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Sample records for environmental gamma dose

  1. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jisha, N. V.; Krishnakumar, D. N.; Surya Prakash, G.; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-03-01

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify 41Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

  2. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jisha, N. V.; Krishnakumar, D. N.; Surya Prakash, G.; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-03-15

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify {sup 41}Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

  3. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jisha, N V; Krishnakumar, D N; Surya Prakash, G; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2012-03-01

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify (41)Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation. PMID:22462965

  4. Population doses from environmental gamma radiation in Iraq

    SciTech Connect

    Marouf, B.A.; Mohamad, A.S.; Taha, J.S.; al-Haddad, I.K. )

    1992-05-01

    The exposure rates due to external gamma radiation were measured in 11 Iraqi governerates. Measurements were performed with an Environmental Monitoring System (RSS-111) in open air 1 m above the ground. The average absorbed dose rate in each governerate was as follows (number x 10(-2) microGy h-1): Babylon (6.0), Kerbala (5.3), Al-Najaf (5.4), Al-Kadysia (6.5), Wasit (6.5), Diala (6.5), Al-Anbar (6.5), Al-Muthana (6.6), Maisan (6.8), Thee-Kar (6.6), and Al-Basrah (6.5). The collective doses to the population living in these governerates were 499, 187, 239, 269, 262, 458, 384, 153, 250, 450, and 419 person-Sv, respectively.

  5. A guide to the measurement of environmental gamma-ray dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, F. W.; Gibson, J. A. B.; Thompson, I. M. G.

    The performance of Geiger counters, ionization chambers, scintillators, gamma-ray spectrometers and thermoluminescence dosimeters is discussed. Cosmic, man made, and natural environmental gamma radiation is considered. Dosimeter calibration, measurement procedures, precautions which reduce errors, accuracy assessment, and the interpretation of results are covered. The calculation of dose equivalent to body organs is outlined. Levels of the annual dose equivalent received by the UK population are given. The minimum change in measured dose rate significant at the 95% confidence level as an estimate of the mean environmental dose rate is 12mrad/yr.

  6. Discrimination between natural and other gamma ray sources from environmental gamma ray dose rate monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, K; Ookubo, H; Kimura, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a method to discriminate between natural and other γ-ray sources from environmental γ-ray dose rate monitoring data was developed, and it was successfully applied to actual monitoring data around nuclear facilities. The environmental dose rate is generally monitored by NaI(Tl) detector systems in the low dose rate range. The background dose rate varies mainly as a result of the deposition of (222)Rn progeny in precipitation and shielding of the ground by snow cover. Increments in the environmental dose rate due to radionuclides released from nuclear facilities must be separated from these background variations. The method in the present study corrects for the dose rate variations from natural sources by multiple regression analysis based on the γ-ray counting rates of single-channel analysers opened in the energy ranges of γ-rays emitted by (214)Bi and (208)Tl. Assuming a normal distribution of the results and using the one-sided type I error of 0.01 while ignoring the type II error, the detection limit of the γ-ray dose rate from artificial sources was 0.77 nGy h(-1). PMID:25948830

  7. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose study to determine the baseline for environmental radiological health practices in Melaka state, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Sahrone, Sallehudin; Wagiran, Husin

    2005-12-01

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured throughout Melaka, Malaysia, over a period of two years, with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. Results obtained are shown in tabular, graphic and cartographic form. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly over different soil types and for different underlying geological characteristics present in the study area. The values ranged from 54 +/- 5 to 378 +/- 38 nGy h(-1). The highest terrestrial gamma dose rates were measured over soil types of granitic origin and in areas with underlying geological characteristics of an acid intrusive (undifferentiated) type. An isodose map of terrestrial gamma dose rate in Melaka was drawn by using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This was based on data collected using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector survey meter. The measurements were taken at 542 locations. Three small 'hot spots' were found where the dose rates were more than 350 nGy h(-1). The mean dose rates in the main population areas in the mukims (parishes) of Bukit Katil, Sungai Udang, Batu Berendam, Bukit Baru and Bandar Melaka were 154 +/- 15, 161 +/- 16, 160 +/- 16, 175 +/- 18 and 176 +/- 18 nGy h(-1), respectively. The population-weighted mean dose rate throughout Melaka state is 172 +/- 17 nGy h(-1). This is lower than the geographical mean dose rate of 183 +/- 54 nGy h(-1). The lower value arises from the fact that most of the population lives in the central area of the state where the lithology is dominated by sedimentary rocks consisting of shale, mudstone, phyllite, slate, hornfels, sandstone and schist of Devonian origin which have lower associated dose rates. The mean annual effective dose to the population from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 0.21 mSv. This value is higher than the world average of 0.07 mSv. PMID:16340071

  8. Public effective doses from environmental natural gamma exposures indoors and outdoors in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Roositalab, Jalil; Mohammadi, Jahangir

    2015-12-01

    The effective doses of public in Iran due to external gamma exposures from terrestrial radionuclides and from cosmic radiation indoors and outdoors of normal natural background radiation areas were determined by measurements and by calculations. For direct measurements, three measurement methods were used including a NaI(TI) scintillation survey meter for preliminary screening, a pressurised ionising chamber for more precise measurements and early warning measurement equipment systems. Measurements were carried out in a large number of locations indoors and outdoors ∼1000 houses selected randomly in 36 large cities of Iran. The external gamma doses of public from living indoors and outdoors were also calculated based on the radioactivity measurements of samples taken from soil and building materials by gamma spectrometry using a high-resolution HPGe system. The national mean background gamma dose rates in air indoors and outdoors based on measurements are 126.9±24.3 and 111.7±17.72 nGy h(-1), respectively. When the contribution from cosmic rays was excluded, the values indoors and outdoors are 109.2±20.2 and 70.2±20.59.4 nGy h(-1), respectively. The dose rates determined for indoors and outdoors by calculations are 101.5±9.2 and 72.2±9.4 nGy h(-1), respectively, which are in good agreement with directly measured dose rates within statistical variations. By considering a population-weighted mean for terrestrial radiation, the ratio of indoor to outdoor dose rates is 1.55. The mean annual effective dose of each individual member of the public from terrestrial radionuclides and cosmic radiation, indoors and outdoors, is 0.86±0.16 mSv y(-1) by measurements and 0.8±0.2 mSv y(-1) by calculations. The results of this national survey of public annual effective doses from national natural background external gamma radiation determined by measurements and calculations indoors and outdoors of 1000 houses in 36 cities of Iran are presented and discussed. PMID

  9. Determination of environmental radiation flux and organ doses using in-situ gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Abdulrahman S.

    Contamination of buildings represent a unique problem during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. It is necessary to determine the long-lived radionuclides and their respective specific activities in building materials before the right D&D decision can be made. At the same time, radiation risk of workers or potential occupants in the facility must be assessed as part of the D&D process. The goal of this project was to develop a methodology of obtaining gamma radiation flux and organ doses from in-situ gamma spectroscopy. Algorithms were developed to simulate the response functions of the HPGe detector and to convert the spectra into photon fluences. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, was used to simulate HPGe detector response and to develop the conversion algorithm. The simulated spectra obtained for an HPGe detector were converted to flux using the algorithm for various different geometries. The response functions of the detector are presented in this document for the gamma energies from 60 keV to 2.2 MeV. Published fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were used to calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent. We then tested the theory at a 100-MeV linear electron accelerator at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Samples of the activated concrete walls and floor in the target room of the Linac facility as well as some steel samples were taken to quantify the specific activities of the structures. The results show that the most important long-lived radionuclides include 22 Na, 46Sc, 54 Mn, 57Co, 60 Co, 65Zn, 152 Eu and 154Eu, depending on the location and composition of the material. The specific activities at the Linac facility range from 1.15E-01 to 765.31 muCi/Kg. The annual effective dose equivalent was assessed to be 2.44 mSv y-1 (0.244 rem y-1 ), which is about 5% of the Annual EDE limits to workers.

  10. Intercomparison of environmental gamma doses measured with A NaI (Tl) survey meter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in the Poonch division of Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Ahmad, Khalil; Akhter, Jabeen; Khan, Abdul Razzaq; Saeed, Raja Azhar; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Matiullah; Rajput, Muhammad Usman

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the intercomparison of the outdoor environmental gamma dose rates measured using a NaI (Tl) based survey meter along with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and estimation of excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR), for the inhabitants of Poonch division of the Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. CaF2: Dy (TLD-200) card dosimeters were installed at height of 1 m from ground at fifteen different locations covering the entire Poonch division comprising of three districts. During three distinct two month time periods within the six month study period, all the installed dosimeters were exposed to outdoor environmental gamma radiations, retrieved and read out at Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Health Physics Division, PINSTECH laboratory, Islamabad. The ambient outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were also taken with NaI (Tl) based portable radiometric instrument at 1 m above the ground. To estimate the annual gamma doses, NaI (Tl) based survey data were used for one complete year following the deployment of the dosimeters. The mean annual gamma dose rates measured by TLDs and survey meter were found as 1.47±0.10 and 0.862±0.003 mGy/y respectively. Taking into account a 29% outdoor occupancy factor, the annual average effective dose rate for individuals was estimated as 0.298±0.04 and 0.175±0.03 mSv/y by TLDs and survey meter, respectively. For outdoor exposure, the ELCR was calculated from the TLD and survey meter measurements. The environmental outdoor average annual effective dose obtained in present study are less than the estimated world average terrestrial and cosmic gamma ray dose rate of 0.9 mSv/y reported in UNSCEAR 2000. The possible origins of gamma doses in the area and incompatibilities of results obtained from the two different measurement techniques are also discussed. PMID:25484014

  11. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almgren, Sara; Barregârd, Lars; Isaksson, Mats

    2008-08-01

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096±0.019(1 SD) and 0.092±0.016(1 SD)μSv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11±0.042(1 SD) and 0.091±0.026(1 SD)μSv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, 222Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings.

  12. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-08-07

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096{+-}0.019(1 SD) and 0.092{+-}0.016(1 SD){mu}Sv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11{+-}0.042(1 SD) and 0.091{+-}0.026(1 SD){mu}Sv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, {sup 222}Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings.

  13. Gamma spectroscopy of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2013-05-01

    We describe experiments for the undergraduate laboratory that use a high-resolution gamma detector to measure radiation in environmental samples. The experiments are designed to instruct the students in the quantitative analysis of gamma spectra and secular equilibrium. Experiments include the radioactive dating of Brazil nuts, determining radioisotope concentrations in natural samples, and measurement of the 235U abundance in uranium rich rocks.

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  16. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  17. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, food habits, environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs.

  20. Accidental gamma dose measurement using commercial glasses.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Pradeep; Vaijapurkar, S G; Senwar, K R; Kumar, D; Bhatnagar, P K

    2008-01-01

    Commercial glasses have been investigated for their application in accidental gamma dose measurement using Thermoluminescent (TL) techniques. Some of the glasses have been found to be sensitive enough that they can be used as TL dating material in radiological accident situation for gamma dosimetry with lower detection limit 1 Gy (the dose significant for the onset of deterministic biological effects). The glasses behave linearly in the dose range 1-25 Gy with measurement uncertainty +/- 10%. The errors in accidental dose measurements using TL technique are estimated to be within +/- 25%. These glasses have shown TL fading in the range of 10-20% in 24 h after irradiation under room conditions; thereafter the fading becomes slower and reaches upto 50% in 15 d. TL fading of gamma-irradiated glasses follows exponential decay pattern, therefore dosimetry even after years is possible. These types of glasses can also be used as lethal dose indicator (3-4 Gy) using TL techniques, which can give valuable inputs to the medical professional for better management of radiation victims. The glasses are easy to use and do not require lengthy sample preparation before reading as in case of other building materials. TL measurement on glasses may give immediate estimation of the doses, which can help in medical triage of the radiation-exposed public. PMID:18285317

  1. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of the Environmental Gamma-ray Dose Rate by Skyshine Analysis During the Maintenance of an Activated TFC in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Takatsu, H.; Maki, K.; Yamada, K.; Mori, S.; Iida, H.; Santoro, R. T.

    1997-09-01

    Gamma-ray exposure dose rates at the ITER site boundary were estimated for the cases of removal of a failed activated Toroidal Field (TF) coil from the torus and removal of a failed activated TF coil together with a sector of the activated Vacuum Vessel (VV). Skyshine analyses were performed using the two-dimensional SN radiation transport code, DOT3.5. The exposure gamma-ray dose rates on the ground at the site boundary (presently assumed to be 1 km from the ITER building), were calculated to be 1.1 and 84 μSv/year for removal of the TF coil without and with a VV sector, respectively. The dose rate level for the latter case is close to the tentative radiation limit of 100 μSv/year so an additional ˜14 cm of concrete is required in the ITER building roof to satisfy the criterion for a safety factor often for the site boundary dose rate.

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S. M.; McMakin, A. H.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into five technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (i.e., dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movements of radioactive particles from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assemblies, evaluates and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture and Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task used the information derived from the other Tasks to estimate the radiation doses individuals could have received from Hanford radiation. This document lists the progress on this project as of September 1991. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Assessment of gamma-dose rate in city of Kermanshah

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohamad Bagher; Kodamoradi, Ehsan; Shaneh, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Environmental natural radiation measurement is of great importance and interest especially for human health. The induction of genetic disorder and cancer appears to be the most important in an exposed population. Materials and Methods: Measurements of background gamma rays were performed using a mini-rad environmental survey meter at 25 different locations around the city of Kermanshah (a city in the west of Iran). The measurements were also performed at two different time of day one in the morning and the other in the afternoon. At each location and time measurements were repeated for five times and the mean was considered as the background dose at that location. Results and Discussions: Comparison between the measured results in the morning and afternoon has not shown any significant difference (P > 0.95). The maximum and minimum obtained results were 2.63 mSv/y and 1.49 mSv/y, respectively. From the total measurements at 25 sites mean and SD background radiation dose to the population is 2.24 ± 0.25 mSv. Conclusion: The mean radiation dose to the population is about 2.5 times of the world average total external exposure cosmic rays and terrestrial gamma rays dose reported by UNSCEAR. PMID:23555133

  6. Neutron/gamma dose characterization for use with TLD

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, J.C.; Magee, L.; Hefley, T.

    1991-01-01

    The work described in this paper was performed in preparation for establishing a thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system for workers exposed to spontaneous fission neutrons from mixed plutonium isotopes, {sup 232}Th, and depleted uranium at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pantex facility. The method proposed uses a neutron-insensitive thermoluminescent dosimeter to measure the gamma dose and apply a neutron dose/gamma dose ratio to calculate the neutron dose equivalent. This approach, while requiring multibadge dosimetry for each individual, provides a more accurate neutron dose calculation than was previously in use and reduces the maximum missed dose and falsely reported dose.

  7. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  12. Irradiation with low-dose gamma ray enhances tolerance to heat stress in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Zheng, Fengxia; Qi, Wencai; Wang, Tianqi; Ma, Lingyu; Qiu, Zongbo; Li, Jingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Gamma irradiation at low doses can stimulate the tolerance to environmental stress in plants. However, the knowledge regarding the mechanisms underlying the enhanced tolerance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation is far from fully understood. In this study, to investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of heat stress alleviated by low-dose gamma irradiation, the Arabidopsis seeds were exposed to a range of doses before subjected to heat treatment. Our results showed that 50-Gy gamma irradiation maximally promoted seedling growth in response to heat stress. The production rate of superoxide radical and contents of hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde in the seedlings irradiated with 50-Gy dose under heat stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione (GSH) content and proline level in the gamma-irradiated seedlings were significantly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components related to heat tolerance were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under heat shock. Our results suggest that low-dose gamma irradiation can modulate the physiological responses as well as gene expression related to heat tolerance, thus alleviating the stress damage in Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:26945467

  13. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-10-01

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population's health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h(-1). At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h(-1). Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize. PMID:26437425

  14. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-01-01

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize. PMID:26437425

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doeses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  16. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sanusi, M S M; Ramli, A T; Gabdo, H T; Garba, N N; Heryanshah, A; Wagiran, H; Said, M N

    2014-09-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h(-1) to 500 nGy h(-1). The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h(-1). This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h(-1) (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation. PMID:24787672

  17. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-12-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have been have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics; agriculture; food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs.

  19. Investigation of natural effective gamma dose rates case study: Ardebil Province in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays pose enough energy to induce chemical changes that may be biologically important for the normal functioning of body cells. The external exposure of human beings to natural environmental gamma radiation normally exceeds that from all man-made sources combined. In this research natural background gamma dose rates and corresponding annual effective doses were determined for selected cities of Ardebil province. Outdoor gamma dose rates were measured using an Ion Chamber Survey Meter in 105 locations in selected districts. Average absorbed doses for Ardebil, Sar-Ein, Germy, Neer, Shourabil Recreational Lake, and Kosar were determined as 265, 219, 344, 233, 352, and 358 nSv/h, respectively. Although dose rates recorded for Germi and Kosar are comparable with some areas with high natural radiation background, however, the dose rates in other districts are well below the levels reported for such locations. Average annual effective dose due to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation for Ardebil province was estimated as 1.73 (1.35–2.39) mSv, which is on average 2 times higher than the world population weighted average. PMID:23369115

  20. GAMMA RAY IMAGING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research is a three year development program to apply high resolution gamma-ray imaging technologies to environmental remediation of radioactive hazards. High resolution, position-sensitive germanium detectors are being developed at the Naval Research Laboratory for space app...

  1. Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

    2004-11-12

    This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-06-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into technical tasks which address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates: source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  3. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-10-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-05-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) funds the project. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  5. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1990-04-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates: source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. The source terms task will develop estimates for radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. These estimates will be based on historical measurements and production information. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  7. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1990-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into technical tasks which address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates. Included are source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. The source terms task will develop estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The environmental transport task will reconstruct the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations via the atmosphere, surface water, and ground water. The environmental monitoring task will assemble, evaluate, and report historical environmental monitoring data. The demographics, agriculture, and food habits task will develop the data needed to determine the populations that could have been affected by the releases. Population and demographic information will be developed for the general population within the study area. In addition to population and demographic data, the food and water consumption patterns and sources of food and water for these populations must be estimated since these provide a primary pathway for the intake of radionuclides. The environmental pathways and dose estimates task will use the information produced by the other tasks to estimate the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford. 1 tab., 1 fig.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H., Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction MDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in envirorunental pathways. epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering. radiation dosimetry. and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  10. Human Lymphocytes Response to Low Gamma-ray Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Bañuelos-Valenzuela, Rómulo

    2002-08-01

    Radiation and non-radiation workers lymphocytes were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90; from these, only Hsp70 protein was detected before and after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 70.5 uGy gamma-ray dose, radiation worker's lymphocytes expressed more Hsp70 protein, than non radiation workers' lymphocytes, indicating a larger tolerance to gamma rays (gammatolerance), due to an adaptation process developed by his labor condition.

  11. Three-dimensional gamma analysis of dose distributions in individual structures for IMRT dose verification.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Yuuki; Araki, Fujio; Oono, Takeshi; Hioki, Kazunari

    2014-07-01

    Our purpose in this study was to implement three-dimensional (3D) gamma analysis for structures of interest such as the planning target volume (PTV) or clinical target volume (CTV), and organs at risk (OARs) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose verification. IMRT dose distributions for prostate and head and neck (HN) cancer patients were calculated with an analytical anisotropic algorithm in an Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) treatment planning system (TPS) and by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The MC dose distributions were calculated with EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc user codes under conditions identical to those for the TPS. The prescribed doses were 76 Gy/38 fractions with five-field IMRT for the prostate and 33 Gy/17 fractions with seven-field IMRT for the HN. TPS dose distributions were verified by the gamma passing rates for the whole calculated volume, PTV or CTV, and OARs by use of 3D gamma analysis with reference to MC dose distributions. The acceptance criteria for the 3D gamma analysis were 3/3 and 2 %/2 mm for a dose difference and a distance to agreement. The gamma passing rates in PTV and OARs for the prostate IMRT plan were close to 100 %. For the HN IMRT plan, the passing rates of 2 %/2 mm in CTV and OARs were substantially lower because inhomogeneous tissues such as bone and air in the HN are included in the calculation area. 3D gamma analysis for individual structures is useful for IMRT dose verification. PMID:24796955

  12. Finnish spectrolite as high-dose gamma detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2015-11-01

    A natural material called spectrolite, from Finland, was studied in this work. The purpose was to test it in gamma radiation beams to verify its performance as a high-dose detector. From this material, pellets were manufactured with two different concentrations of Teflon and spectrolite, and their responses were verified using two luminescent techniques: thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The TL and OSL signals were evaluated by means of characterization tests of the material response, after exposure to a nominal absorbed dose interval of 5 Gy to 10 kGy. The results obtained, for both concentrations, showed a good performance of this material in beams of high-dose gamma radiation. Both techniques were utilized in order to investigate the properties of the spectrolite+Teflon samples for different applications.

  13. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S. M.; McMakin, A. H.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into five technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (i.e., dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movements of radioactive particles from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assemblies, evaluates and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture and Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task used the information derived from the other Tasks to estimate the radiation doses individuals could have received from Hanford radiation. This document lists the progress on this project as of September 1991. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Distribution of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in the eastern coastal area of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Prasad, G; Omori, Y; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is one of the important radiation exposures on the earth's surface that results from the three primordial radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The elemental concentration of these elements in the earth's crust could result in the anomalous variation of the terrestrial gamma radiation in the environment. The geology of the local area plays an important role in distribution of these radioactive elements. Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured around the eastern coastal area of Odisha with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. The values of the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly at different locations in the study area. The values of the terrestrial gamma dose rate ranged from 77 to 1651 nGy h(-1), with an average of 230 nGy h(-1). During the measurement of the terrestrial gamma dose rate, sand and soil samples were also collected for the assessment of natural radionuclides. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K from these samples were measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry with a NaI(Tl) detector. Activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K ranged from 15.6 to 69 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 46.7 Bq kg(-1), from 28.9 to 973 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 250 Bq kg(-1) and from 139 to 952 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 429, respectively. The detailed significance of these studies has been discussed from the radiation protection point of view. PMID:22874894

  15. Indoor Gamma Dose Rates In Kuwait Using Handheld Gamma-ray Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Al-Azmi, Darwish

    2016-07-01

    A survey of indoor gamma dose rates was carried out in Kuwait using a NaI dosimeter/spectrometer. The measurements started from May 2013 until April 2015 and covered different locations within 200 dwellings: 158 halls, 26 rooms, 17 basements, and 43 kitchens (total of 244 locations). Alongside the dose rate measurements, gamma-ray spectra were also acquired to evaluate the relative contributions of K, Bi, and Tl and check the presence of Cs. The results show that the dose rates for all locations varied from 39.3 to 103.3 nSv h with a mean of 70.6 nSv h, indicating that the indoor dose rates are low and within the normal range. PMID:27218289

  16. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-01-01

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  17. Hanford environmental dose reconstruction project: Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The Technical Steering Panel consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included among the members are appointed technical members representing the States of Oregon and Washington, cultural and technical experts nominated by the Indian tribes in the region, and an individual representing the public.

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, cultural and technical experts nominated by the regional Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Project reports and references used in the reports are made available to the public in a public reading room. Project progress is documented in this monthly report, which is available to the public. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  20. Computational determination of absorbed dose distributions from gamma ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2001-04-01

    A biomedical procedure known as brachytherapy involves insertion of many radioactive seeds into a sick gland for eliminating sick tissue. For such implementations, the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is very important. A simulation tool has been developed to determine the spatial distribution of absorbed dose in heterogeneous environments where the gamma ray source consists of many small internal radiation emitters. The computation is base on integral transport method and the computations are done in a parallel fashion. Preliminary results involving 137Cs and 125I sources surrounded by water and comparison of the results to the experimental and computational data available in the literature are presented.

  1. Gamma dose from activation of internal shields in IRIS reactor.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Cammi, Antonio; Garlati, Luisella; Lombardi, Carlo; Padovani, Enrico

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure is a modular pressurised water reactor with an integral design. This means that all the primary system components, such as the steam generators, pumps, pressuriser and control rod drive mechanisms, are located inside the reactor vessel, which requires a large diameter. For the sake of better reliability and safety, it is desirable to achieve the reduction of vessel embrittlement as well as the lowering of the dose beyond the vessel. The former can be easily accomplished by the presence of a wide downcomer, filled with water, which surrounds the core region, while the latter needs the presence of additional internal shields. An optimal shielding configuration is under investigation, for reducing the ex-vessel dose due to activated internals and for limiting the amount of the biological shielding. MCNP 4C calculations were performed to evaluate the neutron and the gamma dose during operation and the 60Co activation of various shields configurations. The gamma dose beyond the vessel from activation of its structural components was estimated in a shutdown condition, with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA 2002 and the MicroShield software. The results of the two codes are in agreement and show that the dose is sufficiently low, even without an additional shield. PMID:16381688

  2. A portable absorbed dose measuring instrument with gamma discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quam, W. M.; Wilde, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of an electronic instrument for measuring the radiation dose absorbed by tissues are presented. The detector is a sphere of tissue-equivalent plastic with a single wire located on a diameter of the sphere. The electronic circuits and method of operation of the detector are described. Advantages are the small size and easy portability plus ability to selectively measure neutron and gamma plus neutron events.

  3. Neural network modelling of dose distribution and dose uniformity in the Tunisian Gamma Irradiator.

    PubMed

    Manai, K; Trabelsi, A

    2013-11-01

    In this paper an approach to model dose distributions, isodose curves and dose uniformity in the Tunisian Gamma Irradiation Facility using artificial neural networks (ANNs) are described. For this purpose, measurements were carried out at different points in the irradiation cell using polymethyl methacrylate dosemeters. The calculated and experimental results are compared and good agreement is observed showing that ANNs can be used as an efficient tool for modelling dose distribution in the gamma irradiation facility. Monte Carlo (MC) photon-transport simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the spatial dose distribution for extensive benchmarking. ANN approach appears to be a significant advance over the time-consuming MC or the less accurate regression methods for dose mapping. As a second application, a detailed dose mapping using two different product densities was carried out. The minimum and maximum dose locations and dose uniformity as a function of the irradiated volume for each product density were determined. Good agreement between ANN modelling and experimental results was achieved. PMID:23633649

  4. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 /times/ 10/sup 8/ rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 /times/ 10/sup 8/ rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Pretreatment with low-dose gamma irradiation enhances tolerance to the stress of cadmium and lead in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wencai; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Lin; Xu, Hangbo; Jin, Qingsheng; Jiao, Zhen

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with negative impact on plant growth and development. To investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of heavy metal stress mitigated by low-dose gamma irradiation, the dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to a Cobalt-60 gamma source at doses ranging from 25 to 150Gy before being subjected to 75µM CdCl2 or 500µM Pb(NO3)2. Then, the growth parameters, and physiological and molecular changes were determined in response to gamma irradiation. Our results showed that 50-Gy gamma irradiation gave maximal beneficial effects on the germination index and root length in response to cadmium/lead stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. The hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents in seedlings irradiated with 50-Gy gamma rays under stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The antioxidant enzyme activities and proline levels in the irradiated seedlings were significantly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, a transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components of heavy metal detoxification were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under cadmium/lead stress. Our results suggest that low-dose gamma irradiation alleviates heavy metal stress, probably by modulating the physiological responses and gene expression levels related to heavy metal resistance in Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:25723134

  6. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  7. Environmental dose rate distribution along the Romanian Black Sea shore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Octavian G.; Margineanu, Romul M.; Blebea-Apostu, Ana-Maria; Gomoiu, Claudia; Bercea, Sorin

    2013-04-01

    The radiometric investigation of the natural radioactivity dose rate distribution along the most important Romanian Black Sea tourist resorts showed values between 34 and 54 nSv/h, lower than the 59 nSv/h, the average background reported for the entire Romanian territory. At the same time we have noticed that the experimental dose rates monotonously increase northward, reaching a maximum in the vicinity of Vadu and Corbu beaches, both on the southern part of the Chituc sandbank. Concurrent gamma ray spectrometric measurements, performed at the Slanic-Prahova Low-Background Radiation Laboratory for sand samples collected from the same location, have shown that the natural radionuclides have a major contribution to background radiation while anthropogenic Cs-137 plays, 26 years after Chernobyl catastrophe, a negligible role. The experimental values of activity concentrations of all radionuclides present in sand samples were used to calculate the corresponding values of dose rates to which, by adding the contribution of cosmic rays, we have obtained values coincident, within experimental uncertainties, with the experimental ones. At the same time, on Chituc sandbank, a transverse profile of dose rate distribution revealed the presence of some local maxima, two to thee times higher then the average ones. Subsequent gamma ray spectrometry showed an increased content of natural radionuclides, most probably due to a local accumulation of heavy minerals, a common occurrence in the vicinity of river deltas, in our case the Danube Delta. In such a way, the monitoring of local dose rate distribution could be very useful not only in attesting the environmental quality of various resorts and beaches, but also, in signaling the presence of heavy minerals, with beneficent economic consequences.

  8. The direct measurement of dose enhancement in gamma test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, E.A.; Snowden, D.P. ); Cappelli, J.R.; Mittleman, S. ); Lowe, L.F.

    1989-12-01

    The design and use of a dual cavity ionization chamber for routine measurement of dose enhancement factors in Co-60 gamma test facilities is described. The enhancement factors can be derived directly from the chamber measurements without recourse to reference data that may be difficult to obtain. It is shown, in agreement with earlier work, that the maximum dose enhancement factors can be altered by a factor two as a result of Compton scatter from relatively small amounts of low or high atomic number materials next to the target. The dual chamber permits the ready detection of such effects. This relatively simple device reliably reproduced earlier results obtained by more involved equipment and procedures. Measured enhancement factors are reported for new material combinations not previously examined and compared with recent calculations.

  9. On-site gamma dose rates at the Andreeva Bay shore technical base, northwest Russia.

    PubMed

    Reistad, O; Dowdall, M; Standring, W J F; Selnaes, Ø G; Hustveit, S; Steinhusen, F; Sørlie, A

    2008-07-01

    The spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RAW) storage facility at Andreeva Bay shore technical base (STB) is one of the largest and most hazardous nuclear legacy sites in northwest Russia. Originally commissioned in the 1960s the facility now stores large amounts of SNF and RAW associated with the Russian Northern Fleet of nuclear powered submarines. The objective of the present study was to map ambient gamma dose rates throughout the facility, in particular at a number of specific sites where SNF and RAW are stored. The data presented here are taken from a Norwegian-Russian collaboration enabling the first publication in the scientific literature of the complete survey of on-site dose rates. Results indicate that elevated gamma dose rates are found primarily at discrete sites within the facility; maximum dose rates of up to 1000 microSv/h close to the ground (0.1m) and up to 3000 microSv/h at 1m above ground were recorded, higher doses at the 1m height being indicative primarily of the presence of contaminated equipment as opposed to ground contamination. Highest dose rates were measured at sites located in the immediate vicinity of buildings used for storing SNF and sites associated with storage of solid and liquid radioactive wastes. Elevated dose rates were also observed near the former channel of a small brook that became heavily contaminated as a result of radioactive leaks from the SNF storage at Building 5 starting in 1982. Isolated patches of elevated dose rates were also observed throughout the STB. A second paper detailing the radioactive soil contamination at the site is published in this issue of Journal of Environmental Radioactivity. PMID:18243437

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography; food consumption; and agriculture; and environmental pathway and dose estimates.

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography; food consumption; and agriculture; and environmental pathway and dose estimates.

  12. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project Is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  13. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project Is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report, January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  16. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  17. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944.The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944.The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These task correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  20. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These task correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  1. Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Low-Dose Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegyesi, Hargita; Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza

    We have studied low dose radiation induced gene expression alterations in a primary human fibroblast cell line using Agilent's whole human genome microarray. Cells were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays (0; 0.1; 0.5 Gy) and 2 hours later total cellular RNA was isolated. We observed differential regulation of approximately 300-500 genes represented on the microarray. Of these, 126 were differentially expressed at both doses, among them significant elevation of GDF-15 and KITLG was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Based on the transcriptional studies we selected GDF-15 to assess its role in radiation response, since GDF-15 is one of the p53 gene targets and is believed to participate in mediating p53 activities. First we confirmed gamma-radiation induced dose-dependent changes in GDF-15 expression by qRT-PCR. Next we determined the effect of GDF-15 silencing on radiosensitivity. Four GDF-15 targeting shRNA expressing lentiviral vectors were transfected into immortalized human fibroblast cells. We obtained efficient GDF-15 silencing in one of the four constructs. RNA interference inhibited GDF-15 gene expression and enhanced the radiosensitivity of the cells. Our studies proved that GDF-15 plays an essential role in radiation response and may serve as a promising target in radiation therapy.

  2. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  3. QUALITY CONTROL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS USING GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the quality control procedures, calibration, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data in measuring the activity of gamma ray-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. Included in the appendices are basic data for selected gamma ray-emitting ra...

  4. Neutron and gamma-ray dose measurements at various distances from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, C.J.; Hankins, D.E.

    1984-08-01

    We measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates at various distances from the Little Boy-Comet Critical Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April of 1983. The Little Boy-Comet Assembly is a replica of the atomic weapon detonated over Hiroshima, designed to be operated at various steady-state power levels. The selected distances for measurement ranged from 107 m to 567 m. Gamma-ray measurements were made with a Reuter-Stokes environmental ionization chamber which has a sensitivity of 1.0 ..mu..R/hour. Neutron measurements were made with a pulsed-source remmeter which has a sensitivity of 0.1 ..mu..rem/hour, designed and built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). 12 references, 7 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the functional characteristics of amniotic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Purohit, Sumita; Chacharkar, M. P.

    2007-06-01

    The effect of different doses of gamma radiation viz. 25, 36 and 50 kGy on the chemical and functional characteristics of the amniotic membrane was studied. The change in the chemical structure of amniotic membranes at high doses of gamma irradiation was evaluated by means of Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy. The degradation of amnion on irradiation with gamma rays could produce a relative variation in IR absorption troughs. This kind of variation was absent in the samples irradiated to doses of 25, 36 and 50 kGy indicating no qualitative change in the material property of amnion. No significant differences in the water absorption capacity and water vapour transmission rate of amniotic membranes irradiated to different doses were observed. Impermeability of the amniotic membranes to different microorganisms was also not affected at high doses of gamma radiation. Gamma irradiation at doses of 25-50 kGy did not evoke undesirable changes in the functional properties of the amniotic membrane.

  6. Daily and Long Term Variations of Out-Door Gamma Dose Rate in Khorasan Province, Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Toossi, M. T. Bahreyni; Bayani, SH.

    2008-08-07

    In Iran before 1996, only a few hot spots had been identified, no systematic study had been envisaged. Since then preparation of out-door environmental gamma radiation map of Iran was defined as a long term goal in our center, at the same time simultaneous monitoring of outdoor gamma level in Khorasan was also proposed. A Rados area monitoring system (AAM-90) including 10 intelligent RD-02 detector and all associated components were purchased. From 2003 gradually seven stations have been setup in Khorasan. For all seven stations monthly average and one hour daily average on four time intervals have been computed. Statistically no significant differences have been observed. This is also true for monthly averages. The overall average dose rate for present seven stations varies from 0.11 {mu}Sv{center_dot}h{sup -1} for Ferdows, to 0.04 {mu}Sv{center_dot}h{sup -1} for Dargaz. Based on our data, 50 minutes sample in any time interval is an accurate sample size to estimate out door Gamma dose rate.

  7. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Ryukyu Islands, subtropical region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, M; Kina, S; Shiroma, M; Shiroma, Y; Masuda, N; Motomura, D; Hiraoka, H; Fujioka, S; Kawakami, T; Yasuda, Y; Arakawa, K; Fukahori, K; Jyunicho, M; Ishikawa, S; Ohomoto, T; Shingaki, R; Akata, N; Zhuo, W; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    In order to explain the distribution of natural radiation level in the Asia, in situ measurements of dose rate in air due to terrestrial gamma radiation have been conducted in a total of 21 islands that belong to Ryukyu Islands (Ryukyu Archipelago), subtropical rejoin of southwest Japan. Car-borne surveys have also been carried out in Okinawa-jima, the biggest island of the archipelago. Based on the results for these measurements, arithmetic mean, the maximum and the minimum of the dose rates at 1 m in height from the unpaved soil ground in the archipelago were estimated to be 47, 165 and 8 nGy h(-1), respectively. A comparative study of car-borne data obtained prior to and subsequent to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, as for Okinawa-jima, indicated that the nuclear accident has no impact on the environmental radiation at the present time. PMID:26065703

  8. Evaluation of dose distributions in gamma chamber using glass plate detector

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Pradeep; Vaijapurkar, S. G.; Bhatnagar, P. K.

    2008-01-01

    A commercial glass plate of thickness 1.75 mm has been utilized for evaluation of dose distributions inside the irradiation volume of gamma chamber using optical densitometry technique. The glass plate showed linear response in the dose range 0.10 Kilo Gray (kGy) to 10 kGy of cobalt-60 gamma radiation with optical sensitivity 0.04 Optical Density (OD) /kGy. The change in the optical density at each identified spatial dose matrix on the glass plate in relation to the position in the irradiation volume has been presented as dose distributions inside the gamma chamber. The optical density changes have been graphically plotted in the form of surface diagram of color washes for different percentage dose rate levels as isodose distributions in gamma chamber. The variation in dose distribution inside the gamma chamber unit, GC 900, BRIT India make, using this technique has been observed within ± 15%. This technique can be used for routine quality assurances and dose distribution validation of any gamma chamber during commissioning and source replacement. The application of commercial glass plate for dose mapping in gamma chambers has been found very promising due to its wider dose linearity, quick measurement, and lesser expertise requirement in application of the technique. PMID:19893695

  9. Formulation and solution of the delayed gamma dose rate problem using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1989-06-01

    With appropriate approximations, the delayed gamma dose rate problem can be formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed-gamma transport equations then take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt-gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the need for the tedious and error prone flux coupling step in conventional calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method are illustrated by an example of its application in the solution of a practical design problem. 62 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Feasibility on the spectrometric determination of the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides using the dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Chung, Kun Ho; Lee, Wanno; Park, Doo-Won; Kang, Mun-Ja

    2014-04-01

    A spectrometric determination of the dose rate using a detector is a very useful method to identify the contribution of artificial nuclides. In addition, the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides from the radioactive materials as well as the environment can give further information such as the in-situ measurement because of the direct relation between the individual dose rate and the activity of a nuclide. In this study, the calculation method for the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides was suggested by introducing the concept of the dose rate spectroscopy and the peak-to-total ratio in the energy spectrum for the dose rate, which means just a form of multiplied counts and the value of a G-factor in the spectrum. In addition, the validity of the suggested method for the individual dose rate was experimentally verified through a comparison of the calculation results on the energy spectra for several conditions of the standard source.

  11. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  12. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  13. Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W. Neil; Luke, Paul N.; Kurfess, J.D.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Kroeger, R.A.; Phillips, G.W.

    1999-06-01

    The goal of this project is the development of field portable gamma-ray detectors that can both image gamma rays from radioactive emission and determine the isotopic composition by the emitted spectrum. Most instruments to date have had either very good imaging with no spectroscopy, or very good spectroscopy with no imaging. The only instruments with both imaging and spectroscopy have had rather poor quality imaging and spectroscopy (e.g. NaI Anger Cameras). The technology would have widespread applications, from laboratory nuclear physics, to breast cancer imaging, to astronomical research. For this project, we focus on the applications in the field of fissile materials, spent nuclear fuels and decontamination and decommissioning.

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington. and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks: Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington. and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks: Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  16. Facility for gamma irradiations of cultured cells at low dose rates: design, physical characteristics and functioning.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Anello, Pasquale; Pecchia, Ilaria; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Campa, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    We describe a low dose/dose rate gamma irradiation facility (called LIBIS) for in vitro biological systems, for the exposure, inside a CO2 cell culture incubator, of cells at a dose rate ranging from few μGy/h to some tens of mGy/h. Three different (137)Cs sources are used, depending on the desired dose rate. The sample is irradiated with a gamma ray beam with a dose rate uniformity of at least 92% and a percentage of primary 662keV photons greater than 80%. LIBIS complies with high safety standards. PMID:27423023

  17. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  18. Gamma-ray spectra and doses from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Most radiation safety guidelines in the nuclear industry are based on the data concerning the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Crucial to determining these guidelines is the radiation from the explosions. We have measured gamma-ray pulse-height distributions from an accurate replica of the Little Boy device used at Hiroshima, operated at low power levels near critical. The device was placed outdoors on a stand 4 m from the ground to minimize environmental effects. The power levels were based on a monitor detector calibrated very carefully in independent experiments. High-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with a germanium detector to identify the lines and to obtain line intensities. The 7631 to 7645 keV doublet from neutron capture in the heavy steel case was dominant. Low-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with bismuth-germanate detectors. We calculated flux spectra from these distributions using accurately measured detector response functions and efficiency curves. We then calculated dose-rate spectra from the flux spectra using a flux-to-dose-rate conversion procedure. The integral of each dose-rate spectrum gave an integral dose rate. The integral doses at 2 m ranged from 0.46 to 1.03 mrem per 10/sup 13/ fissions. The output of the Little Boy replica can be calculated with Monte Carlo codes. Comparison of our experimental spectra, line intensities, and integral doses can be used to verify these calculations at low power levels and give increased confidence to the calculated values from the explosion at Hiroshima. These calculations then can be used to establish better radiation safety guidelines. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Inverse modelling of radionuclide release rates using gamma dose rate observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, Thomas; Stohl, Andreas; von Haustein, Christoph; Thummerer, Severin; Wallner, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Severe accidents in nuclear power plants such as the historical accident in Chernobyl 1986 or the more recent disaster in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have drastic impacts on the population and environment. The hazardous consequences reach out on a national and continental scale. Environmental measurements and methods to model the transport and dispersion of the released radionuclides serve as a platform to assess the regional impact of nuclear accidents - both, for research purposes and, more important, to determine the immediate threat to the population. However, the assessments of the regional radionuclide activity concentrations and the individual exposure to radiation dose underlie several uncertainties. For example, the accurate model representation of wet and dry deposition. One of the most significant uncertainty, however, results from the estimation of the source term. That is, the time dependent quantification of the released spectrum of radionuclides during the course of the nuclear accident. The quantification of the source terms of severe nuclear accidents may either remain uncertain (e.g. Chernobyl, Devell et al., 1995) or rely on rather rough estimates of released key radionuclides given by the operators. Precise measurements are mostly missing due to practical limitations during the accident. Inverse modelling can be used to realise a feasible estimation of the source term (Davoine and Bocquet, 2007). Existing point measurements of radionuclide activity concentrations are therefore combined with atmospheric transport models. The release rates of radionuclides at the accident site are then obtained by improving the agreement between the modelled and observed concentrations (Stohl et al., 2012). The accuracy of the method and hence of the resulting source term depends amongst others on the availability, reliability and the resolution in time and space of the observations. Radionuclide activity concentrations are observed on a

  1. Absorbed Dose Rates in Tissue from Prompt Gamma Emissions from Near-thermal Neutron Absorption.

    PubMed

    Schwahn, Scott O

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency's Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment. PMID:26313590

  2. Absorbed dose rates in tissue from prompt gamma emissions from near-thermal neutron absorption

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwahn, Scott O.

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency s Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  3. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry in the environment using dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Hee-Yeoul; Lee, Wanno; Kang, Mun Ja; Park, Sang Tae

    2016-02-01

    In order to expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was first conducted at a height of 1 m above the ground to calculate the ambient dose rate and individual dose rate at that height, as well as the radioactivity in the soil layer for the detected gamma nuclides from the dose rate spectroscopy. The reliable results could be obtained by introducing the angular correction factor to correct the G-factor with respect to incident photons distributed in a certain range of angles. The intercomparison results of radioactivity using ISOCS software, an analysis of a sample taken from the soil around a detector, and dose rate spectroscopy had a difference of <20% for 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 212Bi, 208Tl, and 40K, except for 212Pb with low-energy photons, that is, <300 keV. In addition, the drawback of using dose rate spectroscopy, that is, all gamma rays from a nuclide should be identified to accurately assess the individual dose rate, was overcome by adopting the concept of contribution ratio of the key gamma ray to the individual dose rate of a nuclide, so that it could be accurately calculated by identifying only a key gamma ray from a nuclide.

  4. Evolving Adjustments to External (Gamma) Slope Factors for CERCLA Risk and Dose Assessments - 12290

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Stuart

    2012-07-01

    To model the external exposure pathway in risk and dose assessments of radioactive contamination at Superfund sites, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses slope factors (SFs), also known as risk coefficients, and dose conversion factors (DCFs). Without any adjustment these external radiation exposure pathways effectively assumes that an individual is exposed to a source geometry that is effectively an infinite slab. The concept of an 'infinite slab' means that the thickness of the contaminated zone and its aerial extent are so large that it behaves as if it were infinite in its physical dimensions. EPA has been making increasingly complex adjustments to account for the extent of the contamination and its corresponding radiation field to provide more accurate risk and dose assessment modeling when using its calculators. In most instances, the more accurate modeling results derived from these gamma adjustments are less conservative. The notable exception are for some radionuclides in rooms with contaminated walls, ceiling, and floors, and the receptor is in location of the room with the highest amount of radiation exposure, usually the corner of small rooms and the center of large conference rooms. (authors)

  5. Local Environmental Characterization using Gamma Ground Survey Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litz, Marc; Burns, David; Katsis, Dimos; Carroll, James

    2013-04-01

    Inexpensive gamma detectors with GPS and wireless communications have been developed and installed to provide a ground survey network for detection of environmental levels of gamma radiation from naturally occurring events (i.e. radon, lightening, solar flares, etc.) and unintended gamma radiation on the battlefield and along transport routes. Signals from lightening and cosmic rays have pulse widths less than 100 us. Pedestrian borne and vehicle borne radiation sources have signatures from millseconds to seconds. The large energy associated with solar initiated disruptions (10^20J) generates a variety of ground level events that can last for hours. Data collected during the 24/7 operation of this gamma network is compared to xray, electron, and ion flux from satellite sensors. Local rainfall data is also utilized to make comparisons to local radon intensity levels. This paper will discuss the time and intensity correlations with corroborating environmental data. If the gamma signals characteristics from local environments and space-based environments can be described with enough detail, it is hoped that automated warning of unexpected radiation events can offer early warning protection to power and energy grid avoiding potentially damaging surges as well as offer local radiation health warning as necessary.

  6. In situ measurements of the sub-surface gamma dose from Chernobyl fallout.

    PubMed

    Timms, D N; Smith, J T; Coe, E; Kudelsky, A V; Yankov, A I

    2005-06-01

    Methods of estimating external radiation exposure of soil-dwelling organisms are currently of much research and regulatory interest. In this paper, we report the first in situ measurements of the sub-surface gamma dose rate for 137Cs contaminated land that quantify variation in dose rate with depth. Two contrasting sites have been investigated. The first site comprised a mineral type soil with a low percentage of organic matter and the second site chosen was in a peat-bog. The different soil compositions afford different 137Cs mobility and this results in variations in the measured gamma dose-rate with soil depth. For each site the paper reports the measured dose rates, the 137Cs activity depth profile, the 137Cs inventory and a description of the soil-characteristics. It is suggested that these data can be used to produce estimates of the sub-surface gamma dose rate in other sites of 137Cs contamination. PMID:15799871

  7. An investigation of eye lens dose for gamma knife treatments of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Chin, L; Sarfaraz, M; Shepard, D; Yu, C

    2000-01-01

    Stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been widely used for treating trigeminal neuralgia (TN). A single large fractional dose of 7000 to 9000 cGy is commonly prescribed as the maximum dose for these treatments. For this reason, if a small percentage of the prescribed dose such as 2-3% scattered to the eye, it could reach or even exceed the tolerance dose of the lens. For several TN cases, we found that the Leksell Gamma Plan system calculates the lens dose about 0.5-2% of the maximum dose independent of the use of eye shielding. These dose values are significantly high and it motivated us to investigate the lens dose for the TN patients treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Phantom studies and in vivo dosimetry measurements were carried out for six patients treated at our institution. The average dose to the lens ipsilateral to the treated nerve was measured to be 7.7+/-0.6 cGy. Based on the biological model of Lyman and Emami [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 21, 109-122 (1991)], the probability of the lens complication (cataract) was determined to be 0.1%. Our findings suggest that few TN patients would develop cataracts after receiving Gamma Knife radiosurgery. PMID:11674826

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  9. Calculation of Dose Deposition in Nanovolumes and Simulation of gamma-H2AX Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik

    2010-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track structure simulations can accurately simulate experimental data: a) Frequency of target hits. b) Dose per event. c) Dose per ion. d) Radial dose. The dose is uniform in micrometers sized voxels; at the nanometer scale, the difference in energy deposition between high and low-LET radiations appears. The calculated 3D distribution of dose voxels, combined with chromosomes simulated by random walk is very similar to the distribution of DSB observed with gamma-H2AX experiments. This is further evidenced by applying a visualization threshold on dose.

  10. Hanford Dose Overview Program: standardized methods and data for Hanford environmental dose calculations. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, W.D.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Napier, B.A.

    1984-05-01

    This document serves as a guide to Hanford contractors for obtaining or performing Hanford-related environmental dose calculations. Because environmental dose estimation techniques are state-of-the-art and are continually evolving, the data and standard methods presented herein will require periodic revision. This document is scheduled to be updated annually, but actual changes to the program will be made more frequently if required. For this reason, PNL's Occupational and Environmental Protection Department should be contacted before any Hanford-related environmental dose calculation is performed. This revision of the Hanford Dose Overview Program Report primarily reflects changes made to the data and models used in calculating atmospheric dispersion of airborne effluents at Hanford. The modified data and models are described in detail. In addition, discussions of dose calculation methods and the review of calculation results have been expanded to provide more explicit guidance to the Hanford contractors. 19 references, 30 tables.

  11. Environmental gamma radiation in the KATRIN Spectrometer Hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippenbrock, Luke; Katrin Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino) experiment, presently undergoing final assembly in Germany, will use tritium β-decay to probe the electron antineutrino mass down to a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2 (90% confidence level). The experimental apparatus has been designed to limit the effect of known and predicted backgrounds near the beta endpoint energy. However, recent commissioning measurements with the main spectrometer have shown that an elusive background source still remains. In this talk, the interaction of environmental gamma radiation inside the KATRIN main spectrometer is studied as a potential background creation mechanism. Geant4 simulations of the gamma flux, derived from concrete radioassay measurements, are compared with detector background rates collected under multiple gamma radiation conditions. Funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics under Grant #DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  12. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D/sub 2/O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%.

  13. Correlation between indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K

    1998-09-01

    A correlation between the indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation is studied using the results of nationwide indoor radon and external exposure surveys, although the surveys were not conducted at the same time nor at the same location. The radon concentration shows a log-normal-like distribution, whereas the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in air shows a normal-like distribution. A log-linear scatterplot for each pair of the indoor radon concentration and gamma-ray dose rate in air in each city reveals a clear relationship. The average, maximum, and minimum as well as regression line of radon concentration were found to increase with the gamma-ray dose rate in air. The group in higher quantile of radon concentration shows larger dependence on the gamma-ray dose rate. The rate of increase of radon concentration with the gamma-ray dose rate in air depends on the house structure. The wooden house has a larger rate of increase than the concrete house, and the regression lines cross at high air dose rate. Based on the finding in the present study a certain criterion level of air dose rate could be established and used for an effective survey to find out which houses might require a remedial action in conjunction with other screening tools. The criterion level of air dose rate might be more effective if the level is set for each house structure since the rate of increase of radon concentration depends on house structure. PMID:9721838

  14. Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H.; Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2010-05-21

    This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly Technical Report, November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Haerer, H. A.

    1987-11-01

    This monthly report for November 1987 summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP).

  16. 131 iodine gamma dose determination in the thyroid gland using two geometrical shapes: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betka, A.; Bentabet, A.; Azbouche, A.; Fenineche, N.; Adjiri, A.; Dib, A.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the internal gamma dose, we used a Monte Carlo code ‘Penelope’ simulation with two geometrical models (cylindrical and spherical). The deposited energy was determined via the loss of energy calculated from the quantum theory for inelastic collisions based on the first-order (plane-wave) Born approximation for charged particles with individual atoms and molecules. Our results show that the cylindrical geometry is more suitable for carrying out such a study. Moreover, we developed an analytical expression for the 131 iodine gamma dose (the energy deposited per photon absorbed dose). This latter could be considered as an important tool for evaluating the gamma dose without going through stochastic models.

  17. Use of prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyada, P.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of using measured prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent is explored theoretically. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of a high density polyethylene cylinder to emit prompt gammas from interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon present in polyethylene. The neutron energy dependent responses of hydrogen and carbon nuclei are combined appropriately to match the energy dependent neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The proposed method is tested initially with simulated spectra and then validated using experimental measurements with an Am-Be neutron source. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations have established the feasibility of estimating neutron ambient dose equivalent using measured neutron induced prompt gammas emitted from polyethylene with an overestimation of neutron dose at very low energies.

  18. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. Study selection We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case–control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure–response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Methods Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. Results We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Conclusions Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of

  19. Indoor terrestrial gamma dose rate mapping in France: a case study using two different geostatistical models.

    PubMed

    Warnery, E; Ielsch, G; Lajaunie, C; Cale, E; Wackernagel, H; Debayle, C; Guillevic, J

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma dose rates show important spatial variations in France. Previous studies resulted in maps of arithmetic means of indoor terrestrial gamma dose rates by "departement" (French district). However, numerous areas could not be characterized due to the lack of data. The aim of our work was to obtain more precise estimates of the spatial variability of indoor terrestrial gamma dose rates in France by using a more recent and complete data base and geostatistics. The study was based on the exploitation of 97,595 measurements results distributed in 17,404 locations covering all of France. Measurements were done by the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) using RPL (Radio Photo Luminescent) dosimeters, exposed during several months between years 2011 and 2012 in French dentist surgeries and veterinary clinics. The data used came from dosimeters which were not exposed to anthropic sources. After removing the cosmic rays contribution in order to study only the telluric gamma radiation, it was decided to work with the arithmetic means of the time-series measurements, weighted by the time-exposure of the dosimeters, for each location. The values varied between 13 and 349 nSv/h, with an arithmetic mean of 76 nSv/h. The observed statistical distribution of the gamma dose rates was skewed to the right. Firstly, ordinary kriging was performed in order to predict the gamma dose rate on cells of 1*1 km(2), all over the domain. The second step of the study was to use an auxiliary variable in estimates. The IRSN achieved in 2010 a classification of the French geological formations, characterizing their uranium potential on the bases of geology and local measurement results of rocks uranium content. This information is georeferenced in a map at the scale 1:1,000,000. The geological uranium potential (GUP) was classified in 5 qualitative categories. As telluric gamma rays mostly come from the progenies of the (238)Uranium series present in rocks, this

  20. Car-borne survey of natural background gamma dose rate in Çanakkale region, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turhan, S; Arıkan, I H; Oğuz, F; Özdemir, T; Yücel, B; Varinlioğlu, A; Köse, A

    2012-01-01

    Natural background gamma radiation was measured along roads in the environs of Çanakkale region by using a car-borne spectrometer system with a plastic gamma radiation detector. In addition, activity concentrations of ²³⁸U, ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th and ⁴⁰K in soil samples from the Çanakkale region were determined by using a gamma spectrometer with an HPGe detector. A total of 92,856 data of the background gamma dose rate were collected for the Çanakkale region. The background gamma dose rate of the Çanakkale region was mapped using ArcGIS software, applying the geostatistical inverse distance-weighted method. The average and population-weighted average of the gamma dose are 55.4 and 40.6 nGy h⁻¹, respectively. The corresponding average annual effective dose to the public ranged from 26.6 to 96.8 µSv. PMID:21362693

  1. Quality assurance of environmental gamma radiation monitoring in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Stuhec, M; Zorko, B; Mitić, D; Miljanić, S; Ranogajec-Komor, M

    2006-01-01

    Environmental gamma radiation monitoring established in Slovenia consists of a network of multifunctional gamma monitors (MFMs) based on pairs of Geiger-Müller counters and a network of measuring sites with high-sensitive thermoluminiscence dosemeters. The measuring points are evenly spread across Slovenia, located at the meteorological stations and more densely on additional locations around the Krsko NPP. The MFM network has a 2-fold function with one sensor used for the purpose of early warning system in near surroundings of the NPP and the other, more sensitive, for natural radiation monitoring. The paper summarises activities to establish quality assurance of the environmental gamma radiation measurements in Slovenia, with a critical view of the results in comparison with the international standards and recommendations. While the results of linearity and energy dependence tests were satisfying, on-field intercomparison showed that the inherent signal of one of the monitors (MFM) has to be taken into account in the range of environmental background radiation. PMID:16410289

  2. Global Map of Lunar Effective Dose Equivalents Observed by Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayatsu, Kanako; Takeda, Yuko; Karouji, Yuzuru; Hareyama, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shingo; Hasebe, N.

    The Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (KGRS) onboard the Japanese large-scale lunar ex-plorer, Kaguya (SELENE) measured gamma rays emitted from the global lunar surface with a large germanium crystal as a main detector [1]. In this study, we estimated the preliminary global maps of the effective dose equivalents due to gamma rays and neutrons from the Moon on the basis of the KGRS data. Especially, the global distribution of effective equivalent dose caused from neutrons on the Moon was evaluated for the first time by this study. Firstly, the effective dose equivalents at each Apollo and Luna landing site were calculated by using the Monte Carlo simulation and the conversion coefficients of gamma rays and neutrons [2]. Secondly, the preliminary global maps of annual effective dose equivalents due to gamma rays and neutrons on the lunar surface were made by the radiation data measured by KGRS and they were compared with the estimated values of effective dose equivalents at Apollo and Luna landing sites. The distribution of the effective dose equivalent due to gamma rays on the Moon mainly corresponds to the abundance distribution of natural radioactive elements as uranium, thorium and potassium. While the global distribution of effective dose equivalent due to neu-trons is closely similar to that of the abundance distribution of iron and titanium, because such elements have a large cross section of fast neutron production [3]. These results obtained by the KGRS will be precious and useful for a future manned exploration of the Moon. [1] Hasebe et al.: Earth, Planets and Space 60 (2008) 299. [2] ICRP: ICRP Publication 74: Conversion Coefficients for use in Radiological Protection against External Radiation (Elsevier Science, Oxford, 1997). [3] Yamashita et al.: Earth, Planets and Space 60 (2008) 313.

  3. A {gamma} dose distribution evaluation technique using the k-d tree for nearest neighbor searching

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Jiankui; Chen Weimin

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The authors propose an algorithm based on the k-d tree for nearest neighbor searching to improve the {gamma} calculation time for 2D and 3D dose distributions. Methods: The {gamma} calculation method has been widely used for comparisons of dose distributions in clinical treatment plans and quality assurances. By specifying the acceptable dose and distance-to-agreement criteria, the method provides quantitative measurement of the agreement between the reference and evaluation dose distributions. The {gamma} value indicates the acceptability. In regions where {gamma}{<=}1, the predefined criterion is satisfied and thus the agreement is acceptable; otherwise, the agreement fails. Although the concept of the method is not complicated and a quick naieve implementation is straightforward, an efficient and robust implementation is not trivial. Recent algorithms based on exhaustive searching within a maximum radius, the geometric Euclidean distance, and the table lookup method have been proposed to improve the computational time for multidimensional dose distributions. Motivated by the fact that the least searching time for finding a nearest neighbor can be an O(log N) operation with a k-d tree, where N is the total number of the dose points, the authors propose an algorithm based on the k-d tree for the {gamma} evaluation in this work. Results: In the experiment, the authors found that the average k-d tree construction time per reference point is O(log N), while the nearest neighbor searching time per evaluation point is proportional to O(N{sup 1/k}), where k is between 2 and 3 for two-dimensional and three-dimensional dose distributions, respectively. Conclusions: Comparing with other algorithms such as exhaustive search and sorted list O(N), the k-d tree algorithm for {gamma} evaluation is much more efficient.

  4. Estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwer, P S; Etnier, E L

    1980-01-01

    Factors important for characterization of tritium in environmental pathways leading to exposure of man are reviewed and quantification of those factors is discussed. Parameters characterizing the behavior of tritium in man are also subjected to review. Factors to be discussed include organic binding, bioaccumulation, quality factor and transmutation. A variety of models are presently in use to estimate dose to man from environmental releases of tritium. Results from four representative models are compared and discussed. Site-specific information is always preferable when parameterizing models to estimate dose to man. There may be significant differences in dose potential among geographic regions due to variable factors. An example of one such factor examined is absolute humidity. It is concluded that adequate methodologies exist for estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium although a number of areas are identified where additional tritium research is desirable.

  5. Gamma irradiator dose mapping simulation using the MCNP code and benchmarking with dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Sohrabpour, M; Hassanzadeh, M; Shahriari, M; Sharifzadeh, M

    2002-10-01

    The Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP, has been applied in simulating dose rate distribution in the IR-136 gamma irradiator system. Isodose curves, cumulative dose values, and system design data such as throughputs, over-dose-ratios, and efficiencies have been simulated as functions of product density. Simulated isodose curves, and cumulative dose values were compared with dosimetry values obtained using polymethyle-methacrylate, Fricke, ethanol-chlorobenzene, and potassium dichromate dosimeters. The produced system design data were also found to agree quite favorably with those of the system manufacturer's data. MCNP has thus been found to be an effective transport code for handling of various dose mapping excercises for gamma irradiators. PMID:12361333

  6. Environmental dose reconstruction for the urals population

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M.O.

    1996-12-31

    In 1948 the Mayak plutonium production facility was put into operation in the Southern Urals approximately 100 km northwest of the city of Chelyabinsk. This facility consisted of three main sites: reactor plant, radiochemical facility, and waste management facility. A series of releases and accidents occurred in the initial period of intense activity during the start-up and early years of operation of the Mayak facility. The major sources of radioactive contamination were: (1) the discharges of 2.75 million curies of liquid wastes into the Techa River in 1949-1956, (2) an explosion in the storage facility of radioactive wastes in 1957 (so-called Kyshtym Accident) which led to the form East Urals Radioactive Trace (EURT) as a result of the dispersion of 2 million curies in the atmosphere, (3) the resuspension of 600 curies with dry silt from the shores of Karachay Lake during a heavy thunderstorm, and (5) gaseous-aerosol releases (about 560,000 Ci of {sup 131}I) mainly during the first decade of the facility`s operation. A large fraction of the releases into the Techa River and during the Kyshtym Accident consist of long-lived radionuclides, mainly {sup 90}Sr. This article covers the following, besides the sources and history of radioactive contamination: data bases for dose reconstruction and risk assessment; the approaches to population dose reconstruction. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Selective source blocking for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia based on analytical dose modelling.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaile; Ma, Lijun

    2004-08-01

    We have developed an automatic critical region shielding (ACRS) algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia. The algorithm selectively blocks 201 Gamma Knife sources to minimize the dose to the brainstem while irradiating the root entry area of the trigeminal nerve with 70-90 Gy. An independent dose model was developed to implement the algorithm. The accuracy of the dose model was tested and validated via comparison with the Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) calculations. Agreements of 3% or 3 mm in isodose distributions were found for both single-shot and multiple-shot treatment plans. After the optimized blocking patterns are obtained via the independent dose model, they are imported into the LGP for final dose calculations and treatment planning analyses. We found that the use of a moderate number of source plugs (30-50 plugs) significantly lowered (approximately 40%) the dose to the brainstem for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. Considering the small effort involved in using these plugs, we recommend source blocking for all trigeminal neuralgia treatments with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. PMID:15379025

  8. Selective source blocking for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia based on analytical dose modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kaile; Ma, Lijun

    2004-08-01

    We have developed an automatic critical region shielding (ACRS) algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia. The algorithm selectively blocks 201 Gamma Knife sources to minimize the dose to the brainstem while irradiating the root entry area of the trigeminal nerve with 70-90 Gy. An independent dose model was developed to implement the algorithm. The accuracy of the dose model was tested and validated via comparison with the Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) calculations. Agreements of 3% or 3 mm in isodose distributions were found for both single-shot and multiple-shot treatment plans. After the optimized blocking patterns are obtained via the independent dose model, they are imported into the LGP for final dose calculations and treatment planning analyses. We found that the use of a moderate number of source plugs (30-50 plugs) significantly lowered (~40%) the dose to the brainstem for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. Considering the small effort involved in using these plugs, we recommend source blocking for all trigeminal neuralgia treatments with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  9. Measurement of absorbed dose rate of gamma radiation for lead compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudraswamy, B.; Dhananjaya, N.; Manjunatha, H. C.

    2010-07-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the absorbed dose rate using both theoretical and measured mass energy attenuation coefficient of gamma for the lead compounds such as PbNO 3, PbCl 2, PbO 2 and PbO using various gamma sources such as 22Na (511, 1274), 137Cs (661.6), 54Mn (835) and 60Co (1173, 1332 keV).

  10. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry: A tutorial for environmental radiation scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.M.; Shebell, P.

    1993-10-01

    This tutorial is intended for those in the environmental field who perform assessments in areas where there is radioactive contamination in the surface soil. Techniques will be introduced for performing on-site quantitative measurements of gamma radiation in the environment using high resolution germanium detectors. A basic understanding of ionizing radiation principles is assumed; however, a detailed knowledge of gamma spectrometry systems is not required. Emphasized is the practical end of operations in the field and the conversion of measured full absorption peak count rates in a collected spectrum to meaningful radiological quantities, such as the concentration of a radionuclide in the soil, activity per unit area, and dose rate in the air. The theory of operation and calibration procedures will be covered in detail to provide the necessary knowledge to adapt the technique to site-specific problems. Example calculations for detector calibration are also provided.

  11. Morphological changes induced by different doses of gamma irradiation in garlic sprouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C. N.; Croci, C. A.; Orioli, G. A.

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of different doses of gamma rays applied in dormancy and post-dormancy on garlic bulbs in relation with some morphophysiological parameters. High (commercial) doses cause the complete inhibition of sprouting and mitosis (due to nuclear aberrations). Relatively low doses show no effects on bulbs but doses of 10 Gy applied in post-dormancy reduce sprouting and stop mitosis. This inhibition becomes noticeable from 150 days post-harvest onwards. Exogenous growth regulators can reverse these effects. Results may reinforce the good practice of radioinhibition processes in garlic.

  12. Integrated Codes for Estimating Environmental Accumulation and Individual Dose from Past Hanford Atmospheric Releases: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T. A.; Burnett, R. A.; Napier, B. A.; Reitz, N. A.; Shipler, D. B.

    1992-02-01

    Preliminary radiation doses were estimated and reported during Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. As the project has progressed, additional information regarding the magnitude and timing of past radioactive releases has been developed, and the general scope of the required calculations has been enhanced. The overall HEDR computational model for computing doses attributable to atmospheric releases from Hanford Site operations is called HEDRIC (Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes). It consists of four interrelated models: source term, atmospheric transport, environmental accumulation, and individual dose. The source term and atmospheric transport models are documented elsewhere. This report describes the initial implementation of the design specifications for the environmental accumulation model and computer code, called DESCARTES (Dynamic EStimates of Concentrations and Accumulated Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments), and the individual dose model and computer code, called CIDER (Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides). The computations required of these models and the design specifications for their codes were documented in Napier et al. (1992). Revisions to the original specifications and the basis for modeling decisions are explained. This report is not the final code documentation but gives the status of the model and code development to date. Final code documentation is scheduled to be completed in FY 1994 following additional code upgrades and refinements. The user's guide included in this report describes the operation of the environmental accumulation and individual dose codes and associated pre- and post-processor programs. A programmer's guide describes the logical structure of the programs and their input and output files.

  13. Gamma Knife 3-D dose distribution near the area of tissue inhomogeneities by normoxic gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Isbakan, Fatih; Uelgen, Yekta; Bilge, Hatice; Ozen, Zeynep; Agus, Onur; Buyuksarac, Bora

    2007-05-15

    The accuracy of the Leksell GammaPlan registered , the dose planning system of the Gamma Knife Model-B, was evaluated near tissue inhomogeneities, using the gel dosimetry method. The lack of electronic equilibrium around the small-diameter gamma beams can cause dose calculation errors in the neighborhood of an air-tissue interface. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of inhomogeneity near the paranosal sinuses cavities. The homogeneous phantom was a spherical glass balloon of 16 cm diameter, filled with MAGIC gel; i.e., the normoxic polymer gel. Two hollow PVC balls of 2 cm radius, filled with N{sub 2} gas, represented the air cavities inside the inhomogeneous phantom. For dose calibration purposes, 100 ml gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses, and then scanned in a MR unit. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. Dose distributions are the results of a single shot of irradiation, obtained by collimating all 201 cobalt sources to a known target in the phantom. Both phantoms were irradiated at the same dose level at the same coordinates. Stereotactic frames and fiducial markers were attached to the phantoms prior to MR scanning. The dose distribution predicted by the Gamma Knife planning system was compared with that of the gel dosimetry. As expected, for the homogeneous phantom the isodose diameters measured by the gel dosimetry and the GammaPlan registered differed by 5% at most. However, with the inhomogeneous phantom, the dose maps in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were spatially different. The diameters of the 50% isodose curves differed 43% in the X axis and 32% in the Y axis for the Z=90 mm axial plane; by 44% in the X axis and 24% in the Z axis for the Y=90 mm coronal plane; and by 32% in the Z axis and 42% in the Y axis for the X=92 mm sagittal plane. The lack of ability of the GammaPlan registered to predict the rapid dose fall off, due

  14. Gamma Knife 3-D dose distribution near the area of tissue inhomogeneities by normoxic gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Isbakan, Fatih; Ulgen, Yekta; Bilge, Hatice; Ozen, Zeynep; Agus, Onur; Buyuksarac, Bora

    2007-05-01

    The accuracy of the Leksell GammaPlan, the dose planning system of the Gamma Knife Model-B, was evaluated near tissue inhomogeneities, using the gel dosimetry method. The lack of electronic equilibrium around the small-diameter gamma beams can cause dose calculation errors in the neighborhood of an air-tissue interface. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of inhomogeneity near the paranosal sinuses cavities. The homogeneous phantom was a spherical glass balloon of 16 cm diameter, filled with MAGIC gel; i.e., the normoxic polymer gel. Two hollow PVC balls of 2 cm radius, filled with N2 gas, represented the air cavities inside the inhomogeneous phantom. For dose calibration purposes, 100 ml gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses, and then scanned in a MR unit. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. Dose distributions are the results of a single shot of irradiation, obtained by collimating all 201 cobalt sources to a known target in the phantom. Both phantoms were irradiated at the same dose level at the same coordinates. Stereotactic frames and fiducial markers were attached to the phantoms prior to MR scanning. The dose distribution predicted by the Gamma Knife planning system was compared with that of the gel dosimetry. As expected, for the homogeneous phantom the isodose diameters measured by the gel dosimetry and the GammaPlan differed by 5% at most. However, with the inhomogeneous phantom, the dose maps in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were spatially different. The diameters of the 50% isodose curves differed 43% in the X axis and 32% in the Y axis for the Z =90 mm axial plane; by 44% in the X axis and 24% in the Z axis for the Y=90 mm coronal plane; and by 32% in the Z axis and 42% in the Y axis for the X=92 mm sagittal plane. The lack of ability of the GammaPlan to predict the rapid dose fall off, due to the air cavities behind or near the

  15. Short-lived variations in the background gamma-radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Burnett, J L; Croudace, I W; Warwick, P E

    2010-09-01

    Sudden increases in the background gamma-radiation dose may occur due to the removal of (222)Rn and (220)Rn progeny from the atmosphere by wet deposition mechanisms. This contribution has been measured using a Geiger-Muller detector at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (Aldermaston, UK) during July 2005-April 2006. The results are approximated by a log-normal distribution and there were nine separate occurrences of the gamma-radiation dose exceeding 125% of the geometric mean value. The increases were associated with periods of heavy rainfall, although no correlation was evident between the dose rate and the amount of rainfall, as increased rainfall dilutes the activity further rather than increasing its atmospheric removal. The events were preceded by periods of fine weather and atmospheric stability that allow for the build-up of (222)Rn and (220)Rn progeny. Similar increases in gamma-radiation dose have been measured at a nearby monitoring station situated approximately 11 miles from Aldermaston. Increases in gamma-radiation dose during heavy rainfall have also been observed throughout the UK, that followed the trajectory of an air mass. All events decreased to typical values within 1-2 h as the water permeated into the ground below and the radioactivity decayed away. PMID:20826890

  16. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Pecaut, M J; Miller, G M; Moyers, M F; Nelson, G A

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements. PMID:11491015

  17. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  18. HEDR model validation plan. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Gilbert, R.O.; Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Thiede, M.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1993-06-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computational ``tools`` for estimating the possible radiation dose that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the planned activities to ``validate`` these tools. In the sense of the HEDR Project, ``validation`` is a process carried out by comparing computational model predictions with field observations and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the model.

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Monthly report, May 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of independent Technical Steering Panel. The Technical Steering Panel consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included among the members are appointed technical members representing the States of Oregon and Washington, cultural and technical experts nominated by the Indian tribes in the region, and an individual representing the public.

  20. Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, John E.; Hugtenburg, Richard P.; Green, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing controversy surrounds the adverse health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. The biological effects of gamma-radiation arise from the direct or indirect interaction between secondary electrons and the DNA of living cells. The probability of the absorption of X-rays and gamma-rays with energies below about 200 keV by particles of high atomic number is proportional to the third to fourth power of the atomic number. In such a case, the more heavily ionizing low-energy recoil electrons are preferentially produced; these cause dose enhancement in the immediate vicinity of the particles. It has been claimed that upon exposure to naturally occurring background gamma-radiation, particles of DU in the human body would produce dose enhancement by a factor of 500–1000, thereby contributing a significant radiation dose in addition to the dose received from the inherent radioactivity of the DU. In this study, we used the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc to accurately estimate the likely maximum dose enhancement arising from the presence of micrometre-sized uranium particles in the body. We found that although the dose enhancement is significant, of the order of 1–10, it is considerably smaller than that suggested previously. PMID:19776147

  1. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-20

    This report summarizes the water pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, conducted by Battelle staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel. The HEDR Project is estimating radiation doses that could have been received by the public from the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the water-pathway dose reconstruction sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the area from above the Hanford Site at Priest Rapids Dam to below the site at McNary Dam from January 1964 to December 1966. Of the potential sources of radionuclides from the river, fish consumption was the most important. Later phases of the HEDR Project will address dose estimates for periods other than 1964--1966 and for populations downstream of McNary Dam. 17 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Moving from gamma passing rates to patient DVH-based QA metrics in pretreatment dose QA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Heming; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of the gamma passing rate metric for per-patient, pretreatment dose QA and to validate a novel patient-dose/DVH-based method and its accuracy and correlation. Specifically, correlations between: (1) gamma passing rates for three 3D dosimeter detector geometries vs clinically relevant patient DVH-based metrics; (2) Gamma passing rates of whole patient dose grids vs DVH-based metrics, (3) gamma passing rates filtered by region of interest (ROI) vs DVH-based metrics, and (4) the capability of a novel software algorithm that estimates corrected patient Dose-DVH based on conventional phan-tom QA data are analyzed. Methods: Ninety six unique ''imperfect'' step-and-shoot IMRT plans were generated by applying four different types of errors on 24 clinical Head/Neck patients. The 3D patient doses as well as the dose to a cylindrical QA phantom were then recalculated using an error-free beam model to serve as a simulated measurement for comparison. Resulting deviations to the planned vs simulated measured DVH-based metrics were generated, as were gamma passing rates for a variety of difference/distance criteria covering: dose-in-phantom comparisons and dose-in-patient comparisons, with the in-patient results calculated both over the whole grid and per-ROI volume. Finally, patient dose and DVH were predicted using the conventional per-beam planar data as input into a commercial ''planned dose perturbation'' (PDP) algorithm, and the results of these predicted DVH-based metrics were compared to the known values. Results: A range of weak to moderate correlations were found between clinically relevant patient DVH metrics (CTV-D95, parotid D{sub mean}, spinal cord D1cc, and larynx D{sub mean}) and both 3D detector and 3D patient gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm) for dose-in-phantom along with dose-in-patient for both whole patient volume and filtered per-ROI. There was considerable scatter in the gamma passing rate

  3. Neutron and gamma-ray dose-rates from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We report dose-rate information obtained at many locations in the near vicinity of, and at distances out to 0.64 km from, the Little Boy replica while it was operated as a critical assembly. The measurements were made with modified conventional dosimetry instruments that used an Anderson-Braun detector for neutrons and a Geiger-Mueller tube for gamma rays with suitable electronic modules to count particle-induced pulses. Thermoluminescent dosimetry methods provide corroborative data. Our analysis gives estimates of both neutron and gamma-ray relaxation lengths in air for comparison with earlier calculations. We also show the neutron-to-gamma-ray dose ratio as a function of distance from the replica. Current experiments and further data analysis will refine these results. 7 references, 8 figures.

  4. Dose De-Escalation With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Clemens M.; Chan, Michael; Mignano, John; Duker, Jay; Melhus, Christopher S.; Williams, Lloyd B.; Wu, Julian K.; Yao, Kevin C.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Single-fraction targeted radiation therapy delivered by the Leksell Gamma Knife system is a minimally invasive treatment option for choroidal melanoma that has been used as an alternative to enucleation, proton beam therapy, or brachytherapy. Previously reported Gamma Knife series involved the treatment of choroidal melanomas with a dose of 40 to 50 Gy at the tumor margin. We report our institutional experience using a significantly lower dose. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with choroidal melanoma were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution over a 7-year period. The treatment and clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 32.2 months. Results: The mean dose to the tumor margin was 22.2 {+-} 2.4 Gy (range, 20- 25 Gy). Mean treated tumor volume was 1.1 {+-} 1.2 cc. Local control was achieved in 13 cases (93%). In 1 patient both intraocular spread and distant metastatic disease developed after treatment. Visual function of the affected eye was preserved in 5 patients (36%) at latest follow-up, in 9 patients (64%) visual loss ensued. Mild to moderate radiation toxicity developed in 8 patients. Conclusions: Choroidal melanoma can be safely and effectively treated using Leksell Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery with a marginal dose of less than 25 Gy.

  5. A simple method of independent treatment time verification in gamma knife radiosurgery using integral dose

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jianyue; Drzymala, Robert; Li Zuofeng

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a simple independent dose calculation method to verify treatment plans for Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Our approach uses the total integral dose within the skull as an end point for comparison. The total integral dose is computed using a spreadsheet and is compared to that obtained from Leksell GammaPlan registered . It is calculated as the sum of the integral doses of 201 beams, each passing through a cylindrical volume. The average length of the cylinders is estimated from the Skull-Scaler measurement data taken before treatment. Correction factors are applied to the length of the cylinder depending on the location of a shot in the skull. The radius of the cylinder corresponds to the collimator aperture of the helmet, with a correction factor for the beam penumbra and scattering. We have tested our simple spreadsheet program using treatment plans of 40 patients treated with Gamma Knife registered in our center. These patients differ in geometry, size, lesion locations, collimator helmet, and treatment complexities. Results show that differences between our calculations and treatment planning results are typically within {+-}3%, with a maximum difference of {+-}3.8%. We demonstrate that our spreadsheet program is a convenient and effective independent method to verify treatment planning irradiation times prior to implementation of Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  6. Monitoring performance of the cameras under the high dose-rate gamma ray environments.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2014-05-01

    CCD/CMOS cameras, loaded on a robot system, are generally used as the eye of the robot and monitoring unit. A major problem that arises when dealing with images provided by CCD/CMOS cameras under severe accident situations of a nuclear power plant is the presence of speckles owing to the high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. To use a CCD/CMOS camera as a monitoring unit in a high radiation area, the legibility of the camera image in such intense gamma-radiation fields should therefore be defined. In this paper, the authors describe the monitoring index as a figure of merit of the camera's legibleness under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation environment. From a low dose-rate (10 Gy h) to a high dose-rate (200 Gy h) level, the legible performances of the cameras owing to the speckles are evaluated. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. The legibility of the sensor indicator (thermo/hygrometer) owing to the number of speckles is also presented. PMID:24667385

  7. Evaluation using GEANT4 of the transit dose in the Tunisian gamma irradiator for insect sterilization.

    PubMed

    Mannai, K; Askri, B; Loussaief, A; Trabelsi, A

    2007-06-01

    A simulation study of the Tunisian Gamma Irradiation Facility for sterile insects release programs has been realized using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code of CERN. The dose was calculated and measured for high and low dose values inside the irradiation cell. The calculated high dose was in good agreement with measurements. However, a discrepancy between calculated and measured values occurs at dose levels commonly used for sterilization of insects. We argue that this discrepancy is due to the transit dose absorbed during displacement of targets from their initial position towards their irradiation position and displacement of radiation source pencils from storage towards their irradiation position. The discrepancy is corrected by taking into account the transit dose. PMID:17395474

  8. Assessment of indoor dose from gamma ray emitters and radon daughters in Milan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, A.; Bazzano, E.; Carioni, T.

    Gamma ray doses were determined by duplicate exposure of dosimeters for two 1 month periods in 100 houses chosen at random and classified a posteriori according to location in the town, age, building materials, air ventilation, etc. Radon and radon daughters long-term determinations were carried out by passive track etch detectors. Gamma spectrometry analysis of typical building materials and spot active analysis of radon and radon daughters were carried out. No relation between house location and indoor gamma ray exposure level is noted. Higher levels are recorded in the oldest houses, and those with brick or hollow tile external walls. The first two stories have the highest radiation levels. There is no correlation between radon concentration and gamma ray exposure rates. The highest radon measures are recorded in dwellings with low occupancy factors.

  9. Optimal mapping of terrestrial gamma dose rates using geological parent material and aerogeophysical survey data.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, B G; Scheib, C; Tyler, A N; Beamish, D

    2012-12-01

    Regulatory authorities need ways to estimate natural terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (nGy h⁻¹) across the landscape accurately, to assess its potential deleterious health effects. The primary method for estimating outdoor dose rate is to use an in situ detector supported 1 m above the ground, but such measurements are costly and cannot capture the landscape-scale variation in dose rates which are associated with changes in soil and parent material mineralogy. We investigate the potential for improving estimates of terrestrial gamma dose rates across Northern Ireland (13,542 km²) using measurements from 168 sites and two sources of ancillary data: (i) a map based on a simplified classification of soil parent material, and (ii) dose estimates from a national-scale, airborne radiometric survey. We used the linear mixed modelling framework in which the two ancillary variables were included in separate models as fixed effects, plus a correlation structure which captures the spatially correlated variance component. We used a cross-validation procedure to determine the magnitude of the prediction errors for the different models. We removed a random subset of 10 terrestrial measurements and formed the model from the remainder (n = 158), and then used the model to predict values at the other 10 sites. We repeated this procedure 50 times. The measurements of terrestrial dose vary between 1 and 103 (nGy h⁻¹). The median absolute model prediction errors (nGy h⁻¹) for the three models declined in the following order: no ancillary data (10.8) > simple geological classification (8.3) > airborne radiometric dose (5.4) as a single fixed effect. Estimates of airborne radiometric gamma dose rate can significantly improve the spatial prediction of terrestrial dose rate. PMID:23147566

  10. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 004

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  11. Radon survey and soil gamma doses in primary schools of Batman, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Damla, Nevzat; Aldemir, Kamuran

    2014-06-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate levels of indoor radon and gamma doses in 42 primary schools located in Batman, southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. Indoor radon measurements were carried out using CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector-based radon dosimeters. The overall mean annual (222)Rn activity in the surveyed area was found to be 49 Bq m(-3) (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 0.25 mSv). However, in one of the districts (Besiri) the maximum radon value turned out to be 307 Bq m(-3). The estimated annual effective doses are less than the recommended action level (3-10 mSv). It is found that the radon concentration decreases with increasing floor number. The concentrations of natural and artificial radioisotopes were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy for soil samples collected in close vicinity of the studied schools. The mean gamma activity concentrations in the soil samples were 31, 25, 329 and 12 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. The radiological parameters such as the absorbed dose rate in air and the annual effective dose equivalent were calculated. These radiological parameters were evaluated and compared with the internationally recommended values. PMID:24437644

  12. Beta- and gamma-dose measurements of the Godiva IV critical assembly.

    PubMed

    Hankins, D E

    1984-03-01

    To aid in the re-evaluation of an exposure that occurred in 1963, information was required on the response of film badges to the beta- and gamma-ray doses from a critical assembly. Of particular interest was the beta spectra from the assembly. The techniques used and the results obtained in this study are of interest to health physicists at facilities where exposures to betas occur. The dose rates from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Godiva IV Critical Assembly were measured at numerous distances from the assembly four and 12 days following a burst. Information was obtained on the beta-particle spectra using absorption curve studies. The beta/gamma dose-rate ratio as a function of distance from the assembly was determined. Shielding provided by various metals, gloves and clothing was measured. The beta- and gamma-ray doses measured were compared with a film packet used in the past at the Nevada Test Site with two types of current TLD personnel badges. Measurements made with a commercial thin-window ion chamber instrument are compared with the dose rates obtained using other dosimeters. PMID:6698784

  13. Gross Gamma Dose Rate Measurements for TRIGA Spent Nuclear Fuel Burnup Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, P.L.; Sterbentz, J.W.

    2002-07-01

    Gross gamma-ray dose rates from six spent TRIGA fuel elements were measured and compared to calculated values as a means to validate the reported element burnups. A newly installed and functional gamma-ray detection subsystem of the In-Cell Examination System was used to perform the measurements and is described in some detail. The analytical methodology used to calculate the corresponding dose rates is presented along with the calculated values. Comparison of the measured and calculated dose rates for the TRIGA fuel elements indicates good agreement (less than a factor of 2 difference). The intent of the subsystem is to measure the gross gamma dose rate and correlate the measurement to a calculated dose rate based on the element s known burnup and other pertinent spent fuel information. Although validation of the TRIGA elements' burnup is of primary concern in this paper, the measurement and calculational techniques can be used to either validate an element's reported burnup or provide a burnup estimate for an element with an unknown burnup. (authors)

  14. Effect of particle size in the TL response of natural quartz sensitized with high gamma dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, A. B., Jr.; Guzzo, P. L.; Sullasi, H. L.; Khoury, H. J.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of particle size in the thermoluminescence (TL) response of natural quartz sensitized with high gamma dose. For this, fragments of a single crystal taken from the Solonópole district (Brazil) were crushed and classified into ten size fractions ranging from 38 μm to 5 mm. Aliquots of each size fraction were sensitized with 25 kGy of gamma dose of 60Co and heat-treated in a muffle furnace at 400oC. The non-sensitized samples were exposed to test doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy and the sensitized samples were exposed to a unique test dose equal to 50 mGy. For non-sensitized samples, the TL peak near 325 °C increases with the particle size decreasing. However, in the case of sensitized samples, the TL output near 280 °C increases with the increasing of particle size up to mean grain size equal to 308 μm. Above 308 μm, an abrupt reduction in the TL intensity was noticed. These effects are discussed in relation to the specific surface area and the different interaction of high gamma doses with fine and coarse particles of quartz.

  15. Gross Gamma Dose Rate Measurements for TRIGA Spent Nuclear Fuel Burnup Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, Philip Lon; Sterbentz, James William

    2001-04-01

    Gross gamma-ray dose rates from six spent TRIGA fuel elements were measured and compared to calculated values as a means to validate the reported element burnups. A newly installed and functional gamma-ray detection subsystem of the In-Cell Examination System was used to perform the measurements and is described in some detail. The analytical methodology used to calculate the corresponding dose rates is presented along with the calculated values. Comparison of the measured and calculated dose rates for the TRIGA fuel elements indicates good agreement (less than a factor of 2 difference). The intent of the subsystem is to measure the gross gamma dose rate and correlate the measurement to a calculated dose rate based on the element s known burnup and other pertinent spent fuel information. Although validation of the TRIGA elements’ burnup is of primary concern in this paper, the measurement and calculational techniques can be used to either validate an element’s reported burnup or provide a burnup estimate for an element with an unknown burnup.

  16. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  17. Effect of gamma ray absorbed dose on the FET transistor parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Baharak; Ashrafi, Saleh

    This article tries to explain a modified method on dosimetry, based on electronic solid state including MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect) transistors. For this purpose, behavior of two models of MOSFETs has been studied as a function of the absorbed dose. The MOSFETs were irradiated at room temperature by 137Cs gamma ray source in the dose range of 1-5 Gy. Threshold voltage variation of investigated samples has been studied based on their transfer characteristic curves (TF) and also using the readout circuit (RC). For evaluation of laboratory samples sensitivity at different operating conditions, different biases were applied on the gate. In practical applications of radiation dosimetry, a significant change occurs in the threshold voltage of irradiated MOSFETs. And sensitivity of these MOSFETs is increased with increasing the bias values. Therefore, these transistors can be excellent candidates as low-cost sensors for systems that are capable of measuring gamma radiation dose.

  18. Patient doses in {gamma}-intracoronary radiotherapy: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thierens, Hubert . E-mail: hubert.thierens@Ughent.be; Reynaert, Nick; Bacher, Klaus; Eijkeren, Marc van; Taeymans, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To determine accurately the radiation burden of both patients and staff from intracoronary radiotherapy (IRT) with {sup 192}Ir and to investigate the importance of IRT in the patient dose compared with interventional X-rays. Methods and materials: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study (RABAS) population consisted of 9 patients undergoing {gamma}-IRT after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and 14 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty only as the control group. For each patient, the dose to the organs and tissues from the internal and external exposure was determined in detail by Monte Carlo N-particle simulations. Patient skin dose measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters served as verification. Staff dosimetry was performed with electronic dosimeters, thermoluminescence dosimeters, and double film badge dosimetry. Results: With respect to the patient dose from IRT, the critical organs are the thymus (58 mGy), lungs (31 mGy), and esophagus (27 mGy). The mean effective dose from IRT was 8 mSv. The effective dose values from interventional X-rays showed a broad range (2-28 mSv), with mean values of 8 mSv for the IRT patients and 13 mSv for the control group. The mean dose received by the radiotherapist from IRT was 4 {mu}Sv/treatment. The doses to the other staff members were completely negligible. Conclusion: Our results have shown that the patient and personnel doses in {gamma}-IRT remain at an acceptable level. The patient dose from IRT was within the variations in dose from the accompanying interventional X-rays.

  19. Simulation of radioactive plume gamma dose over a complex terrain using Lagrangian particle dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, P T; Venkatesan, R; Hedde, Thierry; Roubin, Pierre; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    FLEXPART-WRF is a versatile model for the simulation of plume dispersion over a complex terrain in a mesoscale region. This study deals with its application to the dispersion of a hypothetical air borne gaseous radioactivity over a topographically complex nuclear site in southeastern France. A computational method for calculating plume gamma dose to the ground level receptor is introduced in FLEXPART using the point kernel method. Comparison with another similar dose computing code SPEEDI is carried out. In SPEEDI the dose is calculated for specific grid sizes, the lowest available being 250 m, whereas in FLEXPART it is grid independent. Spatial distribution of dose by both the models is analyzed. Due to the ability of FLEXPART to utilize the spatio-temporal variability of meteorological variables as input, particularly the height of the PBL, the simulated dose values were higher than SPEEDI estimates. The FLEXPART-WRF in combination with point kernel dose module gives a more realistic picture of plume gamma dose distribution in a complex terrain, a situation likely under accidental release of radioactivity in a mesoscale range. PMID:25863323

  20. Field and model investigations of external gamma dose rates along the Cumbrian coast, NW England.

    PubMed

    McDonald, P; Bryan, S E; Hunt, G J; Baldwin, M; Parker, T G

    2005-03-01

    A survey of the contribution to external dose from gamma rays originating from intertidal sediments in the vicinity of the British Nuclear Group Sellafield site showed that the major anthropogenic contributions were due to (137)Cs and (60)Co. At some sites, traces of other anthropogenic radionuclides were detected, namely (106)Ru, (125)Sb, and (154)Eu. The proportions of fine grained material (<63 microm) were used to improve model predictions of dose contribution due to external exposure to gamma rays, using the CUMBRIA77/DOSE77 model. Model dose predictions were compared to those directly measured in the field. Using the new proportions of fine grained material (1-17.5%) in conjunction with field gamma-ray spectra, model predictions were improved considerably for most sites. Exceptions were at Drigg Barn Scar and Whitehaven Coal Sands sites, which had their own unique characteristics. The highest (60)Co activity concentrations in this study were detected at Drigg Barn Scar. These relatively high activity concentrations of (60)Co were due to the presence of (60)Co in mussels and barnacles, hence upsetting the fine sediment relationships used in previous dose calculations. Whitehaven Coal Sands was unusual in that it contained higher levels of radionuclides than would be expected in sandy sediment. The mineralogy of these sediments was the controlling factor on (137)Cs binding, rather than the proportion of fine grained material. By adjusting the effective fine grained sediment proportions for calculations involving (60)Co and (137)Cs at Drigg Barn Scar and Whitehaven Coal Sands respectively, the CUMBRIA77/DOSE77 model predictions could be improved upon significantly for these sites. This work highlights the influence of particle size and sediment composition on external dose rate calculations, as well as the potential for external dose contributions from biota. PMID:15798279

  1. Work plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944, with descriptions of uncertainties inherent in such estimates. The secondary objective is to make project records--information that HEDR staff members used to estimate radiation doses--available to the public. Preliminary dose estimates for a limited geographic area and time period, certain radionuclides, and certain populations are planned to be available in 1990; complete results are planned to be reported in 1993. Project reports and references used in the reports are available to the public in the DOE Public Reading Room in Richland, Washington. Project progress is documented in monthly reports, which are also available to the public in the DOE Public Reading Room.

  2. Neutron/gamma dose separation by the multiple-ion-chamber technique

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Many mixed n/..gamma.. dosimetry systems rely on two dosimeters, one composed of a tissue-equivalent material and the other made from a non-hydrogenous material. The paired chamber technique works well in fields of neutron radiation nearly identical in spectral composition to that in which the dosimeters were calibrated. However, this technique is drastically compromised in phantom due to the degradation of the neutron spectrum. The three-dosimeter technique allows for the fall-off in neutron sensitivity of the two non-hydrogenous dosimeters. Precise and physically meaningful results were obtained with this technique with a D-T source in air and in phantom and with simultaneous D-T neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray irradiation in air. The MORSE-CG coupled n/..gamma.. three-dimensional Monte Carlo code was employed to calculate neutron and gamma doses in a water phantom. Gamma doses calculated in phantom with this code were generally lower than corresponding ion chamber measurements. This can be explained by the departure of irradiation conditions from ideal narrow-beam geometry. 97 references.

  3. Expression of Genes Associated with DNA Damage Sensing in Human Fibroblasts Exposed to Low-dose-rate Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Mehta, Satish; Hammond, Diane; Pierson, Duane; Jeevarajan, Antony; Cucinotta, Francis; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the molecular response to low-dose and low-dose-rate radiation exposure is essential for the extrapolation of high-dose radiation risks to those at dose levels relevant to space and other environmental concerns. Most of the reported studies of gene expressions induced by low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation were carried out on exponentially growing cells. In the present study, we analyzed expressions of 84 genes associated with DNA damage sensing using real time PCR in human fibroblasts in mostly G1 phase of the cell cycle. The cells were exposed continuously to gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.8 cGy/hr for 1, 2, 6 or 24 hrs at 37 C throughout the exposure. The total RNA was isolated immediately after the exposure was terminated. Of the 84 genes, only a few showed significant changes of the expression level. Some of the genes (e.g. DDit3 and BTG2) were found to be up or down regulated only after a short period of exposure, while other genes (e.g. PRKDC) displayed a highest expression level at the 24 hr time point. The expression profiles for the exposed cells which had a smaller portion of G1 cells indicated more cell cycle signaling and DNA repair genes either up or down regulated. Interestingly, the panel of genes changed from radiation exposure in G1 cells is different from the panel in cells having less G1 arrest cells. The gene expression profile of the cells responding to low-dose-radiation insult apparently depends on the cell growth stage. The response pathway in G1 cells may differ from that in exponentially growing cells.

  4. Effects of sterilizing doses of gamma radiation on Mars analog rocks and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Albert, Fred G.; Combie, Joan; Banin, Amos; Yablekovitch, Yehuda; Kan, Ido; Bodnar, Robert J.; Hamilton, Victoria E.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Kuebler, Karla; Wang, Alian; Lindstrom, David J.; Morris, Penny A.; Morris, Richard V.; Murray, Richard W.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Simpson, Paul D.; Steele, Andrew; Symes, Steven J.

    Rock and soil samples from the planet Mars are due to be returned to Earth within a decade. Martian samples initially will be tested for evidence of life and biological hazard under strict biological containment. Wider distribution of samples for organic and inorganic analysis may occur only if neither evidence of life nor hazard is detected, or if the samples are first sterilized. We subjected a range of Mars analog rocks and minerals to high doses of gamma radiation in order to determine the effects of gamma sterilization on the samples' isotopic, chemical, and physical properties. Gamma photons from 60Co (1.17 and 1.33 MeV) in doses as high as 3×107rads did not induce radioactivity in the samples and produced no measurable changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. This level of irradiation also produced no measurable changes in the crystallographic structure of any sample, the surface areas of soil analogs, or the fluid inclusion homogenization temperature of quartz. The only detectable effects of irradiation were dose-dependent changes in the visible and near-infrared spectral region (e.g., discoloration and darkening of quartz and halite and an increase in albedo of carbonates) and increases in the thermoluminescence of quartz and plagioclase. If samples returned from Mars require biological sterilization, gamma irradiation provides a feasible option.

  5. The EXPURT model for calculating external gamma doses from deposited material in inhabited areas.

    PubMed

    Jones, J A; Singer, L N; Brown, J

    2006-01-01

    EXPURT, NRPB's model for calculating external gamma doses in inhabited areas, was originally developed in the mid-1980s. Deposition on surfaces in the area, the subsequent transfer of material between different surfaces or its removal from the system, and dose rates in various locations from material on the different surfaces are modelled. The model has been updated to take account of more recent experimental data on the transfer rates between surfaces and to make it more flexible for use in assessing dose rates following an accidental release. EXPURT is a compartmental model and models the transfer of material between the surfaces using a set of first order differential equations. It enables the impact of the decontamination of surfaces on doses and dose rates to be explored. The paper describes the EXPURT model and presents some preliminary results obtained using it. PMID:16242820

  6. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The work described in this report was prompted by the public's concern about potential effect from the radioactive materials released from the Hanford Site. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation dose the public might have received from the Hanford Site since 1944, when facilities began operating. Phase 1 of the HEDR Project is a pilot'' or demonstration'' phase. The objectives of this initial phase were to determine whether enough historical information could be found or reconstructed to be used for dose estimation and develop and test conceptual and computational models for calculating credible dose estimates. Preliminary estimates of radiation doses were produced in Phase 1 because they are needed to achieve these objectives. The reader is cautioned that the dose estimates provided in this and other Phase 1 HEDR reports are preliminary. As the HEDR Project continues, the dose estimates will change for at least three reasons: more complete input information for models will be developed; the models themselves will be refined; and the size and shape of the geographic study area will change. This is one of three draft reports that summarize the first phase of the four-phased HEDR Project. This, the Summary Report, is directed to readers who want a general understanding of the Phase 1 work and preliminary dose estimates. The two other reports -- the Air Pathway Report and the Columbia River Pathway Report -- are for readers who understand the radiation dose assessment process and want to see more technical detail. Detailed descriptions of the dose reconstruction process are available in more than 20 supporting reports listed in Appendix A. 32 refs., 46 figs.

  7. Protracted low-dose radiation priming and response of liver to acute gamma and proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Mao, X W; Cao, J D; Bayeta, E J M; Pecaut, M J

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated liver from C57BL/6 mice irradiated with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays (0.01 Gy, 0.03 cGy/h), with and without subsequent exposure to acute 2 Gy gamma or proton radiation. Analyses were performed on day 56 post-exposure. Expression patterns of apoptosis-related genes were strikingly different among irradiated groups compared with 0 Gy (p < 0.05). Two genes were affected in the Gamma group, whereas 10 were modified in the LDR + Gamma group. In Proton and LDR + Proton groups, there were six and 12 affected genes, respectively. Expression of genes in the Gamma (Traf3) and Proton (Bak1, Birc2, Birc3, Mcl1) groups was no longer different from 0 Gy control group when mice were pre-exposed to LDR γ-rays. When each combined regimen was compared with the corresponding group that received acute radiation alone, two genes in the LDR + Gamma group and 17 genes in the LDR + Proton group were modified; greatest effect was on Birc2 and Nol3 (> 5-fold up-regulated by LDR + Protons). Oxygen radical production in livers from the LDR + Proton group was higher in LDR, Gamma, and LDR + Gamma groups (p < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy), but there were no differences in phagocytosis of E. coli. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) suggested more inflammation, with and without necrosis, in some irradiated groups. The data demonstrate that response to acute radiation is dependent on radiation quality and regimen and that some LDR γ-ray-induced modifications in liver response were still evident nearly 2 months after exposure. PMID:23869974

  8. Effective gamma-ray doses due to natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Medina, N. H.; Moreira, R. H.; Bellini, B. S.; Aguiar, V. A. P.

    2010-08-01

    We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to study the distribution of natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil: Billings reservoir, Sa~o Bernardo do Campo Parks, Diadema Parks, Interlagos region, Sa~o Paulo, and soil from Sa~o Paulo and Rio de Janeiro beaches. In most of the regions studied we have found that the dose due the external exposure to gamma-rays, proceeding from natural terrestrial elements, are between the values 0.3 and 0.6 mSv/year, established by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

  9. Effective gamma-ray doses due to natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Moreira, R. H.; Bellini, B. S.; Medina, N. H.; Aguiar, V. A. P.

    2010-08-04

    We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to study the distribution of natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil: Billings reservoir, Sao Bernardo do Campo Parks, Diadema Parks, Interlagos region, Sao Paulo, and soil from Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro beaches. In most of the regions studied we have found that the dose due the external exposure to gamma-rays, proceeding from natural terrestrial elements, are between the values 0.3 and 0.6 mSv/year, established by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

  10. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors.The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation fields

  11. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project; dose code recovery activities; Calculation 005

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  12. Verification by the FISH translocation assay of historic doses to Mayak workers from external gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Sotnik, Natalia V; Azizova, Tamara V; Darroudi, Firouz; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Moquet, Jayne E; Fomina, Janna; Lloyd, David C; Hone, Pat A; Edwards, Alan A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to apply the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) translocation assay in combination with chromosome painting of peripheral blood lymphocytes for retrospective biological dosimetry of Mayak nuclear power plant workers exposed chronically to external gamma radiation. These data were compared with physical dose estimates based on monitoring with badge dosimeters throughout each person's working life. Chromosome translocation yields for 94 workers of the Mayak production association were measured in three laboratories: Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Leiden University Medical Center and the former Health Protection Agency of the UK (hereinafter Public Health England). The results of the study demonstrated that the FISH-based translocation assay in workers with prolonged (chronic) occupational gamma-ray exposure was a reliable biological dosimeter even many years after radiation exposure. Cytogenetic estimates of red bone marrow doses from external gamma rays were reasonably consistent with dose measurements based on film badge readings successfully validated in dosimetry system "Doses-2005" by FISH, within the bounds of the associated uncertainties. PMID:26319788

  13. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h(-1) up to 1.5 Gy h(-1). Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h(-1). A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR10) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h(-1), followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h(-1) and 169 ± 12 mGy h(-1) on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h(-1), antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h(-1) which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic stress conditions

  14. Physiological and molecular characterization of the enhanced salt tolerance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation in Arabidopsis seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wencai; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Hangbo; Wang, Lin; Jiao, Zhen

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • 50-Gy gamma irradiation markedly promotes the seedling growth under salt stress in Arabidopsis. • The contents of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and MDA are obviously reduced by low-dose gamma irradiation under salt stress. • Low-dose gamma irradiation stimulates the activities of antioxidant enzymes under salt stress. • Proline accumulation is required for the low-gamma-ray-induced salt tolerance. • Low gamma rays differentially regulate the expression of genes related to salt stress. - Abstract: It has been established that gamma rays at low doses stimulate the tolerance to salt stress in plants. However, our knowledge regarding the molecular mechanism underlying the enhanced salt tolerance remains limited. In this study, we found that 50-Gy gamma irradiation presented maximal beneficial effects on germination index and root length in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. The contents of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and MDA in irradiated seedlings under salt stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and proline levels in the irradiated seedlings were markedly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components of salt stress signaling pathways were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under salt stress. Our results suggest that gamma irradiation at low doses alleviates the salt stress probably by modulating the physiological responses as well as stimulating the stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  15. HEDR modeling approach. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-07-01

    This report details the conceptual approaches to be used in calculating radiation doses to individuals throughout the various periods of operations at the Hanford Site. The report considers the major environmental transport pathways--atmospheric, surface water, and ground water--and projects and appropriate modeling technique for each. The modeling sequence chosen for each pathway depends on the available data on doses, the degree of confidence justified by such existing data, and the level of sophistication deemed appropriate for the particular pathway and time period being considered.

  16. Validation of HEDR models. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Eslinger, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Thiede, M.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computer models for estimating the possible radiation doses that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the validation of these models. In the HEDR Project, the model validation exercise consisted of comparing computational model estimates with limited historical field measurements and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the models. The results of any one test do not mean that a model is valid. Rather, the collection of tests together provide a level of confidence that the HEDR models are valid.

  17. Efficiency Calibration for Environmental Gamma Spectrometry Using GATE.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2016-06-01

    This work investigated the utility of performing efficiency calibration for environmental gamma spectrometry using the Monte Carlo based, free of charge GATE toolbox. The validity of this approach was tested by comparing output efficiency values of an in-house developed GATE-based program with experimental measurements covering various geometries and primary photon energies. The results of this comparison revealed relative deviations within ±20%, thus validating the employed computational approach. Moreover, the GATE-based method was able to predict quantities that are generally difficult to measure experimentally, such as the number of interactions preceding full energy absorption. These computationally obtained predictions were found to be in agreement with theory. PMID:27115226

  18. Detection of low level gaseous releases and dose evaluation from continuous gamma dose measurements using a wavelet transformation technique.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sabyasachi; Rao, D D; Sarkar, P K

    2012-11-01

    Measurement of environmental dose in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant site (Tarapur, India) is carried out continuously for the years 2007-2010 and attempts have been made to quantify the additional contributions from nuclear power plants over natural background by segregating the background fluctuations from the events due to plume passage using a non-decimated wavelet approach. A conservative estimate obtained using wavelet based analysis has shown a maximum annual dose of 38 μSv in a year at 1.6 km and 4.8 μSv at 10 km from the installation. The detected events within a year are in good agreement with the month wise wind-rose profile indicating reliability of the algorithm for proper detection of an event from the continuous dose rate measurements. The results were validated with the dispersion model dose predictions using the source term from routine monitoring data and meteorological parameters. PMID:22940411

  19. Conversion factors for external gamma dose derived from natural radionuclides in soils.

    PubMed

    Quindos, L S; Fernández, P L; Ródenas, C; Gómez-Arozamena, J; Arteche, J

    2004-01-01

    Field in situ gamma radiation exposure rates and laboratory measured radioactivity contents of 1500 Spanish soils were compared. The main objective was to determine if published theoretically derived conversion factors would yield accurate quantitative activity concentration (Bq kg(-1)) for the data carried out in different surveys developed by our laboratory during the last ten years. The in situ external gamma dose rate results were compared to laboratory gamma analysis of soils samples gathered from each site, considering the concentrations of seven radionuclides: 40K, 214Pb, 214Bi, 212Bi, 212Pb, 208Tl and 228Ac. The coefficient of correlation found between these variables indicate a good relationship. A discussion of the factors contributing to the uncertainties as well as measurement procedure are also given in this paper. PMID:14567949

  20. Effect of low dose gamma irradiation on plant and grain nutrition of wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Datta, Partha Sarathi

    2010-08-01

    We recently reported the use of low dose gamma irradiation to improve plant vigor, grain development and yield attributes of wheat ( Singh and Datta, 2010). Further, we report here the results of a field experiment conducted to assess the effect of gamma irradiation at 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1 kGy on flag leaf area, stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthetic rate and plant and grain nutritional quality. Gamma irradiation improved plant nutrition but did not improve the nutritional quality of grains particularly relating to micronutrients. Grain carotene, a precursor for vitamin A, was higher in irradiated grains. Low grain micronutrients seem to be caused by a limitation in the source to sink nutrient translocation rather than in the nutrient uptake capacity of the plant root.

  1. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2015-08-01

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4"X4" NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  2. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2015-08-28

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  3. Estimation of food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  4. Computed radiography as a gamma ray detector--dose response and applications.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, D S; McLeod, R W

    2004-08-21

    Computed radiography (CR) can be used for imaging the spatial distribution of photon emissions from radionuclides. Its wide dynamic range and good response to medium energy gamma rays reduces the need for long exposure times. Measurements of small doses can be performed without having to pre-sensitize the computed radiography plates via an x-ray exposure, as required with screen-film systems. Cassette-based Agfa MD30 and Kodak GP25 CR plates were used in applications involving the detection of gamma ray emissions from technetium-99m and iodine-131. Cassette entrance doses as small as 1 microGy (140 keV gamma rays) produce noisy images, but the images are suitable for applications such as the detection of breaks in radiation protection barriers. A consequence of the gamma ray sensitivity of CR plates is the possibility that some nuclear medicine patients may fog their x-rays if the x-ray is taken soon after their radiopharmaceutical injection. The investigation showed that such fogging is likely to be diffuse. PMID:15446787

  5. Preliminary Results of Indoor Radon/thoron Concentrations and Terrestrial Gamma Doses in Gejiu, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Sun, Quafu; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Min, Xiangdong; Yoshinaga, Shinji

    2008-08-01

    A preliminary survey on indoor radon/thoron and external gamma ray dose rate was conducted for houses in Gejiu city and its neighboring village in Yunnan Province, China. As a result of the radon/thoron measurements for about 50 houses, very high thoron concentrations were found in some hoses (maximum: 7,900 Bq/m3). The mean annual dose from thoron decay products was estimated to be larger than that from radon decay products (2.9 mSv vs. 1.6 mSv). Further dosimetric and epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the possible effects of radon and thoron.

  6. Preliminary Results of Indoor Radon/thoron Concentrations and Terrestrial Gamma Doses in Gejiu, Yunnan, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Sun Quafu; Min Xiangdong

    2008-08-07

    A preliminary survey on indoor radon/thoron and external gamma ray dose rate was conducted for houses in Gejiu city and its neighboring village in Yunnan Province, China. As a result of the radon/thoron measurements for about 50 houses, very high thoron concentrations were found in some hoses (maximum: 7,900 Bq/m{sup 3}). The mean annual dose from thoron decay products was estimated to be larger than that from radon decay products (2.9 mSv vs. 1.6 mSv). Further dosimetric and epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the possible effects of radon and thoron.

  7. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, K.; Kosako, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I.

    2014-06-15

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of {sup 60}Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  8. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, K.; Kosako, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I.

    2014-06-01

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of 60Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  9. Gamma-irradiated onions as a biological indicator of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Vaijapurkar, S G; Agarwal, D; Chaudhuri, S K; Senwar, K R; Bhatnagar, P K

    2001-10-01

    Post-irradiation identification and dose estimation are required to assess the radiation-induced effects on living things in any nuclear emergency. In this study, radiation-induced morphological/cytological changes i.e., number of root formation and its length, shooting length, reduction in mitotic index, micronuclei formation and chromosomal aberrations in the root tip cells of gamma-irradiated onions at lower doses (50-2000 cGy) are reported. The capabilities of this biological species to store the radiation-induced information are also studied. PMID:11762393

  10. Increase of onion yield through low dose of gamma irradiation of its seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiendl, F. M.; Wiendl, F. W.; Wiendl, J. A.; Vedovatto, A.; Arthur, V.

    1995-02-01

    The increase of onions' yield could be achieved by the common farmer through the use of nuclear techniques. This report describes the results obtained with the irradiation of onion seeds, with low doses of gamma radiations (Cobalt-60), at doses of 0 (control), 150, 400 and 700 Gy. Beyond the proper onion's variety also the use of low dose rates of 13.1, 39.2 and 52.3 Gy per hour were of the great importance during irradiation. The results showed to be promising, both in laboratory studies and in the field, resulting in an increase of onions production: A greater number of seedlings, bulbs and a higher yield in weight per hectar were planted. In the field the most promising dose and dose rate to the variety "Super-X" were respectively 150 Gy and 13.1 Gy per hour, yielding an 24.9 percent heavier weight of onions than the control. The other tested variety was "Granex-33", which did not respond so favorable to irradiation. However, also with this variety we harvested a 2.1 percent heavier weight than its control, if the onion seeds were irradiated with the dose of 700 Gy at a dose dose rate of 13.1 Gy per hour.

  11. Investigation of the environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in the processing of sulfide ores for gold using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gbadago, J K; Faanhof, A; Darko, E O; Schandorf, C

    2011-09-01

    The possible environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on workers and a critical community, as a result of milling and processing sulfide ores for gold by a mining company at Bogoso in the western region of Ghana, have been investigated using gamma spectroscopy. Indicative doses for the workers during sulfide ore processing were calculated from the activity concentrations measured at both physical and chemical processing stages. The dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and radioactivity level index for tailings, for the de-silted sediments of run-off from the vicinity of the tailings dam through the critical community, and for the soils of the critical community's basic schools were calculated and found to be lower than their respective permissible limits. The environmental impact of the radionuclides is therefore expected to be low in this mining environment. PMID:21865616

  12. Amorphous and crystalline optical materials used as instruments for high gamma radiation doses estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioan, M.-R.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear radiation induce some changes to the structure of exposed materials. The main effect of ionizing radiation when interacting with optical materials is the occurrence of color centers, which are quantitatively proportional to the up-taken doses. In this paper, a relation between browning effect magnitude and dose values was found. Using this relation, the estimation of a gamma radiation dose can be done. By using two types of laser wavelengths (532 nm and 633 nm), the optical powers transmitted thru glass samples irradiated to different doses between 0 and 59.1 kGy, were measured and the associated optical browning densities were determined. The use of laser light gives the opportunity of using its particularities: monochromaticity, directionality and coherence. Polarized light was also used for enhancing measurements quality. These preliminary results bring the opportunity of using glasses as detectors for the estimation of the dose in a certain point in space and for certain energy, especially in particles accelerators experiments, where the occurred nuclear reactions are involving the presence of high gamma rays fields.

  13. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-03-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach that will be used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems that will be used to plan and control the HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP).

  14. Mining Gene Expression Data for Pollutants (Dioxin, Toluene, Formaldehyde) and Low Dose of Gamma-Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Moskalev, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Snezhkina, Anastasia; Kogan, Valeria; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Peregudova, Darya; Melnikova, Nataliya; Uroshlev, Leonid; Mylnikov, Sergey; Dmitriev, Alexey; Plusnin, Sergey; Fedichev, Peter; Kudryavtseva, Anna

    2014-01-01

    (dioxin, toluene), low dose of gamma-irradiation and common molecular pathways for different kind of stressors. PMID:24475070

  15. Mining gene expression data for pollutants (dioxin, toluene, formaldehyde) and low dose of gamma-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Moskalev, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Snezhkina, Anastasia; Kogan, Valeria; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Peregudova, Darya; Melnikova, Nataliya; Uroshlev, Leonid; Mylnikov, Sergey; Dmitriev, Alexey; Plusnin, Sergey; Fedichev, Peter; Kudryavtseva, Anna

    2014-01-01

    (dioxin, toluene), low dose of gamma-irradiation and common molecular pathways for different kind of stressors. PMID:24475070

  16. Recommended environmental dose calculation methods and Hanford-specific parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Rhoads, K.; Napier, B.A.; Ramsdell, J.V. ); Davis, J.S. )

    1993-03-01

    This document was developed to support the Hanford Environmental Dose overview Panel (HEDOP). The Panel is responsible for reviewing all assessments of potential doses received by humans and other biota resulting from the actual or possible environmental releases of radioactive and other hazardous materials from facilities and/or operations belonging to the US Department of Energy on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. This document serves as a guide to be used for developing estimates of potential radiation doses, or other measures of risk or health impacts, to people and other biota in the environs on and around the Hanford Site. It provides information to develop technically sound estimates of exposure (i.e., potential or actual) to humans or other biotic receptors that could result from the environmental transport of potentially harmful materials that have been, or could be, released from Hanford operations or facilities. Parameter values and information that are specific to the Hanford environs as well as other supporting material are included in this document.

  17. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R.

    1983-09-01

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

  18. Assessment of Annual Effective Dose for Natural Radioactivity of Gamma Emitters in Biscuit Samples in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Abojassim, Ali Abid; Al-Alasadi, Lubna A; Shitake, Ahmed R; Al-Tememie, Faeq A; Husain, Afnan A

    2015-09-01

    Biscuits are an important type of food, widely consumed by babies in Iraq and other countries. This work uses gamma spectroscopy to measure the natural radioactivity due to long-lived gamma emitters in children's biscuits; it also estimates radiation hazard indices, that is, the radium equivalent activity, the representative of gamma level index, the internal hazard index, and the annual effective dose in children. Ten samples were collected from the Iraqi market from different countries of origin. The average specific activities for (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K were 9.390, 3.1213, and 214.969 Bq/kg, respectively, but the average of the radium equivalent activity and the internal hazard index were 33.101 Bq/kg and 0.107, respectively. The total average annual effective dose from consumption by adults, children, and infants is estimated to be 0.655, 1.009, and 0.875 mSv, respectively. The values found for specific activity, radiation hazard indices, and annual effective dose in all samples in this study were lower than worldwide median values for all groups; therefore, these values are found to be safe. PMID:26319734

  19. Aging of magnesium stearate under high doses gamma irradiation and oxidative conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeau, D.; Beuvier, L.; Cornaton, M.; Miserque, F.; Tabarant, M.; Esnouf, S.; Ferry, M.

    2015-05-01

    In nuclear waste packages conditioning processes, magnesium stearate is widely used because of its high lubricating properties. For safety purposes, the radiolytic degradation of these organic materials has to be better understood to be able to predict their aging in repository conditions. This study reports the radiolytic degradation of magnesium stearate, using gamma-rays at room temperature and under air. Modifications were followed using different analytical tools (XPS, ATR-FTIR, ICP-AES, ATG and mass spectrometry). It has been observed that molecules mainly formed up to 1000 kGy of gamma irradiation dose under radio-oxidation are alkanes, hydroperoxides, double bonds in the aliphatic chain, carboxylates with aliphatic chain shorter than the one of stearate and ketones. At a dose of 4000 kGy, dicarboxylic acids are observed: the formation of these molecules needs a dose of at least 1000 kGy to be created under radio-oxidation. These observations allow us to propose a non-exhaustive degradation mechanism of magnesium stearate under gamma-irradiation at room temperature and under air.

  20. A new analytical formula for neutron capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Hosein; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Background Photoneutrons are produced in radiation therapy with high energy photons. Also, capture gamma rays are the byproduct of neutrons interactions with wall material of radiotherapy rooms. Aim In the current study an analytical formula was proposed for capture gamma dose calculations in double bend mazes in radiation therapy rooms. Materials and methods A total of 40 different layouts with double-bend mazes and a 18 MeV photon beam of Varian 2100 Clinac were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) code. Neutron capture gamma ray dose equivalent was calculated by the MC method along the maze and at the maze entrance door of all the simulated rooms. Then, all MC resulted data were fitted to an empirical formula for capture gamma dose calculations. Wu–McGinley analytical formula for capture gamma dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in single-bend mazes was also used for comparison purposes. Results For capture gamma dose equivalents at the maze entrance door, the difference of 2–11% was seen between MC and the derived equation, while the difference of 36–87% was found between MC and the Wu–McGinley methods. Conclusion Our results showed that the derived formula results were consistent with the MC results for all of 40 different geometries. However, as a new formula, further evaluations are required to validate its use in practical situations. Finally, its application is recommend for capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes to improve shielding calculations. PMID:24377027

  1. Foods for a Mission to Mars: Investigations of Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandolph, J.; Shand, A.; Stoklosa, A.; Ma, A.; Weiss, I.; Alexander, D.; Perchonok, M.; Mauer, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    Food must be safe, nutritious, and acceptable throughout a long duration mission to maintain the health, well-being, and productivity of the astronauts. In addition to a developing a stable pre-packaged food supply, research is required to better understand the ability to convert edible biomass into safe, nutritious, and acceptable food products in a closed system with many restrictions (mass, volume, power, crew time, etc.). An understanding of how storage conditions encountered in a long-term space mission, such as elevated radiation, will impact food quality is also needed. The focus of this project was to contribute to the development of the highest quality food system possible for the duration of a mission, considering shelf-stable extended shelf-life foods, bulk ingredients, and crops to be grown in space. The impacts of space-relevant radiation doses on food, bulk ingredient, and select candidate crop quality and antioxidant capacity were determined. Interestingly, increasing gamma-radiation doses (0 to 1000 Gy) did not always increase dose-related effects in foods. Intermediate radiation doses (10 to 800Gy) often had significantly larger impact on the stability of bulk ingredient oils than higher (1000Gy) radiation doses. Overall, most food, ingredient, and crop systems investigated showed no significant differences between control samples and those treated with 3 Gy of gamma radiation (the upper limit estimated for a mission to Mars). However, this does not mean that all foods will be stable for 3-5 years, nor does it mean that foods are stable to space radiation comprising more than gamma rays.

  2. The Fukushima releases: an inverse modelling approach to assess the source term by using gamma dose rate observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunier, Olivier; Mathieu, Anne; Didier, Damien; Tombette, Marilyne; Quélo, Denis; Winiarek, Victor; Bocquet, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear accident and more recently the Fukushima accident highlighted that the largest source of error on consequences assessment is the source term estimation including the time evolution of the release rate and its distribution between radioisotopes. Inverse modelling methods have proved to be efficient to assess the source term due to accidental situation (Gudiksen, 1989, Krysta and Bocquet, 2007, Stohl et al 2011, Winiarek et al 2012). These methods combine environmental measurements and atmospheric dispersion models. They have been recently applied to the Fukushima accident. Most existing approaches are designed to use air sampling measurements (Winiarek et al, 2012) and some of them use also deposition measurements (Stohl et al, 2012, Winiarek et al, 2013). During the Fukushima accident, such measurements are far less numerous and not as well distributed within Japan than the dose rate measurements. To efficiently document the evolution of the contamination, gamma dose rate measurements were numerous, well distributed within Japan and they offered a high temporal frequency. However, dose rate data are not as easy to use as air sampling measurements and until now they were not used in inverse modelling approach. Indeed, dose rate data results from all the gamma emitters present in the ground and in the atmosphere in the vicinity of the receptor. They do not allow one to determine the isotopic composition or to distinguish the plume contribution from wet deposition. The presented approach proposes a way to use dose rate measurement in inverse modeling approach without the need of a-priori information on emissions. The method proved to be efficient and reliable when applied on the Fukushima accident. The emissions for the 8 main isotopes Xe-133, Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, Ba-137m, I-131, I-132 and Te-132 have been assessed. The Daiichi power plant events (such as ventings, explosions…) known to have caused atmospheric releases are well identified in

  3. User instructions for the DESCARTES environmental accumulation code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, T.B.; Eslinger, P.W.; Nichols, W.E.; Lessor, K.S.; Ouderkirk, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project work is conducted under several technical and administrative tasks, among which is the Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates task. The staff on this task have developed a suite of computer codes which are used to estimate doses to individuals in the public. This document contains the user instructions for the DESCARTES (Dynamic estimates of concentrations and Accumulated Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments) suite of codes. In addition to the DESCARTES code, this includes two air data preprocessors, a database postprocessor, and several utility routines that are used to format input data needed for DESCARTES.

  4. Radioactivity Levels and Gamma-Ray Dose Rate in Soil Samples from Kohistan (Pakistan) Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. Khan; Ismail, M.; K., Khan; Akhter, P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) and an anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs is carried out in some soil samples collected from Kohistan district of N.W.F.P. (Pakistan), using gamma-ray spectrometry. The gamma spectrometry is operated using a high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector coupled with a computer based high resolution multi channel analyzer. The specific activity in soil ranges from 24.72 to 78.48Bq·kg-1 for 226Ra, 21.73 to 75.28Bq·kg-1 for 232Th, 7.06 to 14.9Bq·kg-1 for 137Cs and 298.46 to 570.77Bq·kg-1 for 40K with the mean values of 42.11, 43.27, 9.5 and 418.27Bq·kg-1, respectively. The radium equivalent activity in all the soil samples is lower than the safe limit set in the OECD report (370Bq·kg-1). Man-made radionuclide 137Cs is also present in detectable amount in all soil samples. Presence of 137Cs indicates that the samples in this remote area also receive some fallout from nuclear accident in Chernobyl power plant in 1986. The internal and external hazard indices have the mean values of 0.48 and 0.37 respectively. Absorbed dose rates and effective dose equivalents are also determined for the samples. The concentration of radionuclides found in the soil samples during the present study is nominal and does not pose any potential health hazard to the general public.

  5. Novel and Distinct Metabolites Identified Following a Single Oral Dose of Alpha- or Gamma-Hexabromocyclododecane in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metabolism of alpha- and gamma-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. Alpha- or gamma-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed a...

  6. Assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation doses for some Egyptian granite samples.

    PubMed

    El Arabi, A M; Ahmed, N K; Salahel Din, K

    2008-01-01

    External exposures of population to ionising radiation due to naturally occurring radionuclides in sixty-three granite samples from three different locations in south eastern desert of Egypt were considered in this article. Average outdoor gamma dose rates in air were 190, 290 and 330 nGy h(-1) for Elba, Qash Amir and Hamra Dome granites, respectively. The corresponding doses in indoor air are 270, 400 and 470 nGy h(-1), respectively. These average values give rise to annual effective dose (outdoor, indoor and in total) 0.24, 1.4 and 1.6 mSv for Elba granite. For Qash Amir and Hamra Dome granites the corresponding values were 0.35, 2 and 2.3 mSv and 0.41, 2.3 and 2.7 mSv, respectively. PMID:17627952

  7. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-20

    For more than 40 years, the US government made plutonium for nuclear weapons at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Radioactive materials were released to both the air and water from Hanford. People could have been exposed to these materials, called radionuclides. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is a multi-year scientific study to estimate the radiation doses the public may have received as a results of these releases. The study began in 1988. During the first phase, scientists began to develop and test methods for reconstructing the radiation doses. To do this, scientists found or reconstructed information about the amount and type of radionuclides that were released from Hadford facilities, where they traveled in environment, and how they reached people. Information about the people who could have been exposed was also found or reconstructed. Scientists then developed a computer model that can estimate doses from radiation exposure received many years ago. All the information that had been gathered was fed into the computer model. Then scientists did a test run'' to see whether the model was working properly. As part of its test run,'' scientists asked the computer model to generate two types of preliminary results: amounts of radionuclides in the environment (air, soil, pasture grass, food, and milk) and preliminary doses people could have received from all the routes of radiation exposure, called exposure pathways. Preliminary dose estimates were made for categories of people who shared certain characteristics and for the Phase 1 population as a whole. 26 refs., 48 figs.

  8. Automatic optimisation of gamma dose rate sensor networks: The DETECT Optimisation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, K. B.; Müller, T. O.; Astrup, P.; Dyve, J. E.

    2014-05-01

    Fast delivery of comprehensive information on the radiological situation is essential for decision-making in nuclear emergencies. Most national radiological agencies in Europe employ gamma dose rate sensor networks to monitor radioactive pollution of the atmosphere. Sensor locations were often chosen using regular grids or according to administrative constraints. Nowadays, however, the choice can be based on more realistic risk assessment, as it is possible to simulate potential radioactive plumes. To support sensor planning, we developed the DETECT Optimisation Tool (DOT) within the scope of the EU FP 7 project DETECT. It evaluates the gamma dose rates that a proposed set of sensors might measure in an emergency and uses this information to optimise the sensor locations. The gamma dose rates are taken from a comprehensive library of simulations of atmospheric radioactive plumes from 64 source locations. These simulations cover the whole European Union, so the DOT allows evaluation and optimisation of sensor networks for all EU countries, as well as evaluation of fencing sensors around possible sources. Users can choose from seven cost functions to evaluate the capability of a given monitoring network for early detection of radioactive plumes or for the creation of dose maps. The DOT is implemented as a stand-alone easy-to-use JAVA-based application with a graphical user interface and an R backend. Users can run evaluations and optimisations, and display, store and download the results. The DOT runs on a server and can be accessed via common web browsers; it can also be installed locally.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Quarterly report, September--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-12-31

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates); Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Quarterly report, June--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Quarterly report, December 1993--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radio-nuclides followed from release to impact on humans(dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, agriculture; environmental pathways; and dose estimates.

  12. Error prediction of LiF-TLD used for gamma dose measurement for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Liu, Y H

    2011-12-01

    To predict the neutron influence on various (6)LiF concentration in the LiF-TLD, the Monte Carlo code MCNP was adopted to simulate the energy deposition on a TLD chip with dimensions of 3.2×3.2×0.9 mm. By assuming that the TL response is proportional to the energy deposition on it, the percentage error of LiF-TLD used for gamma dose measurement in mixed (n, γ) fields can be written as: %Error=R(n)/R(g)×100%. Where R(n) and R(g) are the TL responses resulted from neutron and gamma, respectively. Taking the water phantom irradiated with the BNCT facility at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) as an example, the (6)LiF concentration for TLD-700 is 0.007%, the magnitude of the neutron flux is ~1×10(9) n/cm(2)/s, the neutron energy is ~4×10(-7) MeV (cadmium cut-off energy), the gamma dose rate is ~3 Gy/h, thus the percentage error can be predicted as 38%. PMID:21489808

  13. Detection and original dose assessment of egg powders subjected to gamma irradiation by using ESR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Talat

    2015-09-01

    ESR (electron spin resonance) techniques were applied for detection and original dose estimation to radiation-processed egg powders. The un-irradiated (control) egg powders showed a single resonance line centered at g=2.0086±0.0005, 2.0081±0.0005, 2.0082±0.0005 (native signal) for yolk, white and whole egg, respectively. Irradiation induced at least one additional intense singlet overlapping to the control signal and caused a significant increase in signal intensity without any changes in spectral patterns. Responses of egg powders to different gamma radiation doses in the range 0-10 kGy were examined. The stability of the radiation-induced ESR signal of irradiated egg powders were investigated over a storage period of about 5 months. Additive reirradiation of the egg powders produces a reproducible dose response function, which can be used to assess the initial dose by back-extrapolation. The additive dose method gives an estimation of the original dose within ±12% at the end of the 720 h storage period.

  14. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; McMakin, A.H.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach being used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems used to plan and control HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP). Battelle's contract with CDC only extends through May 1994 when the key technical work will be completed. There-fore, this plan is focused only on the period during which Battelle is a participant.

  15. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; McMakin, A.H.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach being used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems used to plan and control HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP). Battelle`s contract with CDC only extends through May 1994 when the key technical work will be completed. There-fore, this plan is focused only on the period during which Battelle is a participant.

  16. Long-lived gamma emitting radionuclides in palm dates and estimates of annual effective doses.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of long-lived gamma emitting radionuclides in palm dates was performed. The palm date samples originated from eight countries, namely India, Iran, Jordan, Libya, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates. Among the samples were the palm date types Sukari, Wanana, Umkhuber, Rashudiya, Libana, Madjool, Gumaizi, Anbar, Braim, Ajwa, Khadri, Munafee, Mabroom, Daglanoor, Sulag, and Khalas. Gamma spectrometry revealed activity concentrations of (AVG ± STD) 0.983 ± 0.457, 0.469 ± 0.229, and 287.078 ± 41.871 Bq kg(-1) dry weight for 226Ra, 228Ra, and 40K, respectively. Annual average effective dose was estimated to be 32 μSv from the consumption of palm dates. Comparing these findings with values reported in the literature, it was concluded that consumption of palm dates is safe for the presence of the investigated radionuclides. PMID:25811152

  17. Effect of cumulated dose on hydrogen emission from polyethylene irradiated under oxidative atmosphere using gamma rays and ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Pellizzi, E.; Boughattas, I.; Fromentin, E.; Dauvois, V.; de Combarieu, G.; Coignet, P.; Cochin, F.; Ngono-Ravache, Y.; Balanzat, E.; Esnouf, S.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports the effect of very high doses, up to 10 MGy, on the H2 emission from high density polyethylene (HDPE) irradiated with gamma rays and ion beams, in the presence of oxygen. This was obtained through a two-step procedure. First, HDPE films were pre-aged, at different doses, using either gamma rays or ion beams. In the second step, the pre-aged samples were irradiated in closed glass ampoules for gas quantification, using the same beam type as for pre-ageing. The hydrogen emission rate decreases when dose increases for both gamma rays and ion beams. However, the decreasing rate appears higher under gamma rays than under ion beam irradiations and this is assigned to a lesser oxidation level under the latter. Herein, we show the effectiveness of the radiation-induced defects scavenging effect under oxidative atmosphere, under low and high excitation densities.

  18. Measurements of gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in phantoms exposed to a BNCT epithermal beam with TLD-700.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Magni, D; Regazzoni, V; Borroni, M; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Burian, J; Marek, M; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L

    2014-10-01

    Gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in a phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be measured by means of a single thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD-700). The method exploits the shape of the glow curve (GC) and requires the gamma-calibration GC (to obtain gamma dose) and the thermal-neutron-calibration GC (to obtain neutron fluence). The method is applicable for BNCT dosimetry in case of epithermal neutron beams from a reactor because, in most irradiation configurations, thermal neutrons give a not negligible contribution to the TLD-700 GC. The thermal neutron calibration is not simple, because of the impossibility of having thermal neutron fields without gamma contamination, but a calibration method is here proposed, strictly bound to the method itself of dose separation. PMID:24435913

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation at intermediate doses on the performance of reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combernoux, Nicolas; Labed, Véronique; Schrive, Luc; Wyart, Yvan; Carretier, Emilie; Moulin, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study is to explain the degradation of Polyamide (PA) composite reverse osmosis membrane (RO) in function of the irradiation dose. Irradiations were performed with a gamma 60Co source in wet conditions and under oxygen atmosphere. For different doses of 0.2 and 0.5 MGy with a constant dose rate of 0.5 kGy h-1, RO membranes performances (NaCl retention, permeability) were studied before and after irradiation. ATR-FTIR, ion chromatography and gas chromatography were used to characterize structural modification. Results showed that the permeability of RO membranes irradiated at 0.2 MGy exhibited a small decrease, related to scissions of the PVA coating. However, retention did not change at this dose. At 0.5 MGy, permeability showed a large increase of a factor around 2 and retention began to decrease from 99% to 95%. Chromatography measurements revealed a strong link between permselectivity properties variation, ion leakage and oxygen consumption. Add to ATR-FTIR observations, these results emphasized that the cleavages of amide and ester bonds were observed at 0.5 MGy, more precisely the loss of hydrogen bonds between polyamide chains. By different analysis, modifications of the polysulfone layer occur until a dose of 0.2 MGy.

  20. Low dose gamma irradiation enhances defined signaling components of intercellular reactive oxygen-mediated apoptosis induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.

    2011-01-01

    Transformed cells are selectively removed by intercellular ROS-mediated induction of apoptosis. Signaling is based on the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite pathway (major pathways) and the nitryl chloride and the metal-catalyzed Haber-Weiss pathway (minor pathways). During tumor progression, resistance against intercellular induction of apoptosis is acquired through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Low dose radiation of nontransformed cells has been shown to enhance intercellular induction of apoptosis. The present study was performed to define the signaling components which are modulated by low dose gamma irradiation. Low dose radiation induced the release of peroxidase from nontransformed, transformed and tumor cells. Extracellular superoxide anion generation was strongly enhanced in the case of transformed cells and tumor cells, but not in nontransformed cells. Enhancement of peroxidase release and superoxide anion generation either increased intercellular induction of apoptosis of transformed cells, or caused a partial protection under specific signaling conditions. In tumor cells, low dose radiation enhanced the production of major signaling components, but this had no effect on apoptosis induction, due to the strong resistance mechanism of tumor cells. Our data specify the nature of low dose radiation-induced effects on specific signaling components of intercellular induction of apoptosis at defined stages of multistep carcinogenesis.

  1. External exposure doses due to gamma emitting natural radionuclides in some Egyptian building materials.

    PubMed

    Moharram, B M; Suliman, M N; Zahran, N F; Shennawy, S E; El Sayed, A R

    2012-01-01

    Using of building materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides as (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K and their progeny results in an external exposures of the housing of such buildings. In the present study, indoor dose rates for typical Egyptian rooms are calculated using the analytical method and activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in some building materials. Uniform chemical composition of the walls, floor and ceiling as well as uniform mass concentrations of the radionuclides in walls, floor and ceiling assumed. Different room models are assumed to discuss variation of indoor dose rates according to variation in room construction. Activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K content in eight samples representative Clay soil and different building materials used in most recent Egyptian building were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The specific activity for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, from the selected samples, were in the range 14.15-60.64, 2.75-84.66 and 7.35-554.4Bqkg(-1), respectively. The average indoor absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 0.005μGyh(-1) to 0.071μGyh(-1) and the corresponding population-weighted annual effective dose due to external gamma radiation varies from 0.025 to 0.345mSv. An outdoor dose rate for typical building samples in addition to some radiological hazards has been introduced for comparison. PMID:21839645

  2. Degradation and annealing studies on gamma rays irradiated COTS PPD CISs at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Yingwu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Yuan; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2016-06-01

    The degradation and annealing studies on Colbalt-60 gamma-rays irradiated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) at the various dose rates are presented. The irradiation experiments of COTS PPD CISs are carried out at 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The COTS PPD CISs are manufactured using a standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology with four-transistor pixel PPD architecture. The behavior of the tested CISs shows a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differs in the dose rates. The dark current, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), random noise, saturation output, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range (DR) versus the total ionizing dose (TID) at the various dose rates are investigated. The tendency of dark current, DSNU, and random noise increase and saturation output, SNR, and DR to decrease at 3.0 rad(Si)/s are far greater than those at 0.3 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The damage mechanisms caused by TID irradiation at the various dose rates are also analyzed. The annealing tests are carried out at room temperature with unbiased conditions after irradiation.

  3. Calculation of External Gamma-Ray and Beta-Ray Doses from Accidental Atmospheric Releases of Radionuclides.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1981-02-25

    SUBDOSA-II calculates submersion doses from an acute release of radionuclides to the atmosphere, as did SUBDOSA. Doses are calculated as a function of distance from release point, atmospheric stability, and wind speed for a specified radionuclide inventory. Contributions from both beta and gamma radiation are included as a function of tissue depth.

  4. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  5. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Quarterly report, April--May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environment Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; and, environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  6. Exit Dose Measurement in Therapeutic High Energy Photon Beams and Cobalt-60 Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyan, S.; Ravikumar, M.

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the skin dose to the patient from the treatment planning, the knowledge about exit dose is essential, which is calculated from the percentage depth dose. In this study 6 MV and 18 MV beams from linear accelerator and cobalt-60 beams were used. The ionometric measurements were carried out with parallel plate chamber of sensitive volume 0.16 cc. Parallel plate chamber was fitted in to 30 x 30 cm2 polystyrene phantom at a fixed FSD with the measuring entrance window facing farther from the source. The field size for this measuring condition was maintained at 10 x 10 cm2. The ionization measurements were also carried out by changing the thickness of the polystyrene phantom at the entrance side of the point of measurement. In order to find out the variation of relative exit dose (RED) with field size the measurements were carried out without and with the full back-scattering material (27.2 gm/cm2) placed beyond the entrance window of the chamber. The measurements were also done for the entrance polystyrene phantom thicknesses of 10, 20 and 30 cm for the field size ranging from 5 x 5 cm2 to 30 x 30 cm2. The dose at the exit surface with no backscatter material is about 4.4%, 3.7% and 5.8% less than the dose with the full backscatter material present beyond the point of measurement for 6 MV, 18 MV X-rays and cobalt-60 gamma rays. The reduction in exit dose does not depend much of the phantom thickness through which the beam traverses before exiting at the chamber side. Dose enhancements of about 1.03 times were observed for a field size of 5 x 5 cm2 for 6 MV, 18 MV X-rays and cobalt-60 gamma rays. The dose enhancement factor (DEF) values were noticed to vary with field size beyond 15 x 15 cm2 for all the energies studied. Also it can be observed that the dose enhancement factor (DEF) values do not depend on the thickness of the phantom material through which the beam has traversed. The DEF values were found to vary marginally for different phantom material

  7. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (TGRD) from surface soil in Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbani, Nor Eliana; Abdullah Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa; Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Wan Idris, Wan Mohd Rizlan; Jaafar, Mohd Zuli; Bradley, David A.; Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Taufek

    2014-11-01

    Baseline data on background radiation levels allows for future assessment of possible changes in natural radionuclide concentrations, either as a result of geological processes or radioactive contamination. We have measured terrestrial gamma radiation dose-rates (TGRD) from surface soils throughout accessible areas in the Peninsular Malaysia state of Negeri Sembilan (NS). Dose rate measurements were carried out using a NaI (TI) scintillation survey meter, encompassing 1708 locations, covering about 73% of the 6645 km2 of the land area in NS. This has allowed development of a TGRD contour map, plotted using WinSurf software. The range of measured TGRD was from 71±3 nGy/h up to 1000±11 nGy/h. The greatest measured TGRD was obtained in an area covered by soil types originating from igneous rock of granitic formations, while the least value of TGRD was observed in an area covered by limestone composed of calcite mineral, mostly found near river and coastal areas. Mean values of TGRD across the seven districts of NS ranged from 244±7 nGy/h to 458±13 nGy/h, the global mean being 330±8 nGy/h compared to a mean value of 92 nGy/h and 59 nGy/h for Malaysia and the world, respectively. The average annual dose from such terrestrial gamma radiation dose-rates to an individual residing in NS, assuming a tropical rural setting, is estimated to be 0.96 mSv per year.

  8. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  9. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougrov, N. G.; Goksu, H. Y.; Haskell, E.; Degteva, M. O.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Neta, P. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  10. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    SciTech Connect

    Bougrov, N.G.; Degteva, M.O.; Goeksu, H.Y.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Haskell, E.

    1998-12-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  11. Study of natural radionuclide and absorbed gamma dose in Ukhimath area of Garhwal Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Rautela, B S; Yadav, M; Bourai, A A; Joshi, V; Gusain, G S; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    Natural radiation is the largest contributor to the collective radiation dose of the world population. It is widely distributed in different geological formations such as soil, rocks, air and groundwater. In the present investigation, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were measured in soil samples of the Ukhimath region of Garhwal Himalaya, India using NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to vary from 38.4 ± 6.1 to 141.7 ± 11.9 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 80.5 Bq kg(-1), 57.0 ± 7.5 to 155.9 ± 12.4 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 118.9 Bq kg(-1) and 9.0 ± 3.0 to 672.8 ± 25.9 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 341 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The total absorbed gamma dose rate varies from 70.4 to 169.1 nGy h(-1) with an average of 123.4 nGy h(-1). This study is important to generate a baseline data of radiation exposure in the area. Health hazard effects due to natural radiation exposure are discussed in details. PMID:22908360

  12. Derivation of Geometry Factors for Internal Gamma Dose Calculations for a Cylindrical Radioactive Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Brent J.; Husain, Aamir

    2002-12-15

    A general methodology was developed to estimate geometry factors for internal gamma dose rate calculations within a cylindrical radioactive waste container. In particular, an average geometry factor is needed to calculate the average energy deposition rate within the container for determination of the internal gas generation rate. Such a calculation is required in order to assess the potential for radioactive waste packages to radiolytically generate combustible gases.This work therefore provides a method for estimating the point and average geometry factors for internal dose assessment for a cylindrical geometry. This analysis is compared to other results where it is shown that the classical work of Hine and Brownell do not correspond to the average geometry factors for a cylindrical body but rather to values at the center of its top or bottom end. The current treatment was further developed into a prototype computer code (PC-CAGE) that calculates the geometry factors numerically for a cylindrical body of any size and material, accounting both for gamma absorption and buildup effects.

  13. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  14. Gamma-ray methods for determining natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in environmental and soil science

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.; Evans, C.V.

    1997-05-01

    Gamma-ray methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental materials are convenient because they generally require less bench-top preparation time than, for example, determinations based on alpha-particle pulse-height analysis. Also, parallel measurements of chemical yield are not needed, and typically several radionuclides can be determined simultaneously. In this paper, the authors review gamma-ray methods currently in use at Brookhaven, and present a new method for the determination of the radionuclide protactinium-231 in soils and other environmental materials, using the gamma-ray deconvolution package in the EG&G Ortec {open_quotes}Gammavision{close_quotes} software.

  15. Biological radiation dose from secondary particles in a Milky Way gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Karam, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are a class of highly energetic explosions emitting radiation in a very short timescale of a few seconds and with a very narrow opening angle. Although, all GRBs observed so far are extragalactic in origin, there is a high probability of a GRB of galactic origin beaming towards the Earth in the past ~0.5 Gyr. We define the level of catastrophic damage to the biosphere as approximation 100 kJ m-2, based on Thomas et al. (2005a, b). Using results in Melott & Thomas (2011), we estimate the probability of the Earth receiving this fluence from a GRB of any type, as 87% during the last 500 Myr. Such an intense burst of gamma rays would ionize the atmosphere and deplete the ozone (O3) layer. With depleted O3, there will be an increased flux of Solar UVB on the Earth's surface with potentially harmful biological effects. In addition to the atmospheric damage, secondary particles produced by gamma ray-induced showers will reach the surface. Among all secondary particles, muons dominate the ground-level secondary particle flux (99% of the total number of particles) and are potentially of biological significance. Using the Monte Carlo simulation code CORSIKA, we modelled the air showers produced by gamma-ray primaries up to 100 GeV. We found that the number of muons produced by the electromagnetic component of hypothetical galactic GRBs significantly increases the total muon flux. However, since the muon production efficiency is extremely low for photon energies below 100 GeV, and because GRBs radiate strongly for only a very short time, we find that the biological radiation dose from secondary muons is negligible. The main mechanism of biological damage from GRBs is through Solar UVB irradiation from the loss of O3 in the upper atmosphere.

  16. Three-dimensional dose verification of the clinical application of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery using polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Kozicki, M.; Rosiak, J. M.; Sakelliou, L.; Sandilos, P.; Seimenis, I.; Torrens, M.

    2005-05-01

    This work seeks to verify multi-shot clinical applications of stereotactic radiosurgery with a Leksell Gamma Knife model C unit employing a polymer gel-MRI based experimental procedure, which has already been shown to be capable of verifying the precision and accuracy of dose delivery in single-shot gamma knife applications. The treatment plan studied in the present work resembles a clinical treatment case of pituitary adenoma using four 8 mm and one 14 mm collimator helmet shots to deliver a prescription dose of 15 Gy to the 50% isodose line (30 Gy maximum dose). For the experimental dose verification of the treatment plan, the same criteria as those used in the clinical treatment planning evaluation were employed. These included comparison of measured and GammaPlan calculated data, in terms of percentage isodose contours on axial, coronal and sagittal planes, as well as 3D plan evaluation criteria such as dose-volume histograms for the target volume, target coverage and conformity indices. Measured percentage isodose contours compared favourably with calculated ones despite individual point fluctuations at low dose contours (e.g., 20%) mainly due to the effect of T2 measurement uncertainty on dose resolution. Dose-volume histogram data were also found in a good agreement while the experimental results for the percentage target coverage and conformity index were 94% and 1.17 relative to corresponding GammaPlan calculations of 96% and 1.12, respectively. Overall, polymer gel results verified the planned dose distribution within experimental uncertainties and uncertainty related to the digitization process of selected GammaPlan output data.

  17. Determination of the Absorbed Dose Rate to Water for the 18-mm Helmet of a Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Youngho; Hyun, Sangil; Choi, Yongsoo; Kim, Gi Hong; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To measure the absorbed dose rate to water of {sup 60}Co gamma rays of a Gamma Knife Model C using water-filled phantoms (WFP). Methods and Materials: Spherical WFP with an equivalent water depth of 5, 7, 8, and 9 cm were constructed. The dose rates at the center of an 18-mm helmet were measured in an 8-cm WFP (WFP-3) and two plastic phantoms. Two independent measurement systems were used: one was calibrated to an air kerma (Set I) and the other was calibrated to the absorbed dose to water (Set II). The dose rates of WFP-3 and the plastic phantoms were converted to dose rates for an 8-cm water depth using the attenuation coefficient and the equivalent water depths. Results: The dose rate measured at the center of WFP-3 using Set II was 2.2% and 1.0% higher than dose rates measured at the center of the two plastic phantoms. The measured effective attenuation coefficient of Gamma Knife photon beam in WFPs was 0.0621 cm{sup -1}. After attenuation correction, the difference between the dose rate at an 8-cm water depth measured in WFP-3 and dose rates in the plastic phantoms was smaller than the uncertainty of the measurements. Conclusions: Systematic errors related to the characteristics of the phantom materials in the dose rate measurement of a Gamma Knife need to be corrected for. Correction of the dose rate using an equivalent water depth and attenuation provided results that were more consistent.

  18. Environmental radioactivity in the UK: the airborne geophysical view of dose rate estimates.

    PubMed

    Beamish, David

    2014-12-01

    This study considers UK airborne gamma-ray data obtained through a series of high spatial resolution, low altitude surveys over the past decade. The ground concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides Potassium, Thorium and Uranium are converted to air absorbed dose rates and these are used to assess terrestrial exposure levels from both natural and technologically enhanced sources. The high resolution airborne information is also assessed alongside existing knowledge from soil sampling and ground-based measurements of exposure levels. The surveys have sampled an extensive number of the UK lithological bedrock formations and the statistical information provides examples of low dose rate lithologies (the formations that characterise much of southern England) to the highest sustained values associated with granitic terrains. The maximum dose rates (e.g. >300 nGy h(-1)) encountered across the sampled granitic terrains are found to vary by a factor of 2. Excluding granitic terrains, the most spatially extensive dose rates (>50 nGy h(-1)) are found in association with the Mercia Mudstone Group (Triassic argillaceous mudstones) of eastern England. Geological associations between high dose rate and high radon values are also noted. Recent studies of the datasets have revealed the extent of source rock (i.e. bedrock) flux attenuation by soil moisture in conjunction with the density and porosity of the temperate latitude soils found in the UK. The presence or absence of soil cover (and associated presence or absence of attenuation) appears to account for a range of localised variations in the exposure levels encountered. The hypothesis is supported by a study of an extensive combined data set of dose rates obtained from soil sampling and by airborne geophysical survey. With no attenuation factors applied, except those intrinsic to the airborne estimates, a bias to high values of between 10 and 15 nGy h(-1) is observed in the soil data. A wide range of

  19. Comparison of protein expression profile changes in human fibroblasts induced by low doses of gamma rays and energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Clement, Jade; Gridley, Diala; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    Extrapolation of known radiation risks to the risks from low dose and low dose-rate exposures of human population, especially prolonged exposure of astronauts in the space radiation environment, relies in part on the mechanistic understanding of radiation induced biological consequences at the molecular level. While some genomic data at the mRNA level are available for cells or animals exposed to radiation, the data at the protein level are still lacking. Here, we studied protein expression profile changes using Panorama antibody microarray chips that contain antibodies to more than 200 proteins (or modified proteins) involved in cell signaling that included mostly apoptosis, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and signal transduction. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured till fully confluent and then exposed to 2 cGy of gamma rays at either low (1 cGy/hr) or high (0.2 Gy/min) dose-rate, or to 2 cGy of 150 MeV protons at high dose-rate. The proteins were isolated at 2 and 6 hours after exposure and labeled with Cy3 for the irradiated cells and with Cy5 for the control samples before loaded onto the protein microarray chips. The intensities of the protein spots were analyzed using ScanAlyze software and normalized by the summed fluorescence intensities and the housekeeping proteins. Comparison of the overall protein expression profiles in gamma-irradiated cells showed significantly higher inductions at the high dose-rate than at the low dose-rate. The protein profile in cells after the proton exposure showed a much earlier induction pattern in comparison to both the high and low dose-rate gamma exposures. The same expression patterns were also found in individual cell signaling cascades. At 6 hours post irradiation, high dose-rate gamma rays induced cellular protein level changes (ratio to control ˜2) mostly in apoptosis, cell cycle and cytoskeleton, while low dose-rate gamma rays induced similar changes with smaller fold-change values. In comparison, protons induced

  20. Characterization of Neutron and Gamma Dose in the Irradiation Cell of Texas A and M University Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Latha; Reece, Warren D.; Chirayath, Sunil S.; Aghara, Sukesh

    2011-07-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to develop a three dimensional computational model of the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) operating against the irradiation (dry cell) at steady state thermal power of 1 MW. The geometry of the NSCR core and the dry cell were modeled in detail. NSCR is used for a wide variety of experiments that utilizes the dry cell for neutron as well as gamma irradiation of samples. Information on the neutron and gamma radiation environment inside the dry cell is required to facilitate irradiation of samples. This paper presents the computed neutron flux, neutron and gamma dose rate, and foil reaction rates in the dry cell, obtained through MCNP5 simulations of the NSCR core. The neutron flux was measured using foil activation method and the reaction rates obtained from {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}){sup 198}Au and {sup 54}Fe(n,p){sup 54}Mn were compared with the model and they showed agreement within {approx} 20%. The gamma dose rate at selected locations inside the dry cell was measured using radiochromic films and the results indicate slightly higher dose rates than predicted from the model. This is because the model calculated only prompt gamma dose rates during reactor operation while the radiochromic films measured gammas from activation products and fission product decayed gammas. The model was also used to calculate the neutron energy spectra for the energy range from 0.001 eV- 20 MeV. (authors)

  1. Dose evaluation of an NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter using gamma index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Jen; Lin, Jing-Quan; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Chin-Hsing

    2014-11-01

    An N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel dosimeter has great potential in clinical applications. However, its three-dimensional dose distribution must be assessed. In this work, a quantitative evaluation of dose distributions was performed to evaluate the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter using gamma analysis. A cylindrical acrylic phantom filled with NIPAM gel measuring 10 cm (diameter) by 10 cm (height) by 3 mm (thickness) was irradiated by a 4×4 cm2 square light field. The irradiated gel phantom was scanned using an optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner (OCTOPUS™, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) at 1 mm resolution. The projection data were transferred to an image reconstruction program, which was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). The program reconstructed the image of the optical density distribution using the algorithm of a filter back-projection. Three batches of replicated gel phantoms were independently measured. The average uncertainty of the measurements was less than 1%. The gel was found to have a high degree of spatial uniformity throughout the dosimeter and good temporal stability. A comparison of the line profiles of the treatment planning system and of the data measured by optical CT showed that the dose was overestimated in the penumbra region because of two factors. The first is light scattering due to changes in the refractive index at the edge of the irradiated field. The second is the edge enhancement caused by free radical diffusion. However, the effect of edge enhancement on the NIPAM gel dosimeter is not as significant as that on the BANG gel dosimeter. Moreover, the dose uncertainty is affected by the inaccuracy of the gel container positioning process. To reduce the uncertainty of 3D dose distribution, improvements in the gel container holder must be developed.

  2. Induction of a Radio-Adaptive Response by Low-dose Gamma Irradiation in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Seawright, John W.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) 137Cs gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value < or = 0.003) 4hr after H, but not after 4hr LH compared to control. Other p53-mediated apoptosis genes Casp3, Casp9, Trp53, and Myc exhibited down-regulation but did not achieve a notable level of significance 4hr after H. 24hr after H, genetic down-regulation was no longer present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio

  3. High doses of gamma radiation suppress allergic effect induced by food lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Antônio F. M.; Souza, Marthyna P.; Vieira, Leucio D.; Aguiar, Jaciana S.; Silva, Teresinha G.; Medeiros, Paloma L.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire A.; Santana, Lucimeire A.; Oliva, Maria L. V.; Perez, Katia R.; Cuccovia, Iolanda M.; Coelho, Luana C. B. B.; Correia, Maria T. S.

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for the development of functional foods lies in the development of effective methods to reduce or eliminate food allergenicity, but few reports have summarized information concerning the progress made with food irradiation. In this study, we investigated the relationship between allergenicity and molecular structure of a food allergen after gamma irradiation and evaluate the profile of the allergic response to irradiated allergens. Cramoll, a lectin isolated from a bean and used as a food allergen, was irradiated and the possible structural changes were accompanied by spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. Subsequently, sensitized animals subjected to intragastric administration of non-irradiated and irradiated Cramoll were treated for 7 days. Then, body weight, leukocytes, cytokine profiles and histological parameters were also determined. Cramoll showed complete inhibition of intrinsic activity after high radiation doses. Changes in fluorescence and CD spectra with a simultaneous collapse of the tertiary structure followed by a pronounced decrease of native secondary structure were observed after irradiation. After oral challenge, sensitized mice demonstrate an association between Cramoll intake, body weight loss, eosinophilia, lymphocytic infiltrate in the gut and Eotaxin secretion. Irradiation significantly reduces, according to the dose, the effects observed by non-irradiated food allergens. We confirm that high-dose radiation may render protein food allergens innocuous by irreversibly compromising their molecular structure.

  4. Radioactivity and gamma-dose rates observed at the Morungaba granites, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Fabio de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Fernando Brenha

    2013-07-01

    A ground gamma-ray survey was conducted over part of a large granitic body located near the city of Campinas, eastern São Paulo State, Brazil. The dominant rock types are K-feldspar porphyries-rich granites, porphyritic biotite and hornblend-bearing granites, fine to medium-grained monzogranites and medium to gross grained, biotite and muscovite-bearing monzogranites. The radioactive element distribution reflects local geology, in part re-worked by weathering, and the most radioactive rocks are the K-feldspar-rich granites. The rate of the absorbed dose by the air reflects the integrated effects of the radioactive elements distribution. Most of the observed values vary between 67 and 130 nGy h(-1) and with localised spots with the absorbed dose rate values up to 193 nGy h(-1) and low values of ∼25 nGy h(-1). The mean air absorbed dose rate for the studied area is 77 nGy h(-1). PMID:23222823

  5. Machine learning-based patient specific prompt-gamma dose monitoring in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueth, P.; Dauvergne, D.; Freud, N.; Létang, J. M.; Ray, C.; Testa, E.; Sarrut, D.

    2013-07-01

    Online dose monitoring in proton therapy is currently being investigated with prompt-gamma (PG) devices. PG emission was shown to be correlated with dose deposition. This relationship is mostly unknown under real conditions. We propose a machine learning approach based on simulations to create optimized treatment-specific classifiers that detect discrepancies between planned and delivered dose. Simulations were performed with the Monte-Carlo platform Gate/Geant4 for a spot-scanning proton therapy treatment and a PG camera prototype currently under investigation. The method first builds a learning set of perturbed situations corresponding to a range of patient translation. This set is then used to train a combined classifier using distal falloff and registered correlation measures. Classifier performances were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curves and maximum associated specificity and sensitivity. A leave-one-out study showed that it is possible to detect discrepancies of 5 mm with specificity and sensitivity of 85% whereas using only distal falloff decreases the sensitivity down to 77% on the same data set. The proposed method could help to evaluate performance and to optimize the design of PG monitoring devices. It is generic: other learning sets of deviations, other measures and other types of classifiers could be studied to potentially reach better performance. At the moment, the main limitation lies in the computation time needed to perform the simulations.

  6. Machine learning-based patient specific prompt-gamma dose monitoring in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Gueth, P; Dauvergne, D; Freud, N; Létang, J M; Ray, C; Testa, E; Sarrut, D

    2013-07-01

    Online dose monitoring in proton therapy is currently being investigated with prompt-gamma (PG) devices. PG emission was shown to be correlated with dose deposition. This relationship is mostly unknown under real conditions. We propose a machine learning approach based on simulations to create optimized treatment-specific classifiers that detect discrepancies between planned and delivered dose. Simulations were performed with the Monte-Carlo platform Gate/Geant4 for a spot-scanning proton therapy treatment and a PG camera prototype currently under investigation. The method first builds a learning set of perturbed situations corresponding to a range of patient translation. This set is then used to train a combined classifier using distal falloff and registered correlation measures. Classifier performances were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curves and maximum associated specificity and sensitivity. A leave-one-out study showed that it is possible to detect discrepancies of 5 mm with specificity and sensitivity of 85% whereas using only distal falloff decreases the sensitivity down to 77% on the same data set. The proposed method could help to evaluate performance and to optimize the design of PG monitoring devices. It is generic: other learning sets of deviations, other measures and other types of classifiers could be studied to potentially reach better performance. At the moment, the main limitation lies in the computation time needed to perform the simulations. PMID:23771015

  7. Hippocampal theta, gamma, and theta-gamma coupling: effects of aging, environmental change, and cholinergic activation

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Tara K.; Howe, Matthew D.; Schmidt, Brandy; Hinman, James R.; Escabí, Monty A.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal theta and gamma oscillations coordinate the timing of multiple inputs to hippocampal neurons and have been linked to information processing and the dynamics of encoding and retrieval. One major influence on hippocampal rhythmicity is from cholinergic afferents. In both humans and rodents, aging is linked to impairments in hippocampus-dependent function along with degradation of cholinergic function. Cholinomimetics can reverse some age-related memory impairments and modulate oscillations in the hippocampus. Therefore, one would expect corresponding changes in these oscillations and possible rescue with the cholinomimetic physostigmine. Hippocampal activity was recorded while animals explored a familiar or a novel maze configuration. Reexposure to a familiar situation resulted in minimal aging effects or changes in theta or gamma oscillations. In contrast, exploration of a novel maze configuration increased theta power; this was greater in adult than old animals, although the deficit was reversed with physostigmine. In contrast to the theta results, the effects of novelty, age, and/or physostigmine on gamma were relatively weak. Unrelated to the behavioral situation were an age-related decrease in the degree of theta-gamma coupling and the fact that physostigmine lowered the frequency of theta in both adult and old animals. The results indicate that age-related changes in gamma and theta modulation of gamma, while reflecting aging changes in hippocampal circuitry, seem less related to aging changes in information processing. In contrast, the data support a role for theta and the cholinergic system in encoding and that hippocampal aging is related to impaired encoding of new information. PMID:23303862

  8. Low doses of gamma radiation in the management of postharvest Lasiodiplodia theobromae in mangos

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alice Maria Gonçalves; Lins, Severina Rodrigues Oliveira; da Silva, Josenilda Maria; de Oliveira, Sônia Maria Alves

    2015-01-01

    The postharvest life of mango is limited by the development of pathogens, especially fungi that cause rot, among which stands out the Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Several control methods have been employed to minimize the damages caused by this fungus, chemical control can leave residues to man and nature; physical control by the use of gamma radiation in combination with modified atmosphere and cold storage. The use of gamma radiation helps to reduce the severity of the pathogen assist in the ripening process of fruits, even at low doses (0.25, 0.35 and 0.45 kGy) chemical properties such as pH, soluble solids, acid ascorbic, titratable acidity and also the quality parameters of the pulp showed no damage that are ideal for trade and consumption of mangoes. This treatment can be extended for use in the management of diseases such as natural infections for penducular rot complex that has as one of L. theobroma pathogens involved. PMID:26413068

  9. Hearing Preservation after Low-dose Gamma Knife Radiosurgery of Vestibular Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    HORIBA, Ayako; HAYASHI, Motohiro; CHERNOV, Mikhail; KAWAMATA, Takakazu; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the retrospective study was to evaluate the factors associated with hearing preservation after low-dose Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS) of vestibular schwannomas performed according to the modern standards. From January 2005 to September 2010, 141 consecutive patients underwent such treatment in Tokyo Women’s Medical University. Mean marginal dose was 11.9 Gy (range, 11–12 Gy). The doses for the brain stem, cranial nerves (V, VII, and VIII), and cochlea were kept below 14 Gy, 12 Gy, and 4 Gy, respectively. Out of the total cohort, 102 cases with at least 24 months follow-up were analyzed. Within the median follow-up of 56 months (range, 24–99 months) the crude tumor growth control was 92% (94 cases), whereas its actuarial rate at 5 years was 93%. Out of 49 patients with serviceable hearing on the side of the tumor before GKS, 28 (57%) demonstrated its preservation at the time of the last follow-up. No one evaluated factor, namely Gardner-Robertson hearing class before irradiation, Koos tumor stage, extension of the intrameatal part of the neoplasm up to fundus, nerve of tumor origin, presence of cystic changes in the neoplasm, and cochlea dose demonstrated statistically significant association with preservation of the serviceable hearing after radiosurgery. In conclusion, GKS of vestibular schwannomas performed according to the modern standards of treatment permits to preserve serviceable hearing on the side of the tumor in more than half of the patients. The actual causes of hearing deterioration after radiosurgery remain unclear. PMID:26876903

  10. Hearing Preservation after Low-dose Gamma Knife Radiosurgery of Vestibular Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Horiba, Ayako; Hayashi, Motohiro; Chernov, Mikhail; Kawamata, Takakazu; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2016-04-15

    The objective of the retrospective study was to evaluate the factors associated with hearing preservation after low-dose Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS) of vestibular schwannomas performed according to the modern standards. From January 2005 to September 2010, 141 consecutive patients underwent such treatment in Tokyo Women's Medical University. Mean marginal dose was 11.9 Gy (range, 11-12 Gy). The doses for the brain stem, cranial nerves (V, VII, and VIII), and cochlea were kept below 14 Gy, 12 Gy, and 4 Gy, respectively. Out of the total cohort, 102 cases with at least 24 months follow-up were analyzed. Within the median follow-up of 56 months (range, 24-99 months) the crude tumor growth control was 92% (94 cases), whereas its actuarial rate at 5 years was 93%. Out of 49 patients with serviceable hearing on the side of the tumor before GKS, 28 (57%) demonstrated its preservation at the time of the last follow-up. No one evaluated factor, namely Gardner-Robertson hearing class before irradiation, Koos tumor stage, extension of the intrameatal part of the neoplasm up to fundus, nerve of tumor origin, presence of cystic changes in the neoplasm, and cochlea dose demonstrated statistically significant association with preservation of the serviceable hearing after radiosurgery. In conclusion, GKS of vestibular schwannomas performed according to the modern standards of treatment permits to preserve serviceable hearing on the side of the tumor in more than half of the patients. The actual causes of hearing deterioration after radiosurgery remain unclear. PMID:26876903