. Designing Learning Environments That Excite Serious Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd

    This paper proposes the phenomenon of play as a legitimate goal for interactive multimedia learning environments. Play offers a means for understanding motivation and learning in a holistic way. Serious play is not easy to achieve, but the reward is an intense and satisfying experience for both students and teachers. Technology offers many routes…

  19. Defining the Natural Atmospheric Environment Requirements for the NASA Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Leahy, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration began developing a new vehicle under the Constellation Program to replace the Space Shuttle. The Ares-1 launch vehicle and the Orion capsule will be used to ferry crew and some payloads to the International Space Station and will also be used for new missions to the moon, As development of this new vehicle begins, the Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center has been tasked with defining the natural environments the vehicle will encounter and working with the program to develop natural environmental requirements for the vehicles' elements. An overview of the structure of the program is given, along with a description of the Constellation Design Specification for Natural Environments and the Constellation Natural Environments Definition for Design documents and how they apply to the Ares-I and Orion vehicles.

  20. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements analysis: Operations scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Phillips, John

    1991-01-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the functional and data interface requirements to the link between the GSDE GS/SPF (Amdahl) and the Space Station Control Center (SSCC) and Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) Integration, Verification, and Test Environments (IVTE's). These interfaces will be involved in ground software development of both the control center and the simulation and training systems. Our understanding of the configuration management (CM) interface and the expected functional characteristics of the Amdahl-IVTE interface is described. A set of assumptions and questions that need to be considered and resolved in order to complete the interface functional and data requirements definitions are presented. A listing of information items defined to describe software configuration items in the GSDE CM system is included. It also includes listings of standard reports of CM information and of CM-related tools in the GSDE.

  1. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To meet the great need of replacing many harmful solvents commonly used by industry and the public with environmentally benign substitute solvents, the PARIS II solvent design software has been developed. Although the difficulty of successfully finding replacements increases with...

  2. Design-Based Research and Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Feng; Hannafin, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    During the past decade, design-based research has demonstrated its potential as a methodology suitable to both research and design of technology-enhanced learning environments (TELEs). In this paper, we define and identify characteristics of design-based research, describe the importance of design-based research for the development of TELEs,…

  3. Design of a Blended Learning Environment: Considerations and Implementation Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedik, Nuray; Kiraz, Ercan; Ozden, M. Yasar

    2013-01-01

    This study identified critical issues in the design of a blended learning environment by examining basic design considerations and implementation issues. Following a design-based research approach with the phenomenological tradition of qualitative research, the study investigated instructor experiences relating to the design, development, and…

  4. Ability Requirement Implications of Job Design: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campion, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Measured multiple approaches to job design and examined relationships with ability requirements, using two distinctly different samples (total N=213 jobs), different measures of job design, and ability requirements. Found that motivational attributes of jobs related positively to mental ability requirements; other approaches to job design related…

  5. Using Design-Based Research in Informal Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisman, Molly

    2008-01-01

    Design-Based Research (DBR) has been a tool of the learning sciences since the early 1990s, used as a way to improve and study learning environments. Using an iterative process of design with the goal of reining theories of learning, researchers and educators now use DBR seek to identify "how" to make a learning environment work. They then draw…

  6. Design Milieux for Learning Environments in African Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duveskog, Marcus; Sutinen, Erkki; Cronje, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    During the years 2002 to 2009, five African settings were used as foundation for designing different learning environments. While the content and target group for each learning environment varied, all of their design settings, or milieux, shared one implicit expectation: the milieu should facilitate the production of a change-making learning…

  7. Architecture and Children: Learning Environments and Design Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne, Ed.; Muhlberger, Joe, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This issue addresses (1) growing international interest in learning environments and their effects on behavior, and (2) design education, an integrated model for visual-spatial lifelong learning. It focuses on this new and emerging integrated field which integrates elements in education, new learning environment design, and the use of more two-…

  8. Automated design synthesis of robotic/human workcells for improved manufacturing system design in hazardous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Joshua M.

    2012-06-12

    Manufacturing tasks that are deemed too hazardous for workers require the use of automation, robotics, and/or other remote handling tools. The associated hazards may be radiological or nonradiological, and based on the characteristics of the environment and processing, a design may necessitate robotic labor, human labor, or both. There are also other factors such as cost, ergonomics, maintenance, and efficiency that also effect task allocation and other design choices. Handling the tradeoffs of these factors can be complex, and lack of experience can be an issue when trying to determine if and what feasible automation/robotics options exist. To address this problem, we utilize common engineering design approaches adapted more for manufacturing system design in hazardous environments. We limit our scope to the conceptual and embodiment design stages, specifically a computational algorithm for concept generation and early design evaluation. In regard to concept generation, we first develop the functional model or function structure for the process, using the common 'verb-noun' format for describing function. A common language or functional basis for manufacturing was developed and utilized to formalize function descriptions and guide rules for function decomposition. Potential components for embodiment are also grouped in terms of this functional language and are stored in a database. The properties of each component are given as quantitative and qualitative criteria. Operators are also rated for task-relevant criteria which are used to address task compatibility. Through the gathering of process requirements/constraints, construction of the component database, and development of the manufacturing basis and rule set, design knowledge is stored and available for computer use. Thus, once the higher level process functions are defined, the computer can automate the synthesis of new design concepts through alternating steps of embodiment and function structure updates

  9. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements and... standards under § 80.216 as “GPA” gasoline. (b) Product transfer documents. (1) On each occasion that...

  10. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  11. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  12. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  13. Knowledge management in the engineering design environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace and Defense industry is experiencing an increasing loss of knowledge through workforce reductions associated with business consolidation and retirement of senior personnel. Significant effort is being placed on process definition as part of ISO certification and, more recently, CMMI certification. The process knowledge in these efforts represents the simplest of engineering knowledge and many organizations are trying to get senior engineers to write more significant guidelines, best practices and design manuals. A new generation of design software, known as Product Lifecycle Management systems, has many mechanisms for capturing and deploying a wider variety of engineering knowledge than simple process definitions. These hold the promise of significant improvements through reuse of prior designs, codification of practices in workflows, and placement of detailed how-tos at the point of application.

  14. Engineering design constraints of the lunar surface environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Living and working on the lunar surface will be difficult. Design of habitats, machines, tools, and operational scenarios in order to allow maximum flexibility in human activity will require paying attention to certain constraints imposed by conditions at the surface and the characteristics of lunar material. Primary design drivers for habitat, crew health and safety, and crew equipment are: ionizing radiation, the meteoroid flux, and the thermal environment. Secondary constraints for engineering derive from: the physical and chemical properties of lunar surface materials, rock distributions and regolith thicknesses, topography, electromagnetic properties, and seismicity. Protection from ionizing radiation is essential for crew health and safety. The total dose acquired by a crew member will be the sum of the dose acquired during EVA time (when shielding will be least) plus the dose acquired during time spent in the habitat (when shielding will be maximum). Minimizing the dose acquired in the habitat extends the time allowable for EVA's before a dose limit is reached. Habitat shielding is enabling, and higher precision in predicting secondary fluxes produced in shielding material would be desirable. Means for minimizing dose during a solar flare event while on extended EVA will be essential. Early warning of the onset of flare activity (at least a half-hour is feasible) will dictate the time available to take mitigating steps. Warning capability affects design of rovers (or rover tools) and site layout. Uncertainty in solar flare timing is a design constraint that points to the need for quickly accessible or constructible safe havens.

  15. LISP as an Environment for Software Design: Powerful and Perspicuous

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Robert L.; Walker, Michael G.

    1986-01-01

    The LISP language provides a useful set of features for prototyping knowledge-intensive, clinical applications software that is not found In most other programing environments. Medical computer programs that need large medical knowledge bases, such as programs for diagnosis, therapeutic consultation, education, simulation, and peer review, are hard to design, evolve continually, and often require major revisions. They necessitate an efficient and flexible program development environment. The LISP language and programming environments bullt around it are well suited for program prototyping. The lingua franca of artifical intelligence researchers, LISP facllitates bullding complex systems because it is simple yet powerful. Because of its simplicity, LISP programs can read, execute, modify and even compose other LISP programs at run time. Hence, it has been easy for system developers to create programming tools that greatly speed the program development process, and that may be easily extended by users. This has resulted in the creation of many useful graphical interfaces, editors, and debuggers, which facllitate the development of knowledge-intensive medical applications.

  16. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  17. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  18. Considerations for Designing Instructional Virtual Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennen, Vanessa Paz; Branch, Robert C.

    Virtual reality is an immersive, interactive medium that manipulates the senses in order provide users with simulated experiences in computer-generated worlds. The visual design of virtual reality is an important issue, but literature has tended to stress the medium's instructional potential rather than setting forth a protocol for designing…

  19. Design Principles of the ESCOT Math Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Jody S.; Hoadley, Chris; DiGiano, Chris; Stohl, Hollylynne; Hollebrands, Karen

    This paper describes the Educational Software Components of Tomorrow (ESCOT) project. The focus of the project was on principles that support problem-solving and learner-centered design issues, and the purpose was to garner lessons from a large educational software development project to share with the learning sciences and other interested…

  20. Influence of Natural Environments in Spacecraft Design, Development, and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.

    2012-01-01

    The natural environment has a great influence on the ability of spacecraft to perform according to mission design specification. Compatibility with the natural environment is a primary factor in determining the functional lifetime of the spacecraft. The spacecraft being designed and developed today are growing in complexity. In many instances, the increased complexity also increases its sensitivity to environmental effects. Sensitivities to the natural environment can be tempered through appropriate design measures, mitigation strategies, and/or the acceptance of known risk. The design engineer must understand the effects of the natural environment on the spacecraft and its components; while having an in-depth knowledge of mitigation strategies. Too much protection incurs unnecessary expense, and often times excessive mass; while too little protection can easily lead to premature mission loss. This presentation will provide a brief overview of both the natural environment and its effects and provide some insight into mitigation strategies.

  1. 7 CFR 3560.60 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements. (a) Standards. All Agency-financed MFH will be constructed in accordance with 7 CFR part 1924... 150% of the comparable rent for conventional unit rent level. (3) In meeting the Agency objective of... valuation of a building or facility as recorded in the assessor's office of the municipality and...

  2. The Curriculum Design and Development in MOOCs Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fei; Du, Jing; Li, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The paper selects over 20 online courses and analyses the subjects, organization, the way to show the content of the courses, the use of media, and design of the teaching in the case study of Chinese popular MOOC platform. On this basis, the paper summarizes the principles of curriculum design and design models in MOOC environment, such as…

  3. Choosing the Right Environment. A Study in School Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waropay, V.M.

    1967-01-01

    An environment conducive to learning and it s relation to school design are discussed. The burden to design such a school falls on the architect. Broad inroads of audio and visual teaching aids and vast changes in furniture and equipment influence some design aspects. Aesthetically pleasing surroundings featuring sound control, safety, durability…

  4. Design of environment-responsive biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Masuo; Niimi, T.; Haruyama, T.; Kobatake, E.

    1996-02-01

    Two different types of biomolecular network systems have been designed to respond to the environmental conditions. One is the calmodulin and enzyme (phosphodiesterase, PDE) that activates phosphodiesterase through the conformational change in responding calcium ion. Calmodulin was genetically engineered to be fused with glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Calmodulin/GST fused protein was self-assembled on the gold surface through glutathione. The calmodulin/GST protein layer exhibited an ability to modulate the PDE activity in a solution phase depending on the calcium ion concentration. The other is the engineered gene structure that produces firefly luciferase in responding environmental pollutants. A TOL plasmid, encoding a binding protein xyl R for xyline and a marker enzyme firefly luciferase, has been implemented in a bacterial cell. The whole cell responded to environmentally hazardous substances such as xylene in emitting light.

  5. 40 CFR 80.598 - What are the designation requirements for refiners, importers, and distributors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the designation requirements for refiners, importers, and distributors? 80.598 Section 80.598 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive,...

  6. 40 CFR 53.51 - Demonstration of compliance with design specifications and manufacturing and test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Demonstration of compliance with design specifications and manufacturing and test requirements. 53.51 Section 53.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for...

  7. 49 CFR 173.410 - General design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General design requirements. 173.410 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.410 General design requirements... packaging will avoid, as far as practicable, pockets or crevices where water might collect. (e) Each...

  8. 46 CFR 58.30-5 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-5 Design requirements. (a) The requirements of part 56 are also applicable to piping and fittings in fluid power and control systems listed in... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design requirements. 58.30-5 Section 58.30-5...

  9. 46 CFR 58.30-5 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-5 Design requirements. (a) The requirements of part 56 are also applicable to piping and fittings in fluid power and control systems listed in... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design requirements. 58.30-5 Section 58.30-5...

  10. 46 CFR 58.30-5 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-5 Design requirements. (a) The requirements of part 56 are also applicable to piping and fittings in fluid power and control systems listed in... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design requirements. 58.30-5 Section 58.30-5...

  11. 46 CFR 58.30-5 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-5 Design requirements. (a) The requirements of part 56 are also applicable to piping and fittings in fluid power and control systems listed in... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design requirements. 58.30-5 Section 58.30-5...

  12. 46 CFR 58.30-5 - Design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-5 Design requirements. (a) The requirements of part 56 are also applicable to piping and fittings in fluid power and control systems listed in... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design requirements. 58.30-5 Section 58.30-5...

  13. 7 CFR 801.11 - Related design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the design or pattern of the equipment. Operational controls for mechanical samplers and related... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Related design requirements. 801.11 Section 801.11... FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.11 Related design requirements. (a) Suitability. The...

  14. 7 CFR 801.11 - Related design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the design or pattern of the equipment. Operational controls for mechanical samplers and related... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Related design requirements. 801.11 Section 801.11... FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.11 Related design requirements. (a) Suitability. The...

  15. 7 CFR 801.11 - Related design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the design or pattern of the equipment. Operational controls for mechanical samplers and related... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Related design requirements. 801.11 Section 801.11... FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.11 Related design requirements. (a) Suitability. The...

  16. 7 CFR 801.11 - Related design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the design or pattern of the equipment. Operational controls for mechanical samplers and related... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Related design requirements. 801.11 Section 801.11... FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.11 Related design requirements. (a) Suitability. The...

  17. 7 CFR 801.11 - Related design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the design or pattern of the equipment. Operational controls for mechanical samplers and related... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Related design requirements. 801.11 Section 801.11... FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.11 Related design requirements. (a) Suitability. The...

  18. 46 CFR 162.060-20 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design and construction requirements. 162.060-20 Section... § 162.060-20 Design and construction requirements. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Commandant, each ballast water management system (BWMS) must be designed and constructed in a manner that—...

  19. 46 CFR 162.060-20 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design and construction requirements. 162.060-20 Section... § 162.060-20 Design and construction requirements. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Commandant, each ballast water management system (BWMS) must be designed and constructed in a manner that—...

  20. 46 CFR 162.060-20 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design and construction requirements. 162.060-20 Section... § 162.060-20 Design and construction requirements. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Commandant, each ballast water management system (BWMS) must be designed and constructed in a manner that—...

  1. 49 CFR 192.183 - Vaults: Structural design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vaults: Structural design requirements. 192.183... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.183 Vaults: Structural design requirements. (a) Each underground vault or pit for...

  2. 14 CFR 21.99 - Required design changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Required design changes. 21.99 Section 21... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Changes to Type Certificates § 21.99 Required design changes. (a... product concerned must— (1) If the FAA finds that design changes are necessary to correct the...

  3. 49 CFR 192.183 - Vaults: Structural design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vaults: Structural design requirements. 192.183... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.183 Vaults: Structural design requirements. (a) Each underground vault or pit for...

  4. 14 CFR 21.99 - Required design changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required design changes. 21.99 Section 21... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Changes to Type Certificates § 21.99 Required design changes. (a... product concerned must— (1) If the Administrator finds that design changes are necessary to correct...

  5. Design Requirements for Amorphous Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Young, J. A.; Harrison, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the piezoelectric activity in amorphous piezoelectric polymers is presented. The criteria required to render a polymer piezoelectric are discussed. Although piezoelectricity is a coupling between mechanical and electrical properties, most research has concentrated on the electrical properties of potentially piezoelectric polymers. In this work, we present comparative mechanical data as a function of temperature and offer a summary of polarization and electromechanical properties for each of the polymers considered.

  6. Shock wave sensors: I. Requirements and design.

    PubMed

    Lewin, P A; Schafer, M E

    1991-01-01

    In the last 9 years, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has become one of the preferred procedures for the treatment of urinary and gallbladder calculi. While there is still uncertainty as to the mechanisms of stone fragmentation, current hypotheses suggest that acoustical shock wave parameters such as rise time, peak compressional and rarefactional pressure, and frequency content may all influence the treatment's efficiency. Thus, optimization of lithotripsy treatment needs pressure sensors that can adequately characterize the shock wave field. This article presents and discusses the design of reliable, wideband, quantitative shock wave sensors made of piezoelectric material. The development, design, and performance characteristics of the sensors are presented. Sensor construction details are described, as are the methods used to characterize the sensor's acoustical performance. The key acoustical parameters of the sensor, its frequency response, and directivity pattern are presented; theory indicates that the probes feature uniform sensitivity over the frequency range up to 100 MHz. Preliminary experimental results indicate that piezoelectric polymer sensors made of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with a low acoustical impedance backing are suitable for lithotripter field measurements. The applicability of sensors based on fiber optics to shock wave measurements is also briefly discussed. In a companion article, shock wave measurement techniques are outlined and selected lithotripter test data are presented. PMID:10149140

  7. A Design and Control Environment for Internet-Based Telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oboe, Roberto; Fiorini, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an environment for the design, simulation and control of Internet-based force-relflecting telerobotc systems. We define these systems as using a segment of the computer network to connect the master to the slave.

  8. The Telecommunications Environment and Its Implications for System Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learn, Larry L.; McGill, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses changing telecommunications environment and effect these changes might have on information systems design. Major telecommunications factors and trends reviewed are classified as technical (application of computer technologies to classical telecommunications problems), economic, and regulatory policy related (divestiture of American…

  9. Exascale Co-design for Modeling Materials in Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Germann, Timothy C.

    2014-07-08

    Computational materials science has provided great insight into the response of materials under extreme conditions that are difficult to probe experimentally. For example, shock-induced plasticity and phase transformation processes in single-crystal and nanocrystalline metals have been widely studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, and many of these predictions are beginning to be tested at advanced 4th generation light sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). I will describe our simulation predictions and their recent verification at LCLS, outstanding challenges in modeling the response of materials to extreme mechanical and radiation environments, and our efforts to tackle these as part of the multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx). ExMatEx has initiated an early and deep collaboration between domain (computational materials) scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and hardware architects, in order to establish the relationships between algorithms, software stacks, and architectures needed to enable exascale-ready materials science application codes within the next decade. We anticipate that we will be able to exploit hierarchical, heterogeneous architectures to achieve more realistic large-scale simulations with adaptive physics refinement, and are using tractable application scale-bridging proxy application testbeds to assess new approaches and requirements. Such current scale-bridging strategies accumulate (or recompute) a distributed response database from fine-scale calculations, in a top-down rather than bottom-up multiscale approach.

  10. Designing for Change: Interoperability in a scaling and adapting environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science cyberinfrastructure landscape is constantly changing. Technologies advance and technical implementations are refined or replaced. Data types, volumes, packaging, and use cases evolve. Scientific requirements emerge and mature. Standards shift while systems scale and adapt. In this complex and dynamic environment, interoperability remains a critical component of successful cyberinfrastructure. Through the resource- and priority-driven iterations on systems, interfaces, and content, questions fundamental to stable and useful Earth Science cyberinfrastructure arise. For instance, how are sociotechnical changes planned, tracked, and communicated? How should operational stability balance against 'new and shiny'? How can ongoing maintenance and mitigation of technical debt be managed in an often short-term resource environment? The Arctic Data Explorer is a metadata brokering application developed to enable discovery of international, interdisciplinary Arctic data across distributed repositories. Completely dependent on interoperable third party systems, the Arctic Data Explorer publicly launched in 2013 with an original 3000+ data records from four Arctic repositories. Since then the search has scaled to 25,000+ data records from thirteen repositories at the time of writing. In the final months of original project funding, priorities shift to lean operations with a strategic eye on the future. Here we present lessons learned from four years of Arctic Data Explorer design, development, communication, and maintenance work along with remaining questions and potential directions.

  11. Operational characterisation of requirements and early validation environment for high demanding space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barro, E.; Delbufalo, A.; Rossi, F.

    1993-01-01

    The definition of some modern high demanding space systems requires a different approach to system definition and design from that adopted for traditional missions. System functionality is strongly coupled to the operational analysis, aimed at characterizing the dynamic interactions of the flight element with its surrounding environment and its ground control segment. Unambiguous functional, operational and performance requirements are to be defined for the system, thus improving also the successive development stages. This paper proposes a Petri Nets based methodology and two related prototype applications (to ARISTOTELES orbit control and to Hermes telemetry generation) for the operational analysis of space systems through the dynamic modeling of their functions and a related computer aided environment (ISIDE) able to make the dynamic model work, thus enabling an early validation of the system functional representation, and to provide a structured system requirements data base, which is the shared knowledge base interconnecting static and dynamic applications, fully traceable with the models and interfaceable with the external world.

  12. Designing user models in a virtual cave environment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.; Hudson, R.; Gokhale, N.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the results of a first study into the use of virtual reality for human factor studies and design of simple and complex models of control systems, components, and processes are described. The objective was to design a model in a virtual environment that would reflect more characteristics of the user`s mental model of a system and fewer of the designer`s. The technology of a CAVE{trademark} virtual environment and the methodology of Neuro Linguistic Programming were employed in this study.

  13. Influence of module requirements on flat plate module design evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, J. C.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Photovoltaic module design features and performance characteristics have undergone significant evolutionary changes between pre-1975 First Generation configurations and current Third Generation design technology. A major contributor to this evolution was an iterative process of continuing design guideline and specification development for major module procurements. Module manufacturers have actively responded to these evolving requirements through progressively improving designs. This iterative/feedback process is described. Interim design guidelines and preliminary design options reflecting the LSA 1982 Module Technical Readiness Specification (November 1979) are described with respect to previous design and performance requirements.

  14. A Web Based Collaborative Design Environment for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, Julia

    1998-01-01

    In this era of shrinking federal budgets in the USA we need to dramatically improve our efficiency in the spacecraft engineering design process. We have come up with a method which captures much of the experts' expertise in a dataflow design graph: Seamlessly connectable set of local and remote design tools; Seamlessly connectable web based design tools; and Web browser interface to the developing spacecraft design. We have recently completed our first web browser interface and demonstrated its utility in the design of an aeroshell using design tools located at web sites at three NASA facilities. Multiple design engineers and managers are now able to interrogate the design engine simultaneously and find out what the design looks like at any point in the design cycle, what its parameters are, and how it reacts to adverse space environments.

  15. Space station electric power system requirements and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, Fred

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the conceptual definition and design of the space station Electric Power System (EPS) is given. Responsibilities for the design and development of the EPS are defined. The EPS requirements are listed and discussed, including average and peak power requirements, contingency requirements, and fault tolerance. The most significant Phase B trade study results are summarized, and the design selections and rationale are given. Finally, the power management and distribution system architecture is presented.

  16. ENVIRONMENT FOR LEARNING, A RESEARCH STUDY IN SECONDARY SCHOOL DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier Corp., Syracuse, NY.

    A STUDY OF THE SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT AND THE PREPARATION OF A MODEL DESIGN SOLUTION HAS BEEN CONDUCTED BY AN ARCHITECTURAL FIRM. THE SOLUTION USED DATA FROM AN EXISTING COMPARISON SCHOOL IN THE REDESIGN OF THE EDUCATIONAL FACILITY BASED ON THE INDEPENDENT CONTROL OF THE INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT AND THE ELIMINATION OF CLASSROOM WINDOWS. THIS APPROACH…

  17. Temporal Issues in the Design of Virtual Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Bryan; Obeid, Jihad

    1995-01-01

    Describes design methods used to influence user perception of time in virtual learning environments. Examines the use of temporal cues in medical education and clinical competence testing. Finds that user perceptions of time affects user acceptance, ease of use, and the level of realism of a virtual learning environment. Contains 51 references.…

  18. 7 CFR 801.12 - Design requirements incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 801.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.12 Design requirements...

  19. 7 CFR 801.12 - Design requirements incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 801.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.12 Design requirements...

  20. Defining Support Requirements During Conceptual Design of Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. D.; White, N. H.; Davis, W. T.; Ebeling, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    Current methods for defining the operational support requirements of new systems are data intensive and require significant design information. Methods are being developed to aid in the analysis process of defining support requirements for new launch vehicles during their conceptual design phase that work with the level of information available during this phase. These methods will provide support assessments based on the vehicle design and the operating scenarios. The results can be used both to define expected support requirements for new launch vehicle designs and to help evaluate the benefits of using new technologies. This paper describes the models, their current status, and provides examples of their use.

  1. Critical requirements for the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The requirements for the design of a large space structure which will be deployed, erected, assembled or fabricated in space are delineated in terms of operational loads, stiffness requirements, structure-control interaction, deformations, precision requirements and member slenderness. Design examples for a truss antenna reflector, interorbit propulsion loads and free-flying solar reflectors are given. It is concluded that the demand for dimensional accuracy and stability form the primary requirements.

  2. Formal Verification Toolkit for Requirements and Early Design Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badger, Julia M.; Miller, Sheena Judson

    2011-01-01

    Efficient flight software development from natural language requirements needs an effective way to test designs earlier in the software design cycle. A method to automatically derive logical safety constraints and the design state space from natural language requirements is described. The constraints can then be checked using a logical consistency checker and also be used in a symbolic model checker to verify the early design of the system. This method was used to verify a hybrid control design for the suit ports on NASA Johnson Space Center's Space Exploration Vehicle against safety requirements.

  3. Man/machine interface for a nuclear cask remote handling control station: system design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.; Draper, J.V.

    1984-07-09

    Design requirements are presented for a control station of a proposed semi-automated facility for remote handling of nuclear waste casks. Functional and operational man/machine interface: controls, displays, software format, station architecture, and work environment. In addition, some input is given to the design of remote sensing systems in the cask handling areas. 18 references, 9 figures, 12 tables.

  4. 40 CFR 68.215 - Permit content and air permitting authority or designated agency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authority or designated agency requirements. 68.215 Section 68.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Other... requested by the air permitting authority or designated agency. (c) For 40 CFR part 70 or part 71...

  5. 40 CFR 68.215 - Permit content and air permitting authority or designated agency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authority or designated agency requirements. 68.215 Section 68.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Other... requested by the air permitting authority or designated agency. (c) For 40 CFR part 70 or part 71...

  6. 40 CFR 68.215 - Permit content and air permitting authority or designated agency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authority or designated agency requirements. 68.215 Section 68.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Other... requested by the air permitting authority or designated agency. (c) For 40 CFR part 70 or part 71...

  7. 40 CFR 68.215 - Permit content and air permitting authority or designated agency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authority or designated agency requirements. 68.215 Section 68.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Other... requested by the air permitting authority or designated agency. (c) For 40 CFR part 70 or part 71...

  8. 40 CFR 68.215 - Permit content and air permitting authority or designated agency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authority or designated agency requirements. 68.215 Section 68.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Other... requested by the air permitting authority or designated agency. (c) For 40 CFR part 70 or part 71...

  9. UML Profiles for Design Decisions and Non-Functional Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liming; Gorton, Ian

    2007-06-30

    A software architecture is composed of a collection of design decisions. Each design decision helps or hinders certain Non-Functional Requirements (NFR). Current software architecture views focus on expressing components and connectors in the system. Design decisions and their relationships with non-functional requirements are often captured in separate design documentation, not explicitly expressed in any views. This disassociation makes architecture comprehension and architecture evolution harder. In this paper, we propose a UML profile for modeling design decisions and an associated UML profile for modeling non-functional requirements in a generic way. The two UML profiles treat design decisions and nonfunctional requirements as first-class elements. Modeled design decisions always refer to existing architectural elements and thus maintain traceability between the two. We provide a mechanism for checking consistency over this traceability. An exemplar is given as

  10. Smart design requires updated design and analysis guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejovic, S.; Gajic, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reviews several cases where there is an obvious and important margin between the ideal of smart design and the practical reality which often makes due with obsolete guidelines, outdated recommendations and leads to expensive maintenance troubles. Stated alternatively, this paper is a plea for an attempt to better integrate high technology, experience, knowledge and economics so that both owner and human interests can be better supported and protected. To this end, several well-known plants (Sayano-Shushenskaya, Grand Coulee, Niagara Falls, Richard B Russell, Iron Gates 2, Jenpeg, Bajina Basta, Zvornik, to name a few) have been briefly analysed to clarify the crucial need for updated approaches. Of course, whether the plant is large or small, designing, constructing, operating and updating hydropower plants is a complex set of tasks. Any hydroelectric installation, as a rule, should be designed in several stages. At each stage, entire project documentation should be reviewed by independent reviewers. Reducing the number of analyses, or limiting their scope, with no clear justification except for an attempt to save a little on cost upfront, or worse yet, neglecting the design procedures, can put a project at risk. For a variety of reasons the continuity of knowledge and experience has been lost nearly everywhere. The paper argues that an organized and multidisciplinary transfer of experience is a priority task to be undertaken by the electricity sector. There is a clear need to plan, finance and implement various long-term initiatives; it is urgent that decisions to address this be made now to preserve the currently available knowledge and the almost 200-years of project experience.

  11. Designing Prediction Tasks in a Mathematics Software Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunström, Mats; Fahlgren, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognised need in mathematics teaching for new kinds of tasks which exploit the affordances provided by new technology. This paper focuses on the design of prediction tasks to foster student reasoning about exponential functions in a mathematics software environment. It draws on the first iteration of a design based research study…

  12. Designing Learning Environments to Teach Interactive Quantum Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puente, Sonia M. Gomez; Swagten, Henk J. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at describing and analysing systematically an interactive learning environment designed to teach Quantum Physics, a second-year physics course. The instructional design of Quantum Physics is a combination of interactive lectures (using audience response systems), tutorials and self-study in unit blocks, carried out with small…

  13. Project Selection in the Design Studio: Absence of Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basa, Inci

    2010-01-01

    Project selection is an essential matter of design teaching. Based on observations of a specific curriculum, the author claims that a wide repertoire of subjects including offices, restaurants, hotels, and other public places are used to prepare design students, but that schools and other "learning environments/ schools" are similarly ignored.…

  14. Communication Resource Use in a Networked Collaborative Design Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Geri; Lentini, Marc

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine student use of a prototype networked collaborative design environment to support or augment learning about engineering design. The theoretical framework is based primarily on Vygotsky's social construction of knowledge and the belief that collaboration and communication are critical components…

  15. 42 CFR 121.9 - Designated transplant program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designated transplant program requirements. 121.9 Section 121.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.9 Designated transplant program requirements. (a) To receive organs...

  16. National Ignition Facility system design requirements conventional facilities SDR001

    SciTech Connect

    Hands, J.

    1996-04-09

    This System Design Requirements (SDR) document specifies the functions to be performed and the minimum design requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) site infrastructure and conventional facilities. These consist of the physical site and buildings necessary to house the laser, target chamber, target preparation areas, optics support and ancillary functions.

  17. Software design with fuzzy requirements (A case study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werntz, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes the resource allocation and planning helper (RALPH) scheduling system developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. RALPH addresses the concerns of designing software systems to minimize the need to recode for changes and upgrades; this concern is acute when requirements are uncertain or changing. Determining requirements, understanding the problem, designing for change, and tradeoffs are also discussed.

  18. 14 CFR 152.607 - Building design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Building design requirements. 152.607... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Energy Conservation in Airport Aid Program § 152.607 Building design requirements. Each sponsor shall perform an energy assessment for each federally-assisted building...

  19. 14 CFR 152.607 - Building design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Building design requirements. 152.607... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Energy Conservation in Airport Aid Program § 152.607 Building design requirements. Each sponsor shall perform an energy assessment for each federally-assisted building...

  20. 14 CFR 152.607 - Building design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Building design requirements. 152.607... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Energy Conservation in Airport Aid Program § 152.607 Building design requirements. Each sponsor shall perform an energy assessment for each federally-assisted building...

  1. Specification of requirements for the virtual environment for reactor applications simulation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, S. M.; Pytel, M.

    2012-07-01

    In 2010, the United States Dept. of Energy initiated a research and development effort to develop modern modeling and simulation methods that could utilize high performance computing capabilities to address issues important to nuclear power plant operation, safety and sustainability. To respond to this need, a consortium of national laboratories, academic institutions and industry partners (the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors - CASL) was formed to develop an integrated Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) modeling and simulation capability. A critical element for the success of the CASL research and development effort was the development of an integrated set of overarching requirements that provides guidance in the planning, development, and management of the VERA modeling and simulation software. These requirements also provide a mechanism from which the needs of a broad array of external CASL stakeholders (e.g. reactor / fuel vendors, plant owner / operators, regulatory personnel, etc.) can be identified and integrated into the VERA development plans. This paper presents an overview of the initial set of requirements contained within the VERA Requirements Document (VRD) that currently is being used to govern development of the VERA software within the CASL program. The complex interdisciplinary nature of these requirements together with a multi-physics coupling approach to realize a core simulator capability pose a challenge to how the VRD should be derived and subsequently revised to accommodate the needs of different stakeholders. Thus, the VRD is viewed as an evolving document that will be updated periodically to reflect the changing needs of identified CASL stakeholders and lessons learned during the progress of the CASL modeling and simulation program. (authors)

  2. Computer-aided design development transition for IPAD environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, H. G.; Mock, W. D.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship of federally sponsored computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) programs to the aircraft life cycle design process, an overview of NAAD'S CAD development program, an evaluation of the CAD design process, a discussion of the current computing environment within which NAAD is developing its CAD system, some of the advantages/disadvantages of the NAAD-IPAD approach, and CAD developments during transition into the IPAD system are discussed.

  3. Designing for fiber composite structural durability in hygrothermomechanical environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology is described which can be used to design/analyze fiber composite structures subjected to complex hygrothermomechanical environments. This methodology includes composite mechanics and advanced structural analysis methods (finite element). Select examples are described to illustrate the application of the available methodology. The examples include: (1) composite progressive fracture; (2) composite design for high cycle fatigue combined with hot-wet conditions; and (3) general laminate design.

  4. Exploration Planetary Surface Structural Systems: Design Requirements and Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Project developed system concepts that would be necessary to establish and maintain a permanent human presence on the Lunar surface. A variety of specific system implementations were generated as a part of the scenarios, some level of system definition was completed, and masses estimated for each system. Because the architecture studies generally spawned a large number of system concepts and the studies were executed in a short amount of time, the resulting system definitions had very low design fidelity. This paper describes the development sequence required to field a particular structural system: 1) Define Requirements, 2) Develop the Design and 3) Demonstrate Compliance of the Design to all Requirements. This paper also outlines and describes in detail the information and data that are required to establish structural design requirements and outlines the information that would comprise a planetary surface system Structures Requirements document.

  5. Project W-441, cold vacuum drying facility design requirements document

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, C.T.

    1997-05-08

    This document has been prepared and is being released for Project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document sets forth the physical design criteria, Codes and Standards, and functional requirements that were used in the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document contains section 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements Document. The remaining sections will be issued at a later date. The purpose of the Facility is to dry, weld, and inspect the Multi-Canister Overpacks before transport to dry storage.

  6. Using Space Weather Variability in Evaluating the Radiation Environment Design Specifications for NASA's Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Bruce, Margaret B.; Howard, James W.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program, initiated to fulfill the Vision for Space Exploration, will create a new generation of vehicles for servicing low Earth orbit, the Moon, and beyond. Space radiation specifications for space system hardware are necessarily conservative to assure system robustness for a wide range of space environments. Spectral models of solar particle events and trapped radiation belt environments are used to develop the design requirements for estimating total ionizing radiation dose, displacement damage, and single event effects for Constellation hardware. We first describe the rationale using the spectra chosen to establish the total dose and single event design environmental specifications for Constellation systems. We then compare variability of the space environment to the spectral design models to evaluate their applicability as conservative design environments and potential vulnerabilities to extreme space weather events

  7. 24 CFR 100.205 - Design and construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Design and construction... Because of Handicap § 100.205 Design and construction requirements. (a) Covered multifamily dwellings for first occupancy after March 13, 1991 shall be designed and constructed to have at least one...

  8. Instructional Design Practices in the Design and Development of Digital Humanities Virtual Environments (DH-VEs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Valerie Hunter

    2011-01-01

    Virtual environments, virtual worlds, simulations, 3D models are loaded with potential, promise, and problems. While learning in virtual settings is still being researched, instructional designers are challenged as to which instructional design practices are best suited for virtual environments (VEs). The problem is there is a lack of a conceptual…

  9. THE RHIC/AGS ONLINE MODEL ENVIRONMENT: DESIGN AND OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; BROWN,K.; PILAT,F.; TAFTI,A.A.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    1999-03-29

    An integrated online modeling environment is currently under development for use by AGS and RHIC physicists and commissioners. This environment combines the modeling efforts of both groups in a CDEV [1] client-server design, providing access to expected machine optics and physics parameters based on live and design machine settings. An abstract modeling interface has been designed as a set of adapters [2] around core computational modeling engines such as MAD and UAL/Teapot++ [3]. This approach allows us to leverage existing survey, lattice, and magnet infrastructure, as well as easily incorporate new model engine developments. This paper describes the architecture of the RHIC/AGS modeling environment, including the application interface through CDEV and general tools for graphical interaction with the model using Tcl/Tk. Separate papers at this conference address the specifics of implementation and modeling experience for AGS and RHIC.

  10. Influence of Natural Environments in Spacecraft Design, Development, and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft are growing in complexity and sensitivity to environmental effects. The spacecraft engineer must understand and take these effects into account in building reliable, survivable, and affordable spacecraft. Too much protections, however, means unnecessary expense while too little will potentially lead to early mission loss. The ability to balance cost and risk necessitates an understanding of how the environment impacts the spacecraft and is a critical factor in its design. This presentation is intended to address both the space environment and its effects with the intent of introducing the influence of the environment on spacecraft performance.

  11. Influence of Natural Environments in Spacecraft Design, Development, and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft are growing in complexity and sensitivity to environmental effects. The spacecraft engineer must understand and take these effects into account in building reliable, survivable, and affordable spacecraft. Too much protections, however, means unnecessary expense while too little will potentially lead to early mission loss. The ability to balance cost and risk necessitates an understanding of how the environment impacts the spacecraft and is a critical factor in its design. This presentation is intended to address both the space environment and its effects with the intent of introducing the influence of the environment on spacecraft performance.

  12. Empirical studies of design software: Implications for software engineering environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasner, Herb

    1988-01-01

    The empirical studies team of MCC's Design Process Group conducted three studies in 1986-87 in order to gather data on professionals designing software systems in a range of situations. The first study (the Lift Experiment) used thinking aloud protocols in a controlled laboratory setting to study the cognitive processes of individual designers. The second study (the Object Server Project) involved the observation, videotaping, and data collection of a design team of a medium-sized development project over several months in order to study team dynamics. The third study (the Field Study) involved interviews with the personnel from 19 large development projects in the MCC shareholders in order to study how the process of design is affected by organizationl and project behavior. The focus of this report will be on key observations of design process (at several levels) and their implications for the design of environments.

  13. Simulation Environment for Orion Launch Abort System Control Design Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMinn, J. Dana; Jackson, E. Bruce; Christhilf, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The development and use of an interactive environment to perform control system design and analysis of the proposed Crew Exploration Vehicle Launch Abort System is described. The environment, built using a commercial dynamic systems design package, includes use of an open-source configuration control software tool and a collaborative wiki to coordinate between the simulation developers, control law developers and users. A method for switching between multiple candidate control laws and vehicle configurations is described. Aerodynamic models, especially in a development program, change rapidly, so a means for automating the implementation of new aerodynamic models is described.

  14. Aerospace Systems Design in NASA's Collaborative Engineering Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monell, Donald W.; Piland, William M.

    2000-07-01

    Past designs of complex aerospace systems involved an environment consisting of collocated design teams with project managers, technical discipline experts, and other experts (e.g., manufacturing and systems operations). These experts were generally qualified only on the basis of past design experience and typically had access to a limited set of integrated analysis tools. These environments provided less than desirable design fidelity, often led to the inability of assessing critical programmatic and technical issues (e.g., cost, risk, technical impacts), and generally derived a design that was not necessarily optimized across the entire system. The continually changing, modern aerospace industry demands systems design processes that involve the best talent available (no matter where it resides) and access to the best design and analysis tools. A solution to these demands involves a design environment referred to as collaborative engineering. The collaborative engineering environment evolving within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a capability that enables the Agency's engineering infrastructure to interact and use the best state-of-the-art tools and data across organizational boundaries. Using collaborative engineering, the collocated team is replaced with an interactive team structure where the team members are geographically distributed and the best engineering talent can be applied to the design effort regardless of physical location. In addition, a more efficient, higher quality design product is delivered by bringing together the best engineering talent with more up-to-date design and analysis tools. These tools are focused on interactive, multidisciplinary design and analysis with emphasis on the complete life cycle of the system, and they include nontraditional, integrated tools for life cycle cost estimation and risk assessment. NASA has made substantial progress during the last two years in developing a collaborative

  15. Aerospace Systems Design in NASA's Collaborative Engineering Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monell, Donald W.; Piland, William M.

    1999-01-01

    Past designs of complex aerospace systems involved an environment consisting of collocated design teams with project managers, technical discipline experts, and other experts (e.g. manufacturing and systems operations). These experts were generally qualified only on the basis of past design experience and typically had access to a limited set of integrated analysis tools. These environments provided less than desirable design fidelity, often lead to the inability of assessing critical programmatic and technical issues (e.g., cost risk, technical impacts), and generally derived a design that was not necessarily optimized across the entire system. The continually changing, modern aerospace industry demands systems design processes that involve the best talent available (no matter where it resides) and access to the best design and analysis tools. A solution to these demands involves a design environment referred to as collaborative engineering. The collaborative engineering environment evolving within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a capability that enables the Agency's engineering infrastructure to interact and use the best state-of-the-art tools and data across organizational boundaries. Using collaborative engineering, the collocated team is replaced with an interactive team structure where the team members are geographically distributed and the best engineering talent can be applied to the design effort regardless of physical location. In addition, a more efficient, higher quality design product is delivered by bringing together the best engineering talent with more up-to-date design and analysis tools. These tools are focused on interactive, multidisciplinary design and analysis with emphasis on the complete life cycle of the system, and they include nontraditional, integrated tools for life cycle cost estimation and risk assessment. NASA has made substantial progress during the last two years in developing a collaborative

  16. Aerospace Systems Design in NASA's Collaborative Engineering Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monell, Donald W.; Piland, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Past designs of complex aerospace systems involved an environment consisting of collocated design teams with project managers, technical discipline experts, and other experts (e.g., manufacturing and systems operation). These experts were generally qualified only on the basis of past design experience and typically had access to a limited set of integrated analysis tools. These environments provided less than desirable design fidelity, often lead to the inability of assessing critical programmatic and technical issues (e.g., cost, risk, technical impacts), and generally derived a design that was not necessarily optimized across the entire system. The continually changing, modern aerospace industry demands systems design processes that involve the best talent available (no matter where it resides) and access to the the best design and analysis tools. A solution to these demands involves a design environment referred to as collaborative engineering. The collaborative engineering environment evolving within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a capability that enables the Agency's engineering infrastructure to interact and use the best state-of-the-art tools and data across organizational boundaries. Using collaborative engineering, the collocated team is replaced with an interactive team structure where the team members are geographical distributed and the best engineering talent can be applied to the design effort regardless of physical location. In addition, a more efficient, higher quality design product is delivered by bringing together the best engineering talent with more up-to-date design and analysis tools. These tools are focused on interactive, multidisciplinary design and analysis with emphasis on the complete life cycle of the system, and they include nontraditional, integrated tools for life cycle cost estimation and risk assessment. NASA has made substantial progress during the last two years in developing a collaborative

  17. Supplemental design requirements document, Project W026. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, J.R.

    1993-10-08

    This document supplements and extends the Functional Design Criteria, SP-W026-FDC-001, for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP), Module 1. It provides additional detailed requirements, summarizes key Westinghouse Hanford Company design guidance, and establishes baseline technical agreements to be used in definitive design of the WRAP-1 facility. Revision 3 of the Supplemental Design Requirements Document has been assigned an Impact Level of 3ESQ based on the content of the entire revision. The actual changes made from Revision 2 have an Impact Level of 3S and the basis for these changes was previously reviewed and approved per WHC correspondence No. 9355770.

  18. Computer aided design environment for the analysis and design of multi-body flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, Jayant V.; Singh, Ramen P.

    1989-01-01

    A computer aided design environment consisting of the programs NASTRAN, TREETOPS and MATLAB is presented in this paper. With links for data transfer between these programs, the integrated design of multi-body flexible structures is significantly enhanced. The CAD environment is used to model the Space Shuttle/Pinhole Occulater Facility. Then a controller is designed and evaluated in the nonlinear time history sense. Recent enhancements and ongoing research to add more capabilities are also described.

  19. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 5. Science Applications, Incorporated system requirements definition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report sets forth the system requirements for a Solar Controlled-Environment Agriculture System (SCEAS) Project. In the report a conceptual baseline system description for an engineering test facility is given. This baseline system employs a fluid roof/roof filter in combination with a large storage tank and a ground water heat exchanger in order to provide cooling and heating as needed. Desalination is accomplished by pretreatment followed by reverse osmosis. Energy is provided by means of photovoltaics and wind machines in conjunction with storage batteries. Site and climatic data needed in the design process are given. System performance specifications and integrated system design criteria are set forth. Detailed subsystem design criteria are presented and appropriate references documented.

  20. Designing robots for industrial environments. [economic factors and vulnerability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Environmental hazards to industrial robots are summarized. The inherent reliability of the design of the Unimate robot is assessed and the data used in a management system to bring the reliability performance up to a level nearing what is theoretically available. The design is shown to be capable of a mean time between failure of 400 hours and an average up time of 98%. Specific design decisions made in view of application requirements are explored.

  1. Design and analysis issues in gene and environment studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Both nurture (environmental) and nature (genetic factors) play an important role in human disease etiology. Traditionally, these effects have been thought of as independent. This perspective is ill informed for non-mendelian complex disorders which result as an interaction between genetics and environment. To understand health and disease we must study how nature and nurture interact. Recent advances in human genomics and high-throughput biotechnology make it possible to study large numbers of genetic markers and gene products simultaneously to explore their interactions with environment. The purpose of this review is to discuss design and analytic issues for gene-environment interaction studies in the “-omics” era, with a focus on environmental and genetic epidemiological studies. We present an expanded environmental genomic disease paradigm. We discuss several study design issues for gene-environmental interaction studies, including confounding and selection bias, measurement of exposures and genotypes. We discuss statistical issues in studying gene-environment interactions in different study designs, such as choices of statistical models, assumptions regarding biological factors, and power and sample size considerations, especially in genome-wide gene-environment studies. Future research directions are also discussed. PMID:23253229

  2. A Methodology for the Design of Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Tom; Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and discusses some theoretical starting points and design considerations for addressing emotional and aesthetic aspects of virtual learning environments (VLEs) for support of ubiquitous teaching, studying and learning. In this article, we note that a VLE should be viewed upon as an interactive and sensations arousing…

  3. QUICK - An interactive software environment for engineering design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, David L.

    1989-01-01

    QUICK, an interactive software environment for engineering design, provides a programmable FORTRAN-like calculator interface to a wide range of data structures as well as both built-in and user created functions. QUICK also provides direct access to the operating systems of eight different machine architectures. The evolution of QUICK and a brief overview of the current version are presented.

  4. Virtual Worlds; Real Learning: Design Principles for Engaging Immersive Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu (u. Sjarpm)

    2012-01-01

    The EMDT master's program at Full Sail University embarked on a small project to use a virtual environment to teach graduate students. The property used for this project has evolved our several iterations and has yielded some basic design principles and pedagogy for virtual spaces. As a result, students are emerging from the program with a better grasp of future possibilities.

  5. Designing for Learning: Online Social Networks as a Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Gail; Evans, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This paper deploys notions of emergence, connections, and designs for learning to conceptualize high school students' interactions when using online social media as a learning environment. It makes links to chaos and complexity theories and to fractal patterns as it reports on a part of the first author's action research study, conducted while she…

  6. Designing a Virtual-Reality-Based, Gamelike Math Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xinhao; Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the design issues related to a virtual-reality-based, gamelike learning environment (VRGLE) developed via OpenSimulator, an open-source virtual reality server. The researchers collected qualitative data to examine the VRGLE's usability, playability, and content integration for math learning. They found it important…

  7. Designing for Real-World Scientific Inquiry in Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Nelson, Brian C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most policy doctrines promote the use of scientific inquiry in the K-12 classroom, but good inquiry is hard to implement, particularly for schools with fiscal and safety constraints and for teachers struggling with understanding how to do so. Purpose: In this paper, we present the design of a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE)…

  8. Collaborative Design in a Networked Multimedia Environment: Emerging Communication Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Geri; Grosz-Ngate, Maria

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated the activities of engineering students working on a collaborative design project in a distributed multimedia environment. Topics discussed include learning as a social process; face-to-face and video communication; problem-solving techniques; use of interactive media; the construction of knowledge; and group…

  9. A Review of Literacy Frameworks for Learning Environments Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebmann, Kristen Radsliff

    2013-01-01

    This article charts the development of three literacy research frameworks: multiliteracies, new literacies, and popular literacies. By reviewing the literature surrounding three current conceptions of literacy, an attempt is made to form an integrative grouping that captures the most relevant elements of each for learning environments design.…

  10. Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fuhua, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents" reports on the most recent advances in agent technologies for distributed learning. Chapters are devoted to the various aspects of intelligent software agents in distributed learning, including the methodological and technical issues on where and how intelligent agents…