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Sample records for environmental estrogenic compounds

  1. Binding of Estrogenic Compounds to Recombinant Estrogen Receptor-α: Application to Environmental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Arnaud; Boussioux, Anne-Marie; Escande, Aurélie; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Gomez, Elena; Fenet, Hélène; Ruff, Marc; Moras, Dino; Vignon, Françoise; Duchesne, Marie-Josèphe; Casellas, Claude; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Balaguer, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Estrogenic activity in environmental samples could be mediated through a wide variety of compounds and by various mechanisms. High-affinity compounds for estrogen receptors (ERs), such as natural or synthetic estrogens, as well as low-affinity compounds such as alkylphenols, phthalates, and polychlorinated biphenyls are present in water and sediment samples. Furthermore, compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which do not bind ERs, modulate estrogen activity by means of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In order to characterize compounds that mediate estrogenic activity in river water and sediment samples, we developed a tool based on the ER-αligand-binding domain, which permitted us to estimate contaminating estrogenic compound affinities. We designed a simple transactivation assay in which compounds of high affinity were captured by limited amounts of recombinant ER-αand whose capture led to a selective inhibition of transactivation. This approach allowed us to bring to light that water samples contain estrogenic compounds that display a high affinity for ERs but are present at low concentrations. In sediment samples, on the contrary, we showed that estrogenic compounds possess a low affinity and are present at high concentration. Finally, we used immobilized recombinant ER-αto separate ligands for ER and AhR that are present in river sediments. Immobilized ER-α, which does not retain dioxin-like compounds, enabled us to isolate and concentrate ER ligands to facilitate their further analysis. PMID:15743715

  2. Estrogenic activity assessment of environmental chemicals using in vitro assays: identification of two new estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Lascombe, I; Beffa, D; Rüegg, U; Tarradellas, J; Wahli, W

    2000-01-01

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activities have been suggested to be associated with deleterious effects in animals and humans. To characterize estrogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action, we established in vitro and cell culture assays that detect human estrogen receptor [alpha] (hER[alpha])-mediated estrogenicity. First, we assayed chemicals to determine their ability to modulate direct interaction between the hER[alpha] and the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and in a competition binding assay to displace 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). Second, we tested the chemicals for estrogen-associated transcriptional activity in the yeast estrogen screen and in the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The chemicals investigated in this study were o,p'-DDT (racemic mixture and enantiomers), nonylphenol mixture (NPm), and two poorly analyzed compounds in the environment, namely, tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methane (Tris-H) and tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methanol (Tris-OH). In both yeast and MCF-7 cells, we determined estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor (ER) for o,p'-DDT, NPm, and for the very first time, Tris-H and Tris-OH. However, unlike estrogens, none of these xenobiotics seemed to be able to induce ER/SRC-1 interactions, most likely because the conformation of the activated receptor would not allow direct contacts with this coactivator. However, these compounds were able to inhibit [(3)H]-E(2) binding to hER, which reveals a direct interaction with the receptor. In conclusion, the test compounds are estrogen mimics, but their molecular mechanism of action appears to be different from that of the natural hormone as revealed by the receptor/coactivator interaction analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10903615

  3. Environmental estrogenic compounds and the induction of hepatic vitellogenin synthesis using cultured goldfish hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Z.; Kraak, G.J. Van Der; Squires, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the estrogenic activity of some environmental contaminants including the {beta}-sitosterol, nonylphenol (major components of pulp mill effluent) and 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM, a lampricide widely used in the Great Lakes), using the goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) as a model species. The in vivo exposure studies have demonstrated that all three compounds tested possess various degrees of estrogenic activity as measured by increased plasma vitellogenin (VTG) production in both the male and female fish. To understand how these compounds induce hepatic VTG synthesis and determine their potency of VTG induction, an in vitro hepatocyte culture system of goldfish was established and the induction of VTG synthesis by these compounds in the cultured hepatocytes was studied. The concentration of VTG in the plasma and in the cell culture medium was determined with a enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that {beta}-sitosterol has the highest estrogenic activity of VTG induction.

  4. Genotoxic effects of environmental estrogen-like compounds in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tayama, Sumiko; Nakagawa, Yoshio; Tayama, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    Some environmental estrogen-like compounds, such as bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-octylphenol (OP), propyl p-hydroxybenzoate (P-PHBA), and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (B-PHBA), synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), and natural estrogen, 17beta-estradiol (E2), were studied for their genotoxicity in CHO-K1 cells using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosome aberration (CA), and DNA strand break (comet) assays. Six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused DNA migration in the comet assay and induced SCEs at one or more of the highest doses. Among the chemicals, OP produced an especially high incidence of SCEs. Structural CA was induced by five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and BPA, E2, and DES also induced aneuploid cells. E2 and DES particularly increased the rate of polyploidy at high doses. The incidence of colchicine-mitosis-like (c-mitotic) figures suggesting spindle disrupting effects was also detected with five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused endoreduplication (ERD), a form of nuclear polyploidization induced by block of cell cycle at G2 phase, at one or more high doses. Our present results suggest that OP and NP cause repairable DNA damage, including SCEs, and do not result in CA, while the damage caused by DES, BPA, P-PHBA, and B-PHBA results in the induction of CAs together with SCEs probably because of imperfect repair. We are unable to explain the observation that the DNA damage caused by E2 resulted in CA induction but not DNA migration or SCE induction, except for speculating that the DNA damage is different from that caused by DES and the estrogen-like chemicals. Our findings also suggest that E2, DES and BPA have aneuploidogenic properties, and that the former two of chemicals also are polyploidy-inducing agents. PMID:17913570

  5. Assessing the energy and environmental performance of algae-mediated tertiary treatment of estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Colosi, Lisa M; Resurreccion, Eleazer P; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-02-01

    This study uses a systems-level modeling approach to illustrate a novel synergy between municipal wastewater treatment and large-scale algaculture for production of bio-energy, whereby algae-mediated tertiary treatment provides efficient removal of unregulated, strongly estrogenic steroid hormones from the secondary effluent. Laboratory results from previously published studies suggested that algae-mediated treatment could deliver roughly 75-85% removal of a model estrogen (17β-estradiol) within typical algae pond residence times. As such, experimental results are integrated into a comprehensive life cycle assessment (LCA) framework, to assess the environmental performance of an algae-based tertiary treatment system relative to three conventional tertiary treatments: ozonation, UV irradiation, and adsorption onto granular activated carbon. Results indicate that the algae-mediated tertiary treatment is superior to the selected benchmarks on the basis of raw energy return on investment (EROI) and normalized energy use per mass of estrogenic toxicity removed. It is the only tertiary treatment system that creates more energy than it consumes, and it delivers acceptable effluent quality for nutrient and coliform concentrations while rendering a significant reduction in estrogenic toxicity. These results highlight the dual water and energy sustainability benefits that accrue from the integration of municipal wastewater treatment and large-scale algae farming. PMID:25537081

  6. Relationship between estrogen receptor-binding and estrogenic activities of environmental estrogens and suppression by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Han, Dal-Ho; Denison, Michael S; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Yamada, Koji

    2002-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the estrogenic activity of environmental estrogens by a competition binding assay using a human recombinant estrogens receptor (hERbeta) and by a proliferation assay using MCF-7 cells and a sulforhodamine-B assay. In the binding assay, pharmaceuticals had a stronger binding activity to hERbeta than that of some phytoestrogens (coumestrol, daidzein, genistein, luteolin, chrysin, flavone, and naringenin) or industrial chemicals, but phytoestrogens such as coumestrol had a binding activity as strong as pharmaceuticals such as 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE), tamoxifen (Tam), and mestranol. In the proliferation assay, pharmaceuticals such as diethylstilbestrol, EE, Tam, and clomiphene, and industrial chemicals such as 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and 4-dihydroxybiphenyl had a proliferation-stimulating activity as strong as 17beta-estradiol (ES). In addition, we found that phytoestrogens such as coumestrol, daidzein, luteolin, and quercetin exerted a proliferation stimulating activity as strong as ES. Furthermore, we examined the suppression of proliferation-stimulating activity, induced by environmental estrogen, by flavonoids, such as daidzein, genistein, quercetin, and luteolin, and found that these flavonoids suppressed the induction of the proliferation-stimulating activity of environmental estrogens. The suppressive effect of flavonoids suggests that these compounds have anti-estrogenic and anti-cancer activities. PMID:12224631

  7. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  8. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  9. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  10. Manure-borne estrogens as potential environmental contaminants: a review.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Travis A; Graetz, Donald A; Wilkie, Ann C

    2003-12-15

    Livestock wastes are potential sources of endocrine disrupting compounds to the environment. Steroidal estrogen hormones such as estradiol, estrone, and estriol are a particular concern because there is evidence that low nanogram per liter concentrations of estrogens in water can adversely affect the reproductive biology of fish and other aquatic vertebrate species. We performed a literature review to assess the current state of science regarding estrogen physicochemical properties, livestock excretion, and the fate of manure-borne estrogens in the environment. Unconjugated steroidal estrogens have low solubility in water (0.8-13.3 mg L(-1)) and are moderately hydrophobic (log Kow 2.6-4.0). Cattle excrete mostly 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and respective sulfated and glucuronidated counterparts, whereas swine and poultry excrete mostly 17beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and respective sulfated and glucuronidated counterparts. The environmental fate of estrogens is not clearly known. Laboratory-based studies have found that the biological activity of these compounds is greatly reduced or eliminated within several hours to days due to degradation and sorption. On the other hand, field studies have demonstrated that estrogens are sufficiently mobile and persistent to impact surface and groundwater quality. Future research should use standardized methods for the analysis of manure, soil, and water. More information is needed about the types and amounts of estrogens that exist in livestock wastes and the fate of manure-borne estrogens applied to agricultural lands. Field and laboratory studies should work toward revealing the mechanisms of estrogen degradation, sorption, and transport so that the risk of estrogen contamination of waterways can be minimized. PMID:14717153

  11. The E-SCREEN assay as a tool to identify estrogens: an update on estrogenic environmental pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C; Chung, K L; Fernandez, M F; Olea, N; Serrano, F O

    1995-01-01

    Estrogens are defined by their ability to induce the proliferation of cells of the female genital tract. The wide chemical diversity of estrogenic compounds precludes an accurate prediction of estrogenic activity on the basis of chemical structure. Rodent bioassays are not suited for the large-scale screening of chemicals before their release into the environment because of their cost, complexity, and ethical concerns. The E-SCREEN assay was developed to assess the estrogenicity of environmental chemicals using the proliferative effect of estrogens on their target cells as an end point. This quantitative assay compares the cell number achieved by similar inocula of MCF-7 cells in the absence of estrogens (negative control) and in the presence of 17 beta-estradiol (positive control) and a range of concentrations of chemicals suspected to be estrogenic. Among the compounds tested, several "new" estrogens were found; alkylphenols, phthalates, some PCB congeners and hydroxylated PCBs, and the insecticides dieldrin, endosulfan, and toxaphene were estrogenic by the E-SCREEN assay. In addition, these compounds competed with estradiol for binding to the estrogen receptor and increased the levels of progesterone receptor and pS2 in MCF-7 cells, as expected from estrogen mimics. Recombinant human growth factors (bFGF, EGF, IGF-1) and insulin did not increase in cell yields. The aims of the work summarized in this paper were a) to validate the E-SCREEN assay; b) to screen a variety of chemicals present in the environment to identify those that may be causing reproductive effects in wildlife and humans; c) to assess whether environmental estrogens may act cumulatively; and finally d) to discuss the reliability of this and other assays to screen chemicals for their estrogenicity before they are released into the environment. PMID:8593856

  12. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Caroline; Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Pakdel, Farzad; Brion, François; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Cavaillès, Vincent; Bourguet, William; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; and others

    2014-10-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28 °C as compared to 37 °C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology. - Highlights: • Zebrafish is increasingly used to study the effects of estrogens. • We assessed the activity of pharmaceutical and environmental estrogens on zfERs. • Environmental estrogens displayed greater potency for zfERα compared to zfERβs. • hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zf

  13. HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS.

    Robert J. Kavlock, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.

    Over the past several decades a hypothesis has been put forth that a numb...

  14. Effects of Estrogens and Estrogenic Disrupting Compounds on Fish Mineralized Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patricia I. S.; Estêvão, Maria D.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities. PMID:25196834

  15. PCBs as environmental estrogens: Turtle sex determination as a biomarker of environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, J.M.; Crews, D. ); McLachlan, J.A. )

    1994-09-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread, low-level environmental pollutants associated with adverse health effects such as immune suppression and teratogenicity. There is increasing evidence that some PCB compounds are capable of disrupting reproductive and endocrine function in fish, birds, and mammals, including humans, particularly during development. Research on the mechanism through which these compounds act to alter reproductive function indicates estrogenic activity, whereby the compounds may be altering sexual differentiation. Here we demonstrate the estrogenic effect of some PCBs by reversing gonadal sex in a reptile species that exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Identification of estrogenic compounds in oil sands process waters by effect directed analysis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Siqing; Ramsay, Bruce A; Brown, R Stephen; Wang, Jiaxi; Ramsay, Juliana A

    2015-01-01

    Using effect directed analysis, the presence of estrogenic components in untreated and biologically treated oil sands process water (OSPW) was detected with the yeast estrogenic screening assay after fractionation with solid phase extraction followed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Comparison of the composition, as determined by electrospray ionization combined with high-resolution linear trap quadropole (LTQ)-Orbitrap Velos Pro hybrid mass spectrometry (negative ion) of selected estrogenic and nonestrogenic fractions identified compounds that were uniquely present in the estrogenic samples, biologically treated and untreated. Of the 30 most abundant compounds, there were 14 possible nonaromatic structures and 16 possible aromatic structures. Based on the published literature, the latter are the most likely to cause estrogenicity and were O2, O3 and O4 C17 to C20 compounds with double bond equivalents between 6 and 10 and chemical formulas similar to estrone- and estradiol-like compounds. This study shows exact formulas and masses of possible estrogenic compounds in OSPW. These findings will help to focus study on the most environmentally significant components in OSPW. PMID:25521156

  17. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck . E-mail: khchung@skku.edu

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  18. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  19. Biochemical and molecular changes at the cellular level in response to exposure to environmental estrogen-like chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Palangat, M.; Chen, Chiao-Wen

    1997-01-01

    Estrogen-like chemical are unique because the estrogenic property of these compounds allows them to act like sex hormones. Whether weak or strong, the estrogenic response of a chemical, if not overcome, will add extra estrogenic burden to the system. At elevated doses, natural estrogens and environmental estrogen-like chemicals are known to produce adverse effects. The source of extra or elevated concentration of estrogen could be either endogenous or exogenous. The potential of exposure for humans and animals to environmental estrogen-like chemicals is high. Only a limited number of estrogen-like compounds, such as diethylstibestrol (DES), bisphenol A, nonylphenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), have been used to assess the biochemical and molecular changes at the cellular level. This article is focused mainly on DES-related observations. In addition to estrogenic effects, environmental estrogen-like chemical produce multiple and multitype genetic and/or nongenetic hits. Exposure of Syrian hamsters to stilbene estrogen (DES) produces several changes in the nuclei of target organ for carcinogenesis (kidney). Exposure of Noble rats to DES also produces several changes in the mammary gland. Some other estrogenic compounds may also follow a similar pattern of effects to DES, because these compounds alter cell cycle kinetics, produce telomeric associations, and produce chromosomal aberrations. It should be noted that a particular or multitype hit(s) will depend upon the nature of the environmental estrogen-like chemical. The role of individual attack leading to a particular change is not clear at this stage. Consequences of these multitypes of attack on the nuclei of cells could be (1) nuclear toxicity/cell death; (2) repair of all the hits and then acting as normal cells; or (3) sustaining most of the hits and acting as unstable cells. 180 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Biochar as potential adsorptive media for estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are an emerging problem in water pollution due to their toxic effects on humans and wildlife. Estrogenic compounds are a subset of endocrine disrupting chemicals that are particularly dangerous since they are very potent and can affect fish at concentrations as low as ...

  1. A variety of environmentally persistent chemicals, including some phthalate plasticizers, are weakly estrogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, S; Reynolds, T; White, R; Parker, M G; Sumpter, J P

    1995-01-01

    Sewage, a complex mixture of organic and inorganic chemicals, is considered to be a major source of environmental pollution. A random screen of 20 organic man-made chemicals present in liquid effluents revealed that half appeared able to interact with the estradiol receptor. This was demonstrated by their ability to inhibit binding of 17 beta-estradiol to the fish estrogen receptor. Further studies, using mammalian estrogen screens in vitro, revealed that the two phthalate esters butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) and a food antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were estrogenic; however, they were all less estrogenic than the environmental estrogen octylphenol. Phthalate esters, used in the production of various plastics (including PVC), are among the most common industrial chemicals. Their ubiquity in the environment and tendency to bioconcentrate in animal fat are well known. Neither BBP nor DBP were able to act as antagonists, indicating that, in the presence of endogenous estrogens, their overall effect would be cumulative. Recently, it has been suggested that environmental estrogens may be etiological agents in several human diseases, including disorders of the male reproductive tract and breast and testicular cancers. The current finding that some phthalate compounds and some food additives are weakly estrogenic in vitro, needs to be supported by further studies on their effects in vivo before any conclusions can be made regarding their possible role in the development of these conditions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7556011

  2. Rapid screening of environmental chemicals for estrogen receptor binding capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, R; Wiese, T E; Ervin, K; Nestich, S; Checovich, W

    1998-01-01

    Over the last few years, an increased awareness of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their potential to affect wildlife and humans has produced a demand for practical screening methods to identify endocrine activity in a wide range of environmental and industrial chemicals. While it is clear that in vivo methods will be required to identify adverse effects produced by these chemicals, in vitro assays can define particular mechanisms of action and have the potential to be employed as rapid and low-cost screens for use in large scale EDC screening programs. Traditional estrogen receptor (ER) binding assays are useful for characterizing a chemical's potential to be an estrogen-acting EDC, but they involve displacement of a radioactive ligand from crude receptor preparations at low temperatures. The usefulness of these assays for realistically determining the ER binding interactions of weakly estrogenic environmental and industrial compounds that have low aqueous solubility is unclear. In this report, we present a novel fluorescence polarization (FP) method that measures the capacity of a competitor chemical to displace a high affinity fluorescent ligand from purified, recombinant human ER-[alpha] at room temperature. The ER-[alpha] binding interactions generated for 15 natural and synthetic compounds were found to be similar to those determined with traditional receptor binding assays. We also discuss the potential to employ this FP technology to binding studies involving ER-ss and other receptors. Thus, the assay introduced in this study is a nonradioactive receptor binding method that shows promise as a high throughput screening method for large-scale testing of environmental and industrial chemicals for ER binding interactions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9721254

  3. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  4. Structural and Functional Profiling of Environmental Ligands for Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Grimaldi, Marina; Cavaillès, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals are exposed daily to environmental pollutants that may act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), causing a range of developmental, reproductive, metabolic, or neoplastic diseases. With their mostly hydrophobic pocket that serves as a docking site for endogenous and exogenous ligands, nuclear receptors (NRs) can be primary targets of small molecule environmental contaminants. However, most of these compounds are chemically unrelated to natural hormones, so their binding modes and associated hormonal activities are hardly predictable. Objectives: We conducted a correlative analysis of structural and functional data to gain insight into the mechanisms by which 12 members of representative families of pollutants bind to and activate the estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. Methods: We used a battery of biochemical, structural, biophysical, and cell-based approaches to characterize the interaction between ERs and their environmental ligands. Results: Our study revealed that the chemically diverse compounds bound to ERs via varied sets of protein–ligand interactions, reflecting their differential activities, binding affinities, and specificities. We observed xenoestrogens binding to both ERs—with affinities ranging from subnanomolar to micromolar values—and acting in a subtype-dependent fashion as full agonists or partial agonists/antagonists by using different combinations of the activation functions 1 and 2 of ERα and ERβ. Conclusions: The precise characterization of the interactions between major environmental pollutants and two of their primary biological targets provides rational guidelines for the design of safer chemicals, and will increase the accuracy and usefulness of structure-based computational methods, allowing for activity prediction of chemicals in risk assessment. Citation: Delfosse V, Grimaldi M, Cavaillès V, Balaguer P, Bourguet W. 2014. Structural and functional profiling of environmental ligands for estrogen

  5. Modeling environmental loading rates of municipal wastewater contaminants: steroidal estrogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds in municipal wastewater are of substantial interest because of suspicion that they may cause reproductive disruption in aquatic invertebrates, and because of their potential to contaminate human drinking water sources. Previous work suggests the primary contr...

  6. Modulation of estrogenic effects by environmental temperature and food availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), in combination with environmental influences, interfere with endocrine function in humans and wildlife. Estrogens are a type of EDC that may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. The impact of estrogens on P...

  7. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  8. Environmental signaling: from environmental estrogens to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and beyond.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, J A

    2016-07-01

    The landmark report (Herbst et al. 1971) linking prenatal treatment with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), to cancer at puberty in women whose mothers took the drug while pregnant ushered in an era of research on delayed effects of such exposures on functional outcomes in offspring. An animal model developed in our laboratory at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences confirmed that DES was the carcinogen and exposure to DES caused, as well, functional alterations in the reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems of male and female mice treated in utero. DES was also being used in agriculture and we discovered, at the first meeting on Estrogens in the Environment in 1979 (Estrogens in the Environment, 1980), that many environmental contaminants were also estrogenic. Many laboratories sought to discern the basis for estrogenicity in environmental chemicals and to discover other hormonally active xenobiotics. Our laboratory elucidated how DES and other estrogenic compounds worked by altering differentiation through epigenetic gene imprinting, helping explain the transgenerational effects found in mice and humans. At the Wingspread Conference on the Human-Wildlife Connection in 1991 (Advances in Modern Environmental Toxicology, 1992), we learned that environmental disruption of the endocrine system occurred in many species and phyla, and the term endocrine disruption was introduced. Further findings of transgenerational effects of environmental agents that mimicked or blocked various reproductive hormones and the ubiquity of environmental signals, such as bisphenol A increased concern for human and ecological health. Scientists began to look at other endocrine system aspects, such as cardiovascular and immune function, and other nuclear receptors, with important observations regarding obesity and metabolism. Laboratories, such as ours, are now using stem cells to try to understand the mechanisms by which various environmental signals

  9. COMPARISON OF FATHEAD MINNOW AND HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens have the potential to disrupt endocrine function in a myriad of species. However, in vitro assays designed to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) typically utilize mammalian estrogen receptors. Our overall objective is to charac...

  10. [Estrogenic activity of ultraviolet absorbers and the related compounds].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisashi; Adachi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2005-08-01

    The estrogenic activities of ultraviolet absorbers and their related compounds were investigated using MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Nine of 33 chemicals (benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4,4'-dimethoxybenzophenone, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor, ethyl 2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (etocrylene) and 2-ethylhexyl-2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (octocrylene)) were positive compared with the vehicle control. Benzhydrol, ethyl cinnamate and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone were weakly active. When each xenoestrogen was added to the cells along with ICI 182780, an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, the cell growth was reduced according to its doses. Therefore, the cell proliferation was suggested to generate through ER. Most of these chemicals were also positive using CHOOSER assay, a new method of testing estrogenic activity of xenoestrogen. Each xenoestrogen was also confirmed to bind to ERalpha and ERbeta using a human ER competitive binding assay against 17beta-estradiol. The concentration order of the strength of its inhibitory effect using both ERalpha and ERbeta was similar to that of MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, except for benzyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (B4HB). B4HB showed a stronger activity on CHOOSER assay and the competitive binding assay using both ERalpha and ERbeta, although there was no activity observed on MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Our findings were to detect the estrogenic activity of etocrylene and octocrylene in vitro, in addition to confirming the activities of some ultraviolet absorbers as previously reported. PMID:16079615

  11. The other estrogen receptor in the plasma membrane: implications for the actions of environmental estrogens.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C S; Pappas, T C; Gametchu, B

    1995-01-01

    Environmental or nutritional estrogenic toxicants are thought to mediate developmental and carcinogenic pathologies. Estrogen receptor (ER) measurements are currently used to predict hormonal responsiveness; therefore all ER subpopulations should be considered. We have been involved in the immunoidentification and characterization of membrane steroid receptors in several systems and have recently shown that binding of estradiol (E2) to a subpopulation of ERs (mER) residing in the plasma membrane of GH3 pituitary tumor cells mediates the rapid release of prolactin (PRL). Here we review these findings and present other important characterizations of these receptors such as trypsin and serum susceptibility, movement in the membrane, confocal localization to the membrane, binding to and function of impeded ligands, and immunoseparation of cells bearing mER. We plan to use this system as a model for both the physiological and pathological nongenomic effects of estrogens and estrogenic xenobiotics. Specifically, it should be useful as an in vitro assay system for the ability of estrogenic xenobiotics to cause rapid PRL release as an example of nongenomic estrogen effects. Images Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 4. D Figure 4. E Figure 4. F Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C Figure 7. D PMID:8593873

  12. Binding and transactivation of the largemouth bass estrogen receptors by model compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens (EEs) are chemicals in the environment that can elicit adverse effects on estrogen (E2) signaling by binding with the estrogen receptors (ERs). In largemouth bass (LMB), the physiological actions of E2 are primarily mediated via three receptors (ERα, ERßb ...

  13. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  14. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  15. Interaction of stilbene compounds with human and rainbow trout estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Denina Bobbie Dawn; Trudeau, Vance Lionel; Marlatt, Vicki Lee; Moon, Thomas William; Sherry, James P; Metcalfe, Chris David

    2008-02-01

    Compounds with stilbene structures are widely used as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and are present in plants. A suite of stilbene-related compounds, including PPCPs and plant-derived compounds were tested in vitro for interactions with the human and rainbow trout estrogen receptors and in vivo with rainbow trout using vitellogenin levels as a biomarker. Among the compounds with antagonistic activity, the common structural similarity was (in addition to the stilbene backbone) the presence of 4-hydroxy substitution. Stilbene-related compounds found to act as inhibitors at the estrogen receptor included the plant-derived compound resveratrol and two formulations of fluorescent whitening agents used in detergents, 4,4'-bis(2-sulfostyryl)biphenyl and diaminostilbene-1. In the yeast estrogenicity screening assay, the concentrations which caused a 50% inhibition in estrogenic response (IC50s) with the human estrogen receptor ranged from 2.56 x 10(-6) to 2.56 x 10(-6) M. In the rainbow trout estrogen receptor assay, the IC50s ranged from 7.75 x 10(-8) to 1.11 x 10(-5) M. However, in the in vivo rainbow trout vitellogenin assay, tamoxifen was the only stilbene of the compounds tested to have a significant effect as an inhibitor of estrogenicity. PMID:18348622

  16. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of

  17. Prenylation has a compound specific effect on the estrogenicity of naringenin and genistein.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Georg; Zierau, Oliver; Wober, Jannette; Tischer, Sandra; Metz, Peter; Vollmer, Günter

    2010-01-01

    A variety of plant derived substances, so-called phytoestrogens (PEs), although structurally not related to steroids, produce effects similar to the mammalian estradiol. However, little is known so far about the structural requirements which determine PE activities. Taking into consideration that prenylation reactions are relatively common in plant secondary metabolism, the activity of a set of three PE derivatives of genistein and naringenin, namely genistein, 8-prenylgenistein (8PG), 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)genistein (6DMAG), naringenin, 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin (6DMAN) was compared regarding structure-estrogenicity relationships in three functionally different estrogen receptor assays. Strong estrogenic activities were recorded for 6DMAN and 8PN in all assays used, while the parent compound naringenin showed only very weak estrogenicity. In contrast, in the case of genistein derivatives, only genistein itself exhibited estrogenic activity in a yeast based assay. In MVLN breast cancer cells, a bioluminescent MCF-7-derived cell line, the estrogenic activity of all three genistein derivatives was similar. Studying alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells as an estrogenic response marker revealed a similar pattern of estrogenicity of the genistein derivatives compared to the yeast based assay although a slight estrogenic effect of 6DMAG and 8PG was apparent. In summary, this study demonstrates that prenylation often found in plant secondary metabolism differentially modifies estrogenic properties of PEs depending on the basic structure of the respective PE. PMID:19733663

  18. Rapid Signaling Actions of Environmental Estrogens in Developing Granule Cell Neurons Are Mediated by Estrogen Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoa H.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) constitute a diverse group of man-made chemicals and natural compounds derived from plants and microbial metabolism. Estrogen-like actions are mediated via the nuclear hormone receptor activity of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ and rapid regulation of intracellular signaling cascades. Previous study defined cerebellar granule cell neurons as estrogen responsive and that granule cell precursor viability was developmentally sensitive to estrogens. In this study experiments using Western blot analysis and pharmacological approaches have characterized the receptor and signaling modes of action of selective and nonselective estrogen ligands in developing cerebellar granule cells. Estrogen treatments were found to briefly increase ERK1/2-phosphorylation and then cause prolonged depression of ERK1/2 activity. The sensitivity of granule cell precursors to estrogen-induced cell death was found to require the integrated activation of membrane and intracellular ER signaling pathways. The sensitivity of granule cells to selective and nonselective ER agonists and a variety of estrogenic and nonestrogenic EDCs was also examined. The ERβ selective agonist DPN, but not the ERα selective agonist 4,4′,4′-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol or other ERα-specific ligands, stimulated cell death. Only EDCs with selective or nonselective ERβ activities like daidzein, equol, diethylstilbestrol, and bisphenol A were observed to induce E2-like neurotoxicity supporting the conclusion that estrogen sensitivity in granule cells is mediated via ERβ. The presented results also demonstrate the utility of estrogen sensitive developing granule cells as an in vitro assay for elucidating rapid estrogen-signaling mechanisms and to detect EDCs that act at ERβ to rapidly regulate intracellular signaling. PMID:20926581

  19. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations. PMID:12109482

  20. Development of in vivo and in vitro assays to evaluate the physiological effects of environmental estrogens in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, L.; Yao, Z.; Kraak, G. Van Der

    1995-12-31

    There are many reports of environmental chemicals that may act as estrogens by binding to the nuclear 17-{beta} estradiol (E{sub 2}) receptor. Experiments were conducted to evaluate whether the plant sterol {beta}-sitosterol and the detergent nonylphenol interact with hepatic estrogen receptors in fish. These compounds are estrogenic in mammals and are found in treated industrial and municipal sewage waters and in pulp and paper mill effluents. Specific high affinity binding sites were characterized in rainbow trout. Nonylphenol and sitosterol were found to have relative affinities of 0.009 and 0.0001 compared to E{sub 2}. To determine if these compounds act as E{sub 2} agonists, their ability to induce estrogen dependent processes was monitored. Induction of estrogen receptors is a common E{sub 2} dependent effect. While other groups have shown in other systems that induction of hepatic E2 receptor levels was estrogen dependent, the authors found that E{sub 2} did not increase E{sub 2} binding in goldfish. However, using isolated goldfish hepatocytes cells, E{sub 2}, sitosterol and nonylphenol induced vitellogenin production. Current studies are aimed at evaluating the structure and activity relationships of these compounds responsible for causing E{sub 2} binding and vitellogenin inductions. Other means to evaluate E{sub 2} binding in goldfish liver are also being investigated.

  1. Environmental estrogens in an urban aquatic ecosystem: I. Spatial and temporal occurrence of estrogenic activity in effluent-dominated systems.

    PubMed

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Minarik, Thomas A; Curran, Erin M; Marchuk, Jascha S; Pazderka, Matt J; Smith, Eric A; Goldenstein, Rachel L; Miresse, Christine L; Matlon, Thomas J; Schultz, Melissa M; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigated occurrence of environmental estrogens (EEs) in waterways managed by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago ('District') - one of the largest and most complex water districts in the United States. The objectives of the study were: (i) to document spatial and temporal occurrence of EEs in the Chicago Area Waterways (CAWs); (ii) to determine whether water reclamation plant (WRP) effluents contribute to estrogenic pollution of the receiving streams; (iii) to determine whether the mandated water quality monitoring data could be used to predict estrogenic pollution in the receiving streams; and (iv) to determine whether snow melt, storm runoff and combined sewer overflows may also be contributors of estrogenic activity to these systems. The estrogenic potency of the waterways was assessed using a cell-based reporter gene assay. The water quality data was readily available as part of the District's regular monitoring program. Our findings indicate that EEs are commonly found in the CAWs, and that WRP effluents are one of, but not the only important contributor to estrogenic activity. Mean estrogenic activities in CAWs (11ng estradiol equivalents (EEQs/L)) are well within the values reported for other urban areas and WRP effluents. The estrogenic activity exhibited significant seasonal variation with highest values noted during the spring and summer months. When comparing the mean estrogenic activity of general use waters, secondary contact waters and WRP effluents, we found that general use waters had significantly lower estrogenic activity (ca 5ng EEQ/L) than the other two matrices (ca 15 and 17ng EEQ/L respectively). Our analyses indicate that estrogenic activity of the waterways was not reliably associated with mandated water quality parameters, and that such measurements may not be useful for predicting estrogenic activity, especially so in the complex urban systems. One of the prominent findings of this study is

  2. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    ... estrogen tablets. If you will be taking Estrace® brand tablets, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to aspirin or tartrazine (a food color additive). Ask your pharmacist or check the manufacturer's ...

  3. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    Estrogen is used to treat hot flushes ('hot flashes'; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) in ... and cause problems with the skin or nervous system), very high or very low levels of calcium ...

  4. Biosensor Zebrafish Provide New Insights into Potential Health Effects of Environmental Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Okhyun; Takesono, Aya; Tada, Masazumi; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: Environmental estrogens alter hormone signaling in the body that can induce reproductive abnormalities in both humans and wildlife. Available testing systems for estrogens are focused on specific systems such as reproduction. Crucially, however, the potential for significant health impacts of environmental estrogen exposures on a variety of body systems may have been overlooked. Objective: Our aim was to develop and apply a sensitive transgenic zebrafish model to assess real-time effects of environmental estrogens on signaling mechanisms in a whole body system for use in integrated health assessments. Methods: We created a novel transgenic biosensor zebrafish containing an estrogen-inducible promoter derived with multiple tandem estrogen responsive elements (EREs) and a Gal4ff-UAS system for enhanced response sensitivity. Results: Using our novel estrogen-responsive transgenic (TG) zebrafish, we identified target tissues for environmental estrogens; these tissues have very high sensitivity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Exposure of the TG fish to estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) induced specific expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a wide variety of tissues including the liver, heart, skeletal muscle, otic vesicle, forebrain, lateral line, and ganglions, most of which have not been established previously as targets for estrogens in fish. Furthermore, we found that different EDCs induced GFP expression with different tissue response patterns and time trajectories, suggesting different potential health effects. Conclusion: We have developed a powerful new model for understanding toxicological effects, mechanisms, and health impacts of environmental estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:22510978

  5. Missing links in our understanding of estrogenic compounds; chemical quantitation vs. biological assessment – where do we go from here?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The literature has become replete with reports quantifying estrogenic chemicals in the environment ranging from natural hormones to plasticizers. Laboratories have developed in vitro assays to assess estrogenic activity of both environmental samples and pure chemicals. Information pertaining to th...

  6. Modeling mixtures of environmental estrogens found in U.S. surface waters with an in vitro estrogen mediated transcriptionai activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental estrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipa...

  7. Gene expression profiling in Ishikawa cells: A fingerprint for estrogen active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, Kathleen; Simon, Stephanie

    2009-04-01

    Several anthropogenous and naturally occurring substances, referred to as estrogen active compounds (EACs), are able to interfere with hormone and in particular estrogen receptor signaling. EACs can either cause adverse health effects in humans and wildlife populations or have beneficial effects on estrogen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to examine global gene expression profiles in estrogen receptor (ER)-proficient Ishikawa plus and ER-deficient Ishikawa minus endometrial cancer cells treated with selected well-known EACs (Diethylstilbestrol, Genistein, Zearalenone, Resveratrol, Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT). We also investigated the effect of the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) on the expression patterns caused by these compounds. Transcript levels were quantified 24 h after compound treatment using Illumina BeadChip Arrays. We identified 87 genes with similar expression changes in response to all EAC treatments in Ishikawa plus. ICI lowered the magnitude or reversed the expression of these genes, indicating ER dependent regulation. Apart from estrogenic gene regulation, Bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, Zearalenone, Genistein and Resveratrol displayed similarities to ICI in their expression patterns, suggesting mixed estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In particular, the predominant antiestrogenic expression response of Resveratrol could be clearly distinguished from the other test compounds, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Divergent gene expression patterns of the phytoestrogens, as well as weaker estrogenic gene expression regulation determined for the anthropogenous chemicals Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT, warrants a careful assessment of potential detrimental and/or beneficial effects of EACs. The characteristic expression fingerprints and the identified subset of putative marker genes can be used for screening chemicals with an unknown mode of action and for predicting their potential to exert endocrine disrupting effects.

  8. Compounds of Natural Origin and Acupuncture for the Treatment of Diseases Caused by Estrogen Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Abhishek; Mandal, Subhash C; Banerjee, Sugato

    2016-06-01

    A predominant number of diseases affecting women are related to female hormones. In most of the cases, these diseases are reported to be associated with menstrual problems. These diseases affect female reproductive organs such as the breast, uterus, and ovaries. Estrogen is the main hormone responsible for the menstrual cycle, so irregular menstruation is primarily due to a disturbance in estrogen levels. Estrogen imbalance leads to various pathological conditions in premenopausal women, such as endometriosis, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, poly cysts, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, obesity, etc. In this review, we discuss common drug targets and therapeutic strategies, including acupuncture and compounds of natural origin, for the treatment of diseases caused by estrogen deficiency. PMID:27342884

  9. The inhibition of the estrogenic effects of pesticides and environmental chemicals by curcumin and isoflavonoids.

    PubMed Central

    Verma, S P; Goldin, B R; Lin, P S

    1998-01-01

    Many environmental chemicals and pesticides have been found to be estrogenic and have been shown to stimulate the growth of estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) human breast cancer cells. Since it is difficult to avoid human exposure to environmental estrogens, a potentially important area of research is the development of dietary strategies to prevent the stimulated growth of breast tumors by environmental estrogens. In this context, the inhibitory action of curcumin and a combination of curcumin and isoflavonoids were studied in ER-positive human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and T47D) and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells induced by the pesticide o,p'-DDT and the environmental pollutants 4-nonylphenol and 4-octylphenol. The median inhibitory concentration (IC50) for curcumin in T47D cells was 10 microM when measured at either a 48-hr or a 6-day incubation time. The IC50 value for curcumin was within the 8-10 microM range for inhibiting the growth of T47D cells induced by a 10- microM concentration each of 4-nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, and o, p'-DDT. The IC50 for curcumin in MCF-7 cells induced by 10 microM of either o,p'-DDT, 4-octylphenol, or 4-nonylphenol were 9, 39, and >50 microM, respectively. A combination of curcumin and isoflavonoids was able to inhibit the induced growth of ER-positive cells up to 95%. For MDA-MB-231 cells, the IC50 for curcumin was 17 microM, which was reduced to 11 microM in the presence of 25 microM genistein. Curcumin and genistein induce drastic changes in the morphological shape of both ER-positive and ER-negative cells. Data presented here indicate that a mixture of curcumin and isoflavonoids is the most potent inhibitor against the growth of human breast tumor cells. These data suggest that combinations of natural plant compounds may have preventive and therapeutic applications against the growth of breast tumors induced by environmental estrogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9831541

  10. Universal assay of vitellogenin as a biomarker for environmental estrogens.

    PubMed Central

    Heppell, S A; Denslow, N D; Folmar, L C; Sullivan, C V

    1995-01-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG), the serum phospholipoglycoprotein precursor to egg yolk, is potentially an ideal biomarker for environmental estrogens. This study was undertaken to develop antibodies against conserved regions on the VTG molecule that could form the basis for establishing bioassays to detect estrogen exposure in any oviparous vertebrate. We developed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated against purified rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) VTG and selected for the property of specifically recognizing VTG purified from two phylogenetically distant vertebrates, trout and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting indicated that these mAbs specifically recognize purified VTG and VTG or other estrogen-inducible proteins in plasma or serum from representative species of four vertebrate classes (fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds). All of the mAbs generated were IgM class. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against a synthetic consensus peptide representing the conserved N-terminal amino acid sequence of VTG. The results of Western blotting indicate that this antiserum specifically recognizes VTG in plasma or serum from teleost fish of diverse families. It was used to detect VTG in Western blots of serum from brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) with cancer (hepatocellular and cholangio-carcinoma) collected from a contaminated industrial site outside of their normal vitellogenic season. Our results indicate that it is feasible to generate antibodies capable of recognizing VTG without regard to species and that development of a universal VTG assay is an achievable goal. Images Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8593883

  11. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  12. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  13. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS USING A SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW CDNA MACROARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larkin, Patrick, Leroy C. Folmar, Michael J. Hemmer, Arianna J. Poston and Nancy D. Denslow. 2003. Expression Profiling of Estrogenic Compounds Using a Sheepshead Minnow cDNA Macroarray. Environ. Health Perspect. 111(6):839-846. (ERL,GB 1171).

    A variety of anthropogenic c...

  14. Steroidal aromatic 'naphthenic acids' in oil sands process-affected water: structural comparisons with environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Steven J; West, Charles E; Jones, David; Scarlett, Alan G; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark

    2011-11-15

    estradiol imply that such compounds may account for some of the environmental estrogenic activity reported in OSPW acid-extractable organics and naphthenic acids. PMID:22014158

  15. [Importance of estrogens and estrogen-active compounds for udder health in cattle. A review].

    PubMed

    Zdunczyk, S; Zerbe, H; Hoedemaker, M

    2003-11-01

    High oestrogen concentrations in blood or high intake of oestrogen-active compounds with forage can be associated with an enhanced occurrence of udder diseases. Mean somatic cell count (MSCC) can increase and milk yield can decrease. Subclinically infected udder quarters can develop clinical mastitis and the rate of new infections can be high. This review describes concentrations of oestrogens in peripheral blood plasma in cattle and occurrence of oestrogen-active compounds in forage. Relationships between oestrogens or oestrogen-active compounds and udder health are presented. The possible mechanisms of enhanced susceptibility of the udder to infection under the influence of oestrogens are discussed. PMID:14679840

  16. Comparative responses of three rat strains (DA/Han, Sprague-Dawley and Wistar) to treatment with environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Diel, P; Schmidt, S; Vollmer, G; Janning, P; Upmeier, A; Michna, H; Bolt, H M; Degen, G H

    2004-04-01

    The rat uterotrophic assay is a widely used screening test for the detection of estrogenic, endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Although much attention has been paid to identifying protocol variables and reproducibility between laboratories the question whether toxicodynamic and toxicokinetic variations of different strains may affect their sensitivity to estrogenic stimuli has been rarely addressed. We have compared the estrogenic activity of the environmental chemicals genistein (GEN), bisphenol A (BPA) and p- tert-octylphenol (OCT) in DA/Han (DA), Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Wistar (WIS) rats after repeated oral application. Rats were treated per os for 3 days with different doses of these weakly estrogenic compounds and the potent reference estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE). Then uterine wet weight, thickness of the uterine epithelium, uterine gene expression of clusterin (CLU), and thickness of the vaginal epithelium were examined as parameters for estrogenic potency of the test compounds in the three strains of rats. The uterotrophic response to treatment with BPA, OCT and GEN was similar in the three strains, and allowed us to rank them as GEN being more potent than OCT, and BPA being the weakest estrogen. This was confirmed by analysis of other biological endpoints, despite some differences in the magnitude of their response among strains and to distinct compounds. For instance, the uterus wet weight response to EE treatment indicated lower sensitivity of SD rats than that of DA and WIS rats, but this was not observed for responses of the uterine or vaginal epithelium. Moreover, blood concentrations were assessed at the time of killing and related to biological responses: plasma levels of total and unconjugated BPA and GEN depended upon the dose administered and varied to some extent within treatment groups and among the three rat strains. However, there was no good correlation in the three strains between individual compound concentrations analysed 24 h after the

  17. Rapid effects of estrogens on behavior: environmental modulation and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Laredo, Sarah A.; Landeros, Rosalina Villalon; Trainor, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol can modulate neural activity and behavior via both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. Environmental cues have a major impact on the relative importance of these signaling pathways with significant consequences for behavior. First we consider how photoperiod modulates nongenomic estrogen signaling on behavior. Intriguingly, short days permit rapid effects of estrogens on aggression in both rodents and song sparrows. This highlights the importance of considering photoperiod as a variable in laboratory research. Next we review evidence for rapid effects of estradiol on ecologically-relevant behaviors including aggression, copulation, communication, and learning. We also address the impact of endocrine disruptors on estrogen signaling, such as those found in corncob bedding used in rodent research. Finally, we examine the biochemical mechanisms that may mediate rapid estrogen action on behavior in males and females. A common theme across these topics is that the effects of estrogens on social behaviors vary across different environmental conditions. PMID:24685383

  18. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: Effect of soil type and macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii.

  19. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: effect of soil type and macropores.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii. PMID:25118588

  20. Estrogen receptor independent neurotoxic mechanism of bisphenol A, an environmental estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoot Mo; Seong, Min Jae; Lee, Jae Woong; Lee, Yong Kyung; Kim, Tae Myoung; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Joong; Yun, Young Won; Kim, Tae Seong; Han, Soon Young

    2007-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been shown to cause developmental toxicity and carcinogenic effects. BPA may have physiological activity through estrogen receptor (ER) -α and -β, which are expressed in the central nervous system. We previously found that exposure of BPA to immature mice resulted in behavioral alternation, suggesting that overexposure of BPA could be neurotoxic. In this study, we further investigated the molecular neurotoxic mechanisms of BPA. BPA increased vulnerability (decrease of cell viability and differentiation, and increase of apoptotic cell death) of undifferentiated PC12 cells and cortical neuronal cells isolated from gestation 18 day rat embryos in a concentration-dependent manner (more than 50 µM). The ER antagonists, ICI 182,780, and tamoxifen, did not block these effects. The cell vulnerability against BPA was not significantly different in the PC12 cells overexpressing ER-α and ER-β compared with PC12 cells expressing vector alone. In addition, there was no difference observed between BPA and 17-β estradiol, a well-known agonist of ER receptor in the induction of neurotoxic responses. Further study of the mechanism showed that BPA significantly activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but inhibited anti-apoptotic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. In addition, ERK-specific inhibitor, PD 98,059, reversed BPA-induced cell death and restored NF-κB activity. This study demonstrated that exposure to BPA can cause neuronal cell death which may eventually be related with behavioral alternation in vivo. However, this neurotoxic effect may not be directly mediated through an ER receptor, as an ERK/NF-κB pathway may be more closely involved in BPA-induced neuronal toxicity. PMID:17322771

  1. Estrogenic compounds inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse Leydig TM3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwase, Yumiko . E-mail: Iwase.Yumiko@mg.m-pharma.co.jp; Fukata, Hideki . E-mail: fukata@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Mori, Chisato . E-mail: cmori@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2006-05-01

    Some estrogenic compounds are reported to cause testicular disorders in humans and/or experimental animals by direct action on Leydig cells. In carcinogenesis and normal development, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays an essential role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, we examine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic estrogen), 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen), and genistein (GEN, a phytoestrogen) on GJIC between mouse Leydig TM3 cells using Lucifer yellow microinjection. The three compounds tested produced GJIC inhibition in the TM3 cells after 24 h. Gradually, 10 {mu}M DES began to inhibit GJIC for 24 h and this effect was observed until 72 h. On the other hand, both 20 {mu}M E{sub 2} and 25 {mu}M GEN rapidly inhibited GJIC in 6 h and 2 h, respectively. The effects continued until 24 h, but weakened by 72 h. Furthermore, a combined effect at {mu}M level between DES and E{sub 2} on GJIC inhibition was observed, but not between GEN and E{sub 2}. DES and E{sub 2} showed GJIC inhibition at low dose levels (nearly physiological estrogen levels) after 72 h, but GEN did not. DES-induced GJIC inhibition at 10 pM and 10 {mu}M was completely counteracted by ICI 182,780 (ICl), an estrogen receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the inhibitory effects on GJIC with E{sub 2} (10 pM and 20 {mu}M) and GEN (25 {mu}M) were partially blocked by ICI or calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and were completely blocked by the combination of ICI and calphostin C. These results demonstrate that DES inhibits GJIC between Leydig cells via the estrogen receptor (ER), and that E{sub 2} and GEN inhibit GJIC via ER and PKC. These estrogenic compounds may have different individual nongenotoxic mechanism including PKC pathway on testicular carcinogenesis or development.

  2. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION: A RELATIVE QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the development of a quantifiable exposure indicator for measuring the presence of environmental estrogens in aquatic systems. Synthetic oligonucleotides, designed specifically for the vitellogenin gene (Vg) transcription product, were used in a Reverse Transcription Po...

  3. FIELD DEPLOYABLE TECHNIQUES TO MONITOR EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS THROUGHOUT THE REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE OF WILD BIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife prompted this study of effects of exposure to environmental estrogens during the breeding cycle of wild birds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE ASSAY FOR VITELLOGENIN TO MONITOR ESTROGEN-LIKE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmental contaminants have the potential to disrupt endocrine systems of wildlife and humans resulting in impairment of reproductive and other systems. A subset of these contaminants may initiate these effects by binding to the estrogen receptor. In oviparous vertebrate...

  5. Estrogenic Environmental Chemicals and Drugs: Mechanisms for Effects on the Developing Male Urogenital System

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Julia A.; Richter, Catherine A.; Ruhlen, Rachel L.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2011-01-01

    Development and differentiation of the prostate from the fetal urogenital sinus (UGS) is dependent on androgen action via androgen receptors (AR) in the UGS mesenchyme. Estrogens are not required for prostate differentiation but do act to modulate androgen action. In mice exposure to exogenous estrogen during development results in permanent effects on adult prostate size and function, which is mediated through mesenchymal estrogen receptor (ER) alpha. For many years estrogens were thought to inhibit prostate growth because estrogenic drugs studied were administered at very high concentrations that interfered with normal prostate development. There is now extensive evidence that exposure to estrogen at very low concentrations during the early stages of prostate differentiation can stimulate fetal/neonatal prostate growth and lead to prostate disease in adulthood. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental endocrine disrupting chemical that binds to both ER receptor subtypes as well as to AR. Interest in BPA has increased because of its prevalence in the environment and its detection in over 90% of people in the USA. In tissue culture of fetal mouse UGS mesenchymal cells, BPA and estradiol stimulated changes in the expression of several genes. We discuss here the potential involvement of estrogen in regulating signaling pathways affecting cellular functions relevant to steroid hormone signaling and metabolism and to inter- and intra-cellular communications that promote cell growth. The findings presented here provide additional evidence that BPA and the estrogenic drug ethinylestradiol disrupt prostate development in male mice at administered doses relevant to human exposures. PMID:21827855

  6. Inhibition of catechol estrogen formation in rat liver microsomes by hormonal steroids and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Quail, J A; Newcombe, A M; Jellinck, P H

    1988-10-01

    The inhibitory action of a number of different hormonal steroids and related compounds on the 2-hydroxylation of estradiol by male rat liver microsomes was examined by a radiometric assay. Progesterone, Diethylstilbestrol, testosterone and 4-androstenedione were found to be the most potent of the compounds tested but inhibition was also observed with other steroids and a group of androgen analogs which are aromatization inhibitors. The kinetic constant Ki for those steroids which gave linear double reciprocal plots when added to [2-3H]estradiol was determined and the products from [14C]estradiol in the presence of the inhibitors were examined by TLC and autoradiography. The addition of steroids with a 17-hydroxyl group such as testosterone or dihydroequilin resulted in the formation of mainly 2-hydroxyestradiol with smaller amounts of other metabolites while those with a reducible ketonic group such as progesterone, 4-androstenedione, equilin or equilenin gave rise to considerable amounts of estrone in addition to the catechol estrogens. Further purification of the liver microsomes did not alter this effect. The possible role of progesterone and the catechol estrogens in the control of estrogen hydroxylation in liver as well as other aspects of steroid interaction are discussed. PMID:2845195

  7. Cross-talk between non-genomic and genomic signalling pathways - Distinct effect profiles of environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Elisabete; Kabil, Alena; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional cross-talk after activation by 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) has been studied in considerable detail, but comparatively little is known about the ways in which synthetic estrogen-like chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, interfere with these signalling pathways. E2 can stimulate rapid, non-genomic signalling events, such as activation of the Src/Ras/Erk signalling pathway. We investigated how activation of this pathway by E2, the estrogenic environmental contaminants o,p'-DDT, {beta}-HCH and p,p'-DDE, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) influences the expression of ER target genes, such as TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1, and the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Despite commonalities in their estrogenicity as judged by cell proliferation assays, the environmental contaminants exhibited striking differences in their non-genomic and genomic signalling. The gene expression profiles of o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH resembled the effects observed with E2. In the case of {beta}-HCH this is surprising, considering its reported lack of affinity to the 'classical' ER. The expression profiles seen with p,p'-DDE showed some similarities with E2, but overall, p,p'-DDE was a fairly weak transcriptional inducer of TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1. We observed distinct differences in the non-genomic signalling of the tested compounds. p,p'-DDE was unable to stimulate Src and Erk1/Erk2 activations. The effects of E2 on Src and Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation were transient and weak when compared to EGF, but {beta}-HCH induced strong and sustained activation of all tested kinases. Transcription of TFF1, ER, PR and BRCA1 by E2, o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH could be suppressed partially by inhibiting the Src/Ras/Erk pathway with PD 98059. However, this was not seen with p,p'-DDE. Our investigations show that the cellular activities of estrogens and xenoestrogens are the result of a combination of extranuclear (non-genomic) and nuclear (genomic) events and highlight the

  8. Environmental estrogens in an urban aquatic ecosystem: II. Biological effects.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Melissa M; Minarik, Thomas A; Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Curran, Erin M; Bartell, Stephen E; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2013-11-01

    Urban aquatic ecosystems are often overlooked in toxicological studies even though they serve many ecosystem functions and sustain fish populations despite large-scale habitat alterations. However, urban fish populations are likely exposed to a broad range of stressors, including environmental estrogens (EEs) that may affect anatomy, physiology and reproduction of exposed fish. Although significant progress has been made in establishing ecological consequences of EE exposure, these studies have focused largely on hydrologically simple systems that lack the complexity of urban aquatic environments. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the occurrence and biological effects of EEs across a large urbanized aquatic ecosystem. A multi-pronged study design was employed relying on quantitative determination of select EEs by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and repeated biological monitoring of wild-caught and caged fish for indications of endocrine disruption. Over three years, EEs were measured in aqueous samples (n=42 samples) and biological effects assessed in >1200 male fish across the 2000km(2) aquatic ecosystems of the Greater Metropolitan Area of Chicago, IL. Our study demonstrated that in addition to water reclamation plant (WRP) effluents, non-WRP sources contribute significant EE loads to the aquatic ecosystem. While resident and caged male fish responded with the induction of the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin, an indicator of EE exposure, neither resident nor caged sunfish exhibited prevalent histopathological changes to their reproductive organs (i.e., intersex) that have been reported in other studies. Vitellogenin induction was greater in spring than the fall and was not correlated with body condition factor, gonadosomatic index or hepatosomatic index. Exposure effects were not correlated with sites downstream of treated effluent discharge further affirming the complexity of sources and effects of EEs in urban aquatic ecosystems

  9. ASSAYS FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: BEYOND ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent popular and scientific articles have reported the presence of estrogenic and other hormone mimicking chemicals in the environment and their potential for causing reproductive dysfunction in humans and wildlife. The purpose of this session was to present the best available,...

  10. Estrogen mediated effects in the Sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, following field exposures to sewage effluent containing estrogenic compounds and activity.

    PubMed

    Andrew-Priestley, M N; O'Connor, W A; Dunstan, R H; Van Zwieten, L; Tyler, T; Kumar, A; MacFarlane, G R

    2012-09-15

    The Sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, has been demonstrated as a useful biomonitor of estrogenic compounds following laboratory exposures, yet its utility in the assessment of estrogenic exposure and effects under field conditions requires investigation. To achieve this aim, S. glomerata were deployed in Newcastle, Australia in the effluent receiving marine waters of Burwood Beach WWTP (Burwood Beach "near", <50 m from outfall and Burwood Beach "far", 100-150 m from outfall) and reference locations (Redhead, Fingal Island 1 and Fingal Island 2) at depths of 4, 8 and 12 m for six weeks. Effluent receiving waters of Burwood Beach WWTP were found to be a suitable impact location, demonstrated via measurement of estrogenic compounds and activity throughout the deployment. Estrogenic compounds were detected (average of combined solids and liquid fractions) at average concentrations of: 1.42 ng/L for estrone, 0.69 ng/L for 17β estradiol, 3.83 ng/L for estriol (E3), 0.56 ng/L for 17α-ethynylestradiol, 64.2 ng/L for bisphenol A, 7.51 ng/L for 4-nonylphenol and 5.93 ng/L for 4-tert-octylphenol. Total estrogenic activity was estimated at 4.48 ng/L EEQ via the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES(®)) assay (average of combined solid and liquid fractions). Female vitellogenin gene expression was highest at Burwood Beach locations, yet no significant differences were detected among locations for either sex. Vitellogenin protein was significantly higher (p<0.05) in S. glomerata at Burwood Beach Near compared to reference locations for the 4 and 12 m depths. Increased proportions of females were found at Burwood Beach Near, at 4m depth (p<0.05). Both Burwood Beach locations had higher proportions of mature female gonadal development stages compared to reference locations (p<0.05). Oocyte area was highest at both Burwood Beach locations, but no significant differences were detected among locations. Findings provided further evidence that female S. glomerata may be a suitable

  11. Occurrence of selected estrogenic compounds and estrogenic activity in surface water and sediment of Langat River (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Lui, Tang Seok; Hamin, Nur'Aqilah; Razak, Siti Quistina Noorain Abdul; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and estrogenic activities of steroid estrogens, such as the natural estrone (E1), 17β estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3), as well as the synthetic 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), were investigated in eight sampling points along the Langat River (Malaysia). Surface water samples were collected at 0.5 m and surface sediment 0-5 cm from the river surface. Instrument analysis of steroid estrogens was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS with an ultra-performance liquid chromatograph (Perkin Elmer FX15) coupled to a Q Trap function mass spectrophotometer (model 3200: AB Sciex). Steroid estrogen concentrations were higher in the Langat River sediments than those in its surface water. In surface water, E1 was not detected in any sampling point, E2 was only detected in two midstream sampling points (range 0-0.004 ng/L), E3 in three sampling points (range 0-0.002 ng/L), and EE2 in four sampling points (range 0-0.02 ng/L). E1 and E2 were detected in sediments from all sampling points, E3 in five sampling points, while EE2 only in one midstream sample (3.29E-4 ng/g). Sewage treatment plants, farming waste, and agricultural activities particularly present midstream and downstream were identified as potential sources of estrogens. Estrogenic activity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was below 1 ng/L in all samples for both surface water and sediment, indicating therefore a low potential estrogenic risk to the aquatic environment. Although the health risks are still uncertain for drinking water consumers exposed to low levels of steroid estrogen concentrations, Langat River water is unacceptable for direct drinking purposes without treatment. Further studies of endocrine disruptors in Malaysian waters are highly recommended. PMID:27353134

  12. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of the Estrogenic and Proliferative Properties of Vitamin E Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Khallouki, Farid; de Medina, Philippe; Caze-Subra, Stéphanie; Bystricky, Kerstin; Balaguer, Patrick; Poirot, Marc; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Tocols are vitamin E compounds that include tocopherols (TPs) and tocotrienols (TTs). These lipophilic compounds are phenolic antioxidants and are reportedly able to modulate estrogen receptor β (ERβ). We investigated the molecular determinants that control their estrogenicity and effects on the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Docking experiments highlighted the importance of the tocol phenolic groups for their interaction with the ERs. Binding experiments confirmed that they directly interact with both ERα and ERβ with their isoforms showing potencies in the following order: δ-tocols > γ-tocols > α-tocols. We also found that tocols activated the transcription of an estrogen-responsive reporter gene that had been stably transfected into cells expressing either ERα or ERβ. The role of the phenolic group in tocol–ER interaction was further established using δ-tocopherylquinone, the oxidized form of δ-TP, which had no ER affinity and did not induce ER-dependent transcriptional modulation. Tocol activity also required the AF1 transactivation domain of ER. We found that both δ-TP and δ-TT stimulated the expression of endogenous ER-dependent genes. However, whereas δ-TP induced the proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells but not ER-negative breast cancer cells, δ-TT inhibited the proliferation of both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells. These effects of δ-TT were found to act through the down regulation of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity, establishing that ERs are not involved in this effect. Altogether, these data show that the reduced form of δ-TP has estrogenic properties which are lost when it is oxidized, highlighting the importance of the redox status in its estrogenicity. Moreover, we have shown that δ-TT has antiproliferative effects on breast cancer cells independently of their ER status through the inhibition of HMGR. These data clearly show that TPs can be discriminated from TTs according to their

  13. Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lerner, Darren T.; Sheridan, Mark A.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Atlantic salmon smolts to estrogenic compounds is shown to compromise several aspects of smolt development. We sought to determine the underlying endocrine mechanisms of estrogen impacts on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis. Smolts in freshwater (FW) were either injected 3 times over 10 days with 2 μg g−1 17β-estradiol (E2) or 150 μg g−1 4-nonylphenol (NP). Seawater (SW)-acclimated fish received intraperitoneal implants of 30 μg g−1 E2 over two weeks. Treatment with these estrogenic compounds increased hepatosomatic index and total plasma calcium. E2 and NP reduced maximum growth hormone binding by 30–60% in hepatic and branchial membranes in FW and SW, but did not alter the dissociation constant. E2 and NP treatment decreased plasma levels of IGF-I levels in both FW and SW. In FW E2 and NP decreased plasma GH whereas in SW plasma GH increased after E2 treatment. Compared to controls, plasma chloride concentrations of E2-treated fish were decreased 5.5 mM in FW and increased 10.5 mM in SW. There was no effect of NP or E2 on gill sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase) activity in FW smolts, whereas E2 treatment in SW reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity and altered the number and size of ionocytes. Our data indicate that E2 downregulates the GH/IGF-I-axis and SW tolerance which may be part of its normal function for reproduction and movement into FW. We conclude that the mechanism of endocrine disruption of smolt development by NP is in part through alteration of the GH/IGF-I axis via reduced GH receptor abundance.

  14. Identification of estrogenic compounds emitted from the combustion of computer printed circuit boards in electronic waste.

    PubMed

    Owens, Clyde V; Lambright, Christy; Bobseine, Kathy; Ryan, Bryce; Gray, L Earl; Gullett, Brian K; Wilson, Vickie S

    2007-12-15

    Rapid changes in technology have brought about a surge in demand for electronic equipment. Many of these products contain brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) as additives to decrease the rate of combustion, raising concerns about their toxicological risk. In our study, emissions from the combustion of computer-printed circuit boards were evaluated in the T47D-KBluc estrogen-responsive cell line at a series of concentrations. There was significant activity from the emission extract when compared to the positive control, 0.1 nM estradiol. After HPLC fractionation, GC/MS identified ten chemicals which included bisphenol A; the brominated derivates mono-, di-, and tribisphenol, triphenyl phosphate, triphenyl phosphine oxide, 4'-bromo-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-ol,3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybiphenyl,3,5-dibromo-2-hydroxybiphenyl, and the oxygenated polyaromatic hydrocarbon benzanthrone. Commercially available samples of these ten compounds were tested. The compound 4'-bromo-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-ol resulted in dose-dependent significant increases for luciferase activity at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 microM in the T47D-KBluc assay. The chemical also demonstrated an affinity for binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) with an IC50 of 2 x 10(-7) M. To determine the uterotrophic activity, three doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day) of 4'-bromo-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-ol were administered to adult ovariectomized Long-Evans rats for 3 days. Treatment of the animals with 200 mg/ kg/day showed an increase in uterine weight Hence one new chemical, released by burning of electrical wastes, was identified which displays estrogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. However, it was about 1000-fold less potent than ethynyl estradiol. PMID:18200886

  15. Assays for endocrine-disrupting chemicals: Beyond environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Folmar, L.C.

    1999-07-01

    Recent popular and scientific articles have reported the presence of estrogenic and other hormone mimicking chemicals in the environment and their potential for causing reproductive dysfunction in humans and wildlife. The purpose of this session was to present the best available, if not standard, analytical methods to assay for the effects of xenobiotic chemicals on a broad range of endocrine-mediated events, including reproduction, growth, development and stress responses in aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate animals.

  16. The Use of a Whole Animal Biophotonic Model as a Screen for the Angiogenic Potential of Estrogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Youngblood, Ramey C; McGee, Marcus; Feugang, Jean M; Willard, Scott T; Ryan, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for normal vascular growth and development during wound repair. VEGF is estrogen responsive and capable of regulating its own receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Several agricultural pesticides (e.g., methoxychlor) have estrogenic potential that can initiate inappropriate physiological responses in estrogenic-sensitive tissues following exposure in vivo. Thus, the current study was designed to determine whether the VEGFR-2-Luciferase (Luc) reporter transgenic mouse is a useful model for evaluating estrogenic tendencies of methoxychlor by monitoring wound healing via VEGFR-2-mediated gene expression using bioluminescence and real-time imaging technology. Results: VEGFR-2-Luc gene activity peaked by d 7 (P<0.001) in all groups but was not different (P>0.05) between control and estrogen/methoxychlor exposed mice. Conclusions: Changes in VEGFR-2-Luc gene activity associated with the dermal wound healing process were able to be measured via photonic emission. The increase in vasculature recruitment and formation is paralleled by the increase of VEGFR-2-Luc activity with a peak on day 7. However, estrogen/methoxychlor did not significantly alter wound healing mediated VEGFR-2-Luc gene expression patterns compared to controls. This suggests that the VEGFR-2-Luc transgenic mouse wound model tested in this study may not be optimal for use as a screen for the angiogenic potential of estrogenic compounds. PMID:24782643

  17. Malignant Transformation of Rat Kidney Induced by Environmental Substances and Estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Lira, Susana; Pizarro-Ortiz, María; Calaf, Gloria M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of organophosphorous insecticides in agricultural environments and in urban settings has increased significantly. The aim of the present study was to analyze morphological alterations induced by malathion and 17β-estradiol (estrogen) in rat kidney tissues. There were four groups of animals: control, malathion, estrogen and combination of both substances. The animals were injected for five days and sacrificed 30, 124 and 240 days after treatments. Kidney tissues were analyzed for histomorphological and immunocytochemical alterations. Morphometric analysis indicated that malathion plus estrogen-treated animals showed a significantly (p < 0.05) higher grade of glomerular hypertrophy, signs of tubular damage, atypical proliferation in cortical and hilium zone than malathion or estrogen alone-treated and control animals after 240 days. Results indicated that MFG, ER-α, ER-β, PgR, CYP1A1, Neu/ErbB2, PCNA, vimentin and Thrombospondin 1 (THB) protein expression was increased in convoluted tubules of animals treated with combination of malathion and estrogen after 240 days of 5 day treatment. Malignant proliferation was observed in the hilium zone. In summary, the combination of malathion and estrogen induced pathological lesions in glomeruli, convoluted tubules, atypical cell proliferation and malignant proliferation in hilium zone and immunocytochemical alterations in comparison to control animals or animals treated with either substance alone. It can be concluded that an increased risk of kidney malignant transformation can be induced by exposure to environmental and endogenous substances. PMID:22754462

  18. Screening of synthetic and plant-derived compounds for (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic activities.

    PubMed

    Bovee, Toine F H; Schoonen, Willem G E J; Hamers, Astrid R M; Bento, Marta Jorge; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M

    2008-02-01

    Recently we constructed yeast cells that either express the human estrogen receptor alpha or the human androgen receptor in combination with a consensus ERE or ARE repeat in the promoter region of a green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) read-out system. These bioassays were proven to be highly specific for their cognate agonistic compounds. In this study the value of these yeast bioassays was assessed for analysis of compounds with antagonistic properties. Several pure antagonists, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and plant-derived compounds were tested. The pure antiestrogens ICI 182,780 and RU 58668 were also classified as pure ER antagonists in the yeast estrogen bioassay and the pure antiandrogen flutamide was also a pure AR antagonist in the yeast androgen bioassay. The plant-derived compounds flavone and guggulsterone displayed both antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, while 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) and equol combined an estrogenic mode of action with an antiandrogenic activity. Indol-3-carbinol (I3C) only showed an antiandrogenic activity. Coumestrol, genistein, naringenin and 8-prenylnaringenin were estrogenic and acted additively, while the plant sterols failed to show any effect. Although hormonally inactive, in vitro and in vivo metabolism of the aforementioned plant sterols may still lead to the formation of active metabolites in other test systems. PMID:18188547

  19. Spatiotemporal variations in estrogenicity, hormones, and endocrine-disrupting compounds in influents and effluents of selected wastewater-treatment plants and receiving streams in New York, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Ernst, Anne G.; Gray, James L.; Hemming, Jocelyn D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in wastewater effluents have been linked to changes in sex ratios, intersex (in males), behavioral modifications, and developmental abnormalities in aquatic organisms. Yet efforts to identify and regulate specific EDCs in complex mixtures are problematic because little is known about the estrogen activity (estrogenicity) levels of many common and emerging contaminants. The potential effects of EDCs on the water quality and health of biota in streams of the New York City water supply is especially worrisome because more than 150 wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) are permitted to discharge effluents into surface waters and groundwaters of watersheds that provide potable water to more than 9 million people. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), and New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) began a pilot study to increase the understanding of estrogenicity and EDCs in effluents and receiving streams mainly in southeastern New York. The primary goals of this study were to document and assess the spatial and temporal variability of estrogenicity levels; the effectiveness of various treatment-plant types to remove estrogenicity; the concentrations of hormones, EDCs, and pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs); and the relations between estrogenicity and concentrations of hormones, EDCs, and PPCPs. The levels of estrogenicity and selected hormones, non-hormone EDCs, and PPCPs were characterized in samples collected seasonally in effluents from 7 WWTPs, once or twice in effluents from 34 WWTPs, and once in influents to 6 WWTPs. Estrogenicity was quantified, as estradiol equivalents, using both the biological e-screen assay and a chemical model. Results generally show that (1) estrogenicity levels in effluents varied spatially and seasonally, (2) a wide range of known and unknown EDCs

  20. Analysis of estrogenic activity in environmental waters in Rio de Janeiro state (Brazil) using the yeast estrogen screen.

    PubMed

    Dias, Amanda Cristina Vieira; Gomes, Frederico Wegenast; Bila, Daniele Maia; Sant'Anna, Geraldo Lippel; Dezotti, Marcia

    2015-10-01

    The estrogenicity of waters collected from an important hydrological system in Brazil (Paraiba do Sul and Guandu Rivers) was assessed using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. Sampling was performed in rivers and at the outlets of conventional water treatment plants (WTP). The removal of estrogenic activity by ozonation and chlorination after conventional water treatment (clarification and sand filtration) was investigated employing samples of the Guandu River spiked with estrogens and bisphenol A (BPA). The results revealed a preoccupying incidence of estrogenic activity at levels higher than 1ngL(-1) along some points of the rivers. Another matter of concern was the number of samples from WTPs presenting estrogenicity surpassing 1ngL(-1). The oxidation techniques (ozonation and chlorination) were effective for the removal of estrogenic activity and the combination of both techniques led to good results using less amounts of oxidants. PMID:26024813

  1. INTERACTION OF PAH-RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ALPHA AND BETA ISOFORMS OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. (R826192)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of several 4- and 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic PAHs, and their monohydroxy derivatives to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta isoforms was examined. Only compounds possessing a hydroxyl group were able to compete wit...

  2. INTRODUCTION OF THE VITELLOGENIN GENE IN EARLY LIFE STAGE FATHEAD MINNOWS AS AN EFFECTIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR FOR ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenin (Vg) gene expression in adult male fathead minnows (FHM) has previously been used successfully to detect exposures to estrogenic compounds in aquatic systems; however, sample volume(s)required for >24h exposure durations and the logistics of sampling pose some limita...

  3. Nongenomic Signaling Pathways of Estrogen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Kochukov, Mikhail Y.

    2010-01-01

    Xenoestrogens can affect the healthy functioning of a variety of tissues by acting as potent estrogens via nongenomic signaling pathways or by interfering with those actions of multiple physiological estrogens. Collectively, our and other studies have compared a wide range of estrogenic compounds, including some closely structurally related subgroups. The estrogens that have been studied include environmental contaminants of different subclasses, dietary estrogens, and several prominent physiological metabolites. By comparing the nongenomic signaling and functional responses to these compounds, we have begun to address the structural requirements for their actions through membrane estrogen receptors in the pituitary, in comparison to other tissues, and to gain insights into their typical non-monotonic dose-response behavior. Their multiple inputs into cellular signaling begin processes that eventually integrate at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase activities to coordinately regulate broad cellular destinies, such as proliferation, apoptosis, or differentiation. PMID:19955490

  4. Long-term effects of early life exposure to environmental estrogens on ovarian function: Role of epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Gonzalo; Foster, Warren; Paredes, Alfonso; Yi, Kun Don; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play an important role in development and function of the brain and reproductive tract. Accordingly, it is thought that developmental exposure to environmental estrogens can disrupt neural and reproductive tract development potentially resulting in long-term alterations in neurobehavior and reproductive function. Many chemicals have been shown to have estrogenic activity whereas others affect estrogen production and turnover resulting in disruption of estrogen signaling pathways. However, these mechanisms and the concentrations required to induce these effects cannot account for the myriad adverse effects of environmental toxicants on estrogen sensitive target tissues. Hence, alternative mechanisms are thought to underlie the adverse effects documented in experimental animal models and thus could be important to human health. In this review, the epigenetic regulation of gene expression is explored as a potential target of environmental toxicants including estrogenic chemicals. We suggest that toxicant-induced changes in epigenetic signatures are important mechanisms underlying disruption of ovarian follicular development. In addition, we discuss how exposure to environmental estrogens during early life can alter gene expression through effects on epigenetic control potentially leading to permanent changes in ovarian physiology. PMID:25040227

  5. Physiological and biochemical perturbations in Daphnia magna following exposure to the model environmental estrogen diethylstilbestrol

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, W.S.; Milam, D.L.; LeBlanc, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The estrogenic properties of many environmental contaminants, such as DDE and PCBs, have been associated with reproductive failure in a variety of vertebrate species. While estrogens have been measured in many invertebrate species, the function of this hormone in invertebrates is controversial. The objective of the present study was to identify possible physiological and biochemical target sites for the estrogenic effects of some xenobiotics on the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna using the model environmental estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES). Chronic exposure of daphnids to 0.50 mg/L DES reduced molting frequency among first-generation juveniles and decreased fecundity of second-generation daphnids. Adult first-generation daphnids chronically exposed to DES, as well as adult daphnids acutely exposed to DES for only 48 h, were examined for steroid hormone metabolic capabilities using testosterone as the model steroid. The rate of elimination of two major hydroxylated metabolites of testosterone was significantly reduced, and elimination of glucose conjugates of testosterone was significantly elevated from exposure to 0.50 mg/L DES. These results demonstrate that multigeneration exposure of daphnids to DES results in reduced fecundity and altered steroid metabolic capabilities. Thus, some arthropods, like vertebrates, are sensitive to the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

  6. Rapid dereplication of estrogenic compounds in pomegranate (Punica granatum) using on-line biochemical detection coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Elswijk, Danny A; Schobel, Uwe P; Lansky, Ephraim P; Irth, Hubertus; van der Greef, Jan

    2004-01-01

    During recent years, phytoestrogens have been receiving an increasing amount of interest, as several lines of evidence suggest a possible role in preventing a range of diseases, including the hormonally dependent cancers. In this context, various parts of the pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum; Punicaceae), e.g. seed oil, juice, fermented juice and peel extract, have been shown to exert suppressive effects on human breast cancer cells in vitro. On-line biochemical detection coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-BCD-MS) was applied to rapidly profile the estrogenic activity in the pomegranate peel extract. The crude mixture was separated by HPLC, after which the presence of biologically active compounds, known or unknown, was detected by means of an on-line beta-estrogen receptor (ER) bioassay. Chemical information, such as molecular weight and MS/MS fingerprint, was obtained in real time by directing part of the HPLC effluent towards a mass spectrometer. Using this approach in total three estrogenic compounds, i.e. luteolin, quercetin and kaempferol, were detected and identified by comparing the obtained molecular weights and negative ion APCI MS/MS spectra with the data of an estrogenic compound library. Although well known in literature and widely distributed in nature, the presence of these phytoestrogenic compounds in pomegranate peel extract was not reported previously. Compared to traditional screening approaches of complex mixtures, often characterized by a repeating cycle of HPLC fractionation and biological screening, LC-BCD-MS was shown to profoundly accelerate the time required for compound description and identification. PMID:14732284

  7. Isolation and Characterization of New Phenolic Compounds with Estrogen Biosynthesis-Inhibiting and Antioxidation Activities from Broussonetia papyrifera Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Fu; Du, Baowen; Chen, Bin; Wang, Fei; Wang, Mingkui

    2014-01-01

    Broussonetia papyrifera leaves (BPL) as a traditional Chinese medicine are also used in livestock feed for stimulating reproduction, adipose tissue and muscle development; however, the mechanism of their action is still unknown. Through estrogen biosynthesis-guided fractionation in human ovarian granulosa-like KGN cells, five new phenolic glycosides, broussoside A–E(1–5), along with fifteen known dietary phenolic compounds, were isolated from the n-butanol extract of BPL, and their structures were elucidated on the basis of NMR spectra analysis and chemical evidence. New compounds 3, 4, 5 and the known compounds 9 and 10 were found to potently inhibit estrogen biosynthesis in KGN cells. In addition, compounds 9, 17, 18, and 20 showed strong antioxidant activity against ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt) and DPPH (1, 1′-diphenyl -2-picryl-hydrazyl radical) assays. These findings suggest that BPL may improve meat quality through the regulation of estrogen biosynthesis. Furthermore, they may be useful for the discovery of potential aromatase modulators from natural products. Finally, they could be considered as a new source for natural antioxidants. PMID:24714659

  8. RAPID SCREENING OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS FOR ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last few years, an increased awareness of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their potential to affect wildlife and humans has produced a demand for practical screening methods to identify endocrine activity in a wide range of environmental and industrial chemical...

  9. Removal of Estrogenic Compounds in Dairy Waste Lagoons by Ferrate (VI): Oxidation/Coagulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferrate(VI) was used to break down and/or remove steroidal estrogens (SE) from dairy waste lagoon effluent (DWLE). Dairy lagoon sites were sampled for estrogenic content (EC) and assayed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Effects of varying...

  10. Assessment of in vivo estrogenic response and identification of environmental estrogens in influent and effluent from a sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenting; Wang, Zhijun; Lian, Chuanjie

    2013-09-01

    The in vivo estrogenic response and estrogenic contents of the influent and effluent collected from a sewage treatment plant located in Jiaozuo were assessed. The bioassay showed significant serum vitellogenin (VTG) induction in all the treated male goldfish (Carassius auratus) and significant gonad atrophies were only observed in the fish induced the most VTG expressions. Six target estrogens (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol and bisphenol A) were detected in different polar fractions, with the exception of the 25 % and 50 % methanol fractions extracted from the influent and the 25 %, 50 %, 95 % and 100 % methanol fractions extracted from the effluent. For both the influent and effluent, natural and synthetic steroidal estrogens were detected in those extracted fractions induced the most abundant VTG expressions. PMID:23877625

  11. Ethanolic extract of Coelogyne cristata Lindley (Orchidaceae) and its compound coelogin promote osteoprotective activity in ovariectomized estrogen deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chetan; Mansoori, Mohd Nizam; Dixit, Manisha; Shukla, Priyanka; Kumari, Tejaswita; Bhandari, S P S; Narender, T; Singh, Divya; Arya, K R

    2014-10-15

    Coelogyne cristata Lindley (CC) family Orchidaceae is an Indian medicinal plant used for the treatment of fractured bones in folk-tradition of Kumaon region, Uttarakhand, India. In continuation of our drug discovery program, feeding of ethanolic extract to ovariectomized estrogen deficient mice led to significant restoration of trabecular micro architecture in both femoral and tibial bones, better bone quality and also devoid of any uterine estrogenicity. Subsequently, coelogin, a pure compound was isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of C. cristata and evaluated in in vitro osteoblast cell cultures. Treatment of coelogin to osteoblasts led to enhanced ALP activity (a marker of osteoblast differentiation), mineral nodule formation and mRNA levels of osteogenic markers like BMP-2, Type 1 Collagen and RUNX-2. Based on these results, we propose that ethanolic extract of C. cristata and its pure compound coelogin have potential in the management of post menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:25442280

  12. Electrochemical detection of phenolic estrogenic compounds at clay modified carbon paste electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkamssa, N.; Ouattara, L.; Kawachi, A.; Tsujimura, M.; Isoda, H.; Chtaini, A.; Ksibi, M.

    2015-04-01

    A simple and sensitive electroanalytical method was developed to determine the Endocrine Disrupting chemical 4-tert-octylphenol on clay modified carbon paste electrode (Clay/CPE). The electrochemical response of the proposed electrode was studied by means of cyclic and square wave voltammetry. It has found that the oxidation of 4-tert-octylphenol on the clay/CPE displayed a well-defined oxidation peak. Under these optimal conditions, a linear relation between concentrations of 4-tert-octylphenol current response was obtained over range of 7.26×10-6 to 3.87×10-7 with a detection and quantification limit of 9.2×10-7 M and 3.06×10-6 M, respectively. The correlation coefficient is 0.9963. The modified electrode showed suitable sensitivity, high stability and an accurate detection of 4-tert-octylphenol. The modified electrode also relevant suitable selectivity for various phenolic estrogenic compounds.

  13. Evaluation of estrogenic, antiestrogenic and genotoxic activity of nemorosone, the major compound found in brown Cuban propolis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brown propolis is the major type of propolis found in Cuba; its principal component is nemorosone, the major constituent of Clusia rosea floral resins. Nemorosone has received increasing attention due to its strong in vitro anti-cancer action. The citotoxicity of nemorosone in several human cancer cell lines has been reported and correlated to the direct action it has on the estrogen receptor (ER). Breast cancer can be treated with agents that target estrogen-mediated signaling, such as antiestrogens. Phytoestrogen can mimic or modulate the actions of endogenous estrogens and the treatment of breast cancer with phytoestrogens may be a valid strategy, since they have shown anti-cancer activity. Methods The aim of the present investigation was to assess the capacity of nemorosone to interact with ERs, by Recombinant Yeast Assay (RYA) and E-screen assays, and to determine by comet assay, if the compound causes DNA-damaging in tumoral and non-tumoral breast cells. Results Nemorosone did not present estrogenic activity, however, it inhibited the 17-β-estradiol (E2) action when either of both methods was used, showing their antiestrogenicity. The DNA damage induced by the benzophenone in cancer and normal breast cells presented negative results. Conclusion These findings suggest that nemorosone may have therapeutic application in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:23902919

  14. From pure compounds to complex exposure: Effects of dietary cadmium and lignans on estrogen, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Hurmerinta, Teija; Nurmi, Tarja; Berglund, Marika; Rüegg, Joelle; Poutanen, Matti; Halldin, Krister; Mäkelä, Sari; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina

    2016-06-24

    Exposure to environmental endocrine active compounds correlates with altered susceptibility to disease in human populations. Chemical risk assessment is single compound based, although exposure often takes place as heterogeneous mixtures of man-made and natural substances within complex matrices like diet. Here we studied whether the effects of cadmium and enterolactone on endocrine endpoints in dietary exposure can be predicted based on pure compound effects. Ovariectomized estrogen reporter ERE-luciferase (ERE-luc) mice were maintained on diets that intrinsically contain increasing concentrations of cadmium and enterolactone precursors for three and 21 days. The activation of the ERE-luc, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-ERK1/2, and classical estrogen responses were measured. Interactions between the diets and endogenous hormone were evaluated by challenging the animals with 17β-estradiol. Compared to animals on basal purified diet, mice consuming experimental diets were exposed to significantly higher levels of cadmium and enterolactone, yet the exposure remained comparable to typical human dietary intake. Surprisingly, we could not detect effects on endpoints regulated by pure enterolactone, such as ERE-luc activation. However, cadmium accumulation in the liver was accompanied with activation of EGFR and MAPK-ERK1/2 in line with our earlier CdCl2 studies. Further, attenuation of 17β-estradiol-induced ERE-luc response in liver by experimental diets was observed. Our findings indicate that the exposure context can have substantial effects on the activity of endocrine active compounds in vivo. Thus, whenever possible, a context that mimics human exposure should be tested along with pure compounds. PMID:27108949

  15. Review of Bioassays for Monitoring Fate and Transport ofEstrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Water

    SciTech Connect

    CGCampbell@lbl.gov

    2004-01-30

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are recognizedcontaminants threatening water quality. Despite efforts in sourceidentification, few strategies exist for characterization or treatment ofthis environmental pollution. Given that there are numerous EDCs that cannegatively affect humans and wildlife, general screening techniques likebioassays and biosensors provide an essential rapid and intensiveanalysis capacity. Commonly applied bioassays include the ELISA and YESassays, but promising technologies include ER-CALUXa, ELRA, Endotecta,RIANA, and IR-bioamplification. Two biosensors, Endotecta and RIANA, arefield portable using non-cellular biological detection strategies.Environmental management of EDCs in water requires integration ofbiosensors and bioassays for monitoring and assessment.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water sources are increasingly impacted by upstream anthropogenic activities, including wastewater discharge, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and landfill leachate. Androgenic and estrogenic activities have been detected in surface waters downstream from ...

  17. Bibenzyl- and stilbene-core compounds with non-polar linker atom substituents as selective ligands for estrogen receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Waibel, Michael; De Angelis, Meri; Stossi, Fabio; Kieser, Karen J; Carlson, Kathryn E; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2009-09-01

    A series of structurally simple bibenzyl-diol and stilbene-diol core molecules, structural analogs of the well-known hexestrol and diethylstilbestrol non-steroidal estrogens, were prepared and evaluated as estrogen receptor (ER) subtype-selective ligands. Analysis of their ERalpha and ERbeta binding showed that certain substitution patterns engendered binding affinities that were >100-fold selective for ERbeta. When further investigated in cell-based gene transcription assays, some molecules showed similarly high relative transcriptional potency selectivity in favor of ERbeta. Interestingly, the most ERbeta-selective molecules were those bearing non-polar substituents on one of the internal carbon atoms. These compounds should be useful probes for determining the physiological roles of ERbeta, and they might lead to the development of more selective and thus safer pharmaceuticals. PMID:19286283

  18. Estrogenic compounds determination in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and micellar electrokinetic chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Asensio-Ramos, María; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Fanali, Salvatore; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2014-05-30

    In this work, a group of 12 estrogenic compounds, i.e., four natural sexual hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-estradiol and estriol), an exoestrogen (17α-ethynylestradiol), a synthetic stilbene (dienestrol), a mycotoxin (zearalenone) and some of their major metabolites (2-methoxyestradiol, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, α-zearalenol and β-zearalenol) have been separated and determined by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) coupled to electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry. For this purpose, a background electrolyte containing an aqueous solution of 45 mM of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) adjusted to pH 9.0 with an ammonia solution, as MS friendly surfactant, and methanol (10% (v/v)), as organic modifier, was used. To further increase the sensitivity, normal stacking mode was applied by injecting the sample dissolved in an aqueous solution of 11.5mM of ammonium PFO (APFO) at pH 9.0 containing 10% (v/v) of methanol for 25s. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, using 110 μL of chloroform and 500 μL of acetonitrile as extraction and dispersion solvents, respectively, was employed to extract and preconcentrate the target analytes from different types of environmental water samples (mineral, run-off and wastewater) containing 30% (w/v) NaCl and adjusted to pH 3.0 with 1M HCl. The limits of detection achieved were in the range 0.04-1.10 μg/L. The whole method was validated in terms of linearity, precision, recovery and matrix effect for each type of water, showing determination coefficients higher than 0.992 for matrix-matched calibration and absolute recoveries in the range 43-91%. PMID:24780255

  19. Characterizing the Estrogenic Potential of 1060 Environmental Chemicals by Assessing Growth Kinetics in T47D Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to detect environmental chemicals that pose a risk of endocrine disruption, high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals are needed. Alteration of estrogen signaling has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effec...

  20. A new in vitro screening bioassay for the ecotoxicological evaluation of the estrogenic responses of environmental chemicals using roach (Rutilus rutilus) liver explant culture.

    PubMed

    Gerbron, Marie; Geraudie, Perrine; Rotchell, Jeanette; Minier, Christophe

    2010-10-01

    There is growing evidence that many chemicals released in the environment are able to disturb the normal endocrinology of organisms affecting the structure and function of their reproductive system. This has prompted the scientific community to develop appropriate testing methods to identify active compounds and elucidate mechanisms of action. Of particular interest are in vitro screening methods that can document the effects of these endocrine disrupting compounds on fish. In this study, an in vitro bioassay was developed in the roach (Rutilus rutilus) for evaluating the estrogenicity or antiestrogenicity potency of environmental pollutants by measuring vitellogenin (VTG) induction in cultured liver explants. The cell viability was assessed by the measurement of nonspecific esterase activity using a fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis assay. Results showed that explants could be cultured for 72 h without any significant loss of activity. Dose-dependent responses have been measured with estrogenic model compounds such as 17-β-estradiol (E2) and 17-α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) or antiestrogenic compounds such as tamoxifen. Lowest observable effective concentrations were 1 nM for E2, 1 nM for EE2, and 100 nM for tamoxifen, showing a good sensitivity of the test system. Estrogenicity of butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, 4-nonylphenol, and bisphenol A was tested. bisphenol A (100 μM) or butylparaben induced a twofold increase in VTG production when compared with 100 nM E2, whereas this production was only 20% with 100 μM 4-nonylphenol. Overall, this study shows that the bioassay could provide valuable information on endocrine disrupting chemicals including metabolites and mixtures of compounds. PMID:20549626

  1. Simultaneous trace determination of nine organic UV-absorbing compounds (UV filters) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Zenker, Armin; Schmutz, Hansruedi; Fent, Karl

    2008-08-15

    A new sensitive method has been successfully developed and validated for the simultaneous determination and quantification of nine estrogenic UV filters (benzophenone-1, benzophenone-2, benzophenone-3, benzophenone-4, 4,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, ethyl-4-aminobenzoate, 2-ethyl-hexyl-4-trimethoxycinnamate, 3-(4-methylbenzylidene)-camphor, 3-benzylidene-camphor) in different environmental matrices. After optimisation of extraction conditions for the best recovery of polar to lipophilic compounds from fish tissue and a subsequent lipid clean-up in HPLC, fish extraction recoveries exceeded 72% for all nine UV filters. Identification and quantification of compounds was performed for lipophilic UV filters with gas chromatography-electroionisation-mass spectrometry and for polar and mid-polar compounds with liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. Instrumental detection limits (IDL) varied between 5 and 260 pg injected and method detection limits (MDL) were in the low ng/g lipids range for all test compounds. The described analytical methods are shown to be useful to screen for estrogenic UV filters in environmental samples such as fish and polar organic chemical integrative samplers. PMID:18632108

  2. Anabolic effect of the traditional Chinese medicine compound tanshinone IIA on myotube hypertrophy is mediated by estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Piwen; Soukup, Sebastian Tobias; Hegevoss, Jonas; Ngueu, Sandrine; Kulling, Sabine Emma; Diel, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle loss during menopause is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes type II and the general development of the metabolic syndrome. Therefore, strategies combining nutritional and training interventions to prevent muscle loss are necessary. Danshen Si Wu is a traditional Chinese medicine used for menopausal complains. One of the main compounds of Danshen Si Wu is tanshinone IIA. Physiological effects of tanshinone IIA have been described as being mediated via the estrogen receptor. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine its tissue specific ERα- and ERβ-mediated estrogenic activity, to investigate its antiestrogenic properties, and, particularly, to study estrogen receptor-mediated biological responses to tanshinone IIA on skeletal muscle cells. The purity of tanshinone IIA was analyzed by LC-DAD-MS/MS analysis. ERα/ERβ-mediated activity was dose-dependently analyzed in HEK 239 cells transfected with ERα or ERβ expression vectors and respective reporter genes. Androgenic, antiandrogenic, and antiestrogenic properties of tanshinone IIA were analyzed in a yeast reporter gene assay. The effects of tanshinone IIA on proliferation and cell cycle distribution were investigated in ERα positive T47D breast cancer cells. The ability of tanshinone IIA to stimulate estrogen receptor-mediated myotube hypertrophy was studied in C2C12 myoblastoma cells. Our data show that tanshinone IIA is quite potent at stimulating ERα and ERβ reporter genes with comparable efficacy. Tanshinone IIA displayed antiestrogenic and also antiandrogenic properties in a yeast reporter gene assay. It inhibited the growth of T47D breast cancer cells by suppressing proliferation and arresting the cells in G0/G1. Tanshinone IIA also stimulated the hypertrophy of C2C12 myotubes via an estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism. Summarizing our results, tanshinone IIA can be characterized as an estrogen receptor partial agonist with antiandrogenic properties. It

  3. Neurodifferentiating potential of 8-prenylnaringenin and related compounds in neural precursor cells and correlation with estrogen-like activity.

    PubMed

    Urmann, Corinna; Oberbauer, Eleni; Couillard-Després, Sébastien; Aigner, Ludwig; Riepl, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are an increasing burden for our ageing societies; there is an as yet unmet need for the development of effective therapies. Neurogenesis, i.e., the generation of new neurons in the adult brain from neural stem cells, has received increasing attention since it offers the potential for endogenous brain repair and functional regeneration. Adult neurogenesis is partially under the control of sex hormones such as estradiol, and boosting neurogenesis with estradiol in animals correlates with cognitive improvement. 8-Prenylnaringenin imitates as highly potent phytoestrogen the effects of estradiol. Here, we studied the potential of 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-prenylnaringenin, and related compounds on differentiation induction in vitro using neural precursor cells transiently transfected with a doublecortin promoter luciferase construct, which was recently shown to indicate neuronal fate and differentiation. The flavanones 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-prenylnaringenin showed slight activity in this assay but significant activity by immunostaining. Although the estrogen-like activities of 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-prenylnaringenin are very different, the activity in differentiation induction is similar. Interestingly, also some prenylflavonoids with extended prenyl groups, e.g., a geranyl group, showed increased differentiation activity, while estrogen-like activity is decreased. This allows the conclusion that estrogen-like activity of prenylflavanones does not correlate directly with the activity of differentiation induction in neural precursor cells. PMID:25714726

  4. The analysis of estrogenic compounds by flow injection analysis with amperometric detection using a boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Brocenschi, Ricardo F; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Duran, Boris; Swain, Greg M

    2014-08-01

    We report on the use of flow injection analysis with amperometric detection (FIA-EC) to evaluate the potential of using diamond electrodes for the analysis of three estrogenic compounds: estrone, 17-β-estradiol, and estriol. Amperometric detection was performed using a cathodically pretreated boron-doped diamond electrode that offered low background current, relatively low limits of detection, and good response reproducibility and stability. For all three compounds, response linearity was observed over the concentration range tested, 0.10 to 3.0μmol L(-1), the sensitivity was ca. 10mA L mol(-1), and the minimum concentration detection (S/N≥3) was 0.10μmol L(-1) (~27μg L(-1)). The response variability with multiple injections was ca. 10% (RSD) over 20 injections. For estrone, the oxidation reaction on diamond does not proceed through an adsorbed state like it does on glassy carbon. After an initial current attenuation, the diamond electrode exhibited a stable response (oxidation current) for 3 days of continuous use, indicative of minimal surface contamination or fouling by reaction intermediates and products. The method for estrone was assessed using spiked city tap and local river water. Estrone recoveries in spiked city and river water samples presented standard deviations of less than 10%. In summary, the FIA-EC method with a diamond electrode enables sensitive, reproducible, stable, quick, and inexpensive determination of estrogenic compounds in water samples. PMID:24881529

  5. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS- Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to investigate chlorinated by-products of a selected number of steroids representing both estrogens and androgens. Highly controlled reaction conditions were used to ascertain product distribution. Bench-scale studies were conducted to identify...

  6. Effect of neonatal exposure to estrogenic compounds on development of the excurrent ducts of the rat testis through puberty to adulthood.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, J S; Turner, K J; Brown, D; Sharpe, R M

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) can alter the structure of the testicular excurrent ducts in rats. We characterized these changes according to dose and time posttreatment and established whether potent estrogens (ethinyl estradiol), environmental estrogens (genistein, octylphenol, bisphenol A, parabens), and tamoxifen induce such changes. Rats were administered these compounds neonatally and assessed at several time points during (day 10, or day 18 for some treatments) and after (days 18, 25, 35, and 75) the treatment period to detect any changes in testis weight, distension of the rete testis and efferent ducts, epithelial cell height in the efferent ducts, and immunoexpression of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP-1). Treatment with DES (10, 1, or 0.1 microg/injection; equivalent to 0.37, 0.037, or 0.0037 mg/kg/day, respectively) induced dose-dependent changes in testis weight and all parameters. These effects were most pronounced at days 18 and 25 and appeared to lessen with time, although some persisted into adulthood. Neonatal treatment with ethinyl estradiol (10 microg/injection; equivalent to 0.37 mg/kg/day) caused changes broadly similar to those induced by 10 mg DES. Administration of tamoxifen (2 mg/kg/day) caused changes at 18 days that were similar to those induced by 1 microg DES. Treatment with genistein (4 mg/kg/day), octylphenol (2 mg/injection; equivalent to 150 mg/kg/day), or bisphenol A (0.5 mg/injection; equivalent to 37 mg/kg/day) caused minor but significant (p<0.05) decreases in epithelial cell height of the efferent ducts at days 18 and/or 25. In animals that were followed through to 35 days and/or adulthood, these changes were no longer obvious; other parameters were either unaffected or were affected only marginally and transiently. Administration of parabens (2 mg/kg/day) had no detectable effect on any parameter at day 18. To establish whether these effects of estrogens were direct or indirect (i.e., resulting from reduced

  7. Determination of estrogenic compounds in wastewater using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray and atmospheric pressure photoionization following desalting extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Kuo, Han-Wen; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2009-01-01

    Two complementary LC-MS ionization methods, electrospray (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), have been optimized to determine three natural estrogenic compounds (estrone, 17beta-estradiol and estriol) and two synthetic estrogenic compounds (17alpha-ethynylestradiol and diethylstilbestrol) in the influent and effluent of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The wastewater samples were first subjected to solid-phase extraction coupled with desalting extraction to remove matrix interference. The analytes were then detected using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) with ESI and dopant-assisted (DA) APPI to evaluate the ion suppression effect and to complement the detection and quantification of estrogenic compounds in complex wastewater samples. The average ion suppression factors for the extracts of the WWTP influent analyzed using ESI and APPI were 52+/-5% and 27+/-7%, respectively. The sensitivity and ionization efficiency of the LC-ESI-MS-MS system decreased dramatically when a complex matrix was present in the WWTP influent sample. Estrogenic compounds could be detected in the WWTP influent and effluent samples at concentrations below the parts-per-billion level. The lower detection limits obtained when using ESI and the higher matrix tolerance of the APPI method allowed the complete quantification of estrogenic compounds in very complex samples in a complementary manner. PMID:18996561

  8. Environmental exposure to N-aryl compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, M.R.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    N-aryl compounds are well-known occupational exposure hazards but are relatively unstudied as an environmental exposure problem. Coal-derived liquid fuels and environmental tobacco smoke are examples of materials potentially leading to significant environmental exposures to aryl amines. Integrated chemical class separation and bacterial mutagenicity testing identified primary aromatic amines as the major contributors to the mutagenicities of crude coal liquids. Studies of sidestream cigarette smoke chemistry show that alkaline constituents of cigarette smoke are preferentially released into the environment as compared to that drawn into the mouth by the smoker. Two to ten times the quantity of aromatic amines are released in the sidestream smoke on a per cigarette basis. Quantities of the more mutagenic and carcinogenic multi-ring aryl amines in both coal liquids and in cigarette smoke are very small and they are accompanied by a wide variety of related compounds. Chemical ionization mass spectrometric methods have been developed to distinguish between closely related amines to facilitate their identification and quantitation at trace levels.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGEN SCREEN USING TRANSIENTLY TRANSFECTED RAINBOW TROUT CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow troutp hepatoma (RTH-149) and gonad cells (RTG-2) were used to develop a screening protocol for estrogen disrupting chemicals. Transfection of an estrogen-responsive luciferase reporter plasmid into...

  10. The OECD program to validate the rat uterotrophic bioassay to screen compounds for in vivo estrogenic responses: phase 1.

    PubMed

    Kanno, J; Onyon, L; Haseman, J; Fenner-Crisp, P; Ashby, J; Owens, W

    2001-08-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has completed the first phase of an international validation program for the rodent uterotrophic bioassay. This uterotrophic bioassay is intended to identify the in vivo activity of compounds that are suspected agonists or antagonists of estrogen. This information could, for example, be used to help prioritize positive compounds for further testing. Using draft protocols, we tested and compared two model systems, the immature female rat and the adult ovariectomized rat. Data from 19 participating laboratories using a high-potency reference agonist, ethinyl estradiol (EE), and an antagonist, ZM 189,154, indicate no substantive performance differences between models. All laboratories and all protocols successfully detected increases in uterine weights using EE in phase 1. These significant uterine weight increases were achieved under a variety of experimental conditions (e.g., strain, diet, housing protocol, bedding, vehicle). For each protocol, there was generally good agreement among laboratories with regard to the actual EE doses both in producing the first significant increase in uterine weights and achieving the maximum uterine response. Furthermore, the Hill equation appears to model the dose response satisfactorily and indicates general agreement based on calculated effective dose (ED)(10) and ED(50) within and among laboratories. The feasibility of an antagonist assay was also successfully demonstrated. Therefore, both models appear robust, reproducible, and transferable across laboratories for high-potency estrogen agonists such as EE. For the next phase of the OECD validation program, both models will be tested against a battery of weak, partial estrogen agonists. PMID:11564613

  11. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Penza, M.; Jeremic, M.; Marrazzo, E.; Maggi, A.; Ciana, P.; Rando, G.; Grigolato, P.G.; Di Lorenzo, D.

    2011-08-15

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5 {mu}g/kg). At higher doses (50-500 {mu}g/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ER{alpha} or ER{beta}, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100 nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ER{alpha} in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ER{beta} in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed. - Research Highlights: > The environmental organotin tributyltin chloride shows dose-dependent estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice. > The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and the dose of the compound. > The estrogenic and adipogenic effects of TBT occur at doses closed to

  12. Fate of selected pesticides, estrogens, progestogens and volatile organic compounds during artificial aquifer recharge using surface waters.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Marina; Díaz-Cruz, Silvia; Rosell, Mònica; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2010-05-01

    The artificial recharge of aquifers has become a valuable tool to increase water resources for drinking water production in many countries. In this work a total of 41 organic pollutants belonging to the classes of pesticides, estrogens, progestogens and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been monitored in the water from two artificial recharge plants located in Sweden and Denmark. The results from two sampling campaigns performed in each plant indicate good chemical status of the source water, as the contaminants detected were present at very low levels, far from those established in the legislation as maximum admissible concentrations (when existing) and far from those considered as a risk. Thus, of the 17 pesticides investigated, BAM (2,6-dichlorobenzamide), desethylatrazine, simazine, atrazine, terbuthylazine, diuron, metolachlor, and diazinon were the only compounds detected, and total pesticides levels were below 25ng L(-1), respectively. Estrone-3-sulfate was the only estrogen detected, at concentrations lower than 0.5ng L(-1). Progestogens were not found in any sample. Detected VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and trichloroethylene) were below 0.04microg L(-1). The efficiency of elimination of these organic contaminants was poor as no significant decrease in their concentrations was observed through the recharge process. PMID:20226495

  13. Characterizing the Growth Kinetics in Estrogen Responsive T47D Cells After Exposure to 2000 Environmental Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need to develop high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals for endocrine disrupting potential. The estrogen signaling pathway is a known xenobiotic target that has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects...

  14. ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN FISH EXPOSED TO NATURAL PHARMACEUTICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS USING GENE ARRAYS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denslow, N.D., P. Larkin, T.L. Sabo-Attwood, J. Kocerha, K.J. Kroll, M.J. Hemmer and L.C. Folmar. 2004. Analysis of Changes in Gene Expression Patterns in Fish Exposed to Natural, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Estrogens Using Gene Arrays (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):...

  15. [The environmental estrogen bisphenol A and its effects on the human organism].

    PubMed

    Lazúrová, Z; Lazúrová, I

    2013-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), i.e. an environmental estrogen, is one of the most common synthetic chemicals which enter the human body from plastic bottles, food packaging and dental materials. As many studies show, a longterm exposure to BPA is connected with a risk of developing various diseases and endocrine disorders. Exposure to BPA, particularly during development, increases the risk of breast carcinoma, obesity, diabetes mellitus type 2 as well as reproductive disorders. It also increases the risk of testes carcinoma and prostate carcinoma. Some isolated studies support also the relation between BPA and the risk of cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases. The effect of other xenoestrogens, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, phthalates, dioxins, as well as others, is similar or perhaps even stronger. For the time being, however, the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms of these relations are not quite clear and require further experimental, but especially human, studies. PMID:23808741

  16. QSAR-Assisted Design of an Environmental Catalyst for Enhanced Estrogen Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Colosi, Lisa M.; Huang, Qingguo; Weber, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) was used to streamline redesign of a model environmental catalyst, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), for enhanced reactivity towards a target pollutant, steroid hormone 17β-estradiol. This QSAR, embodying relationship between reaction rate and intermolecular binding distance, was used in silico to screen for mutations improving enzyme reactivity. Eight mutations mediating significant reductions in binding distances were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and resulting recombinant HRP strains were analyzed to determine Michaelis-Menten parameters during reaction with the target substrate. Enzyme turnover rate, ln(kCAT), exhibited inverse relationship with model-predicted binding distances (R2 = 0.81), consistent with the QSAR. Additional analysis of native substrate degradation by selected mutants yielded unexpected increases in ln(kCAT) that were also inversely correlated (R2 = 1.00) with model-predicted binding distances. This suggests that the mechanism of improvement comprises a nonspecific “opening up” of the active site such that it better accommodates environmental estrogens of any size. The novel QSAR-assisted approach described herein offers specific advantages compared to conventional design strategies, most notably targeting an entire class of pollutants at one time and a flexible hybridization of benefits associated with rational design and directed evolution. Thus, this approach is a promising tool for improving enzyme-mediated environmental remediation. PMID:20797763

  17. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS AND THE SUBSEQUENT EFFECTS ON THE PROSTRATE OF THE ADULT RAT: EVALUATION OF INFLAMMATION IN THE VENTRAL AND LATERAL LOBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perinatal exposure to estrogenic compounds and the subsequent effects on the prostate of the adult rat: evaluation of inflammation in the ventral and lateral lobes.

    Stoker TE, Robinette CL, Cooper RL.

    Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National ...

  18. Assessing environmental chemicals for estrogenicity using a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays.

    PubMed Central

    Shelby, M D; Newbold, R R; Tully, D B; Chae, K; Davis, V L

    1996-01-01

    Because of rampant concern that estrogenic chemicals in the environment may be adversely affecting the health of humans and wildlife, reliable methods for detecting and characterizing estrogenic chemicals are needed. It is important that general agreement be reached on which tests to use and that these tests then be applied to the testing of both man-made and naturally occurring chemicals. As a step toward developing a comprehensive approach to screening chemicals for estrogenic activity, three assays for detecting estrogenicity were conducted on 10 chemicals with known or suspected estrogenic activity. The assays were 1) competitive binding with the mouse uterine estrogen receptor, 2) transcriptional activation in HeLa cells transfected with plasmids containing an estrogen receptor and a response element, and 3) the uterotropic assay in mice. The chemicals studied were 17 beta-estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, tamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, methoxychlor, the methoxychlor metabolite 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE), endosulfan, nonylphenol, o,p'-DDT, and kepone. These studies were conducted to assess the utility of this three-assay combination in the routine screening of chemicals, or combinations of chemicals, for estrogenic activity. Results were consistent among the three assays with respect to what is known about the estrogenic activities of the chemicals tested and their requirements for metabolic activation. By providing information on three levels of hormonal activity (receptor binding, transcriptional activation, and an in vivo effect in an estrogen-responsive tissue), an informative profile of estrogenic activity is obtained with a reasonable investment of resources. Images p1296-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9118870

  19. Analytical Methodologies for the Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Biological and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disruptor compounds (EDCs) can mimic natural hormones and produce adverse effects in the endocrine functions by interacting with estrogen receptors. EDCs include both natural and synthetic chemicals, such as hormones, personal care products, surfactants, and flame retardants, among others. EDCs are characterised by their ubiquitous presence at trace-level concentrations and their wide diversity. Since the discovery of the adverse effects of these pollutants on wildlife and human health, analytical methods have been developed for their qualitative and quantitative determination. In particular, mass-based analytical methods show excellent sensitivity and precision for their quantification. This paper reviews recently published analytical methodologies for the sample preparation and for the determination of these compounds in different environmental and biological matrices by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The various sample preparation techniques are compared and discussed. In addition, recent developments and advances in this field are presented. PMID:23738329

  20. EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS ON REPRODUCTIVE PARAMETERS IN A MARINE FISH, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estradiol (E2), ethynylestradiol (EE2) and estrone (E4) are steroidal estrogens that are released into the aquatic environment in sewage treatment effluent. To determine whether these estrogens could impact reproductive parameters in a model fish species, actively spawning male ...

  1. No evidence of exposure to environmental estrogens in two feral fish species sampled from the Yarra River, Australia: A comparison with Northern Hemisphere studies.

    PubMed

    Hassell, Kathryn; Pettigrove, Vincent; Beresford, Nicola; Jobling, Susan; Kumar, Anu

    2016-09-01

    Environmental estrogens originate from a variety of sources including sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents and adverse physiological effects (endocrine disruption) have been observed in several fish species sampled downstream of STP discharges. In this study we examined common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and roach (Rutilis rutilis) for signs of exposure to environmental estrogens in the iconic Yarra River, Melbourne, Australia. The Yarra River flows through the city of Melbourne and more than 2 million people live within the catchment. Two STPs discharge water into the Yarra River within the middle reaches, and the areas immediately downstream of these discharge locations were the focus of this study. Carp and roach were chosen as test species since both have been utilised extensively for endocrine disruption research throughout Europe, North America and Asia, and data from various international studies was used for comparison with the results of the present study. Neither species showed evidence of exposure to environmental estrogens, with no elevation of plasma vitellogenin levels in males and no incidence of intersex gonads. Most physiological endpoints in both species from this study were within ranges reported in carp and roach from reference sites in other studies, however some degenerative histological changes in both male and female gonads were observed. Surface water samples showed no estrogenic activity (measured by the yeast-estrogen screen, YES), but did display strong anti-estrogenic and weak androgenic activity (measured by the yeast-androgen screen, YAS). Whilst the results show no evidence of impacts from environmental estrogens in the Yarra River, the presence of both anti-estrogenic and androgenic activity in water samples, as well as some gonadal changes in carp is concerning and indicates that our focus needs to broaden, in order to look for biological impacts in resident fauna that might be due to environmental pollutants other than environmental

  2. Bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol, an estrogenic-like compound, on catecholamine secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Haoping; Wang, Hong; Ma, Shangwei; Xu, Yantong; Zhang, Han; Wang, Yuefei; Niu, Zichang; Fan, Guanwei; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiu Mei

    2014-01-01

    Excess or deficiency of catecholamine (CA) secretion was related with several diseases. Recently, estrogen and phytoestrogens were reported to regulate the activity of CA system. Bakuchiol is a phytoestrogen isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Leguminosae) which has been used in Traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic or aphrodisiac. In the present study, bovine adrenal medullary cells were employed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of bakuchiol on the regulation of CA secretion. Further, its anti-depressant like and anti-stress effects were evaluated by using behavioral despair and chronic immobilization stress models. Our results indicated that bakuchiol showed bidirectional regulation on CA secretion. It stimulated basal CA secretion in a concentration dependent manner (p < 0.01), while it reduced 300 μM acetylcholine (ACh) (p < 0.01), 100 μM veratridine (Ver) (p < 0.01) and 56 mM K{sup +} (p < 0.05) induced CA secretion, respectively. We also found that the stimulation of basal CA secretion by bakuchiol may act through estrogen-like effect and the JNK pathway in an extra-cellular calcium independent manner. Further, bakuchiol elevated tyrosine hydroxylase Ser40 and Ser31 phosphorylation (p < 0.01) through the PKA and ERK1/2 pathways, respectively. Bakuchiol inhibited ACh, Ver and 56 mM K{sup +} induced CA secretion was related with reduction of intracellular calcium rise. In vivo experiments, we found that bakuchiol significantly reduced immobilization time in behavioral despair mouse (p < 0.05 or 0.01), and plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in chronic immobilization stress (p < 0.05). Overall, these results present a bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol on CA secretion which indicated that bakuchiol may exert anti-stress and the potential anti-depressant-like effects. - Highlights: • Bakuchiol stimulated basal catecholamine secretion. • Bakuchiol inhibited various secretagogues induced catecholamine secretion

  3. Polydopamine-coated magnetic nanoparticles for isolation and enrichment of estrogenic compounds from surface water samples followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    Estrogens, phytoestrogens, and mycoestrogens may enter into the surface waters from different sources, such as effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants, industrial plants, and animal farms and runoff from agricultural areas. In this work, a multiresidue analytical method for the determination of 17 natural estrogenic compounds, including four steroid estrogens, six mycoestrogens, and seven phytoestrogens, in river water samples has been developed. (Fe3O4)-based magnetic nanoparticles coated by polydopamine (Fe3O4@pDA) were used for dispersive solid-phase extraction, and the final extract was analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation procedure, coated by pDA, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The sample preparation method was optimized in terms of extraction recovery, matrix effect, selectivity, trueness, precision, method limits of detection, and method limits of quantification (MLOQs). For all the 17 analytes, recoveries were >70 % and matrix effects were below 30 % when 25 mL of river water sample was treated with 90 mg of Fe3O4@pDA nanoparticles. Selectivity was tested by spiking river water samples with 50 other compounds (mycotoxins, antibacterials, conjugated hormones, UV filters, alkylphenols, etc.), and only aflatoxins and some benzophenones showed recoveries >60 %. This method proved to be simple and robust and allowed the determination of natural estrogenic compounds belonging to different classes in surface waters with MLOQs ranging between 0.003 and 0.1 μg L(-1). Graphical Abstract Determination of natural estrogenic compounds in water by magnetic solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:27032407

  4. Simultaneous determination of environmental estrogens: Diethylstilbestrol and estradiol using Cu-BTC frameworks-sensitized electrode.

    PubMed

    Ji, Liudi; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-10-01

    It is quite important to monitor environmental estrogens in a rapid, sensitive, simple and cost-effective manner due to their wide existence and high toxicity. Using 1,3,5-Benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) as the ligand and copper ions as the center, Cu-BTC frameworks with surface area of 654.6m(2)/g were prepared, and then used to construct a novel electrochemical sensing platform for diethylstilbestrol (DES) and estradiol (E2). On the surface of Cu-BTC frameworks, two oxidation waves at 0.26V and 0.45V are observed for DES and E2, and the oxidation signals are improved greatly. The prepared Cu-BTC frameworks not only enhance the accumulation efficiency of DES and E2, but also improve their electron transfer ability. The influences of pH value, modification amount of Cu-BTC and accumulation time were examined. As a result, a highly-sensitive, rapid and convenient electrochemical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of DES and E2, with detection limit of 2.7nM and 1.1nM. The practical applications manifest this new sensing system is accurate and feasible. PMID:27474301

  5. Removal of Estrogens and Estrogenicity through Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drining waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conven...

  6. Effects of the environmental estrogens bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, p-tert-octylphenol and coumestrol on apoptosis induction, cell proliferation and the expression of estrogen sensitive molecular parameters in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Diel, Patrick; Olff, Sabine; Schmidt, Simone; Michna, Horst

    2002-01-01

    In the presented study, we have analysed effects of the environmental estrogens bisphenol A (BPA), p-tert-octylphenol (OCT), o,p'-DDT (DDT) and coumestrol (COU) on cell proliferation, apoptosis induction, progesterone receptor (PR) and androgen receptor (AR) mRNA expression and ER alpha protein expression in comparison to estradiol (E2) and the selective ER modulator (SERM) raloxifene (RAL) and the pure antiestrogen faslodex (ICI 182780) in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. A dose dependent analysis of the cell cycle distribution of MCF-7 cells after administration of OCT, DDT and COU revealed a significant induction of cell proliferation and reduced rate of apoptosis. Maximum induction of cell proliferation and the lowest rate of apoptosis could be observed at a dose of 10(-6)M. Interestingly, administration of BPA reduces the rate of apoptosis, but does not enhance proliferation at any dose analysed. PR mRNA expression in MCF-7 cells was up regulated after administration of COU and DDT, whereas treatment with BPA and OCT did not effect PR mRNA expression. AR mRNA expression was down regulated by COU, but not effected by BPA, DDT and OCT. The expression of ER alpha protein in the breast cancer cells was slightly down regulated by COU and DDT, but unaffected by BPA and OCT. In summary and in comparison to the effects observed after administration of E2, RAL and ICI our data indicate that none of the analysed compounds exhibit properties comparable to RAL and ICI. COU and DDT exhibit properties which are very similar to E2. Administration of BPA and OCT did not effect any of the estrogen sensitive molecular parameters analysed. Nevertheless OCT is a very potent stimulator of cell proliferation in MCF-7 cells. Surprisingly, BPA is not able to induce the proliferation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, but turns out to be a very potent inhibitor of apoptosis. For this reason and in agreement to the effects of BPA on the molecular parameters analysed, we conclude

  7. Contraceptive Options and Their Associated Estrogenic Environmental Loads: Relationships and Trade-Offs

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Usman; Nicell, Jim A.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the relationships between a user's choice of a given contraceptive option and the load of steroidal estrogens that can be associated with that choice. Family planning data for the USA served as a basis for the analysis. The results showed that collectively the use of contraception in the USA conservatively averts the release of approximately 4.8 tonnes of estradiol equivalents to the environment. 35% of the estrogenic load released over the course of all experienced pregnancies events and 34% the estrogenic load represented by all resultant legacies are a result of contraception failure and the non-use of contraception. A scenario analysis conducted to explore the impacts of discontinuing the use of ethinylestradiol-based oral contraceptives revealed that this would not only result in a 1.7-fold increase in the estrogenic loading of the users, but the users would also be expected to experience undesired family planning outcomes at a rate that is 3.3 times higher. Additional scenario analyses in which ethinylestradiol-based oral contraceptive users were modeled as having switched entirely to the use of male condoms, diaphragms or copper IUDs suggested that whether a higher or lower estrogenic load can be associated with the switching population depends on the typical failure rates of the options adopted following discontinuation. And, finally, it was estimated that, in the USA, at most 13% of the annual estrogenic load can be averted by fully meeting the contraceptive needs of the population. Therefore, while the issue of estrogen impacts on the environment cannot be addressed solely by meeting the population's contraceptive needs, a significant fraction of the estrogenic mass released to environment can be averted by improving the level with which their contraceptive needs are met. PMID:24670973

  8. Environmental exposure to preformed nitroso compounds.

    PubMed

    Tricker, A R; Spiegelhalder, B; Preussmann, R

    1989-01-01

    In the human environment, nitrosatable amine precursors to N-nitroso compounds and nitrosating species such as nitrite and oxides of nitrogen are abundant. As a result, the formation of N-nitroso compounds and human exposure to these compounds show a rather complex pattern. The largest known human exposures to exogenous N-nitrosamines occur in the work place. This is particularly evident in the rubber and tyre manufacturing industry and in metal cutting and grinding shops. Nearly all industries which are concerned with the production and/or use of amines have a related nitrosamine problem. Outside the industrial environment, commodities such as cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, rubber and household products, which are either prepared from amines or contain high concentrations of amino compounds, may be subject to contamination by low concentrations of N-nitroso compounds. This contamination may result from the use of contaminated starting materials, in particular amines, or from the formation of N-nitroso compounds during manufacturing processes. A similar problem exists with agricultural chemicals. As our knowledge of the occurrence and formation of N-nitroso compounds in the environment increases, preventive measures can be introduced, particularly in manufacturing industries, to reduce the levels of human exposure to nitrosamines in the work place and to protect the consumer from nitrosamine exposure from household commodities. PMID:2696580

  9. THE USE OF GENE ARRAYS TO MEASURE CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN FISH EXPOSED TO COMPOUNDS THAT MIMIC ESTROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed estrogen-sensitive gene arrays to measure changes in gene expression in sheepshead minnows and largemouth bass exposed to anthropogenic chemicals that mimic estrogen. The in vivo exposures, which realize the full physiological response in fish, result in changes...

  10. [Estrogens and pharmacological modulation of estrogen receptors].

    PubMed

    Sanidize, T V; Ratiani, L R; Gabuniia, L Iu; Tortladze, M L; Kuridze, N N

    2009-02-01

    Estrogens belong to more or less frequently prescribed preparations. Main fields of application of these preparations (as in monotherapy as well as in combination) are contraception and hormone replacement therapy during menopause. More uncommon indications of estrogens are growth inhibition and hypogonadism (in this case they are prescribed along with gonadotropic hormones). Synthesis and metabolism of estrogens, as well as their intracellular receptors are well studied these days, which allow us to understand physiology and pharmacology of these hormones. In pharmacology the main stage is detection of estrogen receptors inside of cells of targets. There are two types of estrogen receptors alpha- and beta- coded by different genes. A number of steroid and non-steroid compounds have characteristics of estrogens. Likely in the future their popularity will increase, as by the aging of population number of those women, who receive replacement therapy, will increase. Investigations to find an ideal elective modulator of estrogen receptors, that will possess anti-estrogenic activity in connection with mammal gland and develop indifference in connection with endometrium and at the same time will display ability to reduce hot flushes, bone resorption, atrophy of mucous membranes of vagina and urinary bladder, as well as it will favorably effect on metabolism of lipoproteins are carried out. PMID:19276483

  11. Pyrolysis of wastewater biosolids significantly reduces estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T C; Zitomer, D H; McNamara, P J

    2016-11-01

    Most wastewater treatment processes are not specifically designed to remove micropollutants. Many micropollutants are hydrophobic so they remain in the biosolids and are discharged to the environment through land-application of biosolids. Micropollutants encompass a broad range of organic chemicals, including estrogenic compounds (natural and synthetic) that reside in the environment, a.k.a. environmental estrogens. Public concern over land application of biosolids stemming from the occurrence of micropollutants hampers the value of biosolids which are important to wastewater treatment plants as a valuable by-product. This research evaluated pyrolysis, the partial decomposition of organic material in an oxygen-deprived system under high temperatures, as a biosolids treatment process that could remove estrogenic compounds from solids while producing a less hormonally active biochar for soil amendment. The estrogenicity, measured in estradiol equivalents (EEQ) by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, of pyrolyzed biosolids was compared to primary and anaerobically digested biosolids. The estrogenic responses from primary solids and anaerobically digested solids were not statistically significantly different, but pyrolysis of anaerobically digested solids resulted in a significant reduction in EEQ; increasing pyrolysis temperature from 100°C to 500°C increased the removal of EEQ with greater than 95% removal occurring at or above 400°C. This research demonstrates that biosolids treatment with pyrolysis would substantially decrease (removal>95%) the estrogens associated with this biosolids product. Thus, pyrolysis of biosolids can be used to produce a valuable soil amendment product, biochar, that minimizes discharge of estrogens to the environment. PMID:27344259

  12. Estrogen overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002584.htm Estrogen overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Estrogen is a female hormone. Estrogen overdose occurs when ...

  13. The phytoestrogenic compound cajanol from Pigeonpea roots is associated with the activation of estrogen receptor α-dependent signaling pathway in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lu; Gao, Chang; Luo, Meng; Zhao, Chunjian; Wang, Wei; Gu, Chengbo; Yu, Jinghua; Fu, Yujie

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, the main natural estrogen-agonist/antagonist from Pigeonpea roots was studied by the estrogen receptor α-dependent signaling pathway in human prostate cancer cell. First, the natural products with estrogenic activity in Pigeonpea roots were screened by pER8-GFP transgenic Arabidopsis, and cajanol (5-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenyl)-7-methoxychroman-4-one) was confirmed as the active compound. Further study showed that cajanol significantly arrested the cell cycle in the G1 and G2/M phase and induced nuclei condensation, fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies. Western blotting showed that cajanol modulated the ERα-dependent PI3K pathway and induced the activation of GSK3 and CyclinD1 closely following the profile of PI3K activity. Based on above results, we proposed a mechanism through which cajanol could inhibit survival and proliferation of estrogen-responsive cells (PC-3 cells) by interfering with an ERα-associated PI3K pathway, following a process that could be dependent of the nuclear functions of the ERα. Above all, we conclude that cajanol represents a valuable natural phytoestrogen source and may potentially be applicable in health food industry. PMID:23420757

  14. Waste crankcase oil: an environmental contaminant with potential to modulate estrogenic responses.

    PubMed

    Ssempebwa, John; Carpenter, David; Yilmaz, Bayram; DeCaprio, Anthony; O'Hehir, David; Arcaro, Kathleen

    2004-07-23

    Used engine, or crankcase, oil is frequently discarded into the environment resulting in significant pollution of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The chemical composition of crankcase oils changes with use, and in general, used, or waste, crankcase oil is considered more toxic than the original oil. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major constituents of crankcase oil and may exhibit both estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity. In the present study, the estrogenic activity and antiestrogenic activity of both new (unused) and waste crankcase oils were examined in a human breast cancer cell culture assay. Concentrations of 5, 10, 15, 20, or 25 ppm of new oil or waste oil did not alter either the preconfluent or postconfluent cell growth when tested in control medium. In contrast, waste crankcase oil significantly reduced the postconfluent growth of cells grown in medium containing 0.1 nM 17 beta-estradiol. Results from mechanistic assays using [3H]-17 beta-estradiol demonstrated that waste crankcase oil both increased the metabolism of 17 beta-estradiol, and displaced 17 beta-estradiol from the estrogen receptor in MCF-7 cells. The observed antiestrogenic activity of the waste crankcase oil suggests that this pollutant has the potential to alter estrogenic responses, and therefore its presence in the environment may be of concern for reproductive health. PMID:15205025

  15. THE USE OF DNA MACROARRAYS TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS ON WILDLIFE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the mid-1990s, several investigations in the United States and United Kingdom showed that wild fish of several species collected downstream of sewage treatment plants or industrial discharges presented expression of estrogen-responsive genes, or phenotypic sex reversal. Su...

  16. Removal of estrogens and estrogenicity through drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Kathleen; Rosenblum, Laura; Wiese, Thomas E; Wymer, Larry; Dugan, Nicholas; Williams, Daniel; Mash, Heath; Merriman, Betty; Speth, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drinking waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conventional drinking water treatment using a natural water. Bench-scale studies utilizing chlorine, alum coagulation, ferric chloride coagulation, and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were conducted using Ohio River water spiked with three estrogens, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, and estriol. Treatment of the estrogens with chlorine, either alone or with coagulant, resulted in approximately 98% reductions in the concentrations of the parent estrogens, accompanied by formation of by-products. The MVLN reporter gene and MCF-7 cell proliferation assays were used to characterize the estrogenic activity of the water before and after treatment. The observed estrogenic activities of the chlorinated samples showed that estrogenicity of the water was reduced commensurate with removal of the parent estrogen. Therefore, the estrogen chlorination by-products did not contribute appreciably to the estrogenic activity of the water. Coagulation alone did not result in significant removals of the estrogens. However, addition of PAC, at a typical drinking water plant dose, resulted in removals ranging from approximately 20 to 80%. PMID:22361701

  17. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  18. Comparative proteomic data of M13SV1 human breast epithelial cells and their tumorigenic variants under treatment with estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Braeuning, Albert; Schmidt, Claudia; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    Data from a comparative proteomic analysis of three human breast epithelial cell lines are presented. M13SV1 cells and their tumorigenic derivatives M13SV1-R2-2 and M13SV1-R2-N1 were used. Proteomic data were obtained using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent identification of proteins by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. In a second experiment, the three cell lines were treated with different concentrations of the estrogenic compounds β-estradiol or genistein and alterations in protein expression were monitored by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Presented data provide a comprehensive overview of proteomic differences between the three cell lines and their response to estrogenic stimulation. PMID:27331110

  19. [Determination of environmental estrogens in cow feed and soil by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Mu, Guangqing; Chen, Lijun; Jiang, Tiemin

    2013-09-01

    An analytical method was developed for the determination of the residues of five environmental estrogens, including estriol, estradiol, estrone, bisphenol A and diethylstilbestrol, in the cow feed and soil by solid phase extraction (SPE) and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The important parameters which affect the determination efficiency such as the mobile phase, the condition of mass spectrometry and solid phase extraction column were optimized. The optimal determination conditions were as follows: the sample was extracted with acetonitrile at first, then cleaned-up with an NH2-SPE column, and an Acquity UPLC HSS T3 column was selected to separate the analytes. Acetonitrile-methanol (4: 1, v/v) and 0.01% ammonia aqueous solution were used as the mobile phase by gradient elution in the negative mode. The limits of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) were 0.06 - 0.22 microg/kg. The overall recoveries varied from 81.70% to 102.20%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were all less than 10.00%. This method is simple, sensitive and accurate, and suitable for the determination of environmental estrogens in cow feed and soil. PMID:24392631

  20. Transient exposure to environmental estrogen affects embryonic development of brown trout (Salmo trutta fario).

    PubMed

    Schubert, Sara; Peter, Armin; Schönenberger, René; Suter, Marc J-F; Segner, Helmut; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Transient exposure of brown trout embryos from fertilization until hatch (70 days) to 17β-estradiol (E2) was investigated. Embryos were exposed to 3.8 and 38.0 ng/L E2 for 2h, respectively, under four scenarios: (A) exposure once at the day of fertilization (0 days post-fertilization, dpf), (B) once at eyeing stage (38 dpf), (C) weekly exposure until hatch or (D) bi-weekly exposure until hatch. Endpoints to assess estrogen impact on embryo development were fertilization success, chronological sequence of developmental events, hatching process, larval malformations, heart rate, body length and mortality. Concentration-dependent acceleration of development until median hatch was observed in all exposure scenarios with the strongest effect observed for embryos exposed once at 0 dpf. In addition, the hatching period was significantly prolonged by 4-5 days in groups receiving single estrogen exposures (scenarios A and B). Heart rate on hatching day was significantly depressed with increasing E2 concentrations, with the strongest effect observed for embryos exposed at eyeing stage. Estrogenic exposure at 0 dpf significantly reduced body length at hatch, not depending on whether this was a single exposure or the first of a series (scenarios A and D). The key finding is that even a single, transient E2 exposure during embryogenesis had significant effects on brown trout development. Median hatch, hatching period, heart rate and body length at hatch were found to be highly sensitive biomarkers responsive to estrogenic exposure during embryogenesis. Treatment effects were observable only at the post-hatch stage. PMID:25456228

  1. Sensitive determination of estrogens in environmental waters treated with polymeric ionic liquid-based stir cake sorptive extraction and liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia; Yuan, Dongxing

    2016-05-15

    A simple, sensitive and environmentally friendly method using polymeric ionic liquid-based stir cake sorptive extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC/DAD) has been developed for efficient quantification of six selected estrogens in environmental waters. To extract trace estrogens effectively, a poly (1-ally-3-vinylimidazolium chloride-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic cake was prepared and used as the sorbent of stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE). The effects of preparation conditions of sorbent and extraction parameters of SCSE for estrogens were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the developed method showed satisfactory analytical performance for targeted analytes. Low limits of detection (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) were achieved within the range of 0.024-0.057µg/L and 0.08-0.19µg/L, respectively. Good linearity of method was obtained for analytes with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) above 0.99. At the same time, satisfactory method repeatability and reproducibility was achieved in terms of intra- and inter-day precisions, respectively. Finally, the established SCSE-HPLC/DAD method was successfully applied for the determination of estrogens in different environmental water samples. Recoveries obtained for the determination of estrogens in spiked samples ranged from 71.2% to 108%, with RSDs below 10% in all cases. PMID:26992499

  2. Relationship between Sex Steroid and Vitellogenin Concentrations in Flounder (Platichthys flesus) Sampled from an Estuary Contaminated with Estrogenic Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alexander P.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kirby, Mark F.; Thain, John

    2006-01-01

    High concentrations of vitellogenin (VTG; egg yolk protein) have previously been found in male flounder (Platichthys flesus) from several UK estuaries; these levels have been ascribed to the presence of estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs). Gonadal abnormalities, including intersex, have also been recorded in these estuaries. However, there is no firm evidence to date that these two findings are causally linked or that the presence of estrogenic EDCs has any adverse population effects. In the present study, we examined the relationship between concentrations of VTG and sex steroids (11-oxotestosterone in males and 17β-estradiol in females) in specimens of flounder captured from the estuary of the River Mersey. We first questioned whether the high concentrations of VTG in male and immature female flounder were indeed caused by a direct effect of exogenous EDCs and not indirectly via the endogenous secretion of 17β-estradiol. The data favored the direct involvement of estrogenic EDCs. We then questioned whether the presence of estrogenic EDCs not only stimulated inappropriate VTG synthesis but whether it might also have had a negative effect on endogenous steroid secretion. It should be noted that the predicted consequences of a drop in steroid secretion include smaller gonads, smaller oocytes, fewer numbers of sperm, and depressed spawning behavior. This question was more difficult to answer because of the strong effect of the seasonal reproductive cycle and stage of maturation on steroid concentrations. However, matched by month of capture and stage of maturation, both 17β-estradiol in females and 11-keto-testosterone in males were in most cases significantly lower in those years when VTG concentrations were higher. PMID:16818243

  3. The Measurement of Estrogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Geoff; Makin, Hugh L. J.; Bradlow, H. Leon

    Biologists use the word ‘estrogen' when referring to molecules which have the ability to induce uterine growth or vaginal cornification in the immature or ovariectomized rodent. The word estrogen was derived from two Greek words - oistros meaning frenzy and gennein - to beget. Chemists and biochemists, however, often restrict their use of this term to molecules that contain a characteristic 18-carbon steroid nucleus with an aromatic (phenolic) A-ring, both those that are biologically active estrogens and those without biologic activity but which are of intrinsic interest, such as the estrogen conjugates. This chapter is concerned only with these steroid compounds. The structure and inter-relationship of some common estrogens are given in Fig. 8.1. In addition to the biological estrogens, there are a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds which have estrogenic activity when measured by one or another parameter. While many of the assay procedures described in this review are applicable to these compounds, their application to non C18-steroids will not be discussed here. Methodology for these non-steroidal compounds can be found in reviews by Wang et al. (2002), Wu et al. (2004), Muir (2006), and Delmonte and Rader (2006). While not wishing to downgrade the importance of previous work in the estrogen field, the authors have taken a deliberate decision to exclude most publications prior to 1975, not because these do not have value but simply because space is not unlimited and readers of the present chapter might be expected to be seeking information about methodology which is less than 30 years old. Readers seeking pre-1975 information in this area can find it in Oakey and Holder (1995).

  4. Detecting estrogenic activity in water samples withestrogen-sensitive yeast cells using spectrophotometry and fluorescencemicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wozei, E.; Holman, H-Y.N.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Borglin S.

    2006-03-15

    Environmental estrogens are environmental contaminants that can mimic the biological activities of the female hormone estrogen in the endocrine system, i.e. they act as endocrine disrupters. Several substances are reported to have estrogen-like activity or estrogenic activity. These include steroid hormones, synthetic estrogens (xenoestrogens), environmental pollutants and phytoestrogens (plant estrogens). Using the chromogenic substrate ortho-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) we show that an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE, with human estrogen receptor (hER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes the enzyme {beta}-galactosidase, is able to detect estrogenic activity in water samples over a wide range of spiked concentrations of the hormonal estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Ortho-nitrophenol (ONP), the yellow product of this assay can be detected using spectrophotometry but requires cell lysis to release the enzyme and allow product formation. We improved this aspect in a fluorogenic assay by using fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) as a substrate. The product was visualized using fluorescence microscopy without the need to kill, fix or lyse the cells. We show that in live yeast cells, the uptake of E2 and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximum enzyme-catalyzed fluorescent product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. The fluorogenic assay was applied to a selection of estrogenic compounds and the Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of the cells obtained to better understand the yeast whole cell response to the compounds. The fluorogenic assay is most sensitive to E2, but the SR-FTIR spectra suggest that the cells respond to all the estrogenic compounds tested even when no fluorescent response was detected. These findings are promising and may shorten the duration of environmental water screening and monitoring regimes using

  5. The use of a whole animal biophotonic model as a screen for the angiogenic potential of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for normal vascular growth and development during wound repair. VEGF is estrogen responsive and capable of regulating its own receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Several agricultural pesticides (e.g., methoxychlor)...

  6. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  7. Environmental occurrence, analysis, and toxicology of toxaphene compounds.

    PubMed Central

    de Geus, H J; Besselink, H; Brouwer, A; Klungsøyr, J; McHugh, B; Nixon, E; Rimkus, G G; Wester, P G; de Boer, J

    1999-01-01

    Toxaphene production, in quantities similar to those of polychlorinated biphenyls, has resulted in high toxaphene levels in fish from the Great Lakes and in Arctic marine mammals (up to 10 and 16 microg g-1 lipid). Because of the large variabiliity in total toxaphene data, few reliable conclusions can be drawn about trends or geographic differences in toxaphene concentrations. New developments in mass spectrometric detection using either negative chemical ionization or electron impact modes as well as in multidimensional gas chromatography recently have led researchers to suggest congener-specific approaches. Recently, several nomenclature systems have been developed for toxaphene compounds. Although all systems have specific advantages and limitations, it is suggested that an international body such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry make an attempt to obtain uniformity in the literature. Toxicologic information on individual chlorobornanes is scarce, but some reports have recently appeared. Neurotoxic effects of toxaphene exposure such as those on behavior and learning have been reported. Technical toxaphene and some individual congeners were found to be weakly estrogenic in in vitro test systems; no evidence for endocrine effects in vivo has been reported. In vitro studies show technical toxaphene and toxaphene congeners to be mutagenic. However, in vivo studies have not shown genotoxicity; therefore, a nongenotoxic mechanism is proposed. Nevertheless, toxaphene is believed to present a potential carcinogenic risk to humans. Until now, only Germany has established a legal tolerance level for toxaphene--0.1 mg kg-1 wet weight for fish. PMID:10229713

  8. In Vitro Assessment of Estrogenic Activity in Source and Treated Drinking Water Extracts from 25 U.S. Drinking Water Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of estrogenic compounds in environmental water samples and their potential impact on fish, wildlife and human reproductive health has been of concern for some time. In vitro assays have been successfully used to screen for estrogenic activity in many types of water s...

  9. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  10. Distribution and seasonal variation of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and N-nitrosodimethylamine formation potential in the Huangpu River, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai; Li, Yongmei; Chen, Ling

    2014-05-01

    Detection of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in drinking water has led to rising concerns. There are, however, a paucity of studies on the distribution and seasonal variation of NDMA and NDMA formation potential (NDMA-FP) in natural waters, especially in China. For EDCs, limited studies have investigated the distribution and seasonal variation of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), technical-nonylphenols (t-NP), and bisphenol A (BPA) in Shanghai. In this study, water samples were collected from 11 sampling sites along the Huangpu River in 2012. The distribution and seasonal variation of EDCs, NDMA, and NDMA-FP were investigated. The results showed that all of the 11 sampling sites were contaminated by the target compounds. Compared with E2 and EE2, higher E1 and E3 concentrations were usually detected in the Huangpu River. The values of 17β-estradiol equivalents (EEQ) suggest a high possibility of endocrine effects on exposed organisms in the Huangpu River. NDMA-FP and t-NP were the dominant contaminants among the eight target compounds. The detection rates of the target compounds and their concentrations were both higher in dry seasons than in wet seasons. Higher concentrations of target compounds were observed in urban sampling sites near drainage outlets, and also in suburban sampling sites where intensive livestock farming and farmlands were located. PMID:25079632

  11. Selective estrogen receptor-beta (SERM-beta) compounds modulate raphe nuclei tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH-1) mRNA expression and cause antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Clark, J A; Alves, S; Gundlah, C; Rocha, B; Birzin, E T; Cai, S-J; Flick, R; Hayes, E; Ho, K; Warrier, S; Pai, L; Yudkovitz, J; Fleischer, R; Colwell, L; Li, S; Wilkinson, H; Schaeffer, J; Wilkening, R; Mattingly, E; Hammond, M; Rohrer, S P

    2012-11-01

    Estrogen acts through two molecularly distinct receptors termed estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) which bind estradiol with similar affinities and mediate the effects of estrogen throughout the body. ERα plays a major role in reproductive physiology and behavior, and mediates classic estrogen signaling in such tissues as the uterus, mammary gland, and skeleton. ERβ, however, modulates estrogen signaling in the ovary, the immune system, prostate, gastrointestinal tract, and hypothalamus, and there is some evidence that ERβ can regulate ERα activity. Moreover, ERβ knockout studies and receptor distribution analyses in the CNS suggest that this receptor may play a role in the modulation of mood and cognition. In recent years several ERβ-specific compounds (selective estrogen receptor beta modulators; SERM-beta) have become available, and research suggests potential utility of these compounds in menopausal symptom relief, breast cancer prevention, diseases that have an inflammatory component, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory bowel disease, as well as modulation of mood, and anxiety. Here we demonstrate an antidepressant-like effect obtained using two SERM-beta compounds, SERM-beta1 and SERM-beta2. These compounds exhibit full agonist activity at ERβ in a cell based estrogen response element (ERE) transactivation assay. SERM-beta1 and 2 are non-proliferative with respect to breast as determined using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell-based assay and non-proliferative in the uterus as determined by assessing the effects of SERM-beta compounds on immature rat uterine weight and murine uterine weight. In vivo SERM-beta1 and 2 are brain penetrant and display dose dependent efficacy in the murine dorsal raphe assays for induction of tryptophan hydroxylase mRNA and progesterone receptor protein. These compounds show activity in the murine forced swim test and promote hippocampal neurogenesis acutely in rats. Taken

  12. Development of a lipovitellin-based goldfish (Carassius auratus) vitellogenin ELISA for detection of environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaona; Tian, Hua; Ru, Shaoguo

    2015-08-01

    The susceptibility of vitellogenin (Vtg) to degradation is a major problem affecting the robustness of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for goldfish (Carassius auratus) Vtg. In this study, a phospholipoglycoprotein with molecular mass of ∼420kDa was purified from goldfish egg extracts and it produced a single band corresponding to ∼112kDa in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Additionally, the amino acid composition of the purified protein was comparable to that of lipovitellin (Lv) from other fish species. Thus, the purified protein was identified as goldfish Lv. Purified Lv and anti-Lv polyclonal antiserum were used to develop an ELISA with a detection range between 31.25 and 1000ngmL(-)(1). The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 6.45% and 7.08%, respectively. The immunological similarity between goldfish Vtg and Lv was confirmed by immunoelectrophoresis and Western blot. Goldfish Lv showed higher stability than Vtg after -80°C storage, multiple freeze/thaw cycles, and heat treatment. Moreover, the use of treated Lv in the ELISA did not change the slopes of standard curves. Parallelism between the Lv standard curve and plasma dilution curves of vitellogenic females confirmed the validity of the assay for quantifying plasma Vtg. The Lv-based Vtg ELISA was further applied to evaluate the estrogenic activity of monocrotophos pesticide. PMID:25855009

  13. Environmental estrogen Bisphenol A adsorption/oxidation on Graphene oxide/MnO2 (GO/MnO2) nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bele, Sotiria I.; Deliyanni, Eleni A.

    2015-04-01

    The environmental fate and decontamination of Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen that is used as a monomer in plastic industry, are of emerging concern. This study focused on the kinetics, influencing factors and pathways of its adsorption and oxidative decomposition by MnO2. Additionally, Graphene oxide/MnO2 (GO/MnO2) nanocomposite was prepared and tested as a kind of adsorbent and/or catalysts for oxidative decomposition of Bisphenol A (BPA). A suspension of graphene oxide/manganese sulfate (GO/MnSO4) produced by the modified Hummers method was in situ transformed into GO/MnO2 nanocomposite in combination with KMnO4. It is found that MnO2 nanoparticles are uniformly distributed in the structure of GO. The surface chemistry and the porous texture of the prepared nanocomposite were characterized by thermal analysis (DTA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen adsorption (BET). The nanocomposite presented superior catalytic activities, much higher than that of the bare MnO2 for the decomposition of BPA in the presence of H2O2. The high activity of GO/MnO2 nanocomposite for the decomposition of BPA could be related to the synergistic effect of GO and MnO2 with the assistance of H2O2 according to the adsorption-oxidation-desorption mechanism.

  14. Enhanced environmental detection of uranyl compounds based on luminescence characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Jean Dennis

    Uranium (U) contamination can be introduced to the environment as a result of mining and manufacturing activities related to nuclear power, detonation of U-containing munitions (DoD), or nuclear weapons production/processing (DOE facilities). In oxidizing environments such as surface soils, U predominantly exists as U(VI), which is highly water soluble and very mobile in soils. U(VI) compounds typically contain the UO22+ group (uranyl compounds). The uniquely structured and long-lived green luminescence (fluorescence) of the uranyl ion (under UV radiation) has been studied and remained a strong topic of interest for two centuries. The presented research is distinct in its objective of improving capabilities for remotely sensing U contamination by understanding what environmental conditions are ideal for detection and need to be taken into consideration. Specific focuses include: (1) the accumulation and fluorescence enhancement of uranyl compounds at soil surfaces using distributed silica gel, and (2) environmental factors capable of influencing the luminescence response, directly or indirectly. In a complex environmental system, matrix effects co-exist from key soil parameters including moisture content (affected by evaporation, temperature and humidity), soil texture, pH, CEC, organic matter and iron content. Chapter 1 is a review of pertinent background information and provides justification for the selected key environmental parameters. Chapter 2 presents empirical investigations related to the fluorescence detection and characterization of uranyl compounds in soil and aqueous samples. An integrative experimental design was employed, testing different soils, generating steady-state fluorescence spectra, and building a comprehensive dataset which was then utilized to simultaneously test three hypotheses: The fluorescence detection of uranyl compounds is dependent upon (1) the key soil parameters, (2) the concentration of U contamination, and (3) time of analysis

  15. Direct interactions in the recognition between the environmental estrogen bisphenol AF and human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijun; Lv, Junna; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Li, Qi; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF) was used as a model compound to investigate the binding mechanism between the endocrine disrupting compound and human serum albumin (HSA) using multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling method at the protein level. The results indicated that BPAF was indeed bound to HSA and located in the hydrophobic pocket of HSA on subdomain IIA through hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions. The fluorescence quenching data showed that the binding of BPAF and HSA quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA, and the static quenching constants were acquired. PMID:25694370

  16. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  17. Capillary electrochromatography and nano-liquid chromatography coupled to nano-electrospray ionization interface for the separation and identification of estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Asensio-Ramos, María; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel; Fanali, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Nano-LC and CEC were coupled to MS through a nanospray or a pressurized liquid-junction interface for the simultaneous separation and determination of 11 estrogenic compounds. Different stationary phases, that is, phenyl, C18, and C18 bidentate silica hydrate, were studied. For both techniques, the phenyl stationary phase was the best option, considering separation efficiency, selectivity, and resolution. Under the optimized conditions, the baseline separation of the target compounds (including estradiol and zearalanol epimers) was achieved in less than 20 min in nano-LC-MS and less than 13 min in CEC-MS. Molecular imprinted polymer SPE was used for extracting the target compounds from mineral water samples with the analysis of nano-LC-MS. The whole molecular imprinted polymer SPE nano-LC-MS method was validated through a recovery study at two levels of concentration. Sensitivity was improved by on-column focusing technique obtaining LODs in the range 1.4-55.4 ng/L. PMID:26534883

  18. Estimation of environmental properties for inorganic compounds using LSER

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The Great Lakes Science Center has devised values for inorganic species for use in the environmental property- predictive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER). Property estimation has been difficult for inorganic species. In this presentation aqueous solubility, bioconcentration and acute aquatic toxicity are estimated for inorganic compounds using existing LSER equations. The best estimations arise from the most accurate description of predominant solution species, many within an order of magnitude. The toxicities also depend on an estimation of the bioactive amount and configuration. A number of anion/cation combinations (salts) still resist accurate property estimation, and the reasons currently are not understood. These new variable values will greatly extend the application and utility of LSER for the estimation of environmental properties.

  19. Corncob bedding alters the effects of estrogens on aggressive behavior and reduces estrogen receptor-α expression in the brain.

    PubMed

    Villalon Landeros, Rosalina; Morisseau, Christophe; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Fu, Samuel H; Hammock, Bruce D; Trainor, Brian C

    2012-02-01

    There is growing appreciation that estrogen signaling pathways can be modulated by naturally occurring environmental compounds such as phytoestrogens and the more recently discovered xenoestrogens. Many researchers studying the effects of estrogens on brain function or behavior in animal models choose to use phytoestrogen-free food for this reason. Corncob bedding is commonly used in animal facilities across the United States and has been shown to inhibit estrogen-dependent reproductive behavior in rats. The mechanism for this effect was unclear, because the components of corncob bedding mediating this effect did not bind estrogen receptors. Here, we show in the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) that estrogens decrease aggression when cardboard-based bedding is used but that this effect is absent when corncob bedding is used. California mice housed on corncob bedding also had fewer estrogen receptor-α-positive cells in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and ventromedial hypothalamus compared with mice housed on cardboard-based bedding. In addition, corncob bedding suppressed the expression of phosphorylated ERK in these brain regions as well as in the medial amygdala and medial preoptic area. Previous reports of the effects of corncob bedding on reproductive behavior are not widely appreciated. Our observations on the effects of corncob bedding on behavior and brain function should draw attention to the importance that cage bedding can exert on neuroendocrine research. PMID:22186416

  20. Binary classification of a large collection of environmental chemicals from estrogen receptor assays by quantitative structure-activity relationship and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Rotroff, Daniel M; Judson, Richard S

    2013-12-23

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals subject to regulatory decisions for endocrine disrupting potential. The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have tested ∼8200 chemicals in a broad screening panel of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and antagonist activity. The present work uses this large data set to develop in silico quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using machine learning (ML) methods and a novel approach to manage the imbalanced data distribution. Training compounds from the ToxCast project were categorized as active or inactive (binding or nonbinding) classes based on a composite ER Interaction Score derived from a collection of 13 ER in vitro assays. A total of 1537 chemicals from ToxCast were used to derive and optimize the binary classification models while 5073 additional chemicals from the Tox21 project, evaluated in 2 of the 13 in vitro assays, were used to externally validate the model performance. In order to handle the imbalanced distribution of active and inactive chemicals, we developed a cluster-selection strategy to minimize information loss and increase predictive performance and compared this strategy to three currently popular techniques: cost-sensitive learning, oversampling of the minority class, and undersampling of the majority class. QSAR classification models were built to relate the molecular structures of chemicals to their ER activities using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), classification and regression trees (CART), and support vector machines (SVM) with 51 molecular descriptors from QikProp and 4328 bits of structural fingerprints as explanatory variables. A random forest (RF) feature selection method was employed to extract the structural features most relevant to the ER activity. The best model was obtained using SVM in combination with a subset of descriptors identified from a large set via the RF algorithm, which recognized the active and

  1. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds for Ground Support Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery Eliza L.; Calle, Luz, Marina; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The need to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. CPCs are used as temporary protective coatings and must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different oily film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing. The results for the fifteen CPC systems are presented in this paper.

  2. Environmentally friendly corrosion preventive compounds for ground support structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Eliza; Curran, Jerome; Calle, Luz Marina; Kolody, Mark

    The need to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based corrosion preventive compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. CPCs are used as temporary protective coatings and must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different oily film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing. The results for the fifteen CPC systems are presented in this paper.

  3. Molecular Modeling for Screening Environmental Chemicals for Estrogenicity: Use of the Toxicant-Target Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of relevant experimental information available for the evaluation of the potential health and environmental effects of many man made chemicals. Knowledge of the potential pathways for activity provides a rational basis for the extrapolations inherent in the pre...

  4. ASSESSMENT OF DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays and quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PRC) are sensitive methods for assessing exposure of fish and other wildlife to environmental contaminants by measuring changes in gene expression. Several genes normally induced by estradiol in female fish, those for vitellogenins (...

  5. Nitroaromatic munition compounds: environmental effects and screening values.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Opresko, D M; Maxwell, C J; Welsh, C J; Cretella, F M; Reno, P H; Daniel, F B

    1999-01-01

    Available data on the occurrence, transport, transformation, and toxicity of eight nitroaromatic munition compounds and their degradation products, TNT, TNB, DNB, DNA, 2-ADNT, RDX, HMX, and tetryl were used to identify potential fate in the environment and to calculate screening benchmarks or safe environmental levels for aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Results of monitoring studies revealed that some of these compounds persist at sites where they were produced or processed. Most of the compounds are present in soil, sediment, and surface water or groundwater at military sites. Soil adsorption coefficients indicate that these chemicals are only moderately adsorbed to soil and may leach to groundwater. Most of these compounds are transformed by abiotic or biotic mechanisms in environmental media. Primary transformation mechanisms involve photolysis (TNT, RDX, HMX, tetryl), hydrolysis (tetryl), and microbial degradation (TNT, TNB, DNB, DNA, 2-ADNT, and HMX). Microbial degradation for both nitro and nitramine aromatic compounds involves rapid reduction of nitro groups to amino groups, but further metabolism is slow. With the exception of DNB, complete mineralization did not usually occur under the conditions of the studies. RDX was resistant to microbial degradation. Available ecotoxicological data on acute and chronic studies with freshwater fish and invertebrates were summarized, and water quality criteria or ecotoxicological screening benchmarks were developed. Depending on the available data, criteria/benchmarks were calculated according to USEPA Tier I or Tier II guidelines. The munitions chemicals are moderately to highly toxic to freshwater organisms, with chronic screening values < 1 mg/L. For some chemicals, these low values are caused by inherent toxicity; in other cases, they result from the conservative methods used in the absence of data. For nonionic organic munitions chemicals, sediment quality benchmarks were calculated (based on Kow values and the

  6. Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxian; Wu, Wenzhong; Henkelmann, Bernhard; You, Li; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, PAHs and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

  7. Rapid Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Mechanisms Determine the Sexually Dimorphic Sensitivity of Ventricular Myocytes to 17β-Estradiol and the Environmental Endocrine Disruptor Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Scott M.; Chen, Yamei; Yan, Sujuan

    2012-01-01

    Previously we showed that 17β-estradiol (E2) and/or the xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA) alter ventricular myocyte Ca2+ handing, resulting in increased cardiac arrhythmias in a female-specific manner. In the present study, the roles of estrogen receptors (ER) in mediating the rapid contractile and arrhythmogenic effects of estrogens were examined. Contractility was used as an index to assess the impact of E2 or BPA on Ca2+ handling in rodent ventricular myocytes. The concentration-response curve for the stimulatory effects of BPA and E2 on female myocyte was inverted-U shaped. Detectable effects for each compound were observed at 10−12 m, and the most efficacious concentrations for each were at 10−9 m. Sensitivity to E2 and BPA was not observed in male myocytes and was abolished in myocytes from ovariectomized females. Analysis using protein-conjugated E2 suggests that these rapid actions are induced by membrane-associated receptors. Analysis using selective ER agonists and antagonists and a genetic ERβ knockout mouse model showed that ERα and ERβ have opposing actions in myocytes and that the balance between ERβ and ERα signaling is the prime regulator of the sex-specific sensitivity toward estrogens. The response of female myocytes to E2 and BPA is dominated by the stimulatory ERβ-mediated signaling, and the absence of BPA and E2 responsiveness in males is due to a counterbalancing-suppressive action of ERα. We conclude that the sex-specific sensitivity of myocytes to estrogens and the rapid arrhythmogenic effects of BPA and estradiol in the female heart are regulated by the balance between ERα and ERβ signaling. PMID:22166976

  8. Quaternary Triphenylphosphonium Compounds: A New Class of Environmental Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Schlüsener, Michael P; Kunkel, Uwe; Ternes, Thomas A

    2015-12-15

    A nontarget screening using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was established to identify industrial emerging contaminants in the Rhine River. With this approach, quaternary triphenylphosphonium compounds (R-Ph3P(+)) were identified as new emerging contaminants in the aquatic environment. The suggested chemical structures were elucidated by MS fragmentation and chemical databank searches and eventually confirmed via authentic standards. R-Ph3P(+) are used worldwide by the chemical industry to synthesize alkenes via the Wittig reaction. In total, five compounds [R = butyl (Bu), R = ethyl (Et), R = methoxymethyl (MeOMe), R = methyl (Me), and R = phenyl (Ph)] were found in German rivers and streams. R-Ph3P(+) were detected only in those rivers and streams that received an appreciable portion of wastewater from the chemical industry. Up to 2.5 μg/L Et-Ph3P(+) was quantified in a small stream from the Hessian Ried, and in the Rhine, up to 0.56 μg/L Me-Ph3P(+) was detected. R-Ph3P(+) were also identified in suspended particulate matter and sediments in the Rhine catchment, with MeOMe-Ph3P(+) concentrations of up to 0.75 mg/kg and up to 0.21 mg/kg, respectively. Because of the lack of ecotoxicological studies, the environmental risks caused by R-Ph3P(+) can be assessed for neither pelagic nor benthic organisms. PMID:26555603

  9. Environmental toxins and breast cancer on Long Island. II. Organochlorine compound levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Marilie D; Wolff, Mary S; Neugut, Alfred I; Eng, Sybil M; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Britton, Julie A; Terry, Mary Beth; Levin, Bruce; Stellman, Steven D; Kabat, Geoffrey C; Hatch, Maureen; Senie, Ruby; Berkowitz, Gertrud; Bradlow, H Leon; Garbowski, Gail; Maffeo, Carla; Montalvan, Pat; Kemeny, Margaret; Citron, Marc; Schnabel, Freya; Schuss, Allan; Hajdu, Steven; Vinceguerra, Vincent; Niguidula, Nancy; Ireland, Karen; Santella, Regina M

    2002-08-01

    Whether environmental contaminants increase breast cancer risk among women on Long Island, NY, is unknown. The study objective is to determine whether breast cancer risk is increased in relation to organochlorines, compounds with known estrogenic characteristics that were extensively used on Long Island and other areas of the United States. Recent reports do not support a strong association, although there are concerns with high risks observed in subgroups of women. Blood samples from 646 case and 429 control women from a population-based case-control study conducted on Long Island were analyzed. No substantial elevation in breast cancer risk was observed in relation to the highest quintile of lipid-adjusted serum levels of p,p'-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethene (DDE) [odds ratio (OR), 1.20 versus lowest quintile; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76-1.90], chlordane (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.62-1.55), dieldrin (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.69-2.72), the sum of the four most frequently occurring PCB congeners (nos. 118, 153, 138, and 180; OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.54-1.29), and other PCB congener groupings. No dose-response relations were apparent. Nor was risk increased in relation to organochlorines among women who had not breastfed or were overweight, postmenopausal, or long-term residents of Long Island; or with whether the case was diagnosed with invasive rather than in situ disease, or with a hormone receptor-positive tumor. These findings, based on the largest number of samples analyzed to date among primarily white women, do not support the hypothesis that organochlorines increase breast cancer risk among Long Island women. PMID:12163320

  10. Is there a role for estrogen activity assays? Recombinant cell bioassay for estrogen: Development and applications.

    PubMed

    Klein, Karen Oerter

    2015-07-01

    There are many questions which cannot be answered without a very sensitive estradiol assay. A recombinant cell bioassay (RCBA) for estradiol was developed in 1994. The sensitivity of the bioassay is 0.02-0.2 pg/ml (0.07-0.7 pmol/L), more than 20 times more sensitive than commercial RIAs and 10 times more sensitive than newer mass spectrometry assays. The RCBA for estradiol opened the door to study low levels of estradiol equivalents (EE) across the physiological spectrum of life from prepubertal children through menopause and across the spectrum from normal physiology, in boys as well as girls, to pathology, including: premature thelarche; estradiol suppression in children treated with GnRH analogues for precocious puberty; aromatase inhibition in boys with growth hormone deficiency; the differences between oral and transdermal routes of estrogen administration in girls with Turner's syndrome; women with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors; and women with urogenital atrophy treated with low dose vaginal estrogen. A bioassay also allows study of endocrine disruptors, like phytoestrogens and other environmental compounds, which are relevant to public health and alternative medicine options. This paper reviews the assay and the last 20 years of applications. A bioassay for estrogen has a role because measuring biological effect is theoretically useful, increasing the understanding of physiology in addition to biochemical levels, giving different information than other assays, and opening the door to measure very low levels of estrogen activity in both humans and the environment. PMID:25159103

  11. Interaction of environmental chemicals with the estrogen and progesterone receptors from the oviduct of the American alligator.

    PubMed Central

    Vonier, P M; Crain, D A; McLachlan, J A; Guillette, L J; Arnold, S F

    1996-01-01

    Reports of reproductive abnormalities in the American alligator from Lake Apopka, Florida, have been linked to a spill of DDT and other pesticides suspected of having hormonelike activity. To determine whether environmental chemicals had the potential to function as exogenous hormones in the American alligator, we examined the ability of chemicals to bind the estrogen receptor (aER) and progesterone receptor (aPR) in a protein extract prepared from the oviduct of the alligator. In competition binding assays with [3H]17 beta-estradiol, some DDT metabolites showed inhibition of [3H]17 beta-estradiol binding to aER. A combination of DDTs demonstrated an additive decrease in [3H]17 beta-estradiol binding to aER. Modern-use chemicals such as alachlor, trans-nonachlor, endosulfan, and atrazine also competed with [3H]17 beta-estradiol for binding to the aER. To test the effect of chemicals identified in alligator eggs from Lake Apopka on [3H]17 beta-estradiol binding, we mixed these chemicals at concentrations measured in eggs in the competition binding assay. 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide (p,p'-DDD) and trans-nonachlor, both found in Lake Apopka, interacted with aER, whereas others such as chlordane and toxaphene did not. Surprisingly, combinations of these chemicals decreased [3H]17 beta-estradiol binding in a greater than additive manner. To assess the ability of chemicals to interact with aPR, we performed commpetition binding assays with the synthetic progestin [3H]R5020. Most of the chemicals tested did not reduce [3H]R5020 binding to aPR, whereas endosulfan, alachlor, and kepone inhibited binding. These results provide the first evidence that environmental chemicals bind the aER and aPR from the American alligator, supporting the hypothesis that the reported reproductive abnormalities may be related to the modulation of endocrine-related responses. The findings that combinations of chemicals demonstrated a greater than additive interaction with

  12. Aromatase deficiency in a Chinese adult man caused by novel compound heterozygous CYP19A1 mutations: Effects of estrogen replacement therapy on the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhike; Wang, Ou; Nie, Min; Elison, Kathleen; Zhou, Dujin; Li, Mei; Jiang, Yan; Xia, Weibo; Meng, Xunwu; Chen, Shiuan; Xing, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Aromatase deficiency is a rare disorder resulting in estrogen insufficiency in humans. It has been reported in remarkably few men with loss-of-function mutations in the CYP19A1 gene encoding the aromatase, a cytochrome P450 enzyme that plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens. We investigated a non-consanguineous family including an adult man with clinical features of aromatase deficiency, and studied the effects of estrogen replacement in the man. Methods We investigated the clinical and biochemical phenotype, performed CYP19A1 mutational analysis in the family and 50 unrelated persons, studied the effects of CYP19A1 mutations on aromatase protein structure, functionally characterized the mutations by cell-based aromatase activity assays, and studied the effects of estrogen replacement on the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism. Results The man with clinical features of aromatase deficiency had novel compound heterozygous CYP19A1 mutations (Y81C and L451P) that were not found in 50 unrelated persons. Three-dimensional modeling predicted that Y81C and L451P mutants disrupted protein structure. Functional studies on the basis of in vitro expression showed that Y81C and L45P mutants significantly decreased the aromatase activity and catalytic efficiency. Estrogen replacement in the man increased bone mineral density, accelerated bone maturation, improved lipid profile and liver steatosis, and improved glucose levels but not insulin resistance. Conclusions We have identified two novel CYP19A1 missense mutations in an aromatase-deficient man. Estrogen replacement in the man shows great impact on recovering the impairments in the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism, but fails to improve insulin resistance. PMID:25301327

  13. Species comparisons in molecular and functional attributes of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    While endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have the potential to act via several mechanisms of action, one of the most widely studied is the ability of environmental chemicals to interact directly with either the estrogen (ER) or androgen receptor (AR). In vitro screening assay...

  14. Estrogenic compounds, chemical quantitation, biological assessment – What we know, what we don’t, and what should our future priorities be?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last two decades, the literature has become replete with reports quantifying estrogenic chemicals in the environment ranging from natural hormones to plasticizers. In addition to measuring concentrations, laboratories have developed various in vitro assays to assess estrogenic activity of ...

  15. ALTERATION OF BEHAVIORAL SEX DIFFERENTIATION BY EXPOSURE TO ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS DURING A CRITICAL NEONATAL PERIOD: EFFECTS OF ZEARALENONE, METHOXYCHLOR, AND ESTRADIOL IN HAMSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was designed to determine if neonatal exposure to the estrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone or the weakly estrogenic pesticide methoxychlor could masculinize and/or defeminize the behavior of female hamsters. Neonatal hamsters were given a single s.c. injection of ei...

  16. The pesticides endosulfan, toxaphene, and dieldrin have estrogenic effects on human estrogen-sensitive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soto, A M; Chung, K L; Sonnenschein, C

    1994-01-01

    Estrogenic pesticides such as DDT and chlordecone generate deleterious reproductive effects. An "in culture" bioassay was used to assess the estrogenicity of several pesticides. The E-screen test uses human breast estrogen-sensitive MCF7 cells and compares the cell yield achieved after 6 days of culture in medium supplemented with 5% charcoal-dextran stripped human serum in the presence (positive control) or absence (negative control) of estradiol and with diverse concentrations of xenobiotics suspected of being estrogenic. Among the organochlorine pesticides tested, toxaphene, dieldrin, and endosulfan had estrogenic properties comparable to those of DDT and chlordecone; the latter are known to be estrogenic in rodent models. The E-screen test also revealed that estrogenic chemicals may act cumulatively; when mixed together they induce estrogenic responses at concentrations lower than those required when each compound is administered alone. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7925178

  17. POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF COMPOUNDING AND FABRICATING INDUSTRIES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objectives of this research effort were to identify compounding and fabricating industries from a selected number of Standard Industrial Classification codes, and identify the environmental impact resulting from processing steps used by fabrication or compounding indu...

  18. Characterization of environmental estrogens in river water using a three pronged approach: active and passive water sampling and the analysis of accumulated estrogens in the bile of caged fish.

    PubMed

    Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Körner, Oliver; Schönenberger, René; Suter, Marc J F; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2005-11-01

    Estrogenicity of river water is highly variable and it is difficult to obtain an average measure of the estrogenicity. Consequently it is difficult to tie the estrogenic effects observed in fish to their level of exposure to estrogens. To get a better handle on average estrogenic exposure we tested a recently developed passive sampling system (polar organic chemical integrative sampler, POCIS). In addition, we investigated the bioaccumulation of estrogens in caged brown trout and measured plasma vitellogenin in males as a bioindicator of estrogenic effects. We developed a mini-caging method to suit the hydrological conditions in small rivers and to improve upon the often poor survival of salmonids in caging trials. POCISs were positioned upstream and downstream of 5 sewage treatment works' discharges and left on site for 3 weeks (as were the caged fish), during which period 3 water grab samples were taken at each site. Concentrations of estrogens were determined using a yeast-based reporter gene assay and chemical analysis. Results from grab sampling, passive sampling, and bioaccumulation were correlated; however, plasma vitellogenin concentrations were elevated at only 1 of 5 sites. POCISs provide an integrated and biologically meaningful measure of estrogenicity in thatthey accumulate estrogens in a pattern similar to that of brown trout. Mini-caging appears a significant methodological advance; no fish were lost, moreover, all fish survived in excellent health. PMID:16294854

  19. Environmental Fate of Organophosphorus Compounds Related to Chemical Weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M L; Love, A H; Vance, A; Reynolds, J G

    2005-02-08

    Man-made organophosphorus compounds have been widely distributed throughout our environment as pesticides since their development during and after WWII. Many important studies have documented their relative persistence and toxicity. Development and use of some organophosphorus compounds as nerve agents gave rise to a separate but parallel effort to understand environmental persistence. In this latter case, the experiments have focused mainly on evaporation rates and first-order reaction kinetics. However, because organophosphorus compounds are easily polarized, the ionic content of a surrounding media directly factors into these reaction rates, but limited work in this regard has been done under environmentally relevant conditions. Furthermore, limited experiments investigating persistence of these agents on soil has resulted in widely varying degradation rates. Not surprisingly, no studies have investigated affinities of organophosphorus nerve agents to mineral or organic matter typically found in soil. As a result, we initiated laboratory experiments on dilute concentrations of nerve agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (VX) to quantify persistence in simulated environmental aqueous conditions. A quantitative analytical method was developed for VX and its degradation products using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS). VX hydrolysis rate is known to have a pH-dependency, however, the type of buffer and the relative proportion of different nucleophiles in solution significantly affect the overall rate and mechanism of degradation. For example, dissolved carbonate, a weak nucleophile dominating natural water, yielded pseudo-first order rate constants of {approx} 8 x 10{sup -3}/hr at pH 5 and 2 x 10{sup -2}/hr at pH 11. This small pH-dependent variation departs significantly from widely accepted rates at this pH range (4 x 10{sup -4}/hr to 8 x 10{sup -2}/hr) that were based on

  20. BIOCHEMICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ESTROGENICALLY ACTIVE WASTEWATER: COMPARISON OF FIELD EXTRAPOLATIONS TO THE MEASURED CONCENTRATION OF ESTROGENS IN SEWAGE EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenically active wastewater was observed at two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) utilizing caged male channel catfish in a previous study. The focus of this investigation was to identify and characterize the compound(s) responsible for this estrogenic response. ...

  1. Early cerebral activities of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A appear to act via the somatostatin receptor subtype sst(2).

    PubMed Central

    Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Madeo, Maria; Canonaco, Marcello; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been aroused by the specific actions of bisphenol A (BPA). The present investigation represents a first study dealing with the interaction of BPA with the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtype (sst(2)) in the rat limbic circuit. After treating pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats with two doses (400 microg/kg/day; 40 microg/kg/day) of BPA, the binding activity of the above receptor subtype was evaluated in some limbic regions of the offspring. The higher dose proved to be the more effective one, as demonstrated by the elevated affinity of sst(2) with its specific radioligand, [(125)I]-Tyr(0)somatostatin-14. The most dramatic effects of BPA on sst(2) levels occurred at the low-affinity states of such a subtype in some telencephalic limbic areas of postnatal rats (10 days of age; postnatal day [PND] 10). These included lower (p < 0.05) sst(2) levels in the gyrus dentate of the hippocampus and basomedial nucleus of the amygdala; significantly higher (p < 0.01) levels were observed only for the high-affinity states of the periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. A similar trend was maintained in PND 23 rats with the exception of much lower levels of the high-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in the amygdala nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. However, greater changes produced by this environmental estrogen were reported when the binding activity of sst(2) was checked in the presence of the two more important selective agonists (zolpidem and Ro 15-4513) specific for the alpha-containing Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor complex. In this case, an even greater potentiating effect (p < 0.001) was mainly obtained for the low-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in PND 10 animals, with the exception of the high-affinity type in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and gyrus dentate. These results support the contention that an sst(2) subtype alpha-containing GABA type A receptor system might

  2. Modeling the photocatalytic mineralization in water of commercial formulation of estrogens 17-β estradiol (E2) and nomegestrol acetate in contraceptive pills in a solar powered compound parabolic collector.

    PubMed

    Colina-Márquez, José; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors in water are contaminants of emerging concern due to the potential risks they pose to the environment and to the aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a solar photocatalytic treatment process in a pilot-scale compound parabolic collector (CPC) was used to remove commercial estradiol formulations (17-β estradiol and nomegestrol acetate) from water. Photolysis alone degraded up to 50% of estradiol and removed 11% of the total organic carbon (TOC). In contrast, solar photocatalysis degraded up to 57% of estrogens and the TOC removal was 31%, with 0.6 g/L of catalyst load (TiO2 Aeroxide P-25) and 213.6 ppm of TOC as initial concentration of the commercial estradiols formulation. The adsorption of estrogens over the catalyst was insignificant and was modeled by the Langmuir isotherm. The TOC removal via photocatalysis in the photoreactor was modeled considering the reactor fluid-dynamics, the radiation field, the estrogens mass balance, and a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law, that was expressed in terms of the rate of photon adsorption. The optimum removal of the estrogens and TOC was achieved at a catalyst concentration of 0.4 g/L in 29 mm diameter tubular CPC reactors which approached the optimum catalyst concentration and optical thickness determined from the modeling of the absorption of solar radiation in the CPC, by the six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM). PMID:26205059

  3. Evaluating Cost when Selecting Performance Reference Compounds for the Environmental Deployment of Polyethylene Passive Samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge in environmental passive sampling is determining when equilibrium is achieved between the sampler, target contaminants, and environmental phases. A common approach is the use of performance reference compounds (PRCs) to indicate degree of equilibrium. One logistical...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS AND CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    One in eight women is predicted to be diagnosed with breast cancer this year. Of those afflicted with the disease, only about one-quarter will have a family history that helps to explain their diagnosis. The rest have what is termed sporadic cancer, potentially influenced by l...

  5. Biomarker Genes for Detecting Estrogenic Activity of Endocrine Disruptors via Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eui-Man; An, Beum-Soo; Yang, Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are compounds used in various industrial products, drugs, and cosmetics. They can be found in the environment and disturb the endocrine and reproductive systems, resulting in adverse effects to humans and wildlife such as birth defects and developmental disorders. Since several EDs have a structure similar to that of endogenous steroid hormones such as estrogens, they intend to have an affinity for steroid hormone receptors and alter hormone-mediated metabolism by binding to these receptors. EDs are therefore a global concern and assays should be developed to efficiently determine whether these compounds are detrimental to biological systems. Diverse experimental methods may help determine the endocrine disrupting potential of EDs and evaluate the adverse effects of a single and/or combination of these reagents. Currently, biomarkers have been employed to objectively measure EDs potency and understand the underlying mechanisms. Further studies are required to develop ideal screening methods and biomarkers to determine EDs potency at environmentally relevant concentrations. In this review, we describe the biomarkers for estrogenicity of EDs identified both in vitro and in vivo, and introduce a biomarker, cabindin-D9k (CaBP-9k), that may be used to assess estrogenic activity of EDs. PMID:22690157

  6. Estrogen and Xenoestrogens in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, S.V.; Russo, J.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing concern that estrogenic environmental compounds that act as endocrine disrupting chemicals might potentially have adverse effects on hormone-sensitive organs such as the breast. This concern is further fueled by evidence indicating that natural estrogens, specifically 17 β-estradiol (E2), are important factors in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. We have developed an in vitro- in vivo model in which we have demonstrated the carcinogenicity of E2 in the human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F. Hypermethylation of NRG1, STXBP6, BMP6, CSS3, SPRY1 and SNIP were found at different progression stages in this model. The utilization of this powerful and unique model has provided a tool for exploring whether bisphenol A (BPA) and butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) have relevance in the initiation of breast cancer. These studies provide first hand evidence that the natural estrogen 17 β-estradiol and xenoestrogenic substances like BPA are able to induce neoplastic transformation in human breast epithelial cells. PMID:19933552

  7. Estrogenic activity measured in a sewage treatment works treating industrial inputs containing high concentrations of alkylphenolic compounds--a case study.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, David A; Brighty, Geoff C; Daniel, Mic; Kirby, Sonia J; Hurst, Mark R; Kennedy, Joe; Morris, Steven; Routledge, Edwin J; Sumpter, John P; Waldock, Michael J

    2002-03-01

    Chemical analyses were combined with a biological assay to investigate the main estrogenic chemicals as they passed through a sewage treatment works (STW) and entered a river. The STW studied was unusual in that it received wastewater from the textile trade. This wastewater was shown to contain high concentrations of alkylphenol polyethoxylates and their degradation products, such as nonylphenol. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation, combined with biological assay, showed that the majority of the estrogenic activity was contributed by the alkylphenolic chemicals and the natural estrogens 17beta-estradiol and estrone. Despite removal of a high proportion of the alkylphenolic chemicals by the various treatment processes within the STW, concentrations in the final effluent were still high compared to most other STW effluents in the United Kingdom. The effluent was very estrogenic to caged fish, as was the river water 2 and 5 km downstream of the STW, even though less so. Using various approaches, attempts were made to determine which group of chemicals contributed most to the estrogenic activity of the effluent. The analysis suggested that, in this unusual situation, the alkylphenolic chemicals may contribute the majority of the estrogenic activity of the effluent. However, this conclusion was based on a number of uncertainties that are presently unresolved and hence can be considered only tentative. PMID:11878463

  8. Biomarker responses to estrogen and androgen exposure in the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans): A new bioindicator species for endocrine disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Breda M; Hogan, Natacha S

    2016-02-01

    Small-bodied freshwater fish are commonly used in regulatory testing for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) but most lack a sensitive and quantifiable androgen-specific biomarker. Brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans) are a North American freshwater fish whose males produce an androgen-regulated glycoprotein in the kidney called spiggin. Although spiggin induction in females has been used as an androgen-specific biomarker of exposure in other stickleback species it has not been characterized in brook stickleback. Therefore, our objective was to develop a bioassay using brook stickleback to measure estrogenic and androgenic responses and establish the sensitivity of traditional and novel biomarkers of exposure. We first developed and optimized a qPCR assay to measure spiggin and vitellogenin transcript levels in kidney and liver tissue, respectively. Basal levels were differentially expressed in mature wild-caught male and female brook stickleback. To determine their sensitivity to EDCs, fish were exposed to nominal concentrations of 1, 10 and 100ng/L of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) or 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) for 21days (sampled at 7 and 21days) under semi-static renewal conditions. MT and EE2 exposure induced spiggin and vitellogenin transcripts in female kidneys and male livers, respectively. Exposure to EE2 also increased hepatosomatic index in both sexes and decreased gonadosomatic index in females. Histopathological alterations were observed in the kidney of EE2-exposed fish and an increase in kidney epithelium cell height occurred in MT-exposed females. Given the sensitivity of these endpoints, the brook stickleback is a promising new freshwater fish model for EDC evaluation and a potential bioindicator for EDCs in North American freshwater environments. PMID:26545489

  9. Direct determination of the estrogenic compounds 8-prenylnaringenin, zearalenone, alpha- and beta-zearalenol in beer by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maragou, Niki C; Rosenberg, Erwin; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Koupparis, Michael A

    2008-08-15

    A novel LC-ESI-MS method for the simultaneous determination of four of the most significant estrogenic compounds naturally occurring in beer, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), zearalenone (ZON), alpha-zearalenol (alpha-ZOL) and beta-zearalenol (beta-ZOL) which requires minimal sample preparation was developed using a chemometric approach. Experimental design was applied to assess the effects of the LC-ESI-MS parameters (mobile phase flow rate, drying gas flow, nebuliser pressure and capillary potential) on the obtained signal and to optimize the values in order to provide maximum sensitivity and detectability. The proposed method is simple, consisting only of degassing the beer and diluting with water (1:1, v/v) before injection. Comparison between the two internal standards used, zearalanone (ZAN) and 4,2'-dihydroxychalcone (4,2'-DHC), showed that ZAN performs better as internal standard not only for the mycotoxins but for 8-PN as well, giving lower % RSDs. Under inter-day conditions mean recoveries were 107% for ZON, 87.8% for alpha-ZOL, 72.8% for beta-ZOL, and 77.5% for 8-PN. The corresponding % RSDs ranged between 5.0 and 8.0. The method limits of detection were 1.3, 1.4, 1.0 and 0.8 ng mL(-1) for ZON, alpha-ZOL, beta-ZOL and 8-PN, respectively. The method was applied to 15 beer samples obtained from local supermarkets and the concentration of the phytoestrogen 8-PN in beer ranged between <0.8 and 38.6 ng mL(-1), while neither ZON nor its metabolites, alpha-ZOL and beta-ZOL, were detected. PMID:18621378

  10. Studies on electrochemical oxidation of estrogenic disrupting compound bisphenol AF and its interaction with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Yang, Jichun; Wang, Yuejiao; Li, Yanhui; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-07-15

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF) is an environmental pollutant to disrupt endocrine system or cause cancer, thus the detection of trace BPAF is very important. In this study, a simple and highly sensitive electroanalytical method for the determination of BPAF was developed. In pH 6.0 phosphate buffer solutions, carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH) modified glassy carbon electrode exhibits an enhanced effectiveness for the oxidation of BPAF. This electrode exhibited two linear relationships with BPAF concentration range of 0.02μmolL(-1) to 8.0μmolL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.0077μmolL(-1) (S/N=3). The proposed method was successfully applied to determine BPAF in real samples and the results were satisfactory. The MWCNT-COOH/GCE electrode showed good reproducibility, stability and anti-interference. The electrochemistry and spectroscopy methods are also described for the evaluation of BPAF-HSA interaction. In the presence of HSA, the peak currents of BPAF decreased linearly due to the formation of a super-molecular complex. The binding constant between BPAF and HSA, obtained by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), was consistent with the fluorescence analysis. The molecular modeling studies were carried out to clearly describe the interaction between BPAF and HSA. PMID:24866560

  11. Induction of vitellogenesis in Japanese quail as a sensitive indicator of the estrogen-mimetic effect of a variety of environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, G A; Gibbins, A M

    1984-08-01

    Vitellogenesis was induced in mature male Japanese quail following intramuscular injections of 16 mumol/100 g body weight of any one of four estrogen analogues or 160 mumol/100 g of the nonsteroid zearalenone. Six hours after the injections, microgram levels of vitellogenin were detected and quantitated by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of plasma from estrogen-treated birds and from 160 mumol zearalenone-treated birds showed, 4 days after the injections, the three subunits of vitellogenin normally seen in the plasma of egg-laying female quail. As evidenced by increased concentrations of plasma protein-bound phosphorus, total plasma calcium, and total plasma protein, mole-for-mole diethylstilbestrol dipropionate was 114%, ethynyl estradiol 75%, moxestrol 108%, and zearalenone 5.6% as effective as estradiol-17 beta in inducing vitellogenesis over a 4-day period. The responses to 160 mumol zearalenone/100 g over 8 days were approximately .6 the responses for estradiol. The responses to ethynyl estradiol were about equal to those for estradiol for days 1 and 2, then faded to .3 the estradiol response by day 8. Doses of 16 or 160 mumol/100 g of cholecalciferol, chlordecone, corticosterone, o,p1-DDT [1,1,1-trichlor-2-(p-chlorphenyl)-2-(o-chlorphenyl)eth ane], methoxychlor, progesterone, or testosterone, or 16 mumol/100 g of zearalenone did not induce vitellogenesis. Induction of vitellogenesis in male Japanese quail can thus provide a sensitive test of the estrogen-mimicking activity of some possible environmental contaminants. PMID:6237320

  12. EMISSION OF VOLATILE COMPOUNDS BY SEEDS UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small mammals locate buried wet seeds more efficiently than buried dry seeds. This may be attributable to emission of volatile compounds by the seeds. To test this hypothesis I measured emission of volatile compounds from seeds of three plant species (Pinus contorta, Purshia tr...

  13. Novel biosensors for environmental monitoring of phenolic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, O.; Wang, J.

    1995-12-01

    This presentation will describe new strategies for amperometric biosensing of phenolic compounds. The class enzyme tyrosinase is employed in connection with these biosensing schemes. The enzyme can tolerate the high temperature of screen-printing/drying processes used for fabricating disposable sensor strips. In addition to single-use electrodes, we will describe the characteristic of a remote enzyme electrode for field monitoring of phenolic compounds. Finally, a novel bioamplification scheme for enhancing the sensitivity of phenol biosensing will be reported.

  14. HOMOLOGY MODELING OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR SUBTYPE BETA (ER-BETA) AND CALCULATION OF LIGAND BINDING AFFINITIES. (R826133)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone playing critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development, female and male reproductive processes, and bone health. Numerous natural and synthetic environmental compounds have been shown capa...

  15. Detection, transport and degradation of free and conjugated estrogens in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeppert, Nadine; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The behavior of Estradiol (E2), Estrone (E1) and Estrone-Sulfate (E1-3S) in a natural soil is analyzed in terms of transport and metabolic degradation properties. These compounds are released into the environment in significant amounts and have been shown to potentially contribute to endocrine disruption in humans and wildlife. Although literature data demonstrate that hormones sorb strongly to soil and also degrade quickly, significant amounts, especially of conjugated estrogens, can be still detected in various environmental media. Moreover, several recent studies note that hormones bind to colloidal organic carbon, which can facilitate hormone transport and decrease the degree of hormone degradation. These findings thus suggest a moderate mobility and persistence of estrogen compounds and their metabolites. However, many uncertainties regarding the transport and fate of estrogen compounds remain, which are complicated by difficulties in sampling and detection. Most research is performed at the catchment scale where large volumes of water are available for analysis. In addition, laboratory batch tests usually involve estrogen concentrations that are large and unrealistic for environmental conditions, or require use of labeled compounds for which it is unclear whether the substance measured is parent or metabolite. There is a serious lack of transport studies under controlled conditions, using small water volumes and low detection limits, which are crucial to understand the basic transport processes of estrogen transport and degradation. Here, we present a protocol for hormone measurement using an online-SPE LC-MS/MS for detection. We use the method to quantify free estrogens and metabolites at low concentrations in small sample volumes (~mL) of water and soil extracts. The study includes batch (sorption) and transport tests in flow-through columns, using natural clay-rich soil from Bet Dagan, Israel. Consideration of sorption and transport experiments using both

  16. Estrogens and Cognition: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Korol, Donna L.; Pisani, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are becoming well known for their robust enhancement on cognition particularly for learning and memory that relies upon functioning of the hippocampus and related neural systems. What is also emerging is that estrogen modulation of cognition is not uniform, at times enhancing yet at other times impairing learning. This review explores the bidirectional effects of estrogens on learning from a multiple memory systems view, focusing on the hippocampus and striatum, whereby modulation by estrogens sorts according to task attributes and neural systems engaged during cognition. We highlight our findings that show the ability to solve hippocampus-sensitive tasks typically improves under relatively high estrogen status while the ability to solve striatum-sensitive tasks degrades with estrogen exposures. Though constrained by dose and timing of exposure, these opposing enhancements and impairments of cognition can be observed following treatments with different estrogenic compounds including the hormone estradiol, the isoflavone genistein found in soybeans, and agonists that are selective for specific estrogen receptors, suggesting that activation of a single receptor type is sufficient to produce the observed shifts in learning strategies. Using this multi-dimensional framework will allow us to extend our thinking of the relationship between estrogens and cognition to other brain regions and cognitive functions. PMID:26149525

  17. Determination of estrogenic activity in the river Chienti (Marche Region, Italy) by using in vivo and in vitro bioassays.

    PubMed

    Cocci, Paolo; Palermo, Francesco Alessandro; Quassinti, Luana; Bramucci, Massimo; Miano, Antonino; Mosconi, Gilberto

    2016-05-01

    Environmental estrogen-like compounds (i.e. xenoestrogens) are a variety of pollutants, ranging from synthetic to natural occurring molecules, that are found in surface and waste waters over a wide range of concentrations. In aquatic environment, the overall estrogenic activity is often due to the presence of a mixture of chemicals and their degraded products which can induce synergistic effects. Current strategies for monitoring estrogen-like chemicals are based on the use of a battery of in vivo and in vitro ecotoxicological tests. In this regard, the aim of the present work was to carry out a bio-monitoring study for testing estrogenicity of the Chienti river (Marche Region, Italy) by using both an E-screen and a vitellogenin (Vtg) induction assay in juvenile goldfish. Three sites were used for analysis, localized at the mouth (sampling point 1), in the middle (sampling point 2) and at the origin (sampling point 3) of Chienti river. For most of the water samples (i.e. samples collected at sampling points 2 and 3), clear estrogenic activity was detected in the E-screen assay suggesting different proliferation activities in function of the collecting site. In contrast, the Vtg ELISA demonstrated that water samples collected from each sampling point were estrogenic. Overall, we showed for the first time that the estrogenic activities in water samples from the Chienti river were significant in both in vivo and in vitro; we also observed a different sensitivity between bioassays. PMID:27155408

  18. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for brown trout vitellogenin for use in the detection of environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, A.; Solomon, K.; Sherry, J.; Fielden, M.; Hodson, P.

    1995-12-31

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is a phospholipoprotein egg yolk precursor found in females of most oviparous vertebrates. Vitellogenin induction in male teleosts is known to result from exposure to xenoestrogens. Using antisera for brown trout Vg, the authors adapted an (ELISA) for in vivo Vg in brown trout (Salmo trutta). The authors will use the Vg bioassay to detect the estrogenic effects of effluents, contaminated sediments and suspect chemicals. Vg production in male fish was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 11-B estradiol. Harvested and purified Vg was used in an assay based on competition between soluble Vg and Vg adsorbed in microtitre wells for binding sites on rabbit anti-Vg antibody. Adsorbed Vg-antibody complexes were subsequently revealed by an alkaline phosphatase technique. The reaction intensity was measured as absorbance and used to quantify the amount of antibody bound to adsorbed Vg. The amount of bound antibody was inversely proportional to the amount of vitellogenin in the fish plasma. Preliminary results show that the assay`s working range, corresponding to 80--20% binding, was 14--355 ng/ml, with 50% binding (IC{sub 50}) around 71 ng/mi. Calculated at 50% binding, the intra-assay variation was less than 8% (n = 9) and the inter-assay variation was also less than 8% (n =4). The assay`s sensitivity was 0.067 ng/mi and the limit of detection was 0.134 ng/ml. The authors will present the results of Vg bioassays for the presence of estrogen mimics in industrial effluent.

  19. Fate of Estrogens in Soils and Detection by ELISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Emmanuelle; Sheedy, Claudia; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Zvomuya, Francis; Gaultier, Jeanette; Goddard, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Land application of manure can contribute to the release of estrogenic compounds in the environment. Estrogens may move from soils to water by processes such as runoff and leaching. The objectives of the present study were to determine the fate of estrogens in soils and to develop a detection method for these compounds. The sorption (soil sorption coefficient (Kd) and sorption coefficient per unit organic carbon (Koc)) of 17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol and equol were studied, using batch equilibrium experiments, in 121 surface soils from Alberta, Canada. The mineralization of [4-14C] 17β-estradiol was determined in soil microcosms in a subset of 36 samples. Quantitative relationships at the regional level were explored using partial least squares regression (PLS) (between Kd or Koc values and soil properties) and by ordinary least squares regression (between Kd or Koc values of different estrogens). Soil properties (r2 0.51-0.87 for Kd and 0.32-0.44 for Koc) provided better prediction models than using the data of different estrogens (r2 0.38-0.71 for Kd and 0.18-0.40 for Koc). PLS regression models for mineralization parameters of 17ß-estradiol had lower predictive power (lower r2)than models developed for sorption parameters. In addition, it has become of primary importance to develop sensitive detection methods that are able to detect low estrogen concentrations (ng L-1) in a wide variety of environmental matrices in order to validate the prediction of their fate and to study their presence in affected ecosystems. Conjugates were synthesized using a mixed anhydride reaction and two Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) were developed using polyclonal antibodies. One ELISA was highly specific for 17β-estradiol (with an IC50 of 243 ng mL-1) and the second allowed for the broader detection of 17β-estradiol, estrone and estriol (with an IC50 of 18 ng mL-1 for 17β-estradiol). The cross-reactivity of both ELISAs was studied against 13 compounds (natural

  20. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor knockout mice: what their phenotypes reveal about mechanisms of estrogen action.

    PubMed

    Curtis Hewitt, S; Couse, J F; Korach, K S

    2000-01-01

    Natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens have numerous effects on the development and physiology of mammals. Estrogen is primarily known for its role in the development and functioning of the female reproductive system. However, roles for estrogen in male fertility, bone, the circulatory system and immune system have been established by clinical observations regarding sex differences in pathologies, as well as observations following menopause or castration. The primary mechanism of estrogen action is via binding and modulation of activity of the estrogen receptors (ERs), which are ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factors. ERs are found in highest levels in female tissues critical to reproduction, including the ovaries, uterus, cervix, mammary glands and pituitary gland. Since other affected tissues have extremely low levels of ER, indirect effects of estrogen, for example induction of pituitary hormones that affect the bone, have been proposed. The development of transgenic mouse models that lack either estrogen or ER have proven to be valuable tools in defining the mechanisms by which estrogen exerts its effects in various systems. The aim of this article is to review the mouse models with disrupted estrogen signaling and describe the associated phenotypes. PMID:11250727

  1. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS DOCUMENT FOR BORON AND BORON COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health and Environmental Effects Documents (HEEDS) are prepared for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER). his document series is intended to support listings under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as to provide health-related limits an...

  2. Estrogenic Activity of Coumestrol, DDT, and TCDD in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ndebele, Kenneth; Graham, Barbara; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous estrogens have dramatic and differential effects on classical endocrine organ and proliferation. Xenoestrogens are environmental estrogens that have endocrine impact, acting as both estrogen agonists and antagonists, but whose effects are not well characterized. In this investigation we sought to delineate effects of xenoestrogens. Using human cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells) as a model, the effects of representative xenoestrogens (Coumestrol-a phytoestrogen, tetrachlorodioxin (TCDD)-a herbicide and DDT-a pesticide) on proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were examined. These xenoestrogens and estrogen inhibited the proliferation of Hela cells in a dose dependent manner from 20 to 120 nM suggesting, that 17-β-estrtadiol and xenoestrogens induced cytotoxic effects. Coumestrol produced accumulation of HeLa cells in G2/M phase, and subsequently induced apoptosis. Similar effects were observed in estrogen treated cells. These changes were associated with suppressed bcl-2 protein and augmented Cyclins A and D proteins. DDT and TCDD exposure did not induce apoptosis. These preliminary data taken together, suggest that xenoestrogens have direct, compound-specific effects on HeLa cells. This study further enhances our understanding of environmental modulation of cervical cancer. PMID:20623010

  3. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Son, O. van; Piersma, A.H.; Jong, P.C. de; Berg, M. van den

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E{sub 2}) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  4. Bisphenol A, an environmental estrogen-like toxic chemical, induces cardiac fibrosis by activating the ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingying; Zhang, Li; Wu, Xianxian; Hou, Liangyu; Li, Zhange; Ju, Jin; Li, Qian; Qin, Wei; Li, Jiamin; Zhang, Qingwei; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Longyin; Xu, Chaoqian; Fang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-05-27

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely studied typical endocrine-disrupting chemical. The present study aimed to verify whether BPA could induce proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts and collagen production leading to cardiac interstitial fibrosis. After exposure to BPA for 30 consecutive days, decreased cardiac function was observed in rats using echocardiography, and the deposition of collagen was detected by Masson's trichrome staining and electron microscope. BPA remarkably stimulated proliferation and migration of cultured cardiac fibroblasts and collagen production in a concentration-dependent manner, as revealed by MTT, wound healing assay and collagen assay. Meanwhile, BPA treatment also enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). In contrast, pretreatment with estrogen receptor inhibitor ICI182780 or ERK inhibitor PD98059 prevented the enhanced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and subsequently inhibited the up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression induced by BPA. As a consequence, these inhibitors also decreased proliferation and collagen production, as well as the fibrosis-related genes expression. Taken together, our results indicated that BPA may act as a promoting factor in proliferative process and collagen production of cardiac fibroblasts via activating ERK1/2. PMID:27025157

  5. Effects of coumestrol on estrogen receptor function and uterine growth in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Markaverich, B M; Webb, B; Densmore, C L; Gregory, R R

    1995-01-01

    Isoflavonoids and related compounds such as coumestrol have classically been categorized as phytoestrogens because these environmentally derived substances bind to the estrogen receptor (ER) and increase uterine wet weight in immature rats and mice. Assessment of the binding affinities of isoflavonoids for ER and subsequent effects on uterine growth suggest these compounds are less active estrogens than estradiol and therefore may reduce the risk of developing breast or prostate cancer in humans by preventing estradiol binding to ER. With the renewed interest in the relationships between environmental estrogens and cancer cause and prevention, we assessed the effects of the phytoestrogen coumestrol on uterotropic response in the immature, ovariectomized rat. Our studies demonstrated that in this animal model, coumestrol is an atypical estrogen that does not stimulate uterine cellular hyperplasia. Although acute (subcutaneous injection) or chronic (multiple injection or orally via drinking water) administration of coumestrol significantly increased uterine wet and dry weights, the phytoestrogen failed to increase uterine DNA content. The lack of true estrogenic activity was characterized by the inability of this phytoestrogen to cause cytosolic ER depletion, nuclear ER accumulation, or the stimulation of nuclear type II sites which characteristically precede estrogenic stimulation of cellular DNA synthesis and proliferation. In fact, subcutaneous or oral coumestrol treatment caused an atypical threefold induction of cytosolic ER without corresponding cytosolic depletion and nuclear accumulation of this receptor, and this increased the sensitivity of the uterus to subsequent stimulation by estradiol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images p574-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:7556010

  6. Occupational and environmental toxicology of mercury and its compounds.

    PubMed

    Satoh, H

    2000-04-01

    Mercury exists in various chemical forms. The important forms from a toxicological viewpoint are the metallic form, also called the elemental form, the divalent inorganic forms and methylmercury compounds. Elemental (Hg0) mercury has a high vapor pressure and the vapor causes a number of cases of poisoning via inhalation. Classical mercury poisoning is characterized by a triad of signs, namely tremors, erethism and gingivitis. Mercurial erethism, which is characterized by behavioral and personality changes such as extreme shyness, excitability, loss of memory, and insomnia are also observed. Recently, the effects of mercury exposure at levels around 0.05 mg/m3 or lower have been of concern and may include minor renal tubular damage, increased complaints of tiredness, memory disturbance and other symptoms, subclinical finger tremor, abnormal EEG by computerized analysis and impaired performance in neurobehavioral or neuropsychological tests. Abnormal gait, dysarthria, ataxia, deafness and constriction of the visual field are typical of the symptoms of methylmercury poisoning observed in Minamata and Iraqi outbreaks, as well as in occupational methylmercury poisoning cases. Furthermore, an infant born to a mother with excessive methylmercury consumption showed various neurological disturbances and delayed development. Since several populations are believed to be still exposed to methylmercury through the consumption of fish and sea mammals, neurobehavioral deviations in children of these populations have recently been investigated. PMID:10812838

  7. Recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of xenobiotics and complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharewski, T.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure to naturally occurring or synthetic substances that possess sex steroid and/or dioxin-like activity may have long range effects on human health, reproductive fitness and environmental quality. Results from recent epidemiological studies have suggested that xenobiotics with sex steroid activity may contribute to the development of hormone-dependent cancers and disorders in the male reproductive tract as well as attenuate sperm production. However, most of these compounds, which are referred to as endocrine disruptors, are structurally dissimilar to sex steroids. Yet, based upon ambiguous assays, it has been conceded that the effects of these compounds are mediated by receptors. The authors have taken advantage of the mechanism of action of these compounds to develop recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for environmental estrogens and dioxin-like compounds. The assays use an easily measurable enzyme activity (i.e. firefly luciferase), exhibit improved sensitivity and selectivity and are amenable to automation. Data will be presented demonstrating that phytoestrogens (e.g. genistein) and xenobiotics such as pesticides (e.g. DDT, Kepone), nonionic surfactants (e.g. p-nonylphenol), and precursors used in the manufacture of plastics (e.g. Bisphenol A) exhibit estrogenic activity. In addition, the assays have been used to detect estrogenic and dioxin-like activity in complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent. These results demonstrate the utility of recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for identifying substances or complex mixtures with estrogenic and/or dioxin-like activity.

  8. Occurrence, fate and environmental risk assessment of endocrine disrupting compounds at the wastewater treatment works in Pietermaritzburg (South Africa).

    PubMed

    Manickum, T; John, W

    2014-01-15

    Steroid hormone Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) (natural estrogens (17-β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3), synthetic estrogen (17-α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)), natural androgen (testosterone) (tes) and natural progestogen (progesterone) (pro)) at an activated sludge wastewater works (WWW), were quantitated using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The steroid hormone profile in the adjacent surface water was also determined. Pro was the most abundant (41%, 408 ng/L) in the influent, followed by tes (35%, 343 ng/L) and E2 (12%, 119 ng/L). E1 was the most abundant (35%, 23 ng/L) in effluent, followed by E2 (30%, 20 ng/L) and tes (17%, 11 ng/L). Chemical removal efficiencies of the steroid hormones by the WWW averaged 92%. High removal efficiency was observed for pro (98% ± 2) and tes (96% ± 1), compared to natural (72-100%) and synthetic estrogen (90% ± 3), with biodegradation being the major removal route for pro and tes. The lowest removal for E2 is in spring (65%), and maximum removal is in winter (95%). Natural (E2, E1) and synthetic estrogen (EE2) were major contributors to influent (E2 = 69%) and effluent (E2 = 73%) estrogenic potency. The estrogenic potency removal averaged 85% (range: 73-100). Risk assessment of the steroid hormones present in wastewater effluent, and surface water, indicated that EE2 and E2 pose the highest risk to human health and fish. EE2 was found to be much more resistant to biodegradation, compared to E2, in surface water. Estrone, as the breakdown product of E2 and EE2 in wastewater, appears to be suitable as an indicator of EDCs. The study suggests that a battery of tests: quantitative chemical assay, bioassay for estrogenic activity and risk assessment methods, collectively, are preferred in order to make meaningful, accurate conclusions regarding potential adverse effects of EDCs present in treated wastewater effluent or surface water, to the aquatic environment, human health, and wildlife systems. PMID

  9. Comparative endpoint sensitivity of in vitro estrogen agonist assays.

    PubMed

    Dreier, David A; Connors, Kristin A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2015-07-01

    Environmental and human health implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), particularly xenoestrogens, have received extensive study. In vitro assays are increasingly employed as diagnostic tools to comparatively evaluate chemicals, whole effluent toxicity and surface water quality, and to identify causative EDCs during toxicity identification evaluations. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated ToxCast under the Tox21 program to generate novel bioactivity data through high throughput screening. This information is useful for prioritizing chemicals requiring additional hazard information, including endocrine active chemicals. Though multiple in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess estrogen agonist activity, the relative endpoint sensitivity of these approaches and agreement of their conclusions remain unclear during environmental diagnostic applications. Probabilistic hazard assessment (PHA) approaches, including chemical toxicity distributions (CTD), are useful for understanding the relative sensitivity of endpoints associated with in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays by predicting the likelihood of chemicals eliciting undesirable outcomes at or above environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, PHAs were employed to examine the comparative endpoint sensitivity of 16 in vitro assays for estrogen agonist activity using a diverse group of compounds from the USEPA ToxCast dataset. Reporter gene assays were generally observed to possess greater endpoint sensitivity than other assay types, and the Tox21 ERa LUC BG1 Agonist assay was identified as the most sensitive in vitro endpoint for detecting an estrogenic response. When the sensitivity of this most sensitive ToxCast in vitro endpoint was compared to the human MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, a common in vitro model for biomedical and environmental monitoring applications, the ERa LUC BG1 assay was several orders of magnitude less

  10. In Vitro Assays for Assessment of Androgenic and Estrogenic Activity of Defined Mixtures and Complex Environmental Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point sources of endocrine active compounds to aquatic environments such as waste water treatment plants, pulp and paper mills, and animal feeding operations invariably contain complex mixtures of chemicals. The current study investigates the use of targeted in vitro assays des...

  11. Nanostructured copper-coated solid-phase microextraction fiber for gas chromatographic analysis of dibutyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Bu, Yanan; Luo, Chuannan

    2015-01-01

    A novel nanostructured copper-based solid-phase microextraction fiber was developed and applied for determining the two most common types of phthalate environmental estrogens (dibutyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate) in aqueous samples, coupled to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The copper film was coated onto a stainless-steel wire via an electroless plating process, which involved a surface activation process to improve the surface properties of the fiber. Several parameters affecting extraction efficiency such as extraction time, extraction temperature, ionic strength, desorption temperature, and desorption time were optimized by a factor-by-factor procedure to obtain the highest extraction efficiency. The as-established method showed wide linear ranges (0.05-250 μg/L). Precision of single fiber repeatability was <7.0%, and fiber-to-fiber repeatability was <10%. Limits of detection were 0.01 μg/L. The proposed method exhibited better or comparable extraction performance compared with commercial and other lab-made fibers, and excellent thermal stability and durability. The proposed method was applied successfully for the determination of model analytes in plastic soaking water. PMID:25354215

  12. Novel mammalian cell lines expressing reporter genes for the detection of environmental chemicals activating endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptors (ArhR) or estrogen receptors (ER).

    PubMed

    Minh, Si Do; Below, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2008-12-01

    We have constructed two vector systems (pDMS5, pSAB2) containing the promoter regions of the human CYP1A1 gene including xenobiotic response elements or the promoter region of the Xenopus laevis vitellogenin A2 gene including estrogen response elements, respectively, and the genes for green fluorescent protein and firefly luciferase. These vectors were transfected into CHO-K1 cells. Transiently transfected cells consistently responded to 1 nmol/l TCDD (dioxin) or 10 nmol/l 17ss-estradiol, respectively, with a 3-5 fold increase in luciferase activity. Permanent cell lines were selected by culturing transiently transfected cells under continued presence of antibiotics and dilution cloning. Cells which had stably integrated the vector-DNA into the genomic DNA were selected. SiF6 cells responded to treatment with TCDD, PCB126, benzo(a)pyrene or indirubin-3'-monoxime in the concentration range between 0 and 1 micromol/l. SiG12 cells responded to treatment with bisphenol A, 4-MBC and DDT in the concentration range between 0 and 10 micromol/l. Compared with the controls, luciferase mRNA-abundance (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) and luciferase activity (luminescence assay) were elevated up to 3-fold. Resveratrol or tamoxifen, respectively, worked as full antagonists. Luciferase expression was increased upon treatment of cells with extracts of spiked soil samples indicating that our systems are suited for screening of environmental samples. PMID:18835349

  13. Health implications of exposure to environmental nitrogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Mensinga, Tjeert T; Speijers, Gerrit J; Meulenbelt, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Food have set an acceptable daily intake (ADI) for nitrate of 0-3.7 mg nitrate ion/kg bodyweight; this appears to be safe for healthy neonates, children and adults. The same is also true of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Reference Dose (RfD) for nitrate of 1.6 mg nitrate nitrogen/kg bodyweight per day (equivalent to about 7.0 mg nitrate ion/kg bodyweight per day). This opinion is supported by a recent human volunteer study in which a single dose of nitrite, equivalent to 15-20 times the ADI for nitrate, led to only mild methaemoglobinaemia (up to 12.2%), without other serious adverse effects. The JECFA has proposed an ADI for nitrite of 0-0.07 mg nitrite ion/kg bodyweight and the EPA has set an RfD of 0.1 mg nitrite nitrogen/kg bodyweight per day (equivalent to 0.33 mg nitrite ion/kg bodyweight per day). These values are again supported by human volunteer studies. PMID:14579546

  14. Novel Promising Estrogenic Receptor Modulators: Cytotoxic and Estrogenic Activity of Benzanilides and Dithiobenzanilides

    PubMed Central

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Giron, Maria-Dolores; Piotrowska, Hanna; Lisiak, Natalia; Granig, Walter H.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco-Javier; Salto, Rafael; Murias, Marek; Erker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 27 benzanilides and dithiobenzanilides built on a stilbene scaffold and possessing various functional groups in aromatic rings previously described for their spasmolytic properties was assayed on three human cancer cell lines (A549 –lung adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 estrogen dependent breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 estrogen independent breast adenocarcinoma) and 2 non-tumorigenic cell lines (CCD39Lu–lung fibroblasts, MCF-12A - breast epithelial). Three compounds (6, 15 and 18) showed selective antiproliferative activity against estrogen dependent MCF-7 cancer cells and their estrogenic activity was further confirmed in MCF-7 transfected with an estrogen receptor reporter plasmid and in HEK239 cells over-expressing the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Compound 18 is especially interesting as a potential candidate for therapy since it is highly toxic and selective towards estrogen dependent MCF7 cell lines (IC50 = 5.07 μM versus more than 100 μM for MDA-MB-231) and almost innocuous for normal breast cells (IC50 = 91.46 μM for MCF-12A). Docking studies have shown that compound 18 interacts with the receptor in the same cavity as estradiol although the extra aromatic ring is involved in additional binding interactions with residue W383. The role of W383 and the extended binding mode were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:26730945

  15. Vitellogenin induction by xenobiotic estrogens in the red-eared turtle and African clawed frog.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, B D; Palmer, S K

    1995-01-01

    Many environmental pollutants have estrogenic activity in animals. Xenobiotic estrogens include many pesticides and industrial chemicals that biocumulate. The impact of these common pollutants on the reproductive success of wildlife may be considerable, particularly in threatened or endangered species. This research examined the use of plasma vitellogenin in males as a biomarker for estrogenic xenobiotics in reptiles and amphibians. Adult male turtles (Trachemys scripta) and frogs (Xenopus laevis) were given ip injections of estradiol-17 beta (E2), diethylstilbestrol (DES), or o,p'-DDT (1-chloro-2-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl)benzene) daily for 7 days, and plasma was collected on day 14. The estrogenic activity of each compound was determined by measuring the induction of plasma vitellogenin. Vitellogenin was identified by precipitation, electrophoresis, Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). In both species, estradiol and DES treatments induced the most vitellogenin, whereas DDT treatments induced smaller amounts of vitellogenin in a dose-dependent fashion. These data indicate that induction of plasma vitellogenin in males may be a useful biomarker of xenobiotic estrogen activity in wild populations of reptiles and amphibians. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:7556019

  16. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC TOOL FOR IDENTIFYING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX EXTRACTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Unidentified Organic Compounds. For target analytes, standards are purchased, extraction and clean-up procedures are optimized, and mass spectra and retention times for the chromatographic separation are obtained for comparison to the target compounds in environmental sample ...

  17. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  18. Estrogen and Bazedoxifene

    MedlinePlus

    Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are used to treat hot flashes (sudden feelings of warmth, especially in the ... women may experience other symptoms and body changes). Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are also used to prevent ...

  19. Detection of estrogenic activity in municipal wastewater effluent using primary cell cultures from three-spined stickleback and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Björkblom, C; Salste, L; Katsiadaki, I; Wiklund, T; Kronberg, L

    2008-10-01

    Environmental estrogens are substances that imitate the effects of endogenous estrogens. Effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants are known to contain substances with estrogenic activity including steroidal estrogens and xenoestrogens. In the current study, a combination of biological and chemical analysis was applied to determine the estrogenic activity in municipal wastewater effluents in Finland. The male three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) hepatocyte assay with vitellogenin induction as an endpoint was used for the detection of estrogenic activity in solid phase extracts of wastewater effluents, and 17beta-estradiol (E2) as a positive control. The wastewater extracts and E2 were found to induce vitellogenin production. The extracts were also subjected to chromatographic fractionation and the collected fractions were assayed. The only active fraction was the one in which E2, estrone and ethynylestradiol were eluted. Its activity corresponded to the activity of the original wastewater extract. The LC-MS/MS analyses of the wastewater extracts showed that the concentration of estrone was about 65 ng L(-1), the concentration of E2 was less than 1 ng L(-1), while estriol and 17alpha-ethynylestradiol could not be detected. These findings showed that the activity of the wastewater extracts and the chromatographic fraction was much higher than the activity which could have been expected on the base of the chemical analysis. This strongly indicates that other compounds, possibly acting by additivity or synergism, are playing a major role in the induced vitellogenin production by the hepatocytes. PMID:18783814

  20. Estrogen and cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Shang, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen exhibits a broad spectrum of physiological functions ranging from regulation of the menstrual cycle and reproduction to modulation of bone density, brain function, and cholesterol mobilization. Despite the beneficial actions of endogenous estrogen, sustained exposure to exogenous estrogen is a well-established risk factor for various cancers. We summarize our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of estrogen signaling in normal and cancer cells and discuss the major challenges to existing antiestrogen therapies. PMID:23043248

  1. Identification of an estrogenic hormone receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Mimoto, Ai; Fujii, Madoka; Usami, Makoto; Shimamura, Maki; Hirabayashi, Naoko; Kaneko, Takako; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-12-28

    Changes in both behavior and gene expression occur in Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compound. However, only one steroid hormone receptor has been identified. Of the 284 known nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in C. elegans, we selected nhr-14, nhr-69, and nhr-121 for analysis as potential estrogenic hormone receptors, because they share sequence similarity with the human estrogen receptor. First, the genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the affinity of each protein for estrogen was determined using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. All three NHRs bound estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. To evaluate the specificity of the binding, we performed a solution competition assay using an SPR biosensor. According to our results, only NHR-14 was able to interact with estrogen. Therefore, we next examined whether nhr-14 regulates estrogen signaling in vivo. To investigate whether these interactions actually control the response of C. elegans to hormones, we investigated the expression of vitellogenin, an estrogen responsive gene, in an nhr-14 mutant. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that vitellogenin expression was significantly reduced in the mutant. This suggests that NHR-14 is a C. elegans estrogenic hormone receptor and that it controls gene expression in response to estrogen.

  2. In vivo bioassay-guided fractionation of marine sediment extracts from the Southern California Bight, USA, for estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Schlenk, Daniel; Sapozhnikova, Yelena; Irwin, Mary Ann; Xie, Lingtian; Hwang, Wendy; Reddy, Sharanya; Brownawell, Bruce J; Armstrong, Jeff; Kelly, Mike; Montagne, David E; Kolodziej, Edward P; Sedlak, David; Snyder, Shane

    2005-11-01

    The exposure and uptake of environmental estrogenic compounds have been reported in previous studies of demersal flatfish species in the central Southern California Bight (SCB), USA. The objective of this study was to evaluate the estrogenic or feminizing activity of marine sediments from the SCB by using in vivo vitellogenin (VTG) assays in male or juvenile fish. In 2003, sediments were collected near wastewater outfalls serving the counties of Los Angeles (LACSD) and Orange (OCSD), and the city of San Diego (SD), California, USA. Cultured male California halibut (CH; Paralichthys californicus) were either directly exposed to sediments for 7 d or treated with two intraperitoneal injections of sediment extract over 7 d. The 17beta-estradiol (E2) equivalent values ranged from 1 to 90 microg/kg with LACSD > SD > OCSD. Measurable concentrations of E2 were observed in all sediment extracts and ranged from 0.16 to 0.45 ng/g. Estrone (El) was only observed in sediments near the LACSD outfall (0.6 ng/g). Alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates were observed in all sediment samples, but were highest near the OCSD outfall, where concentrations of nonylphenol were 3,200 ng/g. Fractionation studies of the LACSD sediment extract collected in 2004 failed to demonstrate relationships between VTG expression and 62 analytes, including E2, which was observed in the whole extract (2.9 ng/g). Oxybenzone (1.6 ng/g) was identified in bioactive fractions as well as unknown compounds of relatively high polarity. These results indicate that estrogen receptor-based assays may underestimate environmental estrogenic activity and estrogenic compounds other than classic natural and xenoestrogens may contribute to estrogenic activity of sediments from the SCB. PMID:16398118

  3. DATABASE OF SOURCES OF ENVIRONMENTAL RELEASES OF DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Database of Sources of Environmental Releases of Dioxin-like Compounds in the United States (US)(...

  4. Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds of Environmental Interest: Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasteen, Thomas G.; Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) have been assigned environmental roles in global warming, acid precipitation, and cloud formation where two important members dimethyl sulfide (CH3)2 S, DMS, and methanethiol, CH3SH, MT, of VOSC group are involved.

  5. Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds of Environmental Interest: Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol. An Introductory Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasteen, Thomas G.; Bentley, Ronald

    2004-10-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds and their degradation products play important environmental roles in global warming, acid precipitation, and cloud formation. Two important members of this group, dimethyl sulfide, DMS, and methanethiol, MT, are formed by living organisms as well as by abiotic processes. DMS is synthesized by various organisms in the marine environment and large quantities of it are released to the atmosphere. One key precursor for DMS synthesis is the sulfonium salt, dimethylsulfoniopropionate. MT, also formed in marine environments, can be further converted to DMS. The chemical reactions responsible for the biosynthesis of DMS and MT are emphasized here, as well as means for their degradation. Since sulfur compounds are often ignored in normal course work, this article provides a basic foundation for an understanding of these interesting and environmentally significant compounds.

  6. Estrogen-like effects of diet-derived cadmium differ from those of orally administered CdCl(2) in the ERE-luc estrogen reporter mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Balaji; Mäkelä, Sari; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Berglund, Marika; Håkansson, Helen; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Maggi, Adriana

    2011-04-25

    Cadmium (Cd), an environmental and dietary contaminant, has been described to mimic the effects of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in selected model systems when studied as an inorganic salt. However, inorganic Cd salts do not represent the main form of Cd exposure in general human populations. The aims of this study were to compare the estrogen-like effects and the bioavailability of dietary Cd to inorganic CdCl(2). Adult ovariectomized ERE-luc reporter mice were administered two bread based diets containing different concentrations of Cd (17.57 and 49.22μg/kg, corresponding to oral intakes of 1.8 and 5.1μg/kg body weight (bw) per day, respectively), inorganic CdCl(2) (1μg/kg bw per day by gavage) or E(2) (5μg/kg bw per day pellet) for 21 days. The effects on estrogen signaling were investigated by studying the uterine weights, luciferase activation, and expression of endogenous estrogen target genes. The uterine weight was significantly increased by both CdCl(2) and E(2) but not by the Cd containing diets. All treatments modulated the expression of luciferase and the endogenous estrogen target genes; however, there was no consistent overlap between the responses triggered by the bread diets and the responses stimulated by CdCl(2) or E(2). Oral exposure to Cd was calculated and the concentrations in liver and kidneys quantified to estimate the amount of absorbed Cd retained in tissues. The results suggest significantly lower absorption and/or tissue retention of dietary Cd compared to CdCl(2) following oral exposure. Altogether, our results support previous reports on in vivo estrogenicity of CdCl(2) but do not suggest the same activity for diet bound Cd. This study calls for caution when extrapolating results from pure compound studies (e.g. estrogenicity of CdCl(2)) to dietary exposure scenarios (e.g. estrogenicity of diet bound Cd). Further basic research is needed on the mechanisms of interaction between Cd and the estrogen signaling, biologically active species of

  7. Overcoming the toxicity effects of municipal wastewater sludge and biosolid extracts in the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) assay.

    PubMed

    Citulski, Joel; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2012-04-01

    For nearly two decades, the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) has been used as a valuable tool for determining the total estrogenic potency of various environmental samples, including influent and effluent streams at municipal wastewater plants. However, applying the YES assay to wastewater sludges and stabilized biosolids has been problematic. This is due to co-extracted compounds from the solids either proving toxic to the yeast or masking the presence of estrogenic substances. The present research describes the development and validation of sample preparation steps that mitigate the toxicity effects of municipal wastewater sludge and biosolid samples in the YES assay, while allowing for reliable dose-dependent expression of estrogenic activity. A copper work-up for sulfur removal and chromatographic cleanup with silica and alumina were required in addition to solid-phase extraction to adequately remove interfering compounds. Sample stabilization methods such as autoclaving, lyophilization and formaldehyde treatment were found to be detrimental to the assay. Hence, heat-drying is recommended to prevent cytotoxicity and the degradation of estrogenic substances. PMID:22277884

  8. Adaptive Significance of ERα Splice Variants in Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) Resident in an Estrogenic Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility that chronic, multigenerational exposure to environmental estrogens selects for adaptive hormone response phenotypes is a critical unanswered question. Embryos/larvae of killifish from an estrogenic polluted environment (New Bedford Harbor, NBH), as compared to th...

  9. ESTROGEN INDUCED VITELLOGENIN MRNA AND PROTEIN IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally persistent xenobiotic chemicals appear to disrupt normal endocrine function by acting as ligands for endogenous steroid receptors, including the estrogen receptor. Xenobiotics that bind to the estrogen receptor may elicit several effects, one of which is acti...

  10. Effects of Pubertal Exposure to Dietary Soy on Estrogen Receptor Activity in the Breast of Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Fitriya N; Wood, Charles E; Willson, Cynthia J; Register, Thomas C; Lees, Cynthia J; Howard, Timothy D; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K; Tooze, Janet A; Chou, Jeff W; Miller, Lance D; Cline, J Mark

    2016-05-01

    Endogenous estrogens influence mammary gland development during puberty and breast cancer risk during adulthood. Early-life exposure to dietary or environmental estrogens may alter estrogen-mediated processes. Soy foods contain phytoestrogenic isoflavones (IF), which have mixed estrogen agonist/antagonist properties. Here, we evaluated mammary gland responses over time in pubertal female cynomolgus macaques fed diets containing either casein/lactalbumin (n = 12) or soy protein containing a human-equivalent dose of 120 mg IF/day (n = 17) for approximately 4.5 years spanning menarche. We assessed estrogen receptor (ER) expression and activity, promoter methylation of ERs and their downstream targets, and markers of estrogen metabolism. Expression of ERα and classical ERα response genes (TFF1, PGR, and GREB1) decreased with maturity, independent of diet. A significant inverse correlation was observed between TFF1 mRNA and methylation of CpG sites within the TFF1 promoter. Soy effects included lower ERβ expression before menarche and lower mRNA for ERα and GREB1 after menarche. Expression of GATA-3, an epithelial differentiation marker that regulates ERα-mediated transcription, was elevated before menarche and decreased after menarche in soy-fed animals. Soy did not significantly alter expression of other ER activity markers, estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, or promoter methylation for ERs or ER-regulated genes. Our results demonstrate greater ER expression and activity during the pubertal transition, supporting the idea that this life stage is a critical window for phenotypic modulation by estrogenic compounds. Pubertal soy exposure decreases mammary ERα expression after menarche and exerts subtle effects on receptor activity and mammary gland differentiation. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 385-95. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27006379

  11. Enzymatic electrochemical detection coupled to multivariate calibration for the determination of phenolic compounds in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Silvia R; Kergaravat, Silvina V; Pividori, Maria Isabel

    2013-03-15

    An approach based on the electrochemical detection of the horseradish peroxidase enzymatic reaction by means of square wave voltammetry was developed for the determination of phenolic compounds in environmental samples. First, a systematic optimization procedure of three factors involved in the enzymatic reaction was carried out using response surface methodology through a central composite design. Second, the enzymatic electrochemical detection coupled with a multivariate calibration method based in the partial least-squares technique was optimized for the determination of a mixture of five phenolic compounds, i.e. phenol, p-aminophenol, p-chlorophenol, hydroquinone and pyrocatechol. The calibration and validation sets were built and assessed. In the calibration model, the LODs for phenolic compounds oscillated from 0.6 to 1.4 × 10(-6) mol L(-1). Recoveries for prediction samples were higher than 85%. These compounds were analyzed simultaneously in spiked samples and in water samples collected close to tanneries and landfills. PMID:23598144

  12. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    PubMed

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation - both peripherally and in the brain - and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures. PMID:26774208

  13. Estrogenic activity of natural and synthetic estrogens in human breast cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Zava, D T; Blen, M; Duwe, G

    1997-04-01

    We investigated the estrogenic activity of various environmental pollutants (xenobiotics), in particular the xenoestrogen o,p-DDT, and compared their effects with those of endogenous estrogens, phytoestrogens, and mycoestrogens on estrogen receptor binding capacity, induction of estrogen end products, and activation of cell proliferation in estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells in monolayer culture. We also quantified the levels of phytoestrogens in extracts of some common foods, herbs, and spices and in human saliva following consumption of a high phytoestrogen food source (soy milk) to compare phytoestrogen abundance and bioavailability relative to the reported xenoestrogen burden in humans. Results show that natural endogenous estrogens, phytoestrogens, mycoestrogens, and xenoestrogens bind estrogen receptor (ER) in intact cells, but demonstrate marked differences in their ability to induce end products of estrogen action and to regulate cell proliferation. All of the different classes of estrogens stimulated cell proliferation at concentrations that half-saturated ER, but only some classes were able to induce estrogen-regulated end products. Genistein, a common phytoestrogen found in soy foods, differed from the xenoestrogen DDT in its effects on cell proliferation and ability to induce estrogen-regulated end products. Moreover, we found that many of the foods, herbs, and spices commonly consumed by humans contain significant amounts of phytoestrogens, and consumption of soy milk, a phytoestrogen-rich food, markedly increases the levels of phytoestrogens in saliva. In conclusion, our in vitro results predict that a diet high in phytoestrogens would significantly reduce the binding of weak xenoestrogens to ER in target tissues in vivo. PMID:9168008

  14. Reduced embryonic survival in rainbow trout resulting from paternal exposure to the environmental estrogen 17 alpha- ethynylestradiol during late sexual maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kim H.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Nagler, James J.

    2007-11-01

    Exposure of fishes to environmental estrogens is known to affect sexual development and spawning, but little information exists regarding effects on gametes. This study evaluated embryonic survival of offspring from male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17a-ethynylestradiol (EE2)using an in vitro fertilization protocol. Males were exposed at either 1800 or 6700 degree days (8d) (i.e. 161 or 587 days post-fertilization (dpf)) to test for effects on testes linked to reproductive ontogeny. At 18008d, fish were beginning testicular differentiation and were exposed to 109 ng EE2/l for 21 days. At 67008d, fish have testes containing spermatocytes and spermatids and were exposed for 56 days to either 0.8, 8.3, or 65 ng EE2/l. Semen was collected at full sexual maturity in each group and used to fertilize eggs pooled from several non-exposed females. Significant decreases in embryonic survival were observed only with the 67008d exposure. In 0.8 and 8.3 ng EE2/l treatments, embryo survival was significantly reduced at 19 dpf when compared with the control. In contrast, an immediate decrease in embryonic survival at 0.5 dpf was observed in the 65 ng EE2/l treatment. Blood samples collected at spawning from 67008d exposed males revealed a significant decrease in 11-ketotestosterone and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone levels for the 65 ng EE2/l treatment when compared with the other treatment groups. Results indicate that sexually maturing male rainbow trout are susceptible to EE2 exposure with these fish exhibiting two possible mechanisms of reduced embryonic survival through sperm varying dependant

  15. 78 FR 48156 - Update to An Inventory of Sources and Environmental Releases of Dioxin-Like Compounds in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... AGENCY Update to An Inventory of Sources and Environmental Releases of Dioxin-Like Compounds in the... Releases of Dioxin-Like Compounds in the United States for the Years 1987, 1995, and 2000, (EPA/600/R-11... Dioxin-Like Compounds in the United States for the Years 1987, 1995, and 2000, (EPA/600/P-03/002F)....

  16. Estrogen effects in allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Rana S.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Asthma prevalence and severity are greater in women than in men, and mounting evidence suggests this is in part related to female steroid sex hormones. Of these, estrogen has been the subject of much study. This review highlights recent research exploring the effects of estrogen in allergic disease. Recent findings Estrogen receptors are found on numerous immunoregulatory cells and estrogen’s actions skew immune responses toward allergy. It may act directly to create deleterious effects in asthma, or indirectly via modulation of various pathways including secretory leukoprotease inhibitor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel and nitric oxide production to exert effects on lung mechanics and inflammation. Not only do endogenous estrogens appear to play a role, but environmental estrogens have also been implicated. Environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens) including bisphenol A and phthalates enhance allergic sensitization in animal models and may enhance development of atopic disorders like asthma in humans. Summary Estrogen’s role in allergic disease remains complex. As allergic diseases continue to increase in prevalence and affect women disproportionately, gaining a fuller understanding of its effects in these disorders will be essential. Of particular importance may be effects of xenoestrogens on allergic disease. PMID:23090385

  17. Genetic and environmental factors affecting host response to drugs and other chemical compounds in our environment.

    PubMed Central

    Vesell, E S; Passananti, G T

    1977-01-01

    Compared to laboratory animals, humans are extremely heterogenous with respect to the many factors that can influence the distribution and biological effects of toxic chemicals. This heterogeneity can prevent an accurate assessment of the impact of a particular toxic compound on the health of an individual subject. Some of the factors that can significantly modify the host response to certain drugs, which serve in this review as a model for environmental chemicals, are enumerated and discussed. Although the mechanisms by which many of these factors modify the biological effects of certain environmental chemicals and drugs have been determined in some cases, better definition of the nature of interactions between these factors and environmental chemicals in a particular individual is required at a biochemical and molecular level. Recommendations are offered for the further development of our knowledge concerning interactions between environmental chemicals and such factors in a particular individual. PMID:598349

  18. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Fernando; Guzmán, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones strongly influence body fat distribution and adipocyte differentiation. Estrogens and testosterone differentially affect adipocyte physiology, but the importance of estrogens in the development of metabolic diseases during menopause is disputed. Estrogens and estrogen receptors regulate various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Disturbances of this metabolic signal lead to the development of metabolic syndrome and a higher cardiovascular risk in women. The absence of estrogens is a clue factor in the onset of cardiovascular disease during the menopausal period, which is characterized by lipid profile variations and predominant abdominal fat accumulation. However, influence of the absence of these hormones and its relationship to higher obesity in women during menopause are not clear. This systematic review discusses of the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in adipocyte differentiation, and its control by the central nervous systemn and the possible role of estrogen-like compounds and endocrine disruptors chemicals are discussed. Finally, the interaction between the decrease in estrogen secretion and the prevalence of obesity in menopausal women is examined. We will consider if the absence of estrogens have a significant effect of obesity in menopausal women. PMID:24734243

  19. p21-activated kinase group II small compound inhibitor GNE-2861 perturbs estrogen receptor alpha signaling and restores tamoxifen-sensitivity in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhilun; Lorent, Julie; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in most breast cancers. Consequently, ERα modulators, such as tamoxifen, are successful in breast cancer treatment, although tamoxifen resistance is commonly observed. While tamoxifen resistance may be caused by altered ERα signaling, the molecular mechanisms regulating ERα signaling and tamoxifen resistance are not entirely clear. Here, we found that PAK4 expression was consistently correlated to poor patient outcome in endocrine treated and tamoxifen-only treated breast cancer patients. Importantly, while PAK4 overexpression promoted tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, pharmacological treatment with a group II PAK (PAK4, 5, 6) inhibitor, GNE-2861, sensitized tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/LCC2 breast cancer cells to tamoxifen. Mechanistically, we identified a regulatory positive feedback loop, where ERα bound to the PAK4 gene, thereby promoting PAK4 expression, while PAK4 in turn stabilized the ERα protein, activated ERα transcriptional activity and ERα target gene expression. Further, PAK4 phosphorylated ERα-Ser305, a phosphorylation event needed for the PAK4 activation of ERα-dependent transcription. In conclusion, PAK4 may be a suitable target for perturbing ERα signaling and tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients. PMID:26554417

  20. A structural perspective on nuclear receptors as targets of environmental compounds

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Maire, Albane le; Balaguer, Patrick; Bourguet, William

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are members of a large superfamily of evolutionarily related transcription factors that control a plethora of biological processes. NRs orchestrate complex events such as development, organ homeostasis, metabolism, immune function, and reproduction. Approximately one-half of the 48 human NRs have been shown to act as ligand-regulated transcription factors and respond directly to a large variety of endogenous hormones and metabolites that are generally hydrophobic and small in size (eg, retinoic acid or estradiol). The second half of the NR family comprises the so-called orphan receptors, for which regulatory ligands are still unknown or may not exist despite the presence of a C-terminal ligand-binding domain, which is the hallmark of all NRs. Several chemicals released into the environment (eg, bisphenols, phthalates, parabens, etc) share some physicochemical properties with natural ligands, allowing them to bind to NRs and activate or inhibit their action. Collectively referred to as endocrine disruptors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), these environmental pollutants are highly suspected to cause a wide range of developmental, reproductive, neurological, or metabolic defects in humans and wildlife. Crystallographic studies are revealing unanticipated mechanisms by which chemically diverse EDCs interact with the ligand-binding domain of NRs. These studies thereby provide a rational basis for designing novel chemicals with lower impacts on human and animal health. In this review, we provide a structural and mechanistic view of endocrine disrupting action using estrogen receptors α and β, (ERα/β), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), and their respective environmental ligands as representative examples. PMID:25500867

  1. The Behavior of Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds in an Aggressive Coastal Marine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The shift to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. The CPCs, while a temporary protective coating, must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different soft film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. The CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing . The initial results for the fifteen CPC systems are reported : Key words: corrosion preventive compound, CPC, spaceport, environmentally friendly, atmospheric exposure, marine, carbon steel, aluminum alloy, galvanic corrosion, wire on bolt.

  2. Environmental signaling and evolutionary change: can exposure of pregnant mammals to environmental estrogens lead to epigenetically induced evolutionary changes in embryos?

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Sabat, Pablo; Valladares, Luis

    2005-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the epigenetic and hereditary mechanisms regulating genetic expression in mammalian cells. In this review, we propose how certain natural agents, through their dietary consumption, could induce changes in physiological aspects in mammalian mothers, leading to alterations in DNA methylation patterns of the developing fetus and to the emergence of new phenotypes and evolutionary change. Nevertheless, we hypothesize that this process would require (i) certain key periods in the ontogeny of the organism where the environmental stimuli could produce effects, (ii) particular environmental agents as such stimuli, and (iii) that a genomic persistent change be consequently produced in a population. Depending on the persistence of the environmental stimuli and on whether the affected genes are imprinted genes, induced changes in DNA methylation patterns could become persistent. Moreover, some fragments could be more frequently methylated than others over several generations, leading to biased base change and evolutionary consequences. PMID:15982371

  3. The Estrogen Hypothesis of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, James P.; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The explanation of obesity as a simple result of positive energy balance fails to account for the scope of variable responses to diets and lifestyles. It is postulated that individual physiological and anatomical variation may be responsible for developing obesity. Girls in poor families develop greater adiposity than their male siblings, a trend not present in richer environments. This indicates strong influence of estrogen on fat accumulation irrespective of poor socioeconomic conditions. Obesity rates in males and females of developed nations are similar, while in poorer nations obesity is much more prevalent in females. Female to male ratio of obesity correlates inversely with gross domestic product. Therefore, the parity of male and female obesity in developed countries may result from male exposure to environmental estrogen-like substances associated with affluence. These hormonally driven mechanisms may be equally active within both sexes in more developed areas, thereby increasing overall obesity. PMID:24915457

  4. Estrogens, cartilage, and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Richette, Pascal; Corvol, Maïté; Bardin, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    A role for estrogens in osteoarthritis is consistent with the larger increases in women than in men in the incidence and prevalence of hip, knee, and finger osteoarthritis after 50 years of age. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy for the menopause seems to be associated with a decrease in the prevalence of symptoms and radiological alterations related to hip and knee osteoarthritis. The two estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERalpha and Erbeta) have been identified in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage, indicating that cartilage can respond to estrogens. Finally, in vivo experiments in animals and in vitro studies have shed light on the mechanisms by which estrogens may influence chondrocyte metabolism. PMID:12951307

  5. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  6. [Corrected Title: Solid-Phase Extraction of Polar Compounds from Water] Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard; Rutz, Jeffrey; Schultz, John

    2005-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) process has been developed for removing alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and other polar organic compounds from water. This process can be either a subprocess of a water-reclamation process or a means of extracting organic compounds from water samples for gas-chromatographic analysis. This SPE process is an attractive alternative to an Environmental Protection Administration liquid-liquid extraction process that generates some pollution and does not work in a microgravitational environment. In this SPE process, one forces a water sample through a resin bed by use of positive pressure on the upstream side and/or suction on the downstream side, thereby causing organic compounds from the water to be adsorbed onto the resin. If gas-chromatographic analysis is to be done, the resin is dried by use of a suitable gas, then the adsorbed compounds are extracted from the resin by use of a solvent. Unlike the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process works in both microgravity and Earth gravity. In comparison with the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process is more efficient, extracts a wider range of organic compounds, generates less pollution, and costs less.

  7. Bioassay- versus analytically-derived estrogen equivalents: Ramifications for monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern for possible endocrine-related effects on aquatic vertebrates, environmental estrogens (EEs) are a growing focus of surface water contaminant monitoring programs. Some efforts utilize measurement of a targeted set of chemicals known to act as estrogen receptor (ER)...

  8. Sources and environmental behaviors of Dechlorane Plus and related compounds - A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Haidong; Wang, Thanh; Sun, Huizhong; Zheng, Shucheng; Li, Yingming; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-03-01

    Although Dechlorane Plus (DP) has been used as a polychlorinated flame retardant for almost half a century, its detection in the environment was not reported until 2006. The subsequent intensive research has confirmed its global ubiquity. A few reviews have presented the properties, analytical methods and environmental occurrence of DP and related compounds in the past several years. The present review emphasizes on the environmental behavior of DP isomers which is assessed by the variation of the isomer ratio of DP in various matrices. Other aspects including the analytical methods, emission sources, general environmental occurrence and bioaccumulation of DP are also summarized. In this review, three typical emission sources in the environment are categorized after introducing the measurement method of DP. The temporal-spatial distribution is then evaluated at the global scale, which provides an integrated representation of the environmental occurrence of DP and potential impact on the human health and ecosystems. The variations of DP isomer ratio in various matrices reinforce its source related distribution and their stereoselective bioaccumulation. Thereafter, DP related compounds and dechlorinated analogs are briefly summarized in regards to their occurrence in various matrices, suggesting their ubiquity in the environment and bioavailability. Further studies are required to better assess the exposures and toxicological effects of DP and its analogs. A special concern is the serious contamination in e-waste recycling areas in developing countries, where long-term monitoring data on the association of DP exposure and adverse effects to human health and ecosystems is urgently needed. PMID:26760718

  9. Toxic volatile organic compounds in environmental tobacco smoke: Emission factors for modeling exposures of California populations

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Hodgson, A.T.

    1994-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to measure emission factors for selected toxic air contaminants in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) using a room-sized environmental chamber. The emissions of 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including, 1,3-butadiene, three aldehydes and two vapor-phase N-nitrosamines were determined for six commercial brands of cigarettes and reference cigarette 1R4F. The commercial brands were selected to represent 62.5% of the cigarettes smoked in California. For each brand, three cigarettes were machine smoked in the chamber. The experiments were conducted over four hours to investigate the effects of aging. Emission factors of the target compounds were also determined for sidestream smoke (SS). For almost all target compounds, the ETS emission factors were significantly higher than the corresponding SS values probably due to less favorable combustion conditions and wall losses in the SS apparatus. Where valid comparisons could be made, the ETS emission factors were generally in good agreement with the literature. Therefore, the ETS emission factors, rather than the SS values, are recommended for use in models to estimate population exposures from this source. The variabilities in the emission factors ({mu}g/cigarette) of the selected toxic air contaminants among brands, expressed as coefficients of variation, were 16 to 29%. Therefore, emissions among brands were Generally similar. Differences among brands were related to the smoked lengths of the cigarettes and the masses of consumed tobacco. Mentholation and whether a cigarette was classified as light or regular did not significantly affect emissions. Aging was determined not to be a significant factor for the target compounds. There were, however, deposition losses of the less volatile compounds to chamber surfaces.

  10. Visualization of Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Marnie E.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens regulate a diverse range of physiological processes and affect multiple tissues. Estrogen receptors (ERs) regulate transcription by binding to DNA at conserved estrogen response elements, and such elements have been used to report ER activity in cultured cells and in transgenic mice. We generated stable, transgenic zebrafish containing five consecutive elements upstream of a c-fos minimal promoter and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize and quantify transcriptional activation in live larvae. Transgenic larvae show robust, dose-dependent estrogen-dependent fluorescent labeling in the liver, consistent with er gene expression, whereas ER antagonists inhibit GFP expression. The nonestrogenic steroids dexamethasone and progesterone fail to activate GFP, confirming ER selectivity. Natural and synthetic estrogens activated the transgene with varying potency, and two chemicals, genistein and bisphenol A, preferentially induce GFP expression in the heart. In adult fish, fluorescence was observed in estrogenic tissues such as the liver, ovary, pituitary gland, and brain. Individual estrogen-responsive neurons and their projections were visualized in the adult brain, and GFP-positive neurons increased in number after 17β-estradiol exposure. The transgenic estrogen-responsive zebrafish allow ER signaling to be monitored visually and serve as in vivo sentinels for detection of estrogenic compounds. PMID:21540282